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Sample records for unit in-service training

  1. Addressing Adolescent Depression in Schools: Evaluation of an In-Service Training for School Staff in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Budge, Stephanie L.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated an adolescent depression in-service training for school staff in the United States. A total of 252 school staff (e.g., teachers, principals, counselors) completed assessments prior to and following the in-service and a subsample of these staff participated in focus groups following the in-service and three months later.…

  2. GIS In-Service Teacher Training Based on TPACK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jung Eun; Stonier, Francis

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the geographic information systems (GIS) in-service teacher training, focusing on the intersection of technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (TPACK) for successful implementation of GIS in the classroom. Eleven social studies teachers in Georgia learned GIS technologies, inquiry-based learning, and social studies…

  3. Physics teachers' nuclear in-service training in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujvari, Sandor

    2005-01-01

    Teaching of science subjects, specifically physics among others, is important in Hungarian schools. The paper starts with some historical aspects on how the modern physics reached Hungarian schools, what kinds of methods the physics teachers use for their in-service training and what is their success. In 1985 Hungarian Government introduced the system of physics teacher's in-service training for a year. The courses end with a thesis and examination. Teachers have a possibility to join the nuclear physics intensive course of Nuclear Physics Department at Eottvos University. Curriculum and topics of laboratory practice are given together with some dissertations of the course. Moreover, several competition (Leo Szilard competition) is mentioned with starting that in each year the 5 best students get free entrance to the Hungarian universities. (S. Ohno)

  4. Junior Leader Training Development in Operational Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    UNITS Successful operational units do not arise without tough, realistic, and challenging training. Field Manual (FM) 7-0, Training Units and D...operations. The manual provides junior leaders with guidance on how to conduct training and training management. Of particular importance is the definition...1 Relation htp between ADDIE and the Anny Training Management Model. The Army Training Management Model and ADDIE process appear in TRADOC PAM 350

  5. IN-SERVICE TEACHER TRAINING COURSES: ORGANIZATIONAL COMPONENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola Solovey

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the organizational components of the teacher training courses at the Khmelnytsky Regional In-Service Teacher Training Institute. According to the Law of Ukraine “On Professional Development” the state policy in this area aims at the process of continuous professional development and creates conditions for teacher to learn at training courses once every five years. The Law of Ukraine "On Education" declares that the professional development is the duty and the rate of life of teachers. Formation of the number of trainees, the quality of the scientific and pedagogical staff, the content of training, planning and documentation, resources and economic support are the basis for organizing in-service courses. The formation of a contingent of trainees consists of several stages: 1 previous research and prediction of the quantitative composition of trainees; 2 specification of indicators of the actual number of trainees; 3 approval of the actual number of trainees, and the schedule for the next year's courses; 4 an analysis of the implementation of the plan of courses. Every year more than six thousand teachers study at the courses. In accordance with the schedule of training, students are spread across departments. Lecture sessions, practical sessions, trainings are carried out by the scientific staff of the departments, methodologists and teachers of practice. Educational programs are built on the basis of qualification characteristics, state requirements for the content of education in secondary school, the wishes of teachers. The overall structure of the programs corresponds to the recommendations of the Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine. The variable part is developed in accordance with the pedagogical specialties and considering the recommendations of the departments and methodologists. Based on the content of educational programs, the general structure of the curriculum is developed. The institute has

  6. Analysis of References on the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Zhang, Alicia; Lin, Samuel J

    2016-06-01

    The Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam is a knowledge assessment tool widely used during plastic surgery training in the United States. This study analyzed literature supporting correct answer choices to determine highest yield sources, journal publication lag, and journal impact factors. Digital syllabi of 10 consecutive Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam administrations (2006 to 2015) were reviewed. The most-referenced articles, journals, and textbooks were determined. Mean journal impact factor and publication lag were calculated and differences were elucidated by section. Two thousand questions and 5386 references were analyzed. From 2006 to 2015, the percentage of journal citations increased, whereas textbook references decreased (p < 0.001). Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery was cited with greatest frequency (38.5 percent), followed by Clinics in Plastic Surgery (5.6 percent), Journal of Hand Surgery (American volume) (5.1 percent), and Annals of Plastic Surgery (3.8 percent). There was a trend toward less publication lag over the study period (p = 0.05), with a mean publication lag of 9.1 ± 9.0 years for all journal articles. Mean journal impact factor was 2.3 ± 4.3 and lowest for the hand and lower extremity section (1.7 ± 2.8; p < 0.001). The highest yield textbooks were elucidated by section. Plastic surgery faculty and residents may use these data to facilitate knowledge acquisition during residency.

  7. In-service education and training as experienced by registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norushe, T F; Van Rooyen, D; Strumpher, J

    2004-11-01

    Nursing is a dynamic profession that is subject to rapid changes in health care provision, hence the need for in-service training programmes for nurses. Newly employed registered nurses require in-service training in order to update them regarding the latest developments in nursing practice. The researcher noted that some newly appointed registered nurses were not competent in all aspects relating to their tasks. This could have been due to a knowledge deficit relating to either new developments or of the procedure relating to a specific task. In some institutions newly-appointed registered nurses on probation reported not receiving in-service training for six months or longer, yet they were still expected to perform their tasks efficiently. The objectives of the study were to, firstly, explore and describe the experiences of registered nurses regarding in-service training programmes in their institutions and, secondly, to make recommendations to Nursing Service Managers relating to the development of effective in-service training programmes in their institutions. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive design was implemented. Data was analysed using Tesch's descriptive approach (in Creswell, 1994:155). Two main themes emerged, namely that registered nurses experienced in-service training programmes as inadequate and reacted negatively towards them. This article focuses on the experiences of registered nurses relating to in-service training programmes, as well as the formulation of guidelines to assist nursing service managers in the development of effective in-service training programmes.

  8. Factors affecting the nurses’ motivation for participating in the in-service training courses: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sajjadnia

    2015-11-01

    nurses’ service unit (p=0.014. Furthermore, there was a significant and negative correlation between their nursing job experience and organizational factors (r= -0.21, P= 0.004. Conclusion: According to the results and in order to increase the studied nurses’ motivation for participating in the in-service training courses, the following suggestions can be offered: making a proper educational needs assessment, paying careful attention to the nurses’ educational needs, determining the suitable time and place for providing training courses, and encouraging the nurses’ participating in the in-service training courses, etc.

  9. Toward the Application of Constructivism and Constructionism to Work-Related Training in Service of the Enhancement of Human Capital Development in Postsecondary Education Settings in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Education research and employer surveys reveal that the skill gap in the United States spans across the realms of academic foundations, industry qualifications and technical competencies, higher-order cognitive skills, and behavioral skills and values. The purpose of this investigation was to identify key components of the two theoretical models…

  10. An Examination of Technology Training Experiences from Teacher Candidacy to In-Service Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mable Evans

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of in-service teachers concerning the effectiveness of technology training from a teacher education preparation program to in-service professional development. The findings of the study revealed that inservice teachers have had varying degrees of technology experiences from their…

  11. A framework for outcome-level evaluation of in-service training of health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Gabrielle; Perdue, Thomas; Petracca, Frances

    2013-10-01

    In-service training is a key strategic approach to addressing the severe shortage of health care workers in many countries. However, there is a lack of evidence linking these health care worker trainings to improved health outcomes. In response, the United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief's Human Resources for Health Technical Working Group initiated a project to develop an outcome-focused training evaluation framework. This paper presents the methods and results of that project. A general inductive methodology was used for the conceptualization and development of the framework. Fifteen key informant interviews were conducted to explore contextual factors, perceived needs, barriers and facilitators affecting the evaluation of training outcomes. In addition, a thematic analysis of 70 published articles reporting health care worker training outcomes identified key themes and categories. These were integrated, synthesized and compared to several existing training evaluation models. This formed an overall typology which was used to draft a new framework. Finally, the framework was refined and validated through an iterative process of feedback, pilot testing and revision. The inductive process resulted in identification of themes and categories, as well as relationships among several levels and types of outcomes. The resulting framework includes nine distinct types of outcomes that can be evaluated, which are organized within three nested levels: individual, organizational and health system/population. The outcome types are: (1) individual knowledge, attitudes and skills; (2) individual performance; (3) individual patient health; (4) organizational systems; (5) organizational performance; (6) organizational-level patient health; (7) health systems; (8) population-level performance; and (9) population-level health. The framework also addresses contextual factors which may influence the outcomes of training, as well as the ability of evaluators to

  12. Case Report: Rhabdomyolysis in Service Member Following SERE Physical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-19

    hour per response, including the time tor reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of...Member following SERE physical training. Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Capt Matthew A Pombo Se. TASK

  13. In-Service Training of Chemistry Teachers: The Use of Multimedia in Teaching Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Celeste; Baptista, Monica; Arroio, Agnaldo

    2013-01-01

    Information and Communication Technology has allowed the use of several types of visualizations, especially multimedia environments in science teaching. The aim was to investigate how in-service teachers enrolled in a training course understand the nature and the role of visualizations in science teaching as well as the impact of this training on…

  14. In-Service Training of Teachers in Multicultural Urban Schools: A Systematic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickolai-Mays, Susanne; Davis, Jerry L.

    1986-01-01

    Presents seven guidelines for developing effective teacher in-service training programs. Describes a training model for multicultural urban schools which addresses these topics: instructional methods; curriculum; interpersonal relations in the classroom; classroom management and discipline; parent-teacher-student involvement; and multicultural…

  15. The Impact of In-Service Technology Training Programmes on Technology Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbo, Mishack; Makgato, Moses; Muller, Helene

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the impact the Advanced Certificate in Education (ACE) in-service technology training program has on technology teachers' knowledge and understanding of technology. The training of technology teachers is an initiative toward teachers' professional development within the mathematics, science, and technology sphere…

  16. In-service training and expertise requirements in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klener, V.; Heribanova, A.

    2003-01-01

    Proper selection of staff and their special education and training in radiation protection are important factors when assuring faultless man-machine interaction and thereby a reduced likelihood of human factor failure in hazardous practices. University-level institutions can only provide education in the individual partial segments of the multidisciplinary area of radiation protection, whereas the proper practices are learned by graduate personnel on the job, by performing operational tasks at their particular workplace. The scope o expertise of subjects providing radiation protection surveillance and the requirements for their special education and training are outlined. Supervising persons appointed by the radiation source handling licensee to perform a number of operational tasks at the workplace assume a prominent position. Alternatively, systematic supervision at the workplace can be contracted by the licensee from an external body, provided that the latter has acquired appropriate licence from the State Office for Nuclear Safety. The provisions of the Atomic Act and the related implementing regulations with respect to special training and to the examination of professional competence before an expert commission are briefly outlined. (author)

  17. A data fusion approach for track monitoring from multiple in-service trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, George; Chen, Siheng; Garrett, James H.; Kovačević, Jelena; Noh, Hae Young; Bielak, Jacobo

    2017-10-01

    We present a data fusion approach for enabling data-driven rail-infrastructure monitoring from multiple in-service trains. A number of researchers have proposed using vibration data collected from in-service trains as a low-cost method to monitor track geometry. The majority of this work has focused on developing novel features to extract information about the tracks from data produced by individual sensors on individual trains. We extend this work by presenting a technique to combine extracted features from multiple passes over the tracks from multiple sensors aboard multiple vehicles. There are a number of challenges in combining multiple data sources, like different relative position coordinates depending on the location of the sensor within the train. Furthermore, as the number of sensors increases, the likelihood that some will malfunction also increases. We use a two-step approach that first minimizes position offset errors through data alignment, then fuses the data with a novel adaptive Kalman filter that weights data according to its estimated reliability. We show the efficacy of this approach both through simulations and on a data-set collected from two instrumented trains operating over a one-year period. Combining data from numerous in-service trains allows for more continuous and more reliable data-driven monitoring than analyzing data from any one train alone; as the number of instrumented trains increases, the proposed fusion approach could facilitate track monitoring of entire rail-networks.

  18. Empowering education: A new model for in-service training of nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHMUD CHAGHARI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In-service training of nurses plays an indispensable role in improving the quality of inpatient care. Need to enhance the effectiveness of in-service training of nurses is an inevitable requirement. This study attempted to design a new optimal model for in-service training of nurses. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted in two stages during 2015-2016. In the first stage, the Grounded Theory was adopted to explore the process of training 35 participating nurses. The sampling was initially purposeful and then theoretically based on emerging concept. Data were collected through interview, observation and field notes. Moreover, the data were analyzed through Corbin-Strauss method and the data were coded through MAXQDA-10. In the second stage, the findings were employed through Walker and Avant’s strategy for theory construction so as to design an optimal model for in-service training of nursing staff. Results: In the first stage, there were five major themes including unsuccessful mandatory education, empowering education, organizational challenges of education, poor educational management, and educational-occupational resiliency. Empowering education was the core variable derived from the research, based on which a grounded theory was proposed. The new empowering education model was composed of self-directed learning and practical learning. There are several strategies to achieve empowering education, including the fostering of searching skills, clinical performance monitoring, motivational factors, participation in the design and implementation, and problem-solving approach. Conclusion: Empowering education is a new model for in-service training of nurses, which matches the training programs with andragogical needs and desirability of learning among the staff. Owing to its practical nature, the empowering education can facilitate occupational tasks and achieving greater mastery of professional skills among the nurses.

  19. Empowering Education: A New Model for In-service Training of Nursing Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaghari, Mahmud; Saffari, Mohsen; Ebadi, Abbas; Ameryoun, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    In-service training of nurses plays an indispensable role in improving the quality of inpatient care. Need to enhance the effectiveness of in-service training of nurses is an inevitable requirement. This study attempted to design a new optimal model for in-service training of nurses. This qualitative study was conducted in two stages during 2015-2016. In the first stage, the Grounded Theory was adopted to explore the process of training 35 participating nurses. The sampling was initially purposeful and then theoretically based on emerging concept. Data were collected through interview, observation and field notes. Moreover, the data were analyzed through Corbin-Strauss method and the data were coded through MAXQDA-10. In the second stage, the findings were employed through 'Walker and Avants strategy for theory construction so as to design an optimal model for in-service training of nursing staff. In the first stage, there were five major themes including unsuccessful mandatory education, empowering education, organizational challenges of education, poor educational management, and educational-occupational resiliency. Empowering education was the core variable derived from the research, based on which a grounded theory was proposed. The new empowering education model was composed of self-directed learning and practical learning. There are several strategies to achieve empowering education, including the fostering of searching skills, clinical performance monitoring, motivational factors, participation in the design and implementation, and problem-solving approach. Empowering education is a new model for in-service training of nurses, which matches the training programs with andragogical needs and desirability of learning among the staff. Owing to its practical nature, the empowering education can facilitate occupational tasks and achieving greater mastery of professional skills among the nurses.

  20. Scientific foundation of in-service training for prevention of peer violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Miroslav V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the compatibility of the continuous in-service teacher training for prevention of peer violence and modern scientific knowledge in this area. The first part of the paper summarizes the results of 12 systematic reviews and meta-analyses of the effectiveness of the studies of antibullying programs published since 2000. which relate to the effects of uni-modal and multi-modal programs, and the efficacy of interventions used in anti-bullying programs. The second part of the paper analyses the approved programs of in-service teacher training, in which priority is given to the prevention of violence, abuse and negligence. We analyzed 39 programs of continuous in-service teacher training, and focused on the empirical bases of the programs (researches which confirm the effectiveness of a program and the contents of the training (the level of preventive activity, modality, field, and interventions. The results of the analysis of the programs of continuous in-service training for peer violence prevention are discussed in the context of modern scientific knowledge of effectiveness of anti-bullying programs and of professional development of teachers and counsellors.

  1. Residency training in the United States: What foreign medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FMGs) planning to pursue post-graduate residency training in the United States of America (USA). While the number of residency training positions is shrinking, and the number of United States graduates has steadily declined over the past ...

  2. Evaluation of the In-Service Education and Training Programme for Kuwait Army Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutawa, Najat; Al-Furaih, Suad

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates the In-Service Education and Training (INSET) programme organised for Kuwait Army instructors. The focus is on their perceptual gain in related topics and skills, as they attended 10 courses at the College of Education--Kuwait University. Pre- and post-assessments involved 20 trainees. The analysis indicates significant…

  3. Impact of in-service education and training programmes on teachers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Up to 80% of the teachers have participated in three or less INSET activities but only 10% of them said they engaged in activities that involved teaching reading methods in Social Studies. The paper therefore argues that in-service education and training programmes organized did little in exposing teachers to skills required ...

  4. In-Service Training of Teachers as Behavior Modifiers: Review and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eachus, Herbert Todd

    The basic principles of operant and classical conditioning are presented, and their applications for the in-service training of teachers are discussed. Certain classroom behaviors are analyzed and applied to the classic stimulus-response paradigm. Activities are generically classified as positive or negative reinforcers and these reinforcers, in…

  5. Assessing the Impact of In-Service Training on Staff Performance at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    performance in terms of knowledge and skills gained. It was recommended that more research is undertaken on all UEW campuses to add to both literature and knowledge of INSET. Keywords: Staff Performance, In-Service Training, Staff Development International Journal of Educational Research Vol. 3 (2) 2007 pp. 217- ...

  6. When school-based, in-service teacher training sharpens pedagogical awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Lea

    2018-01-01

    Research in the field of professional development (PD) stresses the importance of the development of professional learning communities (PLCs) designed to promote the process of inquiry in teaching. PLCs are of great importance with regard to both school improvement and in-service teacher training...

  7. Kirkpatrick evaluation model for in-service training on cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoura Dorri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several evaluation models that can be used to evaluate the effect of in-service training; one of them is the Kirkpatrick model. The aim of the present study is to assess the in-service training of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR for nurses based on the Kirkpatrick′s model. Materials and Methods: This study is a cross-sectional study based on the Kirkpatrick′s model in which the efficacy of in-service training of CPR to nurses was assessed in the Shahadaye Lenjan Hospital in Isfahan province in 2014. 80 nurses and Nurse′s aides participated in the study after providing informed consent. The in-service training course was evaluated in reaction, learning, behavior, and results level of the Kirkpatrick model. Data were collected through a researcher-made questionnaire. Results: The mean age of the participants was 35 ± 8.5 years. The effectiveness score obtained in the reaction level (first level in the Kirkpatrick model was 4.2 ± 0.32. The effectiveness score in the second level of model or the learning level was 4.70 ± 0.09, which is statistically significant (P < 0.001. The effectiveness score at the third and fourth level were 4.1 ± 0.34 and 4.3 ± 0.12, respectively. Total effectiveness score was 4.35. Conclusions: The results of this study showed that CPR in-service training has a favorable effect on all four levels of the Kirkpatrick model for nurses and nurse′s aides.

  8. Development and Evaluation of the Efficiency of In-Service Training Program with the Theme of Peace Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaran, Semra Demir; Karakurt, Sevgi Özden

    2017-01-01

    In this article, an in-service training program was developed and evaluated to improve the peace education competencies of primary school teachers. This program, named as In-Service Training Program with the Theme of Peace Education for Primary Teachers (BEHEP), was based on the system approach. The implementation was completed in 28 hours with…

  9. IAEA-RCA training course on in-service inspection of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has acquired a wide range of experience for over four decades in design, construction, operation and maintenance of research reactors. The two-week training course on In-Service Inspection of Research Reactors (ISI) has greatly increased the awareness in the field of ISI of Research Reactors. The training course has been formulated so as to cover most of the topics relevant to ISI of research reactors. Important topics such as rationale for in-service inspection, material degradation mechanisms, non-destructive examination techniques, design evaluation of flaws and radiological, codal and regulatory aspects of ISI for research reactors were covered. Lectures on ISI of elastomeric materials and concrete structures, which are generally used in the construction of reactors have also been included in the course. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  10. In-service English language training for Italian Primary School Teachers An experience in syllabus design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dawes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to report on an in-service English Language Teacher Training Programme devised for the Government project to equip Italian primary school teachers  with the skills to teach English. The paper focuses on the first phase of the project which envisaged research into the best training models and the preparation of appropriate  English Language syllabuses. In  the first three sections of the paper we report on the experience of designing the language syllabus. In the last section we suggest ways of using the syllabus as a tool for self reflective professional development.

  11. An attempt for empowering education: A qualitative study of in-service training of nursing personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Chaghari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In-service training of nursing personnel has a significant role in increasing the empowerment of nurses and promotion of the quality of health services. The objective of this study is to identify and explain the process of in-service training of nursing personnel in the hospitals affiliated with Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences in Tehran. Materials and Methods: The present study employed a qualitative approach using Corbin and Strauss method (2008 in 2015, and examined the viewpoints and experiences of 35 nurses, nurse managers, and educational managers with the in-service education of nursing staffs. According to this method, comparisons, asking questions, flip-flop technique, depicting personal experiences, and raising red flag were used for data analysis. Results: In this study, five major themes including unsuccessful mandatory education, empowering education, organizational challenges, weakness in the educational management, and educational-job resiliency were derived from the results. Unsuccessful mandatory education was the main concern of participants and empowering education was the core category derived from this study. Conclusions: Empowering education emphasizes the practice-oriented and self-directed training. It is an applied education, is participation-oriented, facilitates job functions, and is based on exploration.

  12. An attempt for empowering education: A qualitative study of in-service training of nursing personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaghari, Mahmood; Ebadi, Abbas; Ameryoun, Ahmad; Safari, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    In-service training of nursing personnel has a significant role in increasing the empowerment of nurses and promotion of the quality of health services. The objective of this study is to identify and explain the process of in-service training of nursing personnel in the hospitals affiliated with Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences in Tehran. The present study employed a qualitative approach using Corbin and Strauss method (2008) in 2015, and examined the viewpoints and experiences of 35 nurses, nurse managers, and educational managers with the in-service education of nursing staffs. According to this method, comparisons, asking questions, flip-flop technique, depicting personal experiences, and raising red flag were used for data analysis. In this study, five major themes including unsuccessful mandatory education, empowering education, organizational challenges, weakness in the educational management, and educational-job resiliency were derived from the results. Unsuccessful mandatory education was the main concern of participants and empowering education was the core category derived from this study. Empowering education emphasizes the practice-oriented and self-directed training. It is an applied education, is participation-oriented, facilitates job functions, and is based on exploration.

  13. [Training and experience in stroke units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, J F

    2008-01-01

    The social and sanitary benefits provided by stroke units can not be achieved without an adequate training and learning process. This dynamic process consists of the progressive acquisition of: a) a greater degree of expertise in stroke management by the stroke team; b) better coordination between the stroke team, extrahospitalary emergency medical systems, and other in-hospital professionals involved in stroke assistance, and c) more human and technological resources dedicated to improve attention to stroke patients. The higher degree of experience in a stroke unit will have an effect: a) improving (time and quality) the diagnostic process in acute stroke patients; b) increasing the proportion of patients treated with thrombolysis; c) reducing extra and intrahospitalary latencies to stroke treatment, and d) improving stroke outcome in terms of reducing mortality and increasing functional independence. Finally, comprehensive stroke centers will achieve a higher degree of organizational complexity that will permit a global assessment of the most advanced aspects in stroke management, including education and research.

  14. The Effects of Staff Training on Staff Confidence and Challenging Behavior in Services for People with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Andrew; Sturmey, Peter; Oliver, Chris; Cunningham, Joanna; Hayes, Samira; Galvin, Martin; Walshe, Caroline; Cunningham, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    The effects of a 3-day training course in the management of aggressive behavior in services for people with autism spectrum disorders were investigated using a quasi-experimental design. An experimental group received training over a 10-month period and a contrast group, which had received training before this study, did not. Staff training…

  15. TEACHERS' VIEWS ON THE POTENTIAL USE OF ONLINE IN-SERVICE EDUCATION AND TRAINING ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet KOKOC

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined teacher’s views on the potential use of online in-service education and training (INSET activities. The study used a qualitative approach. A total of 13 in-service teachers from primary school, vocational school, science and art center, high school in Trabzon (on the Black Sea coast of Turkey participated in the study. To determine opinions of participants about the potential use of online INSET activities, a online conference was held to determine teachers’ views. The participants who had experienced traditional and face to face INSET courses discussed their INSET experiences and thoughts about online INSET activities. These views were transcribed and then analyzed using content analysis. The main conclusions are: with online INSET activities, especially time and place dependency can be overcome, and accommodation and transportation issues can be resolved. Teachers feel that online INSET activities can promote effective use of resources.

  16. Low Levels of Evidence on the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Bilici, Nadir; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    The Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam is written by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Examinees reasonably infer that tested material reflects the Society's vision for the core curriculum in plastic surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the levels of evidence on which credited answers to the examination questions are based. Two recent Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exams (2014 and 2015) were analyzed. Questions were categorized using a taxonomy model. Recommended journal article references for Level III (decision-making) questions were assigned a level of evidence. Exam sections were analyzed for differences in question taxonomy distribution and level of evidence. To look for studies with higher levels of evidence, a PubMed search was conducted for a random sample of 10 questions from each section. One hundred three Level I (25.8 percent), 138 Level II (34.5 percent), and 159 Level III (39.8 percent) questions were analyzed (p < 0.001). The hand and lower extremity section had the highest percentage of Level III questions (50.0 percent; p = 0.005). Journal articles had a mean level of evidence of 3.9 ± 0.7. The number of articles with a low level of evidence (IV and V) (p = 0.624) and the percentage of questions supported by articles with a high level of evidence (I and II) (p = 0.406) did not vary by section. The PubMed search revealed no instances of a higher level of evidence than the recommended reading list. A significant percentage of Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam questions test clinical management, but most are supported with a low level of evidence. Although that is consistent with low level of evidence of plastic surgery literature, educators should recognize the potential for biases of question writers.

  17. Rheumatology training in Poland vs. United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Lazarewicz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available When evaluating the quality of Rheumatology specialty training, it can be useful to explore similarities and differences between countries. In this article we compare the training in the UK and Poland. The two training programmes are similar in length and in the competencies that must be achieved, although they do have significant differences in the way the training is structured. The UK-based system is more out-patient based, which can be advantageous, as after completion of training the doctor is more confident in treating common rheumatological problems. On the other hand, having exposure to paediatric rheumatology and orthopaedics like one has in Polish-based training, despite a short placement time, is definitely beneficial for the trainee in gaining all-round knowledge. In conclusion, each system has its merits and can be further enhanced by observing how junior doctors are sub-speciality trained in different countries.

  18. A General Investigation of the In-Service Training of English Language Teachers at Elementary Schools in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Melek KOÇ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a critical diagnosis of in-service teacher-training activities offered to English-language teachers in Turkey and aims to investigate whether those teachers are satisfied with the activities. Thirty-two English-language teachers participated in this study. Data were collected from 32 elementary-school teachers of English as a foreign language, using a general evaluation form prepared by the researcher. The results indicate that the teachers are not satisfied with their in-service teacher-training activities and that in-service training does not fulfil their needs. The study also proposes an in-service teacher training model in distance format.

  19. Specialized Training on Addictions for Physicians in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontchev, Gramen V.; Housel, Timothy R.; Callahan, James F.; Kunz, Kevin B.; Miller, Michael M.; Blondell, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    In the United States accredited residency programs in addiction exist only for psychiatrists specializing in addiction psychiatry (ADP); nonpsychiatrists seeking training in addiction medicine (ADM) can train in nonaccredited "fellowships," or can receive training in some ADP programs, only to not be granted a certificate of completion of…

  20. The Training Resource Unit--An Outreach Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Meredith A.

    1991-01-01

    The Training Resource Unit is a New South Wales (Australia) community services initiative that provides services such as direct client training, career training, and consultation to individuals with severe intellectual disability and severe challenging behaviors. The service is provided in the person's place of residence, workplace, or school…

  1. Development process of in-service training intended for teachers to perform teaching of mathematics with computer algebra systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardıç, Mehmet Alper; Işleyen, Tevfik

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we deal with the development process of in-service training activities designed in order for mathematics teachers of secondary education to realize teaching of mathematics, utilizing computer algebra systems. In addition, the results obtained from the researches carried out during and after the in-service training were summarized. Last section focuses on suggestions any teacher can use to carry out activities aimed at using computer algebra systems in teaching environments.

  2. Virtual in-service training from the librarians' point of view in libraries of medical sciences universities in Tehran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaghegh, Niloofar; Raiesi Dehkordi, Puran; Alibeik, MohammadReza; Ghashghaee, Ahmad; Janbozorgi, Mojgan

    2016-01-01

    Background: In-service training courses are one of the most available programs that are used to improve the quantity and quality level of the staff services in various organizations, including libraries and information centers. With the advent of new technologies in the field of education, the problems and shortcomings of traditional in-service training courses were replaced with virtual ones. This study aimed to evaluate the virtual in-service training courses from the librarians' point of view in libraries of state universities of medical sciences in Tehran. Methods: This was a descriptive- analytical study. The statistical population consisted of all librarians at libraries of universities of medical sciences in Tehran. Out of 103 librarians working in the libraries under the study, 93 (90%) participated in this study. Data were collected, using a questionnaire. Results: The results revealed that 94/6% of librarians were satisfied to participate in virtual in-service training courses. In this study, only 45 out of 93 participants said that the virtual in-service courses were held in their libraries. Of the participants, 75.6% were satisfied with the length of training courses, and one month seemed to be adequate time duration for the librarians to be more satisfied. The satisfaction level of the individuals who participated in in-service courses of the National Library was moderate to high. A total of 84.4% participants announced that the productivity level of the training courses was moderate to high. The most important problem with which the librarians were confronted in virtual in-service training was the "low speed of the internet and inadequate computer substructures". Conclusion: Effectiveness of in-service training courses from librarians’ point of view was at an optimal level in the studied libraries. PMID:28491833

  3. Virtual in-service training from the librarians' point of view in libraries of medical sciences universities in Tehran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaghegh, Niloofar; Raiesi Dehkordi, Puran; Alibeik, MohammadReza; Ghashghaee, Ahmad; Janbozorgi, Mojgan

    2016-01-01

    Background: In-service training courses are one of the most available programs that are used to improve the quantity and quality level of the staff services in various organizations, including libraries and information centers. With the advent of new technologies in the field of education, the problems and shortcomings of traditional in-service training courses were replaced with virtual ones. This study aimed to evaluate the virtual in-service training courses from the librarians' point of view in libraries of state universities of medical sciences in Tehran. Methods: This was a descriptive- analytical study. The statistical population consisted of all librarians at libraries of universities of medical sciences in Tehran. Out of 103 librarians working in the libraries under the study, 93 (90%) participated in this study. Data were collected, using a questionnaire. Results: The results revealed that 94/6% of librarians were satisfied to participate in virtual in-service training courses. In this study, only 45 out of 93 participants said that the virtual in-service courses were held in their libraries. Of the participants, 75.6% were satisfied with the length of training courses, and one month seemed to be adequate time duration for the librarians to be more satisfied. The satisfaction level of the individuals who participated in in-service courses of the National Library was moderate to high. A total of 84.4% participants announced that the productivity level of the training courses was moderate to high. The most important problem with which the librarians were confronted in virtual in-service training was the "low speed of the internet and inadequate computer substructures". Conclusion: Effectiveness of in-service training courses from librarians' point of view was at an optimal level in the studied libraries.

  4. Adapting United States training practices to European utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    The factors which must be considered in the process of adapting United States nuclear utility training programs to the needs of a European utility are discussed. Following a review of the present situation and drawing up of a new training program, the management commitments in terms of personnel and finance must be considered. Short term, medium and long term programs are outlined. The long term objectives should include the establishment of a total training centre. This facility should be capable of providing all the training necessary to operate a power plant safely. This would include specific simulator training, classroom training for operators, technician training, staff training, management training etc. In addition to a simulator, it should include an emergency response facility to train personnel. (U.K.)

  5. Secondary Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (PCB Teachers’ Views about In-service Training Related to Curricular Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Çağlayan Mercan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In Turkey the Physics, Chemistry and Biology (PCB curricula were renewed in 2008. However, little in-service training for teachers has been conducted to disseminate the ideas in the new curricula. The purpose of this study was to investigate PCB teachers’ views on in-service training, which may serve as the base knowledge of educational change in Turkey that can be used in further curricular development. In Istanbul 99 teachers voluntarily participated in this qualitative case study. Data were collected utilizing semi-structured interviews and analyzed by employing constant comparative analysis. The data showed that for 40% of the teachers the in-service training was insufficient: the new curricula were not introduced to them adequately. Only 7% of the teachers expressed positive views towards the in-service training. The teachers were concerned about the incompetence of the trainers and the low quality of the training programs. 20% of the teachers felt that they need to keep up to date with the new curricula and establish ways of cooperation among teachers. The results imply that educational change is more than changing the curriculum, which requires serious planning for implementation requiring a reconceptualization of in-service training as part of a larger professional development framework.

  6. Examining the Effectiveness of the In-service Training Program for the Education of the Academically Gifted students in Turkey: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Said TORTOP

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, examining the effectiveness of in-service training for gifted education has been conducted. In the study, 30 Classroom, Science, Mathematics and Preschool teachers working at schools in different cities of Turkey, took part as volunteer participants. Moreover, some criteria were specified for determining the participants. In this in-service training, teachers have received theoretical and practical training in the academicians who study on gifted education. In this process, they have designed units in groups according to the Education Program for Gifted Student Bridge with University (EPGBU curriculum. The research has been designed as a case-study research which is one of the qualitative research models. In the study, some data tools (scales, interview form and the documents were utilized Two of data collection tools were developed by research. These were Science Fair Mentorship Self-efficacy Scale for Teachers (SFMSST and Gifted Education Self-efficacy Scale for Teachers (GESST. As a result of a one-week in-service training, it has been determined that the teachers’ perception of self-efficacy for scientific research mentorship and gifted education increased.

  7. TRAINING OF THE STATE PRESIDENT'S UNIT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The primary function of the State President's Unit is to protect the head of state - not his person as is generally believed, but his authority over the state. Ironically, the ceremonial performances of the State President's Unit lead people to believe that they are only capable of doing drill exer- cises. However, upon investigating.

  8. Optimization methods for the Train Unit Shunting Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Jørgen Thorlund; Lusby, Richard Martin; Wagenaar, Joris Camiel

    2017-01-01

    We consider the Train Unit Shunting Problem, an important planning problem for passenger railway operators. This problem entails assigning train units from shunting yards to scheduled train services in such a way that the resulting operations are without conflicts. The problem arises at every...... shunting yard in the railway network and involves matching train units to arriving and departing train services as well as assigning the selected matchings to appropriate shunting yard tracks. We present an extensive comparison benchmark of multiple solution approaches for this problem, some of which...... are novel. In particular, we develop a constraint programming formulation, a column generation approach, and a randomized greedy heuristic. We compare and benchmark these approaches with two existing methods, a mixed integer linear program and a two-stage heuristic. The benchmark contains multiple real...

  9. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Disparities in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewer, Audrey L; Ibrahim, Said A; Leary, Marion; Dutwin, David; McNally, Bryan; Anderson, Monique L; Morrison, Laurie J; Aufderheide, Tom P; Daya, Mohamud; Idris, Ahamed H; Callaway, Clifton W; Kudenchuk, Peter J; Vilke, Gary M; Abella, Benjamin S

    2017-05-17

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is associated with increased survival from cardiac arrest, yet bystander CPR rates are low in many communities. The overall prevalence of CPR training in the United States and associated individual-level disparities are unknown. We sought to measure the national prevalence of CPR training and hypothesized that older age and lower socioeconomic status would be independently associated with a lower likelihood of CPR training. We administered a cross-sectional telephone survey to a nationally representative adult sample. We assessed the demographics of individuals trained in CPR within 2 years (currently trained) and those who had been trained in CPR at some point in time (ever trained). The association of CPR training and demographic variables were tested using survey weighted logistic regression. Between September 2015 and November 2015, 9022 individuals completed the survey; 18% reported being currently trained in CPR, and 65% reported training at some point previously. For each year of increased age, the likelihood of being currently CPR trained or ever trained decreased (currently trained: odds ratio, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.97-0.99; P trained: OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.98-0.99; P =0.04). Furthermore, there was a greater then 4-fold difference in odds of being currently CPR trained from the 30-39 to 70-79 year old age groups (95% CI, 0.10-0.23). Factors associated with a lower likelihood of CPR training were lesser educational attainment and lower household income ( P training in CPR. Older age, lesser education, and lower income were associated with reduced likelihood of CPR training. These findings illustrate important gaps in US CPR education and suggest the need to develop tailored CPR training efforts to address this variability. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  10. Extravehicular mobility unit training and astronaut injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Samuel; Krog, Ralph L.; Feiveson, Alan H.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Astronaut spacewalk training can result in a variety of symptom complaints and possible injuries. This study quantified and characterized signs, symptoms, and injuries resulting from extravehicular activity spacesuit training at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, immersion facility. METHODS: We identified the frequency and incidence of symptoms by location, mechanisms of injury, and effective countermeasures. Recommendations were made to improve injury prevention, astronaut training, test preparation, and training hardware. At the end of each test, a questionnaire was completed documenting signs and symptoms, mechanisms of injury, and countermeasures. RESULTS: Of the 770 tests, there were 190 in which suit symptoms were reported (24.6%). There were a total of 352 reported suit symptom comments. Of those symptoms, 166 were in the hands (47.16%), 73 were in the shoulders (20.7%), and 40 were in the feet (11.4%). Others ranged from 6.0% to 0.28%, respectively, from the legs, arms, neck, trunk, groin, and head. Causal mechanisms for the hands included moisture and hard glove contacts resulting in fingernail injuries; in the shoulders, hard contact with suit components and strain mechanisms; and in the feet, hard boot contact. The severity of symptoms was highest in the shoulders, hands, and feet. CONCLUSIONS: Most signs and symptoms were mild, self-limited, of brief duration, and were well controlled by available countermeasures. Some represented the potential for significant injury with consequences affecting astronaut health and performance. Correction of extravehicular activity training-related injuries requires a multidisciplinary approach to improve prevention, medical intervention, astronaut training, test planning, and suit engineering.

  11. SPECIALITY TRAINING IN ABROAD – UNITED KINGDOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Pakiž

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Backgroud. According to the Rules on types and curriculum of specialization of doctors in Slovenia part of the specialization can be conducted in abroad after conformation of Medical Chambers. Specialization abroad enables us to learn about different therapeutic approaches, organization of work, educational systems, new methods of treatment, etc. Content In the article organization of work at the Liverpool Women’s Hospital, the greatest European hospital for women’s diseases is presented. Furthermore, specialty training for obstetrics and gynecology according to the rules of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in the UK is described. The specialty training and education programme last seven years in the UK. The specialty trainees attend specific modules besides working at gynaecological and obstetrics departments. The exam is divided in two parts and performed after the second and fifth year of training. During the last two years of the specialty training the doctor is able to roughly determine the subspeciality. The education programme is adjusted for those who are interested in research and academic fields. Conclusions. My experiences as foreign visiting doctor, as well as differences towards our system, are shared.

  12. A Rating of training units in boys basketball by category of U14

    OpenAIRE

    Mašková, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Title: A Rating of training units in boys basketball by category of U14. Objective: Preparation, implementation and evaluation of basketball training units starting by U14 categories. The training units focus on a drill, training game and fitness training following by blending these three components. Methods: Preparing these training units I have used the professional basketball literature. This bachelor work is based on quantitative way of research. The raiting of training units was analyzed...

  13. Comparing varieties of in-service English Language Training for primary school teachers in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Coburn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available International trends show the formal teaching of English beginning at an increasingly early age. This presents challenges for national education systems and in particular, for primary schools and for primary school teachers who are not necessarily trained as English teachers. This paper looks at two different responses to the situation in Norway, through research into two different ways of organising, designing and implementing in-service English Training (INSET for primary school teachers. One is a nationally organised program, the other is a local initiative. The contexts for the two different kinds of courses are outlined and the designs of the courses presented through document analysis interspersed with extracts from interviews with teacher trainers. Strengths and weaknesses of the two different kinds of courses are compared. The study concludes that if English teaching in primary schools in Norway is to improve towards 2030, there is a need for the introduction of new programs and structures for the development of teacher trainers with primary school teaching experience, and for the systematic development of networks of primary school English teachers with the aim of nurturing and sustaining their professional development

  14. Educational quality in nursery schools. From procedures for evaluation to in-service training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Calzolari

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a training-research project promoted by the Educational Coordination of Bologna Municipality and involving 15 Kindergarten sections in a district of Bologna city. The research was conducted in the school year 2009-2010. The project was planned as an Evaluation Research oriented to introduce some Quality Evaluation proceedings into the Kindergarten and to promote, into the group of the teachers that have been involved, some processes of in-service training and educational planning. The Scale for Observation and Evaluation of Kindergarten SOVASI has been used following the methodological suggestions given by M. Ferrari (1994 as a reference and an opportunity for critical reflexion on the scale itself. After a brief report of the theoretical framework of the research, the authors present an analysis of the results concerning the Quality Evaluation of the Kindergartens, some critical reflexions on the proceedings and on the tool that has been used and the ways the researches conducted the data restitution meetings with the teachers in order to promote their professionalism.

  15. Evaluation of the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam: Lower Extremity Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Basta, Marten N; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate the training of plastic surgery residents, we analyzed a knowledge-based curriculum for plastic and reconstructive surgery of the lower extremity. The Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam (PSITE) is a commonly used tool to assess medical knowledge in plastic surgery. We reviewed the lower extremity content on 6 consecutive score keys (2008-2013). Questions were classified by taxonomy, anatomy, and subject. Answer references were quantified by source and relative year of publication. Totally, 107 questions related to the lower extremity (9.1% of all questions) and 14 questions had an associated image (13.1%). Questions required decision making (49%) over interpretation (36%) and direct recall (15%) skills (p < 0.001). Conditions of the leg (42.1%) and thigh (24.3%) constituted most of the questions. Subject matter focused on flap reconstruction (38.3%), nerve injury (8.4%), and congenital deformity (6.5%). Analysis of 263 citations to 66 unique journals showed that Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (54.9%) was the highest yield primary source. The median year of publication relative to PSITE administration was 6 (range: 1-58) with a mode of 2 years. Plastic Surgery by Mathes et al. was the most referenced textbook (21.9%). These data establish a benchmark for lower extremity training during plastic surgery residency. Study efforts focused on the most common topics and references will enhance trainee preparation for lower extremity PSITE questions. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Continuing training plan in a clinical management unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa Antiñolo, Fernando Miguel; Bayol Serradilla, Elia; Gómez Camacho, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Continuing Care Unit (UCA) focused the attention of frail patients, polypathological patients and palliative care. UCA attend patients at home, consulting, day unit, telephone consulting and in two hospitals of the health area. From 2002 UCA began as a management unit, training has been a priority for development. Key elements include: providing education to the workplace, including key aspects of the most prevalent health care problems in daily work, directing training to all staff including organizational aspects of patient safety and the environment, improved working environment, development of new skills and knowledge supported by the evidence-based care for the development of different skills. The unit can be the ideal setting to undertake the reforms necessary conceptual training of professionals to improve the quality of care. 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationships between needle and syringe programs and police: An exploratory analysis of the potential role of in-service training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strike, Carol; Watson, Tara Marie

    2017-06-01

    Training police on the public health benefits of needle and syringe programs (NSPs) is viewed as a best practice to facilitate more collaborative relationships between police and these programs. To date, while the limited published literature contains promising cases of harm reduction in-service training for police, evaluative evidence is preliminary. Using an online survey, we asked NSP managers across Canada about their programs and the quality of their NSP-police relationships. We analyzed data from the responses of 75 program managers among whom 69% reported that their program had a "positive" or "mostly positive" relationship with the police. In-service training about topics such as needle-stick injury prevention and NSP effectiveness was provided by less than 50% of the programs surveyed. Seventy-five percent reported no established protocols to resolve conflicts between NSP staff and police. Four variables, all related to in-service training, were significantly related to positive NSP-police relationships, including training about: NSP program goals (OR 7.7; 95% CI 2.0, 33.1); needle-stick injury prevention and basics of blood-borne virus transmission (OR 4.0; 95% CI 1.1, 15.34); the health and social concerns of people who use drugs (OR 3.9; 95% CI 1.1, 13.5); and evidence about the impact of injection equipment distribution (OR 3.9; 95% CI 1.1, 13.5). Development of in-service training for police that is focused on harm reduction goals and initiatives is a new and evolving area. We highly encourage NSPs to offer and evaluate any such in-service training programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Importance Analysis of In-Service Testing Components for Ulchin Unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dae-Il Kan; Kil-Yoo Kim; Jae-Joo Ha

    2002-01-01

    We performed an importance analysis of In-Service Testing (IST) components for Ulchin Unit 3 using the integrated evaluation method for categorizing component safety significance developed in this study. The importance analysis using the developed method is initiated by ranking the component importance using quantitative PSA information. The importance analysis of the IST components not modeled in the PSA is performed through the engineering judgment, based on the expertise of PSA, and the quantitative and qualitative information for the IST components. The PSA scope for importance analysis includes not only Level 1 and 2 internal PSA but also Level 1 external and shutdown/low power operation PSA. The importance analysis results of valves show that 167 (26.55%) of the 629 IST valves are HSSCs and 462 (73.45%) are LSSCs. Those of pumps also show that 28 (70%) of the 40 IST pumps are HSSCs and 12 (30%) are LSSCs. (authors)

  19. Psychiatry training in the United Kingdom--part 2: the training process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, N; Kasiakogia, K

    2015-01-01

    In the second part of this diptych, we shall deal with psychiatric training in the United Kingdom in detail, and we will compare it--wherever this is meaningful--with the equivalent system in Greece. As explained in the first part of the paper, due to the recently increased emigration of Greek psychiatrists and psychiatric trainees, and the fact that the United Kingdom is a popular destination, it has become necessary to inform those aspiring to train in the United Kingdom of the system and the circumstances they should expect to encounter. This paper principally describes the structure of the United Kingdom's psychiatric training system, including the different stages trainees progress through and their respective requirements and processes. Specifically, specialty and subspecialty options are described and explained, special paths in training are analysed, and the notions of "special interest day" and the optional "Out of programme experience" schemes are explained. Furthermore, detailed information is offered on the pivotal points of each of the stages of the training process, with special care to explain the important differences and similarities between the systems in Greece and the United Kingdom. Special attention is given to The Royal College of Psychiatrists' Membership Exams (MRCPsych) because they are the only exams towards completing specialisation in Psychiatry in the United Kingdom. Also, the educational culture of progressing according to a set curriculum, of utilising diverse means of professional development, of empowering the trainees' autonomy by allowing initiative-based development and of applying peer supervision as a tool for professional development is stressed. We conclude that psychiatric training in the United Kingdom differs substantially to that of Greece in both structure and process. Τhere are various differences such as pure psychiatric training in the United Kingdom versus neurological and medical modules in Greece, in-training

  20. Learning the Discourse of Quality Assurance: A Case of Workplace Learning in Online In-Service Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Mona; Lundin, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, online in-service training for people employed in the food production industry is scrutinized. The purpose of this study is to analyse how the participants adapt to such online environments in terms of the kind of discussions they establish. The more specific interest relates to how the participants discuss current work…

  1. Comparison between Synchronous and Asynchronous Instructional Delivery Method of Training Programme on In-Service Physical Educators' Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanouilidou, Kyriaki; Derri, Vassiliki; Antoniou, Panagiotis; Kyrgiridis, Pavlos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the influences of a training programme's instructional delivery method (synchronous and asynchronous) on Greek in-service physical educators' cognitive understanding on student assessment. Forty nine participants were randomly divided into synchronous, asynchronous, and control group. The experimental groups…

  2. Primary Teachers' Particle Ideas and Explanations of Physical Phenomena: Effect of an In-Service Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, George; Stamovlasis, Dimitrios; Johnson, Phil Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a study concerning Greek primary school teachers' (n = 162) ideas about the particulate nature of matter and their explanations of physical phenomena. The study took place during an in-service training course where the effectiveness of a specially designed intervention was tested. A key feature was an approach based on the…

  3. Dual roles and dual identities: enhancing the experience of in-service teacher training in English Further Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orr, Kevin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In marked distinction from other sectors of education, around 90 percent of Further Education (FE staff in England are employed untrained and complete their Initial Teacher Training (ITT on a part-time in-service basis. By consequence, these staff sustain the dual role of employed teacher and teacher-trainee usually at the beginning of their career. This paper reports on a project funded by ESCalate which researched the dual roles and dual identities of employee and trainee on in-service FE teacher-training courses. It argues that the lack of a culture of pedagogical development in colleges along with the pressure for trainees to quickly cope with teaching can lead to conservative practice as expedience may be prioritised over flair. In response, the paper makes recommendations to enhance the experience and development of in-service teacher trainees.

  4. Relevancy of an In-Service Examination for Core Knowledge Training in a Surgical Subspecialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Chang, Benjamin; Serletti, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    To facilitate knowledge acquisition during plastic surgery residency, we analyzed the breast curriculum on the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam (PSITE). Breast-related questions on 6 consecutive PSITEs were analyzed (2008-2013). Topics were categorized by the content outline for the American Board of Plastic Surgery written board examination. Question vignettes were classified by taxonomy and clinical setting. References for correct answer choices were categorized by source and publication lag. A total of 136 breast-related questions were analyzed (136/1174, 12%). Questions tended to appear more in the Breast and Cosmetic (75%) section than the Comprehensive (25%) section (p 0.05). Only 6% of questions required photographic evaluation. Breast-related topics focused on esthetic problems (35%), traumatic deformities (22%), and tumors (21%). Answer references comprised 293 citations to 63 unique journals published a median of 6 years before PSITE administration. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (57%) was the most cited journal (p < 0.001) and Surgery of the Breast: Principles and Art by Spear was the most referenced textbook (22%). The PSITE affords a curriculum that reflects breast-related topics on the American Board of Plastic Surgery written board examination. These data may optimize knowledge acquisition in esthetic and reconstructive breast surgery. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Scheduling Additional Train Unit Services on Rail Transit Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Zhibin Jiang; Yuyan Tan; Özgür Yalçınkaya

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of scheduling additional train unit (TU) services in a double parallel rail transit line, and a mixed integer programming (MIP) model is formulated for integration strategies of new trains connected by TUs with the objective of obtaining higher frequencies in some special sections and special time periods due to mass passenger volumes. We took timetable scheduling and TUs scheduling as an integrated optimization model with two objectives: minimizing travel ti...

  6. Analytic institutes: A guide to training in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanken, Terry G.

    This investigation was inspired by the researcher's desire to pursue psychoanalytic training subsequent to completion of her PhD in clinical psychology and the discovery that no comprehensive resource existed to assist prospective psychoanalytic candidates with identifying or evaluating psychoanalytic training opportunities. This dissertation therefore aspires to provide a comprehensive guide to analytic training in the United States today. The researcher presents the expanding horizons of depth-oriented training leading to certification as an analyst, including training based on those schools of thought that resulted from early splits with Freud (Adlerian and Jungian) as well as training based on thought that has remained within the Freudian theoretical umbrella (e.g., classical, object relations, self psychology, etc.). Employing a heuristic approach and using hermeneutics and systems theory methodologies, the study situates analytic training in its historical context, explores contemporary issues, and considers its future. The study reviews the various analytic schools of thought and traces the history of psychoanalytic theory from its origins with Freud through its many permutations. It then discusses the history of psychoanalytic training and describes political, social, and economic factors influencing the development of training in this country. The centerpiece of the dissertation is a guidebook offering detailed information on each of 107 training institutes in the United States. Tables provide contact data and information which differentiate the institutes in terms of such parameters as size; length of program, theoretical orientation, and accreditation. A narrative of each institute summarizes the unique aspects of the program, including its admissions policy, the requirements for the training analysis and supervised clinical work, and the didactic curriculum, along with lists of courses offered. Child and adolescent psychoanalytic training is also

  7. IMPROVING THE METHODS OF ESTIMATION OF THE UNIT TRAIN EFFECTIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro KOZACHENKO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of studies of freight transportation by unit trains. The article is aimed at developing the methods of the efficiency evaluation of unit train dispatch on the basis of full-scale experiments. Duration of the car turnover is a random variable when dispatching the single cars and group cars, as well as when dispatching them as a part of a unit train. The existing methodologies for evaluating the efficiency of unit trains’ make-up are based on the use of calculation methodologies and their results can give significant errors. The work presents a methodology that makes it possible to evaluate the efficiency of unit train shipments based on the processing of results of experimental travels using the methods of mathematical statistics. This approach provides probabilistic estimates of the rolling stock use efficiency for different approaches to the organization of car traffic volumes, as well as establishes the effect for each of the participants in the transportation process.

  8. The Needs of Primary English Teachers for an In-Service Teacher Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enisa Mede

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the needs of the primary English teachers at a private school about an in-service teacher training program. Under the light of former studies and literature, this study attempts to find out their needs on the predefined concepts namely, adaptation of teaching methods, emphasis on language skills, utilization of technology, classroom environment, instructional practices and material development. The differences between the needs of the participating teachers according to their grade level (K1-4 were examined as well. A sample of 60 primary English teachers working in private schools around different cities in Turkey participated in this study. Data were collected through a triangulated approach, in which questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and teacher diaries were administered to the participating teachers. The findings revealed except for the material development, the primary English teachers are in a high need of a design for an in-service training program on the predefined concepts. Besides, the only difference between the grade levels was in relation to the utilization of technology. These findings will serve as basis for the design of a new in-service teacher training program to meet their needs in the following academic years.Keywords: In-service teacher education, primary English language teachers, teacher needs, program design. İlköğretim Düzeyi İngilizce Öğretmenlerinin Hizmetiçi Eğitim Programlarına İlişkin İhtiyaçlarıÖzBu çalışma, ilköğretim düzeyi İngilizce öğretmenlerinin hizmetiçi eğitim ihtiyaçlarını yönelik ihtiyaçlarını belirlemeyi amaçlamaktadır. Önceden yapılan çalışmaların ışığında, bu çalışma öğretmenlerinin önceden belirlenmiş kavramlar olan öğretim yöntem ve tekniklerinin adaptasyonu, dil becerilerinin vurgulanması, teknolojinin kullanımı, sınıf ortamı, öğretimde uygulamalar ve materyal geliştirme

  9. Reserve Component Unit Stability: Effects on Deployability and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    within the last year before mobi - lization). However, attendance rates at AT have historically ranged around 60 to 70 percent, and, the more time they...recruiters, offering enlistment incentives, boosting advertising ) but also for initial training of new nonprior- service recruits. And, since the unit would

  10. Changes in Default Alarm Settings and Standard In-Service are Insufficient to Improve Alarm Fatigue in an Intensive Care Unit: A Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowan, Azizeh Khaled; Gomez, Tiffany Michelle; Tarriela, Albert Fajardo; Reed, Charles Calhoun; Paper, Bruce Michael

    2016-01-11

    alarm parameters and frequency of replacing patients' electrodes. Despite the in-service, 50% (12/24) of the nurses specified their need for more training on cardiac monitors in the postproject period. Changing default alarm settings and standard in-service education on cardiac monitor use are insufficient to improve alarm systems safety. Alarm management in ICUs is very complex, involving alarm management practices by clinicians, availability of unit policies and procedures, unit layout, complexity and usability of monitoring devices, and adequacy of training on system use. The complexity of the newer monitoring systems requires urgent usability testing and multidimensional interventions to improve alarm systems safety and to attain the Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal on alarm systems safety in critical care units.

  11. The Effects of In-Service Training Seminars on the Tourism Marketing Role of Professional Tour Guides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezer Korkmaz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study has investigated that how the compulsory in-service training seminars have affected the attitudes composing marketing function of guides. Questionnaire has aimed to investigate that there are meaningful satisfaction level differences between or among the guides in respect to their various qualifications. Unstructured interview and participant observation methods have also been conducted. It has been seen that the satisfaction level of guides from in-service training seminars is quite low. The research findings show that there are meaningful differences between the attitudes of marketing function of guides who are not attended and attended to marketing related seminars. It has been seen that marketing related seminars have positive effects on guides’ marketing related attitudes.

  12. Difered evaluation of in-service teacher’s training in living together and school mediation skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Carme Boqué Torremorell

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present some of the results of a differed evaluation course about living together and school mediation skills addressed to teachers of different schools and educative levels. The aassessment of in-service teachers training courses is usually reduced to a questionnaire filled in at the end of the course, which makes impossible to realize the transference of knowledge to educational settings. Instead, here we follow up and analyze three dimensions —personal, classroom and school performance— to identify relevant factors in the implementation of living together practices and future training needs.

  13. Building Unit Cohesion via the Videodisc Interpersonal Skills Training and Assessment (VISTA) Unit Training Program (VUTP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    tworf) Unclassified h a O~ASSI UICATI ON IDOWN ORA 010C r DS IST RISUTION STATEMENT (of olitdopmf) Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 7...maLai&l:. .• hire •.Dd roveseiet would be to spend more time iti training the leaders. Alt . vih they vere famillarize6 wh --h= --,_-rpa-nt and 25

  14. Integrating rolling stock scheduling with train unit shunting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Jørgen Thorlund; Lusby, Richard Martin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider integrating two important railway optimization problems, in particular the Rolling Stock Scheduling Problem and the Train Unit Shunting Problem. We present two similar branch-and-cut based approaches to solve this integrated problem and, in addition, provide a comparison......, sequential approach ends in infeasibility. Furthermore, for the considered instances, solutions are typically found within a few minutes, indicating the applicability of the methodology to short-term planning....

  15. Training programs in medical physics in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzl, L.H.

    1977-01-01

    The history of the field of medical physics in the United States is reviewed; the importance of the development of the nuclear reactor and particle accelerators to medical physics is pointed out. Conclusions and recommendations of an IAEA/WHO seminar on the training of medical physicists (in 1972) are given and compared with existing programs in the US. It is concluded that the recommendations of the IAEA are, for the most part, followed. 1 table

  16. The effect of in-service entrepreneurship training on mass media managers’ entrepreneurship: A case study of IRIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Motaharrad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the impact of in-service entrepreneurship training on the improvement of mass media managers’ entrepreneurship in Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB, Tehran, Iran. Features of corporate entrepreneurship were regarded as four dimensions of creativity and innovation, risk-taking, perseverance, and competitive spirit. Also, we examined the effect of entrepreneurship training on corporate entrepreneurship. To collect the data, we developed a questionnaire. Forty four production managers of IRIB volunteered to fill in the questionnaire. However, 4 persons were excluded from the group due to incomplete completion of the questionnaire and treatment which made the participants 40 people. The participants were randomly assigned to two participating groups. To test the hypotheses, variance and multi-covariance tests were applied. The analysis of the data obtained showed that the entrepreneurship training has significant effect on creativity, risk-taking, perseverance, and competitive spirit.

  17. Public private partnership in in-service training of physicians: the millennium development goal 6-partnership for African clinical training (M-PACT) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleribe, Obinna Ositadimma; Salako, Babatunde Lawal; Akpalu, Albert; Anteyi, Emmanuel; Ka, Mamadou Mourtalla; Deen, Gibrilla; Akande, Temilola; Abellona U, Mei Ran; Lemoine, Maud; McConnochie, Mairi; Foster, Matthew; Walker, Richard; Taylor-Robinson, Simon David; Jawad, Ali

    2018-01-01

    in-service training of healthcare workers is essential for improving healthcare services and outcome. The Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 6 Partnership for African Clinical Training (M-PACT) program was an innovative in-service training approach designed and implemented by the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) and West African College of Physicians (WACP) with funding from Eco Bank Foundation. The goal was to develop sustainable capacity to tackle MDG 6 targets in West Africa through better postgraduate medical education. Five training centres were establised: Nigeria (Abuja, Ibadan), Ghana (Accra), Senegal (Dakar) and Sierra Leone (Freetown) for training 681 physicians from across West Africa. A curriculum jointly designed by the RCP-WACP team was used to deliver biannual 5-day training courses over a 3-year period. Of 602 trained in clinical medicine, 358 (59.5%) were males and 535 (88.9%) were from hosting countries. 472 (78.4%) of participants received travel bursaries to participate, while 318 (52.8%) were residents in Internal Medicine in the respective institutions. Accra had the highest number of participants (29.7%) followed by Ibadan, (28.7%), Dakar, (24.9%), Abuja, (11.0%) and Freetown, (5.6%). Pre-course clinical knowledge scores ranged from 35.1% in the Freetown Course to 63.8% in Accra Course 1; whereas post-course scores ranged from 50.5% in the Freetown course to 73.8% in Accra course 1. M-PACT made a positive impact to quality and outcome of healthcare services in the region and is a model for continued improvement for healthcare outcomes, e.g malaria, HIV and TB incidence and mortality in West Africa.

  18. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Rates in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Monique L.; Cox, Margueritte; Al-Khatib, Sana M.; Nichol, Graham; Thomas, Kevin L.; Chan, Paul S.; Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Fosbol, Emil L.; Eigel, Brian; Clendenen, Bill; Peterson, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    Context Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves the likelihood of surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), yet treatment rates differ by a community’s racial and income composition. Objective To determine if CPR training differs by the race and income of communities across the United States (U.S.). Design, Setting, and Participants We analyzed county-level CPR training rates from 2010–2011 using CPR training data from the American Heart Association, the American Red Cross, and the Health and Safety Institute. We utilized multivariable logistic regression models to examine the association of annual adult CPR training rates with a county’s proportion of black residents and median household income (categorized as tertiles), as well as other demographic, geographic, and healthcare characteristics. Main Outcome Measure CPR training rate. Results From 07/01/2010–06/30/2011, 13.1 million persons in 3143 U.S. counties received CPR training. The median county training rate ranged from 0.00%–1.29% (median=0.51%) in the lower tertile, 1.29%–4.07% (median=2.39%) in the middle tertile, and >4.07% (median=6.81%) in the upper tertile. Counties that were most likely to have CPR training rates in the lower tertile included those with a higher proportion of rural (odds ratio [OR] 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10, 1.15 per 5 percentage point [PP] change), black (OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.06, 1.13 per 5 PP change), and Hispanic residents (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02, 1.11 per 5 PP change); those with a lower median household income (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.04, 1.34 per $10,000 decrease); those with a higher median age (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04, 1.53 per 10 year change); and those located in the South. Conclusions Counties with a higher proportion of rural, black, Hispanic, and lower income residents had lower CPR training rates. Differences in CPR training by race and income may contribute to recognized disparities in bystander CPR treatment and OHCA survival, and

  19. Training operators of VVER-1000 units in Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normand, X.; Nabet, E.; Hauesberger, P.

    1996-01-01

    The VVER 1000 is the most recent nuclear reactor designed in the former Soviet Union. Its design and operation principles are close to Western four-loop reactors in the 1000- to 1500-MW class; therefore, the Western simulation technology is usually directly applicable to the simulation of these units. Moreover, the current number of state-of-the-art training simulators in operation is very limited. A total of 19 units are in operation, while only 2 modern simulators are available (full-scope type) in Balakovo and Zaporozhe. Access to these simulators is practically limited to the respective plants' trainees, which means that the other units have to be satisfied with hands-on training. Facing this situation and taking into account the predicted lifetime of these plants (15 to 25 yr to go, maybe more), a lot of effort has been made in recent years to provide the plants with modern simulators. The major hurdles to this action were obviously financial and technical (availability of codes, computers, software tools). Today, one full-scope project (Kalinin) is almost complete, and three have been announced (Novovoronezh, Khmelnitsky, Kozloduy). Full-scope simulators are clearly the ultimate target of a concerned power plants. However, all users do realize the advantages of the complementary approach with compact simulators: 1. They can be available quickly for starting the training process. 2. They cover a training field that is not (or partly) addressed by full-scope simulators, i.e., the demonstration of physical phenomena in normal and accidental situations

  20. Investigation of the contributors to wrong unit or wrong train events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persinko, D.; Ramey-Smith, A.

    1986-04-01

    This report presents information on human error in nuclear power plants causing actions to be performed on the wrong train of systems with redundant trains or on the wrong unit of a multi-unit facility. 10 refs

  1. An Integrated Database of Unit Training Performance: Description an Lessons Learned

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leibrecht, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    The Army Research Institute (ARI) has developed a prototype relational database for processing and archiving unit performance data from home station, training area, simulation based, and Combat Training Center training exercises...

  2. Rates of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Monique L; Cox, Margueritte; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Nichol, Graham; Thomas, Kevin L; Chan, Paul S; Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Fosbol, Emil L; Eigel, Brian; Clendenen, Bill; Peterson, Eric D

    2014-02-01

    Prompt bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves the likelihood of surviving an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Large regional variations in survival after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have been noted. To determine whether regional variations in county-level rates of CPR training exist across the United States and the factors associated with low rates in US counties. We used a cross-sectional ecologic study design to analyze county-level rates of CPR training in all US counties from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011. We used CPR training data from the American Heart Association, the American Red Cross, and the Health & Safety Institute. Using multivariable logistic regression models, we examined the association of annual rates of adult CPR training of citizens by these 3 organizations (categorized as tertiles) with a county's geographic, population, and health care characteristics. Completion of CPR training. Rate of CPR training measured as CPR course completion cards distributed and CPR training products sold by the American Heart Association, persons trained in CPR by the American Red Cross, and product sales data from the Health & Safety Institute. RESULTS During the study period, 13.1 million persons in 3143 US counties received CPR training. Rates of county training ranged from 0.00% to less than 1.29% (median, 0.51%) in the lower tertile, 1.29% to 4.07% (median, 2.39%) in the middle tertile, and greater than 4.07% or greater (median, 6.81%) in the upper tertile. Counties with rates of CPR training in the lower tertile were more likely to have a higher proportion of rural areas (adjusted odds ratio, 1.12 [95% CI, 1.10-1.15] per 5-percentage point [PP] change), higher proportions of black (1.09 [1.06-1.13] per 5-PP change) and Hispanic (1.06 [1.02-1.11] per 5-PP change) residents, a lower median household income (1.18 [1.04-1.34] per $10 000 decrease), and a higher median age (1.28 [1.04-1.58] per 10-year change). Counties in the South

  3. Assessment methods in surgical training in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenios Evgeniou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A career in surgery in the United Kingdom demands a commitment to a long journey of assessment. The assessment methods used must ensure that the appropriate candidates are selected into a programme of study or a job and must guarantee public safety by regulating the progression of surgical trainees and the certification of trained surgeons. This review attempts to analyse the psychometric properties of various assessment methods used in the selection of candidates to medical school, job selection, progression in training, and certification. Validity is an indicator of how well an assessment measures what it is designed to measure. Reliability informs us whether a test is consistent in its outcome by measuring the reproducibility and discriminating ability of the test. In the long journey of assessment in surgical training, the same assessment formats are frequently being used for selection into a programme of study, job selection, progression, and certification. Although similar assessment methods are being used for different purposes in surgical training, the psychometric properties of these assessment methods have not been examined separately for each purpose. Because of the significance of these assessments for trainees and patients, their reliability and validity should be examined thoroughly in every context where the assessment method is being used.

  4. Conceptions on the Teaching of Subtraction: A study Focused on an in-Service Teacher Training Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Martínez Silva

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a research about a group of in-service teachers working in primary public schools in a poor urban zone in Monterrey city, Mexico. Its main aim was to study teachers’ conceptions about the teaching of subtraction and, in particular, to know more about the role that they assign to context and contextualizing in the teaching process. Broadly speaking, the research arose from the interest to know more about the relationship between the training and education in mathematics of primary teachers and how the teaching and learning of mathematics actually takes place at school.

  5. A Reflection and Comparison of Physician Training in the United States of America and United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit S. Aiyer

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available As a final year medical student at the University of Birmingham in England, I am very familiar with the training structure of physicians in the National Health Service (NHS. Recently, I had the opportunity to do 4 months of clinical electives at the University of Massachusetts in Worcester, Massachusetts and Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, New York. This experience allowed me to gain insight on the American training system for medical student graduates that provided a new perspective on physician training. The following reflection will be based on my experiences in the two countries and focus on the working guidelines for junior doctors in the United States that is based on the Accredited Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME Duty Hours protocol, and will be compared to the European Work Time Directive (EWTD guidelines for British junior doctors.

  6. Maintaining the Transfer of In-Service Teachers' Training in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Eddie W. L.

    2016-01-01

    Professional training and development is a major component of updating teachers' pedagogical knowledge and skills. However, transferring such knowledge and skill may not always be successful. Based on the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), the present study has developed a model specifying the factors affecting transfer maintenance intention and…

  7. The Effects of In-Service Training on Teachers' Beliefs and Practices in Children's Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Jennifer A.; Han, Myae; Buell, Martha J.

    2015-01-01

    Early childhood educators are often aware of the general importance of play in children's development; however, they are often less aware of how play can support both academic and social learning and what their own roles can be in children's play. In this study, we examined the effect that professional development training about play would have on…

  8. In-Service Teachers' Training: The Case of University Teachers in Yangon, Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulla, Mark B.

    2018-01-01

    Research studies show a number of significant contributions of professional development programs towards teachers' teaching skills. This paper explores the views of eight (8) university lecturers in a university in Yangon, Myanmar with regards to the teacher capacity building and language enhancement training program they attended from 2014-2016.…

  9. Decentralising Curriculum Reform: The Link Teacher Model of In-Service Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, Helen; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents a (Western Australian) case study of the link teacher model, a decentralized, "train the trainer" approach to inservice education. Discusses the model's perceived effectiveness, the link teachers' role, central authority support, and new experimentation opportunities. Combining centralized syllabus change with decentralized…

  10. An Assessment of In-Service Training Needs of Elementary Administrators. A Topic of Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, James Richard

    The problem addressed in this topic of study was that of identifying the inservice training needs of 26 administrators in the Glendale (Arizona) Elementary District and ranking those needs in order of importance. It was assumed that by ranking topic areas according to the number and percentage of responses a priority list of inservice training…

  11. Aligning In-Service Training Examinations in Plastic Surgery and Orthopaedic Surgery With Competency-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh Kumar, Nishant; Benvenuti, Michael A; Drolet, Brian C

    2017-10-01

    In-service training examinations (ITEs) are used to assess residents across specialties. However, it is not clear how they are integrated with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestones and competencies. This study explored the distribution of specialty-specific milestones and competencies in ITEs for plastic surgery and orthopaedic surgery. In-service training examinations were publicly available for plastic surgery (PSITE) and orthopaedics (OITE). Questions on the PSITE for 2014-2016 and the OITE for 2013-2015 were mapped to the specialty-specific milestones and the 6 competencies. There was an uneven distribution of milestones and competencies in ITE questions. Nine of the 36 Plastic Surgery Milestones represented 52% (341 of 650) of questions, and 3 were not included in the ITE. Of 41 Orthopaedic Surgery Milestones, 7 represented 51% (201 of 394) of questions, and 5 had no representation on the ITE. Among the competencies, patient care was the most common (PSITE = 62% [403 of 650]; OITE = 59% [233 of 394]), followed by medical knowledge (PSITE = 34% [222 of 650]; OITE = 31% [124 of 394]). Distribution of the remaining competencies differed between the 2 specialties (PSITE = 4% [25 of 650]; OITE = 9% [37 of 394]). The ITEs tested slightly more than half of the milestones for the 2 specialties, and focused predominantly on patient care and medical knowledge competencies.

  12. "I Feel Much More Confident Now to Talk with Parents": An Evaluation of In-Service Training on Teacher-Parent Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symeou, Loizos; Roussounidou, Eleni; Michaelides, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a teacher in-service training program on teacher-parent communication in Cyprus and its impact on teacher trainees. Data were gathered through questionnaires completed by teachers prior to their training and after having tried, in real school settings, the communication skills and approaches taught during the course. The…

  13. Service dog training program for treatment of posttraumatic stress in service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yount, Rick A; Olmert, Meg D; Lee, Mary R

    2012-01-01

    In July 2008, social worker and certified service dog trainer Rick Yount created the first Warrior dog-training program designed to be a safe, effective, nonpharmaceutical intervention to treat the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury in Veterans and service members undergoing treatment at a large Veterans Administration residential treatment facility. In 2009, Yount was asked to establish the program at a prominent Department of Defense medical center. In October 2010, Yount was invited to create a service dog training program to support the research and treatment mission at the new National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICoE), in Bethesda, Maryland. This program, now being offered through the nonprofit foundation Warrior Canine Connection, continues to produce anecdotal evidence that training service dogs reduces the PTSD symptoms of Warrior-trainers and that the presence of the dogs enhances the sense of wellness in the NICoE staff and the families of our Wounded Warriors. Under the research leadership of the NICoE, the Warrior Canine Connection research team plans to systematically investigate the physiological, psychological, and behavioral benefits of this program.

  14. Aesthetic Surgery Training during Residency in the United States: A Comparison of the Integrated, Combined, and Independent Training Models

    OpenAIRE

    Momeni, Arash; Kim, Rebecca Y.; Wan, Derrick C.; Izadpanah, Ali; Lee, Gordon K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Three educational models for plastic surgery training exist in the United States, the integrated, combined, and independent model. The present study is a comparative analysis of aesthetic surgery training, to assess whether one model is particularly suitable to provide for high-quality training in aesthetic surgery. Methods. An 18-item online survey was developed to assess residents’ perceptions regarding the quality of training in aesthetic surgery in the US. The survey had three...

  15. Differences in dermatology training abroad: A comparative analysis of dermatology training in the United States and in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jhorar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dermatology residency training is not standardized internationally, and each country dictates how training is conducted within its own borders. This article highlights the types of variability in training that can occur from country to country by comparing dermatology residency training programs in the United States and India. This article specifically analyzes the differences that pertain to application and selection, residency program structure, and post-residency opportunities.

  16. Nuclear instrument maintenance and technical training in Nuclear Energy Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Nasir Abdul Wahid

    1987-01-01

    Instrument maintenance service is a necessity in a Nuclear Research Institute, such as the Nuclear Energy Unit (NEU) to ensure the smooth running of our research activities. However, realising that maintenance back-up service for either nuclear or other scientific equipment is a major problem in developing countries such as Malaysia, NEU has set up an Instrumentation and Control Department to assist in rectifying the maintenance problem. Beside supporting in house activities in NEU, the Instrumentation and Control Department (I and C) is also geared into providing services to other organisations in Malaysia. This paper will briefly outline the activities of NEU in nuclear instrument maintenance as well as in technical training. (author)

  17. Knowledge and Skill Retention of In-Service versus Preservice Nursing Professionals following an Informal Training Program in Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Repeated-Measures Quasiexperimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhuma Sankar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to compare the impact of a training program in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR on the knowledge and skills of in-service and preservice nurses at prespecified time points. This repeated-measures quasiexperimental study was conducted in the pediatric emergency and ICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital between January and March 2011. We assessed the baseline knowledge and skills of nursing staff (in-service nurses and final year undergraduate nursing students (preservice nurses using a validated questionnaire and a skill checklist, respectively. The participants were then trained on pediatric CPR using standard guidelines. The knowledge and skills were reassessed immediately after training and at 6 weeks after training. A total of 74 participants—28 in-service and 46 preservice professionals—were enrolled. At initial assessment, in-service nurses were found to have insignificant higher mean knowledge scores (6.6 versus 5.8, P=0.08 while the preservice nurses had significantly higher skill scores (6.5 versus 3.2, P<0.001. Immediately after training, the scores improved in both groups. At 6 weeks however, we observed a nonuniform decline in performance in both groups—in-service nurses performing better in knowledge test (10.5 versus 9.1, P=0.01 and the preservice nurses performing better in skill test (9.8 versus 7.4, P<0.001. Thus, knowledge and skills of in-service and preservice nurses in pediatric CPR improved with training. In comparison to preservice nurses, the in-service nurses seemed to retain knowledge better with time than skills.

  18. Allergy in Hong Kong: an unmet need in service provision and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y T; Ho, H K; Lai, Christopher K W; Lau, C S; Lau, Y L; Lee, T H; Leung, T F; Wong, Gary W K; Wu, Y Y

    2015-02-01

    Many children in Hong Kong have allergic diseases and epidemiological data support a rising trend. Only a minority of children will grow out of their allergic diseases, so the heavy clinical burden will persist into adulthood. In an otherwise high-quality health care landscape in Hong Kong, allergy services and training are a seriously unmet need. There is one allergy specialist for 1.5 million people, which is low not only compared with international figures, but also compared with most other specialties in Hong Kong. The ratio of paediatric and adult allergists per person is around 1:460 000 and 1:2.8 million, respectively, so there is a severe lack of adult allergists, while the paediatric allergists only spend a fraction of their time working with allergy. There are no allergists and no dedicated allergy services in adult medicine in public hospitals. Laboratory support for allergy and immunology is not comprehensive and there is only one laboratory in the public sector supervised by accredited immunologists. These findings clearly have profound implications for the profession and the community of Hong Kong and should be remedied without delay. Key recommendations are proposed that could help bridge the gaps, including the creation of two new pilot allergy centres in a hub-and-spoke model in the public sector. This could require recruitment of specialists from overseas to develop the process if there are no accredited allergy specialists in Hong Kong who could fulfil this role.

  19. 75 FR 21610 - Overview Information: State Vocational Rehabilitation Unit In-Service Training; Notice Inviting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... institutions of higher education only. II. Award Information Type of Award: Discretionary grants. Estimated..., quotations, references, and captions, as well as all text in charts, tables, figures, and graphs. Use a font... following fonts: Times New Roman, Courier, Courier New, or Arial. An application submitted in any other font...

  20. Operative training in otolaryngology in the United Kingdom: a specialist registrar survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgalas, Christos; Hadjihannas, Edward; Ghufoor, Khalid; Pracy, Paul; Papesch, Michael

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the current status of operative training for otolaryngology specialist registrars in the United Kingdom. DESIGN: Web-based questionnaire survey. PARTICIPANTS: All otolaryngology specialist registrars in the United Kingdom. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The overall satisfaction with

  1. Comparison of Plastic Surgery Residency Training in United States and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianmin; Zhang, Boheng; Yin, Yiqing; Fang, Taolin; Wei, Ning; Lineaweaver, William C; Zhang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Residency training is internationally recognized as the only way for the physicians to be qualified to practice independently. China has instituted a new residency training program for the specialty of plastic surgery. Meanwhile, plastic surgery residency training programs in the United States are presently in a transition because of restricted work hours. The purpose of this study is to compare the current characteristics of plastic surgery residency training in 2 countries. Flow path, structure, curriculum, operative experience, research, and evaluation of training in 2 countries were measured. The number of required cases was compared quantitatively whereas other aspects were compared qualitatively. Plastic surgery residency training programs in 2 countries differ regarding specific characteristics. Requirements to become a plastic surgery resident in the United States are more rigorous. Ownership structure of the regulatory agency for residency training in 2 countries is diverse. Training duration in the United States is more flexible. Clinical and research training is more practical and the method of evaluation of residency training is more reasonable in the United States. The job opportunities after residency differ substantially between 2 countries. Not every resident has a chance to be an independent surgeon and would require much more training time in China than it does in the United States. Plastic surgery residency training programs in the United States and China have their unique characteristics. The training programs in the United States are more standardized. Both the United States and China may complement each other to create training programs that will ultimately provide high-quality care for all people.

  2. Risk-informed importance analysis of in-service testing components for Ulchin units 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, D. I.; Kim, K. Y.; Ha, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we perform risk-informed importance analysis of in-service tesing (IST) components for Ulchin Units 3 and 4. The importance analysis using PSA is performed through Level 1 internal and external, shutdown/low power operation, and Level 2 internal PSA. The sensitivity analysis is also performed. For the components not modeled in PSA logic, we develop and apply a new integrated importance analysis method. The importance analysis results for IST valves show that 167 (26.55%) of 629 IST valves are HSSCs and 462 (73.45%) are LSSCs. The importance analysis results for IST pumps show that 28 (70%) of 40 IST pumps are HSSCs and 12 (30%) are KSSCs

  3. Correlation of United States Medical Licensing Examination and Internal Medicine In-Training Examination Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jose A., Jr.; Greer, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (ITE) is administered during residency training in the United States as a self-assessment and program assessment tool. Performance on this exam correlates with outcome on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying examination. Internal Medicine Program Directors use the United States Medical…

  4. The Usage of Information Technologies in Classroom Environment among Primary School Teachers and Their Perception on In-Service Training Programs on IT (Sample of Sakarya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiper, Aydin; Tercan, Selcuk Sirri

    2012-01-01

    In this research, the opinions of teachers, who have received in-service trainings on the subject of information technologies, on their levels of use of information technologies in classes are investigated. A total of 164 teachers, who were working in the city of Sakarya in the 2007-2008 Academic Year, have participated in the research. A…

  5. Impact of In-Service Training and Staff Development on Workers' Job Performance and Optimal Productivity in Public Secondary Schools in Osun State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejoh, Johnson; Faniran, Victoria Loveth

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of in-service training and staff development on workers' job performance and optimal productivity in public secondary schools in Osun State, Nigeria. The study used the ex-post-facto research design. Three research questions and three hypotheses were generated and tested using questionnaire items adapted from…

  6. Teacher Competence and Teacher Quality in Cambodia's Educational Context Linked to In-Service Teacher Training: An Examination Based on a Questionnaire Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phin, Chankea

    2014-01-01

    Competent teacher is an indispensable pillar for students' learning outcome and education quality improvement. This paper examines Cambodian teachers' perception regarding: (1) teacher competence and improving education quality and (2) ensuring teacher quality and in-service teacher training. This study used questionnaire that targeted a line of…

  7. Evaluation of spaced education as a learning methodology for in-service training of health workers in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Tulenko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Participation in in-service training can be a challenge for health workers, especially those stationed in remote areas. Spaced education is an innovative learning methodology that can be delivered electronically by Internet or mobile smartphone. This pilot study, which followed a convenience sample of 37 Ethiopian nationals enrolled in a spaced education course over a six-month period, attempted to determine the acceptability and effectiveness of the methodology in a low-resource context. The course content was co-developed by Ethiopian and international nutrition experts and focused on the recently revised Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH guidelines on the feeding of infants of HIV-positive mothers. Conducted by the US Agency for International Development (USAID-funded CapacityPlus project, led by IntraHealth International, the study suggests that the Internet-based spaced education methodology is acceptable and effective for the acquisition of knowledge in a low-resource context for course participants with a clinical or public health background and moderately reliable Internet access. More research is needed to test the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of the methodology among a wider population of health workers in developing countries, and particularly among government and volunteer health workers in rural and remote settings.

  8. Global Diversity and Academic Success of Foreign-Trained Academic Neurosurgeons in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Akshitkumar M; Ganesh Kumar, Nishant; Reynolds, Rebecca A; Hale, Andrew T; Wellons, John C; Naftel, Robert P

    2017-08-01

    To quantify the proportion of academic neurosurgeons practicing in the United States who acquired residency training outside of the United States and compare their training backgrounds and academic success with those who received their residency training in the United States. We identified 1338 clinically active academic neurosurgeons from 104 programs that participated in the neurosurgery residency match in the United States in January-February 2015. Their training backgrounds, current academic positions, and history of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant awards between 2005 and 2014 were retrieved from publicly accessible sources. Eighty-four U.S. academic neurosurgeons (6.3%) received their residency training in 20 different countries outside of the United States/Puerto Rico, representing all major regions of the world. The majority trained in Canada (n = 48). We found no major differences between the foreign-trained and U.S.-trained neurosurgeons in male:female ratio, year of starting residency, proportion with positions in medical schools ranked in the top 15 by the U.S. News and World Report, general distribution of academic positions, and proportion with an NIH grant. Compared with U.S.-trained academic neurosurgeons, foreign-trained academic neurosurgeons had a significantly higher proportion of Ph.D. degrees (32.1% vs. 12.3%; P neurosurgeons were widely distributed throughout the United States. A small group of U.S. academic neurosurgeons (6.3%) have acquired residency training outside of the United States, representing all major regions of the world. Their general demographic data and academic accomplishments are comparable to those of U.S.-trained neurosurgeons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Systems-Based Aspects in the Training of IMG or Previously Trained Residents: Comparison of Psychiatry Residency Training in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, India, and Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Gaurav; Mazhar, Mir Nadeem; Uga, Aghaegbulam; Punwani, Manisha; Broquet, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: International medical graduates (IMGs) account for a significant proportion of residents in psychiatric training in the United States. Many IMGs may have previously completed psychiatry residency training in other countries. Their experiences may improve our system. Authors compared and contrasted psychiatry residency training in the…

  10. Foreign Language Training in the United States Peace Corps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakow, Allan

    This document reports on the foreign language training offered in the Peace Corps. Following a brief introductory statement, a list of languages taught by the Peace Corps in the years 1961-67 is provided, as well as a brief description of Peace Corps language training methods. Guidelines for language coordinators are outlined, and the approach to…

  11. Collective Training and Fielding Opportunities for the Objective Force Maneuver Systems at the Unit of Action Level in a Unit Manning/Unit Replacement Personnel System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Courts, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of Objective Force formations, beginning with the first Unit of Action, will fundamentally change existing organizational structures, training requirements and operational constructs for the U.S. Army...

  12. Training and Organizational Commitment among Nurses in New Zealand and United States Public Hospitals Experiencing Industry and Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Kenneth; Kang, Dae-seok

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between employee attitudes towards training and organizational commitment among a sample of nurses in New Zealand and the United States. Results show that perceived access to training, training frequency, motivation to learn from training, benefits of training, and supervisory support for training were…

  13. Plutonium Finishing Plant Treatment and Storage Unit Dangerous Waste Training Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ENTROP, G.E.

    2000-01-01

    The training program for personnel performing waste management duties pertaining to the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit is governed by the general requirements established in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Dangerous Waste Training Plan (PFP DWTP). The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit DWTP presented below incorporates all of the components of the PFP DWTP by reference. The discussion presented in this document identifies aspects of the training program specific to the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit. The training program includes specifications for personnel instruction through both classroom and on-the-job training. Training is developed specific to waste management duties. Hanford Facility personnel directly involved with the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit will receive training to container management practices, spill response, and emergency response. These will include, for example, training in the cementation process and training pertaining to applicable elements of WAC 173-303-330(1)(d). Applicable elements from WAC 173-303-330(1)(d) for the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit include: procedures for inspecting, repairing, and replacing facility emergency and monitoring equipment; communications and alarm systems; response to fires or explosions; and shutdown of operations

  14. Pulmonary and Critical Care In-Service Training Examination Score as a Predictor of Board Certification Examination Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempainen, Robert R; Hess, Brian J; Addrizzo-Harris, Doreen J; Schaad, Douglas C; Scott, Craig S; Carlin, Brian W; Shaw, Robert C; Duhigg, Lauren; Lipner, Rebecca S

    2016-04-01

    Most trainees in combined pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship programs complete in-service training examinations (ITEs) that test knowledge in both disciplines. Whether ITE scores predict performance on the American Board of Internal Medicine Pulmonary Disease Certification Examination and Critical Care Medicine Certification Examination is unknown. To determine whether pulmonary and critical care medicine ITE scores predict performance on subspecialty board certification examinations independently of trainee demographics, program director competency ratings, fellowship program characteristics, and prior medical knowledge assessments. First- and second-year fellows who were enrolled in the study between 2008 and 2012 completed a questionnaire encompassing demographics and fellowship training characteristics. These data and ITE scores were matched to fellows' subsequent scores on subspecialty certification examinations, program director ratings, and previous scores on their American Board of Internal Medicine Internal Medicine Certification Examination. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression were used to identify independent predictors of subspecialty certification examination scores and likelihood of passing the examinations, respectively. Of eligible fellows, 82.4% enrolled in the study. The ITE score for second-year fellows was matched to their certification examination scores, which yielded 1,484 physicians for pulmonary disease and 1,331 for critical care medicine. Second-year fellows' ITE scores (β = 0.24, P ITE odds ratio, 1.12 [95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.16]; Internal Medicine Certification Examination odds ratio, 1.01 [95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.02]). Similar results were obtained for predicting Critical Care Medicine Certification Examination scores and for passing the examination. The predictive value of ITE scores among first-year fellows on the subspecialty certification examinations was comparable to second

  15. Gamified Twitter Microblogging to Support Resident Preparation for the American Board of Surgery In-Service Training Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Laura C; DiFiori, Monica M; Jayaraman, Vijay; Shames, Brian D; Feeney, James M

    We sought to determine if a daily gamified microblogging project improves American Board of Surgery In-Service Training Examination (ABSITE) scores for participants. In July 2016, we instituted a gamified microblogging project using Twitter as the platform and modified questions from one of several available question banks. A question of the day was posted at 7-o׳clock each morning, Monday through Friday. Respondents were awarded points for speed, accuracy, and contribution to discussion topics. The moderator challenged respondents by asking additional questions and prompted them to find evidence for their claims to fuel further discussion. Since 4 months into the microblogging program, a survey was administered to all residents. Responses were collected and analyzed. After 6 months of tweeting, residents took the ABSITE examination. We compared participating residents׳ ABSITE percentile rank to those of their nonparticipating peers. We also compared residents׳ percentile rank from 2016 to those in 2017 after their participation in the microblogging project. The University of Connecticut general surgery residency is an integrated program that is decentralized across 5 hospitals in the central Connecticut region, including Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center, located in Hartford. We advertised our account to the University of Connecticut general surgery residents. Out of 45 residents, 11 participated in Twitter microblogging (24.4%) and 17 responded to the questionnaire (37.8%). In all, 100% of the residents who were participating in Twitter reported that daily microblogging prompted them to engage in academic reading. Twitter participants significantly increased their ABSITE percentile rank from 2016 to 2017 by an average of 13.7% (±14.1%) while nonparticipants on average decreased their ABSITE percentile rank by 10.0% (±16.6) (p = 0.003). Microblogging via Twitter with gamification is a feasible strategy to facilitate improving performance on the ABSITE

  16. Wearing a training version of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit, astronaut Mario

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    STS-77 TRAINING VIEW --- Wearing a training version of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit, astronaut Mario Runco, mission specialist, prepares to participate in an underwater rehearsal of a contingency Extravehicular Activity (EVA). This type of training routinely takes place in the 25-feet deep pool of the Johnson Space Centers (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Center (WET-F). The training prepares at least two crew members on each flight for procedures to follow outside the spacecraft in event of failure of remote methods to perform various chores.

  17. Innovative Training of In-Service Teachers for Active Learning: A Short Teacher Development Course Based on Physics Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, Genaro; Alarcon, Hugo; Benegas, Julio

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution we describe a short development course for in-service physics teachers. The course structure and materials are based on the results of educational research, and its main objective is to provide in-service teachers with a first contact with the active learning strategy "Tutorials in Introductory Physics," developed by…

  18. An Analysis of United States Marine Corps Enlisted Entry-Level Training Using Supply Chain and Operations Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    An Analysis of United States Marine Corps Enlisted Entry-Level Training Using Supply Chain and Operations Management ______________________________________ By...Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: An Analysis of United States Marine Corps Enlisted Entry-Level Training Using Supply Chain and Operations Management 6...Level Training; United States Marine Corps; Operations Management ; Supply Chain Management; Process Analysis 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY

  19. On-Demand Interactive Simulation-Centered Training for Small Unit Tactics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Munro, Allen

    2003-01-01

    Training on small unit infantry tactics in both the context of present-day infantry operations and in Objective Force Warrior contexts may benefit from the use of interactive graphics with behavioral...

  20. New control and safety rod unit for the training reactor of the Dresden Technical University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.; Schab, J.; Knorr, J.

    1983-01-01

    The extension of the experimental training of students at the training reactor AKR of the Dresden Technical University requires the reconstruction of the reactor with a new control and safety rod unit. The specific conditions at the AKR led to a new variant. Results of preliminary experiments, design and mode of operation of the first unit as well as hitherto gained operation experiences are presented. (author)

  1. Training Teachers in the United Kingdom for a Multicultural Society--The Rhetoric and the Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Keith

    1984-01-01

    Urges the introduction of more courses in multiracial and multicultural education in training institutions in the United Kingdom, rather than blaming the teachers for being racist and/or ethnocentric. In addition, a survey of teacher training institutions indicates that little is done in comparative education which would change ethnocentric…

  2. Impact of a mental health training course for correctional officers on a special housing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, George F

    2009-05-01

    This study determined the impact of a ten-hour mental health training program developed by the Indiana chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI-Indiana) for correctional officers on a prison special housing ("supermax") unit. The training was delivered to all of the correctional officers on the unit in five weekly sessions and was repeated 15 months later for new unit staff. The number of incidents reported by unit staff in standard monthly reports, consisting of use of force by the officers and battery by bodily waste on the officers by the offenders, was compared for the nine months before and after both training sessions. Attendance at the initial training ranged from 48 to 57 officers per session, and on the basis of Likert ratings, training was well received by the officers. The total number of incidents, the use of force by the officers, and battery by bodily waste all declined significantly after the first mental health training, and the total number of incidents and battery by bodily waste declined significantly after the second training. The provision of ten hours of mental health training to correctional officers was associated with a significant decline in use of force and battery by bodily waste.

  3. The relationship between internal medicine residency graduate performance on the ABIM certifying examination, yearly in-service training examinations, and the USMLE Step 1 examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Cynthia; Jackson, Jeffrey L; Frank, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To explore the relationship between United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 scores, yearly in-service training exam (ITE) scores, and passing the American Board of Internal Medicine certifying examination (ABIM-CE). The authors conducted a retrospective database review of internal medicine residents from the Medical College of Wisconsin from 2004 through 2012. Residents' USMLE Step 1, ITE, and ABIM-CE scores were extracted. Pearson rho, chi-square, and logistic regression were used to determine whether relationships existed between the scores and if Step 1 and ITE scores correlate with passing the ABIM-CE. There were 241 residents, who participated in 728 annual ITEs. There were Step 1 scores for 195 (81%) residents and ABIM-CE scores for 183 (76%). Step 1 and ABIM-CE scores had a modest correlation (rho: 0.59), as did ITE and ABIM-CE scores (rho: 0.48-0.67). Failing Step 1 or being in the bottom ITE quartile during any year of testing markedly increased likelihood of failing the boards (Step 1: relative risk [RR]: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.0-5.9; first-year residents' RR: 1.3; 95% CI: 1.0-1.6; second-year residents' RR: 1.3; 95% CI: 1.1-1.5; third-year residents' RR: 1.3; 95% CI: 1.1-1.5). USMLE Step 1 and ITE scores have a modest correlation with board scores. Failing Step 1 or scoring in the bottom quartile of the ITE increased the risk of failing the boards. What effective intervention, if any, program directors may use with at-risk residents is a question deserving further research.

  4. United States Japan Industry and Technology Management Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gercik, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    .... The intellectual focus of the Program is to integrate the research methodologies of the social sciences, the humanities, and technology to approach issues confronting the United States and Japan...

  5. A Study on Creative Drama in the Content of In-service Training with the Culture Teachers: Qualitative Analysis of the Participants’ Views

    OpenAIRE

    Akkocaoğlu Çayır, Nihan; Akhun, Burcu; Özdemir Şimşek, Pınar

    2016-01-01

    The teachers giving lectures on such subjects as arts, physical education, mathematics, philosophy, English apart from the professional courses at the Vocational High Schools are defined as the culture teachers. This research was conducted with 102 culture teachers who had taken a drama course in the content of in-service training. Before and after the practical drama course of 30 hours which included the characteristics of creative drama and its use as a method, open-ended questions were ask...

  6. 10 CFR 35.690 - Training for use of remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... radiation safety, radionuclide handling, treatment planning, quality assurance, and clinical use of... medical unit that includes— (i) 200 hours of classroom and laboratory training in the following areas— (A... administrative controls to prevent a medical event involving the use of byproduct material; (D) Implementing...

  7. Numerical simulation of aerodynamic performance of a couple multiple units high-speed train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ji-qiang; Zhou, Dan; Liu, Tang-hong; Liang, Xi-feng

    2017-05-01

    In order to determine the effect of the coupling region on train aerodynamic performance, and how the coupling region affects aerodynamic performance of the couple multiple units trains when they both run and pass each other in open air, the entrance of two such trains into a tunnel and their passing each other in the tunnel was simulated in Fluent 14.0. The numerical algorithm employed in this study was verified by the data of scaled and full-scale train tests, and the difference lies within an acceptable range. The results demonstrate that the distribution of aerodynamic forces on the train cars is altered by the coupling region; however, the coupling region has marginal effect on the drag and lateral force on the whole train under crosswind, and the lateral force on the train cars is more sensitive to couple multiple units compared to the other two force coefficients. It is also determined that the component of the coupling region increases the fluctuation of aerodynamic coefficients for each train car under crosswind. Affected by the coupling region, a positive pressure pulse was introduced in the alternating pressure produced by trains passing by each other in the open air, and the amplitude of the alternating pressure was decreased by the coupling region. The amplitude of the alternating pressure on the train or on the tunnel was significantly decreased by the coupling region of the train. This phenomenon did not alter the distribution law of pressure on the train and tunnel; moreover, the effect of the coupling region on trains passing by each other in the tunnel is stronger than that on a single train passing through the tunnel.

  8. In-service materials testing of selected components of unit 1 and 2 of V-1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cintula, J.

    1982-01-01

    The task of in-service nondestructive testing of nuclear installations is to confirm that the state of base material and welded joints has not changed owing to mechanical, thermal or radiation stress. Under the regulations of safe operation the first in-service inspection of all components of a WWER 440 reactor must be carried out after 15,000 to 2O,00O operating hours at the latest. Further in-service inspections are repeated after 30,000 hours (pressure vessels) and 40,000 hours (the main steam piping and the feedwater piping). Proceeding from experience gained so far, intervals are suggested for in-service checks of the other components of the V-1 nuclear power plant. Also briefly described are the main nondestructive methods used for such checks at this power plant. (Z.M.)

  9. Overcoming KC-10 Formal Training Unit Pilot Production Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    Additionally, KC-10s were used to support multiple Operation PHOENIX SCORPION contingencies beginning in November 1997 and through 1998 as well. KC-10s...and ACIQ syllabi recommend for training purposes. As part of determining sources of delay, qualitative data will be used to explain what is...bare hands in that arena, because we can’t teach you to learn how to use a spear. If we do, you might cut your finger while you’re learning." And

  10. United States Army physical readiness training: rationale and evaluation of the physical training doctrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J; Rieger, William; Palkoska, Frank; Van Camp, Steven; Darakjy, Salima

    2009-07-01

    This paper reviews the rationale and evaluations of Physical Readiness Training (PRT), the new U.S. Army physical training doctrine designed to improve soldiers' physical capability for military operations. The purposes of PRT are to improve physical fitness, prevent injuries, progressively train soldiers, and develop soldiers' self-confidence and discipline. The PRT follows the principles of progressive overload, regularity, specificity, precision, variety, and balance. Specificity was achieved by examining the standard list of military (warrior) tasks and determining 1) the physical requirements, 2) the fitness components involved, and 3) the training activities that most likely could improve the military tasks. Injury-prevention features include reduced running mileage, exercise variety (cross-training), and gradual, progressive training. In 3 military field studies, the overall adjusted risk of injury was 1.5-1.8 times higher in groups of soldiers performing traditional military physical training programs when compared with groups using a PRT program. Scores on the Army Physical Fitness Test were similar or higher in groups using PRT programs. In an 8-week laboratory study comparing PRT with a weightlifting/running program, both programs resulted in major improvements in militarily relevant tasks (e.g., 3.2-km walk/run with 32-kg load, 400-m run with 18-kg load, 5- to 30-second rushes to and from prone position, 80-kg casualty drag, obstacle course). When compared with traditional military physical training programs, PRT consistently resulted in fewer injuries and in equal or greater improvements in fitness and military task performance.

  11. Training model to institutionalize population education in the in-service education programme for elementary school teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugenia, M E

    1982-12-01

    The goal of the Philippine Population Education Program (PEP) since its inception in 1972 is to institutionalize population education in the formal educational system. The PEP Training Section views institutionalization of population education in the inservice education program for elementary school teachers as part of the process of making it an integral part of that program. In practice elementary school teachers periodically attend training programs organized by division or district supervisors and school principals. This is the usual modality through which teachers are updated on or informed about new thrusts and recent developments in teaching content, strategies, and methodologies. In this context, the PEP Training Section convened a seminar workshop in December 1981 for 10 subject area supervisors from the 3 large geographic island groups of Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao. They represented 10 school divisions and subject areas where population education is integrated. The specific objectives of the 5 day activity were to: discuss existing inservice training programs in the school divisions; prepare a training model incorporating population education in the overall division inservice training program; and develop a content chart or a listing of topical areas on population education for the training model. 1 of the outputs of the seminar workshop was a training model incorporating population education in the regular inservice training programs using 3 delivery schemes, i.e., seminar workship on the teaching of specific subject areas; district staff meeting and/or echo seminars organized by district supervisors following division seminars; and regular teachers' meeting at the school level organized by school principals. Another output was a content chart listing suggested topics in population education classified according to subject areas into which they will be incorporated. The semninar workshop concluded with a plan to try out the model using the identified

  12. Cuatro Modelos para Disenar Actividades de Capacitacion de Docentes (Four Models to Design In-Service Teacher Training Activities).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Victor M.

    In designing inservice teacher training activities, it is necessary to apply educational principles and teaching and learning techniques which are suitable for adult education programs. Four models for designing inservice teacher training programs are the Malcom Knowles Model, the Leonard Nadler Model, the Cyril O. Houle Model, and the William R.…

  13. Communicating about Death and Dying: Developing Training for Staff Working in Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene; Rose, Tracey; Grant, Robert; Wijne, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many people with intellectual disabilities are affected by death, yet conversations about death are often avoided by staff working with them. This study aimed to assess staff training needs and to develop, trial and evaluate a training course on communicating about death and dying. Method:(i) Semi-structured interviews with 20 staff in…

  14. Health worker performance in the management of paediatric fevers following in-service training and exposure to job aids in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Jane

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving the way artemether-lumefantrine (AL is provided to patients attending clinics is critical to maximize the benefit of this new medicine. In 2007, a new initiative was launched in one part of Kenya to improve malaria case-management through enhanced in-service training and provision of job aids. Methods An evaluation of the intervention using pre- and post-intervention cross sectional health facility surveys was conducted in Bondo district. The surveys included: audit of government health facilities, health worker structured interviews and exit interviews with caretakers of sick children below five years of age. The outcome indicators were the proportions of febrile children who had AL prescribed, AL dispensed, and four different dispensing and counseling tasks performed. Results At baseline 33 government health facilities, 48 health workers and 386 febrile child consultations were evaluated. At follow-up the same health facilities were surveyed and 36 health workers and 390 febrile child consultations evaluated. The findings show: 1 no health facility or health worker was exposed to all components of the intervention; 2 the proportion of health workers who received the enhanced in-service training was 67%; 3 the proportion of febrile children with uncomplicated malaria treated with the first-line anti-malarial drug, artemether-lumefantrine (AL, at health facilities where AL was in stock increased from 76.9% (95%CI: 69.4, 83.1 to 87.6% (95% CI: 82.5, 91.5; 4 there were modest but non-significant improvements in dispensing and counseling practices; and 5 when the analyses were restricted to health workers who received the enhanced in-service training and/or had received new guidelines and job aids, no significant improvements in reported case-management tasks were observed compared to baseline. Conclusion In-service training and provision of job aids alone may not be adequate to improve the prescribing, dispensing and

  15. Health worker performance in the management of paediatric fevers following in-service training and exposure to job aids in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasunna, Beatrice; Zurovac, Dejan; Bruce, Jane; Jones, Caroline; Webster, Jayne; Snow, Robert W

    2010-09-18

    Improving the way artemether-lumefantrine (AL) is provided to patients attending clinics is critical to maximize the benefit of this new medicine. In 2007, a new initiative was launched in one part of Kenya to improve malaria case-management through enhanced in-service training and provision of job aids. An evaluation of the intervention using pre- and post-intervention cross sectional health facility surveys was conducted in Bondo district. The surveys included: audit of government health facilities, health worker structured interviews and exit interviews with caretakers of sick children below five years of age. The outcome indicators were the proportions of febrile children who had AL prescribed, AL dispensed, and four different dispensing and counseling tasks performed. At baseline 33 government health facilities, 48 health workers and 386 febrile child consultations were evaluated. At follow-up the same health facilities were surveyed and 36 health workers and 390 febrile child consultations evaluated. The findings show: 1) no health facility or health worker was exposed to all components of the intervention; 2) the proportion of health workers who received the enhanced in-service training was 67%; 3) the proportion of febrile children with uncomplicated malaria treated with the first-line anti-malarial drug, artemether-lumefantrine (AL), at health facilities where AL was in stock increased from 76.9% (95%CI: 69.4, 83.1) to 87.6% (95% CI: 82.5, 91.5); 4) there were modest but non-significant improvements in dispensing and counseling practices; and 5) when the analyses were restricted to health workers who received the enhanced in-service training and/or had received new guidelines and job aids, no significant improvements in reported case-management tasks were observed compared to baseline. In-service training and provision of job aids alone may not be adequate to improve the prescribing, dispensing and counseling tasks necessary to change malaria case

  16. Determining the environmental training needs and training preferences of tribal officials on reservations in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Jeeta Lakhani

    The problem of this research was to determine the priority environmental management training needs (drinking water, wastewater, and solid waste), classroom training system preferences and related cultural factors of Native American tribal officials with environmental responsibilities living on reservations in the United States. The researcher conducted telephone interviews with 18 tribal officials on reservations in diverse geographic areas of the United States to determine their classroom training preferences. These officials also responded to a mail/fax survey comprised of 28 statements describing their environmental responsibilities in the areas of drinking water, wastewater, and solid waste. Tribal officials indicated how important the statements were according to them on a scale of 1--5 (1 being low importance and 5 being high importance). Tribal officials also indicated their ability to perform in the stated areas on a scale of 1 to 5 (1 being low ability and 5 being high ability). It was found that tribal officials felt they needed training in the areas of: (1) Solid Waste: Awareness of conventional and alternative solid waste management strategies as well as assessing the reservation's need related to solid waste management. (2) Regional or Inter-Governmental Strategies : Working with the federal, and, state governments for enforcing and developing regulations. (3) Drinking water: Assessing the reservation's drinking water needs and awareness of conventional and alternative drinking water systems. (4) Training for environmental staff: Determining and planning training for environmental personnel is another area of need indicated by the responding tribal officials. (5) Wastewater : Assessing the reservations wastewater needs, compliance and liability issues and awareness of alternative and conventional wastewater systems. It was also found that tribal officials preferred: (1) Trainers who were knowledgeable about the subject matter and tribal culture

  17. Building capacity for Health Impact Assessment: Training outcomes from the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchter, Joseph [Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutt, Candace, E-mail: awr8@cdc.gov [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, 4770 Buford Highway MS/F-77, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States); Satariano, William A. [University of California Berkeley, School of Public Health, Division of Community Health and Human Development, Berkeley, CA (United States); Seto, Edmund [University of Washington, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Background: Despite the continued growth of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) in the US, there is little research on HIA capacity-building. A comprehensive study of longer-term training outcomes may reveal opportunities for improving capacity building activities and HIA practice. Methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with HIA trainees in the United States to assess their outcomes and needs. Using a training evaluation framework, we measured outcomes across a spectrum of reaction, learning, behavior and results. Results: From 2006 to 2012, four organizations trained over 2200 people in at least 75 in-person HIA trainings in 29 states. We interviewed 48 trainees, selected both randomly and purposefully. The mean duration between training and interview was 3.4 years. Trainees reported that their training objectives were met, especially when relevant case-studies were used. They established new collaborations at the trainings and maintained them. Training appeared to catalyze more holistic thinking and practice, including a range of HIA-related activities. Many trainees disseminated what they learned and engaged in components of HIA, even without dedicated funding. Going forward, trainees need assistance with quantitative methods, project management, community engagement, framing recommendations, and evaluation. Conclusions: The research revealed opportunities for a range of HIA stakeholders to refine and coordinate training resources, apply a competency framework and leverage complimentary workforce development efforts, and sensitize and build the capacity of communities. - Highlights: • We interviewed HIA trainees in the United States to assess longer-term outcomes. • Training appeared to catalyze a range of beneficial partnerships and activities. • Trainees reported outstanding needs for specific skills and competencies. • There are various opportunities to improve training and capacity-building.

  18. Building capacity for Health Impact Assessment: Training outcomes from the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuchter, Joseph; Rutt, Candace; Satariano, William A.; Seto, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the continued growth of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) in the US, there is little research on HIA capacity-building. A comprehensive study of longer-term training outcomes may reveal opportunities for improving capacity building activities and HIA practice. Methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with HIA trainees in the United States to assess their outcomes and needs. Using a training evaluation framework, we measured outcomes across a spectrum of reaction, learning, behavior and results. Results: From 2006 to 2012, four organizations trained over 2200 people in at least 75 in-person HIA trainings in 29 states. We interviewed 48 trainees, selected both randomly and purposefully. The mean duration between training and interview was 3.4 years. Trainees reported that their training objectives were met, especially when relevant case-studies were used. They established new collaborations at the trainings and maintained them. Training appeared to catalyze more holistic thinking and practice, including a range of HIA-related activities. Many trainees disseminated what they learned and engaged in components of HIA, even without dedicated funding. Going forward, trainees need assistance with quantitative methods, project management, community engagement, framing recommendations, and evaluation. Conclusions: The research revealed opportunities for a range of HIA stakeholders to refine and coordinate training resources, apply a competency framework and leverage complimentary workforce development efforts, and sensitize and build the capacity of communities. - Highlights: • We interviewed HIA trainees in the United States to assess longer-term outcomes. • Training appeared to catalyze a range of beneficial partnerships and activities. • Trainees reported outstanding needs for specific skills and competencies. • There are various opportunities to improve training and capacity-building

  19. Suicide Prevention Training: Policies for Health Care Professionals Across the United States as of October 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Janessa M; Mackelprang, Jessica L; Van Natta, Sara E; Holliday, Carrie

    2018-06-01

    To identify and compare state policies for suicide prevention training among health care professionals across the United States and benchmark state plan updates against national recommendations set by the surgeon general and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention in 2012. We searched state legislation databases to identify policies, which we described and characterized by date of adoption, target audience, and duration and frequency of the training. We used descriptive statistics to summarize state-by-state variation in suicide education policies. In the United States, as of October 9, 2017, 10 (20%) states had passed legislation mandating health care professionals complete suicide prevention training, and 7 (14%) had policies encouraging training. The content and scope of policies varied substantially. Most states (n = 43) had a state suicide prevention plan that had been revised since 2012, but 7 lacked an updated plan. Considerable variation in suicide prevention training for health care professionals exists across the United States. There is a need for consistent polices in suicide prevention training across the nation to better equip health care providers to address the needs of patients who may be at risk for suicide.

  20. Differences between rural and urban primary care units in Turkey: Implications on residents′ training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Yikilkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Family practice training takes place at primary care based training centers linked to Education and Research State Hospitals in Turkey. There is a discussion if these units are adequate to train primary care staff and if the patients of these units reflect the applicants of primary care. Aims: The aim of our study is to investigate the demographic characteristics, the effect of distance on primary care utilization, and most common diagnosis of the patients who applied to two different outpatient clinics: One urban and one rural. Settings and Design: Study was conducted from the electronic health records of the patients applied to outpatient clinics of Ankara Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit Training and Research Hospital Department of Family Medicine between 1 January and 31 December 2009. Results: Total number of patients applied to both of the outpatient clinics was 34,632 [urban clinic: 16.506 (47.7%, rural clinic: 18.126 (52.3%]. Leading three diagnoses were upper respiratory tract infection (URTI, general medical examination (GME, and hypertension (HT in the most common 10 diagnosis. Conclusion: In our study, the rural outpatient clinic is regarded as a primary care unit in the neighborhood of living area and the urban clinic as close to working environment. We found statistically meaningful differences in most common diagnosis, gender, age, and consultation time between the rural and urban clinics. According to our results, family practitioners′ field training should take place at different primary care units according to sociodemographic characteristics of each country.

  1. Training for the future NHS: training junior doctors in the United Kingdom within the 48-hour European working time directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Shreelatta T; Davies, Sally J

    2014-01-01

    Since August 2009, the National Health Service of the United Kingdom has faced the challenge of delivering training for junior doctors within a 48-hour working week, as stipulated by the European Working Time Directive and legislated in the UK by the Working Time Regulations 1998. Since that time, widespread concern has been expressed about the impact of restricted duty hours on the quality of postgraduate medical training in the UK, particularly in the "craft" specialties--that is, those disciplines in which trainees develop practical skills that are best learned through direct experience with patients. At the same time, specialist training in the UK has experienced considerable change since 2007 with the introduction of competency-based specialty curricula, workplace-based assessment, and the annual review of competency progression. The challenges presented by the reduction of duty hours include increased pressure on doctors-in-training to provide service during evening and overnight hours, reduced interaction with supervisors, and reduced opportunities for learning. This paper explores these challenges and proposes potential responses with respect to the reorganization of training and service provision.

  2. Determinants of Effective Unit Performance: Research on Measuring and Managing Unit Training Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    underlies it. However, it can be suppressed through harsh discipline and cultural beliefs. Often the lack of will to fight can be a subconscious ...modified easily without major reprogramming of software. The military still has very limited experience applying 264 Meliza, Bessemer, and Hiller DIS to...skills, equipment maintenance), and CORRECTING WEAKNESSES through immediate re- play or through reprogramming of necessary training. These

  3. Compex system for teaching and training operators for TPP and NPP power units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiptsyura, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Requirements, taken as a principle for constructing the system for operator teaching and training (OTT), have been formulated on the basis of investigation of operators' work at TPP and NPP power units. Functional structure and a structural block-diagram for OTT are built. As a criterion, which determines the structure of any trainers, being a part of OTT a requirement has been chosen satisfying the correspondence beetween habits developed with the help of trainers and habits of real operators' work. Results of analysis permit to confirm that refusal or under statement of the role of any stage of operator training leads to reduction of quality of his training

  4. Review of laparoscopic training in pediatric surgery in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormer, Emma J; Sabharwal, Atul J

    2009-04-01

    To review the exposure pediatric surgery trainees have to laparoscopic surgery in the United Kingdom (UK). A confidential postal questionnaire was sent to all trainees working at registrar level in centers responsible for pediatric surgical training in the UK. Questions assessed the number of consultants with an interest in laparoscopic surgery, types of cases performed laparoscopically, and trainees' role in laparoscopic appendicectomy (LA). Questionnaires were sent to 112 trainees with a 55% response rate (62 replies). At least one response was received from each unit. Based on responses, 49 to 67 consultants in 21 training centers have an interest in laparoscopic surgery (0%-100% of consultants per unit). LA was offered in 20 out of 21 training centers. There was no significant difference in the proportion of appendicectomies performed laparoscopically by junior (years 1-3) and senior (years 4-6) trainees. A significantly higher proportion of junior trainees had not performed any LAs (P = 0.02). Seventy-three percent of trainees were the principal operator. For trainees who were principal operators, the cameraperson was a consultant in 52% and a junior trainee in 17%. The time of day affected the likelihood of a procedure being carried out laparoscopically in 43 (81%) responses. The majority of trainees' exposure to laparoscopic surgery could be viewed as suboptimal; however, the exposure gained varies significantly between different units throughout the UK. In an age moving in favor of minimal access surgery, all units must be in a position to offer pediatric laparoscopic surgical training.

  5. Blood Pressure Directed Booster Trainings Improve Intensive Care Unit Provider Retention of Excellent Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Heather; Maltese, Matthew R; Niles, Dana E; Fischman, Elizabeth; Legkobitova, Veronika; Leffelman, Jessica; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Sutton, Robert M

    2015-11-01

    Brief, intermittent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training sessions, "Booster Trainings," improve CPR skill acquisition and short-term retention. The objective of this study was to incorporate arterial blood pressure (ABP) tracings into Booster Trainings to improve CPR skill retention. We hypothesized that ABP-directed CPR "Booster Trainings" would improve intensive care unit (ICU) provider 3-month retention of excellent CPR skills without need for interval retraining. A CPR manikin creating a realistic relationship between chest compression depth and ABP was used for training/testing. Thirty-six ICU providers were randomized to brief, bedside ABP-directed CPR manikin skill retrainings: (1) Booster Plus (ABP visible during training and testing) versus (2) Booster Alone (ABP visible only during training, not testing) versus (3) control (testing, no intervention). Subjects completed skill tests pretraining (baseline), immediately after training (acquisition), and then retention was assessed at 12 hours, 3 and 6 months. The primary outcome was retention of excellent CPR skills at 3 months. Excellent CPR was defined as systolic blood pressure of 100 mm Hg or higher and compression rate 100 to 120 per minute. Overall, 14 of 24 (58%) participants acquired excellent CPR skills after their initial training (Booster Plus 75% vs 50% Booster Alone, P = 0.21). Adjusted for age, ABP-trained providers were 5.2× more likely to perform excellent CPR after the initial training (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.3-21.2; P = 0.02), and to retain these skills at 12 hours (adjusted odds ratio, 4.4; 95% CI, 1.3-14.9; P = 0.018) and 3 months (adjusted odds ratio, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.2-13.9; P = 0.023) when compared to baseline performance. The ABP-directed CPR booster trainings improved ICU provider 3-month retention of excellent CPR skills without the need for interval retraining.

  6. Scaling up family medicine training in Gezira, Sudan - a 2-year in-service master programme using modern information and communication technology: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Khalid G; Hunskaar, Steinar; Abdelrahman, Samira Hamid; Malik, Elfatih M

    2014-01-21

    In 2010 the Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) was initiated in Gezira state, Sudan, designed as an in-service training model. The project is a collaboration project between the University of Gezira, which aims to provide a 2-year master's programme in family medicine for practicing doctors, and the Ministry of Health, which facilitates service provision and funds the training programme. This paper presents the programme, the teaching environment, and the first batch of candidates enrolled. In this study a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect baseline data at the start of the project from doctors who joined the programme. A checklist was also used to assess the health centres where they work. A total of 188 out of 207 doctors responded (91%), while data were gathered from all 158 health centres (100%) staffed by the programme candidates. The Gezira model of in-service family medicine training has succeeded in recruiting 207 candidates in its first batch, providing health services in 158 centres, of which 84 had never been served by a doctor before. The curriculum is community oriented. The mean age of doctors was 32.5 years, 57% were males, and 32% were graduates from the University of Gezira. Respondents stated high confidence in practicing some skills such as asthma management and post-abortion uterine evacuation. They were least confident in other skills such as managing depression or inserting an intrauterine device. The majority of health centres was poorly equipped for management of noncommunicable diseases, as only 10% had an electrocardiography machine (ECG), 5% had spirometer, and 1% had a defibrillator. The Gezira model has responded to local health system needs. Use of modern information and communication technology is used to facilitate both health service provision and training. The GFMP represents an example of a large-volume scaling-up programme of family medicine in Africa.

  7. Scaling up family medicine training in Gezira, Sudan – a 2-year in-service master programme using modern information and communication technology: a survey study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 the Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) was initiated in Gezira state, Sudan, designed as an in-service training model. The project is a collaboration project between the University of Gezira, which aims to provide a 2-year master’s programme in family medicine for practicing doctors, and the Ministry of Health, which facilitates service provision and funds the training programme. This paper presents the programme, the teaching environment, and the first batch of candidates enrolled. Methods In this study a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect baseline data at the start of the project from doctors who joined the programme. A checklist was also used to assess the health centres where they work. A total of 188 out of 207 doctors responded (91%), while data were gathered from all 158 health centres (100%) staffed by the programme candidates. Results The Gezira model of in-service family medicine training has succeeded in recruiting 207 candidates in its first batch, providing health services in 158 centres, of which 84 had never been served by a doctor before. The curriculum is community oriented. The mean age of doctors was 32.5 years, 57% were males, and 32% were graduates from the University of Gezira. Respondents stated high confidence in practicing some skills such as asthma management and post-abortion uterine evacuation. They were least confident in other skills such as managing depression or inserting an intrauterine device. The majority of health centres was poorly equipped for management of noncommunicable diseases, as only 10% had an electrocardiography machine (ECG), 5% had spirometer, and 1% had a defibrillator. Conclusions The Gezira model has responded to local health system needs. Use of modern information and communication technology is used to facilitate both health service provision and training. The GFMP represents an example of a large-volume scaling-up programme of family medicine in Africa. PMID:24443978

  8. Agroforestry In-Service Training. A Training Aid for Asia & the Pacific Islands (Honiara, Solomon Islands, South Pacific, October 23-29, 1983). Training for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Training Manual No. T-16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillion, Jacob; Weeks, Julius

    The Forestry/Natural Resources Sector in the Office of Training and Program Support of the Peace Corps conducted an agroforestry inservice training workshop in Honiara, Solomon Islands, in 1983. Participants included Peace Corps volunteers and their host country national counterparts from six countries of the Pacific Islands and Asia (Western…

  9. The effect of stress fracture interventions in a single elite infantry training unit (1983-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Charles; Finestone, Aharon S

    2017-10-01

    Stress fractures can be seen as an undesired byproduct of demanding physical training. The threshold value of stress that places an individual bone at high risk for stress fracture has not been identified. In a prospective study of stress fractures in 1983, a 31% incidence was found during demanding Israeli infantry basic training by bone scan criteria. Within a subgroup of these recruits, an elite infantry unit was found to have a 40% incidence. Since then and until 2015, eight additional induction companies of the same elite infantry unit were prospectively monitored for stress fractures during their basic training. In all of the studies, stress fracture surveillance and the examining orthopedist were the same. A retrospective review of all nine studies and of eight training changes was performed to look for a temporal trend in stress fracture incidence and to see if these might be related to training changes. There was a statistically significant trend for lower radiological proven stress fractures (p=0.0001) and radiological proven stress fractures plus clinical stress fractures (p=0.0013), as well as lower stress fracture severity by radiological criteria (p=0.0001) between 1983 and 2015. The only training change that was associated, by multivariate logistic regression, with a decreased incidence of stress fracture was restricting training to the authorized training protocol (odds ratio, 3874; 95% CI, 1.526 to 9.931; p=0.004). Increased recruit weight was found by multivariate analysis to be associated with lower stress fracture incidence (odds ratio 1.034; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.070; p=0.051). Moving the training to a base with flatter terrain and reducing the formal marching distance by 1/3 was associated with a decrease in high grade stress fractures (odds ratio, 10.03; 95% CI, 3.5 to 28.4; p=0.0001). Neither the combined changes of enforcing a seven hour a night sleep regimen, training in more comfortable boots and adding a physical therapist to the unit nor

  10. The Impact of ICT Training Through Wikis on In-Service EFL Teachers: Changes in Beliefs, Attitudes, and Competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamith José Fandiño Parra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of information and communication technology (ICT invites teachers to abandon traditional roles and act more as mentors, exploring the new media themselves as learners and thus acting as role models for their students (Fitzpatrick & Davies, 2003. For turning students into producers of online content and creating a collaborative learning environment, wikis appear to help foreign language teachers to infuse ICT in their classrooms (Kovacic, Bubas & Zlatovic, 2007. Within this context, results from an action research project carried out in four public schools suggest that beliefs, attitudes, and competencies can be impacted positively when working on the use of new technologies with in-service English teachers.

  11. Impact of an In-Service Training in Neurocognitive Insights on Teacher Stress, Teacher Professionalism and Teacher Student Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneyers, Elien; Jacobs, Karen; Struyf, Elke

    2016-01-01

    The stressful nature of the teaching profession is recognised worldwide. Consistent with the recent international attention regarding the connection between neurocognition and education, the study "Learn2be@school" introduced a training for teachers about the occurrence of stress and the relationship between human behaviour and the…

  12. La Capacitacion de Docentes en el Marco de la Regionalizacion Educativa (In-Service Teacher Training within Educational Regional Planning).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Victor M.

    A paper discusses inservice teacher training in the context of regionalized education, with reference to recent Latin American efforts to regionalize, decentralize, and de-concentrate educational systems in order to provide relavant and adequate regional educational systems and so make equal education possible. Basic concepts in regionalized…

  13. Ecological Systems Theory: Using Spheres of Influence to Support Small-unit Climate and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    identifying the model’s elements and influential individuals, define spheres of influence and construct a model that details the ecological systems...Research Report 1997 Ecological Systems Theory: Using Spheres of Influence to Support Small-unit Climate and Training...Technical review by: Sena Garven, U.S. Army Research Institute Michael D. Wood , Walter Reed Army Institute of Research

  14. Crew resource management training in the intensive care unit. A multisite controlled before–after study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, Peter F.; de Bruijne, Martine; van Dyck, C.; Wagner, Cordula

    Introduction There is a growing awareness today that adverse events in the intensive care unit (ICU) are more often caused by problems related to non-technical skills than by a lack of technical, or clinical, expertise. Team training, such as crew resource management (CRM), aims to improve these

  15. Crew resource management training in the intensive care unit: a multisite controlled before-after study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, P.F.; Bruijne, M. de; Dyck, C. van; So, R.L.; Tangkau, P.; Wagner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a growing awareness today that adverse events in the intensive care unit (ICU) are more often caused by problems related to non-technical skills than by a lack of technical, or clinical, expertise. Team training, such as crew resource management (CRM), aims to improve these

  16. The effect of training on noise reduction in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calikusu Incekar, Mujde; Balci, Serap

    2017-07-01

    Noise, an environmental stimulus, is especially important in the neurobehavioral development of newborns and brain development of infants at high risk. Conditions in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) may cause certain sensory stimuli that are not appropriate for the development of newborns, especially preterm infants. This study was conducted in order to determine noise levels in the NICU and to evaluate the effect of training provided for noise control. This study was conducted as a pretest-posttest quasiexperimental design between September and November 2014 in a 30-bed NICU of a tertiary hospital in Istanbul. A sample group consisting of 30 people (26 nurses, 4 care workers). Noise measurement devices were used in the Training Program of Noise Control. Of the health professionals, 96.7% were women, 86.7% were nurses, and 63.3% were university graduates. Some 36.7% of the health professionals had worked within the unit for more than 5 years. Noise measurements of full implementations were made over three 24-h periods. Noise measurements were taken before and after the training on Monday, Friday, and Sunday. Noise levels after training diminished in all three measurements, and the decrease was found statistically significant (P Noise Control Training for health professionals who work in NICUs is an effective way of reducing noise. We recommend that this training should be given to NICU health professionals and noise levels should be determined through measurements at specific times. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The transition to competency-based pediatric training in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Halah; Al Tatari, Hossam; Holmboe, Eric S

    2015-04-01

    Although competency-based medical education has become the standard for physician training in the West, many developing countries have not yet adopted competency-based training. In 2009 in the United Arab Emirates, the government regulatory and operational authorities for healthcare in Abu Dhabi mandated a wide-scale reform of the emirate's postgraduate residency programs to the competency-based framework of the newly formed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-International (ACGME-I). This article briefly describes the rationale for competency-based medical education and provides an overview of the transition from traditional, time-based residency training to competency-based postgraduate medical education for the Pediatrics residency programs in Abu Dhabi. We will provide data on the initial impact of this transition on resident performance and patient outcomes in a Pediatrics residency program in an academic medical center in the United Arab Emirates.

  18. A multi-method approach to curriculum development for in-service training in China's newly established health emergency response offices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadong Wang

    Full Text Available To describe an innovative approach for developing and implementing an in-service curriculum in China for staff of the newly established health emergency response offices (HEROs, and that is generalisable to other settings.The multi-method training needs assessment included reviews of the competency domains needed to implement the International Health Regulations (2005 as well as China's policies and emergency regulations. The review, iterative interviews and workshops with experts in government, academia, the military, and with HERO staff were reviewed critically by an expert technical advisory panel.Over 1600 participants contributed to curriculum development. Of the 18 competency domains identified as essential for HERO staff, nine were developed into priority in-service training modules to be conducted over 2.5 weeks. Experts from academia and experienced practitioners prepared and delivered each module through lectures followed by interactive problem-solving exercises and desktop simulations to help trainees apply, experiment with, and consolidate newly acquired knowledge and skills.This study adds to the emerging literature on China's enduring efforts to strengthen its emergency response capabilities since the outbreak of SARS in 2003. The multi-method approach to curriculum development in partnership with senior policy-makers, researchers, and experienced practitioners can be applied in other settings to ensure training is responsive and customized to local needs, resources and priorities. Ongoing curriculum development should reflect international standards and be coupled with the development of appropriate performance support systems at the workplace for motivating staff to apply their newly acquired knowledge and skills effectively and creatively.

  19. A multi-method approach to curriculum development for in-service training in China's newly established health emergency response offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yadong; Li, Xiangrui; Yuan, Yiwen; Patel, Mahomed S

    2014-01-01

    To describe an innovative approach for developing and implementing an in-service curriculum in China for staff of the newly established health emergency response offices (HEROs), and that is generalisable to other settings. The multi-method training needs assessment included reviews of the competency domains needed to implement the International Health Regulations (2005) as well as China's policies and emergency regulations. The review, iterative interviews and workshops with experts in government, academia, the military, and with HERO staff were reviewed critically by an expert technical advisory panel. Over 1600 participants contributed to curriculum development. Of the 18 competency domains identified as essential for HERO staff, nine were developed into priority in-service training modules to be conducted over 2.5 weeks. Experts from academia and experienced practitioners prepared and delivered each module through lectures followed by interactive problem-solving exercises and desktop simulations to help trainees apply, experiment with, and consolidate newly acquired knowledge and skills. This study adds to the emerging literature on China's enduring efforts to strengthen its emergency response capabilities since the outbreak of SARS in 2003. The multi-method approach to curriculum development in partnership with senior policy-makers, researchers, and experienced practitioners can be applied in other settings to ensure training is responsive and customized to local needs, resources and priorities. Ongoing curriculum development should reflect international standards and be coupled with the development of appropriate performance support systems at the workplace for motivating staff to apply their newly acquired knowledge and skills effectively and creatively.

  20. Training to be an historian of anesthesia: options at universities in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Karishma R; Desai, Sukumar P

    2013-08-01

    To determine whether a lack of training opportunities explains the finding that few anesthesia historians have obtained formal training in history. Prospective study. University hospital. A list of 128 medical schools within the United States (U.S.) was obtained from the Association of American Medical Colleges and information about graduate programs in history, history of science, and history of medicine was gathered. Editorial board members of journals affiliated with professional associations in history, history of science, and history of medicine were also queried. We were unable to identify any U.S. institution that offered graduate training in history of anesthesia, while only a handful offered such training in history of medicine. As a result, individuals wishing to pursue doctoral training in history of medicine often enroll in programs devoted to history of science, but with an emphasis on medicine. The vast majority of affiliated universities offer doctoral programs in history. We identified programs that may be considered centers of excellence based on affiliations of editorial board members. Graduate training in history of anesthesia is currently unavailable, and specific opportunities in history of medicine are quite limited. Individuals wishing to obtain formal training in history of anesthesia need to enroll in a history of science or history of medicine program, and choose a research topic in history of anesthesia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Inspiratory muscle training is used in some intensive care units, but many training methods have uncertain efficacy: a survey of French physiotherapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Bonnevie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Questions: How common is inspiratory muscle training by physiotherapists in the intensive care unit (ICU? Which patients receive the training? What methods are used to administer the training? Is maximal inspiratory pressure used to evaluate the need for the training and the patient's outcome after training? Design: Cross-sectional survey of all ICUs in France. Participants: Two hundred and sixty-five senior physiotherapists. Results: The response rate was 99% among eligible units. Therapist experience in ICU was significantly associated with the use of inspiratory muscle training (p = 0.02. Therapists mainly used inspiratory muscle training either systematically or specifically in patients who failed to wean from mechanical ventilation. The training was used significantly more in non-sedated patients (p < 0.0001. The most commonly nominated technique that respondents claimed to use to apply the training was controlled diaphragmatic breathing (83% of respondents, whereas 13% used evidence-based methods. Among those who applied some form of inspiratory muscle training, 16% assessed maximal inspiratory pressure. Six respondents (2%, 95% CI 1 to 5 used both an evidence-based method to administer inspiratory muscle training and the recommended technique for assessment of inspiratory muscle strength. Conclusion: Most physiotherapists in French ICUs who apply inspiratory muscle training use methods of uncertain efficacy without assessment of maximal inspiratory pressure. Further efforts need to be made in France to disseminate information regarding evidence-based assessment and techniques for inspiratory muscle training in the ICU. The alignment of inspiratory muscle training practice with evidence could be investigated in other regions. [Bonnevie T, Villiot-Danger J-C, Gravier F-E, Dupuis J, Prieur G, Médrinal C (2015 Inspiratory muscle training is used in some intensive care units, but many training methods have uncertain efficacy: a survey of

  2. The 1978 first in-service inspection of the reactor pressure vessel of the second unit of the Greifswald nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, D.; Busch, R.; Hildebrandt, E.; Redlich, K.H.

    1979-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel and the primary coolant circuit of the second 440-MW(e) unit of the Greifswald nuclear power plant were subjected to an in-service inspection. Extent of the inspection, development and construction of a reactor inspection container as well as the nondestructive materials testing methods used are described. Further, problems of performing the inspection, such as needs of time and personnel and radiation exposure, are considered. Finally, it is stated that the reactor pressure vessel was in safe operating state. (author)

  3. 78 FR 18325 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Formal Training Unit (FTU) and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... Statement (EIS) for the Formal Training Unit (FTU) and Main Operating Base 1 (MOB 1) for the Beddown of KC... Statement (EIS) for the Formal Training Unit (FTU) and Main Operating Base 1 (MOB 1) for the Beddown of KC...-46A tanker aircraft, associated infrastructure and manpower of the FTU and MOB 1 at existing active...

  4. Delivery Strategies to Enhance the Sustainability of Training: Lessons from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rosa, Cecilia; Nadeau, Andrew; Hernandez, Emilio; Kafeero, Fred; Zahiga, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) utilizes training as a major component of the support it provides to its member countries in Africa. In the past, stand-alone training events targeting individual actors were the norm. However, an external evaluation indicated that this type of training scores low in terms of…

  5. Needs assessment of science teachers in secondary schools in Kumasi, Ghana: A basis for in-service education training programs at the Science Resource Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyamfi, Alexander

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, it identified the priority needs common to all science teachers in secondary schools in Kumasi, Ghana. Second, it investigated the relationship existing between the identified priority needs and the teacher demographic variables (type of school, teacher qualification, teaching experience, subject discipline, and sex of teacher) to be used as a basis for implementing in-service education training programs at the Science Resource Centers in Kumasi Ghana. An adapted version of the Moore Assessment Profile (MAP) survey instrument and a set of open-ended questions were used to collect data from the science teachers. The researcher handed out one hundred and fifty questionnaire packets, and all one hundred and fifty (100%) were collected within a period of six weeks. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, content analysis, and inferential statistics. The descriptive statistics reported the frequency of responses, and it was used to calculate the Need Index (N) of the identified needs of teachers. Sixteen top-priority needs were identified, and the needs were arranged in a hierarchical order according to the magnitude of the Need Index (0.000 ≤ N ≤ 1.000). Content analysis was used to analyze the responses to the open-ended questions. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the null hypotheses of the study on each of the sixteen identified top-priority needs and the teacher demographic variables. The findings of this study were as follows: (1) The science teachers identified needs related to "more effective use of instructional materials" as a crucial area for in-service training. (2) Host and Satellite schools exhibited significant difference on procuring supplementary science books for students. Subject discipline of teachers exhibited significant differences on utilizing the library and its facilities by students, obtaining information on where to get help on effective science teaching

  6. Effect of Mandatory Unit and Individual Physical Training on Fitness in Military Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Morgan K; Grier, Tyson; Canham-Chervak, Michelle; Bushman, Timothy T; Nindl, Bradley C; Jones, Bruce H

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to look at the effect of additional individual physical training (PT) in addition to mandatory unit PT as well as other risk factors on physical fitness. A cross-sectional design. This study was conducted on a US military installation. Participants were 6290 male and 558 female active duty US Army soldiers in 3 light infantry brigades. Participants completed self-administered questionnaires asking about individual characteristics, PT, and physical fitness. Cut points were established for soldiers scoring within the top 33% for each of the 3 Army Physical Fitness Test events (2-mile run, sit-ups, and push-ups) and top 50% in each of the tests combined for overall performance. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals from multivariate analyses were calculated. Variables impacting physical fitness performance of men and women included increased body mass index, leading unit PT sessions, and individual distance running mileage. Other variables impacting physical performance for men included increased age, smoking, and individual resistance training. Soldiers performing additional individual PT demonstrated a positive influence on fitness compared to unit PT participation alone. Increased age and being overweight/obese negatively influenced physical fitness. To enhance fitness performance through unit PT, running by ability groups and resistance training should be encouraged by leadership.

  7. Nuclear Education & Training — Showcasing the Best Practices of the United Kingdom and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dato Syed Ahmad Idid, S.N. K. A.-I.

    2015-01-01

    Skilled, competent and sufficient human resources is fundamental for the safe and successful implementation and expansion of a nuclear power programme (NPP). As nuclear education and training (E&T) stakeholders deliberate and discuss to identify suitable syllabus and courses to offer for education and training to support NPP, it is critical that the nuclear fuel cycle as well as the nuclear power value-chain is taken into consideration in the selection and introduction of relevant courses by Universities and Institutions to nurture and educate skilled manpower for the nuclear power industry. This paper strives to share with the education and training stakeholders, that the task of educating and training students is not solely to prepare them to work in a nuclear power plant, but importantly also to train human resources to support other organizations that require skilled and competent personnel in nuclear related field including Government agencies and Ministries, Business and Industry, Financial sector, International agencies and media agencies, amongst others. Additionally this paper aims to dovetail that a critical mass of skilled manpower along the entire value-chain or scope of nuclear power sector covering planning, construction, manufacturing, commissioning, operation and maintenance and decommissioning must be trained to implement the related tasks required to support NPP competently. Thus, it is within this context, that this paper will outline best practices in nuclear education and training offered by the United Kingdom and France which trains students, professionals, technicians as well as craftsmen not only for employment in a nuclear power plant but also for supporting the nuclear policy formulation in Government Agencies and for supporting nuclear power industry sectors including engineering, construction, manufacturing and services. This paper will offer recommendations for enhancing cooperation in nuclear education and training aimed at building

  8. A brief history of federal support for health physics education and training in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemer, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    Since the formation of health physics as a profession following the end of World War II, the federal government of the United States has played an active role in the support of education and training of health physicists. The purpose of this paper is to review the types of federal support that have been available from the federal government in the past and to examine the current status of support. Individuals trained in health physics through the nuclear navy programs have not been included in this discussion. (author)

  9. Intensive care unit nurses' evaluation of simulation used for team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballangrud, Randi; Hall-Lord, Marie Louise; Hedelin, Birgitta; Persenius, Mona

    2014-07-01

    To implement a simulation-based team training programme and to investigate intensive care nurses' evaluations of simulation used for team training. Simulation-based training is recommended to make health care professionals aware of and understand the importance of teamwork related to patient safety. The study was based on a questionnaire evaluation design. A total of 63 registered nurses were recruited: 53 from seven intensive care units in four hospitals in one hospital trust and 10 from an intensive care postgraduate education programme. After conducting a simulation-based team training programme with two scenarios related to emergency situations in the intensive care, the participants evaluated each simulation activity with regard to: (i) outcome of satisfaction and self-confidence in learning, (ii) implementation of educational practice and (iii) simulation design/development. Intensive care nurses were highly satisfied with their simulation-based learning, and they were mostly in agreement with the statements about self-confidence in learning. They were generally positive in their evaluation of the implementation of the educational practice and the simulation design/development. Significant differences were found with regard to scenario roles, prior simulation experience and area of intensive care practice. The study indicates a positive reception of a simulation-based programme with regard to team training in emergency situations in an intensive care unit. The findings may motivate and facilitate the use of simulation for team training to promote patient safety in intensive care and provide educators with support to develop and improve simulation-based training programmes. © 2013 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  10. Identifying an Education Gap in Wound Care Training in United States Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Emily Stamell; Ingram, Amber; Landriscina, Angelo; Tian, Jiaying; Kirsner, Robert S; Friedman, Adam

    2015-07-01

    As restoration of the integument is paramount to wound healing, dermatologists should be central to managing wounds; yet this is often not the case. If a training gap exists during residency training, this may account for the observed discrepancy. To identify United States (US) dermatology residents' impressions regarding their preparedness to care for wounds, and to assess the amount and type of training devoted to wound care during residency. An online survey among current US dermatology residents enrolled in a residency training program. The primary goal was to determine whether dermatology residents believe more wound care education is needed, evaluate preparedness to care for wounds, and identify future plans to manage wounds. Responses were received from 175 of 517 (33.8%) US Dermatology residents contacted. The majority of residents did not feel prepared to manage acute (78.3%) and chronic (84.6%) wounds. Over three quarters (77.1%) felt that more education is needed. Fewer than half (49.1% and 35.4%) of residents planned to care for acute and chronic wounds, respectively, when in practice. There is a gap in wound care education in US dermatology residency training. This translates to a low percentage of dermatology residents planning to care for wounds in future practice. Dermatology residents need to receive focused wound care training in order to translate the underpinnings of wound healing biology and ultimately better serve patients.

  11. A Comparison of Two Control Display Unit Concepts on Flight Management System Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    1997-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges for a pilot in the transition to a 'glass' cockpit is understanding the flight management system (FMS). Because of both the complex nature of the FMS and the pilot-FMS interface, a large portion of transition training is devoted to the FMS. The current study examined the impact of the primary pilot-FMS interface, the control display unit (CDU), on FMS training. Based on the hypothesis that the interface design could have a significant impact on training, an FMS simulation with two separate interfaces was developed. One interface was similar to a current-generation design, and the other was a multiwindows CDU based on graphical user interface techniques. For both application and evaluation reasons, constraints were applied to the graphical CDU design to maintain as much similarity as possible with the conventional CDU. This preliminary experiment was conducted to evaluate the interface effects on training. Sixteen pilots with no FMS experience were used in a between-subjects test. A time-compressed, airline-type FMS training environment was simulated. The subjects were trained to a fixed-time criterion, and performance was measured in a final, full-mission simulation context. This paper describes the technical approach, simulation implementation, and experimental results of this effort.

  12. Environmental geology in the United States: Present practice and future training needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Lawrence

    Environmental geology as practiced in the United States confronts issues in three large areas: Threats to human society from geologic phenomena (geologic hazards); impacts of human activities on natural systems (environmental impact), and natural-resource management. This paper illustrates present U.S. practice in environmental geology by sampling the work of 7 of the 50 state geological surveys and of the United States Geological Survey as well. Study of the work of these agencies provides a basis for identifying avenues for the training of those who will deal with environmental issues in the future. This training must deal not only with the subdisciplines of geology but with education to cope with the ethical, interdisciplinary, and public-communication aspects of the work of the environmental geologist.

  13. Strategy of formation and training for the basic units of cooperative production. Actions for their implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iriadna Marín de León

    2014-06-01

    The implementation of the strategy of Formation and Training had great importance since applying the same one, they could get rich our cooperatives, of elements that contribute to the obtaining of a bigger level of efficiency and effectiveness of the human resources, given by the knowledge that they can acquire the same ones.   The article approaches the topics of Administration of human resources, formation and training theoretically, the elements of the functional strategy, and lastly a journey for the Cooperative Sector leaving of its emergence until specifying the characteristics of the Basic Units of Cooperative Production as part of the same one.   He is also carried out a valuation of the current situation as for Formation and Training of the human resources in the UBPC of the County of Pinar del Ro. This is made going to different diagnosis techniques. Later on they intend the actions that allow the implementation of this strategy.

  14. Correlation of United States Medical Licensing Examination and Internal Medicine In-Training Examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jose A; Greer, Sharon

    2009-12-01

    The Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (ITE) is administered during residency training in the United States as a self-assessment and program assessment tool. Performance on this exam correlates with outcome on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying examination. Internal Medicine Program Directors use the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) to make decisions in recruitment of potential applicants. This study was done to determine a correlation of USMLE Steps 1, 2 and 3 results with ITE scores in each level of Internal Medicine training. A retrospective review of all residents graduating from an Internal Medicine program from 1999 to 2006 was done. Subjects included had data for all USMLE Steps and ITE during all years of training. Thirty-one subjects were included in the study. Correlations of USMLE Steps 1, 2 and 3 were done with ITE scores (percent correct) in each year of training. Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) was determined for each pairing and a t test to determine statistical significance of the correlation was done. Statistical significance was defined as P value ITE percent correct in PGY I, II and III were 0.46, 0.55 and 0.51 respectively. Corresponding r values for USMLE Step 2 and ITE percent correct were 0.79, 0.70 and 0.72; for USMLE Step 3 these values were 0.51, 0.37 and 0.51 respectively for each training year. USMLE scores are correlated with ITE scores. This correlation was strongest for USMLE Step 2.

  15. Description and comparison of pharmacy technician training programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Douglas C; Draime, Juanita A; Anderson, Timothy S

    2016-01-01

    To describe pharmacy technician training programs in the United States and to compare pharmacy technician program characteristics between programs with and without a pharmacist on faculty and between programs with different accreditation status. Descriptive, cross-sectional study. Not applicable. United States pharmacy technician programs. Not applicable. Student class size, faculty credentials, coursework components, program length, tuition rates, and admission criteria. Currently, there are more than 698 pharmacy technician programs across 1114 campuses, with complete data available for 216 programs. Programs varied widely in terms of class sizes, faculty credentials, and admission criteria. Programs with pharmacists on faculty were significantly less expensive than were those without pharmacists (P = 0.009). Accreditation had no impact on tuition prices. This is the first study of its kind to describe and characterize pharmacy technician training programs. There is relatively little control of technician training by the profession of pharmacy. The quality of these programs in terms of student outcomes is unknown, and it should be explored. Rigorous debate and discussion is needed regarding the future of pharmacy technician roles and the training required for those roles. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A study on the optimization of test interval for check valves of Ulchin Unit 3 using the risk-informed in-service testing approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, D. I.; Kim, K. Y.; Yang, Z. A.; Ha, J. J.

    2002-01-01

    We optimized the test interval for check valves of Ulchin Unit 3 using the risk-informed in-service testing (IST) approach. First, we categorized the IST check valves for Ulchin Unit 3 according to their contributions to the safety of Ulchin Unit 3. Next, we performed the risk analysis on the relaxation of test interval for check valves identified as relatively low important to the safety of Ulchin Unit 3 to identify the maximum increasable test interval of them. Finally, we estimated the number of tests of IST check valves to be performed due to the changes of test interval. These study results are as follows: The categorization of IST check valve importance; the number of the HSSCs is 24(11.48%), the ISSCs is 40 (19.14%), and the LSSCs is 462(69.38%). The maximum increasable test interval; 6 times of current test interval of ISSCs2 and 40 times of that of LSSCs. The number of tests of IST check valves to be performed during 6 refueling time can be reduced from 7692 to 1333 ( 82.7%)

  17. In-Service Education within Schools: A Comparative Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahawy, Bayoumi M.

    This paper prepared in the United States by a visiting faculty member of the Suez Canal University in Egypt, presents a comparative study that finds that school-based in-service training sessions, in which teachers learn within their own teaching environments, do much to encourage more teachers to adopt a more positive attitude to the…

  18. Simulation team training for improved teamwork in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandahl, Christer; Gustafsson, Helena; Wallin, Carl-Johan; Meurling, Lisbet; Øvretveit, John; Brommels, Mats; Hansson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to describe implementation of simulator-based medical team training and the effect of this programme on inter-professional working in an intensive care unit (ICU). Over a period of two years, 90 percent (n = 152) of the staff of the general ICU at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden, received inter-professional team training in a fully equipped patient room in their own workplace. A case study method was used to describe and explain the planning, formation, and results of the training programme. In interviews, the participants reported that the training had increased their awareness of the importance of effective communication for patient safety. The intervention had even had an indirect impact by creating a need to talk, not only about how to communicate efficaciously, but also concerning difficult care situations in general. This, in turn, had led to regular reflection meetings for nurses held three times a week. Examples of better communication in acute situations were also reported. However, the findings indicate that the observed improvements will not last, unless organisational features such as staffing rotas and scheduling of rounds and meetings can be changed to enable use of the learned behaviours in everyday work. Other threats to sustainability include shortage of staff, overtime for staff, demands for hospital beds, budget cuts, and poor staff communication due to separate meetings for nurses and physicians. The present results broaden our understanding of how to create and sustain an organizational system that supports medical team training.

  19. Effects of aging and Parkinson's disease on motor unit remodeling: influence of resistance exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Neil A; Hammond, Kelley G; Bickel, C Scott; Windham, Samuel T; Tuggle, S Craig; Bamman, Marcas M

    2018-04-01

    Aging muscle atrophy is in part a neurodegenerative process revealed by denervation/reinnervation events leading to motor unit remodeling (i.e., myofiber type grouping). However, this process and its physiological relevance are poorly understood, as is the wide-ranging heterogeneity among aging humans. Here, we attempted to address 1) the relation between myofiber type grouping and molecular regulators of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) stability; 2) the impact of motor unit remodeling on recruitment during submaximal contractions; 3) the prevalence and impact of motor unit remodeling in Parkinson's disease (PD), an age-related neurodegenerative disease; and 4) the influence of resistance exercise training (RT) on regulators of motor unit remodeling. We compared type I myofiber grouping, molecular regulators of NMJ stability, and the relative motor unit activation (MUA) requirement during a submaximal sit-to-stand task among untrained but otherwise healthy young (YA; 26 yr, n = 27) and older (OA; 66 yr, n = 91) adults and OA with PD (PD; 67 yr, n = 19). We tested the effects of RT on these outcomes in OA and PD. PD displayed more motor unit remodeling, alterations in NMJ stability regulation, and a higher relative MUA requirement than OA, suggesting PD-specific effects. The molecular and physiological outcomes tracked with the severity of type I myofiber grouping. Together these findings suggest that age-related motor unit remodeling, manifested by type I myofiber grouping, 1) reduces MUA efficiency to meet submaximal contraction demand, 2) is associated with disruptions in NMJ stability, 3) is further impacted by PD, and 4) may be improved by RT in severe cases. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Because the physiological consequences of varying amounts of myofiber type grouping are unknown, the current study aims to characterize the molecular and physiological correlates of motor unit remodeling. Furthermore, because exercise training has demonstrated neuromuscular benefits in aged

  20. Training for integrated digital I and C system of Tomari unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tutiya, Akiyoshi; Sanbe, Takayuki; Hayashi, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    In Tomari nuclear power station Unit No.3, integrated digital I and C facilities was applied for each control unit including safety protection system overall and which connect them by bus (a network), and perform data communications for the first time as a Japanese PWR power station. For the continuation of safe and stable operation of Tomari nuclear power station Unit No.3 which is our greatest power supply, it is important to perform appropriate maintenance jobs about integrated digital I and C System at the time of normal operation, periodical inspection and trouble outbreak. For the assured accomplishment of these work by maintenance personnel, we clarified goal of necessary knowledge and skills and examined training facilities and curriculums. (author)

  1. Crew resource management training in the intensive care unit. A multisite controlled before-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Peter F; de Bruijne, Martine; van Dyck, Cathy; So, Ralph L; Tangkau, Peter; Wagner, Cordula

    2016-08-01

    There is a growing awareness today that adverse events in the intensive care unit (ICU) are more often caused by problems related to non-technical skills than by a lack of technical, or clinical, expertise. Team training, such as crew resource management (CRM), aims to improve these non-technical skills. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of CRM in the ICU. Six ICUs participated in a paired controlled trial, with one pretest and two post-test measurements (after 3 and 12 months). Three ICUs received CRM training and were compared with a matched control unit. The 2-day classroom-based training was delivered to multidisciplinary groups (ie, ICU physicians, nurses, managers). All levels of Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework were assessed using a mixed method design, including questionnaires, observations and routinely administered patient outcome data. Level I-reaction: participants were very positive directly after the training. Level II-learning: attitudes towards behaviour aimed at optimising situational awareness were relatively high at baseline and remained stable. Level III-behaviour: self-reported behaviour aimed at optimising situational awareness improved in the intervention group. No changes were found in observed explicit professional oral communication. Level IV-organisation: patient outcomes were unaffected. Error management culture and job satisfaction improved in the intervention group. Patient safety culture improved in both control and intervention units. We can conclude that CRM, as delivered in the present study, does not change behaviour or patient outcomes by itself, yet changes how participants think about errors and risks. This indicates that CRM requires a combination with other initiatives in order to improve clinical outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. The role of primary care in service provision for people with severe mental illness in the United Kingdom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhan Reilly

    Full Text Available Severe mental illness is a serious and potentially life changing set of conditions. This paper describes and analyses patient characteristics and service usage over one year of a representative cohort of people with a diagnosis of severe mental illness across England, including contacts with primary and secondary care and continuity of care.Data were collected from primary care patient notes (n = 1150 by trained nurses from 64 practices in England, covering all service contacts from 1(st April 2008 to 31st March 2009. The estimated national rate of patients seen only in primary care in the period was 31.1% (95% C.I. 27.2% to 35.3% and the rates of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were 56.8% (95% C.I. 52.3% to 61.2% and 37.9% (95% C.I. 33.7% to 42.2%. In total, patients had 7,961 consultations within primary care and 1,993 contacts with mental health services (20% of the total. Unemployed individuals diagnosed more recently were more likely to have contact with secondary care. Of those seen in secondary care, 61% had at most two secondary care contacts in the period. Median annual consultation rates with GPs were lower than have been reported for previous years and were only slightly above the general population. Relational continuity in primary care was poor for 21% of patients (Modified Modified Continuity Index = <0.5, and for almost a third of new referrals to mental health services the primary care record contained no information on the referral outcome.Primary care is centrally involved in the care of people with serious mental illness, but primary care and cross-boundary continuity is poor for a substantial proportion. Research is needed to determine the impact of poor continuity on patient outcomes, and above all, the impact of new collaborative ways of working at the primary/secondary care interface.

  3. Some causes of vibrations recorded by in-service diagnostic systems in steam generators of units 1 and 2 of Dukovany nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadilek, J.; Matal, O.

    1989-01-01

    A brief description is presented of the design of the steam generators of the first and second units of the Dukovany nuclear power plant. Attention is also given to the feed water systems and the diagnostic systems. The causes are analyzed of the irregularly occurring vibrations in the steam generators in service. It is demonstrated that the source of the vibrations transmitted to the steam generators are the valves in the feeding tract. The vibrations are induced by dynamic forces from the feed water. Reducing the water pressure at the delivery of the electric feed pumps by reducing the size of the rotor, etc., does not remove all vibrations. It is therefore recommended that valves be ins+alled with better regulating characteristics. (Z.M.). 6 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs

  4. United Nations Environment Programme Capacity Building Pilot Project - Training on persistent organic pollutant analysis under the Stockholm Convention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, J.; Leslie, H.A.; van Leeuwen, S.P.J.; Wegener, J.W.M.; van Bavel, B; Lindstrom, G.; Lahoutifard, N.; Fiedler, H.

    2008-01-01

    Within the framework of a United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Capacity Building Project for training of laboratory staff in developing countries on persistent organic pollutant (POP) analysis, an interlaboratory study was organised following an initial evaluation of the performance of

  5. Professional Training in Software Engineering: A Critical Need in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Waldrow

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The software is related to almost every aspect of daily life: manufacturing, banking, travel, communications, defense, medicine, research, government, education, entertainment, law ... Is an essential part of military systems and is used in all civilian sectors, including safety and mission critical. Moreover, the complexity of many of these systems has increased exponentially in recent decades and the software has become an essential component for all of them. Unfortunately, the "systems of higher education", in almost all countries have not kept pace with these changes. The current science and engineering programs, both undergraduate and graduate, they need to incorporate more training in Software Engineering. It is especially true in areas such as aerospace engineering, because these systems are highly dependent on computer, information, communications and software. This article presents an analysis of the current situation of the United States in what has to do with software engineering training that receive and require the aerospace engineers.

  6. Exposure to electromagnetic fields aboard high-speed electric multiple unit trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, D; Zhu, F; Qiu, R; Niu, Q

    2016-01-01

    High-speed electric multiple unit (EMU) trains generate high-frequency electric fields, low-frequency magnetic fields, and high-frequency wideband electromagnetic emissions when running. Potential human health concerns arise because the electromagnetic disturbances are transmitted mainly into the car body from windows, and from there to passengers and train staff. The transmission amount and amplitude distribution characteristics that dominate electromagnetic field emission need to be studied, and the exposure level of electromagnetic field emission to humans should be measured. We conducted a series of tests of the on board electromagnetic field distribution on several high-speed railway lines. While results showed that exposure was within permitted levels, the possibility of long-term health effects should be investigated.

  7. Ethics and professionalism education during neonatal-perinatal fellowship training in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, C L; Geis, G M; Kesselheim, J C; Sayeed, S

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the perceived adequacy of ethics and professionalism education for neonatal-perinatal fellows in the United States, and to measure confidence of fellows and recent graduates when navigating ethical issues. Neonatal-Perinatal Fellowship Directors, fellows and recent graduates were surveyed regarding the quality and type of such education during training, and perceived confidence of fellows/graduates in confronting ethical dilemmas. Forty-six of 97 Directors (47%) and 82 of 444 fellows/graduates (18%) completed the surveys. Over 97% of respondents agreed that ethics training is 'important/very important'. Only 63% of Directors and 37% of fellows/graduates rated ethics education as 'excellent/very good' (P=0.004). While 96% of Directors reported teaching of ethics, only 70% of fellows/graduates reported such teaching (Pethics and professionalism for fellows is important, yet currently insufficient; a more standardized curriculum may be beneficial to ensure that trainees achieve competency.

  8. Training in the Motor Vehicle Repair and Sales Sector in the United Kingdom. Report for the FORCE Programme. First Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhys, Garel

    An international team of researchers studied the following aspects of training in the United Kingdom's motor vehicle repair and sales sector: structure and characteristics; institutional and social context; relationship to the labor market; changing structural, economic, and organizational conditions; and training/recruitment and relationship to…

  9. The Importance of Ethical Training for the Improvement of Ethical Decision-Making: Evidence from Germany and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottig, Daniel; Heischmidt, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    Based on three independent samples from Germany and the United States, this exploratory, cross-cultural study examines empirically the importance of ethical training for the improvement of ethical decision-making. The results of the study reveal a significant difference in the use of corporate codes of conduct and ethical training, as well as…

  10. An Investigation on the impact of using problem-based trainings in the in-service courses on the teachers' performance and capabilities, by relying on the elementary sixth grade mathematics book (case study: the city of Ahvaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pari Cheraq

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the administrative structure of the education system and the need to coordinate with the world of science and technology and hence, the need to update the general and technical information and knowledge, have doubled the importance and necessity of holding the new and efficient in-service trainings for the teachers. In this study, the attempt was taken to examine and analyze the impact of using problem-based trainings during the in-service courses on the teachers' performance and capabilities, by relying on the mathematics book of the sixth grade elementary level (case study: the city of Ahvaz. To do so, using a quasi-experimental study, 37 teachers of the sixth grade were selected from the elementary schools of Ahvaz city. For the in-service training courses on the teaching of mathematics, the problem-based learning method was used. After conducting the problem-based teaching method and the traditional method of teaching, through using the test and the standard questionnaire, the data about the teaching practice and the capabilities of the teachers were collected. Using t-test for the paired and independent samples, it was demonstrated that the problem-based in-service trainings, enhance the teachers' capabilities and performance regarding the problem-solving skills.

  11. Influence of Strengthening Mathematics and Science in Secondary Education (SMASSE) in Service Education and Training(INSET) on the Attitude of Students towards Mathematics Perfomance in Public Secondary Schools of Rangwe Division, Homa-Bay Sub County-Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wafubwa, Ruth Nanjekho

    2015-01-01

    The general performance in mathematics in Kenya has been declining over the past years. This prompted the researchers to investigate the influence of Strengthening Mathematics and Science in Secondary Education (SMASSE) In Service Education and Training (INSET) on students' attitudes towards mathematics performance in public secondary schools of…

  12. The Effect of In-Service Training of Computer Science Teachers on Scratch Programming Language Skills Using an Electronic Learning Platform on Programming Skills and the Attitudes towards Teaching Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaria, Ahmed; Alhassan, Riyadh

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effect of in-service training of computer science teachers in Scratch language using an electronic learning platform on acquiring programming skills and attitudes towards teaching programming. The sample of this study consisted of 40 middle school computer science teachers. They were assigned into two…

  13. Providing Transthoracic Echocardiography Training for Intensive Care Unit Trainees: An Educational Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuza, Catherine M; Hanifi, M Tariq; Koç, Melissa; Stopfkuchen-Evans, Matthias

    2018-04-09

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is important in the management of critically ill patients, yet it has not been incorporated into many residency programs' curricula. Our objective is to determine if trainees undergoing a 60-minute training session on TTE have improved knowledge, ultrasound skills, and increases the utilization of TTE during their rotation in the intensive care unit (ICU). We will also compare the results of participants with prior TTE exposure to TTE-naïve trainees. Our hypothesis is that after the training, participants' will have improved knowledge and ultrasound skills compared to before training. Our secondary hypotheses are that TTE-naïve trainees will have greater improvements in knowledge scores compared to those who have had prior TTE experience and trainees will increase their use of TTE in the ICU. Single-center, prospective trial. Brigham and Women's Hospital (academic hospital). Residents and fellows rotating through the ICU, at any level of postgraduate training. Forty-two trainees participated in the study. Statistically significant improvement after training was observed for all multiple choice questions (MCQ) and practical assessments (p < 0.001). When assessing the differences in score improvement between TTE-experienced versus TTE-naïve users, mean score improvements were notably higher for TTE-naïve participants (MCQ: 28.2 ± 11.6; echo clinical: 48.6 ± 23.4) compared to TTE-experienced users (MCQ: 18.6 ± 13.5, p = 0.01; echo clinical: 38.3 ± 30.2, p = 0.04). A short didactic presentation on TTE use may be useful in teaching ICU trainees basic TTE skills and encouraging the use of bedside TTE in the ICU. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Differentiation, context and teacher education: the changing profile of trainees on in-service initial teacher training programmes in the lifelong learning sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel, Penny

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of initial teacher training (ITT student data relating to the University of Huddersfield part-time in-service Cert Ed/PGCE over a three-year period has revealed significant change in the make-up of trainee cohorts. There has been an increase in younger trainees and in trainees very new to teaching, although more experienced and older trainees do continue to enrol. There has also been a considerable shift in the balance of trainees away from further education (FE college staff. These changes have implications for those who manage and deliver teacher education for the sector. It remains of key importance that the curriculum is not experienced as overly ‘FE-college centric’ and that mentoring arrangements acknowledge the needs of trainees from diverse contexts. It is clear that in the delivery of ITT for the lifelong learning sector, increasingly, one size will not comfortably fit all. Within teacher education much emphasis is placed upon the role of differentiation in regard to trainee practice. The changing trainee profile identified requires that teacher education itself unambiguously models a differentiated approach – and, in relation to teacher education for the lifelong learning sector, differentiation must address workplace context.

  15. Multicultural training in the United States: a survey of occupational therapy programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elena Verdine Donoso; Muñoz, Jaime Phillip; Powell, Janet M

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was designed to describe multicultural training practices in occupational therapy programs. A survey was sent to occupational therapy programs in the United States to gather information on multicultural content, skills, and teaching methods as well as diversity context and challenges. The response rate was 54%. The most frequently covered multicultural content was related to cultural background and sociopolitical factors. Multicultural skills covered most often were practice oriented and interpersonal skills. Teaching methods reported as used most often differed from the methods thought by the respondents to be most effective. Programs reported multiple challenges to multicultural training including lack of time and lack of diversity in the student body, faculty, and environment. Results suggest that educators may need to expand multicultural content and skills to prepare occupational therapy students for providing care in increasingly diverse practice settings. In addition, increased use of teaching methods that focus on exposure to diverse populations and reflection may be needed to improve the effectiveness of multicultural training in occupational therapy programs.

  16. Identifying the Learning Curve for Uterine Artery Embolisation in an Interventional Radiological Training Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Raj, E-mail: rajdas@nhs.net, E-mail: raj.das@stgeorges.nhs.uk; Lucatelli, Pierleone, E-mail: pierleone.lucatelli@gmail.com; Wang, Haofan, E-mail: wwhhff123@gmail.com; Belli, Anna-Maria, E-mail: anna.belli@stgeorges.nhs.uk [St George’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    AimA clear understanding of operator experience is important in improving technical success whilst minimising patient risk undergoing endovascular procedures, and there is the need to ensure that trainees have the appropriate skills as primary operators. The aim of the study is to retrospectively analyse uterine artery embolisation (UAE) procedures performed by interventional radiology (IR) trainees at an IR training unit analysing fluoroscopy times and radiation dose as surrogate markers of technical skill.MethodsTen IR fellows were primary operator in 200 UAE procedures over a 5-year period. We compared fluoroscopy times, radiation dose and complications, after having them categorised according to three groups: Group 1, initial five, Group 2, >5 procedures and Group 3, penultimate five UAE procedures. We documented factors that may affect screening time (number of vials employed and use of microcatheters).ResultsMean fluoroscopy time was 18.4 (±8.1), 17.3 (±9.0), 16.3 (±8.4) min in Groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between these groups (p > 0.05) with respect to fluoroscopy time or radiation dose. Analysis after correction for confounding factors showed no statistical significance (p > 0.05). All procedures were technically successful, and total complication rate was 4 %.ConclusionUAE was chosen as a highly standardised procedure followed by IR practitioners. Although there is a non-significant trend for shorter screening times with experience, technical success and safety were not compromised with appropriate Consultant supervision, which illustrates a safe construct for IR training. This is important and reassuring information for patients undergoing a procedure in a training unit.

  17. Effects of Barbell Deadlift Training on Submaximal Motor Unit Firing Rates for the Vastus Lateralis and Rectus Femoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Matt S.; Thompson, Brennan J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous investigations that have studied motor unit firing rates following strength training have been limited to small muscles, isometric training, or interventions involving exercise machines. We examined the effects of ten weeks of supervised barbell deadlift training on motor unit firing rates for the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris during a 50% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) assessment. Twenty-four previously untrained men (mean age  = 24 years) were randomly assigned to training (n = 15) or control (n = 9) groups. Before and following the intervention, the subjects performed isometric testing of the right knee extensors while bipolar surface electromyographic signals were detected from the two muscles. The signals were decomposed into their constituent motor unit action potential trains, and motor units that demonstrated accuracy levels less than 92.0% were not considered for analysis. One thousand eight hundred ninety-two and 2,013 motor units were examined for the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris, respectively. Regression analyses were used to determine the linear slope coefficients (pulses per second [pps]/% MVC) and y-intercepts (pps) of the mean firing rate and firing rate at recruitment versus recruitment threshold relationships. Deadlift training significantly improved knee extensor MVC force (Cohen's d = .70), but did not influence force steadiness. Training had no influence on the slopes and y-intercepts for the mean firing rate and firing rate at recruitment versus recruitment threshold relationships. In agreement with previous cross-sectional comparisons and randomized control trials, our findings do not support the notion that strength training affects the submaximal control of motor units. PMID:25531294

  18. Effects of barbell deadlift training on submaximal motor unit firing rates for the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt S Stock

    Full Text Available Previous investigations that have studied motor unit firing rates following strength training have been limited to small muscles, isometric training, or interventions involving exercise machines. We examined the effects of ten weeks of supervised barbell deadlift training on motor unit firing rates for the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris during a 50% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC assessment. Twenty-four previously untrained men (mean age  = 24 years were randomly assigned to training (n = 15 or control (n = 9 groups. Before and following the intervention, the subjects performed isometric testing of the right knee extensors while bipolar surface electromyographic signals were detected from the two muscles. The signals were decomposed into their constituent motor unit action potential trains, and motor units that demonstrated accuracy levels less than 92.0% were not considered for analysis. One thousand eight hundred ninety-two and 2,013 motor units were examined for the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris, respectively. Regression analyses were used to determine the linear slope coefficients (pulses per second [pps]/% MVC and y-intercepts (pps of the mean firing rate and firing rate at recruitment versus recruitment threshold relationships. Deadlift training significantly improved knee extensor MVC force (Cohen's d = .70, but did not influence force steadiness. Training had no influence on the slopes and y-intercepts for the mean firing rate and firing rate at recruitment versus recruitment threshold relationships. In agreement with previous cross-sectional comparisons and randomized control trials, our findings do not support the notion that strength training affects the submaximal control of motor units.

  19. Effects of barbell deadlift training on submaximal motor unit firing rates for the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Matt S; Thompson, Brennan J

    2014-01-01

    Previous investigations that have studied motor unit firing rates following strength training have been limited to small muscles, isometric training, or interventions involving exercise machines. We examined the effects of ten weeks of supervised barbell deadlift training on motor unit firing rates for the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris during a 50% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) assessment. Twenty-four previously untrained men (mean age  = 24 years) were randomly assigned to training (n = 15) or control (n = 9) groups. Before and following the intervention, the subjects performed isometric testing of the right knee extensors while bipolar surface electromyographic signals were detected from the two muscles. The signals were decomposed into their constituent motor unit action potential trains, and motor units that demonstrated accuracy levels less than 92.0% were not considered for analysis. One thousand eight hundred ninety-two and 2,013 motor units were examined for the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris, respectively. Regression analyses were used to determine the linear slope coefficients (pulses per second [pps]/% MVC) and y-intercepts (pps) of the mean firing rate and firing rate at recruitment versus recruitment threshold relationships. Deadlift training significantly improved knee extensor MVC force (Cohen's d = .70), but did not influence force steadiness. Training had no influence on the slopes and y-intercepts for the mean firing rate and firing rate at recruitment versus recruitment threshold relationships. In agreement with previous cross-sectional comparisons and randomized control trials, our findings do not support the notion that strength training affects the submaximal control of motor units.

  20. Differential Motor Unit Changes after Endurance or High-Intensity Interval Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Valdes, Eduardo; Falla, Deborah; Negro, Francesco; Mayer, Frank; Farina, Dario

    2017-06-01

    Using a novel technique of high-density surface EMG decomposition and motor unit (MU) tracking, we compared changes in the properties of vastus medialis and vastus lateralis MU after endurance (END) and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Sixteen men were assigned to the END or the HIIT group (n = 8 each) and performed six training sessions for 14 d. Each session consisted of 8-12 × 60-s intervals at 100% peak power output separated by 75 s of recovery (HIIT) or 90-120 min continuous cycling at ~65% V˙O2peak (END). Pre- and postintervention, participants performed 1) incremental cycling to determine V˙O2peak and peak power output and 2) maximal, submaximal (10%, 30%, 50%, and 70% maximum voluntary contraction [MVC]), and sustained (until task failure at 30% MVC) isometric knee extensions while high-density surface EMG signals were recorded from the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis. EMG signals were decomposed (submaximal contractions) into individual MU by convolutive blind source separation. Finally, MU were tracked across sessions by semiblind source separation. After training, END and HIIT improved V˙O2peak similarly (by 5.0% and 6.7%, respectively). The HIIT group showed enhanced maximal knee extension torque by ~7% (P = 0.02) and was accompanied by an increase in discharge rate for high-threshold MU (≥50% knee extension MVC) (P 0.05). HIIT and END induce different adjustments in MU discharge rate despite similar improvements in cardiopulmonary fitness. Moreover, the changes induced by HIIT are specific for high-threshold MU. For the first time, we show that HIIT and END induce specific neuromuscular adaptations, possibly related to differences in exercise load intensity and training volume.

  1. Operator Training and TEMS Support: A Survey of Unit Leaders in Northern and Central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason B; Galante, Joseph M; Sena, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Members of Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) teams routinely work in high-risk tactical situations. Awareness of the benefit of Tactical Emergency Medical Support (TEMS) is increasing but not uniformly emphasized. To characterize the current regional state of tactical medicine and identify potential barriers to more widespread implementation. A multiple-choice survey was administered to SWAT team leaders of 22 regional agencies in northern and central California. Questions focused on individual officer self-aid and buddy care training, the use and content of individual first aid kits (IFAKs), and the operational inclusion of a dedicated TEMS provider. Respondents included city police (54%), local county sheriff (36%), state law enforcement (5%), and federal law enforcement (5%). RESULTS showed that 100% of respondents thought it was ?Very Important? for SWAT officers to understand the basics of self-aid and buddy care and to carry an IFAK, while only 71% of respondents indicated that team members actually carried an IFAK. In addition, 67% indicated that tourniquets were part of the IFAK, and 91% of surveyed team leaders thought it was ?Very Important? for teams to have a trained medic available onsite at callouts or high-risk warrant searches. Also, 59% of teams used an organic TEMS element. The majority of SWAT team leaders recognize the benefit of basic Operator medical training and the importance of a TEMS program. Despite near 100% endorsement by unit-level leadership, a significant proportion of teams are lacking one of the key components including Operator IFAKs and/or tourniquets. Tactical team leaders, administrators, and providers should continue to promote adequate Operator training and equipment as well as formal TEMS support. 2013.

  2. Ethics education in family medicine training in the United States: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Helen M; Satin, David; Nelson, Valerie; Vadiveloo, Thenmalar

    2014-01-01

    Although professional organizations endorse ethics education in family medicine training, there is little published evidence that ethics teaching occurs. This survey collated data on the aims, content, pedagogical methods, assessment, and barriers relating to formal ethics education in family medicine residency programs in the United States. A questionnaire surveyed all 445 family medicine residency programs in the United States. Forty percent of programs responded (178/445). Of these, 95% formally teach at least one ethics topic, 68.2% teach six or more topics, and 7.1% teach all 13 core topics specified in the questionnaire. Programs show variation, providing between zero to 100 hours' ethics education over the 3 years of residency training. Of the responding programs, 3.5% specify well-defined aims for ethics teaching, 25.9% designate overall responsibility for the ethics curriculum to one individual, and 33.5% formally assess ethics competencies. The most frequent barriers to ethics education are finding time in residents' schedules (59.4%) and educator expertise (21.8%). Considerable variation in ethics education is apparent in both curricular content and delivery among family medicine residency programs in the United States. Additional findings included a lack of specification of explicit curricular aims for ethics teaching allied to ACGME or AAFP competencies, a tendency not to designate one faculty member with lead responsibility for ethics teaching in the residency program, and a lack of formal assessment of ethics competencies. This has occurred in the context of an absence of robust assessment of ethics competencies at board certification level.

  3. Strategies business of the unit providing services of virtual training – unipanamericana compensar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Marcela Cardona Bedoya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of processes thesis of "Master in Management and Marketing Management and Global New Markets" for the University Camilo José Cela. The data collection is done through an exploratory research and the study of business unit Unit Providing Services of Virtual Training Unipanamericana - Compensate. Considering secondary sources we identified: 1 The most important in the world and in Colombia at the level of new technologies, 2 The development trends of the array Mic Mac establishes the relationship between trends and portfolio of the business unit. And 3 Identify the growth of applications and the impact of E-learning. The collection and analysis of information on the qualitative method developed through interviews, aiming to identify trends that impact the marketing plan. In the analysis were found four trends that impact the line of business: The joint educational levels, The new educational experiences, Changes in learning models and Strengthening education systems. These trends were explored in an evaluative context, to identify new technologies that are necessary for professional development.   

  4. A pilot application of risk-based methods to establish in-service inspection priorities for nuclear components at Surry Unit 1 Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, T.; Gore, B.; Simonen, F.; Doctor, S.

    1994-08-01

    As part of the Nondestructive Evaluation Reliability Program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing a method that uses risk-based approaches to establish in-service inspection plans for nuclear power plant components. This method uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) results and Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FEMA) techniques to identify and prioritize the most risk-important systems and components for inspection. The Surry Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 was selected for pilot applications of this method. The specific systems addressed in this report are the reactor pressure vessel, the reactor coolant, the low-pressure injection, and the auxiliary feedwater. The results provide a risk-based ranking of components within these systems and relate the target risk to target failure probability values for individual components. These results will be used to guide the development of improved inspection plans for nuclear power plants. To develop inspection plans, the acceptable level of risk from structural failure for important systems and components will be apportioned as a small fraction (i.e., 5%) of the total PRA-estimated risk for core damage. This process will determine target (acceptable) risk and target failure probability values for individual components. Inspection requirements will be set at levels to assure that acceptable failure probabilistics are maintained

  5. The training of specialists in Family and Community Health Nursing according to the supervisors of the teaching units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltra-Rodríguez, Enrique; Martínez-Riera, José Ramón; Mármol-López, María Isabel; Pastor-Gallardo, Francisco Javier; Gras-Nieto, Elvira; Holgado-Fernández, Ana

    To analyze the current situation of the training of specialists in family and community nursing from the perspective of nurses responsible for teaching units. Exploratory analysis using nominal group technique of the contributions made by representatives of 19 multidisciplinary teaching units in family and community care from 11 Spanish autonomous communities. They categorized and weighted those contributions. The emerging categories on the strengths and difficulties encountered related to the tutors, the environment where the training took place, the structure of the teaching unit, the organization of the teaching and the official programme of the speciality, the external supports and the theoretical training. Training in Family and Community Nursing is an opportunity to improve primary health care to train in news and necessary but complex skills. Support is required for training to be effective and the specialty and training should be made known. Tutors are a key part of this process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Needs in Service Provision for Oral Health Care in Older People: A Comparison Between Greater Manchester (United Kingdom) and Utrecht (the Netherlands).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everaars, Babette; Jerković-Ćosić, Katarina; van der Putten, Gert-Jan; Pretty, Ian A; Brocklehurst, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Retaining natural teeth for longer, together with increasing care dependency in the elderly, has the potential to hamper adequate oral self-care and service provision. The aim of this qualitative study was to compare and contrast views from a multi-stakeholder perspective on the future priorities for oral health care services of older people in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. A participatory setting partnership was undertaken with 4 key stakeholder groups in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. A final consensus group considered collective responses. The views of the different groups were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed thematically. Two main themes derived: "individual well-being" and "underlying principles of service provision." Codes relating to principles of service provision focused on the importance of developing quality criteria, improving access, prevention and screening, awareness raising, education and training, together with multidisciplinary care. In both countries, oral health was seen as an important element of "individual well-being," and a number of "principles of service provision" were suggested. This contrasts with the current lack of evidence-based treatments and quality criteria that are available for dependent older people.

  7. Defining our destiny: trainee working group consensus statement on the future of emergency surgery training in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrock, A E; Gokani, V J; Harries, R L; Pearce, L; Smith, S R; Ali, O; Chu, H; Dubois, A; Ferguson, H; Humm, G; Marsden, M; Nepogodiev, D; Venn, M; Singh, S; Swain, C; Kirkby-Bott, J

    2015-01-01

    The United Kingdom National Health Service treats both elective and emergency patients and seeks to provide high quality care, free at the point of delivery. Equal numbers of emergency and elective general surgical procedures are performed, yet surgical training prioritisation and organisation of NHS institutions is predicated upon elective care. The increasing ratio of emergency general surgery consultant posts compared to traditional sub-specialities has yet to be addressed. How should the capability gap be bridged to equip motivated, skilled surgeons of the future to deliver a high standard of emergency surgical care? The aim was to address both training requirements for the acquisition of necessary emergency general surgery skills, and the formation of job plans for trainee and consultant posts to meet the current and future requirements of the NHS. Twenty nine trainees and a consultant emergency general surgeon convened as a Working Group at The Association of Surgeons in Training Conference, 2015, to generate a united consensus statement to the training requirement and delivery of emergency general surgery provision by future general surgeons. Unscheduled general surgical care provision, emergency general surgery, trauma competence, training to meet NHS requirements, consultant job planning and future training challenges arose as key themes. Recommendations have been made from these themes in light of published evidence. Careful workforce planning, education, training and fellowship opportunities will provide well-trained enthusiastic individuals to meet public and societal need.

  8. Effects of a Staff Training Intervention on Seclusion Rates on an Adult Inpatient Psychiatric Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Julie; Paun, Olimpia; Fogg, Louis

    2018-06-01

    The current article presents the effects of a 90-minute staff training intervention aimed at reducing inpatient psychiatric seclusion rates through strengthened staff commitment to seclusion alternatives and improved de-escalation skills. The intervention occurred at an 18-bed adult inpatient psychiatric unit whose seclusion rates in 2015 were seven times the national average. Although the project's primary outcome compared patient seclusion rates before and after the intervention, anonymous staff surveys measured several secondary outcomes. Seclusion rates were reduced from a 6-month pre-intervention average of 2.95 seclusion hours per 1,000 patient hours to a 6-month post-intervention average of 0.29 seclusion hours per 1,000 patient hours, a 90.2% reduction. Completed staff surveys showed significant staff knowledge gains, non-significant changes in staff attitudes about seclusion, non-significant changes in staff de-escalation skill confidence, and use of the new resource sheet by only 17% of staff. The key study implication is that time-limited, focused staff training interventions can have a measurable impact on reducing inpatient seclusion rates. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 56(6), 23-30.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Training Level, Acculturation, Role Ambiguity, and Multicultural Discussions in Training and Supervising International Counseling Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kok-Mun; Smith, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    This research partially replicated Nilsson and Anderson's "Professional Psychology: Research and Practice" (2004) study on training and supervising international students. It investigated the relationships among international counseling students' training level, acculturation, supervisory working alliance (SWA), counseling self-efficacy (COSE),…

  10. Training of nurses on Foley catheter insertion in intensive care unit patients: limits and possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magno Conceição Merces

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Nursing has an important role in urinary tract infection prevention and control. Urinary catheters insertion represents the local topography with the highest rate of hospital infection. Foley catheter placement is performed solely by the nurse and requires aseptic techniques during its performance, thus preventing risks to the patients. The study aimed to evaluate the training of nurses on Foley catheter insertion and point out limits and possibilities of this practice in patients at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of Hospital Geral do Interior da Bahia (HGIB. Methods: This was a qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study. Data collection was carried out through semi-structured interviews. After data analysis, two categories were evaluated, namely: the training of nurses on Foley catheter insertion in ICU patients and the limits and possibilities of Foley catheter insertion practice by nurses in ICU patients. Bardin analysis was used for data analysis. Results: The study shows that the nurse’s practice on Foley catheter insertion in ICU patients is based on the use of aseptic techniques for urinary tract infection prevention, theoretical and practical knowledge on Foley catheter insertion in ICU patients, knowledge on urinary tract infections and associations with catheter insertion, whereas the limits and possibilities of Foley catheter insertion practice by nurses are understood through measures to minimize the risk of hospital infection caused by long-term catheter use in the ICU. Nurses point out that the risks of hospital infection are inherent to long-term catheter use. This is an important fact, as the knowledge or its absence may constitute a limit or possibility for Foley catheter insertion practice by the nurse in ICU patients. Conclusion: Nurses must seek the systematization of knowledge, which warrants support for the team, as well as information, safety and prompt care, allowing the reduction of urinary

  11. Delayed coking unit preheat train optimization; Otimizacao do preaquecimento das Unidades de Coque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marins, Edson R; Geraldelli, Washington O; Barros, Francisco C [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    The oil industry has been investing in research and development of new techniques and process improvements with the objective to increase the residual fraction profitability and to fulfill the market demands. The adequacy of the refining scheme has led to the development of bottom of the barrel processes that has the objective to convert heavy fractions into products of higher aggregate value. In this context, the process of Delayed Coking presents a great importance in the production of distillates in the diesel range as well as the processing of heavy residues, mostly in the markets where the fuel oil consumption is being reduced. With the approach to help PETROBRAS decide which route to follow during new designs of Delayed Coking units, this work presents a comparative study of the preheat train performance among the energy recovery to preheat the feed, in contrast with preheating the feed and generating steam, simultaneously. In this study the Pinch Technology methodology was used as a procedure for heat integration with the objective of getting the maximum energy recovery from the process, finding the best trade-off between operational cost and investment cost. The alternative of steam generation aims to provide an appropriate flexibility in Delayed Coking units design and operation. (author)

  12. The employment status of 1995 graduates from radiation oncology training programs in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, Daniel F.; Kresl, John J.; Sheldon, John M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the employment status of 1995 graduates of radiation oncology training programs in the United States. Methods and Materials: All senior residents (149) and fellows (36) who completed training in 1995 were mailed an employment survey questionnaire by the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO). Telephone follow-up of nonrespondents achieved a 100% response rate. Twenty graduates who chose to continue training and five who returned to their home countries were removed from the study. Of the 160 who attempted to enter the U.S. workforce, 106 were men and 54 were women. Initial job status and job status at 6-8 months following graduation were determined. Results: Unemployment was 6.9% at graduation and 4.4% at 6-8 months. Underemployment (part-time employment) was 10.6% at graduation and 11.9% at 6-8 months postgraduation. Of those working part-time 6-8 months after graduation, 63% (12 of 19) did so involuntarily after unsuccessfully seeking full-time employment. For the 20 graduates who chose to continue training with fellowships, seven (35%) did so solely to avoid unemployment, four (20%) were partially influenced by the job market, and nine (45%) were not influenced by the job market. Adverse employment search outcome was defined as being either unemployed as a radiation oncologist or involuntarily working part-time. Excluding those who chose to work part-time, a total of 19 (11.9%) graduates at 6-8 months following graduation, compared to 22 (13.8%) at graduation, were either unemployed or involuntarily working part-time. In terms of gender, this represented 18.5% (10 of 54) of females and 8.6% (9 of 105) of males. In terms of geographic restrictions in the job search, 56% of males and 70% of females with an adverse employment outcome limited their job search to certain parts of the country. This compares to 62% of all graduates in this study with geographic restrictions in their job search. In terms of perceptions of the

  13. The employment status of 1995 graduates from radiation oncology training programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, D F; Kresl, J J; Sheldon, J M

    1999-03-15

    To quantify the employment status of 1995 graduates of radiation oncology training programs in the United States. All senior residents (149) and fellows (36) who completed training in 1995 were mailed an employment survey questionnaire by the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO). Telephone follow-up of nonrespondents achieved a 100% response rate. Twenty graduates who chose to continue training and five who returned to their home countries were removed from the study. Of the 160 who attempted to enter the U.S. workforce, 106 were men and 54 were women. Initial job status and job status at 6-8 months following graduation were determined. Unemployment was 6.9% at graduation and 4.4% at 6-8 months. Underemployment (part-time employment) was 10.6% at graduation and 11.9% at 6-8 months postgraduation. Of those working part-time 6-8 months after graduation, 63% (12 of 19) did so involuntarily after unsuccessfully seeking full-time employment. For the 20 graduates who chose to continue training with fellowships, seven (35%) did so solely to avoid unemployment, four (20%) were partially influenced by the job market, and nine (45%) were not influenced by the job market. Adverse employment search outcome was defined as being either unemployed as a radiation oncologist or involuntarily working part-time. Excluding those who chose to work part-time, a total of 19 (11.9%) graduates at 6-8 months following graduation, compared to 22 (13.8%) at graduation, were either unemployed or involuntarily working part-time. In terms of gender, this represented 18.5% (10 of 54) of females and 8.6% (9 of 105) of males. In terms of geographic restrictions in the job search, 56% of males and 70% of females with an adverse employment outcome limited their job search to certain parts of the country. This compares to 62% of all graduates in this study with geographic restrictions in their job search. In terms of perceptions of the workforce and employment opportunities, 95% of

  14. "Run-through" training at specialist training year 1 and uncoupled core surgical training for oral and maxillofacial surgery in the United Kingdom: a snapshot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, M; Collyer, J; Dhariwal, D

    2018-05-01

    Training in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) in the UK has undergone considerable changes during the last 10years, and "core" surgical training has replaced "basic" surgical training. In 2014 a pilot "run-through" training programme from specialist training year one (ST1)-ST7 was introduced to facilitate early entry into the speciality. Run-through training guarantees that a trainee, after a single competitive selection process and satisfactory progress, will be given training that covers the entire curriculum of the speciality, whereas uncoupled training requires a second stage of competitive recruitment after the first one (for OMFS only) or two years of "core" training to progress to higher specialty training. The first two years of run-through training (ST1-ST2) are the same as for core surgical training. Dual-qualified maxillofacial aspirants and those in their second degree course are curious to know whether they should go for the uncoupled core surgical training or the run-through programme in OMFS. The General Medical Council (GMC) has now agreed that run-through training can be rolled out nationally in OMFS. To assess the two pathways we used an online questionnaire to gain feedback about the experience from all OMFS ST3 and run-through trainees (ST3/ST4) in 2016-2017. We identified and contacted 21 trainees, and 17 responded, including seven run-through trainees. Eleven, including five of the run-through trainees, recommended the run-through training programme in OMFS. Six of the seven run-through trainees had studied dentistry first. The overall mean quality of training was rated as 5.5 on a scale 0-10 by the 17 respondents. This survey gives valuable feedback from the current higher surgical trainees in OMFS, which will be useful to the GMC, Health Education England, OMFS Specialist Advisory Committee, and those seeking to enter higher surgical training in OMFS. Copyright © 2018 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published

  15. Effectiveness of classroom based crew resource management training in the intensive care unit: Study design of a controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, P.F.; de Bruijne, M.C.; van Dyck, C.; Wagner, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Crew resource management (CRM) has the potential to enhance patient safety in intensive care units (ICU) by improving the use of non-technical skills. However, CRM evaluation studies in health care are inconclusive with regard to the effect of this training on behaviour and

  16. Effectiveness of classroom based crew resource management training in the intensive care unit: study design of a controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, P.F.; Bruijne, M. de; Dyck, C. van; Wagner, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Crew resource management (CRM) has the potential to enhance patient safety in intensive care units (ICU) by improving the use of non-technical skills. However, CRM evaluation studies in health care are inconclusive with regard to the effect of this training on behaviour and

  17. The Implications of the National Minimum Wage for Training Practices and Skill Utilisation in the United Kingdom Hospitality Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Gill; Williams, Steve; Adam-Smith, Derek

    2003-01-01

    Two key issues thrown up by the 1999 introduction of the National Minimum Wage (NMW) in the United Kingdom are its likely impact on employers' training practices in low paying sectors of the economy and the implications for skills. Based on a study of the hospitality industry, this article assesses the limited significance of the differential,…

  18. Impact of online toxicology training on health professionals: the Global Educational Toxicology Uniting Project (GETUP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Anselm; Vohra, Rais; Dawson, Andrew H; Stolbach, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    The Global Educational Toxicology Uniting Project (GETUP), supported by the American College of Medical Toxicology, links countries with and without toxicology services via distance education with the aim to improve education. Due to the lack of toxicology services in some countries there is a knowledge gap in the management of poisonings. We describe our experience with the worldwide delivery of an online introductory toxicology curriculum to emergency doctors and other health professionals treating poisoned patients. We delivered a 15-module introductory Internet-based toxicology curriculum to emergency doctors and health professionals, conducted from August to December 2016. This Internet-based curriculum was adapted from one used to teach emergency residents toxicology in the United States. Modules covered themes such as pharmaceutical (n = 8), toxidromes (n = 2) and agrochemicals (n = 5) poisoning. Participants completed pre-test and post-test multiple choice questions (MCQs) before and after completing the online module, respectively, throughout the course. We collected information on participant demographics, education and training, and perception of relevance of the curriculum. Participants gave feedback on the course and how it affected their practice. One hundred and thirty-six health professionals from 33 countries participated in the course: 98 emergency doctors/medical officers, 25 physicians, eight pharmacists/poisons information specialists, two toxicologists, two medical students and one nurse. Median age of participants was 34 years. Median number of years postgraduate was seven. Ninety (65%) had access to either a poisons information centre over the phone or toxicologist and 48 (35%) did not. All participants expected the course to help improve their knowledge. Overall median pre-module MCQ scores were 56% (95%CI: 38, 75%) compared to post-module MCQ scores median 89% (95% CI: 67, 100%) (p education to health professionals treating

  19. Whither the Pulmonary Ward Attending? Preserving Subspecialty Exposure in United States Internal Medicine Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Lekshmi; Babik, Jennifer; Looney, Mark R; Hollander, Harry

    2017-04-01

    Twenty years ago, the term "hospitalist" was coined at the University of California-San Francisco (San Francisco, CA), heralding a new specialty focused on the care of inpatients. There are now more than 50,000 hospitalists practicing in the United States. At many academic medical centers, hospitalists are largely replacing subspecialists as attendings on the inpatient medicine wards. At University of California-San Francisco, this has been accompanied by declining percentages of residency graduates who enter subspecialty training in internal medicine. The decline in subspecialty medicine interest can be attributed to many factors, including differences in compensation, decreased subspecialist exposure, and a changing research funding landscape. Although there has not been systematic documentation of this trend in pulmonary and critical care medicine, we have noted previously pulmonary and critical care-bound trainees switching to hospital medicine instead. With our broad, multiorgan system perspective, pulmonary and critical care faculty should embrace teaching general medicine. Residency programs have instituted creative solutions to encourage more internal medicine residents to pursue careers in subspecialty medicine. Some solutions include creating rotations that promote more contact with subspecialists and physician-scientists, creating clinician-educator tracks within fellowship programs, and appointing subspecialists to internal medicine residency leadership positions. We need more rigorous research to track the trends and implications of the generalist-specialist balance of inpatient ward teams on resident career choices, and learn what interventions affect those choices.

  20. An overview of pedagogy and organisation in clinical interprofessional training units in Sweden and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the organization and pedagogy in Swedish and Danish interprofessional training units (ITUs) and to synthesize empirical findings from Swedish and Danish ITUs published in peer review journals. A questionnaire concerning organization and pedagogy was sent to twenty Swedish and Danish ITUs. After a bibliographic search aimed to find empirical studies from ITUs, twenty Swedish and eight Danish studies were included in the review. The questionnaires results showed that despite different wording, the overall aims for the ITUs were to provide students with the possibility of uniprofessional learning, interprofessional learning, and strengthening of professional identity. Furthermore, it appeared that there were different organizational and pedagogical approaches. The review revealed that differences in clinical tutors' affiliation and presence in the ITU were challenging. Also different pedagogical approaches were discussed. However, all articles showed that the goals for the ITUs in general were fulfilled. There is basis therefore to recommend the establishment of future clinical ITUs with the patient in the core and with the use of a student activating approach.

  1. Training, their influence on the quality of services. An experience in the unit "Coffee Express" of Fomento.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Ivón Sosa Ibarra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Achieving quality of service is a necessity in this highly competitive and turbulent world, one of the elements that influence it is training. This research was designed and implemented a training procedure to improve the quality of services in a cafeteria of Development, were detected with the training needs of their staff to plan and implement actions that will raise the skills of workers. Surveys were conducted to determine the state of opinion of internal and external clients implemented before and after the procedure and to evaluate the quality of service received from the selected attributes to the application of Delphi method experts. The unit has made progress recognized and improved economic indicators becoming a reference center in the municipality, which shows that is possible to provide quality services from training workers.

  2. Radiation oncology training in the United States: report from the Radiation Oncology Resident Training Working Group organized by the Society of Chairman of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In response to the major changes occurring in healthcare, medical education, and cancer research, SCAROP addressed issues related to post-graduate education that could enhance existing programs and complement the present system. Methods and Materials: SCAROP brought together a Working Group with a broad range of representatives organized in subcommittees to address: training, curriculum, and model building. Results: The Working Group emphasized the importance of training physicians with the necessary clinical, scientific, and analytical skills, and the need to provide expert radiation oncology services to patients throughout the United States. Opportunities currently exist for graduates in academic medicine, although there may be limited time and financial resources available to support academic pursuits. Conclusions: In the face of diminishing resources for training and education and the increased scope of knowledge required, a number of models for resident training are considered that can provide flexibility to complement the present system. This report is intended to initiate dialogue among the organizations responsible for radiation oncology resident education so that resident training can continually evolve to meet the needs of cancer patients and take advantage of opportunities for progress through innovative cancer care and research

  3. Effect of just-in-time simulation training on tracheal intubation procedure safety in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishisaki, Akira; Donoghue, Aaron J; Colborn, Shawn; Watson, Christine; Meyer, Andrew; Brown, Calvin A; Helfaer, Mark A; Walls, Ron M; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2010-07-01

    Tracheal intubation-associated events (TIAEs) are common (20%) and life threatening (4%) in pediatric intensive care units. Physician trainees are required to learn tracheal intubation during intensive care unit rotations. The authors hypothesized that "just-in-time" simulation-based intubation refresher training would improve resident participation, success, and decrease TIAEs. For 14 months, one of two on-call residents, nurses, and respiratory therapists received 20-min multidisciplinary simulation-based tracheal intubation training and 10-min resident skill refresher training at the beginning of their on-call period in addition to routine residency education. The rate of first attempt and overall success between refresher-trained and concurrent non-refresher-trained residents (controls) during the intervention phase was compared. The incidence of TIAEs between preintervention and intervention phase was also compared. Four hundred one consecutive primary orotracheal intubations were evaluated: 220 preintervention and 181 intervention. During intervention phase, neither first-attempt success nor overall success rate differed between refresher-trained residents versus concurrent non-refresher-trained residents: 20 of 40 (50%) versus 15 of 24 (62.5%), P = 0.44 and 23 of 40 (57.5%) versus 18 of 24 (75.0%), P = 0.19, respectively. The resident's first attempt and overall success rate did not differ between preintervention and intervention phases. The incidence of TIAE during preintervention and intervention phases was similar: 22.0% preintervention versus 19.9% intervention, P = 0.62, whereas resident participation increased from 20.9% preintervention to 35.4% intervention, P = 0.002. Resident participation continued to be associated with TIAE even after adjusting for the phase and difficult airway condition: odds ratio 2.22 (95% CI 1.28-3.87, P = 0.005). Brief just-in-time multidisciplinary simulation-based intubation refresher training did not improve the resident

  4. The influence of taekwondo training on school-life adaptation and exercise value in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ik Rae; Park, Hyo Joo; Lee, Taek Kyun

    2018-04-01

    Previous experience has shown that school-based taekwondo training in the United States (US) results in many beneficial effect sregarding school education and the physical health of the adolescent participants; of especial significance, the training plays an important role in terms of exercise value and school-life adaptation. To explore this overall effect, a self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 401 adolescents over the age of 10 years. The survey comprisesa total of 29 questions that consist of 17 exercise-value-related questions (general, moral, and status) and 12 questions that are related to school-life adaptation (adaptation to teachers, adaptation to academic activities, adaptation to rule compliance, and adaptation to school activities). The survey results show that taekwondo training affects school-life adaptation by helping to improve student morality and by bolstering the students compliance with school rules during their schooling. The exercise value of taekwondo training is considered a necessity for US adolescents due to the corresponding educational aspects; in particular, the training plays a very important role in the maintenance of amenable student-teacher and student-peer relationships. From the previously mentioned findings, and if taekwondo teachers train their students carefully with educational missions in mind, it is expected that taekwondo training will play a very important role in the cultivation of anappropriate education value among US adolescents.

  5. Integration or specialization? Similarities and differences between Sweden and the United States in gerontology education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Mary E; Börjesson, Ulrika

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the similarities and differences in the education and training of gerontologists and others who work with older people in Sweden and the United States. It outlines the aging trends in both countries and assesses the level of training for those who provide care in a variety of fields. Both countries are aging, but the programs for gerontological training are quite different in the two countries, reflecting underlying cultural values. Sweden's education is generally more oriented toward the integration of some aging education in more disciplinary fields, such as nursing and social work and thus could benefit from more specialized, aging-specific courses. The United States is highly specialized, with multiple programs in various subfields of aging (e.g., geropsychology; aging services administration) and could benefit from integrating more aging knowledge into courses in other disciplines. The authors challenge professionals to consider if there is a basic but global curriculum and/or set of competencies in gerontology that could be agreed upon. As an increasingly global village, the ability to share and learn is more easily achievable. Sweden and the United States have much to learn from each other in terms of appropriately educating and training those who support our older people.

  6. Relationship between Training Programs being Offered in State and Federal Penal Institutions and the Unfilled Job Openings in the Major Occupations in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrence, John Thomas

    Excluding military installations, training programs in state and federal penal institutions were surveyed, through a mailed checklist, to test the hypotheses that (1) training programs in penal institutions were not related to the unfilled job openings by major occupations in the United States, and (2) that training programs reported would have a…

  7. Effects of Just-in-Time Online Training on Knowledge and Application of the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP®) Model among In-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Devshikha

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was a difference in knowledge and application of the SIOP ® Model among in-service teachers who participated in an online professional development course on the SIOP® Model. Although these teachers all participated in the same course, information on the number of English Language Learners…

  8. The United Kingdom and Ireland Association of Forensic Toxicologists; establishing best practice for professional training & development in forensic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosbey, Simon; Elliott, Simon; Paterson, Sue

    2017-01-01

    The current status of forensic toxicology in the United Kingdom is discussed with an emphasis on professional training and development. Best practice is proposed using a blend of modular foundation knowledge training, continuing professional development, academic study, research & development and ongoing analytical practice. The need for establishing a professional career structure is also discussed along with a suggested example of a suitable model. The issues discussed in this paper are intended to provoke discussion within the forensic toxicology community, industry regulators and other government bodies responsible for the administration of justice. Copyright © 2016 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Current knowledge of scoliosis in physiotherapy students trained in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, D A Jason; Pilcher, Christine; Drake, Shawn; Maude, Erika; Glynn, David

    2017-01-01

    It has been highlighted in both Poland and the United States of America (USA) that knowledge of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) among physiotherapy students is limited with respect to the 2011 International Society on Scoliosis Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORT) guidelines. Early detection of scoliosis and correct initial management is essential in effective care, and thus physiotherapists should be aware of the basic criteria for diagnosis and indications for treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the basic knowledge of IS in physiotherapy students trained in the United Kingdom (UK). A previously designed and tested 10-question survey, including knowledge of the 2011 SOSORT guidelines, was transcribed onto an online-survey platform. Questions were designed to analyse knowledge of definition, cause, development, prevalence, diagnosis, treatment and bracing of scoliosis. All UK universities offering physiotherapy degrees were invited to participate, with the programme lead of each institution asked to distribute the questionnaire to all penultimate and final year physiotherapy students (bachelor's and master's degrees). The final number of students who received the study invitation is unknown. The survey link closed after 8 weeks of data collection. Two hundred and six students, split over 12 institutions, successfully completed the questionnaire. Analysis showed that 79% of students recognised when IS is likely to develop, yet only 52% recognised that IS's aetiology is unknown. Eighty-eight percent of students incorrectly defined IS as a 2-dimensional deformity, with only 24% successfully recognising the prevalence of IS within the scoliosis population. Just 12% knew the criteria for diagnosis; however, 93% were unable to recognise the appropriate treatment approach through therapeutic exercise. Finally, 54% of students managed to identify correctly when bracing is recommended for IS. In comparison to previous studies within the USA, students in

  10. The Alpini Effect: Why the US Army Should Train Units for Mountain Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    practical knowledge of the ground, and are very little adapted for mountain warfare.”20 The concept of infantry forces trained in mountain combat was...spearheaded the word of mouth campaign as he said, “It is easier to train a skier to be a soldier than to train a soldier to be a skier .” 30...author’s knowledge from professional experience 51 at Camp Carson from 1942-1944 and the US

  11. A Study of United States Army Product Support Manager (PSM) Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    you identify any additional Life Cycle training or training improvements? The theme of the responses centered on there is not one magic formula to...prepare a future PSM. One participant’s answer was: “PSMs MUST have experience in a PM shop . That experience needs to include having provided...TRAINING 33 shop only deepens an already steep learning curve for that PSM and frustrates the PMs as they don’t understand what a PSM does and CAN do

  12. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AGE DISCRIMINATION, EDUCATION, AND DIVERSITY TRAINING: A COMPARATIVE STUDY IN THE UNITED STATES AND THAILAND

    OpenAIRE

    Bahaudin G. M ujtaba; Frank J. Cavico; Albert A. Williams; Jatuporn Sungkhawan

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript explores age discrimination in employment and the challenges that managers confront in seeking to establish and maintain a legal, ethical, and productive workplace. The data regarding age and older workers comes from 218 respondents in the United States and 379 respondents in Thailand. A factor analysis was done ; and the results demonstrate that race, gender, education, country where you live the most, country where you presently live, and diversity training were statisticall...

  13. Effectiveness of classroom based crew resource management training in the intensive care unit: study design of a controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Crew resource management (CRM) has the potential to enhance patient safety in intensive care units (ICU) by improving the use of non-technical skills. However, CRM evaluation studies in health care are inconclusive with regard to the effect of this training on behaviour and organizational outcomes, due to weak study designs and the scarce use of direct observations. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of CRM training on attitude, behaviour and organization after one year, using a multi-method approach and matched control units. The purpose of the present article is to describe the study protocol and the underlying choices of this evaluation study of CRM in the ICU in detail. Methods/Design Six ICUs participated in a paired controlled trial, with one pre-test and two post test measurements (respectively three months and one year after the training). Three ICUs were trained and compared to matched control ICUs. The 2-day classroom-based training was delivered to multidisciplinary groups. Typical CRM topics on the individual, team and organizational level were discussed, such as situational awareness, leadership and communication. All levels of Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework (reaction, learning, behaviour and organisation) were assessed using questionnaires, direct observations, interviews and routine ICU administration data. Discussion It is expected that the CRM training acts as a generic intervention that stimulates specific interventions. Besides effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, the assessment of the barriers and facilitators will provide insight in the implementation process of CRM. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR1976 PMID:22073981

  14. Adaptation of motor unit contractile properties in rat medial gastrocnemius to treadmill endurance training: Relationship to muscle mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryściak, Katarzyna; Majerczak, Joanna; Kryściak, Jakub; Łochyński, Dawid; Kaczmarek, Dominik; Drzymała-Celichowska, Hanna; Krutki, Piotr; Gawedzka, Anna; Guzik, Magdalena; Korostynski, Michał; Szkutnik, Zbigniew; Pyza, Elżbieta; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wiesława; Zoladz, Jerzy A; Celichowski, Jan

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effects of 2, 4 and 8 weeks of endurance training on the contractile properties of slow (S), fast fatigue resistant (FR) and fast fatigable (FF) motor units (MUs) in rat medial gastrocnemius (MG) in relation to the changes in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis. The properties of functionally isolated MUs were examined in vivo. Mitochondrial biogenesis was judged based on the changes in mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNA), the content of the electron transport chain (ETC) proteins and PGC-1α in the MG. Moreover, the markers of mitochondria remodeling mitofusins (Mfn1, Mfn2) and dynamin-like protein (Opa1) were studied using qPCR. A proportion of FR MUs increased from 37.9% to 50.8% and a proportion of FF units decreased from 44.7% to 26.6% after 8 weeks of training. The increased fatigue resistance, shortened twitch duration, and increased ability to potentiate force were found as early as after 2 weeks of endurance training, predominantly in FR MUs. Moreover, just after 2 weeks of the training an enhancement of the mitochondrial network remodeling was present as judged by an increase in expression of Mfn1, Opa1 and an increase in PGC-1α in the slow part of MG. Interestingly, no signs of intensification of mitochondrial biogenesis assessed by ETC proteins content and mtDNA in slow and fast parts of gastrocnemius were found at this stage of the training. Nevertheless, after 8 weeks of training an increase in the ETC protein content was observed, but mainly in the slow part of gastrocnemius. Concluding, the functional changes in MUs' contractile properties leading to the enhancement of muscle performance accompanied by an activation of signalling that controls the muscle mitochondrial network reorganisation and mitochondrial biogenesis belong to an early muscle adaptive responses that precede an increase in mitochondrial ETC protein content.

  15. Effectiveness of classroom based crew resource management training in the intensive care unit: study design of a controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemper Peter F

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crew resource management (CRM has the potential to enhance patient safety in intensive care units (ICU by improving the use of non-technical skills. However, CRM evaluation studies in health care are inconclusive with regard to the effect of this training on behaviour and organizational outcomes, due to weak study designs and the scarce use of direct observations. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of CRM training on attitude, behaviour and organization after one year, using a multi-method approach and matched control units. The purpose of the present article is to describe the study protocol and the underlying choices of this evaluation study of CRM in the ICU in detail. Methods/Design Six ICUs participated in a paired controlled trial, with one pre-test and two post test measurements (respectively three months and one year after the training. Three ICUs were trained and compared to matched control ICUs. The 2-day classroom-based training was delivered to multidisciplinary groups. Typical CRM topics on the individual, team and organizational level were discussed, such as situational awareness, leadership and communication. All levels of Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework (reaction, learning, behaviour and organisation were assessed using questionnaires, direct observations, interviews and routine ICU administration data. Discussion It is expected that the CRM training acts as a generic intervention that stimulates specific interventions. Besides effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, the assessment of the barriers and facilitators will provide insight in the implementation process of CRM. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR: NTR1976

  16. Physician training in aerospace medicine--an historical review in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doarn, Charles R; Mohler, Stanley R

    2013-02-01

    The training of U.S. physicians in aviation medicine closely followed the development of reliable airplanes. This training has matured as aviation and space travel have become more routine over the past several decades. In the U.S., this training began in support of military pilots who were flying increasingly complex aircraft in the early part of the 20th century. As individuals reached into the stratosphere, low Earth orbit, and eventually to the Moon, physicians were trained not only through military efforts but in academic settings as well. This paper provides an historical summary of how physician training in aerospace medicine developed in the U.S., citing both the development of the military activities and, more importantly, the perspectives of the academic programs. This history is important as we move forward in the development of commercial space travel and the needs that such a business model will be required to meet.

  17. FORMAÇÃO DOCENTE EM SERVIÇO E A RECORRÊNCIA A MATERIAL MULTIMIDIA PARA O ENSINO DAS ENERGIAS RENOVÁVEIS. IN-SERVICE TEACHER TRAINING. RECURRING TO MULTIMEDIA MATERIAL FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Ofélia Chaile

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho relata uma investigação levada a cabo entre profissionais das áreas de Física – Energias Renováveis (ER e Pedagogia, que procura difundir e ensinar as ER. Propôs-se, para isso, preparar um grupo de docentes de escolas técnicas sob a modalidade conhecida como Formação Docente em Serviço, em um processo onde a inserção e a recorrência a materiais técnico-informáticos se constituíram em importante contribuição. A investigação efetuou abordagens complementares: a inserção curricular das ER no nível médio, a formação em serviço de docentes do nível primário, a pesquisa-ação colaborativa entre docentes. Para caracterizar o sujeito da categoria “formação docente em serviço” foram aplicadas entrevistas e recolhidos relatos, narrativas de aulas dadas, de onde se interpretam concepções, representações e escolas de formação para os docentes. O material de ensino, por sua parte, foi testado em campo, mediante sucessivas análises. Os resultados do estudo qualitativo permitiram conhecer pautas de orientação do processo de formação, em relação ao uso de materiais técnico-informáticos no ensino. The paper presents an investigation carried out by professionals of Physics – Renewable Energy (RE and Pedagogy areas, whose aim is to spread and teach RE. Therefore, it is set forth the training of a group of secondary technical school teachers under the modality known as In-service Teacher Training, through which the inclusion and the recurrence to techno-computing material will constitute a significant contribution. The research produced complementary approaches: RE curriculum insertion in middle school, in-service teacher training in the primary school, and collaborative action research among teachers. In order to characterize the subject of the category “in-service teacher training”, interviews are carried out, and stories and school class narrations are collected, from which conceptions

  18. Promoting excellence in nuclear power plant training in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangin, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) was formed in late 1979 by U.S. nuclear utilities to enhance the operational safety and reliability of their nuclear plants. One of INPO's major functions is to promote excellence in industry training and qualification programs. To accomplish this objective, INPO develops and uses guidelines and evaluation criteria to assist utilities in developing and implementing high quality training and education programs. The training guidelines permit utilities to develop performance-based programs which meet their specific need with minimal duplication of effort. INPO regularly evaluates each utility's training programs and practices in the plant evaluation and accreditation processes using criteria based on the training guidelines. In the accreditation process, INPO examines training programs and training organizations to determine whether they have the potential to produce individuals qualified to perform assigned tasks. During plant evaluations, INPO examines the implementation of the programs and their effectiveness in producing qualified individuals. After each accreditation review and plant evaluation, INPO recommends improvements and follows up to ensure they are made. (author)

  19. Sea Training at Maritime Academies Oversight. Hearings Before the Ad Hoc Select Subcommittee on Maritime Education and Training of the Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session on Sea Training of United States Merchant Marine Officers and Different Ways of Satisfying This Requirement at the Various Maritime Academies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries.

    Recorded are minutes of hearings before the House Ad Hoc Select Subcommittee on Maritime Education and Training regarding the sea training of United States Merchant Marine officers. Examined are various approaches to meeting the sea training requirement, especially the options of maritime academy training vessels, sailing on U.S.-flag merchant…

  20. Simulation training improves team dynamics and performance in a low-resource cardiac intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaram Subaya Emani

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of simulationbased training in improving team dynamics and performance in lowresource pediatric CICU environments, indicating its potential role in eliminating communication barriers in these settings.

  1. Science-practice nexus for landslide surveying: technical training for local government units in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, A. L.; Hespiantoro, S.; Dyar, D.; Balzer, D.; Kuhn, D.; Torizin, J.; Fuchs, M.; Kastl, S.; Anhorn, J.

    2017-02-01

    The Indonesian archipelago is prone to various geological hazards on an almost day to day basis. In order to mitigate disaster risk and reduce losses, the government uses its unique setup of ministerial training institutions. The Centre for Development of Human Resources in Geology, Mineral and Coal offers different level of technical training to local governments in order to provide them with the necessary means to understand geological hazards, mitigate risks, and hence close the gap between local and national governments. One key factor has been the continuous incorporation of new scientific knowledge into their training curricula. The paper presents benefits and challenges of this science-practice nexus using the standardised landslide survey as one example where mobile technology has been introduced to the training just recently.

  2. Improving Leadership Training at the United States Naval Academy by Utilizing Interactive Multimedia Instruction (IMI)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kawane, Shannon

    1999-01-01

    ... a program consistent with the Naval Academy's leadership training philosophy. The results suggest that an IMI program can be developed that is consistent with the Naval Academy's leadership development program...

  3. Disaster Education: A Survey Study to Analyze Disaster Medicine Training in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Ritu R; Cattamanchi, Srihari; Alqahtani, Abdulrahman; Aljohani, Majed; Keim, Mark; Ciottone, Gregory R

    2017-08-01

    The increase in natural and man-made disasters occurring worldwide places Emergency Medicine (EM) physicians at the forefront of responding to these crises. Despite the growing interest in Disaster Medicine, it is unclear if resident training has been able to include these educational goals. Hypothesis This study surveys EM residencies in the United States to assess the level of education in Disaster Medicine, to identify competencies least and most addressed, and to highlight effective educational models already in place. The authors distributed an online survey of multiple-choice and free-response questions to EM residency Program Directors in the United States between February 7 and September 24, 2014. Questions assessed residency background and details on specific Disaster Medicine competencies addressed during training. Out of 183 programs, 75 (41%) responded to the survey and completed all required questions. Almost all programs reported having some level of Disaster Medicine training in their residency. The most common Disaster Medicine educational competencies taught were patient triage and decontamination. The least commonly taught competencies were volunteer management, working with response teams, and special needs populations. The most commonly identified methods to teach Disaster Medicine were drills and lectures/seminars. There are a variety of educational tools used to teach Disaster Medicine in EM residencies today, with a larger focus on the use of lectures and hospital drills. There is no indication of a uniform educational approach across all residencies. The results of this survey demonstrate an opportunity for the creation of a standardized model for resident education in Disaster Medicine. Sarin RR , Cattamanchi S , Alqahtani A , Aljohani M , Keim M , Ciottone GR . Disaster education: a survey study to analyze disaster medicine training in emergency medicine residency programs in the United States. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(4):368-373.

  4. Perceptions of basic, advanced, and pediatric life support training in a United States medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillow, Malford Tyson; Stader, Donald; Nguyen, Matthew; Cao, Dazhe; McArthur, Robert; Hoxhaj, Shkelzen

    2014-05-01

    Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), and Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) are integral parts of emergency resuscitative care. Although this training is usually reserved for residents, introducing the training in the medical student curriculum may enhance acquisition and retention of these skills. We developed a survey to characterize the perceptions and needs of graduating medical students regarding BLS, ACLS, and PALS training. This was a study of graduating 4th-year medical students at a U.S. medical school. The students were surveyed prior to participating in an ACLS course in March of their final year. Of 152 students, 109 (71.7%) completed the survey; 48.6% of students entered medical school without any prior training and 47.7% started clinics without training; 83.4% of students reported witnessing an average of 3.0 in-hospital cardiac arrests during training (range of 0-20). Overall, students rated their preparedness 2.0 (SD 1.0) for adult resuscitations and 1.7 (SD 0.9) for pediatric resuscitations on a 1-5 Likert scale, with 1 being unprepared. A total of 36.8% of students avoided participating in resuscitations due to lack of training; 98.2%, 91.7%, and 64.2% of students believe that BLS, ACLS, and PALS, respectively, should be included in the medical student curriculum. As per previous studies that have examined this topic, students feel unprepared to respond to cardiac arrests and resuscitations. They feel that training is needed in their curriculum and would possibly enhance perceived comfort levels and willingness to participate in resuscitations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Comparative Study of Surgical Training in South East Asia, Australia and The United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Kheong Lum

    2009-07-01

    Conclusion: Quality of training can be improved by changing to a curriculum and competency based model, utilization of continuous assessment methods, reducing service requirements and better compensation for trainers. Southeast Asia has the potential to provide centres of excellence for surgical training. Surgical educators in SEA will find useful information in this paper to improve their programs which will hopefully evolve into a common core curriculum and enable cross border exchange of surgical trainees in SEA for broader exposure.

  6. Training health and safety committees to use control banding: lessons learned and opportunities for the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracker, Anne L; Morse, Timothy F; Simcox, Nancy J

    2009-05-01

    Control banding (CB) is a control-focused risk management model that has received international attention. CB strategies are designed to control workplace chemical exposures after the completion of a qualitative risk assessment. Connecticut was one of the first states to provide training on how to use this control-focused tool. Joint labor/management teams and individuals from 34 workplaces attended a control banding workshop and learned how to use one CB model, the United Kingdom (UK) Health and Safety Executive's Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Essentials Toolkit. After the initial training program the investigators used follow-up workshops, questionnaires, site visit data, and case studies to evaluate the training curriculum and assess the utility and effectiveness of this CB strategy. We found that the model is easily learned, although several areas for improvement were identified. Participants from 10 workplaces used COSHH Essentials to evaluate at least one task. The training curriculum was effective in that the agreement between the exposure variables coded by these workplaces and one of the workshop instructors, a certified industrial hygienist (CIH), were highly concordant. The training curriculum and the model promoted a discussion of risk between workers and managers and resulted in the implementation of improvements in the work environment. The model agreed with both the CIH's and the worksites' qualitative risk assessments 65% of the time, and likely over-controlled for 71% (5/7) of the cases of nonagreement. Feedback from workshop participants benefits the current dialogue on the implications of implementing CB in the United States.

  7. Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 342, the Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit (FTP), which is located in Area 23 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 88 km (55 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 342 is comprised of CAS 23-56-01. The FTP is an area approximately 100 m by 140 m (350 ft by 450 ft) located west of the town of Mercury, Nevada, which was used between approximately 1965 and 1990 to train fire-fighting personnel (REECo, 1991; Jacobson, 1991). The surface and subsurface soils in the FTP have likely been impacted by hydrocarbons and other contaminants of potential concern (COPC) associated with burn activities and training exercises in the area.

  8. Interim report on the fate of wood preservatives in soils adjacent to in-service utility poles in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, B.B.; Ripp, J.; Sims, R.C.

    1995-06-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is studying the environmental impact of preservatives associated with in-service utility poles. As part of this endeavor, two EPRI contractors, META Environmental, Inc. (META) and Atlantic Environmental Services, Inc. (Atlantic), have collected soil samples from around wood utility poles nationwide, for various chemical and physical analyses. This report covers the results for 107 pole sites in the US. These pole sites included a range of preservative types, soil types, wood types, pole sizes, and in-service ages. The poles in this study were preserved with one of two types of preservative: pentachlorophenol (PCP) or creosote. Approximately 40 to 50 soil samples were collected from each wood pole site in this study. The soil samples collected from the pole sites were analyzed for chlorinated phenols and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) if the pole was preserved with PCP, or for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) if the pole was preserved with creosote. The soil samples were also analyzed for physical/chemical parameters, such as pH, total organic carbon (TOC), and cationic exchange capacity (CEC). Additional samples were used in studies to determine biological degradation rates, and soil-water distribution and retardation coefficients of PCP in site soils. Methods of analysis followed standard EPA and ASTM methods, with some modifications in the chemical analyses to enable the efficient processing of many samples with sufficiently low detection limits for this study. All chemical, physical, and site-specific data were stored in a relational computer database

  9. An Evaluation of a Teacher Training Program at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBerry, LaMonnia Edge

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the effects of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's work in partnering with professors from universities across the United States during a 1-year collaborative partnership through an educational program referred to as Belfer First Step Holocaust Institute for Teacher Educators (BFS…

  10. Predictors of patrol officer interest in cybercrime training and investigation in selected United States police departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Thomas J; Bossler, Adam M

    2012-09-01

    Cybercrime has created substantial challenges for law enforcement, particularly at the local level. Most scholars and police administrators believe that patrol officers need to become more effective first responders to cybercrime calls. The evidence illustrates, however, that many patrol officers are neither adequately prepared nor strongly interested in taking an active role in addressing cybercrime at the local level. This study, therefore, examined the factors that predicted patrol officer interest in cybercrime training and investigations in two southeastern U.S. cities. The study specifically examined the relationship between demographics, cybercrime exposure, computer training, computer proficiency, Internet and cybercrime perceptions, and views on policing cybercrime with officer interest in cybercrime investigation training and conducting cybercrime investigations in the future. Officer views on policing cybercrime, particularly whether they valued cybercrime investigations and believed that cybercrime would dramatically change policing, along with their computer skills, were the strongest predictors of interest in cybercrime efforts. Officers who had received previous computer training were less interested in additional training and conducting investigations. These findings support the argument that more command and departmental meetings focusing on the value of investigating these types of crime need to be held in order to increase officer interest.

  11. Mental health first aid training for the Bhutanese refugee community in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Parangkush; Li, Changwei; Gurung, Ashok; Bizune, Destani; Dogbey, M Christina; Johnson, Caroline C; Yun, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training for Bhutanese refugee community leaders in the U.S. We hypothesized that training refugee leaders would improve knowledge of mental health problems and treatment process and decrease negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. One hundred and twenty community leaders participated in MHFA training, of whom 58 had sufficient English proficiency to complete pre- and post-tests. The questionnaires assessed each participant's ability to recognize signs of depression, knowledge about professional help and treatment, and attitudes towards people with mental illness. Between the pre- and post-test, participants showed significant improvement in the recognition of symptoms of depression and expressed beliefs about treatment that became more concordant with those of mental health professionals. However, there was no reduction in negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. MHFA training course is a promising program for Bhutanese refugee communities in the U.S. However, some adaptations may be necessary to ensure that MHFA training is optimized for this community.

  12. Impact of Subspecialty Fellowship Training on Research Productivity Among Academic Plastic Surgery Faculty in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Aditya; Therattil, Paul J; Chung, Stella; Lee, Edward S

    2015-01-01

    The impact of subspecialty fellowship training on research productivity among academic plastic surgeons is unknown. The authors' aim of this study was to (1) describe the current fellowship representation in academic plastic surgery and (2) evaluate the relationship between h-index and subspecialty fellowship training by experience and type. Academic plastic surgery faculty (N = 590) were identified through an Internet-based search of all ACGME-accredited integrated and combined residency programs. Research output was measured by h-index from the Scopus database as well as a number of peer-reviewed publications. The Kruskal-Wallis test, with a subsequent Mann-Whitney U test, was used for statistical analysis to determine correlations. In the United States, 72% (n = 426) of academic plastic surgeons had trained in 1 or more subspecialty fellowship program. Within this cohort, the largest group had completed multiple fellowships (28%), followed by hand (23%), craniofacial (22%), microsurgery (15%), research (8%), cosmetic (3%), burn (2%), and wound healing (0.5%). Higher h-indices correlated with a research fellowship (12.5; P productivity compared with their colleagues. Craniofacial-trained physicians also demonstrated a higher marker for academic productivity than multiple other specialties. In this study, we show that the type and number of fellowships influence the h-index and further identification of such variables may help improve academic mentorship and productivity within academic plastic surgery.

  13. Mobile surgical skills education unit: a new concept in surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Faisal M; Hseino, Hazem; Hill, Arnold D K; Kavanagh, Eamon; Traynor, Oscar

    2011-08-01

    Basic surgical skills are an integral part of surgical training. Simulation-based surgical training offers an opportunity both to trainees and trainers to learn and teach surgical skills outside the operating room in a nonpatient, nonstressed environment. However, widespread adoption of simulation technology especially in medical education is prohibited by its inherent higher cost, limited space, and interruptions to clinical duties. Mobile skills laboratory has been proposed as a means to address some of these limitations. A new program is designed by the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), in an approach to teach its postgraduate basic surgical trainees the necessary surgical skills, by making the use of mobile innovative simulation technology in their own hospital settings. In this article, authors describe the program and students response to the mobile surgical skills being delivered in the region of their training hospitals and by their own regional consultant trainers.

  14. United States Department of Energy breeder reactor staff training domestic program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Two US DOE projects in the Pacific Northwest offer unique on-the-scene training opportunities at sodium-cooled fast-reactor plants: the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) near Richland, Washington, which has operated successfully in a wide range of irradiation test programs since 1980; and the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) near Idaho Falls, Idaho, which has been in operation for approximately 20 years. Training programs have been especially designed to take advantage of this plant experience. Available courses are described

  15. A cluster randomised controlled trial of a staff-training intervention in residential units for people with long-term mental illness in Portugal: the PromQual trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Graça; Papoila, Ana; Tomé, Gina; Killaspy, Helen; King, Michael; Caldas-de-Almeida, José Miguel

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a staff-training intervention to improve service users' engagement in activities and quality of care, by means of a cluster randomised controlled trial. All residential units with at least 12-h a day staff support (n = 23) were invited to participate. Quality of care was assessed with the Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care (QuIRC) filled online by the unit's manager. Half the units (n = 12) were randomly assigned to continue providing treatment as usual, and half (n = 11) received a staff-training intervention that focused on skills for engaging service users in activities, with trainers working alongside staff to embed this learning in the service. The primary outcome was service users' level of activity (measured with the Time Use Diary), reassessed at 4 and 8 months. Secondary outcomes were the quality of care provided (QuIRC), and service users' quality of life (Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life) reassessed at 8 months. Generalized linear mixed effect models were used to assess the difference in outcomes between units in the two trial arms. The trial was registered with Current Controlled Trials (Ref NCT02366117). Knowledge acquired by the staff during the initial workshops increased significantly (p ≤ 0.01). However, the intervention and comparison units did not differ significantly in primary and secondary outcomes at either follow-up. The intervention increased the level of knowledge of staff without leading to an improvement in service users' engagement in activities, quality of life, or quality of care in the units.

  16. Retention Patterns for Army National Guard Units Attending the National Training Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    which are more difficult, Table 2.1 NTC ROUNDOUT BATTALION SCHEDULE ARNG UNIT STATE DATES 1-108 AR GA 9-22 September 󈨗 2-136 INF (M) MN 19 April-8 May...1984 1-121 INF (M) GA 3-22 October 󈨘 2-121 INF (M) GA 18 March-6 April 󈨙 2-152 AR AL 1-20 June 󈨙 2-120 INF (M) NC 26 June-15 July 󈨙 3-156 INF...roundout unit to the 24th Infantry Division headquartered at Fort Stewart, Georgia. Elements of the unit are located in Tifton , Valdosta, Fitzgerald and

  17. Catalog of Simulation Models and Wargames Used for Unit and Leader Training. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    149 SAS 155 -. I TAC SUPPRESSOR 181 xiv 77- TABLE 5 (continued) N’ NAME PAGE - TAM 187 TWX 205 WASGRAM 213 Other: Economi -l DROMEDARY 79 LOGISTICS...be an upgrade of WACE and BABAS as a computer-assisted mixed land and sea training simulation. DATE IMPLEMENTED: Prototype to be field tested, end of

  18. The Evaluation of Vocational Training. Report of a Seminar (University of Manchester, United Kingdom, January 1975).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commission des Communautes Europeennes (Luxembourg).

    Based on the working papers and the results of seminar discussions on the evaluation of vocational education in various European countries, this volume summarizes current European thinking on the evaluation of training programs. Chapter 1 describes and defines the different levels of analysis which can be used in evaluation: analysis in the…

  19. Training Needs in Gerontology. Hearings, Special Committee on Aging, United States Senate. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Special Committee on Aging.

    At the second day of hearings on training needs in gerontology the witnesses were Stephen Kurzman accompanied by Arthur S. Flemming, John Lapp, Gerald D. LaVeck; George Maddox; Elias Cohen; Wilma Donahue; Brin Hawkins with Lettie Graves and Yolanda Owens; and John B. Martin. (MS)

  20. A Study to Identify the Transitional Training Needs for United States Army Medical Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-29

    Books Kotler , Philip, and Roberta Clarke. Marketing for Health Care Organizations. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall, 1987. Runyon, Richard P., and...8217 and most can benefit from instruction in administrative principles and practices during residency" (444). A focus began to turn toward residency...leadership development, office communi-ations, professional and legal obligations, Rawls 8 and practice marketing . Because these newly trained physicians

  1. Effect of exercise training on Ca2+ release units of left ventricular myocytes of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro-Júnior, M.A.; Quintão-Júnior, J.F.; Drummond, L.R.; Lavorato, V.N.; Drummond, F.R.; Amadeu, M.A.; Oliveira, E.M.; Felix, L.B.; Cruz, J.S.; Mill, J.G.; Natali, A.J.; Prímola-Gomes, T.N.

    2014-01-01

    In cardiomyocytes, calcium (Ca 2+ ) release units comprise clusters of intracellular Ca 2+ release channels located on the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and hypertension is well established as a cause of defects in calcium release unit function. Our objective was to determine whether endurance exercise training could attenuate the deleterious effects of hypertension on calcium release unit components and Ca 2+ sparks in left ventricular myocytes of spontaneously hypertensive rats. Male Wistar and spontaneously hypertensive rats (4 months of age) were divided into 4 groups: normotensive (NC) and hypertensive control (HC), and normotensive (NT) and hypertensive trained (HT) animals (7 rats per group). NC and HC rats were submitted to a low-intensity treadmill running protocol (5 days/week, 1 h/day, 0% grade, and 50-60% of maximal running speed) for 8 weeks. Gene expression of the ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) and FK506 binding protein (FKBP12.6) increased (270%) and decreased (88%), respectively, in HC compared to NC rats. Endurance exercise training reversed these changes by reducing RyR2 (230%) and normalizing FKBP12.6 gene expression (112%). Hypertension also increased the frequency of Ca 2+ sparks (HC=7.61±0.26 vs NC=4.79±0.19 per 100 µm/s) and decreased its amplitude (HC=0.260±0.08 vs NC=0.324±0.10 ΔF/F 0 ), full width at half-maximum amplitude (HC=1.05±0.08 vs NC=1.26±0.01 µm), total duration (HC=11.51±0.12 vs NC=14.97±0.24 ms), time to peak (HC=4.84±0.06 vs NC=6.31±0.14 ms), and time constant of decay (HC=8.68±0.12 vs NC=10.21±0.22 ms). These changes were partially reversed in HT rats (frequency of Ca 2+ sparks=6.26±0.19 µm/s, amplitude=0.282±0.10 ΔF/F 0 , full width at half-maximum amplitude=1.14±0.01 µm, total duration=13.34±0.17 ms, time to peak=5.43±0.08 ms, and time constant of decay=9.43±0.15 ms). Endurance exercise training attenuated the deleterious effects of hypertension on calcium release units of left ventricular myocytes

  2. Effect of exercise training on Ca{sup 2+} release units of left ventricular myocytes of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro-Júnior, M.A. [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Laboratório de Biologia do Exercício, Departamento de Educação Física, Viçosa, MG (Brazil); Quintão-Júnior, J.F.; Drummond, L.R.; Lavorato, V.N.; Drummond, F.R. [Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Laboratório de Biologia do Exercício, Departamento de Educação Física, Viçosa, MG (Brazil); Amadeu, M.A.; Oliveira, E.M. [Universidade de São Paulo, Laboratório de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular do Exercício, Escola de Educação Física e Esportes, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Felix, L.B. [Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Departamento de Engenharia Elétrica, Viçosa, MG (Brazil); Cruz, J.S. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Laboratório de Membranas Excitáveis e Biologia Cardiovascular, Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mill, J.G. [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Natali, A.J.; Prímola-Gomes, T.N. [Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Laboratório de Biologia do Exercício, Departamento de Educação Física, Viçosa, MG (Brazil)

    2014-08-29

    In cardiomyocytes, calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) release units comprise clusters of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release channels located on the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and hypertension is well established as a cause of defects in calcium release unit function. Our objective was to determine whether endurance exercise training could attenuate the deleterious effects of hypertension on calcium release unit components and Ca{sup 2+} sparks in left ventricular myocytes of spontaneously hypertensive rats. Male Wistar and spontaneously hypertensive rats (4 months of age) were divided into 4 groups: normotensive (NC) and hypertensive control (HC), and normotensive (NT) and hypertensive trained (HT) animals (7 rats per group). NC and HC rats were submitted to a low-intensity treadmill running protocol (5 days/week, 1 h/day, 0% grade, and 50-60% of maximal running speed) for 8 weeks. Gene expression of the ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) and FK506 binding protein (FKBP12.6) increased (270%) and decreased (88%), respectively, in HC compared to NC rats. Endurance exercise training reversed these changes by reducing RyR2 (230%) and normalizing FKBP12.6 gene expression (112%). Hypertension also increased the frequency of Ca{sup 2+} sparks (HC=7.61±0.26 vs NC=4.79±0.19 per 100 µm/s) and decreased its amplitude (HC=0.260±0.08 vs NC=0.324±0.10 ΔF/F{sub 0}), full width at half-maximum amplitude (HC=1.05±0.08 vs NC=1.26±0.01 µm), total duration (HC=11.51±0.12 vs NC=14.97±0.24 ms), time to peak (HC=4.84±0.06 vs NC=6.31±0.14 ms), and time constant of decay (HC=8.68±0.12 vs NC=10.21±0.22 ms). These changes were partially reversed in HT rats (frequency of Ca{sup 2+} sparks=6.26±0.19 µm/s, amplitude=0.282±0.10 ΔF/F{sub 0}, full width at half-maximum amplitude=1.14±0.01 µm, total duration=13.34±0.17 ms, time to peak=5.43±0.08 ms, and time constant of decay=9.43±0.15 ms). Endurance exercise training attenuated the deleterious effects of hypertension on calcium release units of

  3. Effect of exercise training on Ca²⁺ release units of left ventricular myocytes of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro-Júnior, M A; Quintão-Júnior, J F; Drummond, L R; Lavorato, V N; Drummond, F R; Amadeu, M A; Oliveira, E M; Felix, L B; Cruz, J S; Mill, J G; Natali, A J; Prímola-Gomes, T N

    2014-11-01

    In cardiomyocytes, calcium (Ca²⁺) release units comprise clusters of intracellular Ca²⁺ release channels located on the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and hypertension is well established as a cause of defects in calcium release unit function. Our objective was to determine whether endurance exercise training could attenuate the deleterious effects of hypertension on calcium release unit components and Ca²⁺ sparks in left ventricular myocytes of spontaneously hypertensive rats. Male Wistar and spontaneously hypertensive rats (4 months of age) were divided into 4 groups: normotensive (NC) and hypertensive control (HC), and normotensive (NT) and hypertensive trained (HT) animals (7 rats per group). NC and HC rats were submitted to a low-intensity treadmill running protocol (5 days/week, 1 h/day, 0% grade, and 50-60% of maximal running speed) for 8 weeks. Gene expression of the ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) and FK506 binding protein (FKBP12.6) increased (270%) and decreased (88%), respectively, in HC compared to NC rats. Endurance exercise training reversed these changes by reducing RyR2 (230%) and normalizing FKBP12.6 gene expression (112%). Hypertension also increased the frequency of Ca²⁺ sparks (HC=7.61 ± 0.26 vs NC=4.79 ± 0.19 per 100 µm/s) and decreased its amplitude (HC=0.260 ± 0.08 vs NC=0.324 ± 0.10 ΔF/F0), full width at half-maximum amplitude (HC=1.05 ± 0.08 vs NC=1.26 ± 0.01 µm), total duration (HC=11.51 ± 0.12 vs NC=14.97 ± 0.24 ms), time to peak (HC=4.84 ± 0.06 vs NC=6.31 ± 0.14 ms), and time constant of decay (HC=8.68 ± 0.12 vs NC=10.21 ± 0.22 ms). These changes were partially reversed in HT rats (frequency of Ca²⁺ sparks=6.26 ± 0.19 µm/s, amplitude=0.282 ± 0.10 ΔF/F0, full width at half-maximum amplitude=1.14 ± 0.01 µm, total duration=13.34 ± 0.17 ms, time to peak=5.43 ± 0.08 ms, and time constant of decay=9.43 ± 0.15 ms). Endurance exercise training attenuated the deleterious effects of hypertension on calcium release

  4. Effect of exercise training on Ca2+ release units of left ventricular myocytes of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Carneiro-Júnior

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In cardiomyocytes, calcium (Ca2+ release units comprise clusters of intracellular Ca2+ release channels located on the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and hypertension is well established as a cause of defects in calcium release unit function. Our objective was to determine whether endurance exercise training could attenuate the deleterious effects of hypertension on calcium release unit components and Ca2+ sparks in left ventricular myocytes of spontaneously hypertensive rats. Male Wistar and spontaneously hypertensive rats (4 months of age were divided into 4 groups: normotensive (NC and hypertensive control (HC, and normotensive (NT and hypertensive trained (HT animals (7 rats per group. NC and HC rats were submitted to a low-intensity treadmill running protocol (5 days/week, 1 h/day, 0% grade, and 50-60% of maximal running speed for 8 weeks. Gene expression of the ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2 and FK506 binding protein (FKBP12.6 increased (270% and decreased (88%, respectively, in HC compared to NC rats. Endurance exercise training reversed these changes by reducing RyR2 (230% and normalizing FKBP12.6 gene expression (112%. Hypertension also increased the frequency of Ca2+ sparks (HC=7.61±0.26 vs NC=4.79±0.19 per 100 µm/s and decreased its amplitude (HC=0.260±0.08 vs NC=0.324±0.10 ΔF/F0, full width at half-maximum amplitude (HC=1.05±0.08 vs NC=1.26±0.01 µm, total duration (HC=11.51±0.12 vs NC=14.97±0.24 ms, time to peak (HC=4.84±0.06 vs NC=6.31±0.14 ms, and time constant of decay (HC=8.68±0.12 vs NC=10.21±0.22 ms. These changes were partially reversed in HT rats (frequency of Ca2+ sparks=6.26±0.19 µm/s, amplitude=0.282±0.10 ΔF/F0, full width at half-maximum amplitude=1.14±0.01 µm, total duration=13.34±0.17 ms, time to peak=5.43±0.08 ms, and time constant of decay=9.43±0.15 ms. Endurance exercise training attenuated the deleterious effects of hypertension on calcium release units of left ventricular myocytes.

  5. Effect of exercise training on Ca2+ release units of left ventricular myocytes of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro-Júnior, M A; Quintão-Júnior, J F; Drummond, L R; Lavorato, V N; Drummond, F R; Amadeu, M A; Oliveira, E M; Felix, L B; Cruz, J S; Mill, J G; Natali, A J; Prímola-Gomes, T N

    2014-08-29

    In cardiomyocytes, calcium (Ca2+) release units comprise clusters of intracellular Ca2+ release channels located on the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and hypertension is well established as a cause of defects in calcium release unit function. Our objective was to determine whether endurance exercise training could attenuate the deleterious effects of hypertension on calcium release unit components and Ca2+ sparks in left ventricular myocytes of spontaneously hypertensive rats. Male Wistar and spontaneously hypertensive rats (4 months of age) were divided into 4 groups: normotensive (NC) and hypertensive control (HC), and normotensive (NT) and hypertensive trained (HT) animals (7 rats per group). NC and HC rats were submitted to a low-intensity treadmill running protocol (5 days/week, 1 h/day, 0% grade, and 50-60% of maximal running speed) for 8 weeks. Gene expression of the ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) and FK506 binding protein (FKBP12.6) increased (270%) and decreased (88%), respectively, in HC compared to NC rats. Endurance exercise training reversed these changes by reducing RyR2 (230%) and normalizing FKBP12.6 gene expression (112%). Hypertension also increased the frequency of Ca2+ sparks (HC=7.61±0.26 vs NC=4.79±0.19 per 100 µm/s) and decreased its amplitude (HC=0.260±0.08 vs NC=0.324±0.10 ΔF/F0), full width at half-maximum amplitude (HC=1.05±0.08 vs NC=1.26±0.01 µm), total duration (HC=11.51±0.12 vs NC=14.97±0.24 ms), time to peak (HC=4.84±0.06 vs NC=6.31±0.14 ms), and time constant of decay (HC=8.68±0.12 vs NC=10.21±0.22 ms). These changes were partially reversed in HT rats (frequency of Ca2+ sparks=6.26±0.19 µm/s, amplitude=0.282±0.10 ΔF/F0, full width at half-maximum amplitude=1.14±0.01 µm, total duration=13.34±0.17 ms, time to peak=5.43±0.08 ms, and time constant of decay=9.43±0.15 ms). Endurance exercise training attenuated the deleterious effects of hypertension on calcium release units of left ventricular myocytes.

  6. Orthopaedic training in Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Orthopaedic training in Kenya, like in other East, central and .... quite a number of good facilities that would train an ... provide a forum for exchange of ideas and training. (2,3) ... administrators purely interested in service provision,.

  7. Konaklama İşletmelerinde Kat Hizmetleri Çalışanlarının Hizmet İçi Eğitim Kalite Algısı ile Motivasyon Düzeyleri Arasındaki İlişki: İstanbul Bölgesinde Bir Araştırma(Relationship Between In-Service Training Quality Perception and Motivation Factors of Hospitality Businesses Housekeeping Employees: A Research In Istanbul Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk TANRIVERDİ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hospitality businesses that establish innovative initiatives in order to create a value against competitive conditions that occur today, started implementing in-service training techniques by concluding the fact that an increase in motivations of employees result in a linear improvement in productivity and quality in services. In our survey, we examined the relationship and its power between in-service training and intrinsic job motivational factors and also between in-service training and extrinsic job motivational factors in hospitality businesses that apply in-service training programs in Istanbul area. Surveys were conducted on 110 housekeeping employees of two hospitality businesses’; scales of in-service training quality perception, intrinsic job motivational factors and extrinsic job motivational factors are being used. Data that was collected by this sample are analyzed by factor, correlation and regression analysis. Within the framework of the research it is concluded that there is a linear relationship between in-service training and intrinsic job motivational factors and also between in-service training and extrinsic job motivational factors.

  8. Electrophysiological characteristics of motor units and muscle fibers in trained and untrained young male subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duez, Lene; Qerama, Erisela; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that the amplitudes of compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) and interference pattern analysis (IPA) would be larger in trained subjects compared with untrained subjects, possibly due to hypertrophy of muscle fibers and/or increased central drive. Moreover, we hypothesized...... and untrained subjects in IPA power spectrum and turns per second or amplitude of the CMAPs obtained by DMS. Muscle fiber hypertrophy and/or altered central drive may account for our results, but there was no indication of changes in muscle fiber excitability. Muscle Nerve, 2010....... that the untrained muscle is less excitable compared with the trained muscle. An electromyographic (EMG) needle electrode was used to record the IPA at maximal voluntary effort. The CMAP was obtained by stimulating the musculocutaneous nerve and recording the brachial biceps muscle using surface electrodes. CMAPs...

  9. Videos, tweet-ups, and training unite scientist communicators at Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mary Catherine; Ramsayer, Kate

    2012-02-01

    AGU's public information office held several events at the 2011 Fall Meeting designed to train, recognize, and reward member scientists who communicate with, or want to communicate with, nonscience audiences. On Sunday, about 90 researchers gathered at the Marriott Marquis hotel for an all-day science communications training event covering topics including journalism from the insider's perspective, storytelling, and using humor to share science. On Wednesday a communications panel focusing specifically on climate science shared tips on communicating with audiences via TV and the Web, among other outlets. At a social media soiree Monday evening, geobloggers, Facebook fans, Twitter followers, and others met in person and talked about how to share news and research across the many platforms of the Internet. Later in the week, bloggers from AGU's blogosphere and other sites met for lunch to discuss the online Earth and space science community.

  10. United States Air Force Training Management 2010. Volume 2. A Strategy for Superiority

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    decontaminate the ramp area with the remote robotic Chemical- Biological Warfare (CBW) sterilizers. If the Chemical- Biological (CB) attacks continue, she will be...Of Skilled Craftsmen Troubles Some Firms." The Wall Street Journal. 14 September 1987, pp. 1,8. 44. Naisbitt, John. Megatrends : Ten New Directions...Computer Based Training CBW Chemical- Biological Warfare CMAS Computer-Based Maintenance Aids System CMI Computer-Managed Instruction DOD Department of

  11. Improving leadership training at the United States Naval Academy by utilizing Interactive Multimedia Instruction (IMI)

    OpenAIRE

    Kawane, Shannon E.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis addresses several issues identified in the analysis and design phases of the Instructional Systems Development process to develop an IMI leadership program for the Naval Academy. The overarching goal is to provide the Naval Academy with a study that uses current research and existing innovative leadership programs to answer questions that need to be resolved in developing a program consistent with the Naval Academy's leadership training philosophy. The results suggest that an IMI ...

  12. Cockpit Resource Management (CRM): A tool for improved flight safety (United Airlines CRM training)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J. E.; Taggart, William R.

    1987-01-01

    The approach and methodology used in developing cockpit management skills is effective because of the following features: (1) A comparative method of learning is used enabling crewmembers to study different forms of teamwork. (2) The learning comes about as a result of crewmembers learning from one another instead of from an expert instructor. (3) Key elements of cockpit teamwork and effective management are studied so that crewmembers can determine how these elements can improve safety and problem solving. (4) Critique among the crewmembers themselves rather than from outsiders is used as a common focusing point for crews to provide feedback to one another on how each can be a more effective crewmember. (5) The training is continuous in the sense that it becomes part of recurrent, upgrade, and other forms of crewmember training and development. And (6) the training results in sound and genuine insights that come about through solid education as opposed to tutoring, coaching, or telling crewmembers how to behave more effectively.

  13. Return on Investment for the United States Navy’s Training with Industry Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    supply lines of operations: supply chain management , acquisition management , and operational logistics (NAVSUP, n.d...included logistics support. The Supply Corps’ overall mission today, “delivering sustained global logistics capabilities to the Navy and Joint Warfighter...exposure to managing logistics from the unit level to the strategic level. With each billet assigned, Supply Corps officers build

  14. Performance on a Surgical In-Training Examination Varies by Training Year and Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Levin, L Scott; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Few studies in surgery have addressed medical knowledge competency training as defined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. As in-training examinations are ubiquitous educational tools for surgical residents in the United States, insights into examination performance may help fill this void. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between In-Service Examination performance and training characteristics in plastic surgery. This retrospective cohort study reviewed performance data for the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Examination for the years 2012 to 2015. Comparisons were made both within and between training pathways by means of Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Data were available for 1367 independent (37.9 percent) and 2240 integrated residents (62.1 percent). Among integrated residents, performance increased with additional years of training (p 0.05). Similarly, independent resident examination performance increased by year of training (p 0.05). At each level of training (postgraduate years 4 to 6), integrated residents outperformed their independent resident colleagues (postgraduate years 1 to 3) (p < 0.001). Performance on the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Examination increases during residency, with integrated residents outperforming independent residents. These findings may have implications for medical knowledge competency training as defined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education.

  15. The potential impact of the World Trade Organization's general agreement on trade in services on health system reform and regulation in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skala, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    The collapse of the World Trade Organization's (WTO) Doha Round of talks without achieving new health services liberalization presents an important opportunity to evaluate the wisdom of granting further concessions to international investors in the health sector. The continuing deterioration of the U.S. health system and the primacy of reform as an issue in the 2008 presidential campaign make clear the need for a full range of policy options for addressing the national health crisis. Yet few commentators or policymakers realize that existing WTO health care commitments may already significantly constrain domestic policy options. This article illustrates these constraints through an evaluation of the potential effects of current WTO law and jurisprudence on the implementation of a single-payer national health insurance system in the United States, proposed incremental national and state health system reforms, the privatization of Medicare, and other prominent health system issues. The author concludes with some recommendations to the U.S. Trade Representative to suspend existing liberalization commitments in the health sector and to interpret current and future international trade treaties in a manner consistent with civilized notions of health care as a universal human right.

  16. Preregistration research training of speech and language therapists in the United Kingdom: a nationwide audit of quantity, content and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnamenta, Emma; Joffe, Victoria L

    2018-04-24

    To carry out an audit of the quantity and content of research teaching on UK preregistration speech and language therapy (SLT) degree programmes. Lecturers delivering research teaching from each higher education institution providing preregistration training were invited to complete an online survey. Amount of research teaching, content of research teaching (including final-year projects), perceived confidence by staff of graduates in research awareness, research activity and leading research. Responses were received for 14 programmes (10 undergraduate and four postgraduate), representing 73% of all undergraduate courses and 44% of all postgraduate courses in the United Kingdom. Fifty percent of courses included over 30 h of research teaching, with wide variability across both undergraduate and postgraduate courses in number of hours, modules and credits devoted to research. There was no association between quantity of research teaching and perception of adequacy of quantity of teaching. Critical appraisal, statistical software and finding literature were the most common topics taught. Conversely, service evaluation and audit was the least common topic covered. All institutions provided a final-year project, with 11/14 requiring empirical research. Perceived confidence of graduates was higher for research awareness than active research and leading research, but this varied across institutions. There was a strong correlation between lecturers' perceived confidence of graduates in research awareness and number of hours of research teaching. Despite the requirements for healthcare professionals to engage in evidence-based practice, the amount and nature of research training in preregistration courses for SLTs in the United Kingdom is highly variable. Levels of perceived confidence of graduates were also variable, not only for active participation in research, and for leading research, but also for research awareness. This has implications for the ability of SLTs to

  17. Accreditation of undergraduate medical training programs: practices in nine developing countries as compared with the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto, Jose; Burch, Vanessa C; Adnan, Nor Azila Mohd; Afolabi, Bosede B; Ismail, Zalina; Jafri, Wasim; Olapade-Olaopa, E Oluwabunmi; Otieno-Nyunya, Boaz; Supe, Avinash; Togoo, Altantsetseg; Vargas, Ana Lia; Wasserman, Elizabeth; Morahan, Page S; Burdick, William; Gary, Nancy

    2006-07-01

    Undergraduate medical training program accreditation is practiced in many countries, but information from developing countries is sparse. We compared medical training program accreditation systems in nine developing countries, and compared these with accreditation practices in the United States of America (USA). Medical program accreditation practices in nine developing countries were systematically analyzed using all available published documents. Findings were compared to USA accreditation practices. Accreditation systems with explicitly defined criteria, standards and procedures exist in all nine countries studied: Argentina, India, Kenya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines and South Africa. Introduction of accreditation processes is relatively recent, starting in 1957 in India to 2001 in Malaysia. Accrediting agencies were set up in these countries predominantly by their respective governments as a result of legislation and acts of Parliament, involving Ministries of Education and Health. As in the USA, accreditation: (1) serves as a quality assurance mechanism promoting professional and public confidence in the quality of medical education, (2) assists medical schools in attaining desired standards, and (3) ensures that graduates' performance complies with national norms. All nine countries follow similar accreditation procedures. Where mandatory accreditation is practiced, non-compliant institutions may be placed on probation, student enrollment suspended or accreditation withdrawn. Accreditation systems in several developing countries are similar to those in the developed world. Data suggest the trend towards instituting quality assurance mechanisms in medical education is spreading to some developing countries, although generalization to other areas of the world is difficult to ascertain.

  18. Identification of Eastern United States Reticulitermes Termite Species via PCR-RFLP, Assessed Using Training and Test Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Garrick

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reticulitermes termites play key roles in dead wood decomposition and nutrient cycling in forests. They also damage man-made structures, resulting in considerable economic loss. In the eastern United States, five species (R. flavipes, R. virginicus, R. nelsonae, R. hageni and R. malletei have overlapping ranges and are difficult to distinguish morphologically. Here we present a molecular tool for species identification. It is based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of a section of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene, followed by a three-enzyme restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP assay, with banding patterns resolved via agarose gel electrophoresis. The assay was designed using a large set of training data obtained from a public DNA sequence database, then evaluated using an independent test panel of Reticulitermes from the Southern Appalachian Mountains, for which species assignments were determined via phylogenetic comparison to reference sequences. After refining the interpretive framework, the PCR-RFLP assay was shown to provide accurate identification of four co-occurring species (the fifth species, R. hageni, was absent from the test panel, so accuracy cannot yet be extended to training data. The assay is cost- and time-efficient, and will help improve knowledge of Reticulitermes species distributions.

  19. [Prosthodontic specialty training in the United States: what can we learn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, H

    2017-12-09

    Prosthodontics is one of the nine recognized specialties by American Dental Association. The postgraduate prosthodontic program used to train prosthodontic specialists in U S A started about 70 years ago. Compared to China which just launched the dental residency programs, the programs in U S A have more developed and relatively more mature education system. It is worthwhile for China to study and learn the U S A prosthodontic residency education program. Prosthodontics is a specialty to diagnose and treat complex dental problems, and is often considered as the 'orchestrator' directing and coordinating all the other dental specialists to manage complex situations. This specialty plays an important role in a nation's oral health system. The present article is aimed to introduce the history of US prosthodontic residency program, initial accreditation, curriculum, education standards and mechanisms of the residency program, and how the program is monitored and managed post initial accreditation, with the hope that this system can serve as a reference for China's developing its own residency program.

  20. An analysis of the delivery of anaesthetic training sessions in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A; Tatham, K C; Yentis, S M; Wilson, J; Cox, M

    2017-11-01

    We analysed data from the electronic rota system CLWRota, covering 2,689,962 anaesthetic sessions between 01/01/2014 and 31/12/2015, in 91 UK Trusts, in order to investigate trainees' supervision. There were 8209 trainee attachments analysed, during which 618,695 sessions were undertaken by trainees. The number of supervised sessions per week that trainees worked varied considerably (median (IQR [range]) 2.6 (1.6-3.6 [0-10]) for all grades combined), with senior trainees more likely than junior trainees to be supervised for fewer than the three sessions per week mandated by the Royal College of Anaesthetists. The number of supervised sessions was unrelated to Trusts' size, suggesting that trainees in smaller hospitals receive the same level of supervision as in larger teaching hospitals. Analysis of a dataset of this size should be a good reflection of the delivery of anaesthesia training in the UK. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. Impact of reduced working time on surgical training in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canter, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The European Working Time Directive (EWTD) 48 h working week has been law in European countries since 1998. A phased approach to implementation was agreed for doctors in training, which steadily brought down working hours to 58 in 2004, 56 in 2007 and 48 in 2009. Medical trainees can "opt out" to a 54 h working week but this has to be voluntary and rotas cannot be constructed that assume an opt out is taking place. A key component of the working week arrangements is that the maximum period of work for a resident doctor without rest is 13 h. Shorter sessions of work have led to complex rotas, frequent handovers with difficulties maintaining continuity of care with implications for patient safety. Although there has been over 10 years notice of the changes to the working week and progress has up to now been reasonable (helped, in part by a steady increase in consultant numbers) this latest reduction from 56 h to 48 h seems to have been the most difficult to manage. Copyright © 2010 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Guidelines for cognitive behavioral training within doctoral psychology programs in the United States: report of the Inter-organizational Task Force on Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology Doctoral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepac, Robert K; Ronan, George F; Andrasik, Frank; Arnold, Kevin D; Belar, Cynthia D; Berry, Sharon L; Christofff, Karen A; Craighead, Linda W; Dougher, Michael J; Dowd, E Thomas; Herbert, James D; McFarr, Lynn M; Rizvi, Shireen L; Sauer, Eric M; Strauman, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies initiated an interorganizational task force to develop guidelines for integrated education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology at the doctoral level in the United States. Fifteen task force members representing 16 professional associations participated in a year-long series of conferences, and developed a consensus on optimal doctoral education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology. The recommendations assume solid foundational training that is typical within applied psychology areas such as clinical and counseling psychology programs located in the United States. This article details the background, assumptions, and resulting recommendations specific to doctoral education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology, including competencies expected in the areas of ethics, research, and practice. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Introducing geriatric health in medical training in Ajman, United Arab Emirates: A co-curricular approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMedical students’ knowledge and understanding of theelderly will affect the quality of care to the rising populationof older adults which points to a need to identify geriatrichealth training methods appropriate for the region andcurriculum. Therefore the study assessed the effect of a cocurricularintroductory workshop on knowledge regardinggeriatric health and attitude towards the elderly amongfourth year medical students in a medical universityMethodA quasi-experimental before-after study, with control wasconducted at Gulf Medical College among 60 medicalstudents from discipline-based curriculum in year IV duringMay–June 2010 of whom 16 had opted (attendees toundergo the introductory course, a five day workshop of 10hours duration. Pre- and post-testing used self-administeredquestionnaires for demographic variables: age, gender,nationality, close contact with older people; a quiz on oldpeople’s health, and Kogan’s Old People Scale (KOPS forattitude. The difference in scores on quiz and KOPS werecompared for the attendees and 26 non-attendees whoparticipated in both pre and post testing.ResultsThe attendees group had 38% male and 62% femaleparticipants and the non-attendees group had 21% and 79%respectively. The groups were not significantly different inage, sex, nationality and close contact with the elderly. Thescores on the quiz and KOPS showed no statisticallysignificant difference between the two groups before orafter the workshop. Almost all the participants evaluatedthe workshop very positively especially the interaction withhealthy elderly and inmates of old people’s home.ConclusionA 10-hour introductory co-curricular workshop made nosignificant change in the knowledge on geriatric health orattitude of fourth year medical students though theyreported it as a very enriching experience. A reflectivereport may have been a better assessment tool and theimpact on their clinical practice cannot be predicted.

  4. The Communication and Bioethical Training (CoBiT) Program for assisting dialysis decision-making in Spanish ACKD units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Llana, Helena; Bajo, Maria-Auxiliadora; Barbero, Javier; Selgas, Rafael; Del Peso, Gloria

    2017-04-01

    Healthcare professionals currently working in Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease (ACKD) units must cope with difficult situations regarding assisting patients with the dialysis decision-making process, and they are often untrained for these conversations. Although we have evidence from the literature that these skills can be learned, few professionals feel confident in this area. A Communication and Bioethical Training (CoBiT) Program for ACKD staff (physicians, nurses and allied health professionals) was developed to improve their ability and self-confidence in conducting these conversations. A four-stage study was conducted: (1) development of the CoBiT program, beginning with the creation of an interdisciplinary focus group (N = 10); (2) design of a questionnaire to assess self-confidence based on the areas identified by the focus group. The face validity of the instrument was tested using an inter-judge methodology (N = 6); (3) design of the format and contents of the program; (4) piloting the program. Thirty-six health professionals took an 8-h workshop based on role-playing methodology. Participants assessed their self-confidence in their communication skills before and after the program using self-report measures. The results show that after the program, participants reported significantly higher levels of self-confidence measured with a five-point Likert scale (p CoBiT program improves ACKD Unit healthcare professionals' self-confidence in their ability to perform a specific communication task.

  5. Airway registry and training curriculum improve intubation outcomes in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malo J

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intubation in critically ill patients remains a highly morbid procedure, and the optimal approach is unclear. We sought to improve the safety of intubation by implementing a simulation curriculum and monitoring performance with an airway registry. Methods and Methods: This is a prospective, single-center observational study of all intubations performed by the medical intensive care unit (ICU team over a five-year period. All fellows take part in a simulation curriculum to improve airway management performance and minimize complications. An airway registry form is completed immediately after each intubation to capture relevant patient, operator, and procedural data. Results: Over a five-year period, the medical ICU team performed 1411 intubations. From Year 1 to Year 5, there were significant increases in first-attempt success (72.6 vs. 88.0%, p<0.001, use of video laryngoscopy (72.3 vs. 93.5%, p<0.001, and use of neuromuscular blocking agents (73.5 vs. 88.4%, p<0.001. There were concurrent decreases in rates of desaturation (25.6 vs. 17.1%, p=0.01 and esophageal intubations (5 vs. 1%, p=0.009. Low rates of hypotension (8.3% and cardiac arrest (0.6% were also observed. Conclusions: The safety of intubation in critically ill patients can be markedly improved through joint implementation of an airway registry and simulation curriculum.

  6. TALGO BT - a variable gauge diesel driving unit for TALGO trains; TALGO BT - ein Diesel-Triebkopf mit variabler Spurweite fuer TALGO-Zuege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zander, C.P. [Siemens Krauss-Maffei Lokomotiven GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2000-03-01

    An adjustable driving unit was developed for the variable gauge TALGO trains which have been in use for decades. The unit also has a novel type of carriage and a novel braking system. [German] Fuer die seit Jahrzehnten im Einsatz befindlichen, spurwechselfaehigen TALGO-Zuege wurde ein umspurbarer Triebkopf entwickelt. Dieses Fahrzeug ist in mehrfacher Hinsicht ohne Vorbild. Neu sind neben dem spurveraenderlichen Drehgestell die Fahrwerksanordnung und das Bremssystem. (orig.)

  7. Impact of a provider training program on the treatment of children with autism spectrum disorder at psychosocial care units in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana C. Silva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop, implement, and verify the impact of a training program for health care providers working with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD in psychosocial care centers for children and adolescents (Centro de Atenção Psicossocial à Infância e à Adolescência – CAPSi in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted with 14 professionals from four CAPSi units. The training program consisted of six phases: 1 pre-intervention observation; 2 meeting with staff to assess the main needs of the training program; 3 developing materials for training and evaluation; 4 meetings to discuss program implementation; 5 a final meeting for case discussion and evaluation; and 6 distance supervision. Three measures were used to evaluate the training program: i the Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices (KAP questionnaire; ii videos containing questions designed to assess program comprehension; and iii a satisfaction survey. Results: Thirteen videos were produced to as visual aids for use during the training program, and a further 26 videos were developed to evaluate it. The program was well evaluated by the participants. The video responses and KAP questionnaire scores suggest that staff knowledge and attitudes improved after training. Conclusion: The positive findings of this study suggest that the tested training program is feasible for use with multidisciplinary teams working in the CAPSi environment.

  8. Impact of a provider training program on the treatment of children with autism spectrum disorder at psychosocial care units in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luciana C; Teixeira, Maria C T V; Ribeiro, Edith L; Paula, Cristiane S

    2017-12-18

    To develop, implement, and verify the impact of a training program for health care providers working with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in psychosocial care centers for children and adolescents (Centro de Atenção Psicossocial à Infância e à Adolescência - CAPSi) in São Paulo, Brazil. This quasi-experimental study was conducted with 14 professionals from four CAPSi units. The training program consisted of six phases: 1) pre-intervention observation; 2) meeting with staff to assess the main needs of the training program; 3) developing materials for training and evaluation; 4) meetings to discuss program implementation; 5) a final meeting for case discussion and evaluation; and 6) distance supervision. Three measures were used to evaluate the training program: i) the Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices (KAP) questionnaire; ii) videos containing questions designed to assess program comprehension; and iii) a satisfaction survey. Thirteen videos were produced to as visual aids for use during the training program, and a further 26 videos were developed to evaluate it. The program was well evaluated by the participants. The video responses and KAP questionnaire scores suggest that staff knowledge and attitudes improved after training. The positive findings of this study suggest that the tested training program is feasible for use with multidisciplinary teams working in the CAPSi environment.

  9. The Text of the Instrument connected with the Agency's Assistance to the United Arab Republic in Establishing a Project for Training and Medical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1967-06-09

    The text of the Agreement between the Agency and the Government of the United Arab Republic in connection with the Agency's assistance to that Government in establishing a project for training and medical applications of atomic energy is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members.

  10. The Text of the Instrument connected with the Agency's Assistance to the United Arab Republic in Establishing a Project for Training and Medical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The text of the Agreement between the Agency and the Government of the United Arab Republic in connection with the Agency's assistance to that Government in establishing a project for training and medical applications of atomic energy is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members

  11. Guidelines for Cognitive Behavioral Training within Doctoral Psychology Programs in the United States: Report of the Inter-Organizational Task Force on Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepac, Robert K.; Ronan, George F.; Andrasik, Frank; Arnold, Kevin D.; Belar, Cynthia D.; Berry, Sharon L.; Christofff, Karen A.; Craighead, Linda W.; Dougher, Michael J.; Dowd, E. Thomas; Herbert, James D.; McFarr, Lynn M.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Sauer, Eric M.; Strauman, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies initiated an interorganizational task force to develop guidelines for integrated education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology at the doctoral level in the United States. Fifteen task force members representing 16 professional associations participated in a yearlong series of…

  12. Knowing versus doing: education and training needs of staff in a chronic care hospital unit for individuals with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Katherine A; Stanley, Ian H; Van Haitsma, Kimberly; Moody, Jennifer; Alonzi, Dana; Hansen, Bryan R; Gitlin, Laura N

    2014-12-01

    Hospital clinical staff routinely confront challenging behaviors in patients with dementia with limited training in prevention and management. The authors of the current article conducted a survey of staff on a chronic care hospital unit concerning knowledge about dementia, perceived educational needs, and the care environment. The overall mean score for a 27-item knowledge scale was 24.08 (SD = 2.61), reflecting high level of disease knowledge. However, staff indicated a need for more information and skills, specifically for managing behaviors nonpharmacologically (92.3%), enhancing patient safety (89.7%), coping with care challenges (84.2%), and involving patients in activities (81.6%). Although most staff (i.e., nurses [80%] and therapists [86.4%]) believed their care contributed a great deal to patient well-being, approximately 75% reported frustration and being overwhelmed by dementia care. Most reported being hit, bitten, or physically hurt by patients (66.7%), as well as disrespected by families (53.8%). Findings suggest that staff have foundational knowledge but lack the "how-to" or hands-on skills necessary to implement nonpharmacological behavioral management approaches and communicate with families. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. The Impact of Support at the Workplace on Transfer of Training: A Study of an Indian Manufacturing Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Ragini; Ghosh, Piyali; Rai, Alka; Shukla, Divya

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the individual impacts of two components of support at the workplace, namely, support from peers and supervisor, on transfer of training in a post-training environment. Mediation by motivation to transfer in the relationship of supervisor and peer support with transfer of training has also been examined. Data on 149…

  14. Implementing Transfer of Learning in Training and Professional Development in a US Public Child Welfare Agency: What Works?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Virginia; Bosco-Ruggiero, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    In-service training in public child welfare agencies in the United States has long been viewed as an important vehicle for the improvement of job satisfaction and organizational commitment, and therefore as important to retention in child welfare. This article examines the critical role of transfer of learning strategies in such training and…

  15. Creating a gold medal Olympic and Paralympics health care team: a satisfaction survey of the mobile medical unit/polyclinic team training for the Vancouver 2010 winter games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D Ross; Heidary, Behrouz; Bell, Nathaniel; Appleton, Leanne; Simons, Richard K; Evans, David C; Hameed, S Morad; Taunton, Jack; Khwaja, Kosar; O'Connor, Michael; Garraway, Naisan; Hennecke, Peter; Kuipers, Donna; Taulu, Tracey; Quinn, Lori

    2013-11-13

    The mobile medical unit/polyclinic (MMU/PC) was an essential part of the medical services to support ill or injured Olympic or Paralympics family during the 2010 Olympic and Paralympics winter games. The objective of this study was to survey the satisfaction of the clinical staff that completed the training programs prior to deployment to the MMU. Medical personnel who participated in at least one of the four training programs, including (1) week-end sessions; (2) web-based modules; (3) just-in-time training; and (4) daily simulation exercises were invited to participate in a web-based survey and comment on their level of satisfaction with training program. A total of 64 (out of 94 who were invited) physicians, nurses and respiratory therapists completed the survey. All participants reported favorably that the MMU/PC training positively impacted their knowledge, skills and team functions while deployed at the MMU/PC during the 2010 Olympic Games. However, components of the training program were valued differently depending on clinical job title, years of experience, and prior experience in large scale events. Respondents with little or no experience working in large scale events (45%) rated daily simulations as the most valuable component of the training program for strengthening competencies and knowledge in clinical skills for working in large scale events. The multi-phase MMU/PC training was found to be beneficial for preparing the medical team for the 2010 Winter Games. In particular this survey demonstrates the effectiveness of simulation training programs on teamwork competencies in ad hoc groups.

  16. Associations between United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) and Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (IM-ITE) scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Furman S; Zeger, Scott L; Kolars, Joseph C

    2008-07-01

    Little is known about the associations of previous standardized examination scores with scores on subsequent standardized examinations used to assess medical knowledge in internal medicine residencies. To examine associations of previous standardized test scores on subsequent standardized test scores. Retrospective cohort study. One hundred ninety-five internal medicine residents. Bivariate associations of United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Steps and Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (IM-ITE) scores were determined. Random effects analysis adjusting for repeated administrations of the IM-ITE and other variables known or hypothesized to affect IM-ITE score allowed for discrimination of associations of individual USMLE Step scores on IM-ITE scores. In bivariate associations, USMLE scores explained 17% to 27% of the variance in IME-ITE scores, and previous IM-ITE scores explained 66% of the variance in subsequent IM-ITE scores. Regression coefficients (95% CI) for adjusted associations of each USMLE Step with IM-ITE scores were USMLE-1 0.19 (0.12, 0.27), USMLE-2 0.23 (0.17, 0.30), and USMLE-3 0.19 (0.09, 0.29). No single USMLE Step is more strongly associated with IM-ITE scores than the others. Because previous IM-ITE scores are strongly associated with subsequent IM-ITE scores, appropriate modeling, such as random effects methods, should be used to account for previous IM-ITE administrations in studies for which IM-ITE score is an outcome.

  17. Assessment of Two Desk-Top Computer Simulations Used to Train Tactical Decision Making (TDM) of Small Unit Infantry Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beal, Scott A

    2007-01-01

    .... A questionnaire administered to leaders following simulation exercises documented their sense of personal involvement during mission execution and their perceptions of the training value of the simulations...

  18. Training and in-service training of home economics extension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Home economics is traditionally a femaledominated profession. Home economists employed in the KwaZulu-Natal agricultural and rural development extension delivery system are mainly responsible for serving a predominantly female clientele, namely rural women. These home economists focus on women's domestic ...

  19. Cross-Sectional Study of Unmet Mental Health Need in 5- to 7-Year Old Latino Children in the United States: Do Teachers and Parents Make a Difference in Service Utilization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppelberg, Claudio O; Hollinshead, Marisa O; Collins, Brian A; Nieto-Castañon, Alfonso

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study is to examine the rates of mental health service utilization in young Latino children of immigrants in relation to maternal and teacher reports of child mental health need. Specific knowledge is lacking about gaps in service utilization among young Latino children, the fastest growing and possibly the most underserved segment of the US child population. The associations of mental health service utilization (Service Assessment for Children and Adolescents) and mental health need (clinical levels of internalizing, externalizing, or total problems reported by mothers [Child Behavior Checklist] and teachers [Teacher's Report Form]) were examined in a community sample of young Latino children of immigrants ( n = 228; mean age = 6) and compared across mothers' and teachers' responses. Mother-teacher agreement was also studied. Sixty-five children (28.5 %) had a mental health need; most (76.9 %) of these received no services. For all types of mental health need, service utilization was more likely when need was reported by mothers rather than teachers ( p = .03). Teachers' reports were not associated with service utilization. Mother-teacher agreement was low for externalizing ( r = .23; p ≤ 0.01) and total problems ( r = .21; p ≤ 0.05), and nonsignificant for internalizing problems. This study is the first in the United States to document, in such a young Latino group, high rates of unmet need comparable to those among older Latino youth; low or no mother-teacher agreement on which children had a mental health need; low utilization of school-based services; and a lack of association between service utilization and teacher-reported mental health need-both for externalizing and internalizing problems. These findings suggest that schools are not effectively leveraging mental health services for young Latino children. Potential factors responsible for the findings are discussed.

  20. Approval of multiple unit trains by means of the simulation of contact wire/pantograph; Triebfahrzeugzulassung mithilfe der Simulation Fahrdraht/Stromabnehmer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichmann, Thomas; Raubold, Johannes [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany). Industry Sector, Mobility Div.

    2011-04-15

    The simulation program employed at Siemens adopting the finite element method delivers reliable findings about the dynamic interaction between pantographs and overhead contact lines and was verified by a validation according to EN 50318. In particular, a considerable reduction of measurement expenses for approval procedures of multiple unit trains with a lot of combination options for pantograph arrangements can be achieved by means of these simulations. (orig.)

  1. MEN WANT WORK. REPORT TO THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, OFFICE OF MANPOWER AUTOMATION AND TRAINING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOLLIS, DAVID L.

    THE COUNCIL OF THE SOUTHERN MOUNTAINS MADE A ONE-YEAR STUDY OF THE MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING ACT IN APPALACHIA AND HELPED ESTABLISH THE YOUTH, EDUCATION, JOB DEVELOPMENT, WORK EXPERIENCE, VISTA, AND ON THE JOB TRAINING PROGRAMS WHICH ARE REVIEWED AND EVALUATED IN THIS REPORT. IT WAS CONCLUDED THAT--(1) MEN WANT JOBS, (2) WHILE UNFILLED…

  2. Chemical and Biological Training for Army and Marine Corps Units in the Republic of Korea Needs Improvement (REDACTED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-24

    informs the public . Vision Our vision is to be a model oversight organization in the Federal Government by leading change, speaking truth, and...PAM 750-8(AUG 05) A- CBRN Adminstration # Question: MSC Sub Unit Sub1 Sub Unit Sub2 Sub Unit Sub3 Sub Unit Sub4 1 Does the CBRN section have a copy...2-6] (Company) Select Select Select Select Select 8 Does the unit have the following required references/ publications w/changes and updates on hand

  3. Comparison of Training Qualifications Programs, for Operating Boats and Yachts, which are not Covered by STCW Convention in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darijo Mišković

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Research in this paper was conducted under the EU project TRECVET Core Curriculum for Skippers of Small Commercial Vessels (in short TCC-SCV where a Faculty of Maritime Studies Rijeka was a project partner. The goal of the project was to analyze seven professional SCV skipper qualifications from UK, France, Spain, Germany, Slovenia, Czech Republic and Croatia by breaking them into their smallest parts called Fundamental Elements and thereby offering objective comparability. After reviewing and comparing training programs in The United Kingdom and The Republic of Croatia for qualifications, required for operating boats and yachts, set by the appropriate Authorities, this paper analyzed skipper/yacht master certification scheme in terms of theoretical education and practical trainings, syllabus contents, required experience, examination methods and evaluated the overall characteristics. At the end, the authors pointed out to some deficiencies in current training program in The Republic of Croatia and drew the conclusion that experience and lessons from other training programs can find purpose for training program reform in their own country.

  4. A gap analysis of the United States death care sector to determine training and education needs pertaining to highly infectious disease mitigation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Aurora B; Witter, Lesley; Herstein, Jocelyn J; Jelden, Katelyn C; Beam, Elizabeth L; Gibbs, Shawn G; Lowe, John J

    2017-09-01

    A United States industry-specific gap analysis survey of the death care sector-which comprises organizations and businesses affiliated with the funeral industry and the handling of human remains- was developed, the results analyzed, and training and education needs in relation to highly infectious disease mitigation and management were explored in an effort to identify where occupational health and safety can be enhanced in this worker population. Collaborating national death care organizations distributed the 47-question electronic survey. N = 424 surveys were initiated and results recorded. The survey collected death care sector-specific information pertaining to the comfortability and willingness to handle highly infectious remains; perceptions of readiness, current policies and procedures in place to address highly infectious diseases; current highly infectious disease training levels, available resources, and personal protective equipment. One-third of respondents have been trained on how to manage highly infectious remains. There was a discrepancy between Supervisor/Management and Employee/Worker perceptions on employees' willingness and comfortability to manage potentially highly infectious remains. More than 40% of respondents did not know the correct routes of transmission for viral hemorrhagic fevers. Results suggest death care workers could benefit from increasing up-to-date industry-specific training and education on highly infectious disease risk mitigation and management. Professional death care sector organizations are positioned to disseminate information, training, and best practices.

  5. A pilot of the use of Short Message Service (SMS) as a training tool ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this setting, short in-service training interventions are a pragmatic attempt at improving ... education. A pragmatic approach to training these nurses is to provide in- service .... outcomes.1 The need for quality training interventions and trained ...

  6. The Impact of Training and Culture on Leadership Values and Perceptions at the United States Army Engineer School

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas, Ted

    1998-01-01

    .... The EOBC students are training to assume leadership positions which the EOAC students were in. A random sample of business leaders values were then compared to the Army engineers values to draw cultural leadership...

  7. Assessment of Two Desk-Top Computer Simulations Used to Train Tactical Decision Making (TDM) of Small Unit Infantry Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beal, Scott A

    2007-01-01

    Fifty-two leaders in the Basic Non-Commissioned Officer Course (BNCOC) at Fort Benning, Georgia, participated in an assessment of two desk-top computer simulations used to train tactical decision making...

  8. Culturally Relevant Human Subjects Protection Training: A Case Study in Community-Engaged Research in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kue, Jennifer; Szalacha, Laura A; Happ, Mary Beth; Crisp, Abigail L; Menon, Usha

    2018-02-01

    Non-academic members of research teams, such as community members, can perceive traditional human subjects protection training as lacking in cultural relevance. We present a case exemplar of the development of a human subjects protection training for research staff with limited English proficiency and/or no or limited research experience. Seven modules were adapted for language, cultural examples, etc., from the standard Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) human subjects protection training. Non-academic research staff completed a day-long training in human subjects protection (six modules) and our research protocol (one module). We assessed comprehension of content with PowerPoint slides and module quizzes. All participants successfully passed each module quiz with ≥ 80% correct. Questions answered incorrectly were discussed before proceeding to the next module. To meet the increasing demand for collaborative community-engaged research with underserved minority populations, human subjects protection training protocols can be adapted successfully to reflect real-world situations and provide culturally relevant materials to help non-academic research staff better understand the importance and necessity of research ethics.

  9. A comparison of the education and work experiences of immigrant and the United States of America-trained nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurenko, O; Gupte, G; Shan, G

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the education and work experience of immigrant and American-trained registered nurses from 1988 to 2008. The USA increasingly relies on immigrant nurses to fill a significant nursing shortage. These nurses receive their training overseas, but can obtain licenses to practice in different countries. Although immigrant nurses have been in the USA workforce for several decades, little is known about how their education and work experience compares with USA-trained nurses. Yet much is presumed by policy makers and administrators who perpetuate the stereotype that immigrant nurses are not as qualified. We analysed the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses datasets from 1988 to 2008 using the Cochran-Armitage trend tests. Our findings showed similar work experience and upward trends in education among both groups of nurses. However, American-trained nurses were more likely to further advance their education, whereas immigrant nurses were more likely to have more work experience and practice in a wider range of healthcare settings. Although we discovered differences between nurses trained in the USA and abroad, we theorize that these differences even out, as education and work experience each have their own distinct caregiving advantages. Immigrant nurses are not less qualified than their American-trained counterparts. However, healthcare providers should encourage them to further pursue their education and certifications. Even though immigrant nurses' education and work experience are comparable with their American counterparts, workforce development policies may be particularly beneficial for this group. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  10. Plan de formación continuada en una unidad de gestión clínica Continuing training plan in a clinical management unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Miguel Gamboa Antiñolo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available La Unidad de Continuidad Asistencial está orientada a la atención de pacientes frágiles, pluripatológicos y de cuidados paliativos. Atiende a pacientes en domicilio, consulta, unidad de día, consultoría telefónica y en dos hospitales de la misma área sanitaria. Desde su inicio en 2002 como unidad de gestión, la formación ha sido un elemento prioritario de desarrollo. Los elementos clave son acercar la formación al lugar de trabajo, incluir aspectos fundamentales de los problemas asistenciales más prevalentes en el trabajo diario, orientar la formación a todo el personal incluyendo aspectos organizativos, de seguridad del paciente y su entorno, mejora del clima laboral, desarrollo de nuevas habilidades y conocimientos apoyados en la asistencia basada en la evidencia para el desarrollo de las diferentes competencias profesionales. La unidad puede ser el escenario idóneo para acometer las necesarias reformas conceptuales de la formación de los profesionales que permitan mejorar la calidad asistencial.Continuing Care Unit (UCA focused the attention of frail patients, polypathological patients and palliative care. UCA attend patients at home, consulting, day unit, telephone consulting and in two hospitals of the health area. From 2002 UCA began as a management unit, training has been a priority for development. Key elements include: providing education to the workplace, including key aspects of the most prevalent health care problems in daily work, directing training to all staff including organizational aspects of patient safety and the environment, improved working environment, development of new skills and knowledge supported by the evidence-based care for the development of different skills. The unit can be the ideal setting to undertake the reforms necessary conceptual training of professionals to improve the quality of care.

  11. Design and accomplishment for the monitoring unit of the sup 6 sup 0 Co train freight inspection system

    CERN Document Server

    Cong Peng

    2002-01-01

    The sup 6 sup 0 Co railway cargo inspection system has super automaticity. And the monitoring unit is an important part of the automatic control system. The author introduces the idea of designing the monitoring unit in detail and accomplishes a new-style unit which is different from the traditional one. The monitoring unit which is highly integrated, easy to be mounted and debugged and convenient to be operated and maintained has play an excellent role in the work of the whole inspection system

  12. Training activities at the EPRI NDE Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pherigo, G.

    1986-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), through its Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, has identified two specific categories of NDE training to best serve the industry's need for enhanced personnel qualification programs. These categories include in-service inspection (ISI) training and technical skills training. The ISI training provides operator training in new NDE technology areas that are ready for field application. The technical skills training is developed as part of a long-range plan to support all basic NDE methods typical to the electric power industry. The need for specific training and better documentation of NDE personnel qualifications is becoming more evident. ASME Section XI requirements for the qualification and certification of visual examiners and the recognition by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) of the importance of the ultrasonic (UT) operator in finding intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) are two of the major issues being addressed by the training task of the EPRI NDE Center. The overall intent of the center's training is to meet the most critical utility needs with quality training that can be used by the trainee's employer as a part of their certification of that individual. To do this, the center has organized and activated a carefully maintained documentation and records systems built around the continuing education unit

  13. Effects of Resistance Training on Muscle Strength, Endurance, and Motor Unit According to Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Polymorphism in Male College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ae-Rim Hong, Sang-Min Hong, Yun-A Shin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in muscle mass and strength across the adult age span are variable and related to the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF genotype. In particular, a single CNTF haplotype (1357 G→A is important for neuronal and muscular developments and may be associated with muscle strength response to resistance training. We examined whether CNTF genotype differentially influences the effect of resistance training on neuromuscular improvement in male college students. Resistance training of the upper extremities comprised 3 sets at 75%–85% intensity per 1 repetition maximum, 3 times a week, for a total of 8 weeks. We measured isokinetic muscle function of the elbow joint with regard to strength (60°/s and endurance (180°/s by using an isokinetic dynamometer. The biceps brachii (BB and brachioradialis muscles were studied using surface electromyography with spike-triggered averaging to assess surface-detected motor unit potential (SMUP area. After resistance training, the SMUP of the BB increased significantly at 60°/s (p < 0.05, but no difference in the CNTF genotype was observed. The SMUP of the BB at 180°/s increased significantly in the GG/AA genotype group compared with that in the GA genotype group (p < 0.05. The average power of the elbow flexor at 180°/s increased significantly after resistance training (p < 0.05, but again, no difference in the CNTF genotype was observed. Thus, improvements in muscle strength and endurance may have resulted directly from resistance training rather than from genetic factors related to nerves in muscle tissue.

  14. Corrective action plan for corrective action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nacht, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Mercury Fire Training Pit is a former fire training area located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Mercury Fire Training Pit was used from approximately 1965 to the early 1990s to train fire-fighting personnel at the NTS, and encompasses an area approximately 107 meters (m) (350 feet [ft]) by 137 m (450 ft). The Mercury Fire Training Pit formerly included a bermed burn pit with four small burn tanks, four large above ground storage tanks an overturned bus, a telephone pole storage area, and areas for burning sheds, pallets, and cables. Closure activities will include excavation of the impacted soil in the aboveground storage tank and burn pit areas to a depth of 1.5 m (5 ft), and excavation of the impacted surface soil downgradient of the former ASTs and burnpit areas to a depth of 0.3 m (1 ft). Excavated soil will be disposed in the Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill at the NTS

  15. Personnel Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokar, M.

    2012-01-01

    The professional training of employees for Units 3 and 4 of the Mochovce Power Plant is approaching finals. At the beginning, in particular the main control room operators were trained, later all the other employees needed for power plant commissioning and operation. In June, the second phase of the project will start; it will be focused on the new equipment of the Units under commissioning. (author)

  16. Vinculos Entre la Capacitacion de Docentes y el Desarrollo de Materiales Educativos Impresos--Anotaciones para Una Discusion (Links between In-service Teacher Training and the Development of Printed Educational Aids).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Victor M.

    Textbooks and other printed materials will be ever present, in the foreseeable future, as major aids for teaching and learning processes. New textbooks imply new guidelines for teachers, and the ways to handle such guidelines demand teacher training. This paper explains some links between inservice teacher training programs and the development of…

  17. La Capacitacion de Docentes Como Prioridad de los Sistemas Educativos de America Latino y al Caribe (In-Service Teacher Training as a Priority of Latin American and Caribbean Educational Systems).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Victor M.

    Whenever top-level officials in Latin American and Caribbean educational systems are approached, the topic of inservice teacher training is presented as a major priority. This paper outlines some ideas about the subject of inservice teacher training as a priority of educational systems in Latin American and Caribbean countries. The most frequent…

  18. The training of neonatologists and the paradigms implied in their relationship with the parents of babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethel Cukierkorn Battikha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze and to interpret the psychological repercussions generated by the presence of parents in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for residents in Neonatology. Methods: Study based on the psychoanalytic theory, involving a methodological interface with qualitative surveys in Health Sciences. Twenty resident physicians in Neonatology, from five public institutions of São Paulo state, responded to a single semi-structured interview. Based on several readings of the material, achieving the core of emergent meanings that would be significant to the object of the survey, six categories were elected for analysis and interpretation: parents' staying at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and its effects on the neonatologists' professional practice; communication of the diagnosis and what parents should know; impasses between parents and doctors when the diagnosis is being communicated; doctor's identification with parents; communication of the child's death and their participation in the interview. Results: The interpretation of the categories provided an understanding of the psychic mechanisms mobilized in doctors in their relationships with the children's parents, showing that the residents experience anguish and suffering when they provide medical care and during their training process, and also that they lack psychological support to handle these feelings. Conclusions: There is a need of intervention in neonatologists training and education, which may favor the elaboration of daily experiences in the Unit, providing a less anguishing and defensive way out for young doctors, especially in their relationship with patients and parents.

  19. A cross sectional study of surgical training among United Kingdom general practitioners with specialist interests in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, H J M; Fitzgerald, J E F; Reilly, J; Beamish, A J; Gokani, V J

    2015-04-08

    Increasing numbers of minor surgical procedures are being performed in the community. In the UK, general practitioners (family medicine physicians) with a specialist interest (GPwSI) in surgery frequently undertake them. This shift has caused decreases in available cases for junior surgeons to gain and consolidate operative skills. This study evaluated GPwSI's case-load, procedural training and perceptions of offering formalised operative training experience to surgical trainees. Prospective, questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. A novel, 13-item, self-administered questionnaire was distributed to members of the Association of Surgeons in Primary Care (ASPC). A total 113 of 120 ASPC members completed the questionnaire, representing a 94% response rate. Respondents were general practitioners practising or intending to practice surgery in the community. Respondents performed a mean of 38 (range 5-150) surgical procedures per month in primary care. 37% (42/113) of respondents had previously been awarded Membership or Fellowship of a Surgical Royal College; 22% (25/113) had completed a surgical certificate or diploma or undertaken a course of less than 1 year duration. 41% (46/113) had no formal British surgical qualifications. All respondents believed that surgical training in primary care could be valuable for surgical trainees, and the majority (71/113, 63%) felt that both general practice and surgical trainees could benefit equally from such training. There is a significant volume of surgical procedures being undertaken in the community by general practitioners, with the capacity and appetite for training of prospective surgeons in this setting, providing appropriate standards are achieved and maintained, commensurate with current standards in secondary care. Surgical experience and training of GPwSI's in surgery is highly varied, and does not yet benefit from the quality assurance secondary care surgical training in the UK undergoes. The Royal Colleges of

  20. Contractile properties of motor units and expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in rat fast-type muscle after volitional weight-lifting training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łochyński, Dawid; Kaczmarek, Dominik; Mrówczyński, Włodzimierz; Warchoł, Wojciech; Majerczak, Joanna; Karasiński, Janusz; Korostyński, Michał; Zoladz, Jerzy A; Celichowski, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic resistance training increases the force and speed of muscle contraction, but little is known about modifications to the contractile properties of the main physiological types of motor units (MUs) that contribute to these muscle adaptations. Although the contractile profile of MU muscle fibers is tightly coupled to myosin heavy chain (MyHC) protein expression, it is not well understood if MyHC transition is a prerequisite for modifications to the contractile characteristics of MUs. In this study, we examined MU contractile properties, the mRNA expression of MyHC, parvalbumin, and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ pump isoforms, as well as the MyHC protein content after 5 wk of volitional progressive weight-lifting training in the medial gastrocnemius muscle in rats. The training had no effect on MyHC profiling or Ca 2+ -handling protein gene expression. Maximum force increased in slow (by 49%) and fast (by 21%) MUs. Within fast MUs, the maximum force increased in most fatigue-resistant and intermediate but not most fatigable MUs. Twitch contraction time was shortened in slow and fast fatigue-resistant MUs. Twitch half-relaxation was shortened in fast most fatigue-resistant and intermediate MUs. The force-frequency curve shifted rightward in fast fatigue-resistant MUs. Fast fatigable MUs fatigued less within the initial 15 s while fast fatigue-resistant units increased the ability to potentiate the force within the first minute of the standard fatigue test. In conclusion, at the early stage of resistance training, modifications to the contractile characteristics of MUs appear in the absence of MyHC transition and the upregulation of Ca 2+ -handling genes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Opportunities to Improve Skills and to Teach and Train Others: Employee Outcomes in the United States and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, HaeNim; McNamara, Tay K.; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Lee, Jungui

    2014-01-01

    Opportunities to improve skills and opportunities to teach or train others may be associated with job satisfaction, work engagement and organizational commitment. The analysis reported in this paper used a subsample of 823 employees within two Japanese and three American worksites. We tested not only the direct relationships of each type of…

  2. Manpower Projections, Recruitment Needs and Training Requirements for Commercial Airline Pilots in the United States 1968-1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Robert Marchand

    This study evaluated the reported airline pilot shortage in relation to certified air carriers; recruitment needs for qualified applicants; training requirements as recommended by air carriers, airline captains, and flight officers; and airline pilot supply and demand during 1968-79. A literature review on foreign and domestic pilot shortages was…

  3. Verification of electricity savings through energy-efficient train management - Energy data base for traction units - Annex 5; Verifizierung der Stromeinsparung durch energieeffizientes Zugsmanagement - Anhang 5: Energiedatenbank Traktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M.; Lerjen, M.; Menth, S. [emkamatik GmbH, Wettingen (Switzerland); Luethi, M. [Swiss Federal Insitute of Technology (ETHZ), Institute for Transport Planning and Systems (IVT), Zuerich (Switzerland); Tuchschmid, M. [SBB AG, BahnUmwelt-Center, 3000 Bern (Switzerland)

    2009-11-15

    This appendix to a final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at how various data sources on the energy consumption of the SBB's traction units can be combined into an energy-data basis. In this way, the considerable amount of work previously involved in combining and correlating data can be avoided. The aims being followed in the realisation of the traction data base are examined and discussed. The data base will provide the basis for the manual detail analysis of energy consumption within the framework of the overall efforts to save electricity using efficient train management.

  4. Unit Manning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGinniss, Mike

    2003-01-01

    .... This decision combines two crucial initiatives: first, transforming the Army from an individual soldier replacement system to a unit manning system that enhances cohesion and keeps trained soldiers, leaders, and commanders together longer, thereby...

  5. Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondi, Vinai; Bernard, Johnny Ray; Jabbari, Siavash; Keam, Jennifer; Amorim Bernstein, Karen L. de; Dad, Luqman K.; Li, Linna; Poppe, Matthew M.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Chollet, Casey T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 to 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p < 0.001), whereas clinical experience in endovascular brachytherapy (p <0.001) decreased over time. The distribution of gynecologic and prostate brachytherapy cases remained stable, while clinical case load in breast brachytherapy increased (p = 0.006). A small but significant percentage of residents reported receiving inadequate clinical experience in pediatrics, seeing 10 or fewer pediatric cases during the course of residency. Procedures involving higher capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical duties

  6. Exploring Modularity in Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlonitis, Viktor; Hsuan, Juliana

    2017-01-01

    the effects of modularity and integrality on a range of different analytical levels in service architectures. Taking a holistic approach, the authors synthesize and empirically deploy a framework comprised of the three most prevalent themes in modularity and service design literature: Offering (service...... insights on the mirroring hypothesis of modularity theory to services. Originality/value The paper provides a conceptualization of service architectures drawing on service design, modularity, and market relationships. The study enriches service design literature with elements from modularity theory...

  7. Simulation-based training delivered directly to the pediatric cardiac intensive care unit engenders preparedness, comfort, and decreased anxiety among multidisciplinary resuscitation teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Catherine K; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Beke, Dorothy; Imprescia, Annette; Kappus, Liana J; Garden, Alexander; Hayes, Gavin; Laussen, Peter C; Bacha, Emile; Weinstock, Peter H

    2010-09-01

    Resuscitation of pediatric cardiac patients involves unique and complex physiology, requiring multidisciplinary collaboration and teamwork. To optimize team performance, we created a multidisciplinary Crisis Resource Management training course that addressed both teamwork and technical skill needs for the pediatric cardiac intensive care unit. We sought to determine whether participation improved caregiver comfort and confidence levels regarding future resuscitation events. We developed a simulation-based, in situ Crisis Resource Management curriculum using pediatric cardiac intensive care unit scenarios and unit-specific resuscitation equipment, including an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit. Participants replicated the composition of a clinical team. Extensive video-based debriefing followed each scenario, focusing on teamwork principles and technical resuscitation skills. Pre- and postparticipation questionnaires were used to determine the effects on participants' comfort and confidence regarding participation in future resuscitations. A total of 182 providers (127 nurses, 50 physicians, 2 respiratory therapists, 3 nurse practitioners) participated in the course. All participants scored the usefulness of the program and scenarios as 4 of 5 or higher (5 = most useful). There was significant improvement in participants' perceived ability to function as a code team member and confidence in a code (P < .001). Participants reported they were significantly more likely to raise concerns about inappropriate management to the code leader (P < .001). We developed a Crisis Resource Management training program in a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit to teach technical resuscitation skills and improve team function. Participants found the experience useful and reported improved ability to function in a code. Further work is needed to determine whether participation in the Crisis Resource Management program objectively improves team function during real

  8. Survey of core medical trainees in the United Kingdom 2013 - inconsistencies in training experience and competing with service demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Fiona; Newbery, Nina; Burr, Bill; Goddard, Andrew F

    2014-04-01

    There is currently considerable concern about the attractiveness of hospital medicine as a career and experiences in core medical training (CMT) are a key determinant of whether trainees continue in the medical specialties. Little is understood about the quality and impact of the current CMT programme and this survey was designed to assess this. Three key themes emerged. Firstly, the demands of providing service have led to considerable loss of training opportunities, particularly in outpatients and formal teaching sessions. Trainees spend a lot of this service time doing menial tasks and over 90% report that service takes up 80-100% of their time. Secondly, clinical and educational supervision is variable, with trainees sometimes getting little consultant feedback on their clinical performance. Finally, 44% of trainees report that CMT has not prepared them to be a medical registrar and many trainees are put off acute medical specialties by their experiences in CMT.

  9. An analysis of United States Marine Corps Enlisted Entry-Level Training using supply chain and operations management

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonso, Steven; Oh, Dingjin; Younger, Larry M.

    2010-01-01

    MBA Professional Report Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Enlisted Entry-Level Training (EELT) pipeline is a complex network that is of vital importance to the U.S. Marine Corps' ability to maintain a balanced force and serve as the nation's force in readiness. This report provides an all-inclusive description of the EELT pipeline by identifying the fundamental steps in the supply chain, analyzing the supply chain's critical characteristics, and providing in...

  10. Postdeployment military mental health training: cross-national evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Heather M; Garber, Bryan G; Zamorski, Mark A; Wray, Mariane; Mulligan, Kathleen; Greenberg, Neil; Castro, Carl Andrew; Adler, Amy B

    2013-05-01

    Deployments increase risk for adjustment problems in service members. To mitigate this increased risk, mental health training programs have been developed and implemented in several nations. As part of a coordinated effort, three nations adapted a U.S. mental health training program that had been validated by a series of group randomized trials demonstrating improvement in postdeployment adjustment. Implementation of evidence-based programs in a new context is challenging: How much of the original program needs to remain intact in order to retain its utility? User satisfaction rates can provide essential data to assess how well a program is accepted. This article summarizes service member ratings of postdeployment mental health training and compares ratings from service members across four nations. The participating nations (Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and the United States) administered mental health training to active duty military personnel in their respective nations. Following the training, military personnel completed an evaluation of the training. Overall, across the four nations, more than 70% of military personnel agreed or strongly agreed that they were satisfied with the mental health training. Although some differences in evaluations were observed across nations, components of training that were most important to overall satisfaction with the training were strikingly similar across nations. Fundamentally, it appears feasible that despite cultural and organizational differences, a mental health training program developed in one nation can be successfully adapted for use in other nations. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Autism: Assessment and Intervention Practices of School Psychologists and the Implications for Training in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jenny Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are being diagnosed at alarmingly high rates and school psychologists are charged with evaluating, identifying, and providing interventions for students with ASD in the United States' public school systems. A national survey probed Nationally Certified School Psychologists (NCSP) to determine their level of…

  12. Employment and Training Policy in the United States during the Economic Crisis. Upjohn Institute Working Paper No. 10-161

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Christopher J.; Eberts, Randall W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines labor market conditions and public employment policies in the United States during what some are calling the Great Recession. We document the dramatic labor market changes that rapidly unfolded when the rate of gross domestic product growth turned negative, from the end of 2007 through early 2009. The paper reviews the…

  13. IMMUNISATION TRAINING NEEDS IN MALAWI

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-09

    Sep 9, 2014 ... In addition, the duration of the training curriculum is inadequate, and in-service training sessions for managers and service ... training curricula regularly and the service providers are trained on a regular basis. INTRODUCTION .... logistics management, programme management, and surveillance of vaccine ...

  14. Use of mock-up training to reduce personnel exposure at the North Anna Unit 1 Steam Generator Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, H.G. [Virginia Power, Mineral, VA (United States); Reilly, B.P. [Bechtel Power Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The North Anna Power Station is located on the southern shore of Lake Anna in Louisa County, approximately forty miles northwest of Richmond, Virginia. The two 910 Mw nuclear units located on this site are owned by Virginia Electric and Power Company (Virginia Power) and Old Dominion Electric Cooperative and operated by Virginia Power. Fuel was loaded into Unit 1 in December 1977, and it began commercial operation in June 1978. Fuel was loaded into Unit 2 in April 1980 and began commercial operation in December 1980. Each nuclear unit includes a three-coolant-loop pressurized light water reactor nuclear steam supply system that was furnished by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Included within each system were three Westinghouse Model 51 steam generators with alloy 600, mill-annealed tubing material. Over the years of operation of Unit 1, various corrosion-related phenomena had occurred that affected the steam generators tubing and degraded their ability to fulfill their heat transfer function. Advanced inspection and repair techniques helped extend the useful life of the steam generators, but projections based on the results of the inspections indicated that the existing steam generators tubing and degraded their ability to fullfill their heat transfer function. Advanced inspection and repair techniques helped extend the useful life of the steam generators, but projections based on the results of the inspections indicated that the existing steam generators would not last their design life and must be repaired. To this end Virginia Power determined that a steam generator replacement (SGR) program was necessary to remove the old steam generator tube bundles and lower shell sections, including the channel heads (collectively called the lower assemblies), and replace them with new lower assemblies incorporating design features that will prevent the degradation problems that the old steam generators had experienced.

  15. Institutional Roles for In-Service Education of School Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Patrick D., Ed.; Blackstone, Peggy L., Ed.

    This document is a compilation of papers read at a 4-day conference attended by 60 participants from throughout the United States. Chapters include (1) "In-Service Education of School Administrators: Background, Present Status, and Problems," by Robert B. Howsam; (2) "Notes on Institutional Relationships in the In-Service Education of the…

  16. The impact of training strategies on the accuracy of genomic predictors in United States Red Angus cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J; Kachman, S D; Spangler, M L

    2017-08-01

    Genomic selection (GS) has become an integral part of genetic evaluation methodology and has been applied to all major livestock species, including beef and dairy cattle, pigs, and chickens. Significant contributions in increased accuracy of selection decisions have been clearly illustrated in dairy cattle after practical application of GS. In the majority of U.S. beef cattle breeds, similar efforts have also been made to increase the accuracy of genetic merit estimates through the inclusion of genomic information into routine genetic evaluations using a variety of methods. However, prediction accuracies can vary relative to panel density, the number of folds used for folds cross-validation, and the choice of dependent variables (e.g., EBV, deregressed EBV, adjusted phenotypes). The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of genomic predictors for Red Angus beef cattle with different strategies used in training and evaluation. The reference population consisted of 9,776 Red Angus animals whose genotypes were imputed to 2 medium-density panels consisting of over 50,000 (50K) and approximately 80,000 (80K) SNP. Using the imputed panels, we determined the influence of marker density, exclusion (deregressed EPD adjusting for parental information [DEPD-PA]) or inclusion (deregressed EPD without adjusting for parental information [DEPD]) of parental information in the deregressed EPD used as the dependent variable, and the number of clusters used to partition training animals (3, 5, or 10). A BayesC model with π set to 0.99 was used to predict molecular breeding values (MBV) for 13 traits for which EPD existed. The prediction accuracies were measured as genetic correlations between MBV and weighted deregressed EPD. The average accuracies across all traits were 0.540 and 0.552 when using the 50K and 80K SNP panels, respectively, and 0.538, 0.541, and 0.561 when using 3, 5, and 10 folds, respectively, for cross-validation. Using DEPD-PA as the response variable

  17. United States Program for Technical assistance to IAEA Standards. Concept Paper: Knowledge Acquisition, Skills training for enhanced IAEA safeguards inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, F.A.; Toquam, J.L.

    1993-11-01

    This concept paper explores the potential contribution of ``Knowledge Acquisition Skills`` in enhancing the effectiveness of international safeguards inspections by the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA, or Agency) and identifies types of training that could be provided to develop or improve such skills. For purposes of this concept paper, Knowledge Acquisition Skills are defined broadly to include all appropriate techniques that IAEA safeguards inspectors can use to acquire and analyze information relevant to the performance of successful safeguards inspections. These techniques include a range of cognitive, analytic, judgmental, interpersonal, and communications skills that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively.

  18. Investigation of The regularities of the process and development of method of management of technological line operation within the process of mass raw mate-rials supply in terms of dynamics of inbound traffic of unit trains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Катерина Ігорівна Сізова

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale sinter plants at metallurgical enterprises incorporate highly productive transport-and-handling complexes (THC that receive and process mass iron-bearing raw materials. Such THCs as a rule include unloading facilities and freight railway station. The central part of the THC is a technological line that carries out operations of reception and unloading of unit trains with raw materials. The technological line consists of transport and freight modules. The latter plays a leading role and, in its turn, consists of rotary car dumpers and conveyor belts. This module represents a determinate system that carries out preparation and unloading operations. Its processing capacity is set in accordance with manufacturing capacity of the sinter plant. The research has shown that in existing operating conditions, which is characterized by “arrhythmia” of interaction between external transport operation and production, technological line of THC functions inefficiently. Thus, it secures just 18-20 % of instances of processing of inbound unit trains within set standard time. It was determined that duration of the cycle of processing of inbound unit train can play a role of regulator, under stochastic characteristics of intervals between inbound unit trains with raw materials on the one hand, and determined unloading system on the other hand. That is why evaluation of interdependence between these factors allows determination of duration of cycle of processing of inbound unit trains. Basing on the results of the study, the method of logistical management of the processing of inbound unit trains was offered. At the same time, real duration of processing of inbound unit train is taken as the regulated value. The regulation process implies regular evaluation and comparison of these values, and, taking into account different disturbances, decision-making concerning adaptation of functioning of technological line. According to the offered principles

  19. Development Implications of Liberalization of Trade in Services ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Development Implications of Liberalization of Trade in Services ... disseminated by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). ... The Honourable Chrystia Freeland, Minister of International Trade, announced a ...

  20. Unveiling the Teachers' Profiles through an INSET (In Service Training) Course of Greek Primary School Teachers in the Pedagogy of ICT (Information and Communications Technology) In-Classroom Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanatidis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    To meet the increasing demand for change in the infusion of ICT pedagogy in education a nationwide project was launched in Greece on May 2008. An INSET course for primary school teachers in the pedagogy of ICT in classroom instruction. The writer, aimed to study the teachers' views about certain aspects of the training experience in terms of the…

  1. FINAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT Southwest United States of America – Distributed Technology Training Consortia (SWUSA-DTTC) Contract Number: DE-EE0006339

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Kodie [Electricore, Inc., Santa Clarita, CA (United States)

    2014-12-29

    The Southwest United States of America – Distributed Technology Training Consortia (SWUSA-DTTC) leveraged the highest concentration of renewable resources in the U.S. as well as operation of the leading independent microgrid installations and other distributed technologies to collect and analyze real-time data streams, advance power system simulations and analysis, identify educational and training gaps and develop solutions-focused curricula. The SWUSA-DTTC consortium posed a unique collaboration between universities and utilities to ensure that classes were focused on subjects and topics of interest to the utilities and ones that had practical benefit related to the preparedness for accommodating high penetration of solar and other distributed energy technologies. This approach to have a close collaboration and shared effort to develop the course content and curriculum is unique and a significant departure from conventional course development. This coursework and training was intended to endure over a long time horizon (10-20 year time frame), and include professionals over the entire Southwest region and the rest of the US, and even outreach into foreign countries. Project Objectives In order to support the increase in power systems research, development, and analytical capacity, the SWUSA-DTTC brought together respected professors in Power Systems education, student/professor research and development, and valuable industry and utility experience. Through this program, the partnered universities created and/or modified existing curricula available to students and professionals in the form of university courses, short courses, videos, consortia-led training, and online materials. During this time, the supporting vendors and utilities provided the SWUSA-DTTC with technical advisory roles as well as providing input and feedback in terms of utility and related energy industry needs. The goals were to create power and energy systems training, curricula, and

  2. Education Research: Neurology training reassessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Matthew B.; Coleman, Mary; Jozefowicz, Ralph; Engstrom, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the strengths and weaknesses of neurology resident education using survey methodology. Methods: A 27-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2011. Results: Of eligible respondents, 49.8% of residents returned the survey. Most residents believed previously instituted duty hour restrictions had a positive impact on resident quality of life without impacting patient care. Most residents rated their faculty and clinical didactics favorably. However, many residents reported suboptimal preparation in basic neuroscience and practice management issues. Most residents (71%) noted that the Residency In-service Training Examination (RITE) assisted in self-study. A minority of residents (14%) reported that the RITE scores were used for reasons other than self-study. The vast majority (86%) of residents will enter fellowship training following residency and were satisfied with the fellowship offers they received. Conclusions: Graduating residents had largely favorable neurology training experiences. Several common deficiencies include education in basic neuroscience and clinical practice management. Importantly, prior changes to duty hours did not negatively affect the resident perception of neurology residency training. PMID:23091077

  3. Simulator of a geotermoelectric unit for the training of operators; Simulador de una unidad geotermoelectrica para entrenamiento de operadores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavira Mondragon, Jose Antonio; Lopez Aguilera, Diana Monica; Roldan Villasana, Edgardo Javier; Rodriguez Lozano, Saul [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The use of simulators replica in real time for operators training has demonstrated to be one of the best forms to enable the personnel of the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). This article shows the basic characteristics of a simulator replica of the Cerro Prieto geotermoelectric power station of Baja California. It is expected that with this simulator 400 people between operators, shift superintendents and operation and maintenance auxiliary personnel become qualified. [Spanish] El uso de simuladores replica en tiempo real para entrenamiento de operadores de centrales generadoras ha demostrado ser una de las mejores formas de capacitar al personal de la Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). Este articulo muestra las caracteristicas principales de un simulador replica de la central geotermoelectrica de Cerro Prieto Baja California. Se espera que con este simulador se capaciten 400 personas entre operadores, superintendentes de turno y auxiliares de operacion y mantenimiento.

  4. Chlamydia prevalence among women and men entering the National Job Training Program: United States, 2003-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterwhite, Catherine Lindsey; Tian, Lin H; Braxton, Jimmy; Weinstock, Hillard

    2010-02-01

    To analyze 5-year prevalence trends in Chlamydia trachomatis infections among high-risk young men and women aged 16 to 24 years entering the National Job Training Program, where universal screening is required. Entrance exams conducted in over 100 National Job Training Program centers from 2003 to 2007 were considered. Women provided cervical specimens tested using either a DNA hybridization probe (PACE 2, Gen-Probe, San Diego, CA) or a strand displacement amplification test (SDA, BD ProbeTec ET, Becton-Dickinson, Sparks, MD). In the absence of a pelvic exam, urine specimens were tested using SDA. PACE 2 testing was performed predominately from 2002 to 2005; from 2005 to 2007, SDA was used. All male testing was conducted using SDA on urine specimens. Chlamydia prevalence trends were assessed for women and men, using logistic regression models. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR), 95% confidence intervals (CI), and P-values were calculated. Approximately 15,000 women and 30,000 men were screened annually for chlamydia. Among both sexes, adjusted prevalence declined significantly from 2003 to 2007. In 2003, crude prevalence among women was 9.9%; in 2007, prevalence was 13.7%. However, after controlling for covariates, including increasingly sensitive tests, the model indicated a significant declining prevalence trend (AOR: 0.95, CI: 0.93-0.97, 4.6% decrease in odds per year). Among men, crude prevalence in 2003 was 8.4%; in 2007, prevalence was 8.3%; after controlling for possible confounding, a significant decline in prevalence was also detected (AOR: 0.98, CI: 0.96-0.99, 1.9% decrease in odds per year). In a relatively stable, high-risk population of young women and men, adjusted chlamydia prevalence declined from 2003 to 2007. Test technology plays a critical role in interpreting rates and should be considered whenever chlamydia rates are examined.

  5. Assessing the In-Service Needs of Basic School Natural Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... that no significant associations existed. It was recommended among other things that in-service training courses be used as platforms in upgrading the teachers' knowledge and skills. Additionally, in-service course organizers should first assess the in-service needs of participants before providing the appropriate support ...

  6. Inter-laboratory assessment by trained panelists from France and the United Kingdom of beef cooked at two different end-point temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagaoua, Mohammed; Micol, Didier; Picard, Brigitte; Terlouw, Claudia E M; Moloney, Aidan P; Juin, Hervé; Meteau, Karine; Scollan, Nigel; Richardson, Ian; Hocquette, Jean-François

    2016-12-01

    Eating quality of the same meat samples from different animal types cooked at two end-point cooking temperatures (55°C and 74°C) was evaluated by trained panels in France and the United Kingdom. Tenderness and juiciness scores were greater at 55°C than at 74°C, irrespective of the animal type and location of the panel. The UK panel, independently of animal type, gave greater scores for beef flavour (+7 to +24%, PFrench panel was higher at 74°C than at 55°C (+26%, Pcooking beef at a lower temperature increased tenderness and juiciness, irrespective of the location of the panel. In contrast, cooking beef at higher temperatures increased beef flavour and decreased abnormal flavour for the UK panelists but increased abnormal flavour for the French panel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 415: Project 57 No. 1 Plutonium Dispersion (NTTR) Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada, Revision 0 with ROTC-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloop, Christina

    2017-12-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 415: Project 57 No. 1 Plutonium Dispersion, which is located on Range 4808A of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. CAU 415 comprises one corrective action site (CAS): NAFR-23-02, Pu Contaminated Soil. The purpose of this CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 415 based on the implementation of the corrective action of Closure in Place.

  8. A Highly Automated, Wireless Inertial Measurement Unit Based System for Monitoring Gym-Based Push-Start Training Sessions by Bob-Skeleton Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark GAFFNEY

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Inertial Measurement Units (WIMUs are increasingly used to improve our understanding of complex human motion scenarios. In sports this allows for more valid coaching, selection and training methods leading to improved athletic performance. The Push-Start in the Winter Olympic sport of Bob-Skeleton is poorly understood but believed to be critical to performance. At the University of Bath a piece of gym-based equipment called the “Assassin” used by athletes to practice the Push-Start was instrumented with a custom WIMU system to investigate this motion regime. A test subject performed 36 runs, comprising 3 runs at each of 12 combinations of 3 Incline and 4 Weight settings. A developed algorithm automatically identified valid data-files, extracted the Pushing-Phase Acceleration data, and estimated sled Velocity and Displacement. The average velocities derived from an existing Light-Gate and WIMU data-files were comparable, with an average Root Mean Squared Error of 0.105 meters per second over the 52 valid WIMU data-files identified, covering 11 of the 12 Weight and Incline settings. Additional investigation of WIMU data revealed information such as: step count; track incline; and whether weights had been added could be determined, although further verification and validation of these features are required. Such an automated WIMU-based system could replace performance monitoring methods such as Light-Gates, providing higher fidelity performance data, additional information on equipment setup with lower-cost and greater ease-of-use by coaches or athletes. Its portable and modular nature also allow use with other training scenarios or equipment, such as using additional on-body WIMUs, or use with outdoor and ice-track sleds, enabling performance monitoring from the gym to the ice-track for improved candidate selection, comparison and training in Bob-Skeleton and other ice-track based sled sports.

  9. Training Standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2003-01-01

    The article describes the benefits of and required process and recommendations for implementing the standardization of training in the nuclear power industry in the United States and abroad. Current Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) enable training standardization in the nuclear power industry. The delivery of training through the Internet, Intranet and video over IP will facilitate this standardization and bring multiple benefits to the nuclear power industry worldwide. As the amount of available qualified and experienced professionals decreases because of retirements and fewer nuclear engineering institutions, standardized training will help increase the number of available professionals in the industry. Technology will make it possible to use the experience of retired professionals who may be interested in working part-time from a remote location. Well-planned standardized training will prevent a fragmented approach among utilities, and it will save the industry considerable resources in the long run. It will also ensure cost-effective and safe nuclear power plant operation

  10. Os professores de química e o uso do computador em sala de aula: discussão de um processo de formação continuada Chemistry teachers and the use of computers in the classroom: discussions about a process of in-service teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderlei Sebastião Gabini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo discute estratégias utilizadas em um processo de formação continuada que se destina a promover a inserção da informática nas aulas de Química, organizado com base na racionalidade prática e na reflexão crítica sobre o trabalho docente. Esse processo envolveu professores de escolas estaduais localizadas na região de Jaú (SP e utilizou a educação a distância como recurso para mediar os períodos entre os encontros presenciais. As estratégias selecionadas para discussão neste artigo, dentre as utilizadas no processo de formação, são: a elaboração de material didático e o desenvolvimento de aulas nas Salas Ambiente de Informática das escolas. Tais propostas se revelaram importantes por considerarem o professor como autor dos recursos didáticos para trabalho em sala de aula, e o contexto escolar como subsídio à própria ação de formação.This article discusses strategies used in a process of in-service teacher training which aims to promote the insertion of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT in Chemistry, classes organized on the basis of practical thinking and critical reflection on the teaching. This process has involved teachers in state public schools in the region of Jaú (SP and has used Distance Education as a resource to mediate in the periods between meetings. The strategies selected for discussion in this article, among those used in the process of in-service teacher training, are the elaboration of learning materials as well as working with students in the Computer Lab of the schools. These proposals have shown up as important features for consideration: the teacher as the author of learning resources for the work in the classroom, along with the school context as a subsidy for the process of in-service teacher training itself.

  11. German Command’s Guidelines on Training of Wehrmacht’s Military Units at Soviet-German Front Based on the Front-line Experience in 1941-1942

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shendrikov Evgeniy Aleksandrovich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available he article analyzes the guidelines of the training division of the General Staff of German land forces on improving the fighting techniques of Wehrmacht’s military units on the basis of the front-line experience gained in armed hostilities with the Red Army in 1941-1942. The study of archives allowed the author to reveal drawbacks and shortcomings of Wehrmacht’s military units training in the period preceding the second major German advance in Summer of 1942. In particular, the following drawbacks were revealed: incatious movement through monitored terrains, insufficient camouflage security, lack of proper skills in overhead shooting, poor field engineering of the infantry, poor land navigation, defeat of tank attacks and finally, tank combating at close range. The article also contains the characteristics of profound and thorough training of German command for the summer campaign of 1942, which covered all major issues such as the actions of reconnaissance forces, the organization of officers and non-commissioned officers’ training, close combat instructions, training of infantry’s field engineering, night training, making reports etc. At the end of the article the author comes to the conclusion that despite the intensified training and correction of previous mistakes, German command failed to achieve radical turning point in the war, which ended in the total defeat of fascist Germany.

  12. Launcher In-Service Workspace

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:Through Engineering Investigations (EIs), testing, development, evaluation and system integration of Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment (ALRE) in-service...

  13. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2006-01-01

    This report provides a summary and analysis of visual site inspections and soil gas sampling results for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 342, Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit. CAU 342 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 and consists of Corrective Action Site 23-56-01, Former Mercury Fire Training Pit. This report covers calendar years 2004 and 2005. Visual site inspections were conducted on May 20 and November 14, 2004, and May 17 and November 15, 2005. No significant findings were observed during these inspections. The site was in good condition, and no repair activities were required. Soil gas samples were collected on November 29, 2005, for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and samples were collected on December 1, 2005, for analysis of base gases. Base gas concentrations in the monitoring well show a high concentration of carbon dioxide and a low concentration of oxygen, which is an indication of biodegradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in the soil. Results for VOCs and SVOCs are unchanged, with VOCs below or near laboratory method detection limits and no SVOCs detected above laboratory method detection limits. Post-closure monitoring was required for six years after closure of the site. Therefore, since 2005 was the sixth year of monitoring, the effectiveness of natural attenuation of the TPH-impacted soil by biodegradation was evaluated. The base gas concentrations indicate that biodegradation of TPH in the soil is occurring; therefore, it is recommended that monitoring be discontinued. Visual site inspections should continue to be performed biannually to ensure that the signs are in place and readable and that the use restriction has been maintained. The results of the site inspections will be documented in a letter report and submitted annually

  14. Improving the physical health of people with severe mental illness in a low secure forensic unit: An uncontrolled evaluation study of staff training and physical health care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Mark; Llewellyn-Jones, Sian; Yarnold, Steve; Simpson, Alan

    2016-12-01

    The life expectancy of people with severe mental illnesses is substantially reduced, and monitoring and screening for physical health problems is a key part of addressing this health inequality. Inpatient admission presents a window of opportunity for this health-care activity. The present study was conducted in a forensic mental health unit in England. A personal physical health plan incorporating clearly-presented and easily-understood values and targets for health status in different domains was developed. Alongside this, a brief physical education session was delivered to health-care staff (n = 63). Printed learning materials and pedometers and paper tape measures were also provided. The impact was evaluated by a single-group pretest post-test design; follow-up measures were 4 months' post-intervention. The feasibility and acceptability of personal health plans and associated resources were examined by free-text questionnaire responses. Fifty-seven staff provided measures of attitudes and knowledge before training and implementation of the physical health plans. Matched-pairs analysis indicated a modest but statistically-significant improvement in staff knowledge scores and attitudes to involvement in physical health care. Qualitative feedback indicated limited uptake of the care plans and perceived need for additional support for better adoption of this initiative. Inpatient admission is a key setting for assessing physical health and promoting improved management of health problems. Staff training and purpose-designed personalized care plans hold potential to improve practice and outcomes in this area, but further support for such innovations appears necessary for their uptake in inpatient mental health settings. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  15. Training in-service physical educators to improve class time management. (Formar a profesores de Educaciόn Fίsica en la mejora de la administración del tiempo de clase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vasiliadou

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of a short-term training program οn physical education time management, in elementary school. Thirty-two physical educators were randomly divided into experimental and control group. Each teacher taught six lessons (two for pre-test, two for post-test and two for retention test. After the pre-test, the experimental group attended a training program which included a two-hour lecture with emphasis on how to effectively manage the allotted class time, and a two-hour practicum, supervised by the researcher. Then, both groups were post- and retention tested. For the evaluation of class time management, the form Time Management (Graham, 2001 was used. Multivariate analysis of variance with repeated measures and analysis of covariance were used for data analysis. Results showed that physical educators in the experimental group learned to increase student activity time, and managed student waiting time significantly better than those in the control group which, on the other hand, managed significantly better the time allotted to provide instructions. It is concluded that a short but focused training can significantly influence class time management, an important criterion of teaching effectiveness. Resumen Este estudio ha perseguido analizar qué efecto tiene la aplicación de un programa educativo corto en la administración del tiempo en Educación Física en Enseñanza Primaria. Para ello, treinta y dos profesores fueron divididos aleatoriamente en dos grupos: experimental y control. Cada profesor impartió seis clases (dos pre-test, dos post-test y dos de retención. Tras el pre-test, el grupo experimental siguiό un programa sobre cόmo administrar eficazmente el tiempo de clase, con dos horas de lectura y un prácticum de dos horas supervisado por el investigador. Todo ello fue seguido de un post-test y retenciόn de pruebas por ambos grupos, para lo cual se utilizó el

  16. [Evaluation of the instruction and the instructors by the students during a clinical training period in a gynecology and obstetrics unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploteau, S; Winer, N; Barrier, J; Rogez, J-M; Philippe, H-J

    2007-12-01

    The evaluation of an educational system is part of the essential process to get high-quality teaching. We wanted to assess the teaching and the teachers in a gynaecological unit with a view to improve the education of the trainees within a dynamic educational system. It is a prospective study which took place in the gynecology-obstetric unit of the University of Nantes. Thanks to a questionnaire called "Evaluation of the teaching during a gynecologic-obstetric training course", we evaluated the feelings of 21 medical students about their two-month training course. This questionnaire of 27 items is divided in several parts. The first one is about the quality of the teaching, the second about planification, the third about the quality of the learning resources, and the fourth is about the educational quality of each teacher (interaction teacher-student). The fifth one evaluates the perception of this work experience by the student, notably his clinical activity and his personal implication in the unity. There are also some open questions which point out the positive aspects of the teaching but also its failings and the parts that must be improved. We give here the details of the different stages of this assessment from the questionnaire up to the results, mentioning their limits considering the conceptual orientations and the methodological orientations chosen. Analysis of the data was done determining the percentage of agreement and disagreement to a statement of the questionnaire. All the students find the teachings interesting and stimulating, objectives were gone through thoroughly. Courses were well organised. Their integration in the medical team was good. They feel responsible especially when they are on call (88.3%). On the other hand, for a quarter of them, educational supports are not adapted, teaching documents are not clear and adapted to the National Test. Half of them (45%) are not satisfied by the numerical campus which does not facilitate

  17. A pilot study of the Incredible Years Teacher Training programme and a curriculum unit on social and emotional skills in community pre-schools in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Henningham, H; Walker, S; Powell, C; Gardner, J Meeks

    2009-09-01

    School-based interventions involving teacher and/or child training have been shown to benefit teacher practices and to prevent conduct problems and improve children's social and emotional competence in developed countries; however, we are aware of no reports from a developing country. We conducted a pilot study of the Incredible Years Teacher Training programme and a curriculum unit on social and emotional skills based on concepts and activities drawn from the Incredible Years Dina Dinosaur Classroom Curriculum to determine if this approach is appropriate for use with Jamaican pre-school teachers and children. Five pre-schools in Kingston, Jamaica were randomly assigned to an intervention (3 pre-schools with 15 classrooms) or control (2 pre-schools with 12 classrooms) condition. Intervention involved seven whole-day teacher workshops using the Incredible Years Teacher Training programme supplemented by 14 child lessons in each class. The project was evaluated through structured observations of four categories of teacher behaviour and four observer ratings: two rating scales of child behaviour and two rating scales of classroom atmosphere. Significant intervention benefits were found to teachers' behaviour with increased positive behaviour [b = 7.9; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.5, 12.3], reduced negative behaviour (b =-3.5; 95% CI: -6.6, -0.2) and increases in the extent to which teachers promoted children's social and emotional skills (b = 46.4; 95% CI: 11.0, 81.7). The number of teacher commands was not significantly reduced (b =-2.71; 95% CI: -6.01, 0.59). Significant intervention benefits were found to ratings of child behaviour with an increase in children's appropriate behaviour (b = 5.7, 95% CI: 1.0, 10.8) and in children's interest and enthusiasm (b = 7.2, 95% CI: 0.9, 13.5). Intervention also benefited classroom atmosphere with increases in opportunities provided for children to share and help each other (b = 1.3, 95% CI: 0.5, 2.1) and in teacher warmth

  18. Air Traffic Controllers Testing and Training Program. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Aviation of the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress. First Session (December 16, 1981). Serial No. 97-84.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

    This document is a transcript of a United States Senate subcommittee hearing which was conducted to review the effort the Department of Transportation and the Federal Aviation Administration have undertaken to hire and train new air traffic controllers to take the places of those controllers who went on strike in August, 1981, and were…

  19. Scoping the evidence for EarlyBird and EarlyBird Plus, two United Kingdom-developed parent education training programmes for autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson-Squibb, John-Joe; Davids, Eugene Lee; de Vries, Petrus J

    2018-03-01

    EarlyBird and EarlyBird Plus are parent education and training programmes designed by the UK National Autistic Society in 1997 and 2003, having been delivered to more than 27,000 families in 14 countries. These group-based programmes aim to (1) support parents immediately after diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, (2) empower parents, encouraging a positive perception of their child's autism spectrum disorder and (3) help parents establish good practice. In the absence of any previous comprehensive review, we performed a scoping review of all peer-reviewed publications on EarlyBird/EarlyBird Plus. A search was conducted between February and June 2016 using EbscoHost, Sabinet, SAGE Journals, Directory of Open Access Journals, BioMed Central, Scopus, ScienceDirect and grey literature. Two reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts for inclusion. In total, 18 articles were identified: 16 from the United Kingdom and 2 from New Zealand. We reviewed the context, study populations, design, outcome measures, whether focus was on parental perception, parental change or child changes and programme feasibility. Strong parental support for the acceptability but lower level evidence of efficacy of EarlyBird/EarlyBird Plus was found. Future research should consider randomised controlled trials. There is no research on EarlyBird/EarlyBird Plus in low-resource settings; therefore, we recommend broader feasibility evaluation of EarlyBird/EarlyBird Plus including accessibility, cultural appropriateness and scalability.

  20. Fault analysis and disposal of the train B Emergency Diesel Generator in unit 1 starting-up with earth breaker on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Guangxin; Wu Yang; Zhai Changying; Gu Qiubin

    2014-01-01

    On April ll"t"h, 2014, the train B Emergency Diesel Generator set in Fuqing NPP Unit l incorrectly started-up with earth breaker on. After a careful fault analysis, a possible cause had come out that a logic error in DCS had not been found in time because lacking of proper verification. Latter, with a method of reversing analysis, the possible cause had been retested again to be identified to be the real cause which had led to this whole incident. This error has been corrected completely and also been verified sufficiently by another additional logic verification test of lLHA and B. Through the fault analysis and disposal of this whole incident, some issues, the lack of part of the reverse logic in the DCS, have been come out and they might be a potential threat to the safety operation of the Fuqing NPP latter. As to such issues, a status report has been put forward to take some necessary steps to eliminate such issues completely. (authors)

  1. Injury Incidence and Injury Risk Factors Among U.S. Army Basic Trainees at Ft. Jackson SC, 1998 (Including Fitness Training Unit Personnel, Discharges, and Newstarts)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knapik, J

    1999-01-01

    An epidemiological consultation (EPICON) was requested by the Commander, U.S. Army Training Center, Ft Jackson, SC, to assist in the development of an Army Center for the Study of Training-Related Injuries. This EPICON (1...

  2. Software life after in-service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, M.; Eng, P.

    1993-01-01

    Software engineers and designers tend to conclude a software project at the in-service milestone of the software life cycle. But the reality is that the 'life after in-service' is significantly longer than other phases of the life cycle, typically 20 years or more depending on the maintainability of the hardware platform and the designed life of the plant. During this period, the software asset (as with other physical assets in the plant) continues to be upgraded to correct deficiencies, meet new requirements, cope with obsolescence of equipment and so on. The software life cycle ends with a migration of the software to a different platform. It is typical in a software development project to put a great deal of emphasis on design methodologies, techniques, tools, development environment, standard procedures, and project management to ensure quality product is delivered on schedule and within budget. More often than not, a disproportion of emphasis is placed on the issues and needs of the in-service phase. Once the software is in-service, the designers move on to other projects, while the maintenance and support staff must manage the software. This paper examines the issues in three steps. First it presents a view of software from maintenance and support staff perspectives, including complexity of software, suitability of documentation, configuration management, training, difficulties and risks associated with making changes, required skills and knowledge. Second, it identifies the concerns raised from these viewpoints, including costs of maintaining the software, ability to meet additional requirements, availability of support tools, length of time required to engineer and install changes, and a strategy for the migration of software asset. Finally it discusses some approaches to deal with the concerns. (Author) 5 refs., fig

  3. Les interactions entre formation et innovation au Royaume-Uni au tournant du XXIe siècle Innovation, Training and Education in the United Kingdom since the 1990s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Coron

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the main features of economic activity in the United Kingdom is the diffusion of innovation which creates greater needs in the fields of labour training and education. This paper tries to analyse the system which has linked training and education with R&D and innovation since the 1990s. First, young people are showing a growing interest in training in new technologies, perhaps because they have become aware that they have to, if they want to keep up with the increased pace of innovation. Besides, public investment in training has been declining since 1995 and its level is too low to enable the labour force to benefit from innovation. This explains why we can find, on the one hand, a strong demand for training coming from individuals and, on the other hand, an insufficient supply from the State. The situation looks paradoxical because the government is aware of the fact that training has become an economic issue while trying to minimize the effects of its financial disengagement policy, which started in the 1990s, by opting for a growing interventionist policy. Hence, in spite of successive governments’ huge efforts to overcome the country’s difficulties in education, the training level of a great part of the labour force remains inadequate and curbs the appropriation and diffusion of innovation.

  4. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 411. Double Tracks Plutonium Dispersion (Nellis), Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick K. [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 411, Double Tracks Plutonium Dispersion (Nellis). CAU 411 is located on the Nevada Test and Training Range and consists of a single corrective action site (CAS), NAFR-23-01, Pu Contaminated Soil. There is sufficient information and historical documentation from previous investigations and the 1996 interim corrective action to recommend closure of CAU 411 using the SAFER process. Based on existing data, the presumed corrective action for CAU 411 is clean closure. However, additional data will be obtained during a field investigation to document and verify the adequacy of existing information, and to determine whether the CAU 411 closure objectives have been achieved. This SAFER Plan provides the methodology to gather the necessary information for closing the CAU. The results of the field investigation will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 20, 2014, by representatives of NDEP, the U.S. Air Force (USAF), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine whether CAU 411 closure objectives have been achieved. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 411; Collect environmental samples from designated target populations to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information; If COCs are no longer present, establish clean closure as the corrective action; If COCs are present, the extent of contamination will be defined and further corrective actions

  5. Alcohol education and training in pre-registration nursing: a national survey to determine curriculum content in the United Kingdom (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Aisha S; Webster, Brian J

    2013-09-01

    Alcohol-related harm impacts significantly on the health of the population. Nurses are often among the first health professionals that many patients with alcohol-related problems come into contact with and have been identified as playing a key role but may be ill-prepared to respond. Future nurses need to have the skills, knowledge and clinical confidence to respond to patients suffering from alcohol-related harm. A pre-registration curriculum that ensures a nursing workforce fit for practice in responding to alcohol-related harm is necessary. To determine the level of alcohol education and training content in the pre-registration curriculum for nursing in the United Kingdom (UK). To establish whether there are variations in the pre-registration curriculum content across the UK. A descriptive study. All 68 UK Higher Education Institutions offering a total of 111 pre-registration courses for nurses were invited to participate in the study. Twenty nine completed questionnaires were returned, a response rate of 26%. The largest number of identified responders were from England (n=15), with 3 from Scotland and 1 each from Wales and Northern Ireland. Nine Universities chose not to identify themselves. An online semi-structured questionnaire survey was used to collect the study data. Teaching of alcohol and alcohol related harm was mainly delivered during the second year of a pre-registration nursing programme provided mainly to adult and mental health students. Overall, the majority of alcohol related content that is provided within the responding pre-registration nursing courses relates to biophysiology, aetiology, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. This study highlights the need for a greater and more relevant focus of alcohol education to pre-registration nursing students of all fields of practice incorporating an integrated approach across all years of study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections among men and women entering the National Job Training Program--United States, 2004-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Heather; Satterwhite, Catherine Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    National notifiable disease data indicate that there were 99 cases of gonorrhea for every 100,000 persons in the United States in 2009, the lowest recorded gonorrhea rate in US history. However, the extent to which declining case reports signify a reduction in prevalence is unknown. Gonorrhea prevalence was estimated among 16- to 24-year-old men and women entering the National Job Training Program (NJTP) between 2004 and 2009. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the probability of testing positive for gonorrhea over time. A total of 95,184 men and 91,697 women were screened for gonorrhea upon entry to the NJTP between 2004 and 2009. For women, gonorrhea prevalence increased from 2004 (2.6%) to 2006 (2.9%), then decreased steadily through 2009 (1.8%). For men, prevalence increased from 2004 (1.3%) to 2005 (1.6%), then decreased through 2009 (0.9%). Gonorrhea prevalence among black women decreased from 3.6% in 2004 to 2.5% in 2009 and was 2 to 4 times higher than prevalence among white women. Likewise, prevalence among black men decreased from 2.0% to 1.5% and was 8 to 22 times higher than prevalence among white men. After adjusting for gonorrhea risk factors, the odds of women and men testing positive for gonorrhea decreased by 50% and 40%, respectively, from 2004 to 2009. Declining trends in gonorrhea infection among NJTP entrants are similar to those observed in gonorrhea case report data, suggesting that the decrease in case reports is due to a decrease in prevalence. However, targeted interventions are needed to reduce gonorrhea infections in populations with disproportionate risk.

  7. Training cows to approach the milking unit in response to acoustic signals in an automatic milking system during the grazing season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wredle, E.; Munksgaard, Lene; Sporndly, E.

    2006-01-01

    connected to the automatic milking system. The cows were trained indoors using an operant conditioning technique. All cows had 12 training sessions with 7–12 signals given at variable intervals. An evaluation period followed the training period. During evaluation, the trained cows received an individual...... cows housed in a barn with an automatic milking system. A small box emitting an acoustic signal was attached to the collar of the 10 cows. During the training period, the signal was induced manually from a distance and during the evaluation period, signals were activated automatically from a computer...... (with no signal) in early season was 9.7 ± 0.18 h (P 7 ± 0.56 h and 9.0 ± 0.20 h for the five cows trained in late season and a reference group (with no signal), respectively. During the evaluation in a full herd situation, the response ranged between 15 and 75...

  8. The Effects of Continuous One-Arm Kettlebell Swing Training on Physiological Parameters in United States Air Force Personnel: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    traditional forms of military PT programs, especially in regards to run performance, muscular strength, and injury prevention. As reviewed previously...contrast, Otto and colleagues used an explosive KB training regimen that was similar in training volume and rest intervals to Olympic weightlifting ...Furthermore, a supervised training program such as the one used in this study should be followed to reduce risk of injury and to ensure that subjects

  9. Training in childhood obesity management in the United States: a survey of pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics and family medicine residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Margaret S; Rhodes, Erinn T; Ludwig, David S

    2010-02-17

    Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds), and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. The response rate was 42.2% (299/709) and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%. Overall, 52.5% of respondents felt that childhood obesity training in residency was extremely important, and the majority of programs offered training in aspects of childhood obesity management including prevention (N = 240, 80.3%), diagnosis (N = 282, 94.3%), diagnosis of complications (N = 249, 83.3%), and treatment (N = 242, 80.9%). However, only 18.1% (N = 54) of programs had a formal childhood obesity curriculum with variability across specialties. Specifically, 35.5% of IM-Peds programs had a formal curriculum compared to only 22.6% of pediatric and 13.9% of family medicine programs (p obesity training was competing curricular demands (58.5%). While most residents receive training in aspects of childhood obesity management, deficits may exist in training quality with a minority of programs offering a formal childhood obesity curriculum. Given the high prevalence of childhood obesity, a greater emphasis should be placed on development and use of effective training strategies suitable for all specialties training physicians to care for children.

  10. Operator training and the training simulator experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, D.

    The author outlines the approach used by Ontario Hydro to train operators from the day they are hired as Operators-in-Training until they are Authorized Unit First Operators. He describes in detail the use of the simulator in the final year of the authorization program, drawing on experience with the Pickering NGS A simulator. Simulators, he concludes, are important aids to training but by no means all that is required to guarantee capable First Operators

  11. Annual training manual for security training: Protective force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    Westinghouse is committed to high quality training relevant to the need of the Protective Forces at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The training programs at WIPP are designed to qualify Security personnel to perform WIPP security missions in a professional and responsible manner. The program consists of basic as well as sustainment training, as further described in this plan. This plan documents the WIPP Security training program for security personnel for calendar year 1990. The programs detailed in this plan are designed to adequately train persons to ensure the uninterrupted continuity of Department of Energy (DOE)/Westinghouse operations. The Security Training Program consists of four basic elements. These elements are (1) basic level training; (2) on-the-job training; (3) refresher training; and (4) in-service training.

  12. In-service inspection techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backfisch, W.; Zipser, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    The owner of a nuclear power plant (NPP) is obligated and interested to maintain - by regular maintenance and in-service inspections - the operational safety and availability of the plant for the subsequent operating period in a condition, as is specified as the basis of the erection and the last operational permits. In-service inspections are performed to verify the operational safety, and maintenance work is performed to guarantee the availability. Below, the typical in-service inspections of a light-water reactor NPP (operated on a pressurized-water reactor or on a boiling-water reactor) are described with details and examples of typical inspections, especially of recurrent performance tests of the systems. (orig./RW)

  13. Cooperation for Innovation in Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pyka, Andreas; Schön, Benjamin; Windrum, Paul

    the development in service industries include the increasing modularization of services, the increasing importance of the introduction of novelties as well as new organizational forms for the division of labour between private and public actors in service innovation processes. In economics research so far...... is strongly biased towards innovation in manufacturing, only a few attempts exist to develop a self-contained economic theory of innovation for the service industries. The same can be said on economic research on the organization of innovation processes in the service industries. In public sector economics......PPin-Project places collaboration between public and private actors in service innovation processes central. To do this we develop in this working package a theory of public-private service innovation networks. For this purpose the literature on innovation processes and innovation networks is surveyed...

  14. Training in childhood obesity management in the United States: a survey of pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics and family medicine residency program directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodes Erinn T

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. Methods We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds, and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. Results The response rate was 42.2% (299/709 and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%. Overall, 52.5% of respondents felt that childhood obesity training in residency was extremely important, and the majority of programs offered training in aspects of childhood obesity management including prevention (N = 240, 80.3%, diagnosis (N = 282, 94.3%, diagnosis of complications (N = 249, 83.3%, and treatment (N = 242, 80.9%. However, only 18.1% (N = 54 of programs had a formal childhood obesity curriculum with variability across specialties. Specifically, 35.5% of IM-Peds programs had a formal curriculum compared to only 22.6% of pediatric and 13.9% of family medicine programs (p Conclusions While most residents receive training in aspects of childhood obesity management, deficits may exist in training quality with a minority of programs offering a formal childhood obesity curriculum. Given the high prevalence of childhood obesity, a greater emphasis should be placed on development and use of effective training strategies suitable for all specialties training physicians to care for children.

  15. In-Service Education of Teachers: Overview, Problems and the Way Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osamwonyi, Eduwen Friday

    2016-01-01

    The need for in-service education of teachers cannot be underestimated. It is a necessity in enhancing work performance and motivation of teachers in the field. Absence of in-service training of teachers will retard professional growth of teachers as well as "missing gaps" between demands and actual achievement levels. Inservice…

  16. The First Aid Training Picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ian

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the history of first aid training provisions in the United Kingdom with respect to the outdoor industry, what to look for in a first aid training provider, an experiential model of first aid training, and the current National Governing Body requirements for first aid training for various types of coaches and instructors. (TD)

  17. School-based In-service Teacher training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Jørgen; Hadzibegovic-Bubanja, Elvira; Nielsen, Søren P.

    -based initiatives as an integral part of modern teacher education programmes. The publication is an attempt to translate more academic reflections into action by being practice-oriented. However, not in the form of a classical tool kit or how-to-do guidelines which would wrongly give the impression...... of modern teacher education programmes. The publication is an attempt to translate more academic reflections into action by being practice-oriented. However, not in the form of a classical tool kit or how-to-do guidelines which would wrongly give the impression that it is possible to develop guidelines...... upper–secondary education). The philosophy of the Handbook is that teacher competence development becomes both more efficient and much cheaper if closely related to the actual job requirements of teachers, organised at school level and for teams of teachers with strong support from school leadership...

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 541: Small Boy Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada with ROTC 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 541 is co-located on the boundary of Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site and Range 65C of the Nevada Test and Training Range, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 541 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 541, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 05-23-04, Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site; 05-45-03, Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 1, 2014, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 541. The site investigation process also will be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CASs 05-23-04 and 05-45-03 are from nuclear testing activities conducted at the Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site and Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy sites. The presence and nature of

  19. Import market penetration in services

    OpenAIRE

    Langhammer, Rolf J.

    1991-01-01

    The EC-1992 programme foresees the complete liberalization of trade in services among member countries. To what extent has import market penetration in the Community already begun in selected service industries? Which EC member countries have been the forerunners to date? The following paper uses a new data base released recently by EUROSTAT in an attempt to answer these and other related questions.

  20. A comparative study of teaching clinical guideline for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in two ways: face-to-face and workshop training on the knowledge and practice of nurses in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAJID YAZDANI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is one of the most popular nosocomial infections in the intensive care units and the nurse’s role in preventing it is very important. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two methods of face to face training and work- shop clinical guidelines in prevention of VAP. Methods: In this experimental randomized clinical trial, the knowledge and practice of nurses in ICUs were studied in two groups: face to face training (35 nurses and workshops (40 nurses by using clinical guidelines in prevention of VAP in one of the hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The level of knowledge and practice in each group was assessed by selfreport questionnaire, knowledge questionnaire and also direct observation of practice, before and after training. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, paired t-test, independent t-test, McNemar test, Fisher’s exact, sign and Chi-square test, using SPSS 14. Results: This study demonstrated that both methods of face to face training and workshop were very effective. The incidence of inappropriate pressure of cuff in the tracheal tubes and tracheostomy tubes was significantly reduced after training (p=0.001. But, by comparison of these two methods and the relationship between the variables revealed that no significant difference was found between the two groups of face to face training and workshop. Conclusion: Training the nurses is highly effective in preventing VAP, particularly for appropriate cuff pressure, suctioning and disinfecting hands.

  1. Effective mechanic training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdge, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The need for the training of mechanics is discussed, and the increased interest within the utility industry of placing a similar importance on this training as it has traditionally placed on operator training, is expressed. Effective approaches and techniques are described. Fundamental mechanical maintenance concepts and their practical application are discussed, including the use of supporting video programs. The importance of follow-up practical shop exercise which reinforces classroom instruction is stressed, drawing from practical utility experience. Utilizing success in training as a measure of eligibility for advancement is discussed as well as the interface between training and the company bargaining unit

  2. Experience with quality of training of personnel in start-up, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziman, V.; Alaxin, E.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical education of personnel takes place in the branch training centre in Jaslovske Bohunice and in the concern training centre of the Slovak Power Plants. Practical training takes place in the Bohunice V-1 power plant. Selected specialists are trained in the training centre of the Novo Voronezh nuclear power plant, at the Paks nuclear plant and in the training centre of the Tusimice power plant. The recruitment, selection, schooling, practical training and placement of personnel and their assignment to posts is done in such a manner as to make sure that the complexly trained personnel is available 6 months to 3 years prior to the physical start-up of the nuclear power plant. The training of university graduates for the post of reactor operator takes 18 months or more. Trained personnel attend in-service training courses in form of complementary courses whose content includes such problems as the elimination of typified possible accidents, on the basis of the analysis of all failures which occurred in the previous period. The rising quality of personnel training at the Bohunice V-1 nuclear power plant is reflected in the decreasing number of failures caused by the human factor and in the increased availability of the power units. (M.D.)

  3. (ARV) treatment training programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    Keywords:ARV, training, evaluation, HIV, health care provider. RÉSUMÉ .... workers, adequate laboratory facilities for measuring viral load and .... questionnaire guide, the head of unit of the ART ...... begins its scale-up programme. Some of ...

  4. Plutonium Training Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Galya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wolkov, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-26

    This report was created to examine the current state of plutonium training in the United States and to discover ways in which to ensure that the next generation of plutonium workers are fully qualified.

  5. In-service and pre-service teacher education in IBSE: The ESTABLISH approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ješková, Zuzana; Kireš, Marián; McLoughlin, Eilish; Finlayson, Odilla; Ottander, Christina; Ekborg, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    One of the main goals of the ESTABLISH 7fp project (available on line at http://www.establish-fp7.eu/) was the development and implementation of the professional development teacher education programmes (TEP) to support teachers in adopting inquiry-based strategies in their teaching. Within the project there was a model for in-service and pre-service teacher training in IBSE designed and implemented across 12 participating countries. The programme is based on 4 core elements and 4 additional elements that are built around the IBSE teaching units developed within the project. As accepted by ESTABLISH partners, all teacher training programmes include the minimum of the four elements, i.e. introduction to IBSE, industrial content knowledge, teacher as implementer and teacher as developer of IBSE teaching materials. There are also four additional elements designed in detail, i.e. ICT for IBSE, argumentation in the classroom, research and design projects for students, assessment of IBSE. These can be added to the programme optionally with regard to the level of teachers’ IBSE skills and current situation in education and teachers’ professional development within the country. This ESTABLISH model of TEP was followed in participating countries in order to change teachers’ attitudes from traditional ways of teaching towards adopting inquiry strategies and their successful implementation in the classroom. Within the face-to-face workshops teachers experienced and developed their inquiry based teaching strategies using specifically developed materials. In addition, the e-platform has been developed to provide on-line support. This platform provides educators and teachers with all the necessary materials for the training and IBSE teaching units and other teaching materials for teachers’ ongoing help. The teacher training programme was successfully implemented in Slovakia. There were two runs of teacher training workshops on IBSE already carried out. Moreover, the

  6. Measurement Science and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunderson, C. Victor

    The need for training and retraining is a central element in current discussions about the economy of the United States. This paper is designed to introduce training practitioners to some new concepts about how measurement science can provide a new framework for assessing progress and can add new discipline to the development, implementation, and…

  7. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Language Training Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 1st March to 25 June 2004 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957.

  8. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 1st March to 25 June 2004 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957.

  9. Second-Career Training for Air Traffic Controllers Should Be Discontinued. Report to the Congress of the United States by the Comptroller General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    Air traffic controllers no longer able to perform their highly specialized duties must be removed in the interest of aviation safety. Because few employment opportunities exist outside the government for controllers' skills, Congress established a second-career training program in 1972 for controllers so removed by the Federal Aviation…

  10. Maintenance training centre at NPP Paks, Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babos, K.

    1996-01-01

    The lecture shows the feature of WWER-440/213 units maintenance, the existing maintenance training system, the necessity of the change in maintenance training system at NPP Paks. The author introduces the would-be maintenance training centre, the training facilities and the main tasks related to the maintenance training. (author)

  11. NATO’s Relevance to United States Enduring National Interests Time to Remove the Training Wheels but Continue to Hold the Handle Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    advice, and friendship will have a lasting and positive effect on not only my military career but also my professional & personal life after the Army...if NATO didn’t exist today, the United States would not seek to create it.”1 Magnus Petersson flrnher asserts that within the United States...this topic relevant to the current and emerging strategic environment.7 Magnus Petersson, The US-NATO Debate: From Libya to Ukraine. (New York

  12. NATOs Relevance to United States Enduring National Interests Time to Remove the Training Wheels but Continue to Hold the Handle Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    advice, and friendship will have a lasting and positive effect on not only my military career but also my professional & personal life after the Army...if NATO didn’t exist today, the United States would not seek to create it.”1 Magnus Petersson flrnher asserts that within the United States...this topic relevant to the current and emerging strategic environment.7 Magnus Petersson, The US-NATO Debate: From Libya to Ukraine. (New York

  13. Training assessments and assistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybylski, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    The Transportation Management Division, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (TMD/EM-261), United States Department of Energy (DOE), Training Program Manager has established an independent Training Assessment Program, the intent of which is to evaluate, exclusively, transportation and packaging training activities throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) community. The results generated from an application of the Training Assessment Program are intended to be utilized as a management tool for maintaining compliance with applicable regulatory-driven training requirements. In addition, the Transportation Assessment Program can be employed to evaluate training methodologies and, through a pre-arranged, cooperative, technical assistance effort, provide each Department of Energy (DOE) site with the means necessary to enhance it's overall transportation and packaging training capabilities

  14. Success in Implementation of a Resident In-Service Examination Review Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcucci, Jessica A.; Hyer, J. Madison; Bruner, Evelyn T.; Lewin, David N.; Batalis, Nicholas I.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Primary pathology board certification has been correlated with senior resident in-service examination (RISE) performance. We describe our success with an annual, month-long review series. Methods: Aggregate program RISE performance data were gathered for 3 years prior to and 3 years following initiation of the review series. In addition, mean United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 and 2 Clinical Knowledge scores for residents participating in each RISE examination were obtained to control for incoming knowledge and test-taking ability. Linear models were used to evaluate differences in average RISE performance prior to and following the initiation of the review series in addition to controlling for relevant covariates. Results: Significant improvement was noted in the grand total, anatomic pathology section average, clinical pathology section average, and transfusion medicine section. Although not statistically significant, improvement was noted on the cytopathology and clinical chemistry sections. There was no significant difference in scores in hematopathology, molecular pathology, and the special topics section average. In addition, improvement in primary pathology board certification rates was also noted. Conclusions: Institution of a month-long RISE review series demonstrated improved overall performance within our training program. The success could easily be replicated in any training program without significant disruption to an annual didactic series. PMID:28340222

  15. Success in Implementation of a Resident In-Service Examination Review Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcucci, Jessica A; Hyer, J Madison; Bruner, Evelyn T; Lewin, David N; Batalis, Nicholas I

    2017-04-01

    Primary pathology board certification has been correlated with senior resident in-service examination (RISE) performance. We describe our success with an annual, month-long review series. Aggregate program RISE performance data were gathered for 3 years prior to and 3 years following initiation of the review series. In addition, mean United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 and 2 Clinical Knowledge scores for residents participating in each RISE examination were obtained to control for incoming knowledge and test-taking ability. Linear models were used to evaluate differences in average RISE performance prior to and following the initiation of the review series in addition to controlling for relevant covariates. Significant improvement was noted in the grand total, anatomic pathology section average, clinical pathology section average, and transfusion medicine section. Although not statistically significant, improvement was noted on the cytopathology and clinical chemistry sections. There was no significant difference in scores in hematopathology, molecular pathology, and the special topics section average. In addition, improvement in primary pathology board certification rates was also noted. Institution of a month-long RISE review series demonstrated improved overall performance within our training program. The success could easily be replicated in any training program without significant disruption to an annual didactic series. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Contingent post-closure plan, hazardous waste management units at selected maintenance facilities, US Army National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, California, is a US Army training installation that provides tactical experience for battalion/task forces and squadrons in a mid- to high-intensity combat scenario. Through joint exercises with US Air Force and other services, the NTC also provides a data source for improvements of training doctrines, organization, and equipment. To meet the training and operational needs of the NTC, several maintenance facilities provide general and direct support for mechanical devices, equipment, and vehicles. Maintenance products used at these facilities include fuels, petroleum-based oils, lubricating grease, various degreasing solvents, antifreeze (ethylene glycol), transmission fluid, brake fluid, and hydraulic oil. Used or spent petroleum-based products generated at the maintenance facilities are temporarily accumulated in underground storage tanks (USTs), collected by the NTC hazardous waste management contractor (HAZCO), and stored at the Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Storage Facility, Building 630, until shipped off site to be recovered, reused, and/or reclaimed. Spent degreasing solvents and other hazardous wastes are containerized and stored on-base for up to 90 days at the NTC's Hazardous Waste Storage Facility, Building 703. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed an inspection and reviewed the hazardous waste management operations of the NTC. Inspections indicated that the NTC had violated one or more requirements of Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and as a result of these violations was issued a Notice of Noncompliance, Notice of Necessity for Conference, and Proposed Compliance Schedule (NON) dated October 13, 1989. The following post-closure plan is the compliance-based approach for the NTC to respond to the regulatory violations cited in the NON

  17. Consistency and reliability of judgements by assessors of case based discussions in general practice specialty training programmes in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodgener, Susan; Denney, Meiling; Howard, John

    2017-01-01

    Case based discussions (CbDs) are a mandatory workplace assessment used throughout general practitioner (GP) specialty training; they contribute to the annual review of competence progression (ARCP) for each trainee. This study examined the judgements arising from CbDs made by different groups of assessors and whether or not these assessments supported ARCP decisions. The trainees selected were at the end of their first year of GP training and had been identified during their ARCPs to need extra training time. CbDs were specifically chosen as they are completed by both hospital and GP supervisors, enabling comparison between these two groups. The results raise concern with regard to the consistency of judgements made by different groups of assessors, with significant variance between assessors of different status and seniority. Further work needs to be done on whether the CbD in its current format is fit for purpose as one of the mandatory WPBAs for GP trainees, particularly during their hospital placements. There is a need to increase the inter-rater reliability of CbDs to ensure a consistent contribution to subsequent decisions about a trainee's overall progress.

  18. Relational uncertainty in service dyads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreye, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    in service dyads and how they resolve it through suitable organisational responses to increase the level of service quality. Design/methodology/approach: We apply the overall logic of Organisational Information-Processing Theory (OIPT) and present empirical insights from two industrial case studies collected...... the relational uncertainty increased the functional quality while resolving the partner’s organisational uncertainty increased the technical quality of the delivered service. Originality: We make two contributions. First, we introduce relational uncertainty to the OM literature as the inability to predict...... and explain the actions of a partnering organisation due to a lack of knowledge about their abilities and intentions. Second, we present suitable organisational responses to relational uncertainty and their effect on service quality....

  19. Effect of Intensive Education and Training of Nurses on Ventilator-associated Pneumonia and Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infection Incidence in Intensive Care Unit at a Tertiary Care Center in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Neeru; Biswal, Manisha; Gandhi, Komal; Kaur, Kulbeer; Saini, Vikas; Yaddanapudi, Lakshminarayana N

    2017-11-01

    The aim was to analyze the impact of education and training of nurses on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). A prospective observational study at a tertiary care hospital included adult patients with Intensive Care Unit stay >48 h. The study was done in three phases: in Phase 1, baseline VAP and CLABSI incidence was calculated; in Phase 2, education and training of nurses; and in Phase 3, data were recollected for the incidence of VAP and CLABSI. The baseline incidence of VAP in Phase 1 was 28.86/1000 ventilator days and that of CLABSI was 7.89/1000 central-line days. In Phase 3, the incidence of VAP increased to 35.06 and that of CLABSI decreased significantly, 1.73. Intensive education and training sessions with feedback from nurses over a period of 6 months led to significant reduction in the incidence of CLABSI; however, the incidence of VAP increased.

  20. Equality of Opportunity and Vocational Training. Creation and Management of Enterprises by Women. The Situation in the United Kingdom. Rapport National Royaume-Uni. Synthesis Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Annie

    This document contains three reports: (1) a report on women entrepreneurs in the United Kingdom (UK) in English; (2) the same report in French; and (3) a synthesis report of 12 national reports and 4 related reports. The report on women entrepreneurs in the UK includes an introduction, a description of the methodology, five sections of findings,…

  1. Study protocol: cluster randomised controlled trial to assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of a staff training intervention in inpatient mental health rehabilitation units in increasing service users' engagement in activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killaspy, Helen; Cook, Sarah; Mundy, Tim; Craig, Thomas; Holloway, Frank; Leavey, Gerard; Marston, Louise; McCrone, Paul; Koeser, Leonardo; Arbuthnott, Maurice; Omar, Rumana Z; King, Michael

    2013-08-28

    This study focuses on people with complex and severe mental health problems who require inpatient rehabilitation. The majority have a diagnosis of schizophrenia whose recovery has been delayed due to non-response to first-line treatments, cognitive impairment, negative symptoms and co-existing problems such as substance misuse. These problems contribute to major impairments in social and everyday functioning necessitating lengthy admissions and high support needs on discharge to the community. Engagement in structured activities reduces negative symptoms of psychosis and may lead to improvement in function, but no trials have been conducted to test the efficacy of interventions that aim to achieve this. This study aims to investigate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a staff training intervention to increase service users' engagement in activities. This is a single-blind, two-arm cluster randomised controlled trial involving 40 inpatient mental health rehabilitation units across England. Units are randomised on an equal basis to receive either standard care or a "hands-on", manualised staff training programme comprising three distinct phases (predisposing, enabling and reinforcing) delivered by a small team of psychiatrists, occupational therapists, service users and activity workers. The primary outcome is service user engagement in activities 12 months after randomisation, assessed using a standardised measure. Secondary outcomes include social functioning and costs and cost-effectiveness of care. The study will provide much needed evidence for a practical staff training intervention that has potential to improve service user functioning, reducing the need for hospital treatment and supporting successful community discharge. The trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials (Ref ISRCTN25898179).

  2. An Alternative Approach to Preservice Police Training: Combining Training and Education Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    Many states offer police and corrections officer certification through state approved police basic training, either after hire (in-service) or before hire (preservice). Only large agencies conduct their own basic training academies after being hired. The trend is to save money through preservice training offered by colleges. This especially…

  3. “Too busy to think, too tired to learn” - the attrition of the apprenticeship model of surgical training in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Kelly

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article examines the notion of apprenticeship as experienced by trainee surgeons within the modern NHS, and attempts to demonstrate some unintended consequences of managerial target setting upon the training process. It argues that this situation is made more critical by the lack of explicit standards and curriculum by which trainees may assess their progress, and also that the potential grafting of behaviourist competence-based training models onto older notions of apprenticeship will be inadequate to meet the need for an holistic account of the development of professional practice. Alternative theoretical perspectives are examined, in particular social accounts of shared and collaborative expertise such as Lave and Wenger’s “community of practice” and Vygotsky’s thinking on the “zone of proximal development” with its emphasis on a highly active pedagogic role for both mentor and peers. A parallel is also suggested with Leder’s work on therapeutic discourse, in the sense that both patient and trainee actively construct shared interpretative modes with the doctor-mentor. These accounts challenge the traditional model of medical education which assumes a linear hierarchy of learning, effectively ignoring the cyclic nature of surgical development, and the mutual learning needs of “new comers” and “old-timers”. In order to initiate the modelling of surgical development, it is suggested that: • a dynamic and non-linear view of progress is required; • the link between formal structured training and opportunistic learning “on the job” is crucial; • assessment strategies are needed that promote, rather than hinder, the learning that derives from reflective practice.

  4. Nuclear education and training in the Internet age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereznai, G.; Garland, W.

    2001-01-01

    Student enrolment in nuclear engineering programs offered by Canadian universities has been declining, and at some universities has fallen below the minimum level needed to sustain the program. At the same time, a significant number of engineers working in the nuclear industry have retired and many more will be reaching retirement age in the next few years. The operation and maintenance of the 14 in-service CANDU units, the refurbishment of the four Pickering 'A' units and of the four Bruce 'A' units will require a significant level of new engineers and scientists. Service support for the CANDU units operating overseas, the construction of two units in China, the completion of Cernavoda 2, and the market for several more CANDU units in Asia, will also require significant numbers of new graduates. The vast amount of information that the future practitioners of the nuclear power industry need to be aware of will be increasingly difficult to disseminate with the traditional classroom-based education and training methods. Almost all of the documents required for the design, analysis, procurement and operation of a nuclear unit are now generated by computer, and increasingly such information is accessible where and when needed via the company lntranet. The authors have developed an lnternet/Intranet compatible self-paced interactive multimedia approach to deliver a course on CANDU Systems and Operations. The course has been offered at ten universities in six countries, including Thailand, China, Indonesia, Vietnam, the Philippines, as well as Canada. (author)

  5. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. This course is designed for people with a good level of s...

  6. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. This course is designed for people with a good level...

  7. Measuring the influence of a mental health training module on the therapeutic optimism of advanced nurse practitioner students in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Steve; Rogers, Melanie; Elsom, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the influence of a mental health training module on the therapeutic optimism of advanced nurse practitioner (ANP) students in primary care (family practice). Three cohorts of ANPs who undertook a Mental Health Problems in Primary Care Module as part of their MSc ANP (primary care) run by the University of Huddersfield completed the Elsom Therapeutic Optimism Scale (ETOS), in a pre- and postformat. The ETOS is a 10-item, self-administered scale, which has been used to evaluate therapeutic optimism previously in mental health professionals. All three cohorts who completed the scale showed an improvement in their therapeutic optimism scores. With stigma having such a detrimental effect for people diagnosed with a mental health problem, ANPs who are more mental health literate facilitated by education and training in turn facilitates them to have the skills and confidence to engage and inspire hope for the person diagnosed with mental health problems. ©2013 The Author(s) ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  8. 26 CFR 301.7516-1 - Training and training aids on request.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Training and training aids on request. 301.7516... the United States § 301.7516-1 Training and training aids on request. The Commissioner is authorized... conducted by the Internal Revenue Service, and to supply them with texts and other training aids. Requests...

  9. In-service inspection guidelines for composite aerospace structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heida, Jaap H.; Platenkamp, Derk J.

    2012-01-01

    The in-service inspection of composite aerospace structures is reviewed, using the results of a evaluation of promising, mobile non-destructive inspection (NDI) methods. The evaluation made use of carbon fibre reinforced specimens representative for primary composite aerospace structures, including relevant damage types such as impact damage, delaminations and disbonds. A range of NDI methods were evaluated such as visual inspection, vibration analysis, phased array ultrasonic inspection, shearography and thermography inspection. Important aspects of the evaluation were the capability for defect detection and characterization, portability of equipment, field of view, couplant requirements, speed of inspection, level of training required and the cost of equipment. The paper reviews the damage tolerance design approach for composites, and concludes with guidelines for the in-service inspection of composite aerospace structures.

  10. Assessment of DoD Wounded Warrior Matters: Selection and Training of Warrior Transition Unit and Wounded Warrior Battalion Leaders and Cadre

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-22

    incorporated aspects of care unique to the military health system as identified in the Medical Management Guide.27 25 Department of the Army Pamphlet 611-21...Warrior Regiment brochure described the Marine Corps care model as “unique in that its approach is to return recovering Marines to their parent...operational units as quickly as their medical conditions permit.” According to this brochure , allowing Marines to “stay in the fight” is what makes the

  11. Fitness and mobility training in patients with Intensive Care Unit-acquired muscle weakness (FITonICU): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrholz, Jan; Thomas, Simone; Burridge, Jane H.; Schmidt, Andr?; Scheffler, Bettina; Schellin, Ralph; R?ckriem, Stefan; Mei?ner, Daniel; Mehrholz, Katja; Sauter, Wolfgang; Bodechtel, Ulf; Elsner, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Background Critical illness myopathy (CIM) and polyneuropathy (CIP) are a common complication of critical illness. Both cause intensive-care-unit-acquired (ICU-acquired) muscle weakness (ICUAW) which increases morbidity and delays rehabilitation and recovery of activities of daily living such as walking ability. Focused physical rehabilitation of people with ICUAW is, therefore, of great importance at both an individual and a societal level. A recent systematic Cochrane review found no random...

  12. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 411: Double Tracks Plutonium Dispersion (Nellis), Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burmeister, Mark [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 411 Closure Report (CR) was published in June 2016 (NNSA/NFO, 2016). The purpose of this addendum is to clarify language in the CR relating to the field instrument for the detection of low-energy radiation (FIDLER), provide the waste disposal documentation for waste generated during the corrective action investigation (CAI), and reference a letter from the U.S. Air Force (USAF) regarding the closure of CAU 411.

  13. The reliability of workplace-based assessment in postgraduate medical education and training: a national evaluation in general practice in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Douglas J; Bruce, David A; Mercer, Stewart W; Eva, Kevin W

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the reliability and feasibility of six potential workplace-based assessment methods in general practice training: criterion audit, multi-source feedback from clinical and non-clinical colleagues, patient feedback (the CARE Measure), referral letters, significant event analysis, and video analysis of consultations. Performance of GP registrars (trainees) was evaluated with each tool to assess the reliabilities of the tools and feasibility, given raters and number of assessments needed. Participant experience of process determined by questionnaire. 171 GP registrars and their trainers, drawn from nine deaneries (representing all four countries in the UK), participated. The ability of each tool to differentiate between doctors (reliability) was assessed using generalisability theory. Decision studies were then conducted to determine the number of observations required to achieve an acceptably high reliability for "high-stakes assessment" using each instrument. Finally, descriptive statistics were used to summarise participants' ratings of their experience using these tools. Multi-source feedback from colleagues and patient feedback on consultations emerged as the two methods most likely to offer a reliable and feasible opinion of workplace performance. Reliability co-efficients of 0.8 were attainable with 41 CARE Measure patient questionnaires and six clinical and/or five non-clinical colleagues per doctor when assessed on two occasions. For the other four methods tested, 10 or more assessors were required per doctor in order to achieve a reliable assessment, making the feasibility of their use in high-stakes assessment extremely low. Participant feedback did not raise any major concerns regarding the acceptability, feasibility, or educational impact of the tools. The combination of patient and colleague views of doctors' performance, coupled with reliable competence measures, may offer a suitable evidence-base on which to monitor progress and

  14. The prospective United Kingdom nuclear energy programme up to 2000 AD and the UKAEA's role and manpower requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeone, R.N.; Hodgkinson, I.A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper begins by surveying the development of the United Kingdom nuclear industry, its organization in both the public and private sectors of the economy, and changes in the numbers employed up to the present day. The possible future nuclear programme and overall manpower needs, and the UKAEA's role and manpower requirements within this programme, are outlined. Manpower problems arising from national shortages of engineers and technicians and reviews of arrangements for their education and training, and also from the pattern of historical development of the UKAEA, are described. UKAEA arrangements for formulating and implementing personnel policies, current policies for recruitment, carrier management and in-service training and their relationship to present and future needs are then discussed. The final section draws attention to UKAEA facilities for the training of staff from other organizations in the United Kingdom and from overseas. (author)

  15. The chatting gathering as a methodological strategy in in-service learning: moving along dialogical dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Alonso

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on an experience of in-service training carried out by a group of educators in literacy. The novelty of the undertaking lies in the methodological proposal analysed: using “chatting gatherings” as a methodological strategy, which supports critical reflection and the construction of knowledge, both in in-service training of professionals and in basic adult education. This experience reveals the nature of learning achieved through dialogical educational processes. Further, it allows us to observe the impact that they may have on the improvement of the professionals’ educational practices.

  16. In service design by simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr H. Ghoniem

    2004-03-14

    Irradiation of materials by energetic particles (e.g. electrons, ions and neutrons) is associated with very high internal power dissipation, which can drive the underlying nano- and microstructure far from normal equilibrium conditions. One of the most unusual responses in this connection is the ability of the material's nano- and microstructure to self-assemble in well-organized, two- and three-dimensional periodic arrangements. We reviewed and assessed experimental evidence and theoretical models pertaining to the physical understanding of nano- and microstructure self-organization under irradiation conditions. Experimental observations on the formation of self-organized defect clusters, dislocation loops, voids and bubbles were presented and critically assessed. Implantation of metals with energetic helium results in remarkable self-assembled bubble super-lattices with wavelengths (super-lattice parameters) in the range of 5-8 nm. Ion and neutron irradiation produce a wide variety of self-assembled 3-D defect walls and void lattices, with wavelengths that can be tailored in the range of 10's to 100's of nanometers. Theoretical models aimed at explaining these observations were introduced, and a consistent description of many features is outlined. The primary focus of the most recent modeling efforts, which are based on stability theory and concepts of non-linear dynamics, was to determine criteria for the evolution and spatial symmetry of self-organized microstructures. The correspondence between this theoretical framework and experimental observations was also examined, highlighting areas of agreement and pointing out unresolved questions. The main objective of this research was to develop new computational tools for in-service design and performance prediction of advanced fusion material systems by computational simulation. We also need to develop these computational tools to assist in planning and assessment of corresponding radiation

  17. Training management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    The following topics to be covered in this report are: Design principles for training programmes; training methods, materials and facilities; national and international organization; training assessment and documentation; relation between supplier and customer, licensing requirements and practices. (orig.)

  18. Training Nuclear Power Specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulikas, V.

    2003-01-01

    Situation of preparation of nuclear energy specialists in Lithuania is presented. Nuclear engineers are being prepared at Kaunas University of Technology. In view with decision to decommission Unit 1, the Ignalina NPP is limiting the number of new personnel to fill in vacancies. The main attention is given to the training courses for improvement skills of existing Ignalina NPP, VATESI personnel. Main topics of the training courses are listed. Comparison with previous years on personnel hired and dismissed in Ignalina NPP is made

  19. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in...

  20. Leishmaniose tegumentar americana em centro de treinamento militar localizado na Zona da Mata de Pernambuco, Brasil American cutaneous leishmaniasis in military training unit localized in Zona da Mata of Pernambuco State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinval P. Brandão-Filho

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Um surto de leishmaniose tegumentar americana ocorreu em 1996 em unidade de treinamento militar situada na Zona da Mata de Pernambuco, com o registro de 26 casos humanos. Um inquérito epidemiológico foi realizado através da realização de levantamento entomológico e da aplicação do Teste de Montenegro. Lutzomyia choti apresentou predominância de 89,9% dos flebótomos identificados. De 545 homens que participaram de treinamentos no período, 24,1% (incluindo os casos clínicos foram positivo para o Teste de Montenegro.An outbreak of American cutaneous leishmaniasis has been occurred in military training unit localized in 'Zona da Mata' of Pernambuco State, Brazil, where were registered 26 human cases. An epidemiological survey was carried out by entomological investigation and Montenegro skin test (MST. Lutzomyia choti presents predominance (89.9% in sandflies identified. Out of 545 men who realized training activities were 24.12% positive to MST.

  1. Prevalence, risk factors, and effects of performance-related medical disorders (PRMD) among tertiary-trained jazz pianists in Australia and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Graham C

    2014-03-01

    This study explores performance-related medical disorders (PRMD) among a sample of tertiary-trained jazz pianists. Participants included both Australian and US pianists (n=214), including current and former tertiary students, professional pianists, and teachers. This mixed methods (quantitative and qualitative) exploratory and descriptive study used survey and case studies to provide baseline data for further research. Students reported a past and present period prevalence of 63% for pain and 41% for PRMD (injury attributed to practice or performance) with the forearm being the body part most affected, usually by fatigue. Diagnosis and treatment were reported as often unsatisfactory mainly due to lack of knowledge of PRMD by teachers and by professional health providers, and also to limited access to specialist PRMD services where these exist. Although teacher knowledge of PRMD is quite low, students still seek advice primarily from their teachers. The current study highlights a need to address the issue of PRMD among jazz pianists and their teachers more strategically, both in its prevention and in diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Nuclear engineering training and advanced training at universities and in manufacturing industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, A.

    1984-01-01

    The lecture describes: the qualification of the staff of one nuclear power plant building company, the structure of university studies in the Federal Republic of Germany, in the USA and in the GDR, technical colleges, continuation studies, in-service training in the manufacturing industry, training programmes for short-term benefits, training of German and foreign operating personnel by the manufacturers, training within the framework of technology transfer. (HSCH) [de

  3. Innovative Approaches in the Training of Lexicographers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    What kind of in-service training should the trainee lexicographer undergo if he or she ... In answer to the question which qualities a good definer should have, Landau ... valuable practical training, but I know of none that offer such opportunities.

  4. Training in radiopharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savio, E.; Zeledon, P.; Rey, A.; Fornaro, L.; Ures, C.; Balter, H.; Monterio, N.; Apuy, J.; Padhy, A.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of having a professional with suitable training in Radiopharmacy to be responsible of a Radiopharmacy Unit in a Nuclear Medicine Service was the reason of promoting a Radiopharmacy Specialisation. With the coordination of the Radiochemistry Laboratory this training is giving by three Schools of the University: Chemistry and Pharmacy School, Sciences School and Medicine School (through the participation of the University Hospital). The training, which takes place during six months with full dedication enables the professional to implement Good Radiopharmaceutical Practice in a Nuclear Medicine Service, and to manage with diagnostic and therapeutic protocols

  5. Auditory Integration Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jafari

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Auditory integration training (AIT is a hearing enhancement training process for sensory input anomalies found in individuals with autism, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, dyslexia, hyperactivity, learning disability, language impairments, pervasive developmental disorder, central auditory processing disorder, attention deficit disorder, depressin, and hyperacute hearing. AIT, recently introduced in the United States, and has received much notice of late following the release of The Sound of a Moracle, by Annabel Stehli. In her book, Mrs. Stehli describes before and after auditory integration training experiences with her daughter, who was diagnosed at age four as having autism.

  6. Review: Auditory Integration Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ja'fari

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory integration training (AIT is a hearing enhancement training process for sensory input anomalies found in individuals with autism, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, dyslexia, hyperactivity, learning disability, language impairments, pervasive developmental disorder, central auditory processing disorder, attention deficit disorder, depression, and hyper acute hearing. AIT, recently introduced in the United States, and has received much notice of late following the release of the sound of a miracle, by Annabel Stehli. In her book, Mrs. Stehli describes before and after auditory integration training experiences with her daughter, who was diagnosed at age four as having autism.

  7. Training 1983 and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Quality training is necessary to assure competent, safe, efficient, and economical operation of a Nuclear Power Plant thereby providing the best insurance for our investors, customers and employees. By providing quality training programs to meet our needs, we can also meet the requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Programs designed and administered to meet the utility needs will assure the rapid integration of new employees into the Nuclear Mission staff and operating units. The task of providing quality training for such diverse groups of employees, each with differing needs, is a challenge to the utility both financially and in manpower availability to perform training. A review of current training needs and resources is discussed. A new approach to training is presented to identify possible resources available and cooperative units which could be developed to increase the manpower available for operations, utilize the manpower available for training more effectively, provide more efficient use of classroom facilities, and to be more cost effective providing the funds that will be necessary to support the new needs of the total Nuclear organization

  8. Language Training - French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 mailto:nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  9. Language Training - French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 mailto:nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  10. Redefining Scientist-Educator Partnerships: Science in Service at Stanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, K.

    2005-05-01

    The Stanford Solar Observatories Group and Haas Center for Public Service have created an innovative model for scientist-educator partnerships in which science students are trained and mentored by public service education professionals to create outreach events for local communities. The program, Science in Service, is part of the EPO plan for the Solar Group's participation in NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission. Based on the principles of service learning, the Science in Service Program mentors college science students in best practices for communicating science and engages these students in public service projects that center on teaching solar science. The program goals are to - Enhance and expand the learning experiences that pre-college students, from underserved and underrepresented groups in particular, have in science and technology. - Promote leadership in community service in the area of science and engineering among the next generation of scientists and engineers, today's undergraduate students. - Encourage science and engineering faculty to think creatively about their outreach requirements and to create a community of faculty committed to quality outreach programs. This talk will describe the unique advantages and challenges of a research-public service partnership, explain the structure of Stanford's Science in Service Program, and present the experiences of the undergraduates and the outreach communities that have been involved in the program.

  11. A Practice onto Personnel In-Service Training’s Affect to Job Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Köksal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The kitchen which is qualified as the hearth of hotels is a department includes kitchen staff whose responsibilities, authority and duties are identified related to an organizational structure and in a hierarchy instead of being merely a physical space with equipment and working areas that are built for food production. The aim of kitchen is to realize food production in the limits of cost, quality and hygiene standards of hotel. Beside many factors which affect job satisfaction and organizational loyalty the training which is going to be received is also important. As knowing the job increases the job satisfaction and self confidence and it also affects the organizational loyalty in a positive way. This study aims that grups hotel, how does in-service training affect kitchen personnel. In this study applied filed technique used in and firstly searched the factors affect job satisfaction and thoughts about in-service training then applied an one-week training to the same personnel. A different survey performed order to measure the affect to job satisfaction of personnel who was in training and to determine is the in-service training suitable.

  12. Training organisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrlova, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Slovenske elektrarne considers a specific training and education of experienced experts to be a key issue. The company gradually undergoes quite demanding change in the field of education and training of the nuclear power plants staff. We have an ambitious vision - to create one of the best training organisations in Europe by the means of systematic approach to the training. (author)

  13. Training activities in physical and chemical sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rassoul, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The IAEA Physics-Chemistry-Instrumentation (PCI) laboratory at Seibersdorf, Austria, trains scientists and technicians from developing countries in a wide variety of disciplines associated with the use of nuclear methods and related technologies. Training courses focus on areas such as environmental and pollution control, analytical chemistry, purity control of nuclear materials, dosimetry, isotope hydrology, nuclear electronics and instrumentation, and computer programming and maintenance. PCI also organizes group training for selected fellowships for periods up to 6 months; and in-service training for periods ranging from 2 months to 1 year. The programmes for in-service training are divided into four areas: chemistry, nuclear instrumentation, dosimetry, and isotope hydrology. An advanced training course in isotope analytical techniques is planned for 1990 and will be addressed to the staff of environmental isotope laboratories in developing countries

  14. Training program to prepare the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the protocol additional to the agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in the United

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stevens, Rebecca C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valente, John N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valente, John U [BNL; Jo, Jae H [BNL; Sellen, Joana [U.S. DOE/NNSA; Wonder, Edward [QINETIQ-NORTH AMERICA

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, a joint team from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) consisting of specialists in training IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the U.S. Additional Protocol. Since the U.S. Additional Protocol would allow for IAEA access to the DOE laboratories under the aegis of complementary access activities, the DOE laboratories would need to prepare for such visits. The goal of the training was to ensure that the DOE laboratories would successfully host an IAEA complementary access. In doing so, the labs must be able to provide the IAEA with the information that the IAEA would need to resolve its questions about the U.S. Declaration and declared activities at the lab, and also protect certain equities, as provided under the U.S. Additional Protocol Article 1.b and c. which set forth a 'National Security Exclusion.' This 'NSE' states that the AP provisions apply within the United States 'excluding only instances where its application would result in access by the Agency to activities with direct national security significance to the United States or to location or information associated with such activities.' These activities are referred to collectively as DNSS-direct national security significance. Furthermore, the U.S. has a specific right to employ managed access, without prejudice to the right under Article 1.b, in connection with activities of DNSS. The provisions in Articles 1.b and 1.c are unique to the U.S. AP, and are additional to the more general right, under Article 7, to use managed access to protect from disclosure proprietary and/or proliferation-sensitive information, and to meet safety and security requirements, that is incorporated directly from the Model Additional Protocol. The BNL-LANL team performed training at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho

  15. Training program to prepare the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the protocol additional to the agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in the United

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, Brian David; Stevens, Rebecca C.; Uribe, Eva C.; Sandoval, M. Analisa; Valente, John N.; Valente, John U.; Jo, Jae H.; Sellen, Joana; Wonder, Edward

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, a joint team from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) consisting of specialists in training IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the U.S. Additional Protocol. Since the U.S. Additional Protocol would allow for IAEA access to the DOE laboratories under the aegis of complementary access activities, the DOE laboratories would need to prepare for such visits. The goal of the training was to ensure that the DOE laboratories would successfully host an IAEA complementary access. In doing so, the labs must be able to provide the IAEA with the information that the IAEA would need to resolve its questions about the U.S. Declaration and declared activities at the lab, and also protect certain equities, as provided under the U.S. Additional Protocol Article 1.b and c. which set forth a 'National Security Exclusion.' This 'NSE' states that the AP provisions apply within the United States 'excluding only instances where its application would result in access by the Agency to activities with direct national security significance to the United States or to location or information associated with such activities.' These activities are referred to collectively as DNSS-direct national security significance. Furthermore, the U.S. has a specific right to employ managed access, without prejudice to the right under Article 1.b, in connection with activities of DNSS. The provisions in Articles 1.b and 1.c are unique to the U.S. AP, and are additional to the more general right, under Article 7, to use managed access to protect from disclosure proprietary and/or proliferation-sensitive information, and to meet safety and security requirements, that is incorporated directly from the Model Additional Protocol. The BNL-LANL team performed training at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak

  16. Community of Inquiry Development in a Blended Learning Course for In-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodosiadou, Dimitra; Konstantinidis, Angelos; Pappos, Christos; Papadopoulos, Nikos

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the course design and evaluation methods of an online community of inquiry that is developed in a blended learning training course for in-service teachers working in public K-6 schools in Greece. The course content is about digital storytelling, its educational value, and the use of supportive web 2.0 tools for developing…

  17. Using In-Service and Coaching to Increase Teachers' Accurate Use of Research-Based Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretlow, Allison G.; Cooke, Nancy L.; Wood, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing the accurate use of research-based practices in classrooms is a critical issue. Professional development is one of the most practical ways to provide practicing teachers with training related to research-based practices. This study examined the effects of in-service plus follow-up coaching on first grade teachers' accurate delivery of…

  18. NDE training activities at the EPRI NDE center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The need for an industry-wide qualification for NDE personnel is becoming more evident in both in-service inspection and technical skills training. ASME Section XI requirements for the qualification and certification of visual, ultrasonic, and eddy current examines is one of the major areas being supported by training at the Center. The other major thrust is in response to the Boiling Water Reactor Owners Group and its recognition of the importance of the UT operator's accurately detecting, discriminating, and sizing intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC) in piping, and inspecting weld overlay repairs of these cracked pipes. In addition, the pressurized water reactor (PWR) utilities have recognized the importance of improved eddy current data analysis of steam generator tubing. The overall intent of the Center's training is to meet the most critical utility needs with quality training that can be used by the trainee's employer as a part of its certification of that individual. To do this, the Center has organized and activated a carefully maintained documentation and records system built around the Continuing Education Unit (CEU). To address the problem of the small supply of entry-level NDE personnel available to the utilities, the Center has developed, through its Human Resource Development, academic and utility co-op programs to generate guidelines and NDE teaching materials for high schools, technical schools, and universities

  19. Training at Electricite de France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippon, S.

    1985-01-01

    With 41 nuclear power units operating and another 21 units under construction, France is serious about improving personnel training for the 3000 new employees each year. Electricite de France (EdF) takes a paternalistic approach to personnel training and to recruitment and advancement from within the organization. Courses in the training program range from one day to one year in length, and may take place either on or off the site. The author describes the training centers and schedule, but emphasizes the training is an ongoing process. Most instructors come from operating power stations. The courses use simulators to train operators in the use of fault analysis during an emergency. Computer-aided teaching systems are also widely used. 1 figure

  20. The CAM-ICU has now a French "official" version. The translation process of the 2014 updated Complete Training Manual of the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit in French (CAM-ICU.fr).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanques, Gérald; Garnier, Océane; Carr, Julie; Conseil, Matthieu; de Jong, Audrey; Rowan, Christine M; Ely, E Wesley; Jaber, Samir

    2017-10-01

    Delirium is common in Intensive-Care-Unit (ICU) patients but under-recognized by bed-side clinicians when not using validated delirium-screening tools. The Confusion-Assessment-Method for the ICU (CAM-ICU) has demonstrated very good psychometric properties, and has been translated into many different languages though not into French. We undertook this opportunity to describe the translation process. The translation was performed following recommended guidelines. The updated method published in 2014 including introduction letters, worksheet and flowsheet for bed-side use, the method itself, case-scenarios for training and Frequently-Asked-Questions (32 pages) was translated into French language by a neuropsychological researcher who was not familiar with the original method. Then, the whole method was back-translated by a native English-French bilingual speaker. The new English version was compared to the original one by the Vanderbilt University ICU-delirium-team. Discrepancies were discussed between the two teams before final approval of the French version. The entire process took one year. Among the 3692 words of the back-translated version of the method itself, 18 discrepancies occurred. Eight (44%) lead to changes in the final version. Details of the translation process are provided. The French version of CAM-ICU is now available for French-speaking ICUs. The CAM-ICU is provided with its complete training-manual that was challenging to translate following recommended process. While many such translations have been done for other clinical tools, few have published the details of the process itself. We hope that the availability of such teaching material will now facilitate a large implementation of delirium-screening in French-speaking ICUs. Copyright © 2017 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). All rights reserved.

  1. Differences in the motor unit firing rates and amplitudes in relation to recruitment thresholds during submaximal contractions of the first dorsal interosseous between chronically resistance trained and physically active men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterczala, Adam J; Miller, Jonathan D; Trevino, Michael A; Dimmick, Hannah L; Herda, Trent J

    2018-02-26

    Previous investigations report no changes in motor unit (MU) firing rates during submaximal contractions following resistance training. These investigations did not account for MU recruitment or examine firing rates as a function of recruitment threshold (REC).Therefore, MU recruitment and firing rates in chronically resistance trained (RT) and physically active controls (CON) were examined. Surface electromyography signals were collected from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) during isometric muscle actions at 40% and 70% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). For each MU, force at REC, mean firing rate (MFR) during the steady force, and MU action potential amplitude (MUAPAMP) were analyzed. For each individual and contraction, the MFRs were linearly regressed against REC, whereas, exponential models were applied to the MFR vs. MUAPAMP and MUAPAMP vs. REC relationships with the y-intercepts and slopes (linear) and A and B terms (exponential) calculated. For the 40% MVC, the RT group had less negative slopes (p=0.001) and lower y-intercepts (p=0.006) of the MFR vs. REC relationships and lower B terms (p=0.011) of the MUAPAMP vs. REC relationships. There were no differences in either relationship between groups for the 70% MVC. During the 40% MVC, the RT had a smaller range of MFRs and MUAPAMPS in comparison to the CON, likely due to reduced MU recruitment. The RT had lower MFRs and recruitment during the 40% MVC that may indicate a leftward shift in the force-frequency relationship, and thus require less excitation to the motoneuron pool to match the same relative force.

  2. Continuous professional training of medical laboratory scientists in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Training and re-training of healthcare workers is pivotal to improved service delivery. Objective. To determine the proportion of practising medical laboratory scientists with in-service training in Benin City, Nigeria and areas covered by these programmes. Methods. Medical laboratory scientists from Benin City ...

  3. Language Training - French Training

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages:   http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from January to June 2007 (break at Easter). This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) Timetable will be fixed after discussion with the students. For registratio...

  4. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For further information, please contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 langua...

  5. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For further information, please contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 languag...

  6. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    La prochaine session se déroulera du 04 octobre 2004 au 11 février 2005 (interruption de 3 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web : http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter M. Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants ...

  7. Why Process Improvement Training Fails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dawei; Betts, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the underlying reasons why providing process improvement training, by itself, may not be sufficient to achieve the desired outcome of improved processes; and to attempt a conceptual framework of management training for more effective improvement. Design/methodology/approach: Two similar units within…

  8. Training opportunities for overseas psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, P

    1975-08-01

    The literature relating to the training opportunities offered to overseas graduates in this country and the United States is reviewed. Although overseas trainees in psychiatry do not see themselves at a great disadvantage, the fact that the great majority are working in non-teaching hospitals means by implication that overall their training is not as good as that of home graduates.

  9. In-service inspection and periodic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisele, H.; Meyer, F.A.; Zipser, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    In-service inspections are performed to verify the operational safety, and maintenance work is performed to guarantee the availability. Below, the typical in-service inspections of a light-water reactor NPP (operated on a pressurized-water reactor/PWR/ or on a boiling-water reactor/BWR/) are described with details and examples of typical inspections, especially of recurrent performance tests of the systems. (orig./RW)

  10. In-service inspection and periodic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisele, H.; Meyer, F.A.; Zipser, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    In-service inspections are performed to verify the operational safety, and maintenance work is performed to guarantee the availability. In the present paper, the typical in-service inspections of a light-water reactor NPP (operated on a pressurized-water reactor/PWR/ or on a boiling-water reactor/BWR/) are described with details and examples of typical inspections, especially of recurrent performance tests of the systems. (orig./RW)

  11. Snake Train

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鲁

    1993-01-01

    The Parisian Transit Authority (RATP) has beguntesting a new train it hopes will be the 'metro① of theyear 2000': a 150-foot-long continuous tube dubbed② the'Boa.' The train is not sectioned off into cars③, thusallowing as many as 890 passengers to walk from one endof the Boa to the other. Swiveling axles beneath the train

  12. Los residentes en las unidades de cuidados intensivos: ¿cuál es su percepción de la formación que reciben? Residents in an Intensive Care Unit, what perception they have on their training?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Vázquez-Mata

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Este trabajo intenta responder a la pregunta de cuál es la visión que tienen los residentes de su formación en las unidades de cuidados intensivos (UCI. Sujetos y métodos. Hemos realizado un estudio cualitativo tipo grounded theory. Los participantes son residentes de cualquier especialidad que estuviesen trabajando en las UCI durante el estudio. El diseño tiene tres partes: percepción subjetiva de los residentes de aquellos aspectos que ellos consideran más útiles para su formación, priorización de las actividades regulares más características de las UCI y entrevistas semiestructuradas con informadores claves. Resultados. Nuestro trabajo identifica que los residentes consideran como eje de su formación la práctica clínica a 'pie de cama' desarrollada con autonomía y apoyada en una buena tutorización. Paralelamente, otras competencias nucleares como la investigación, la comunicación en situaciones complejas, el trabajo en equipo o la gestión de recursos están infravaloradas, mientras que otras como la seguridad del paciente o la bioética no se han detectado en las respuestas de los residentes. Conclusión. La percepción de los residentes sobre formación durante su estancia en las UCI adolece de algunas carencias, dado que ciertos aspectos claves de la medicina actual no se percibien como prioridades en dicha formación.Aim. Our work tries to answer the following question: what is the perception of residents on their training in the Intensive Care Units (ICU? Subjects and methods. We have conducted a qualitative study based on grounded theory. Participants are residents from different specialties working in the ICU of four hospitals of our National Health Service. The study consist of three parts: resident's subjective perception of those aspects most appreciate in their clinical practice; resident's prioritizations of routine ICU's activities, and semi-structured interviews with key informants. Results

  13. Productivity in services: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Torres Júnior

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Through the method of Systematic Review of Literature (SRL, this study conducted an analysis of productivity in services. For this purpose, fourteen journals of Operations Management and Scielo database were consulted. The studies were analyzed with respect to six criteria for classification: i type of study, ii investigated business sector, iii affiliation of authors, iv prevailing methodological approach, v themes, e vi methods used in comparative analyzes of performance. It was found that the greatest amount of work used the modeling approach to assess the productivity, particularly by linear programming methodology - Data Analysis Envelopment (DEA. It was observed that the vast majority of authors are academic, there are few publications of researchers from companies or that have both types of researchers. The study identified four recurring themes in the articles. Then, some studies have focused on the establishment of productivity indicators and their analysis over time, comparing the performance of different firms or industries. Other studies have identified the characteristics and difficulties of measuring productivity in services in relation to manufacturing companies. Different studies have proposed indicators to measure productivity in services. Finally, in light of the main textbooks on operation's management and service literature, this study identified key strategies and methods for improving productivity in services. It was found that the theme productivity in services is a promising research topic.

  14. Language Training - English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be an average of 8 participants per class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays, etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people ...

  15. Language Training - English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people w...

  16. A case-mix in-service education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arons, R R

    1985-01-01

    The new case-mix in-service education program at the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is a fine example of physicians and administration working together to achieve success under the new prospective pricing system. The hospital's office of Case-Mix Studies has developed an accurate computer-based information system with historical, clinical, and demographic data for patients discharged from the hospital over the past five years. Reports regarding the cases, diagnoses, finances, and characteristics are shared in meetings with the hospital administration and directors of sixteen clinical departments, their staff, attending physicians, and house officers in training. The informative case-mix reports provide revealing sociodemographic summaries and have proven to be an invaluable tool for planning, marketing, and program evaluation.

  17. Introduction to the training center and development of SAT-based training materials at Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, I.

    1996-01-01

    Training of the plant personnel has always been a top-important issue for the top-management. Before commissioning of unit 1 training had been delivered in training centres of neighbouring countries supporting WWER-440/230 units (Novovoronech, Trnava, Reinsberg, Greifsvald). The commissioning and operational experiences of the first years allowed establishing home training. For this purpose, training programs, Hungarian training materials and tools were developing which is described. In this process, Hungarian academic and research institutes took part from the very beginning

  18. Internet of Things in Service Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangxuan Xu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Last decade has witnessed rapid growth of Internet of Things (IoT literatures by scientists from technology domain such as computer science, telecommunication and engineering, but very few studies have been done by sociologists and even fewer by economic geographers in service research. The great impact that IoT will bring to service offerings and its spatial consequence is disproportionate to how much research has been done in this area. The paper aims to understand how the adoption of IoT affects the spatial ramification of service offerings and service business. After the theoretical framework and research method, part three explains what the implications of IoT in service context are, why and how IoT enables innovation in services and the current obstacles. Part four further discusses what could be the spatial ramification with the case of China emerging IoT industry in city Wuxi.

  19. Main principles of development stationary training facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiptsyura, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The designation of stationary training facilities is shown and the main requirements for them are formulated. When considering the above-mentioned requirements, special attention was paid to obligatory correspondence between training experience and practical skill of an operator. It is shown, that the switchboard block is the major unit of the training facility, which should develop skills and habits of an operator

  20. Comment on autogenic training and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, M; Sato, T; Takeichi, M; Fakunishi, I

    1997-06-01

    We comment on a report by Watanabe, et al. regarding the effects of autogenic training on hypertension. Using previous reports in the United States, we mention methodological problems on how to evaluate the effects of autogenic training and express our hope that they would provide further research to clarify the effects of autogenic training on hypertension.

  1. 14 CFR 375.34 - Indoctrination training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Indoctrination training. 375.34 Section 375... § 375.34 Indoctrination training. Foreign civil aircraft may be operated in the United States for the purpose of giving indoctrination training in the operation of the aircraft concerned to a buyer or a buyer...

  2. Analysis of Serbian Military Riverine Units Capability for Participation in the United Nations Peacekeeping Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Radojevic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses required personnel, training capacities and equipment for participation in the United Nations peacekeeping operations with the riverine elements. In order to meet necessary capabilities for engagement in United Nations peacekeeping operations, Serbian military riverine units have to be compatible with the issued UN requirements. Serbian Armed Forces have the potential to reach such requirements with the River Flotilla as a pivot for the participation in UN missions. Serbian Military Academy adopted and developed educational and training program in accordance with the provisions and recommendations of the IMO conventions and IMO model courses. Serbian Military Academy has opportunities for education and training military riverine units for participation in the United Nations peacekeeping operations. Moreover, Serbia has Multinational Operations Training Center and Peacekeeping Operations Center certified to provide selection, training, equipping and preparations of individuals and units to the United Nations multinational operations.

  3. PWR reactor vessel in-service-inspection according to RSEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algarotti, Marc; Dubois, Philippe; Hernandez, Luc; Landez, Jean Paul

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear services experience Framatome ANP (an AREVA and Siemens company) has designed and constructed 86 Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) around the world including the three units lately commissioned at Ling Ao in the People's Republic of China and ANGRA 2 in Brazil; the company provided general and specialized outage services supporting numerous outages. Along with the American and German subsidiaries, Framatome ANP Inc. and Framatome ANP GmbH, Framatome ANP is among the world leading nuclear services providers, having experience of over 500 PWR outages on 4 continents, with current involvement in more than 50 PWR outages per year. Framatome ANP's experience in the examinations of reactor components began in the 1970's. Since then, each unit (American, French and German companies) developed automated NDT inspection systems and carried out pre-service and ISI (In-Service Inspections) using a large range of NDT techniques to comply with each utility expectations. These techniques have been validated by the utilities and the safety authorities of the countries where they were implemented. Notably Framatome ANP is fully qualified to provide full scope ISI services to satisfy ASME Section XI requirements, through automated NDE tasks including nozzle inspections, reactor vessel head inspections, steam generator inspections, pressurizer inspections and RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) inspections. Intercontrole (Framatome ANP subsidiary dedicated in supporting ISI) is one of the leading NDT companies in the world. Its main activity is devoted to the inspection of the reactor primary circuit in French and foreign PWR Nuclear Power Plants: the reactor vessel, the steam generators, the pressurizer, the reactor internals and reactor coolant system piping. NDT methods mastered by Intercontrole range from ultrasonic testing to eddy current and gamma ray examinations, as well as dye penetrant testing, acoustic monitoring and leak testing. To comply with the high requirements of

  4. evolution of hiv training for enhanced care provision in kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in pre-service and in-service HIV training to ensure sustainability. INTRODUCTION. Over the .... workers to ensure provision of quality service delivery. (1). HIV service delivery ... (internal migration) as well as 'brain drain' to wealthier countries ...

  5. Train shunting at a workshop area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Per Munk; Pisinger, David

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of planning the shunting of train units at a railway workshop area. Before and after the maintenance check, a train unit is parked at a depository track. The problem is to schedule the trains to workshops and depot tracks in order to complete the repairs as soon as possibl....... It turns out, that both GLS and SA find within a few minutes solutions that are a few percent from the best MIP solution found....

  6. 45 CFR 235.64 - FFP rates, and activities and costs matchable as training expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... training functions and; (2) Staff development personnel assigned part time to training functions to the...: (1) Salaries, fringe benefits, travel and per diem for employees in initial in-service training of at least one week; (2) Travel and per diem for employees in agency training sessions away from the employee...

  7. Instructor training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuzhakov, A.Yu.

    1995-01-01

    A SAT-based Instructor Training Course was developed and implemented at NVTC. The duration of the initial course is 3 weeks and 2 weeks for annual refresher course. NVTC has had much experience with this Instructor Training Course generating the following lessons-learned: SAT implementation needs to be supported by plant management; age of instructors; developments of training materials and conducting training at the same time; knowledge and use of the PC; English language skills; social transitioning from the NPP to the TC; motivation; workplace environment and conditions

  8. Organisational blueprints for growth in service firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, D.; Van der Meer, J.D.; Hammer, M.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Start-ups and Smaller and Medium sized Enterprises are vital for national economies. The vast majority of these enterprises can be found in services industries. One of the parameters to measure performance of a company is growth. Only a very small percentage of these enterprises find ways to

  9. Designing for in-service inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, K.B.

    2002-01-01

    The process of design of components, equipment and systems normally focuses on functional requirements, integrity and environmental conditions. Manufacturing processes, fabricability, inspectability and maintainability in service are considered while designing. Provisions for the requirements of ISI also need to be given due consideration while designing the systems, equipment and components

  10. Design strategies for human relations in services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snelders, H.M.J.J.; Perik, E.M.; Secomandi, F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the degree of control that designers might have over human relations in services. For this purpose, a number of speculative service designs were devised to address work-related stress. We focus on three of the generated designs, where design interventions have made changes to

  11. Pacific Association for Clinical Training (PACT): lessons learned and next steps in developing a sustainable continuing health professionals education system in the United States-Affiliated Pacific Island (USAPI) jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenconsejo-Lum, Lee E; Maskarinec, Gregory G; Palafox, Neal A

    2007-03-01

    In response to the 1998 Institute of Medicine report, "Pacific Partnerships for Health ", acknowledging the need for the continuing education of health workers in the United States-Affiliated Pacific Island (USAPI) jurisdictions, the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) awarded a grant (1999-2003) to the University of Washington for a continuing education project in the Pacific. When shortfalls in HRSA funding threatened continuation of the program, Pacific advocates aggressively made a case for refunding of this important project. In 2003, HRSA announced competitive funding for a new program for continuing education. The Department of Family Medicine and Community Health (DFMCH) at the University of Hawai'i (UH), John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) was awarded the HRSA Cooperative Agreement to run from September 2003 through August 2007, creating PACT the Pacific Association for Clinical Training. PACT assembled a professional, community-based advisory board, most of whom were indigenous Pacific Islanders, and conducted a continuing clinical education needs assessment in every jurisdiction, subsequently developing and delivering programs utilizing distance education relevant to the needs of each USAPI jurisdiction. Priority health areas included diabetes, oral health and geriatrics, as mandated by HRSA. This report describes the processes, accomplishments, challenges and lessons learned from the project. PACT needs assessment reports for each jurisdiction and an executive summary are published as Original Articles in this issue of Pacific Health Dialog. As funding for PACT comes to an end, it is clear that much work remains to be done in the region. "Continuing clinical education" is only one part of a continuum of human resources for health (HRH) workforce development. Continued USAPI regional, U.S. national and international collaboration and resources are needed to achieve the ultimate goal of improved health and health care delivery

  12. Enlist micros: Training science teachers to use microcomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, William E.; Ellis, James D.; Kuerbis, Paul J.

    A National Science Foundation grant to the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) at The Colorado College supported the design and production of training materials to encourage literacy of science teachers in the use of microcomputers. ENLIST Micros is based on results of a national needs assessment that identified 22 compentencies needed by K-12 science teachers to use microcomputers for instruction. A writing team developed the 16-hour training program in the summer of 1985, and field-test coordinators tested it with 18 preservice or in-service groups during the 1985-86 academic year at 15 sites within the United States. The training materials consist of video programs, interactive computer disks for the Apple II series microcomputer, a training manual for participants, and a guide for the group leader. The experimental materials address major areas of educational computing: awareness, applications, implementation, evaluation, and resources. Each chapter contains activities developed for this program, such as viewing video segments of science teachers who are using computers effectively and running commercial science and training courseware. Role playing and small-group interaction help the teachers overcome their reluctance to use computers and plan for effective implementation of microcomputers in the school. This study examines the implementation of educational computing among 47 science teachers who completed the ENLIST Micros training at a southern university. We present results of formative evaluation for that site. Results indicate that both elementary and secondary teachers benefit from the training program and demonstrate gains in attitudes toward computer use. Participating teachers said that the program met its stated objectives and helped them obtain needed skills. Only 33 percent of these teachers, however, reported using computers one year after the training. In June 1986, the BSCS initiated a follow up to the ENLIST Micros curriculum to

  13. SI units in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, D.

    1976-10-01

    In the field of radiation protection all hitherto used units for activity, activity concentrations, exposure, absorbed dose, and dose rates have to be replaced by SI units during the next years. For this purpose graphs and conversion tables are given as well as recommendations on unit combinations preferentially to be used. As to the dose equivalent, it is suggested to introduce a new special unit being 100 times greater than the rem, instead of maintaining the rem or using the gray for both absorbed dose and dose equivalent. Measures and time schedule relating to the gradual transition to SI units in measuring techniques, training, and publishing et cetera are explained. (author)

  14. Airline Crew Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The discovery that human error has caused many more airline crashes than mechanical malfunctions led to an increased emphasis on teamwork and coordination in airline flight training programs. Human factors research at Ames Research Center has produced two crew training programs directed toward more effective operations. Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) defines areas like decision making, workload distribution, communication skills, etc. as essential in addressing human error problems. In 1979, a workshop led to the implementation of the CRM program by United Airlines, and later other airlines. In Line Oriented Flight Training (LOFT), crews fly missions in realistic simulators while instructors induce emergency situations requiring crew coordination. This is followed by a self critique. Ames Research Center continues its involvement with these programs.

  15. Qualified operator training in the simulated control room environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, Teodor; Studineanu, Emil; Radulescu, Catalina; Bolocan, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Mainly designed for the training of the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 operators, the virtual simulated environment allows the training of the already qualified operators for Cernavoda NPP Unit 1, adding to the already trained knowledge, the differences which has occurred in the Unit 2 design. Using state-of-the-art computers and displays and qualified software, the virtual simulated panels could offer a viable alternative to classic hardware-based training. This approach allows quick training of the new procedures required by the new configuration of the re-designed operator panels in the main control room of Cernavoda NPP Unit 2. (authors)

  16. Qualified operator training in the simulated control room environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, Teodor; Studineanu, Emil; Radulescu, Catalina; Bolocan, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Mainly designed for the training of the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 operators, the virtual simulated environment allows the training of the already qualified operators for Cernavoda NPP Unit 1, adding to the already trained knowledge, the differences which have occurred in the Unit 2 design. Using state-of-the-art computers and displays and qualified software, the virtual simulated panels could offer a viable alternative to classic hardware-based training. This approach allows quick training of the new procedures required by the new configuration of the re-designed operator panels in the main control room of Cernavoda NPP Unit 2. (authors)

  17. Targeted In-service Inspections Using Risk Insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulat, S.; Montgomery, B.; Robin Graybeal, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper includes a discussion of the historical background and rationale for development of a targeted In-service Inspection (ISI) program using risk insights, known as Risk-Informed In-service Inspection (RI-ISI). RI-ISI programs are optimized inspection programs which target specific welds for inspection based upon potential degradation mechanisms and consequences of failure. Inspections are performed on those welds that are the highest contributors to plant risk. Additionally the inspections are tailored to detect the specific postulated degradation mechanisms. As a result, the numbers of inspections are reduced along with the associated cost and radiation exposure, while maintaining or improving the level of quality and safety. Provided in this paper are the basic principles of RI-ISI program development, and a summary of the impact of the implementation of such programs. For example, implementation of a Risk-Informed In-service Inspection program results in a reduction of both cost and radiation exposure. Cost savings are estimated at between USD 1,000,000 and USD 2,300,000 per unit per ten year interval for a Class 1 and2 RI-ISI application. Cost savings are estimated based on average cost per weld of USD 7600 for examination, including the following activities: erection and removal of scaffolding, removal and replacement of insulation, removal and replacement of interferences, weld preparation, examination, documentation, craft support. Reduction in radiation exposure is estimated at 75% to 90% for a Class 1 and2 RI-ISI application. Reduction in radiation exposure is due to the following factors: number of welds selected for examination decreases by 60% to 75%, surface examinations essentially eliminated, within a given risk category, welds can be selected for examination based on additional factors such as the minimization of radiation exposure.(author).

  18. Field training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumford, G.E.; Hadaway, E.H.

    1991-01-01

    Individualized, personal training can be used to increase an employee's awareness of the HSE program. Such training can stimulate personal commitment and provide personal skills that can be utilized for the benefit of the overall HSE effort. But, providing such training within our industry can be a difficult task due to the scheduling, travel arrangements, and cost associated with bringing employees from isolated, remote locations to centrally located training facilities. One method of overcoming these obstacles involves the use of field instructors to provide the training at the many, and varied number of individuals can be reached with minimal disruption to their work scheduling or to their time off. In fact, this type of on-site training is already used by some oil companies and drilling contractors with encouraging results. This paper describes one drilling contractor's experiences with such a training program. The results after eight years how that this program not only can provide and efficient, economical means of employee training, but also can have a direct application to employee motivation regarding a company's HSE effort

  19. [Teacher Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmatier, Robert A., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    This issue collects three articles concerning reading-teacher training. "Language, Failure, and Panda Bears" by Patricia M. Cunningham calls attention to dialect difficulties in the classroom and provides ideas for teacher training programs and for public schools to solve this problem. William H. Rupley, in "Improving Teacher Effectiveness in…

  20. Interface unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyson, D.V.; Freudenthal, A.; De Hoogh, M.P.A.; Dekoven, E.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to an interface unit comprising at least a display unit for communication with a user, which is designed for being coupled with a control unit for at least one or more parameters in a living or working environment, such as the temperature setting in a house, which control unit

  1. ENGLISH TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch PLACES AVAILABLE Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English who need to improve their professional writing (administrative, scientific, technical). Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their sp...

  2. Operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirstad, J.

    1983-12-01

    The traditional operator job is changing, which among other things has generated a need for better job training. Surprisingly increased process automation has lead to increased operator qualifications, i.e. basic job training but also up-date and rehearsal training within certain fixed intervals. There are several, similar models for instructional system development available in the literature. One model which is of special interest integrates Operator Training development and Man-Machine Interfaces development. The extent to which Systematic Operator Training has been implemented varies with branches and companies. The nuclear power branch is given as an example in the report. This branch probably represents something better than the average among the process industries.(author)

  3. Education research: neurology training reassessed. The 2011 American Academy of Neurology Resident Survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas E; Maas, Matthew B; Coleman, Mary; Jozefowicz, Ralph; Engstrom, John

    2012-10-23

    To assess the strengths and weaknesses of neurology resident education using survey methodology. A 27-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2011. Of eligible respondents, 49.8% of residents returned the survey. Most residents believed previously instituted duty hour restrictions had a positive impact on resident quality of life without impacting patient care. Most residents rated their faculty and clinical didactics favorably. However, many residents reported suboptimal preparation in basic neuroscience and practice management issues. Most residents (71%) noted that the Residency In-service Training Examination (RITE) assisted in self-study. A minority of residents (14%) reported that the RITE scores were used for reasons other than self-study. The vast majority (86%) of residents will enter fellowship training following residency and were satisfied with the fellowship offers they received. Graduating residents had largely favorable neurology training experiences. Several common deficiencies include education in basic neuroscience and clinical practice management. Importantly, prior changes to duty hours did not negatively affect the resident perception of neurology residency training.

  4. Overview of Cernavoda NPP training programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valache, Cornelia

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents a general assessment of Cernavoda NPP personnel training programme, highlighting the role of training in human performance improvement. Cernavoda NPP Personnel Training and Authorization Department (PTAD) is the one responsible for the training of Unit 1 and 2 staff. PTAD is structured in such a manner as to support and respond to all Cernavoda NPP training, qualification and authorization requirements. The training of personnel is continuously adapted based on IAEA Guides and INPO/WANO recommendations, to keep with world standards, based on the internal and external reviews. At Cernavoda NPP the Training Concept and the Training Programmes are based on SAT - Systematic Approach to Training. The Training Concept is established on a set of training documents (RD's, SI's, IDP's), which address all the SAT phases: Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation. The Training Programmes are structured on the initial and continuing personnel training. Their content and goals respond to the training specific needs for each plant major job family. In order to successfully support NPP training programmes, CNPP training center has upgraded classrooms with new presentation facilities and there are plans to expand the space of the building, to develop additional operator and maintenance skills facilities. There are also a number of general areas for improvement of PTAD activity, such as operators and maintenance training, initial and continuing training of both Unit 1 and 2 staff. By responding in a timely and completely manner to all plant training requirements PTAD will help in rising human performance of Cernavoda NPP personnel, supporting the safe, efficient and cost effective production of power. (author)

  5. Training Attestations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2004-01-01

    In the past, paper Training Attestations were printed during the first quarter of a New Year for Staff Members having followed courses and seminars the previous year in the context of CERN's official Training Programmes.  The attestations were sent to Divisional Training Officers (DTO's) for distribution to all Staff Members concerned within their Division. In practise many Staff Members did not find this paper useful, however some expressed a wish to be able to have access to a self-service facility in case of need. This change was discussed by the Joint Training Board (JTB) and with the DTO's during 2003 and was supported. As a consequence, following a collaboration between HR-PMD and IT-AIS, from 2004 onwards paper Training Attestations will no longer be printed and distributed as before. Those requiring a list of training followed in the past can now obtain their attestation directly from the Human Resources Toolkit (HRT) application for all training followed since 1997. https://hrt.cern...

  6. LANGUAGE TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch FRENCH TRAINING General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. This course is designed for people wi...

  7. LANGUAGE TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch FRENCH TRAINING General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. This course is designed for peop...

  8. Facilities for in-service control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, H.

    1980-01-01

    Up to now the efficiency of in-service control had been limited and dependent on special qualifications of the super-intending personnel and was thus neither exact nor transferable. In the meantime a great number of testing and measuring facilities for special application have been developed. Even novel types of testing methods do not grant absolutely precise statements. In most cases, however, there is a possibility of planning repairs by trend control and of avoiding failures of operation with aggravating consequences. Technical designers from all subject fields should be made familiar with the continually increasing spectrum of in-service inspection techniques so that a better application of modern and well-tried testing methods can be planned. Systematic in-service inspections complete the Rules of Technology which are safety-oriented with regard to the nonlinear wear between regular dates of control which has been ignored so far and its implied risks. Components which are not liable to control can be checked much better by novel type methods. (orig./RW) [de

  9. Training of personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Selected staffs (in the area of NPPs) are examined by the State Examining Committee established by Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR's) chairman. The committee consists of representatives of NRA SR , Bohunice NPPs, Mochovce NPP, Research Institute of Nuclear Energy and experts from the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology of the Slovak Technical University. The review of selected personnel of NPP V-1, V-2 and Mochovce NPP which passed exams in 1996 is given. NRA SR paid attention to the upgrading training process of individual categories of staff for V-1, V-2 and Mochovce NPPs, simulator training and training with computerized simulation system according to the United criteria of nuclear installation personnel training that started in 1992. During the year, an inspection was performed focused on examination of technical equipment of the simulator of Mochovce NPP, professional eligibility and overall preparation of simulator training including simulator software. Throughout the year launching works continued at the simulator with the deadline of commissioning to trial use operation in the first half of 1997

  10. Driverless Train

    OpenAIRE

    Törnqvist, Julia; Berglund, Emma

    2017-01-01

    As automation increases in train services, this project resulted in making a driver-less train. The main purpose was to see how security can be increased. By using sensors, today’s technologies and rebuild the stations with walls on the platforms, the safety can increase for the better. This project designs a railway system consisting of a train, boom barriers and a station. The mechanical parts were made from scratch to get the system to work beneficially. The use of Arduino as a micro contro...

  11. In service inspection of pipes based on risk methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza G, G.; Viais J, J.; Carmona C, M.

    2006-01-01

    The politics of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (by its initials in English NRC) of the United States of America on the use of the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) in activities of nuclear regulation it foments the use of this analysis technique to improve the decisions making, to reduce the unnecessary work in maintenance aspects, inspection and tests and to improve the regulatory efficiency. The inspection programs in service (ISI by its initials in English) developed by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (by its initials in English ASME) it has been the one primary mechanism to prove the mechanical equipment in plants of nuclear energy, these programs indeed have been carried out in plants of nuclear energy by more of two decades. Their purpose is to identify the conditions, such as indications of cracks that are precursory of flights and ruptures which violate the integrity principles of the pressure frontier. The inspection in service activities include ultrasonic tests, surface tests and penetrating liquids test, also activities that include the scaffolds construction, removal of insulations and welding polishing. The inspections in service every 18 months during the times outside of service are executed. One of the objectives is to lower the costs of the inspections during the times outside of service and to reduce the exposure to the radiation by part of the personnel during these times out for inspections, while it is increased or it maintains the personnel's safety and the reliability. As part of the methodology a pipe segment is selected for which a fault in any point has the same consequences, being calculated the fault probability of the tube using the dimensions of the segment. In this work the inspection in service methodology is applied based on risk to an aspersion system of low pressure of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central. For this system a reduction in the number of welding to inspect of 103 to only 15 is obtained

  12. ESCAP mobile training scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasas, F M

    1977-01-01

    In response to a United Nations resolution, the Mobile Training Scheme (MTS) was set up to provide training to the trainers of national cadres engaged in frontline and supervisory tasks in social welfare and rural development. The training is innovative in its being based on an analysis of field realities. The MTS team consisted of a leader, an expert on teaching methods and materials, and an expert on action research and evaluation. The country's trainers from different departments were sent to villages to work for a short period and to report their problems in fulfilling their roles. From these grass roots experiences, they made an analysis of the job, determining what knowledge, attitude and skills it required. Analysis of daily incidents and problems were used to produce indigenous teaching materials drawn from actual field practice. How to consider the problems encountered through government structures for policy making and decisions was also learned. Tasks of the students were to identify the skills needed for role performance by job analysis, daily diaries and project histories; to analyze the particular community by village profiles; to produce indigenous teaching materials; and to practice the role skills by actual role performance. The MTS scheme was tried in Nepal in 1974-75; 3 training programs trained 25 trainers and 51 frontline workers; indigenous teaching materials were created; technical papers written; and consultations were provided. In Afghanistan the scheme was used in 1975-76; 45 participants completed the training; seminars were held; and an ongoing Council was created. It is hoped that the training program will be expanded to other countries.

  13. National Training Center Research Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Arms Training Activity, NTC’s parent organization. The program supports the Training Activity’ mission of developing lessons learned from past ...the accomplishment of that mission. ARI has awarded the BOM Corporation a three year contract to assist in the utilization of the NTC data for the...Alarm and the M8 or M9 Chemical detection papaer following suspected attacks? o How long from detection to unit assuming the proper MOPP4 level? 44. ?I

  14. Use of Job and Task Analysis in Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Washington Univ., Alexandria, VA. Human Resources Research Office.

    A t a briefing sponsored by the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Individual Training, members of the Human Resources Research Office reported on four projects using job and task analysis in different training situations. Wor k Unit STOCK was a training program designed to develop training management procedures for heterogeneous ability…

  15. Optimally Locating MARFORRES Units

    OpenAIRE

    Salmeron, Javier; Dell, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Javier Salmeron and Rob Dell The U.S. Marine Forces Reserve (USMCR, MARFORRES) is conducting realignment studies where discretionary changes may benefit from formal mathematical analysis. This study has developed an optimization tool to guide and/or support Commander, MARFORRES (CMFR) decisions. A prototype of the optimization tool has been tested with data from the units and Reserve Training Centers (RTCs) in the San Francisco, CA and Sacramento, CA areas. Prepared for: MARFORRES, POC:...

  16. Resuscitation training.

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, A.

    1995-01-01

    All physicians, dentists, nurses and health care personnel should be adequately and regularly trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Guidelines for acquiring the necessary skills in basic and advanced life support are now available.

  17. Interval Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're overdoing it, slow down. As your stamina improves, challenge yourself to vary the pace. You ... exercise training modes in young and old humans. Cell Metabolism. 2017;25:581. Xie B, et al. ...

  18. Core Competencies for Training Effective School Consultants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhouse, Katie Lynn Sutton

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and validate a set of core competencies of effective school-based consultants for preservice school psychology consultation training. With recent changes in service delivery models, psychologists are challenged to engage in more indirect, preventative practices (Reschly, 2008). Consultation emerges as…

  19. Supervisor training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    on the experience of an integrated supervisor training programme offered in Aalborg, Denmark in 2009/2010. In this programme general issues of professional supervision and the application of artistic media as a core element in the supervisory process were Integrated. It is the hope of the author that this article...... will inspire other music therapists to develop supervisor training programmes for professional music therapists and also to undertake further research into professional supervision....

  20. In-service inspection of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Manual is intended to provide more comprehensive considerations on the management, organization, preparation, improvement and implementation of in-service inspection activities and the related surveillance. It also gives illustrative examples of good practices and recommendations from operating and other organizations that are consistent with the requirements and recommendations of the Code and Safety Guides. The Manual is directed primarily towards plant management. This Manual should be used in conjunction with the Code and the Safety Guides, in particular with IAEA Safety Series Nos. 50-C-O, 50-SG-O2, 50-SG-05, 50-SG-07, 50-SG-08 and 50-SG-D1, which contain recommendations of a general character about maintenance activities and radiation protection in an operating power plant, and with the 'Manual on the Maintenance of Systems and Components Important to Safety'. This Manual is divided into four technical sections. The first introduces the purpose, structure and main requirements of the programme. The second section describes constituents of the programme, recommending its scope, scheduling, acceptance standards and documentation of results. The following section goes into details of the inspection programme's contents, such as the selection of components, inspection locations, defect types, applicable techniques and procedures, and the evaluation of results. The last section specifies recommended methods and techniques for inspection, such as visual, ultrasonic, eddy current, magnetic particle and others. This main part of the Manual is complemented by a number of annexes which reproduce actual national examples of established procedures, ISI programme parts, acceptance standards, personnel training programmes, testing techniques and other aspects of in-service inspection, illustrating practical implementation of the recommendations of the Manual