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Sample records for unit dose medication

  1. Unit of measurement used and parent medication dosing errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, H Shonna; Dreyer, Benard P; Ugboaja, Donna C; Sanchez, Dayana C; Paul, Ian M; Moreira, Hannah A; Rodriguez, Luis; Mendelsohn, Alan L

    2014-08-01

    Adopting the milliliter as the preferred unit of measurement has been suggested as a strategy to improve the clarity of medication instructions; teaspoon and tablespoon units may inadvertently endorse nonstandard kitchen spoon use. We examined the association between unit used and parent medication errors and whether nonstandard instruments mediate this relationship. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a larger study of provider communication and medication errors. English- or Spanish-speaking parents (n = 287) whose children were prescribed liquid medications in 2 emergency departments were enrolled. Medication error defined as: error in knowledge of prescribed dose, error in observed dose measurement (compared to intended or prescribed dose); >20% deviation threshold for error. Multiple logistic regression performed adjusting for parent age, language, country, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, education, health literacy (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults); child age, chronic disease; site. Medication errors were common: 39.4% of parents made an error in measurement of the intended dose, 41.1% made an error in the prescribed dose. Furthermore, 16.7% used a nonstandard instrument. Compared with parents who used milliliter-only, parents who used teaspoon or tablespoon units had twice the odds of making an error with the intended (42.5% vs 27.6%, P = .02; adjusted odds ratio=2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-4.4) and prescribed (45.1% vs 31.4%, P = .04; adjusted odds ratio=1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-3.5) dose; associations greater for parents with low health literacy and non-English speakers. Nonstandard instrument use partially mediated teaspoon and tablespoon-associated measurement errors. Findings support a milliliter-only standard to reduce medication errors. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Effect of Medication Label Units of Measure on Parent Choice of Dosing Tool: A Randomized Experiment.

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    Yin, H Shonna; Parker, Ruth M; Sanders, Lee M; Dreyer, Benard P; Mendelsohn, Alan; Bailey, Stacy; Patel, Deesha A; Jimenez, Jessica J; Kim, Kwang-Youn A; Jacobson, Kara; Hedlund, Laurie; Landa, Rosa; Maness, Leslie; Tailor Raythatha, Purvi; McFadden, Terri; Wolf, Michael S

    Some experts recommend eliminating "teaspoon" and "tablespoon" terms from pediatric medication dosing instructions, because these terms could inadvertently encourage use of nonstandard tools (ie, kitchen spoons), which are associated with dosing errors. We examined whether use of "teaspoon" or "tsp" on prescription labels affects parents' choice of dosing tools, and the role of health literacy and language. Analysis of data collected as part of a controlled experiment (SAFE Rx for Kids [Safe Administration For Every Prescription for Kids] study), which randomized English- and Spanish-speaking parents (n = 2110) of children 8 years of age and younger to 1 of 5 groups, which varied in unit of measurement pairings on medication labels and dosing tools. Outcome assessed was parent self-reported choice of dosing tool. Parent health literacy was measured using the Newest Vital Sign. Seventy-seven percent had limited health literacy (36.0% low, 41.0% marginal); 35.0% completed assessments in Spanish. Overall, 27.7% who viewed labels containing either "tsp" or "teaspoon" units (alone or with "mL") chose nonstandard dosing tools (ie, kitchen teaspoon, kitchen tablespoon), compared with 8.3% who viewed "mL"-only labels (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.4 [95% confidence interval (CI), 3.3-5.8]). Odds varied based on whether "teaspoon" was spelled out or abbreviated ("teaspoon"-alone: AOR = 5.3 [95% CI, 3.8-7.3]); "teaspoon" with mL: AOR = 4.7 [95% CI, 3.3-6.5]; "tsp" with mL: AOR = 3.3 [95% CI, 2.4-4.7]; P units ("teaspoon" or "tsp") on prescription labels is associated with increased likelihood of parent choice of nonstandard dosing tools. Future studies might be helpful to examine the real-world effect of eliminating teaspoon units from medication labels, and identify additional strategies to promote the safe use of pediatric liquid medications. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Doses from Medical Radiation Sources

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    ... Memoriam Sections All Sections (listing) Accelerator AIRRS Decommissioning Environmental/Radon Homeland Security Instrumentation Medical Health Physics Military Health Physics Nonionizing Radiation Power Reactor Affiliates ...

  4. Using hospital pharmacy technicians to check unit dose carts.

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    Spooner, S H; Emerson, P K

    1994-05-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of technicians checking unit dose carts as compared with pharmacists checking unit dose carts. The final (after check) fill in both arms of the study was evaluated for accuracy on the same five criteria: 1) correct drug, 2) correct dose, 3) correct dosage form, 4) correct quantity, and 5) expiration date. In the technician arm, 7571 doses were checked with 10 errors, giving a 99.76% (1 error in 420) accuracy. In the pharmacist arm of the study, 3116 doses were checked with 34 total errors, giving a 98.91% (1 error in 92) accuracy. The results of this study indicate that technicians would have as high if not a higher accuracy rate than pharmacists. Using pharmacy technicians in this role should continue the same level of care by maintaining a high accuracy in medication dispensing and provide greater economic benefit to the organization by using technical rather than professional personnel.

  5. Topology optimization of inertia driven dosing units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Casper Schousboe

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for optimizing inertia driven dosing units, sometimes referred to as eductors, for use in small scale flow applications. The unit is assumed to operate at low to moderate Reynolds numbers and under steady state conditions. By applying topology optimization...

  6. Charpak, Garwin, propose unit for radiation dose

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    Feder, Toni

    2002-01-01

    Becquerels, curries, grays, rads, rems, roentgens, sieverts - even for specialists the units of radiation can get confusing. That's why two eminent physicists, Georges Charpak of France, and Richard Garwin, are proposing the DARI as a unit of radiation dose they hope will help the public evaluate the risks associated with low-level radiation exposure (1 page)

  7. A BASIC CAMERA UNIT FOR MEDICAL PHOTOGRAPHY.

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    SMIALOWSKI, A; CURRIE, D J

    1964-08-22

    A camera unit suitable for most medical photographic purposes is described. The unit comprises a single-lens reflex camera, an electronic flash unit and supplementary lenses. Simple instructions for use of th's basic unit are presented. The unit is entirely suitable for taking fine-quality photographs of most medical subjects by persons who have had little photographic training.

  8. INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION IN MEDICAL UNITS

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    Irina Ionela ROTARIU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years there has been noticed an increase of the general interest in proper communication between medical specialists, on one hand, and the patients and their families, on the other. The benefits of properly performed communication certainly lead to an increase of public confidence in the medical system and therefore to the patients' improved satisfaction and contentment.

  9. Pharmacy collected medication histories in an observation unit

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    Gabrielle L Procopio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clear processes to facilitate medication reconciliation in a hospital setting are still undefined. The observation unit allows for a high patient turnover rate, where obtaining accurate medication histories is critical. Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the ability of pharmacists and student pharmacists to identify discrepancies in medication histories obtained at triage in observation patients. Methods: Pharmacists and student pharmacists obtained a medication history for each patient placed in observation status. Patients were excluded if they were unable to provide a medication history and family, caregiver, or community pharmacy was also unable to provide the history. A comparison was made between triage and pharmacy collected medication histories to identify discrepancies. Results: A total of 501 medications histories were collected, accounting for 3213 medication records. There were 1176 (37% matched medication records and 1467 discrepancies identified, including 808 (55% omissions, 296 (20.2% wrong frequency, 278 (19% wrong dose, 51 (3.5% discontinued, and 34 (2.3% wrong medication. There was an average of 2.9 discrepancies per patient profile. In all, 76 (15% of the profiles were matched. The median time to obtain a medication history was 4 min (range: 1–48 min. Conclusion: Pharmacy collected medication histories in an observation unit identify discrepancies that can be reconciled by the interdisciplinary team.

  10. Architecture and Design of Medical Processor Units for Medical Networks

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    Ahamed, Syed V; 10.5121/ijcnc.2010.2602

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces analogical and deductive methodologies for the design medical processor units (MPUs). From the study of evolution of numerous earlier processors, we derive the basis for the architecture of MPUs. These specialized processors perform unique medical functions encoded as medical operational codes (mopcs). From a pragmatic perspective, MPUs function very close to CPUs. Both processors have unique operation codes that command the hardware to perform a distinct chain of subprocesses upon operands and generate a specific result unique to the opcode and the operand(s). In medical environments, MPU decodes the mopcs and executes a series of medical sub-processes and sends out secondary commands to the medical machine. Whereas operands in a typical computer system are numerical and logical entities, the operands in medical machine are objects such as such as patients, blood samples, tissues, operating rooms, medical staff, medical bills, patient payments, etc. We follow the functional overlap betw...

  11. Architecture and Design of Medical Processor Units for Medical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed V. Ahamed

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper1 introduces analogical and deductive methodologies for the design medical processor units(MPUs. From the study of evolution of numerous earlier processors, we derive the basis for thearchitecture of MPUs. These specialized processors perform unique medical functions encoded as medicaloperational codes (mopcs. From a pragmatic perspective, MPUs function very close to CPUs. Bothprocessors have unique operation codes that command the hardware to perform a distinct chain of subprocessesupon operands and generate a specific result unique to the opcode and the operand(s. Inmedical environments, MPU decodes the mopcs and executes a series of medical sub-processes and sendsout secondary commands to the medical machine. Whereas operands in a typical computer system arenumerical and logical entities, the operands in medical machine are objects such as such as patients, bloodsamples, tissues, operating rooms, medical staff, medical bills, patient payments, etc. We follow thefunctional overlap between the two processes and evolve the design of medical computer systems andnetworks.

  12. Impact of Medication Dose Tracking Technology on Nursing Practice.

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    Peek, Grayson; Campbell, Udobi; Kelm, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Objective: The impact of providing nursing staff access to data collected through a medication dose tracking technology (MDTT) web portal was investigated. Methods: A quasi-experimental, nonrandomized, pre-post intervention study was conducted in the Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit (CTICU) at Duke University Hospital. The change in the number of medication requests per dispense routed to the pharmacy electronic health record (EHR) in-basket was analyzed pre and post web portal access. Other endpoints included the number of MDTT web portal queries per day by nursing staff, change in nursing satisfaction survey scores, and technician time associated with processing medication requests pre and post web portal access. The pre web portal access phase of the study occurred from June 1, 2014 to August 31, 2014. The post web portal access phase occurred from October 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014. Results: An 11.4% decrease in the number of medication requests per dispense was exhibited between the pre and post web portal access phases of the study (0.0579 vs 0.0513, respectively; p < .001). Pre and post surveys showed a significant improvement in nurses' satisfaction regarding access to information on the location of medications (p = .009). Additionally, CTICU nursing staff utilized the MDTT web portal for 3.21 queries per day from October 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014. Conclusion: Providing nurses access to data collected via an MDTT decreased the number of communications between nursing and pharmacy staff regarding medication availability and led to statistically significant improvements in nursing satisfaction for certain aspects of the medication distribution process.

  13. [Medication errors in Spanish intensive care units].

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    Merino, P; Martín, M C; Alonso, A; Gutiérrez, I; Alvarez, J; Becerril, F

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the incidence of medication errors in Spanish intensive care units. Post hoc study of the SYREC trial. A longitudinal observational study carried out during 24 hours in patients admitted to the ICU. Spanish intensive care units. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit participating in the SYREC during the period of study. Risk, individual risk, and rate of medication errors. The final study sample consisted of 1017 patients from 79 intensive care units; 591 (58%) were affected by one or more incidents. Of these, 253 (43%) had at least one medication-related incident. The total number of incidents reported was 1424, of which 350 (25%) were medication errors. The risk of suffering at least one incident was 22% (IQR: 8-50%) while the individual risk was 21% (IQR: 8-42%). The medication error rate was 1.13 medication errors per 100 patient-days of stay. Most incidents occurred in the prescription (34%) and administration (28%) phases, 16% resulted in patient harm, and 82% were considered "totally avoidable". Medication errors are among the most frequent types of incidents in critically ill patients, and are more common in the prescription and administration stages. Although most such incidents have no clinical consequences, a significant percentage prove harmful for the patient, and a large proportion are avoidable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  14. Effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units

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    Lee, Gun Sun; Kim, Jin Soo; Seo, Yo Seob; Kim, Jae Duk [School of Dentistry, Oral Biology Research Institute, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    This study aimed to provide comparative measurements of the effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units according to phantoms and exposure parameters. Dose measurements were carried out using a head phantom representing an average man (175 cm tall, 73.5 kg male) and a limbless whole body phantom representing an average woman (155 cm tall, 50 kg female). Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were used for the dosimeter. Two direct and 2 indirect digital panoramic units were evaluated in this study. Effective doses were derived using 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations. The effective doses of the 4 digital panoramic units ranged between 8.9 {mu}Sv and 37.8 {mu}Sv. By using the head phantom, the effective doses from the direct digital panoramic units (37.8 {mu}Sv, 27.6 {mu}Sv) were higher than those from the indirect units (8.9 {mu}Sv, 15.9 {mu}Sv). The same panoramic unit showed the difference in effective doses according to the gender of the phantom, numbers and locations of TLDs, and kVp. To reasonably assess the radiation risk from various dental radiographic units, the effective doses should be obtained with the same numbers and locations of TLDs, and with standard hospital exposure. After that, it is necessary to survey the effective doses from various dental radiographic units according to the gender with the corresponding phantom.

  15. Effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gun-Sun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob; Kim, Jae-Duk

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to provide comparative measurements of the effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units according to phantoms and exposure parameters. Dose measurements were carried out using a head phantom representing an average man (175 cm tall, 73.5 kg male) and a limbless whole body phantom representing an average woman (155 cm tall, 50 kg female). Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were used for the dosimeter. Two direct and 2 indirect digital panoramic units were evaluated in this study. Effective doses were derived using 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations. The effective doses of the 4 digital panoramic units ranged between 8.9 µSv and 37.8 µSv. By using the head phantom, the effective doses from the direct digital panoramic units (37.8 µSv, 27.6 µSv) were higher than those from the indirect units (8.9 µSv, 15.9 µSv). The same panoramic unit showed the difference in effective doses according to the gender of the phantom, numbers and locations of TLDs, and kVp. To reasonably assess the radiation risk from various dental radiographic units, the effective doses should be obtained with the same numbers and locations of TLDs, and with standard hospital exposure. After that, it is necessary to survey the effective doses from various dental radiographic units according to the gender with the corresponding phantom.

  16. Statistical behavior of high doses in medical radiodiagnosis; Comportamento estatistico das altas doses em radiodiagnostico medico

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    Barboza, Adriana Elisa, E-mail: adrianaebarboza@gmail.com, E-mail: elisa@bolsista.ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work has as main purpose statistically estimating occupational exposure in medical diagnostic radiology in cases of high doses recorded in 2011 at national level. For statistical survey of this study, doses of 372 IOE's diagnostic radiology in different Brazilian states were evaluated. Data were extracted from the work of monograph (Research Methodology Of High Doses In Medical Radiodiagnostic) that contains the database's information Sector Management doses of IRD/CNEN-RJ, Brazil. The identification of these states allows the Sanitary Surveillance (VISA) responsible, becomes aware of events and work with programs to reduce these events. (author)

  17. The effect of dose heterogeneity on radiation risk in medical imaging.

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    Samei, Ehsan; Li, Xiang; Chen, Baiyu; Reiman, Robert

    2013-06-01

    The current estimations of risk associated with medical imaging procedures rely on assessing the organ dose via direct measurements or simulation. The dose to each organ is assumed to be homogeneous. To take into account the differences in radiation sensitivities, the mean organ doses are weighted by a corresponding tissue-weighting coefficients provided by ICRP to calculate the effective dose, which has been used as a surrogate of radiation risk. However, those coefficients were derived under the assumption of a homogeneous dose distribution within each organ. That assumption is significantly violated in most medical-imaging procedures. In helical chest CT, for example, superficial organs (e.g. breasts) demonstrate a heterogeneous dose distribution, whereas organs on the peripheries of the irradiation field (e.g. liver) might possess a discontinuous dose profile. Projection radiography and mammography involve an even higher level of organ dose heterogeneity spanning up to two orders of magnitude. As such, mean dose or point measured dose values do not reflect the maximum energy deposited per unit volume of the organ. In this paper, the magnitude of the dose heterogeneity in both CT and projection X-ray imaging was reported, using Monte Carlo methods. The lung dose demonstrated factors of 1.7 and 2.2 difference between the mean and maximum dose for chest CT and radiography, respectively. The corresponding values for the liver were 1.9 and 3.5. For mammography and breast tomosynthesis, the difference between mean glandular dose and maximum glandular dose was 3.1. Risk models based on the mean dose were found to provide a reasonable reflection of cancer risk. However, for leukaemia, they were found to significantly under-represent the risk when the organ dose distribution is heterogeneous. A systematic study is needed to develop a risk model for heterogeneous dose distributions.

  18. Medical responsibility in the United Arab Emirates.

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    Benomran, Fawzi

    2010-05-01

    Medical responsibility in the United Arab Emirates was formerly defined and governed according to Law 7 of 1975 for the practice of medical professions, which had been a part of civil law. The passing of Law 10 of 2008, namely the "Law on Medical Responsibility in UAE", enacted on 16th December 2008 created a new framework to deal with this issue. One of its provisions required medical practitioners to hold insurance policies, so that insurance companies pays damages to the plaintiff (patient) injured as a result of a physicians' negligence. This paper outlines the issue of medical responsibility and medical negligence. The author's translation of the new law into English is included so that its full text is available for the readers, especially expatriate doctors working in the UAE. Where appropriate, a brief comparison between the old law and new laws is also presented. The objective of this paper is to provide medical practitioners with basic information about the subject in general and to this legislation in particular. It is mandatory for doctors to realize inherent risks involved in the course of their practice. A basic knowledge of the law is required to avoid pitfalls and to safeguard oneself against errors arising from ignorance of the duties and rights of the professional person.

  19. Monte Carlo PENRADIO software for dose calculation in medical imaging

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    Adrien, Camille; Lòpez Noriega, Mercedes; Bonniaud, Guillaume; Bordy, Jean-Marc; Le Loirec, Cindy; Poumarede, Bénédicte

    2014-06-01

    The increase on the collective radiation dose due to the large number of medical imaging exams has led the medical physics community to deeply consider the amount of dose delivered and its associated risks in these exams. For this purpose we have developed a Monte Carlo tool, PENRADIO, based on a modified version of PENELOPE code 2006 release, to obtain an accurate individualized radiation dose in conventional and interventional radiography and in computed tomography (CT). This tool has been validated showing excellent agreement between the measured and simulated organ doses in the case of a hip conventional radiography and a coronography. We expect the same accuracy in further results for other localizations and CT examinations.

  20. Organ-specific external dose coefficients and protective apron transmission factors for historical dose reconstruction for medical personnel.

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    Simon, Steven L

    2011-07-01

    While radiation absorbed dose (Gy) to the skin or other organs is sometimes estimated for patients from diagnostic radiologic examinations or therapeutic procedures, rarely is occupationally-received radiation absorbed dose to individual organs/tissues estimated for medical personnel; e.g., radiologic technologists or radiologists. Generally, for medical personnel, equivalent or effective radiation doses are estimated for compliance purposes. In the very few cases when organ doses to medical personnel are reconstructed, the data is usually for the purpose of epidemiologic studies; e.g., a study of historical doses and risks to a cohort of about 110,000 radiologic technologists presently underway at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. While ICRP and ICRU have published organ-specific external dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) (i.e., absorbed dose to organs and tissues per unit air kerma and dose equivalent per unit air kerma), those factors have been published primarily for mono-energetic photons at selected energies. This presents two related problems for historical dose reconstruction, both of which are addressed here. It is necessary to derive conversion factor values for (1) continuous distributions of energy typical of diagnostic medical x-rays (bremsstrahlung radiation), and (2) energies of particular radioisotopes used in medical procedures, neither of which are presented in published tables. For derivation of DCCs for bremsstrahlung radiation, combinations of x-ray tube potentials and filtrations were derived for different time periods based on a review of relevant literature. Three peak tube potentials (70 kV, 80 kV, and 90 kV) with four different amounts of beam filtration were determined to be applicable for historic dose reconstruction. The probabilities of these machine settings were assigned to each of the four time periods (earlier than 1949, 1949-1954, 1955-1968, and after 1968). Continuous functions were fit to each set of discrete values of the

  1. The use of natural language processing on narrative medication schedules to compute average weekly dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao-Chin; Leng, Jianwei; Cannon, Grant W; Zhou, Xi; Egger, Marlene; South, Brett; Burningham, Zach; Zeng, Qing; Sauer, Brian C

    2016-12-01

    Medications with non-standard dosing and unstandardized units of measurement make the estimation of prescribed dose difficult from pharmacy dispensing data. A natural language processing tool named the SIG extractor was developed to identify and extract elements from narrative medication instructions to compute average weekly doses (AWDs) for disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the performance of the SIG extractor. This agreement study utilized Veterans Health Affairs pharmacy data from 2008 to 2012. The SIG extractor was designed to extract key elements from narrative medication schedules (SIGs) for 17 select medications to calculate AWD, and these medications were categorized by generic name and route of administration. The SIG extractor was evaluated against an annotator-derived reference standard for accuracy, which is the fraction of AWDs accurately computed. The overall accuracy was 89% [95% confidence interval (CI) 88%, 90%]. The accuracy was ≥85% for all medications and route combinations, except for cyclophosphamide (oral) and cyclosporine (oral), which were 79% (95%CI 72%, 85%) and 66% (95%CI 58%, 73%), respectively. The SIG extractor performed well on the majority of medications, indicating that AWD calculated by the SIG extractor can be used to improve estimation of AWD when dispensed quantity or days' supply is questionable or improbable. The working model for annotating SIGs and the SIG extractor are generalized and can easily be applied to other medications. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Gun-Sun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob; Kim, Jae-Duk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to provide comparative measurements of the effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units according to phantoms and exposure parameters. Materials and Methods Dose measurements were carried out using a head phantom representing an average man (175 cm tall, 73.5 kg male) and a limbless whole body phantom representing an average woman (155 cm tall, 50 kg female). Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were used for the dosimeter. Two d...

  3. Medication error - Inadvertent high dose intradermal cloxacillin induced skin necrosis

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    Adithan Surendiran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication error is one of the important causes of preventable adverse drug reactions. It can occur in the form of administration of a wrong drug, in the wrong dose, to the wrong patient, in an unsuitable dosage form, for the wrong duration or by using an inappropriate route of administration. Intradermal skin testing for cloxacillin hypersensitivity is done at low doses to check for drug allergy. In this report, three patients were given 50 times higher dose of cloxacillin than recommended for skin testing, resulting in pain and necrosis at the site of injection. The error occurred due to wrong dilution of the drug as done by a nursing intern. Some reasons for this could be overtime working, under trained staff, unsupervised nursing interns, complicated and unclear protocols, interpersonal communication gap between health care professionals and also poor availability of ideal resources. Pharmacovigilance centers must alert health care professionals about the significance of reporting medication errors through bulletins and journals.

  4. Effectiveness of the Medical Emergency Team: the importance of dose.

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    Jones, Daryl; Bellomo, Rinaldo; DeVita, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Up to 17% of hospital admissions are complicated by serious adverse events unrelated to the patients presenting medical condition. Rapid Response Teams (RRTs) review patients during early phase of deterioration to reduce patient morbidity and mortality. However, reports of the efficacy of these teams are varied. The aims of this article were to explore the concept of RRT dose, to assess whether RRT dose improves patient outcomes, and to assess whether there is evidence that inclusion of a physician in the team impacts on the effectiveness of the team. A review of available literature suggested that the method of reporting RRT utilization rate, (RRT dose) is calls per 1,000 admissions. Hospitals with mature RRTs that report improved patient outcome following RRT introduction have a RRT dose between 25.8 and 56.4 calls per 1,000 admissions. Four studies report an association between increasing RRT dose and reduced in-hospital cardiac arrest rates. Another reported that increasing RRT dose reduced in-hospital mortality for surgical but not medical patients. The MERIT study investigators reported a negative relationship between MET-like activity and the incidence of serious adverse events. Fourteen studies reported improved patient outcome in association with the introduction of a RRT, and 13/14 involved a Physician-led MET. These findings suggest that if the RRT is the major method for reviewing serious adverse events, the dose of RRT activation must be sufficient for the frequency and severity of the problem it is intended to treat. If the RRT dose is too low then it is unlikely to improve patient outcomes. Increasing RRT dose appears to be associated with reduction in cardiac arrests. The majority of studies reporting improved patient outcome in association with the introduction of an RRT involve a MET, suggesting that inclusion of a physician in the team is an important determinant of its effectiveness.

  5. [Triage in acute medical admission units.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars; Hallas, Peter

    2010-01-01

    . At 87% of the MAUs, a doctor was contacted by the admitting physician, while the contact was the responsibility of a nurse in 13% of MAUs. None of the contacted MAUs used a validated triage tool and 95% answered that they triaged on the basis of individual clinical assessment of patients. However, 22......INTRODUCTION: Many emergency departments use validated triage tools. It is currently undocumented if such a practice is common in Danish medical admission units (MAU). The current study was conducted in order to clarify this. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Questionnaire survey with data collected from......% answered that selected groups of patients were routinely assessed by a senior physician. CONCLUSION: None of the Danish MAUs uses a validated triage tool to prioritize acutely admitted medical patients. Udgivelsesdato: 2010-May-31...

  6. Medication reconciliation in patients hospitalized in a cardiology unit.

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    Magalhães, Gabriella Fernandes; Santos, Gláucia Noblat de Carvalho; Santos, Gláucia Beisl Noblat de Carvalho; Rosa, Mário Borges; Noblat, Lúcia de Araújo Costa Beisl

    2014-01-01

    To compare drugs prescribed on hospital admission with the list of drugs taken prior to admission for adult patients admitted to a cardiology unit and to identify the role of a pharmacist in identifying and resolving medication discrepancies. This study was conducted in a 300 bed university hospital in Brazil. Clinical pharmacists taking medication histories and reconciling medications prescribed on admission with a list of drugs used prior to admission. Discrepancies were classified as justified (e.g., based on the pharmacotherapeutic guidelines of the hospital studied) or unintentional. Treatments were reviewed within 48 hours following hospitalization. Unintentional discrepancies were further classified according to the categorization of medication error severity. Pharmacists verbally contacted the prescriber to recommend actions to resolve the discrepancies. A total of 181 discrepancies were found in 50 patients (86%). Of these discrepancies, 149 (82.3%) were justified changes to the patient's home medication regimen; however, 32 (17.7%) discrepancies found in 24 patients were unintentional. Pharmacists made 31 interventions and 23 (74.2%) were accepted. Among unintentional discrepancies, the most common was a different medication dose on admission (42%). Of the unintentional discrepancies 13 (40.6%) were classified as error without harm, 11 (34.4%) were classified as error without harm but which could affect the patient and require monitoring, 3 (9.4%) as errors could have resulted in harm and 5 (15.6%) were classified as circumstances or events that have the capacity to cause harm. The results revealed a high number of unintentional discrepancies and the pharmacist can play an important role by intervening and correcting medication errors at a hospital cardiology unit.

  7. Medication reconciliation in patients hospitalized in a cardiology unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Fernandes Magalhães

    Full Text Available To compare drugs prescribed on hospital admission with the list of drugs taken prior to admission for adult patients admitted to a cardiology unit and to identify the role of a pharmacist in identifying and resolving medication discrepancies.This study was conducted in a 300 bed university hospital in Brazil. Clinical pharmacists taking medication histories and reconciling medications prescribed on admission with a list of drugs used prior to admission. Discrepancies were classified as justified (e.g., based on the pharmacotherapeutic guidelines of the hospital studied or unintentional. Treatments were reviewed within 48 hours following hospitalization. Unintentional discrepancies were further classified according to the categorization of medication error severity. Pharmacists verbally contacted the prescriber to recommend actions to resolve the discrepancies.A total of 181 discrepancies were found in 50 patients (86%. Of these discrepancies, 149 (82.3% were justified changes to the patient's home medication regimen; however, 32 (17.7% discrepancies found in 24 patients were unintentional. Pharmacists made 31 interventions and 23 (74.2% were accepted. Among unintentional discrepancies, the most common was a different medication dose on admission (42%. Of the unintentional discrepancies 13 (40.6% were classified as error without harm, 11 (34.4% were classified as error without harm but which could affect the patient and require monitoring, 3 (9.4% as errors could have resulted in harm and 5 (15.6% were classified as circumstances or events that have the capacity to cause harm.The results revealed a high number of unintentional discrepancies and the pharmacist can play an important role by intervening and correcting medication errors at a hospital cardiology unit.

  8. Low dose Mifepristone (100 mg for medical termination of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Seth

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abortion is the most common entity in the practice of obstetrics and gynaecology. Different methods and modes have been opted for until now to find an effective regimen with the least complications. We have tried the minimal dose (100 mg of Mifepristone (PO instead of the presently recommended 200 mg for medical abortion in early first trimester cases. Objectives: The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of low dose (100 mg Mifepristone for medical termination of early pregnancy with oral Misoprostol 800 μg, 24 hours later.Design: A prospective analytical study was conducted on a population of 82 early-pregnant patients who have requested medical abortions.Method: Pregnant women of less than 56 days gestation age from their last menstrual period, requesting medical abortion were selected over a period of 14 months from January 2007 to March 2008. They were given 100 mg Mifepristone orally on Day-1, followed by 800 μg Misoprostol orally 24 hours later on Day-2, keeping the patient in the ward for at least 6 hours. Abortion interval, success rate, post-abortion bleeding and side-effects were noted. Success was defined as complete uterine evacuation without the need for surgical intervention.Results: The total success rate of this minimal dose Mifepristone regimen was 96.25%. Pain and nausea were the predominant side-effects noted. In total 72 (90% women had completely aborted within 5 hours of taking Misoprostol. Three (3.75% women only required suction aspiration, hence termed as failed medical abortion. The abortion interval increased with the gestation age. All three failures were of the more-than-42-day gestational age group. The overall mean abortion interval was 4.68 ± 5.32 hours.Conclusion: Mifepristone 100 mg, followed 24 hours later by Misoprostol 800 μg orally, is a safe and effective regimen for medical abortion.

  9. Radiation dose from medical imaging: a primer for emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jesse G A; Mills, Christopher N; Mogensen, Monique A; Lee, Christoph I

    2012-05-01

    Medical imaging now accounts for most of the US population's exposure to ionizing radiation. A substantial proportion of this medical imaging is ordered in the emergency setting. We aim to provide a general overview of radiation dose from medical imaging with a focus on computed tomography, as well as a literature review of recent efforts to decrease unnecessary radiation exposure to patients in the emergency department setting. We conducted a literature review through calendar year 2010 for all published articles pertaining to the emergency department and radiation exposure. The benefits of imaging usually outweigh the risks of eventual radiation-induced cancer in most clinical scenarios encountered by emergency physicians. However, our literature review identified 3 specific clinical situations in the general adult population in which the lifetime risks of cancer may outweigh the benefits to the patient: rule out pulmonary embolism, flank pain, and recurrent abdominal pain in inflammatory bowel disease. For these specific clinical scenarios, a physician-patient discussion about such risks and benefits may be warranted. Emergency physicians, now at the front line of patients' exposure to ionizing radiation, should have a general understanding of the magnitude of radiation dose from advanced medical imaging procedures and their associated risks. Future areas of research should include the development of protocols and guidelines that limit unnecessary patient radiation exposure.

  10. Psychotropic Medication Use among Adolescents: United States, 2005-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the National Technical Information Service NCHS Psychotropic Medication Use Among Adolescents: United States, 2005–2010 Recommend ... 0% of adolescents reported the use of psychotropic medications. Figure 1. Percentage of adolescents aged 12–19 ...

  11. TLD determination of neutron dose contribution in medical linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano, A.; Rivera, T.; Calderon A, J. A. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Villasenor N, L. F. [Hospital General de Mexico, Dr. Balmis No. 148, Col. Doctores, 06726 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: azorin@xanum.uam.m [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2011-02-15

    The increased use of Linacs with accelerating voltage higher than 10 MV in clinical radiotherapy is producing and increasing demand of accurate dosimetric measurements of the photon induced neutron contamination of the radiotherapy beams, due that the associated Bremsstrahlung X rays may produce neutrons as a result of subsequent photonuclear reactions with the different materials constituting the accelerator head. Thermal neutron fluences can be measured with TLD-600/TLD-700 pairs arranged in both a bare and a cadmium (Cd) foil covered methacry-late box. Neutron response of Tl dosemeters irradiated with two different neutron sources has been investigated. The shape of the glow curve of these TLDs after irradiation in a medical Linac and in a Pu Be neutron source has been studied to verify the contribution of neutrons to an additional dose to staff, patients and the general public, due to photonuclear reactions generating neutrons from medical Linacs. (Author)

  12. The neutron dose equivalent around high energy medical electron linear accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poje Marina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of neutron dose equivalent was made in four dual energy linear accelerator rooms. Two of the rooms were reconstructed after decommissioning of 60Co units, so the main limitation was the space. The measurements were performed by a nuclear track etched detectors LR-115 associated with the converter (radiator that consist of 10B and with the active neutron detector Thermo BIOREM FHT 742. The detectors were set at several locations to evaluate the neutron ambient dose equivalent and/or neutron dose rate to which medical personnel could be exposed. Also, the neutron dose dependence on collimator aperture was analyzed. The obtained neutron dose rates outside the accelerator rooms were several times smaller than the neutron dose rates inside the accelerator rooms. Nevertheless, the measured neutron dose equivalent was not negligible from the aspect of the personal dosimetry with almost 2 mSv a year per person in the areas occupied by staff (conservative estimation. In rooms with 15 MV accelerators, the neutron exposure to the personnel was significantly lower than in the rooms having 18 MV accelerators installed. It was even more pronounced in the room reconstructed after the 60Co decommissioning. This study confirms that shielding from the neutron radiation should be considered when building vaults for high energy linear accelerators, especially when the space constraints exist.

  13. X-rays, radiometers and skin unit dose. The development of measuring methods and measuring units for X radiation in medical physics from the beginning until the international standardization; X-Strahlen, Radiometer und Hauteinheitsdosis. Die Entwicklung der Messverfahren und Masseinheiten fuer Roentgenstrahlung in der medizinischen Physik von den Anfaengen bis zur internationalen Standardisierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glessmer-Junike, Simone

    2015-01-22

    X-rays, a special form of ionizing radiation, have been utilized in medicine and technology ever since their discovery at the end of 1895. However, the usage of X-rays made the development of measuring techniques necessary. Newly-developed measuring devices were at first called radiometers', but later the term dosimeter' has gained universal acceptance. The development of numerous dosimeters used in radiotherapy was accompanied by new units of measurement, each corresponding to its individual newly constructed dosimeter or method of measurement. While at first conversions between old and new units were performed, it later became clear that both within Germany and Europe units with similar names were used with different meanings, which was both incompatible and confusing. The first serious attempts of a standardization of units in Germany were made after the First World War, when the when the ionizing properties of X-rays was focused on for both measurements and unit definitions. Efforts towards an international standardization of units became successful in the mid-1920s when the Roentgen was defined as the universal unit. From the development described above, four stages of the evolution of radiation measurement and units in radiotherapy could be identified by means of comprehensive systematic research in printed publications. The first stage was the period of diagnostic application of X-rays, when tools for the determination of X-ray quality were designed. This stage progressed into that of therapeutic administration of X-rays shortly after, when instruments and units for the measurement of X-ray quantities (dose') were implemented. Due to the variety and diversity of measurement apparatus and units a third stage emerged, closely interconnected with the second. During the third stage, a nation-wide standardization was attempted in Germany. With the conclusion of this stage - the resolution of a unit for dose measurement in Germany - the stage of

  14. [Cooperation with the electronic medical record and accounting system of an actual dose of drug given by a radiology information system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hideo; Yoneda, Tarou; Satou, Shuji; Ishikawa, Toru; Hara, Misako

    2009-12-20

    By input of the actual dose of a drug given into a radiology information system, the system converting with an accounting system into a cost of the drug from the actual dose in the electronic medical record was built. In the drug master, the first unit was set as the cost of the drug, and we set the second unit as the actual dose. The second unit in the radiology information system was received by the accounting system through electronic medical record. In the accounting system, the actual dose was changed into the cost of the drug using the dose of conversion to the first unit. The actual dose was recorded on a radiology information system and electronic medical record. The actual dose was indicated on the accounting system, and the cost for the drug was calculated. About the actual dose of drug, cooperation of the information in a radiology information system and electronic medical record were completed. It was possible to decide the volume of drug from the correct dose of drug at the previous inspection. If it is necessary for the patient to have another treatment of medicine, it is important to know the actual dose of drug given. Moreover, authenticity of electronic medical record based on a statute has also improved.

  15. Medication administration errors in an intensive care unit in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background Medication administration errors in patient care have been shown to be frequent and serious. Such errors are particularly prevalent in highly technical specialties such as the intensive care unit (ICU). In Ethiopia, the prevalence of medication administration errors in the ICU is not studied. Objective To assess medication administration errors in the intensive care unit of Jimma University Specialized Hospital (JUSH), Southwest Ethiopia. Methods Prospective observation based cross...

  16. Pilot comparison of three cardiopulmonary resuscitation medication dosing strategies in overweight children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchevsky, Lyndsy E; Pesaturo, Kimberly A; Smith, Brian S; Hartman, Christian A

    2010-10-01

    Dose calculations using three variations of patient weight estimates (actual body weight [ABW], ideal body weight [IBW], and the Broselow Pediatric Emergency Tape [BPET, a length-based weight estimation tool]) were compared to administered doses of cardiopulmonary resuscitation medications in overweight and obese children to assess for differences in dose. This retrospective cohort analysis included 54 consecutive pediatric patients who underwent emergency resuscitation at UMass Memorial Medical Center between January 2000 and October 2008. Patients were identified using ICD-9 codes related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Patients were included if they were overweight or obese, less than 12 years of age, less than 146 centimeters in length, and received emergency resuscitation medication(s). Doses of administered medications were recorded and compared to potential doses calculated based on ABW, IBW and the dose recommended by the BPET. Dose differences greater than 10% were considered clinically significant and dose differences greater than 20% were considered to be potential medication errors. Out of 54 possible patients, four overweight patients were included; none were obese. Ten total medication doses were assessed (minimum two per patient). In all patients, at least one comparator dose varied by greater than 20% from the administered dose. Four out of 10 doses calculated according to ABW, eight out of 10 doses calculated with IBW, and eight out of 10 doses recommended by the BPET all differed by greater than 20% from the administered dose. Dosing variations were observed when the dose received was compared to dosing using three variants of patient weight estimates. The largest dosing differences were observed upon comparison of the administered dose versus the dose recommended by the BPET.

  17. Faculty development and medical education units in India: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkoli, B V; Sood, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Faculty development in medical education is gaining momentum in India. While planning a National Conference on Medical Education (NCME 2007), we did a survey of principals and faculty of medical colleges to understand the status of faculty development programmes and medical education units in medical colleges in India. Questionnaires were sent to principals of medical colleges by surface mail and to faculty through a web-based programme to elicit information on various aspects of faculty development programmes and medical education units. The responses of both groups were analysed. The number of medical education units has increased rapidly after regulations have been revised in 1997 by the Medical Council of India. The main activities of medical education units were to conduct workshops targeted at medical teachers. The frequently covered topics were teaching-learning, media and student assessment. Lectures dominated the methodology of imparting information. Evaluation was done mainly by feedback questionnaires and pre-test/post-test questionnaires. Projects and follow up were rarely used. The responses from both groups were strikingly similar. The major strengths of medical education units were perceived as availability of trained and motivated faculty, good infrastructure and supportive leadership. The shortcomings were lack of infrastructure, funding and full-time faculty, besides time constraints and resistance to change. The respondents suggested strengthening of infrastructure, appointment of full-time faculty and staff, incentives and recognition of contributions to faculty development, making participation a mandatory requirement, extending the scope of faculty development programmes to include research and networking at the national level. Conclusion. The study reveals the need for policy decisions that support functioning of medical education units in India besides active participation of the faculty.

  18. Structure determines medication errors in nursing units: a mechanistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Chiao; Lee, Bih-O; Tsai, Shu-Ling; Tseng, Yun Shan; Chang, Chia-Hao

    2015-03-01

    Medication errors have long been considered critical in global health care systems. However, few studies have been conducted to explore the effects of nursing unit structure on medication errors. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine the effects of structural factors on medication errors in nursing units. A total of 977 staff nurses and 62 head nurses participated in this cross-sectional design study. The findings show that professional autonomy (β = .53, t = 6.03, p nursing experts (β = .52, t = 5.99, p medication error rates. This study shows that the structural factors influence medication administration and the mechanistic approach is specifically in relation of low medication error rates. The author suggests that head nurses should consider strategies that require adjustments to unit control mechanisms.

  19. Orthopaedic Teaching in United Kingdom Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, M; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a study of medical students' training in orthopedics. Discusss discrepancies between course content and duration and the deficiencies that exist in basic knowledge of anatomy relevant to orthopedics. Recommends that orthopedic courses should appear earlier in the curriculum and practice should be emphasized. (TW)

  20. Assessing medical students’ competence in calculating drug doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Harries

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that healthcare professionals are not optimally able to calculate medicine doses and various strategies have been employed to improve these skills. In this study, the performance of third and fourth year medical students was assessed and the success of various educational interventions investigated. Students were given four types of dosing calculations typical of those required in an emergency setting. Full competence (at the 100% level was defined as correctly answering all four categories of calculation at any one time. Three categories correct meant competence at the 75% level. Interventions comprised an assignment with a model answer for self-assessment in the third year and a small group tutorial in the fourth year. The small groups provided opportunities for peer-assisted learning. A subgroup of 23 students received individual tuition from the lecturer prior to the start of the fourth year. Amongst the 364 eligible students, full competence rose from 23% at the beginning of the third year to 66% by the end of the fourth year. More students succeeded during the fourth than the third year of study. Success of small group tuition was assessed in a sample of 200 students who had formal assessments both before and after the fourth year tuition. Competence at the 75% level improved by 10% in attendees and decreased by 3% in non-attendees, providing evidence of the value of students receiving assistance from more able same-language peers. Good results were achieved with one-on-one tuition where individualised assistance allowed even struggling students to improve.

  1. Training programs in medical physics in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzl, L H

    1977-01-01

    The history of the field of medical physics in the United States is reviewed; the importance of the development of the nuclear reactor and particle accelerators to medical physics is pointed out. Conclusions and recommendations of an IAEA/WHO seminar on the training of medical physicists (in 1972) are given and compared with existing programs in the US. It is concluded that the recommendations of the IAEA are, for the most part, followed. 1 table. (RWR)

  2. Methodology of high dose research in medical radiodiagnostic; Metodologia de investigacao de doses elevadas em radiodiagnostico medico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, Adriana E.; Martins, Cintia P. de S., E-mail: ird@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    This work has as main purpose to study occupational exposure in diagnostic radiology in medical cases of high doses recorded in 2011 at the national level . These doses were recorded by monitoring individual of the occupationally exposed individuals (OEI's). This monitoring of the doses received by ionizing radiation has as main objective to ensure that the principle of dose limitation is respected. In this study it were evaluated doses of 372 OEI's radiology in different Brazilian states. Doses were extracted from the database of Sector Management Doses of the Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry - IRD/CNEN-RJ, Brazil. The information from the database provide reports of doses from several states, which allows to quantify statistically, showing those with the highest doses in four areas: dose greater than or equal to 20 mSv apron and chest and dose greater than or equal to 100 mSv apron and chest. The identification of these states allows the respective Sanitary Surveillance (VISA), be aware of the events and make plans to reduce them. This study clarified the required procedures when there is a record of high dose emphasizing the importance of using protective radiological equipment, dosimeter and provide a safety environment work by maintaining work equipment. Proposes the ongoing training of professionals, emphasizing the relevance of the concepts of radiation protection and the use of the questionnaire with their investigative systematic sequence, which will allow quickly and efficiently the success the investigations.

  3. Paediatric dose measurement in a full-body digital radiography unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maree, Gert J.; Hering, Egbert R. [Groote Schuur Hospital and University of Cape Town, Division of Medical Physics, Cape Town (South Africa); Irving, Benjamin J. [University of Cape Town, MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, Department of Human Biology, Cape Town, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2007-10-15

    Ionizing radiation has a detrimental effect on the human body, particularly in children. Thus it is important to minimize the dose. Linear slit-scanning X-ray units offer the possibility of dose reductions. In order to further develop linear slit-scanning radiography, the dose needs to be accurately calculated for various examinations. To measure the entrance dose (free-in-air) and calculate the effective doses for various radiological examinations in children on Lodox Statscan and Shimadzu radiography units. Entrance doses (free-in-air) were measured using a dose meter and ionization chamber on the Statscan and Shimadzu units at two South African hospitals. The entrance doses were measured for a number of common examinations and were used to compute the effective dose using a Monte Carlo program. The standard deviation of the entrance doses was in the range 0-0.6%. The effective dose from the Statscan unit was well below that from the Shimadzu unit as well as that found in other radiological studies from around the world in children. The one exception was chest examination where the dose was similar to that in other studies worldwide due to the use of Chest AP projection compared to Chest PA used in the comparitive studies. Linear slit-scanning systems help reduce the dose in radiological examinations in children. (orig.)

  4. Pharmacist-led medication review in an acute admissions unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Trine Graabæk; Bonnerup, Dorthe Krogsgaard; Kjeldsen, Lene Juel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Over the last decades, several papers have evaluated clinical pharmacy interventions in hospital settings with conflicting findings as results. Medication reviews are frequently a central component of these interventions. However, the term ‘medication review’ covers a plethora.......Methods A procedure was developed based on clinical experience and inspiration from previous studies and literature on medication review models. The procedure was developed to fit the busy workflow in acute admissions units.Results The procedure consists of five steps: (1) collection of clinical patient data, (2...... of principles and methodologies, and the practical procedure is seldom described in detail, which makes reproducing study findings difficult. The objective of this paper is to provide a detailed description of a procedure developed and used for pharmacist-led medication review in acute admissions units...

  5. [Evaluating radiation dose load in medical personnel of radiologic diagnostic departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunov, B V; Koroleva, E P

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with materials on radiation hygienic evaluation of radiologic diagnostic departments in various medical institutions of Moscow. The studies covered work of medical staffers in X-ray examination and in contact with short-lived isotope generators. The authors outlined the examination types and stages with maximal radiation danger. Disimetric information obtained during the study helped to calculate values of equivalent, effective doses of radiation for medical personnel and maximal potential doses.

  6. Evaluation of a vancomycin dosing protocol for intensive care unit patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, I.; Verstappen, G.; Veeger, N.; Boerma, E. C.; Buter, H.

    2015-01-01

    Vancomycin is a glycopeptide antibiotic that needs to be dosed to achieve target trough levels of 15-20 mg/l. Dosing can be challenging in ICU patients. To optimise therapy, in ICU-pharmacy collaboration, a dosing protocol was introduced on the ICU of the Medical Center Leeuwarden, the Netherlands.

  7. Effect of the European directive on medical exposure on patients doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, P.; Heaton, B. [Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In 2000 the European Directive on medical exposures was incorporated into United Kingdom law. Whilst the primary aim was to ensure that all uses of ionising radiation in medical practice were justified and a benefit to the patient or volunteer was identified, there was an understanding that patient doses would be controlled and collective doses reduced. The Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000 made a lot of new demands on radiology and Nuclear Medicine departments. No department is too small or specialized to ignore these regulations and the impact can be major. The Aberdeen Radiation Protection Service advises a number of users of ionising radiation on the implementation of these regulations ranging from single person dental practices to large radiology departments in busy regional hospitals. The particular problems and issues affecting different departments will be discussed. The regulations identified new key roles with Employers, Referrers, Practitioners and Operators all having specific responsibilities. Each of these groups needs to be identified, informed of their responsibilities and trained as necessary. The problems this has raised for the various staff groups will be discussed. A large number of procedures had to be written from how a patient is uniquely identified to how incidents are reported and investigated. There is much emphasis on optimising the use of equipment and techniques used, paying particular attention to women of child bearing age and children. Again there are problems in implementing this in practice and these issues will be discussed. A formal procedure for reporting 'near misses' and actual incidents of overexposure, were introduced. Each reported event is reviewed to identify issues and lessons which can be learnt by others. There is often a lateral thinking exercise involved to reduce the probability of an incident happening again and some novel solutions have been

  8. Medical tourism services available to residents of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, Brandon W; Luger, Tana; Reisinger, Heather Schacht; Martin, Rene; Horowitz, Michael D; Cram, Peter

    2011-05-01

    There are growing reports of United States (US) residents traveling overseas for medical care, but empirical data about medical tourism are limited. To characterize the businesses and business practices of entities promoting medical tourism and the types and costs of procedures being offered. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS, AND OUTCOMES: Between June and August 2008, we conducted a telephone survey of all businesses engaged in facilitating overseas medical travel for US residents. We collected information from each company including: the number of employees; number of patients referred overseas; medical records security processes; destinations to which patients were referred; treatments offered; treatment costs; and whether patient outcomes were collected. We identified 63 medical tourism companies and 45 completed our survey (71%). Companies had a mean of 9.8 employees and had referred an average of 285 patients overseas (a total of approximately 13,500 patients). 35 (79%) companies reported requiring accreditation of foreign providers, 22 (50%) collected patient outcome data, but only 17 (39%) described formal medical records security policies. The most common destinations were India (23 companies, 55%), Costa Rica (14, 33%), and Thailand (12, 29%). The most common types of care included orthopedics (32 companies, 73%), cardiac care (23, 52%), and cosmetic surgery (29, 66%). 20 companies (44%) offered treatments not approved for use in the US--most commonly stem cell therapy. Average costs for common procedures, CABG ($18,600) and knee arthroplasty ($10,800), were similar to previous reports. The number of Americans traveling overseas for medical care with assistance from medical tourism companies is relatively small. Attention to medical records security and patient outcomes is variable and cost-savings are dependent on US prices. That said, overseas medical care can be a reasonable alternative for price sensitive patients in need of relatively common, elective medical

  9. Caring for migrant farm workers on medical-surgical units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Maureen J

    2011-01-01

    Over 3 million migrant farm workers are employed in the United States. Many factors place them at risk for work-related disease and injury. Knowledge of workers' health issues can prepare medical-surgical nurses to anticipate and meet the needs of this underserved population.

  10. [The nurse within emergency medical-psychological units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbon, Rémy; Dalphin, Catherine; Prieto, Nathalie; Cheucle, Éric

    2017-04-01

    The growing recognition of post-traumatic stress disorders and the need to intervene early justifies the creation of emergency medical-psychological units. The nurse has a major role to play within these teams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Residency Applicants Misinterpret Their United States Medical Licensing Exam Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Roger C.; Desbiens, Norman A.

    2009-01-01

    Proper interpretation of the results of the United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) is important for program directors, residents, and faculty who advise applicants about applying for residency positions. We suspected that applicants often misinterpreted their performance in relationship to others who took the same examination. In 2005, 54…

  12. Managing acute medical admissions: a survey of acute medical services and medical assessment and planning units in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Providence, C; Gommans, J; Burns, A

    2012-01-01

    To determine the current provision of acute medical services, including the development of medical assessment and planning units (MAPUs), by district health boards (DHBs) throughout New Zealand (NZ). A questionnaire-based survey about organisation of acute medical services and establishment of MAPUs was sent to all 21 DHBs in NZ. All 21 DHBs responded. Seven DHBs serving 42% of the population have established MAPUs since 2003 and a further six have plans to do so over the next 3 years, potentially expanding service to 73% of the NZ population. All seven current MAPUs are in close proximity to and accept patients directly from emergency departments. Each MAPU has a documented target length of stay, four units have referral protocols, five provide guidelines for management of common medical emergencies and five routinely audit unit performance. Five MAPUs have cardiac monitored beds and isolation rooms. Rapid access is available to computed tomography scanning (six units), ultrasound (five) and echocardiography (four). Two units have no nominated physician leadership and two lack dedicated therapy resources. General physicians are involved in provision of acute medical services in 20 of 21 DHBs. Medical assessment and planning units have become an important component of acute medical service provision in NZ. The established units largely comply with Australasian recommendations, although important deficiencies exist. Training of physicians must combine the needs of acute medical patients and clinical roles of physicians within MAPUs with local DHB requirements for services to be most effective. © 2010 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2010 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  13. Ability of medical students to calculate drug doses in children after their paediatric attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshikoya KA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Dose calculation errors constitute a significant part of prescribing errors which might have resulted from informal teaching of the topic in medical schools. Objectives: To determine adequacy of knowledge and skills of drug dose calculations in children acquired by medical students during their clinical attachment in paediatrics.Methods: Fifty two 5th year medical students of the Lagos State University College of Medicine (LASUCOM, Ikeja were examined on drug dose calculations from a vial and ampoules of injections, syrup and suspension, and tablet formulation. The examination was with a structured questionnaire mostly in the form of multiple choice questions.Results: Thirty-six (69.2% and 30 (57.7% students were taught drug dose calculation in neonatal posting and during ward rounds/ bed-side teaching, respectively. Less than 50% of the students were able to calculate the correct doses of each of adrenaline, gentamicin, chloroquine and sodium bicarbonate injections required by the patient. Dose calculation was however relatively better with adrenalin when compared with the other injections. The proportion of female students that calculated the correct doses of quinine syrup and cefuroxime suspension were significantly higher than those of their male counterparts (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively; Chi-square test. When doses calculated in mg/dose and mL/dose was compared for adrenalin injection and each of quinine syrup and cefuroxime suspension, there were significant differences (adrenaline and quinine, p=0.005; adrenaline and cefuroxime, p=0.003: Fischer’s exact test. Dose calculation errors of similar magnitude to injections, syrup and suspension were also observed with tablet formulation.Conclusions: LASUCOM medical students lacked the basic knowledge of paediatric drug dose calculations but were willing to learn if the topic was formally taught. Drug dose calculations should be given a prominent consideration in the undergraduate medical

  14. Dosing antiretroviral medication when crossing time zones: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Joseph M; Volny-Anne, Alain; Waitt, Catriona; Boffito, Marta; Khoo, Saye

    2016-01-01

    International tourism continues to increase worldwide, and people living with HIV and their clinicians are increasingly confronted with the problem of how to dose antiretroviral therapy during transmeridian air travel across time zones. No guidance on this topic currently exists. This review is a response to requests from patient groups for clear, practical and evidence-based guidance for travelling on antiretroviral therapy; we present currently available data on the pharmacokinetic forgiveness and toxicity of various antiretroviral regimens, and synthesize this data to provide guidelines on how to safely dose antiretrovirals when travelling across time zones.

  15. [Knowledge of nurses about medication doses at pediatric urgency departament].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Márquez, Gloria; Martínez-Serrano, Ana; Míguez-Navarro, Concepción; López-Mirón, Juan Antonio; Espartosa-Larrayad, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Errors in drug administration are the second cause of errors in hospitalized patients. Children are a high risk group. Besides, pressure in care interventions at emergency department leads to increase incidence errors. Determining nurses' knowledge about the most common drug doses at pediatric urgency department. Descriptive transversal study. We collected data from nurses of 14 pediatric emergency departments of Madrid. With an "ad hoc" questionnaire we collected the following data during five days in January of 2014: demographic, knowledge of responsibility in administration and doses of drugs. Global descriptive analysis was made and it was stratified by hospital and work experience. The answer rate was 114 (34.9%). Only 80 (70.8%) of nurses confirm doses before their administration; 20 (18.6%) think that a wrong prescription that they administer is not their responsibility. There is a high knowledge in the group with more than five years of work experience, except for sedative-analgesic drugs (p<0.05). The average score obtained was 3.8 of 10 (1.99). Nurses' knowledge about drug doses is low. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. The ethics of medical tourism: from the United Kingdom to India seeking medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghani, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Is the practice of UK patients traveling to India as medical tourists morally justified? This article addresses that question by examining three ethically relevant issues. First, the key factor motivating citizens of the United Kingdom to seek medical treatment in India is identified and analyzed. Second, the life prospects of the majority of the citizens of the two nations are compared to determine whether the United Kingdom is morally warranted in relying on India to meet the medical needs of its citizens. Third, as neoliberal reforms are justified on the grounds that they will help the indigent populations affected by them, the impact of medical tourism--a neoliberal initiative--on India's socially and economically marginalized groups is scrutinized.

  17. Assessing the problem of counterfeit medications in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, G; Patel, S; Khan, S

    2012-03-01

    Counterfeit medicines pose an ever-increasing threat to public health, although precise tracking of illegal counterfeit prescription drug activity is difficult. Available data indicate that all types of medications have been targeted. Adverse health effects, including death, have resulted from using counterfeit medications; consumers who self-medicate without appropriate interactions with the healthcare system rarely receive adequate healthcare. The Internet provides a large, convenient route for counterfeiters to reach potential buyers with unregulated, often dangerous, products. The majority of medicines purchased via unverified Internet sites are counterfeit; often, these products lack the purported drug compound or have variable concentrations of active ingredients and sometimes contain dangerous toxins. Although many consumers acknowledge some degree of risk with purchasing medications via the Internet, speed, convenience and cost often prompt these purchases. Counterfeit medications also have been detected in the legitimate supply chain, but represent a significantly smaller proportion of sales than those purchased via the Internet. Pilot programmes in Europe have demonstrated that product verification systems prevent penetration of counterfeit products into the legitimate supply chain. Significant EU legislation, including stronger penalties for counterfeiting, is in development. In the United Kingdom, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) launched an initiative against counterfeit medication. Healthcare professionals should report suspected cases of counterfeit medication to the MHRA, be alert to threats to the medicine supply, and provide practical advice to patients about ordering medications online, including avoiding unregulated Internet pharmacies, and being suspicious of sites offering substantial discounts and prescription-only medication without a prescription. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. [Medical entomology for the Armed services: preliminary results from the medical entomology unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pages, F; Girod, R

    2004-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases constitutes a threat to the operational capability of armed forces personnel operating outside or stationed overseas. To take this risk into account, the French armed forces medical corps created a medical entomology unit in 2003. The primary function of this unit is to monitor the entomological status of French military bases in sub-Saharan Africa (identification of vectors, study of vector behavior, and measurement of resistance to insecticides) as a means of maintaining an effective vector-control strategy. The French medical entomology unit takes part in the Impact Vector project aimed at evaluating the vector-borne disease risks for troops in combat situations, contributes its expertise to the investigation of epidemic disease, and participates in the development of a global strategy for vector-control for the armed services. To improve understanding and control of vector-borne disease risks, the unit provides basic training in medical entomology to army physicians, veterinarians, and pharmacists as well as to others involved in control programs. The purpose of this article is to present the results of the unit's first activities: investigation of a malaria epidemic that occurred in Ivory Coast in 2003, measurement of malaria exposure over a 4-month period in a combat group on duty in rural Africa, and initial evaluation of control techniques (spraying around living quarters and use of insecticide-impregnated battle dress).

  19. Evaluation of medication errors with implementation of electronic health record technology in the medical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao TV

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available T Vivian Liao,1 Marina Rabinovich,2 Prasad Abraham,2 Sebastian Perez,3 Christiana DiPlotti,4 Jenny E Han,5 Greg S Martin,5 Eric Honig5 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Mercer Health Sciences Center, 2Department of Pharmacy and Clinical Nutrition, Grady Health System, 3Department of Surgery, Emory University, 4Pharmacy, Ingles Markets, 5Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Purpose: Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU are at an increased risk for medication errors (MEs and adverse drug events from multifactorial causes. ME rate ranges from 1.2 to 947 per 1,000 patient days in the medical ICU (MICU. Studies with the implementation of electronic health records (EHR have concluded that it significantly reduced overall prescribing errors and the number of errors that caused patient harm decreased. However, other types of errors, such as wrong dose and omission of required medications increased after EHR implementation. We sought to compare the number of MEs before and after EHR implementation in the MICU, with additional evaluation of error severity.Patients and methods: Prospective, observational, quality improvement study of all patients admitted to a single MICU service at an academic medical center. Patients were evaluated during four periods over 2 years: August–September 2010 (preimplementation; period I, January–February 2011 (2 months postimplementation; period II, August–September 2012 (21 months postimplementation; period III, and January–February 2013 (25 months postimplementation; period IV. All medication orders and administration records were reviewed by an ICU clinical pharmacist and ME was defined as a deviation from established standards for prescribing, dispensing, administering, or documenting medication. The frequency and classification of MEs were compared between groups by chi square; p<0.05 was considered significant.Results: There was a statistically significant increase

  20. Dose per unit area - a study of elicitation of nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise Arup; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2007-01-01

    with a patch test and a repeated open application test (ROAT). Nickel was applied on small and large areas. The varying parameters were area, total dose and dose per unit area. RESULTS: In the patch test, at a low concentration [15 microg nickel (microg Ni)/cm(2)], there were significantly higher scores...... concentrations, even though the same dose per unit area is applied.......BACKGROUND: Experimental sensitization depends upon the amount of allergen per unit skin area and is largely independent of the area size. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed at testing if this also applies for elicitation of nickel allergy. PATIENTS/METHODS: 20 nickel allergic individuals were tested...

  1. An Introduction to Medical Malpractice in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Medical malpractice law in the United States is derived from English common law, and was developed by rulings in various state courts. Medical malpractice lawsuits are a relatively common occurrence in the United States. The legal system is designed to encourage extensive discovery and negotiations between adversarial parties with the goal of resolving the dispute without going to jury trial. The injured patient must show that the physician acted negligently in rendering care, and that such negligence resulted in injury. To do so, four legal elements must be proven: (1) a professional duty owed to the patient; (2) breach of such duty; (3) injury caused by the breach; and (4) resulting damages. Money damages, if awarded, typically take into account both actual economic loss and noneconomic loss, such as pain and suffering. PMID:19034593

  2. Variability in Medical Marijuana Laws in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Bestrashniy, Jessica; Winters, Ken C.

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana use and its distribution raise several complex health, social and legal issues in the United States. Marijuana is prohibited in only 23 states and pro-marijuana laws are likely to be introduced in these states in the future. Increased access to and legalization of medical marijuana may have an impact on recreational marijuana use and perception through increased availability and decreased restrictiveness around the drug. The authors undertook an analysis to characterize the policy f...

  3. Assessment of patient dose in medical processes by in-vivo dose measuring devices: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncel, Nina

    2016-11-01

    In-vivo dosimetry (IVD) in medicine especially in radiation therapy is a well-established and recommended procedure for the estimation of the dose delivered to a patient during the radiation treatment. It became even more important with the emerging use of new and more complex radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated or image-guided radiation therapy. While IVD has been used in brachytherapy for decades and the initial motivation for performing was mainly to assess doses to organs at risk by direct measurements, it is now possible to calculate 3D for detection of deviations or errors. In-vivo dosimeters can be divided into real-time and passive detectors that need some finite time following irradiation for their analysis. They require a calibration against a calibrated ionization chamber in a known radiation field. Most of these detectors have a response that is energy and/or dose rate dependent and consequently require adjustments of the response to account for changes in the actual radiation conditions compared to the calibration situation. Correction factors are therefore necessary to take. Today, the most common dosimeters for patients' dose verification through in-vivo measurements are semiconductor diodes, thermo-luminescent dosimeters, optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters, metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors and plastic scintillator detectors with small outer diameters.

  4. Assessment of teamwork during structured interdisciplinary rounds on medical units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Kevin J; Boudreau, Yvonne N; Creden, Amanda J; Slade, Maureen E; Williams, Mark V

    2012-01-01

    Interdisciplinary rounds (IDR) provide a means to assemble hospital team members and improve collaboration. Little is known about teamwork during IDR. To evaluate and characterize teamwork during IDR. Cross-sectional observational study. Six medical units which had implemented structured interdisciplinary rounds (SIDR). We adapted the Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery (OTAS) tool, a behaviorally anchored rating scale shown to be reliable and valid in surgical settings. OTAS provides scores ranging from 0 to 6 (0 = problematic behavior; 6 = exemplary behavior) across 5 domains (communication, coordination, cooperation/backup behavior, leadership, and monitoring/situational awareness) and for prespecified subteams. Two researchers conducted direct observations using the adapted OTAS tool. We conducted 7-8 independent observations for each unit (total = 44) and 20 joint observations. Inter-rater reliability was excellent at the unit level (Spearman's rho = 0.75), and good across domains (rho = 0.53-0.68) and subteams (rho = 0.53-0.76) with the exception of the physician subteam, for which it was poor (rho = 0.35). Though teamwork scores were generally high, we found differences across units, with a median (interquartile range [IQR]) 4.5 (3.9-4.9) for the lowest and 5.4 (5.3-5.5) for the highest performing unit (P teamwork during SIDR across units, domains, and most subteams. Variation in performance suggests a need to improve consistency of teamwork and emphasizes the importance of leadership. Copyright © 2012 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  5. Source localisation and dose verification for a novel brachytherapy unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxas, Marinos G.

    A recent development in the field of radiotherapy has been the introduction of the PRS Intrabeam system (Carl Zeiss Surgical GmbH, Oberkochen, Germany). This is essentially a portable, miniaturised, electron-driven photon generator that allows high intensity, soft-energy x-rays (50 kVp) to be delivered directly to the tumour site in a single fraction. The system has been used for the interstitial radiation treatment of both brain and breast tumours. At present, a standardised in-vivo dose verification technique is not available for the PRS treatments. The isotropical distribution of photons about the tip of the PRS probe inserted in the tissue can effectively be viewed as a point source of radiation buried in the body. This work has looked into ways of localising the PRS source utilising its own radiation field. Moreover, the response of monoenergetic sources, mimicking realistic brachytherapy sources, has also been investigated. The purpose of this project was to attempt to localise the source as well as derive important dosimetric information from the resulting image. A detection system comprised of a well-collimated Germanium detector (HPGe) has been devised in a rotate-translate Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) modality. The superior energy resolving ability of the detection system allowed for energy selective reconstruction to be carried out in the case of the monoenergetic source (241Am). Results showed that the monoenergetic source can be localised to within 1 mm and the continuous PRS x-ray source to within 3mm. For the PRS dose map derivation, Monte Carlo studies have been employed in order to extract information on the dosimetric aspect of the resulting image. The final goal of this work was therefore to formulate a direct mathematical relation (Transform Map) between the image created by the escaping photons and the dose map as predicted by the theoretical model. The formation therefore of the in-vivo PRS image could allow for a real-time monitoring

  6. International students in United States' medical schools: does the medical community know they exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Jashodeep; Miller, Bonnie M

    2012-01-01

    Matriculation of international students to United States' (US) medical schools has not mirrored the remarkable influx of these students to other US institutions of higher education. While these students' numbers are on the rise, the visibility for their unique issues remains largely ignored in the medical literature. These students are disadvantaged in the medical school admissions process due to financial and immigration-related concerns, and academic standards for admittance also continue to be significantly higher compared with their US-citizen peers. Furthermore, it is simply beyond the mission of many medical schools - both public and private - to support international students' education, especially since federal, state-allocated or institutional funds are limited and these institutions have a commitment to fulfill the healthcare education needs of qualified domestic candidates. In spite of these obstacles, a select group of international students do gain admission to US medical schools and, upon graduation, are credentialed equally as their US-citizen counterparts by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). However, owing to their foreign citizenship, these students have visa requirements for post-graduate training that may adversely impact their candidacy for residency placement. By raising such issues, this article aims to increase the awareness of considerations pertinent to this unique population of medical students. The argument is also made to support continued recruitment of international students to US medical schools in spite of these impediments. In our experience, these students are not only qualified to tackle the rigors of a US medical education, but also enrich the cultural diversity of the medical student body. Moreover, these graduates could effectively complement the efforts to augment US physician workforce diversity while contributing to healthcare disparity eradication, minority health issues, and service in

  7. International students in United States’ medical schools: does the medical community know they exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jashodeep Datta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Matriculation of international students to United States’ (US medical schools has not mirrored the remarkable influx of these students to other US institutions of higher education. Methods: While these students’ numbers are on the rise, the visibility for their unique issues remains largely ignored in the medical literature. Results: These students are disadvantaged in the medical school admissions process due to financial and immigration-related concerns, and academic standards for admittance also continue to be significantly higher compared with their US-citizen peers. Furthermore, it is simply beyond the mission of many medical schools – both public and private – to support international students’ education, especially since federal, state-allocated or institutional funds are limited and these institutions have a commitment to fulfill the healthcare education needs of qualified domestic candidates. In spite of these obstacles, a select group of international students do gain admission to US medical schools and, upon graduation, are credentialed equally as their US-citizen counterparts by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME. However, owing to their foreign citizenship, these students have visa requirements for post-graduate training that may adversely impact their candidacy for residency placement. Conclusion: By raising such issues, this article aims to increase the awareness of considerations pertinent to this unique population of medical students. The argument is also made to support continued recruitment of international students to US medical schools in spite of these impediments. In our experience, these students are not only qualified to tackle the rigors of a US medical education, but also enrich the cultural diversity of the medical student body. Moreover, these graduates could effectively complement the efforts to augment US physician workforce diversity while contributing to

  8. Computerized Dose Range Checking Using Hard and Soft Stop Alerts Reduces Prescribing Errors in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Lilanthi; Vyles, David; Bakerman, Paul; Holton, Vanessa; Vaidya, Vinay; Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Westdorp, Joan; Sanchez, Christine; Kurz, Rhonda

    2017-09-01

    An enhanced dose range checking (DRC) system was developed to evaluate prescription error rates in the pediatric intensive care unit and the pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit. An enhanced DRC system incorporating "soft" and "hard" alerts was designed and implemented. Practitioner responses to alerts for patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit and the pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit were retrospectively reviewed. Alert rates increased from 0.3% to 3.4% after "go-live" (P < 0.001). Before go-live, all alerts were soft alerts. In the period after go-live, 68% of alerts were soft alerts and 32% were hard alerts. Before go-live, providers reduced doses only 1 time for every 10 dose alerts. After implementation of the enhanced computerized physician order entry system, the practitioners responded to soft alerts by reducing doses to more appropriate levels in 24.7% of orders (70/283), compared with 10% (3/30) before go-live (P = 0.0701). The practitioners deleted orders in 9.5% of cases (27/283) after implementation of the enhanced DRC system, as compared with no cancelled orders before go-live (P = 0.0774). Medication orders that triggered a soft alert were submitted unmodified in 65.7% (186/283) as compared with 90% (27/30) of orders before go-live (P = 0.0067). After go-live, 28.7% of hard alerts resulted in a reduced dose, 64% resulted in a cancelled order, and 7.4% were submitted as written. Before go-live, alerts were often clinically irrelevant. After go-live, there was a statistically significant decrease in orders that were submitted unmodified and an increase in the number of orders that were reduced or cancelled.

  9. Doses in sensitive organs during prostate treatment with a 60Co unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Navarro Becerra, J A; Pérez Arrieta, M L; Pérez-Landeros, L H

    2014-01-01

    Using thermoluminiscent dosimeters the absorbed dose in the bladder, rectum and thyroid have been evaluated when 200 cGy was applied to the prostate. The treatment was applied with a (60)Co unit. A water phantom was built and thermoluminiscent dosimeters were located in the position where the prostate, bladder, rectum and thyroid are located. The therapeutic beam was applied in 4 irradiations at 0, 90, 180 and 270° with the prostate at the isocenter. The TLDs readouts were used to evaluate the absorbed dose in each organ. The absorbed doses were used to estimate the effective doses and the probability of developing secondary malignacies in thyroid, rectum and bladder.

  10. Patient access to medical records on a psychiatric inpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, E J; Furedy, R L; Simonton, M J; Neuffer, C H

    1979-03-01

    The authors studied the effects of patient access to medical records during hospitalization in a psychiatric unit of a community general hospital. Questionnaires were completed by about 20 staff and 88 patients, and records were compared with those from an earlier period to note any changes in the written record. Patients reported feeling better informed and more involved in their treatment, and staff said that they became more thoughtful about their notes in the chart. The availability of staff seems crucial to this process and facilitates the working alliance.

  11. Automation of PCXMC and ImPACT for NASA Astronaut Medical Imaging Dose and Risk Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Amir; Picco, Charles; Flores-McLaughlin, John; Shavers, Mark; Semones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    To automate astronaut organ and effective dose calculations from occupational X-ray and computed tomography (CT) examinations incorporating PCXMC and ImPACT tools and to estimate the associated lifetime cancer risk per the National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements (NCRP) using MATLAB(R). Methods: NASA follows guidance from the NCRP on its operational radiation safety program for astronauts. NCRP Report 142 recommends that astronauts be informed of the cancer risks from reported exposures to ionizing radiation from medical imaging. MATLAB(R) code was written to retrieve exam parameters for medical imaging procedures from a NASA database, calculate associated dose and risk, and return results to the database, using the Microsoft .NET Framework. This code interfaces with the PCXMC executable and emulates the ImPACT Excel spreadsheet to calculate organ doses from X-rays and CTs, respectively, eliminating the need to utilize the PCXMC graphical user interface (except for a few special cases) and the ImPACT spreadsheet. Results: Using MATLAB(R) code to interface with PCXMC and replicate ImPACT dose calculation allowed for rapid evaluation of multiple medical imaging exams. The user inputs the exam parameter data into the database and runs the code. Based on the imaging modality and input parameters, the organ doses are calculated. Output files are created for record, and organ doses, effective dose, and cancer risks associated with each exam are written to the database. Annual and post-flight exposure reports, which are used by the flight surgeon to brief the astronaut, are generated from the database. Conclusions: Automating PCXMC and ImPACT for evaluation of NASA astronaut medical imaging radiation procedures allowed for a traceable and rapid method for tracking projected cancer risks associated with over 12,000 exposures. This code will be used to evaluate future medical radiation exposures, and can easily be modified to accommodate changes to the risk

  12. Impact of pharmacist antimicrobial dosing adjustments in septic patients on continuous renal replacement therapy in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Sai-Ping; Zhu, Zheng-Yi; Ma, Kui-Fen; Zheng, Xia; Lu, Xiao-Yang

    2013-12-01

    Correct dosing of antimicrobial drugs in septic patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is complex. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of dosing adjustments performed by pharmacists on the length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, ICU cost, and antimicrobial adverse drug events (ADEs). A single-center, 2-phase (pre-/post-intervention) study was performed in an ICU of a university-affiliated hospital. Septic patients receiving CRRT in the post-intervention phase received a specialized antimicrobial dosing service from critical care pharmacists, whereas patients in the pre-intervention phase received routine medical care without involving pharmacists. The 2 phases were compared to evaluate the outcomes of pharmacist interventions. Pharmacists made 183 antimicrobial dosing adjustment recommendations for septic patients receiving CRRT. Changes in CRRT-related variables (116, 63.4%) were the most common risk factors for dosing errors, and β-lactams (101, 55.2%) were the antimicrobials most commonly associated with dosing errors. Dosing adjustments were related to a reduced length of ICU stay from 10.7 ± 11.1 days to 7.7 ± 8.3 days (p = 0.037) in the intervention group, and to cost savings of $3525 (13,463 ± 12,045 vs. 9938 ± 8811, p = 0.038) per septic patient receiving CRRT in the ICU. Suspected antimicrobial adverse drug events in the intervention group were significantly fewer than in the pre-intervention group (19 events vs. 8 events, p = 0.048). The involvement of pharmacists in antimicrobial dosing adjustments in septic patients receiving CRRT is associated with a reduced length of ICU stay, lower ICU costs, and fewer ADEs. Hospitals may consider employing clinical pharmacists in ICUs.

  13. Trends in Radiation Doses to Patients from Medical X-ray Examinations in Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olga Iacob; Irina Anca Popescu [Institute of Public Health, Iassy (Romania); Mihai Radu Iacob [University ' Al. I. Cuza' Iassy (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    Even if the doses received by patients during 2005 survey are lower than those estimated in the 2000 national survey on diagnostic medical radiation exposure by 27 percent, on average, their values still indicate an urgent need to develop radiation protection and optimization activities for X ray examinations, especially in pediatrics radiology. The increasing attention given in last years to radiation protection for conventional examinations, with development of national patient dosimetry protocols and reference doses, new radiation protection legislation and norms have played a significant part in this substantial reduction in effective doses. (N.C.)

  14. Intake risk and dose evaluation methods for workers in radiochemistry labs of a medical cyclotron facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandrino, Riccardo; del Vecchio, Antonella; Savi, Annarita; Todde, Sergio; Belloli, Sara

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the risks and doses for the internal contamination of the radiochemistry staff in a high workload medical cyclotron facility. The doses from internal contamination derive from the inhalation of radioactive gas leakage from the cells by personnel involved in the synthesis processes and are calculated from urine sample measurements. Various models are considered for the calculation of the effective committed dose from the analysis of these urine samples, and the results are compared with data obtained from local environmental measurement of the radioactivity released inside the lab.

  15. Monitor units are not predictive of neutron dose for high-energy IMRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hälg Roger A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the substantial increase in beam-on time of high energy intensity-modulated radiotherapy (>10 MV techniques to deliver the same target dose compared to conventional treatment techniques, an increased dose of scatter radiation, including neutrons, is delivered to the patient. As a consequence, an increase in second malignancies may be expected in the future with the application of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. It is commonly assumed that the neutron dose equivalent scales with the number of monitor units. Methods Measurements of neutron dose equivalent were performed for an open and an intensity-modulated field at four positions: inside and outside of the treatment field at 0.2 cm and 15 cm depth, respectively. Results It was shown that the neutron dose equivalent, which a patient receives during an intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment, does not scale with the ratio of applied monitor units relative to an open field irradiation. Outside the treatment volume at larger depth 35% less neutron dose equivalent is delivered than expected. Conclusions The predicted increase of second cancer induction rates from intensity-modulated treatment techniques can be overestimated when the neutron dose is simply scaled with monitor units.

  16. A population-based study of dosing and persistence with anti-dementia medications.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brewer, Linda

    2013-02-27

    PURPOSE: Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are the mainstay of pharmacological intervention for the cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD). This study assessed the adequacy of dosing and persistence with AD medications and the predictors of these variables in the \\'real world\\' (outside the clinical trial setting). METHODS: The Health Service Executive-Primary Care Reimbursement Services prescription claims database in the Republic of Ireland contains prescription information for 1.6 million people. Patients aged >70 years who received at least two prescriptions for donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine and memantine between January 2006 and December 2010 were included in the study. Rates of dose-maximisation were recorded by examining the initiation dose of each AD drug commenced during the study period and any subsequent dose titrations. Non-persistence was defined by a gap in prescribing of more than 63 consecutive days. Predictors of dose-maximisation and non-persistence were also analysed. RESULTS: Between January 2006 and December 2010, 20,729 patients aged >70 years received a prescription for an AD medication. Despite most patients on donepezil and memantine receiving a prescription for the maximum drug dose, this dose was maintained for 2 consecutive months in only two-thirds of patients. Patients were significantly more likely to have their doses of donepezil and memantine maximised if prescribed in more recent years (2010 vs. 2007). Rates of non-persistence were 30.1 % at 6 months and 43.8 % at 12 months. Older age [75+ vs. <75 years; hazards ratio (HR) 1.16, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.27] and drug type (rivastigmine vs. donepezil; HR 1.15, 95 % CI 1.03-1.27) increased the risk of non-persistence. Non-persistence was lower for those commencing therapy in more recent years (2010 vs. 2007; HR 0.81, 95 % CI 0.73-0.89, p < 0.001) and for those on multiple anti-dementia medications (HR 0.59, 95 % CI 0

  17. Readmission to medical intensive care units: risk factors and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yong Suk; Lee, Yeon Joo; Park, Jong Sun; Yoon, Ho Il; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Choon-Taek; Cho, Young-Jae

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to find factors related to medical intensive care unit (ICU) readmission and to develop a prediction index for determining patients who are likely to be readmitted to medical ICUs. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 343 consecutive patients who were admitted to the medical ICU of a single medical center from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2012. We analyzed a broad range of patients' characteristics on the day of admission, extubation, and discharge from the ICU. Of the 343 patients discharged from the ICU alive, 33 (9.6%) were readmitted to the ICU unexpectedly. Using logistic regression analysis, the verified factors associated with increased risk of ICU readmission were male sex [odds ratio (OR) 3.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29-8.48], history of diabetes mellitus (OR 3.03, 95% CI 1.29-7.09), application of continuous renal replacement therapy during ICU stay (OR 2.78, 95% CI 0.85-9.09), white blood cell count on the day of extubation (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.07-1.21), and heart rate just before ICU discharge (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.06). We established a prediction index for ICU readmission using the five verified risk factors (area under the curve, 0.76, 95% CI 0.66-0.86). By using specific risk factors associated with increased readmission to the ICU, a numerical index could be established as an estimation tool to predict the risk of ICU readmission.

  18. Consensus guidelines for oral dosing of primarily renally cleared medications in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Joseph T; Aspinall, Sherrie L; Semla, Todd P; Weisbord, Steven D; Fried, Linda F; Good, C Bernie; Fine, Michael J; Stone, Roslyn A; Pugh, Mary Jo V; Rossi, Michelle I; Handler, Steven M

    2009-02-01

    To establish consensus oral dosing guidelines for primarily renally cleared medications prescribed for older adults. Literature search followed by a two-round modified Delphi survey. A nationally representative survey of experts in geriatric clinical pharmacy. Eleven geriatric clinical pharmacists. After a comprehensive literature search and review by an investigative group of six physicians (2 general internal medicine, 2 nephrology, 2 geriatrics), 43 dosing recommendations for 30 medications at various levels of renal function were created. The expert panel rated its agreement with each of these 43 dosing recommendations using a 5-point Likert scale (1=strongly disagree to 5=strongly agree). Recommendation-specific means and 95% confidence intervals were estimated. Consensus was defined as a lower 95% confidence limit of greater than 4.0 for the recommendation-specific mean score. The response rate was 81.8% (9/11) for the first round. All respondents who completed the first round also completed the second round. The expert panel reached consensus on 26 recommendations involving 18 (60%) medications. For 10 medications (chlorpropamide, colchicine, cotrimoxazole, glyburide, meperidine, nitrofurantoin, probenecid, propoxyphene, spironolactone, and triamterene), the consensus recommendation was not to use the medication in older adults below a specified level of renal function (e.g., creatinine clearance <30 mL/min). For the remaining eight medications (acyclovir, amantadine, ciprofloxacin, gabapentin, memantine, ranitidine, rimantadine, and valacyclovir), specific recommendations for dose reduction or interval extension were made. An expert panel of geriatric clinical pharmacists was able to reach consensus agreement on a number of oral medications that are primarily renally cleared.

  19. Photoneutron leakage from medical accelerators: a comprehensive approach to patient and personnel dose measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, F.; Curzio, G. [Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Dipartimento di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari, Pisa (Italy)

    1992-07-01

    Simple and reliable techniques, based on the use of superheated drop neutron detectors (SDD's*), are presented for both medical accelerator personnel exposure monitoring, and the direct measurement of non therapeutic dose equivalent received by patients undergoing high-energy x-ray and electron treatment. (author)

  20. Unit-based clinical pharmacists' prevention of serious medication errors in pediatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Rainu; Bates, David W; Abramson, Erika L; Soukup, Jane R; Goldmann, Donald A

    2008-07-01

    Rates of serious medication errors in three pediatric inpatient units (intensive care, general medical, and general surgical) were measured before and after introduction of unit-based clinical pharmacists. Error rates on the study units and similar patient care units in the same hospital that served as controls were determined during six- to eight-week baseline periods and three-month periods after the introduction of unit-based clinical pharmacists (full-time in the intensive care unit [ICU] and mornings only on the general units). Nurses trained by the investigators reviewed medication orders, medication administration records, and patient charts daily to detect errors, near misses, and adverse drug events (ADEs) and determine whether near misses were intercepted. Two physicians independently reviewed and rated all data collected by the nurses. Serious medication errors were defined as preventable ADEs and nonintercepted near misses. The baseline rates of serious medication errors per 1000 patient days were 29 for the ICU, 8 for the general medical unit, and 7 for the general surgical unit. With unit-based clinical pharmacists, the ICU rate dropped to 6 per 1000 patient days. In the general care units, there was no reduction from baseline in the rates of serious medication errors. A full-time unit-based clinical pharmacist substantially decreased the rate of serious medication errors in a pediatric ICU, but a part-time pharmacist was not as effective in decreasing errors in pediatric general care units.

  1. Implementation of pharmacists’ interventions and assessment of medication errors in an intensive care unit of a Chinese tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang SP

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sai-Ping Jiang,1,* Jian Chen,2,* Xing-Guo Zhang,1 Xiao-Yang Lu,1 Qing-Wei Zhao1 1Department of Pharmacy, 2Intensive Care Unit, the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Pharmacist interventions and medication errors potentially differ between the People’s Republic of China and other countries. This study aimed to report interventions administered by clinical pharmacists and analyze medication errors in an intensive care unit (ICU in a tertiary hospital in People’s Republic of China.Method: A prospective, noncomparative, 6-month observational study was conducted in a general ICU of a tertiary hospital in the People’s Republic of China. Clinical pharmacists performed interventions to prevent or resolve medication errors during daily rounds and documented all of these interventions and medication errors. Such interventions and medication errors were categorized and then analyzed.Results: During the 6-month observation period, a total of 489 pharmacist interventions were reported. Approximately 407 (83.2% pharmacist interventions were accepted by ICU physicians. The incidence rate of medication errors was 124.7 per 1,000 patient-days. Improper drug frequency or dosing (n=152, 37.3%, drug omission (n=83, 20.4%, and potential or actual occurrence of adverse drug reaction (n=54, 13.3% were the three most commonly committed medication errors. Approximately 339 (83.4% medication errors did not pose any risks to the patients. Antimicrobials (n=171, 35.0% were the most frequent type of medication associated with errors.Conclusion: Medication errors during prescription frequently occurred in an ICU of a tertiary hospital in the People’s Republic of China. Pharmacist interventions were also efficient in preventing medication errors. Keywords: pharmacist, medication error, preva­lence rate, type, severity, intensive care

  2. Improving emergency department flow through Rapid Medical Evaluation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Lucas; Josephson, Timothy; Bates, Kathy; Kuipers, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    The Toronto Western Hospital is an academic hospital in Toronto, Canada, with an annual Emergency Department (ED) volume of 64,000 patients. Despite increases in patient volumes of almost six percent per annum over the last decade, there have been no commensurate increases in resources, infrastructure, and staffing. This has led to substantial increase in patient wait times, most specifically for those patients with lower acuity presentations. Despite requiring only minimal care, these patients contribute disproportionately to ED congestion, which can adversely impact resource utilization and quality of care for all patients. We undertook a retrospective evaluation of a quality improvement initiative aimed at improving wait times experienced by patients with lower acuity presentations. A rapid improvement event was organized by frontline workers to rapidly overhaul processes of care, leading to the creation of the Rapid Medical Evaluation (RME) unit - a new pathway of care for patients with lower acuity presentations. The RME unit was designed by re-purposing existing resources and re-assigning one physician and one nurse towards the specific care of these patients. We evaluated the performance of the RME unit through measurement of physician initial assessment (PIA) times and total length of stay (LOS) times for multiple groups of patients assigned to various ED care pathways, during three periods lasting three months each. Weekly measurements of mean and 90th percentile of PIA and LOS times showed special cause variation in all targeted patient groups. Of note, the patients seen in the RME unit saw their median PIA and LOS times decrease from 98min to 70min and from 165min to 130min, respectively, from baseline. Despite ever-growing numbers of patient visits, wait times for all patients with lower acuity presentations remained low, and wait times of patients with higher acuity presentations assigned to other ED care pathways were not adversely affected. By

  3. The impact of an automated dose-dispensing scheme on user compliance, medication understanding, and medication stockpiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Bira; Haugbølle, Lotte Stig

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been assumed that a new health technology, automated dose-dispensing (ADD), would result in benefits for medication users, including increased compliance, enhanced medication understanding, and improved safety. However, it was legislators and health professionals who pinpointed...... the assumed user benefits. Neither Danish nor international studies dealt with users' perspective on ADD in general or with respect to the pinpointed benefits, and thus exploration was needed. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this article is to respond to the following research question: How does ADD affect users......' handling and consumption of medication in terms of compliance behavior, and how does the assumption of user benefits made by health professionals and legislators measure up to users' experiences with ADD? METHODS: The results built on a secondary analysis of 9 qualitative interviews with a varied selection...

  4. Implementation of pharmacists' interventions and assessment of medication errors in an intensive care unit of a Chinese tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Sai-Ping; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Xing-Guo; Lu, Xiao-Yang; Zhao, Qing-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacist interventions and medication errors potentially differ between the People's Republic of China and other countries. This study aimed to report interventions administered by clinical pharmacists and analyze medication errors in an intensive care unit (ICU) in a tertiary hospital in People's Republic of China. A prospective, noncomparative, 6-month observational study was conducted in a general ICU of a tertiary hospital in the People's Republic of China. Clinical pharmacists performed interventions to prevent or resolve medication errors during daily rounds and documented all of these interventions and medication errors. Such interventions and medication errors were categorized and then analyzed. During the 6-month observation period, a total of 489 pharmacist interventions were reported. Approximately 407 (83.2%) pharmacist interventions were accepted by ICU physicians. The incidence rate of medication errors was 124.7 per 1,000 patient-days. Improper drug frequency or dosing (n=152, 37.3%), drug omission (n=83, 20.4%), and potential or actual occurrence of adverse drug reaction (n=54, 13.3%) were the three most commonly committed medication errors. Approximately 339 (83.4%) medication errors did not pose any risks to the patients. Antimicrobials (n=171, 35.0%) were the most frequent type of medication associated with errors. Medication errors during prescription frequently occurred in an ICU of a tertiary hospital in the People's Republic of China. Pharmacist interventions were also efficient in preventing medication errors.

  5. Medical and Scientific Illustration in the United States (US).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The field of Medical and Scientific Illustration in the United States is large and constantly changing. In 1974, when the author began his studies, everything about the field was different. At the time, a student in the U.S. could go to a number of Universities (4 year) or Colleges (2 year) to study this subject. More than forty years later, only a few programs still offer similar programs of study. The Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), where the author is a professor and Randolph Community College in North Carolina are all that remain from the more than ten that had operated. These two programs are very different from one another and there is not adequate space in this article to expand on these differences. Program details can be found online at: http://cias.rit.edu/schools/photographic-arts-sciences/undergraduate-biomedical-photographic-communications.

  6. Monitoring of doses in hemodynamic medical team with dosemeters calibrated to measure the personal dose equivalent; Monitoracao das doses na equipe medica de hemodinamica com dosimetro calibrado em equivalente de dose pessoal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, T.C. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Curso de Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mail: alonso@cdtn.br; Silva, T.A. da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: silvata@cdtn.br

    2005-07-01

    In hemodynamic, the exposure time of the workers to the radiation are larger than in the conventional one. Consequently, the received doses are larger. The dose of the medical team is also affected significantly by the uniqueness of the exams that are accomplished in two ways of irradiation and several angles of incidences, what stands out the need of the dosimeters use with metrologic reliability adapted for such situations. The individual monitoring of the doses received by individuals occupationally exposed to the radiation is accomplished with films dosimeters or thermo luminescent ones, with the main objective to guarantee that the limits of doses are not surpassed. The used in the system Brazilian metrologic system is still the individual dose for photons, in spite of the international recommendations for the use of the equivalent personal dose, that is the greatness adapted to assess the equivalent dose and the effective dose. In this work, the dosimeter composed by the Harshaw-Bicron badge and the detecting thermoluminescent of lithium fluoride was tested and adapted to measure the equivalent of personal dose in the depths 0,07 mm and 10 mm. It was applied in the hemodynamics practices and the doses were compared with those obtained by the routine film dosimeter. The results suggest, for daily use of the interventional services, the indication of the new dosimeter in substitution to the of the type films. (author)

  7. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients: focus on the clinical utility of (low-dose fondaparinux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Nisio M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Marcello Di Nisio,1,2 Ettore Porreca3 1Department of Medical, Oral and Biotechnological Sciences, University G D'Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy; 2Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 3Department of Medicine and Aging, Centre for Aging Sciences, Internal Medicine Unit, University G D'Annunzio Foundation, Chieti, Italy Abstract: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a frequent complication among acutely ill medical patients hospitalized for congestive heart failure, acute respiratory insufficiency, rheumatologic disorders, and acute infectious and/or inflammatory diseases. Based on robust data from randomized controlled studies and meta-analyses showing a reduced incidence of VTE by 40% to about 60% with pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis, prevention of VTE with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH, unfractionated heparin (UFH, or fondaparinux is currently recommended in all at-risk hospitalized acutely ill medical patients. In patients who are bleeding or are at high risk for major bleeding, mechanical prophylaxis with graduated compression stockings or intermittent pneumatic compression may be suggested. Thromboprophylaxis is generally continued for 6 to 14 days or for the duration of hospitalization. Selected cases could benefit from extended thromboprophylaxis beyond this period, although the risk of major bleeding remains a concern, and additional studies are needed to identify patients who may benefit from prolonged prophylaxis. For hospitalized acutely ill medical patients with renal insufficiency, a low dose (1.5 mg once daily of fondaparinux or prophylactic LMWH subcutaneously appears to have a safe profile, although proper evaluation in randomized studies is lacking. The evidence on the use of prophylaxis for VTE in this latter group of patients, as well as in those at higher risk of bleeding complications, such as patients with thrombocytopenia, remains scarce. For critically ill patients

  8. Partnered medication review and charting between the pharmacist and medical officer in the Emergency Short Stay and General Medicine Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Erica Y; Roman, Cristina P; Smit, De Villiers; Newnham, Harvey; Galbraith, Kirsten; Dooley, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    A partnered medication review and charting model involving a pharmacist and medical officer was implemented in the Emergency Short Stay Unit and General Medicine Unit of a major tertiary hospital. The aim of the study was to describe the safety and effectiveness of partnered medication charting in this setting. A partnered medication review and charting model was developed. Credentialed pharmacists charted pre-admission medications and venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in collaboration with the admitting medical officer. The pharmacist subsequently had a clinical discussion with the treating nurse regarding the medication management plan for the patient. A prospective audit was undertaken of all patients from the initiation of the service. A total of 549 patients had medications charted by a pharmacist from the 14th of November 2012 to the 30th of April 2013. A total of 4765 medications were charted by pharmacists with 7 identified errors, corresponding to an error rate of 1.47 per 1000 medications charted. Partnered medication review and charting by a pharmacist in the Emergency Short Stay and General Medicine unit is achievable, safe and effective. Benefits from the model extend beyond the pharmacist charting the medications, with clinical value added to the admission process through early collaboration with the medical officer. Further research is required to provide evidence to further support this collaborative model. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Liquid medication dosing errors in children: role of provider counseling strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, H Shonna; Dreyer, Benard P; Moreira, Hannah A; van Schaick, Linda; Rodriguez, Luis; Boettger, Susanne; Mendelsohn, Alan L

    2014-01-01

    To examine the degree to which recommended provider counseling strategies, including advanced communication techniques and dosing instrument provision, are associated with reductions in parent liquid medication dosing errors. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data on provider communication and dosing instrument provision from a study of a health literacy intervention to reduce medication errors. Parents whose children (20% deviation from prescribed). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed, controlling for parent age, language, country, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, education, health literacy (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults); child age, chronic disease status; and site. Of 287 parents, 41.1% made dosing errors. Advanced counseling and instrument provision in the ED were reported by 33.1% and 19.2%, respectively; 15.0% reported both. Advanced counseling and instrument provision in the ED were associated with decreased errors (30.5 vs. 46.4%, P = .01; 21.8 vs. 45.7%, P = .001). In adjusted analyses, ED advanced counseling in combination with instrument provision was associated with a decreased odds of error compared to receiving neither (adjusted odds ratio 0.3; 95% confidence interval 0.1-0.7); advanced counseling alone and instrument alone were not significantly associated with odds of error. Provider use of advanced counseling strategies and dosing instrument provision may be especially effective in reducing errors when used together. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Medical abortion outcomes after a second dose of misoprostol for persistent gestational sac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Matthew F; Kudva, Anupa; Creinin, Mitchell D

    2008-10-01

    We sought to examine outcomes after a second dose of misoprostol was given at a 1-week follow-up visit after medical abortion for the presence of a persistent gestational sac (GS) on ultrasound examination. We examined outcomes in women who were enrolled in two randomized trials of medical abortion regimens. Pregnant women up to 63 days' gestation received mifepristone followed by misoprostol 800 mcg vaginally either 24 h later, 6-8 h later or within 15 min. Participants in both studies returned for an evaluation, including transvaginal ultrasonography, approximately 7 days after initiating treatment. We included women with a GS present at the follow-up visit. Subjects who had not expelled the GS received a second dose of misoprostol 800 mcg vaginally. Participants returned approximately 1 week later and were contacted by telephone 5 weeks after treatment. Of 1972 women who had a follow-up ultrasound examination within 11 days of treatment, a persistent GS was identified in 82 women (4.2%) of whom 68 opted to receive a second dose of misoprostol. All 68 women returned for follow-up evaluation and 42 (62%) expelled the GS. In the 26 women with an embryonic pole within the persistent sac, expulsion occurred in 5 (36%) of 14 with and 7 (54%) of 13 without gestational cardiac activity (GCA) (p = .45). Of the 14 pregnancies with GCA, only 5 (36%) had GCA at follow-up. More than half of women with a persistent GS after medical abortion will expel the pregnancy when treated with a second dose of misoprostol. One-third of women who have a GS with cardiac activity will expel the GS with a second dose of misoprostol, making a second dose a reasonable option.

  11. Intentional weight loss and dose reductions of anti-diabetic medications--a retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Ashok Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Intentional weight loss, primarily by improving insulin resistance, is known to decrease the need for anti-diabetic medications. In this study, we assess the magnitude of weight loss that resulted in dose reductions or discontinuation of anti-diabetic medications in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes (DM undergoing weight loss treatment. METHODS: Case records of 50 overweight or obese patients with DM who successfully decreased dosage or discontinued diabetes medications after losing weight via attendance at two University-based, outpatient weight management centers were analyzed. Follow-up visits, weight reduction interventions, and decisions for dose reductions or discontinuation of medications were individualized to patient needs by the treating physician. RESULTS: Mean starting BMI was 35 kg/m(2, mean age 53.4 years, and 58% were male. All 50 used at least one anti-diabetic medication (30 metformin, 39 sulfonylureas, 31 insulin, 21 sitagliptin to manage blood sugar. Mean duration of follow-up was 30.2 months. Mean weight loss was 10.8 ± 4.1 kgs (11.1% of initial body weight ± 4.7%. 22/50 patients (44% discontinued anti-diabetes medications (14 sulfonylureas [36%], 7 insulin [23%], 4 sitagliptin [19%]. The mean percentage weight loss achieved at the point of successful discontinuation of medication was 11.2% ± 3.5% (14% for sulphonylureas, 11% for insulin, and 7.1% for sitagliptin. Mean percentage weight loss of 5.6% ± 2.8% (5.1% for sulphonylureas, 4.3% for insulin, and 7.1% for sitagliptin was required for initial dose reduction. For every 5% weight loss, predicted dose reductions were sulphonylureas, 39%; insulin, 42%; and any anti-diabetic medications, 49%. CONCLUSION: Among overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes, intentional weight loss of 7-14% was typically required for full discontinuation of at least one anti-diabetic medication. Discontinuation of insulin was achieved at a mean

  12. MSCT and C-ARM units: doses to patients in the angiographic procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staniszewska, M.A. [Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Jazwinski, J. [Military Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Computed Tomography Angiography (C.T.A.) is an attractive non -invasive alternative to invasive traditional angiography. The coronary arteries are the most frequent angiography procedure. Because of a high resolution and wide possibilities offered by software for image reconstruction, a number of scanner types having sixteen rows of detectors at least make possible to visualise and analyse of the blood flow in the thin vessels, without an aggressive interference into the patient body. This is achieved at the x -rays exposure pattern quite different to that used for the C-arm units. Consequently, both the organ dose values and their spatial distribution are also different for C.T.A. and C-arm conducted procedures, what can influence on a radiation risk to patients. This paper is aimed on evaluation of doses obtained by patients during coronarography performed using multislice computed tomographs (M.S.C.T.) and C-arm units. Materials and Methods The doses were evaluated experimentally, using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) (Polish product, equivalent TLD-100) and anthropomorphic Rando Man phantom (made by Alderson). The measurements were performed for CT protocols covering the coronary arteries used at 16-row and 64-row M.S.C.T. scanners and the C-arm units. Before the use TLDs were calibrated for the two x-ray spectra corresponding to the energies of photon emitted by CT scanners and C -arm units. The organ doses were calculated on the basis of the TLDs readings for the specified volume of the phantom. The effective dose to each the analysed procedure were computed according to the ICRP recommendations given in Publication 60. Results The measurements were carried out for 3 M.S.C.T. scanners. The protocols covering the chest and allowing to achieve a good contrast resolution were checked for the patient dose, i.e.: the chest angiography R.C.T. of the chest and the coronary arteries. The organ doses ranged from the tenths of m

  13. Joining the Conversation: Predictors of Success on the United States Medical Licensing Examinations (USMLE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohara, Sabry; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Jacob, Adam N.; Khuder, Sadik A.; Gandy, Robyn A.; Metting, Patricia J.; Gold, Jeffrey; Kleshinski, James; and James Kleshinski

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether models based on pre-admission testing, including performance on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), performance on required courses in the medical school curriculum, or a combination of both could accurately predict performance of medical students on the United States Medical Licensing…

  14. Medical complications and outcomes at an onsite rehabilitation unit for older people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulroy, M

    2013-09-01

    The rehabilitation of older patients in Ireland after an acute medical event occurs at dedicated onsite hospital units or at offsite centres. Information on medical complications and outcomes is inadequate.

  15. Unit cost of medical services at different hospitals in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010-11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital (USD 1 = INR 52. The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country's hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising

  16. Challenges implementing bar-coded medication administration in the emergency room in comparison to medical surgical units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Nancy

    2013-03-01

    Bar-coded medication administration has been successfully implemented and utilized to decrease medication errors at a number of hospitals in recent years. The purpose of this article was to discuss the varying success in utilization of bar-coded medication administration on medical-surgical units and in the emergency department. Utilization reports were analyzed to better understand the challenges between the units. Many factors negatively impacted utilization in the emergency department, including the inability to use bar-coded medication administration for verbal orders or to document medications distributed by the prescribing providers, unique aspects of emergency department nursing workflow, additional steps to chart when using bar-coded medication administration, and alert fatigue. Hardware problems affected all users. Bar-coded medication administration in its current form is more suitable for use on medical-surgical floors than in the emergency department. New solutions should be developed for bar-coded medication administration in the emergency department, keeping in mind requirements to chart medications when there is no order in the system, document medications distributed by prescribing providers, adapt to unpredictable nursing workflow, minimize steps to chart with bar-coded medication administration, limit alerts to those that are clinically meaningful, and choose reliable hardware with adequate bar-code scanning capability.

  17. Use of Medical Metered Dose Inhalers for Functionality Testing of Bioaerosol Detection and Identification Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    BIOAEROSOL DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION SYSTEMS ECBC-TR-964 Jana Kesavan Deborah R. Schepers Jerold R. Bottiger RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY...Testing Of Bioaerosol Detection And Identification Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...Medical Metered Dose Inhalers for Functionality Testing of Bioaerosol Detection and Identification Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  18. Independent dose per monitor unit review of eight U.S.A. proton treatment facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyers, M. F., E-mail: MFMoyers@roadrunner.com [Colton, California 92354 (United States); Ibbott, G. S.; Grant, R. L.; Summers, P. A.; Followill, D. S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas – M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Compare the dose per monitor unit at different proton treatment facilities using three different dosimetry methods. Methods: Measurements of dose per monitor unit were performed by a single group at eight facilities using 11 test beams and up to six different clinical portal treatment sites. These measurements were compared to the facility reported dose per monitor unit values. Results: Agreement between the measured and reported doses was similar using any of the three dosimetry methods. Use of the ICRU 59 N{sub D,w} based method gave results approximately 3% higher than both the ICRU 59 N{sub X} and ICRU 78 (TRS-398) N{sub D,w} based methods. Conclusions: Any single dosimetry method could be used for multi-institution trials with similar conformity between facilities. A multi-institutional trial could support facilities using both the ICRU 59 N{sub X} based and ICRU 78 (TRS-398) N{sub D,w} based methods but use of the ICRU 59 N{sub D,w} based method should not be allowed simultaneously with the other two until the difference is resolved.

  19. Independent dose per monitor unit review of eight U.S.A. proton treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyers, M F; Ibbott, G S; Grant, R L; Summers, P A; Followill, D S

    2014-01-01

    Compare the dose per monitor unit at different proton treatment facilities using three different dosimetry methods. Measurements of dose per monitor unit were performed by a single group at eight facilities using 11 test beams and up to six different clinical portal treatment sites. These measurements were compared to the facility reported dose per monitor unit values. Agreement between the measured and reported doses was similar using any of the three dosimetry methods. Use of the ICRU 59 ND,w based method gave results approximately 3% higher than both the ICRU 59 NX and ICRU 78 (TRS-398) ND,w based methods. Any single dosimetry method could be used for multi-institution trials with similar conformity between facilities. A multi-institutional trial could support facilities using both the ICRU 59 NX based and ICRU 78 (TRS-398) ND,w based methods but use of the ICRU 59 ND,w based method should not be allowed simultaneously with the other two until the difference is resolved.

  20. A randomized controlled trial of different buccal misoprostol doses in mifepristone medical abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Erica; Tsereteli, Tamar; Nguyen, Nhu Ngoc Thi; Winikoff, Beverly

    2012-09-01

    An 800-mcg dose of buccal misoprostol following mifepristone has been shown to be highly effective in terminating pregnancies through 63 days since the last menstrual period (LMP) (B. Winikoff, I.G. Dzuba, M.D. Creinin, et al., Two distinct oral routes of misoprostol in mifepristone medical abortion: a randomized controlled trial. Obstet Gynecol 2008; 112: 1303-1310). However, a two 200-mcg misoprostol pill option would simplify administration, and potentially reduce costs and increase women's satisfaction. This study compares a 400-mcg dose (Group I) to an 800-mcg dose (Group II) of buccal misoprostol. Eligible and consenting women requesting medical termination of early pregnancy (n=1122) were randomized and instructed to take misoprostol 36 to 48 h after taking 200 mg mifepristone. Follow-up visits occurred 12 to 15 days after mifepristone administration. Ninety-six percent of women in both groups had successful abortions. Women in Group I experienced significantly less vomiting and fever/chills than women in Group II. Ninety-six percent of women in both groups found the procedure very satisfactory or satisfactory. Four hundred micrograms of buccal misoprostol is as effective as the standard 800-mcg dose in terminating pregnancies up to 63 days LMP and reduces side effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pretreatment serum human chorionic gonadotropin cutoff value for medical treatment success with single-dose and multi-dose regimen of methotrexate in tubal ectopic pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhwan; Jung, Young Mi; Lee, Da Yong

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate individual pretreatment serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) cutoff value for medical treatment success with single-dose and multi-dose regimen of methotrexate in tubal ectopic pregnancy. Methods Eighty-five women who received methotrexate for the treatment of tubal ectopic pregnancy during 2003 to 2015 were selected. Fifty-three women received a single-dose regimen and 32 women received a multi-dose regimen. Medical treatment failure was defined as necessity of surgical treatment. The medical treatment success rate was estimated in both regimens and the pretreatment serum hCG titer to predict the success was assessed by receiver operating characteristics curve analysis. Results Pretreatment clinical and laboratory parameters were similar between group of single-dose regimen and multi-dose regimen. Treatment success rate was 64.2% in the single-dose regimen group and 71.9% in the multi-dose regimen group (P>0.05). Pretreatment serum hCG titer was an independent prognostic factor for treatment success in each regimen. Serum hCG cutoff value to predict the treatment success was 3,026 IU/L in single-dose regimen group and 3,711 IU/L in multi-dose regimen group. Conclusion We recommend use of single-dose regimen when pretreatment serum hCG <3,026 IU/L but multi-dose regimen may be favored when initial serum hCG level between 3,026 and 3,711 IU/L. PMID:28217676

  2. Applying graphics processor units to Monte Carlo dose calculation in radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhtiari M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential in using of using a graphics processor unit (GPU for Monte-Carlo (MC-based radiation dose calculations. The percent depth dose (PDD of photons in a medium with known absorption and scattering coefficients is computed using a MC simulation running on both a standard CPU and a GPU. We demonstrate that the GPU′s capability for massive parallel processing provides a significant acceleration in the MC calculation, and offers a significant advantage for distributed stochastic simulations on a single computer. Harnessing this potential of GPUs will help in the early adoption of MC for routine planning in a clinical environment.

  3. Cost of pain medication to treat adult patients with nonmalignant chronic pain in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasu, Rafia S; Vouthy, Kiengkham; Crowl, Ashley N; Stegeman, Anne E; Fikru, Bithia; Bawa, Walter Agbor; Knell, Maureen E

    2014-09-01

    Red Book 2009 for maximum recommended daily dose. Total pain medication costs were calculated in 2009 and 2013 dollar values. The study analyzed NMCP-related outpatient visit trends and used time series analysis to forecast visits using U.S. population data and statistics. The total costs of prescription medications prescribed for pain were $17.8 billion annually in the United States. Cost estimates were captured based on a total of 690,205,290 (~690 million) weighted outpatient visits made for chronic pain from 2000 to 2007 in the United States. Of those patients, 99% received a medication that could be used for NMCP. Among the patients, 29% reported taking ≥5 medications. A linear trend of pain visits is visible, reporting change (from 11% to 14%) from 2000 to 2007 in the United States. All agents except opioids/opioid-like agents and analgesics/NSAIDs were further categorized as adjuvant therapy to create 3 major drug class categories. The largest 3 categories of pain therapy for the United States (annually) were analgesics/NSAIDs ($1.9 billion), opioids ($3.6 billion), and adjuvants ($12.3 billion). Despite having the highest prescription frequency nationally, analgesics/NSAIDS accounted for about 11% of the overall pain medication costs. This study found that adjuvant therapy accounted for 69% of the total pain medication costs. Among adjuvants, 33.5% of the cost was contributed by antirheumatics/immunologics. Other adjuvants included muscle relaxants (4.4%), topical products (8.6%), and corticosteroids (9.4%). This study demonstrated national prescribing costs and use within various drug categories of pain medications in a large outpatient population over an 8-year period in the United States. Policymakers, stakeholders, and health plan decision makers may consider this cost analysis, since they need to know how drug costs are being allocated. Moreover, information about costs and use of pain medications is valuable for the practitioner making individual

  4. High-dose misoprostol as an alternative therapy after failed medical abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiu-Tai; Hou, Guang-Qiong; Chen, Tien-Hui; Chu, Yi-Chih; Lin, Ta-Chin; Kuan, Long-Ching; Lin, Mau; Huang, Shu-Feng; Chen, Fu-Min; Kuo, Tsung-Cheng

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the complete abortion rate for the vaginal administration of high-dose misoprostol after a failed medical abortion. When their medical abortions failed after the conventional oral administration of mifepristone and misoprostol, participants then received 1,000 microg of misoprostol vaginally. The efficacy and side effects of this treatment were evaluated. Twenty-seven women who failed to abort after the conventional administration of mifepristone and misoprostol were enrolled in this trial. Fourteen days after the vaginal administration of 1,000 microg misoprostol, the overall complete expulsion rate had reached 88.8% (24/27). Most adverse effects were mild to moderate and did not require treatment. The vaginal administration of 1,000 microg misoprostol as a salvage therapy after a failed medical abortion appears to be a safe and highly effective alternative to surgical intervention.

  5. Neutron dose calculation at the maze entrance of medical linear accelerator rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, R C; Facure, A; Silva, A X

    2007-01-01

    Currently, teletherapy machines of cobalt and caesium are being replaced by linear accelerators. The maximum photon energy in these machines can vary from 4 to 25 MeV, and one of the great advantages of these equipments is that they do not have a radioactive source incorporated. High-energy (E > 10 MV) medical linear accelerators offer several physical advantages over lower energy ones: the skin dose is lower, the beam is more penetrating, and the scattered dose to tissues outside the target volume is smaller. Nevertheless, the contamination of undesirable neutrons in the therapeutic beam, generated by the high-energy photons, has become an additional problem as long as patient protection and occupational doses are concerned. The treatment room walls are shielded to attenuate the primary and secondary X-ray fluence, and this shielding is generally adequate to attenuate the neutrons. However, these neutrons are scattered through the treatment room maze and may result in a radiological problem at the door entrance, a high occupancy area in a radiotherapy facility. In this article, we used MCNP Monte Carlo simulation to calculate neutron doses in the maze of radiotherapy rooms and we suggest an alternative method to the Kersey semi-empirical model of neutron dose calculation at the entrance of mazes. It was found that this new method fits better measured values found in literature, as well as our Monte Carlo simulated ones.

  6. Medically inoperable endometrial cancer in patients with a high body mass index (BMI): Patterns of failure after 3-D image-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Badiyan, Shahed

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: High BMI is a reason for medical inoperability in patients with endometrial cancer in the United States. Definitive radiation is an alternative therapy for these patients; however, data on patterns of failure after definitive radiotherapy are lacking. We describe...... the patterns of failure after definitive treatment with 3-D image-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for medically inoperable endometrial cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-three consecutive patients with endometrial cancer FIGO stages I-III were treated definitively with HDR brachytherapy...

  7. Acute medical assessment units: an efficient alternative to in-hospital acute medical care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Watts, M

    2011-02-01

    Acute Medical Assessment Units (AMAUs) are being proposed as an alternative to congested Emergency Departments (EDs for the assessment of patients with a range of acute medical problems. We retrospectively reviewed the discharge destination of patients referred to a newly established AMAU during a six-month period. During the same period we contrasted activity in the ED for a similar group of patients. 1,562 patients were assessed in the AMAU. 196 (12.5%) were admitted to an in-patient bed and 1,148 (73.5%) were entered into specific diagnosis-driven out-patient pathways. 1,465 patients attended the ED and 635 (43.3%) were admitted. Out-patient alternatives to expensive in-patient care need to be provided at the \\'coal face" of acute referral. The AMAU provides this, and as a consequence admission rates are relatively low. This is achieved by directly communicating with GPs, accessing senior clinical decision makers, and providing immediate access to diagnostically driven outpatient pathways.

  8. Performance assessment of the BEBIG MultiSource high dose rate brachytherapy treatment unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Antony; Mzenda, Bongile

    2009-12-21

    A comprehensive system characterisation was performed of the Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG GmbH MultiSource High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment unit with an (192)Ir source. The unit is relatively new to the UK market, with the first installation in the country having been made in the summer of 2009. A detailed commissioning programme was devised and is reported including checks of the fundamental parameters of source positioning, dwell timing, transit doses and absolute dosimetry of the source. Well chamber measurements, autoradiography and video camera analysis techniques were all employed. The absolute dosimetry was verified by the National Physical Laboratory, UK, and compared to a measurement based on a calibration from PTB, Germany, and the supplied source certificate, as well as an independent assessment by a visiting UK centre. The use of the 'Krieger' dosimetry phantom has also been evaluated. Users of the BEBIG HDR system should take care to avoid any significant bend in the transfer tube, as this will lead to positioning errors of the source, of up to 1.0 mm for slight bends, 2.0 mm for moderate bends and 5.0 mm for extreme curvature (depending on applicators and transfer tube used) for the situations reported in this study. The reason for these errors and the potential clinical impact are discussed. Users should also note the methodology employed by the system for correction of transit doses, and that no correction is made for the initial and final transit doses. The results of this investigation found that the uncorrected transit doses lead to small errors in the delivered dose at the first dwell position, of up to 2.5 cGy at 2 cm (5.6 cGy at 1 cm) from a 10 Ci source, but the transit dose correction for other dwells was accurate within 0.2 cGy. The unit has been mechanically reliable, and source positioning accuracy and dwell timing have been reproducible, with overall performance similar to other existing HDR equipment. The unit is capable of high

  9. Metabolic syndrome in patients with severe mental illness undergoing psychiatric rehabilitation receiving high dose antipsychotic medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bapu V Ravindranath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To review evidence of chronic antipsychotic medication and the association with metabolic syndrome in mentally ill patients. This evidence was used to analyse a cohort of patients with severe mental illness and to deduce a correlation between the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and their dose regimens. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four male patients undergoing Psychiatric rehabilitation underwent a review of current medication and assessment of risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Assessment criteria was based upon National Cholesterol Education Programme expert panel on detection, evaluation and treatment of high blood cholesterol in adults (Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III criteria, incorporating waist circumference, raised triglycerides, reduced high density lipoprotein, raised blood pressure and fasting blood glucose. PubMed, Nature and Science Direct databases have been used to compile the medical and scientific background on metabolic syndrome and antipsychotic medication and the effect on patients particularly on high dose. Results: Out of 24 patients, 10 patients (41.7% were receiving high dose antipsychotics (HDA and four were on maximum dosage limits of 100%. 8.3% (2/24 patients were receiving only one first generation antipsychotics (FGA, 37.5% (9/24 patients were receiving only one second generation antipsychotic (SGA, 45.8% patients (11/24 were receiving two or more SGA only, and only one patient was receiving two or more FGA. One patient was receiving a combination of FGA and SGA. PRN ("as needed" therapy was not included in this study as their usage was limited. Clozapine was mostly prescribed in these patients (10/24, 41.6%. Four out of the 24 patients refused blood tests therefore were excluded from the following results. In the patients evaluated, 55% (11/20 had confirmed metabolic syndrome. In these patients with metabolic syndrome, 45.4% (5/11 were on HDA and 27.3% (3/11 were on maximum British National

  10. Neonatal doses from X ray examinations by birth weight in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, K.; Akahane, K.; Aota, T.; Hada, M.; Takano, Y.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and type of X ray examinations performed on neonates classified according to their birth weight in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). In this study, the radiology records of 2408 neonates who were admitted to the NICU of Oita Prefectural Hospital between January 1994 and September 1999 were investigated. This study revealed that the neonates with earlier gestational ages and lower birth weights required longer NICU stays and more frequent X ray examinations made using a mobile X ray unit. The average number of X ray examinations performed on neonates of less than 750 g birth weight was 26 films per neonate. In regard to computed tomography and fluoroscopy, no significant relationship was found between the birth weight and number of X rays. This study revealed that the entrance-surface dose per neonate was dependent upon the birth weight, while the maximum dose was not dependent upon the birth weight. The average neonatal dose in the NICU was predominantly from computed tomography and fluoroscopy. The individual dose varied widely among neonates. (author)

  11. Dominant unit CD34+ cell dose predicts engraftment after double-unit cord blood transplantation and is influenced by bank practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtill, Duncan; Smith, Katherine; Devlin, Sean; Meagher, Richard; Tonon, Joann; Lubin, Marissa; Ponce, Doris M; Giralt, Sergio; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Stevens, Cladd E; Barker, Juliet N

    2014-11-06

    We investigated the unit characteristics associated with engraftment after double-unit cord blood (CB) transplantation (dCBT) and whether these could be reliably identified during unit selection. Cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraftment in 129 myeloablative dCBT recipients was 95% (95% confidence interval: 90-98%). When precryopreservation characteristics were analyzed, the dominant unit CD34(+) cell dose was the only characteristic independently associated with engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.43; P = .002). When postthaw characteristics were also included, only dominant unit infused viable CD34(+) cell dose independently predicted engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.95; P banks were more likely to have low recovery (P banks and units with cryovolumes other than 24.5 to 26.0 mL were more likely to have poor postthaw viability. Precryopreservation CD34(+) cell dose and banking practices should be incorporated into CB unit selection.

  12. A STUDY OF DIFFERENT DOSES OF SUBLINGUAL MISOPROSTOL AFTER ORAL MIFEPRISTONE IN MEDICAL TERMINATION OF PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Though Mifepristone- Misoprostol combination is well established for early pregnancy termination, the optimal Misoprostol dose is still under much debate. AIMS: To compare the efficacy of sublingual 400µg Misoprostol and 800µg Misoprostol after oral 200mg Mifepristone in achieving complete abortion, to study the induction abortion interval, complications and adverse effects seen with both groups. Setting 100 antenatal women requesting for medical termination of pregnancy of upto 63 days of gestation in ESI Medical College and Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Karnataka in India. Design A Prospective Observational study. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Study population was randomized into 2 groups of 50 patients each. Both groups received 200 mg Mifepristone. Twenty four hours later, Group A received 400µg sublingual Misoprostol and Group B received 800 µg sublingual Misoprostol. OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome analyzed in this study is the efficacy of the two regimens in achieving complete abortion. Secondary outcome measures are Induction to Abortion interval and adverse effects like pain abdomen, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, fever and chills. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Averages and proportions were calculated for the study and appropriate statistical tests like Chi Square Test, Fischer Exact Test and Student T Test were done using MiniTab version 16. RESULTS: Administration of 400µg sublingual Misoprostol 24 hours after 200 mg of Mifepristone has complete medical abortion rates comparable with 800µg sublingual Misoprostol with significantly lesser side effects. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, administration of 400µg sublingual Misoprostol after 200 mg of Mifepristone has complete medical abortion rates comparable with 800µg sublingual Misoprostol with significantly lesser side effects. However further research with different doses and routes of administration of Misoprostol in required in a larger

  13. Radiation doses and risks to neonates undergoing radiographic examinations in intensive care units in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Bouaoun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the radiation doses to neonates from diagnostic radiography in order to derive the local diagnostic reference levels (LDRLs for optimisation purposes.Methods: This study was carried out in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU of  two hospitals in Tunis. 134 babies, with weights ranging from 635 g to 6680 g, performed chest-abdomen X-ray examinations. Neonates were categorized into groups of birth weight. For each X-ray examination, patient data and exposure parameters were recorded. Dose area product (DAP was measured and entrance surface dose (ESD was estimated. Effective dose was calculated from the Monte Carlo simulation software PCXMC.Results: DAP values increased with neonatal weight and demonstrated a wide variation (5.0 - 43.0 mGy.cm2, mean 23.4 mGy.cm2 for patient weight from 600 g to 4000 g. A wide variation was also observed for ESD (14 - 93 μGy, mean 55.2 μGy. The LDRLs expressed in term of DAP were estimated to be 17.6 mGy.cm2 and 29.1 mGy.cm2 for the first and the second NICU, respectively. In terms of effective dose, the average value was about 31.6 μSv per single radiological examination. The results show the necessity to use a standardized protocol with high voltage technique combined to lower current time product (mAs values and an adapted collimation which could lead to further reductions in the neonatal doses. Conclusion: This study presents the LDRLs and the effective doses for neonates in two NICUs and demonstrates the necessity to optimize patient protection for this category of patient.

  14. PCXMC, a Monte Carlo program for calculating patient doses in medical x-ray examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapiovaara, M.; Siiskonen, T.

    2008-11-15

    PCXMC is a Monte Carlo program for calculating patients' organ doses and effective doses in medical x-ray examinations. The organs and tissues considered in the program are: active bone marrow, adrenals, brain, breasts, colon (upper and lower large intestine), extrathoracic airways, gall bladder, heart, kidneys, liver, lungs, lymph nodes, muscle, oesophagus, oral mucosa, ovaries, pancreas, prostate, salivary glands, skeleton, skin, small intestine, spleen, stomach, testicles, thymus, thyroid, urinary bladder and uterus. The program calculates the effective dose with both the present tissue weighting factors of ICRP Publication 103 (2007) and the old tissue weighting factors of ICRP Publication 60 (1991). The anatomical data are based on the mathematical hermaphrodite phantom models of Cristy and Eckerman (1987), which describe patients of six different ages: new-born, 1, 5, 10, 15-year-old and adult patients. Some changes are made to these phantoms in order to make them more realistic for external irradiation conditions and to enable the calculation of the effective dose according to the new ICRP Publication 103 tissue weighting factors. The phantom sizes are adjustable to mimic patients of an arbitrary weight and height. PCXMC allows a free adjustment of the x-ray beam projection and other examination conditions of projection radiography and fluoroscopy

  15. Analysis of Radiation Impact on White Mice through Radiation Dose Mapping in Medical Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutikno, Madnasri; Susilo; Arya Wijayanti, Riza

    2016-08-01

    A study about X-ray radiation impact on the white mice through radiation dose mapping in Medical Physic Laboratory is already done. The purpose of this research is to determine the minimum distance of radiologist to X-ray instrument through treatment on the white mice. The radiation exposure doses are measured on the some points in the distance from radiation source between 30 cm up to 80 with interval of 30 cm. The impact of radiation exposure on the white mice and the effects of radiation measurement in different directions are investigated. It is founded that minimum distance of radiation worker to radiation source is 180 cm and X-ray has decreased leukocyte number and haemoglobin and has increased thrombocyte number in the blood of white mice.

  16. QUANTITIES AND UNITS IN MEDICAL SCIENCE - A PLEA FOR STANDARDIZATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZIJLSTRA, WG

    1993-01-01

    The paper puts forward the idea that a relative lack of interest in the quantitative aspects of pathophysiological processes has made medical practice as well as medical research vulnerable to misconceptions carried into the field by technical innovations. More attention to these matters may not onl

  17. CAN INITIAL βHCG VALUES PREDICT THE NEED FOR SECOND DOSE OF METHOTREXATE IN MEDICAL MANAGEMENT OF ECTOPIC PREGNANCY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Narayanan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Prediction of requirement of second dose of methotrexate in patients treated with single dose would help in guiding treatment and counseling. The aim of this study is to determine whether pretreatment beta HCG values can predict the need for second dose of methotrexate in medically managed ectopic pregnancy. MATERIALS AND METHODS 46 women with ectopic pregnancies who were managed medically were included. The median of beta HCG titres on day 1, day 4 and day 7 was assessed in patients who responded to single dose methotrexate and those who required a second dose. RESULTS Out of the 46 patients studied, 41 responded to medical treatment (success 91%. 14 out of 41 required second dose of methotrexate (34%. Two patients required third dose of methotrexate. Five patients required surgery. DISCUSSION The median of day 1 and day 4 beta HCG values were not statistically different between those who responded to single dose methotrexate and those who required a second dose. Only day 7 values were found to be different. CONCLUSION The beta-hCG titre on day 1 and day 4 is not a predictor of requirement of second dose of methotrexate.

  18. Antimicrobial selection and dosing in the treatment of wounds in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, S E; Duz, M; Rendle, D I

    2016-11-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship within the veterinary profession is recognised by governing and professional bodies as being important; the attitudes and behaviour of veterinary surgeons merit investigation. To investigate levels of protected antimicrobial use and accuracy of antimicrobial dosing in a common clinical scenario in equine practice. Retrospective cohort study. Antimicrobial use was evaluated retrospectively in 113 cases subsequently referred to a single referral hospital for the treatment of limb wounds over a 20-month period. Antimicrobial classification (first-line, alternative or protected) was made according to guidelines produced by the British Equine Veterinary Association. These guidelines also served as the reference for recommended dose rates. Systemic antimicrobials were administered prior to referral in 94/113 (83.2%) horses, of which 8 (8.5%) received the protected third or fourth generation cephalosporins or fluoroquinolones. Forty-eight of 87 (55.2%) horses for which complete dosing data were available received antimicrobials at ≤90% of the recommended dose. Practitioners who held a postgraduate clinical qualification or worked in purely equine practice were no more or less likely to use protected antimicrobials (P = 0.06 and P = 0.64, respectively) or administer inadequate doses (P = 0.75 and P = 0.85, respectively). Veterinary surgeons with more experience were less likely to use protected antimicrobials (P<0.001); however, with the small case numbers, this finding should be interpreted with caution. Heavier horses were more likely to be under-dosed (P<0.002). This study highlights the administration of certain classes of antimicrobials in situations where their use is unlikely to be justified. If these findings reflect more general attitudes and behaviour then greater awareness of, and compliance with, recommendations for responsible antimicrobial use are required among equine practitioners. Bodyweight ought to be measured or estimated

  19. Automating and estimating glomerular filtration rate for dosing medications and staging chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinkley KE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Katy E Trinkley,1 S Michelle Nikels,2 Robert L Page II,1 Melanie S Joy11Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Objective: The purpose of this paper is to serve as a review for primary care providers on the bedside methods for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR for dosing and chronic kidney disease (CKD staging and to discuss how automated health information technologies (HIT can enhance clinical documentation of staging and reduce medication errors in patients with CKD.Methods: A nonsystematic search of PubMed (through March 2013 was conducted to determine the optimal approach to estimate GFR for dosing and CKD staging and to identify examples of how automated HITs can improve health outcomes in patients with CKD. Papers known to the authors were included, as were scientific statements. Articles were chosen based on the judgment of the authors.Results: Drug-dosing decisions should be based on the method used in the published studies and package labeling that have been determined to be safe, which is most often the Cockcroft–Gault formula unadjusted for body weight. Although Modification of Diet in Renal Disease is more commonly used in practice for staging, the CKD–Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD–EPI equation is the most accurate formula for estimating the CKD staging, especially at higher GFR values. Automated HITs offer a solution to the complexity of determining which equation to use for a given clinical scenario. HITs can educate providers on which formula to use and how to apply the formula in a given clinical situation, ultimately improving appropriate medication and medical management in CKD patients.Conclusion: Appropriate estimation of GFR is key to optimal health outcomes. HITs assist clinicians in both choosing the most appropriate GFR estimation formula and in applying the results of the GFR estimation in practice. Key limitations of the

  20. Radiologic and nuclear medicine studies in the United States and worldwide: frequency, radiation dose, and comparison with other radiation sources--1950-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettler, Fred A; Bhargavan, Mythreyi; Faulkner, Keith; Gilley, Debbie B; Gray, Joel E; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Lipoti, Jill A; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; McCrohan, John L; Stabin, Michael G; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Yoshizumi, Terry T

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation each conducted respective assessments of all radiation sources in the United States and worldwide. The goal of this article is to summarize and combine the results of these two publicly available surveys and to compare the results with historical information. In the United States in 2006, about 377 million diagnostic and interventional radiologic examinations and 18 million nuclear medicine examinations were performed. The United States accounts for about 12% of radiologic procedures and about one-half of nuclear medicine procedures performed worldwide. In the United States, the frequency of diagnostic radiologic examinations has increased almost 10-fold (1950-2006). The U.S. per-capita annual effective dose from medical procedures has increased about sixfold (0.5 mSv [1980] to 3.0 mSv [2006]). Worldwide estimates for 2000-2007 indicate that 3.6 billion medical procedures with ionizing radiation (3.1 billion diagnostic radiologic, 0.5 billion dental, and 37 million nuclear medicine examinations) are performed annually. Worldwide, the average annual per-capita effective dose from medicine (about 0.6 mSv of the total 3.0 mSv received from all sources) has approximately doubled in the past 10-15 years.

  1. Individualized Dosing of Children’s Liquid Medications in the Community Pharmacy Setting: A Survey of Parents and Guardians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingxiao Zhai, MS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: 1 To determine parents’ and/or guardians’ interest in having pharmacists provide children’s liquid medications in a pre-measured, individualized dosing device 2 To assess parents’ and/or guardians’ perception of dosing liquid medications for a child. Design: Observational survey Setting: Regional chain pharmacy in North Carolina Participants: > 18 years old, parent/guardian of a child <13 who had prescription filled for liquid medication within the pharmacy chain, responsible for administering child’s liquid medication Intervention: 14 item questionnaire Main Outcome Measure: Interest in pharmacists providing children’s liquid medications in pre-measured, individualized dosing devices Results: 250 questionnaires were mailed; 42 were marked “return to sender” (16.8%, 22 were returned completed (10.6%, and 20 of the 22 met inclusion criteria (9.6%. 95% of study participants reported being interested in having pharmacists provide children’s liquid medications in the proposed dosing device, and 40% were willing to pay for such a service. 90% of respondents reported it is “not at all difficult” to understand the amount of dose a child is to receive, while 55% reported it is “not at all difficult” to measure doses. 25% of respondents reported sometimes using a kitchen spoon to measure a child’s medication. Conclusion: Community pharmacists should explore providing children’s liquid medications in an individualized dosing device, as study results determined parents are interested in and willing to pay for the theoretical device. Further large-scale studies would be beneficial in determining interest in and willingness to pay for the dosing device in various pharmacy settings nationwide.

  2. FAKTOR PENYEBAB MEDICATION ERROR DI INSTALASI RAWAT DARURAT FACTORS AFFECTING MEDICATION ERRORS AT EMERGENCY UNIT

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Incident of medication errors is an importantindicator in patient safety and medication error is most commonmedical errors. However, most of medication errors can beprevented and efforts to reduce such errors are available.Due to high number of medications errors in the emergencyunit, understanding of the causes is important for designingsuccessful intervention. This research aims to identify typesand causes of medication errors.Method: Qualitative study was used and data were col...

  3. Medication Incidents Related to Automated Dose Dispensing in Community Pharmacies and Hospitals - A Reporting System Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ka-Chun; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Wensing, Michel; De Smet, Peter A. G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Automated dose dispensing (ADD) is being introduced in several countries and the use of this technology is expected to increase as a growing number of elderly people need to manage their medication at home. ADD aims to improve medication safety and treatment adherence, but it may introduce new safety issues. This descriptive study provides insight into the nature and consequences of medication incidents related to ADD, as reported by healthcare professionals in community pharmacies and hospitals. Methods The medication incidents that were submitted to the Dutch Central Medication incidents Registration (CMR) reporting system were selected and characterized independently by two researchers. Main Outcome Measures Person discovering the incident, phase of the medication process in which the incident occurred, immediate cause of the incident, nature of incident from the healthcare provider's perspective, nature of incident from the patient's perspective, and consequent harm to the patient caused by the incident. Results From January 2012 to February 2013 the CMR received 15,113 incidents: 3,685 (24.4%) incidents from community pharmacies and 11,428 (75.6%) incidents from hospitals. Eventually 1 of 50 reported incidents (268/15,113 = 1.8%) were related to ADD; in community pharmacies more incidents (227/3,685 = 6.2%) were related to ADD than in hospitals (41/11,428 = 0.4%). The immediate cause of an incident was often a change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation. Most reported incidents occurred in two phases: entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag. Conclusion A proportion of incidents was related to ADD and is reported regularly, especially by community pharmacies. In two phases, entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag, most incidents occurred. A change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation was the immediate causes of an incident

  4. Medical researchers unite for study on cancer intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We introduce Drs. Antoine Snijders and Jian-Hua Mao, whose article is published in this issue of AMOR and discuss their views on cancer genetics, targeted therapy, and personalized medicine.Having worked together in numerous joint investigations that have yielded significant results, Dr. Snijders and Dr. Mao would most definitely agree that two heads are better than one. “Researchers these days need to have the ability to collaborate across many different disciplines,” said the duo in an exclusive interview with AMOR. Dr. Snijders and Dr. Mao, both with PhDs in cancer genetics and genomics, are currently based at the Biological Systems and Engineering Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California, which is a member of the national laboratory system supported by the U.S Department of Energy through its Office of Science. The Berkeley Lab is well known for producing excellent scholars, as thirteen Nobel Prize winners are affiliated with the Lab and seventy of its scientists are members of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, one of the highest honors for a scientist in the United States. Dr. Snijders, a Dutch who has conducted his research at Berkeley Lab for the past eight years, did his Masters in Science (Medical Biology at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands – an institute with a strong focus on scientific research and is home to five Spinoza Prize (a.k.a. the “Dutch Nobel” winners. Dr. Snijders’s PhD (cum laude in cancer and molecular biology was awarded by University Utrecht in Netherlands, but his research work was carried out at the University of California San Francisco. Subsequently, he continued his postdoctoral research in molecular cytogenetics at the same institution. A prolific author of 114 publications (with 3,851 citations according to ResearchGate, Dr. Snijders – who also volunteers with California’s Contra Costa County Search and Rescue team for missing persons – has interests in

  5. Evaluation of Radiation Dose Received by Premature Neonates Admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, Mohmmadreza; Zanganeh, Kobra Aria; Dehdashtian, Masoud; Malekian, Arash; Fatahiasl, Jafar

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the radiation dose received by premature neonates using diagnostic radiographies. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 116 premature neonates with gestational age from 25 to 37 weeks; with the diagnosis of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS) and tachypnea, they were admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Ahvaz Imam Khomeini Hospital in 2015. For assessing the dose received, the model GR-200 thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) was used. For each premature neonate under radiation, three TLDs separately (one for each) were placed on surfaces of Ch1, T1, and G1 (chest, thyroid, and gonad of first newborn, respectively). Moreover, for the adjacent neonate at a distance of 60 - 100 cm, two TLDs were laid in the surfaces of T2 and G2 (thyroid and gonad of second newborn, respectively). The dose received by TLDs for any baby and the adjacent neonate under the entrance surface dose (ESD) was estimated. Results The mean of neonates’ weight under study was 1,950.78 ± 484.9 g. During the hospitalization period, minimum one and maximum three radiographies were done for any premature neonate. The doses received in the premature neonates to Ch1, T1 and G1 were 0.08 ± 0.01, 0.06 ± 0.01, and 0.05 ± 0.01 mSv, respectively and for adjacent infants for T2 and G2 were 0.003 ± 0.001 and 0.002 ± 0.0009 mSv, respectively. Conclusions In the study, radiation dose received by organs at risk of premature neonates was lower than the international criteria and standards, therefore, also due to the lack of radiation damage threshold, to limit collimator, and the use of the proper filtration, kilovoltage and time during radiography of premature neonates are recommended. PMID:28090228

  6. Second trimester medical abortion with mifepristone followed by unlimited dosing of buccal misoprostol in Armenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Karmen S; Chong, Erica; Tsereteli, Tamar; Avagyan, Gayane; Abrahamyan, Ruzanna; Winikoff, Beverly

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and acceptability of a regimen using mifepristone and buccal misoprostol with unlimited dosing for second trimester abortion in Armenia. Women seeking to terminate 13-22 week pregnancies were enrolled in the study. Participants swallowed 200 mg mifepristone in the clinic and were instructed to return to the hospital for induction 24-48 h later. During induction, women were given 400 μg buccal misoprostol every 3 h until the fetus and placenta were expelled. The abortion was considered a success if complete uterine evacuation was achieved without oxytocin or surgery. A total of 120 women with a median gestational age of 18 weeks participated in the study. All women began misoprostol induction around 24 h after taking mifepristone. Complete uterine evacuation was achieved in 119 (99.2%) women. The median induction-to-abortion interval was 10.3 h (range 4-17.4) with a mean of 9.5 ± 2.5 h. A median of four misoprostol doses (range 2-6) with a mean of 4 ± 1 misoprostol doses were administered. The induction-to-abortion interval, number of misoprostol doses, pain score and analgesia use increased as gestational age advanced. Acceptability of the method was high among both patients and providers. The medical abortion regimen of 200 mg mifepristone followed 24 h later by induction with 400 μg buccal misoprostol administered every 3 h, with no limit on the number of doses used for the termination of pregnancies of 13-22 weeks' gestation is an effective and acceptable option for women.

  7. Misoprostol dose and route after mifepristone for early medical abortion: a randomised controlled noninferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hertzen, H; Huong, N T M; Piaggio, G; Bayalag, M; Cabezas, E; Fang, A H; Gemzell-Danielsson, K; Hinh, N D; Mittal, S; Ng, E H Y; Chaturachinda, K; Pinter, B; Puscasiu, L; Savardekar, L; Shenoy, S; Khomassuridge, A; Tuyet, H T D; Velasco, A; Peregoudov, A

    2010-09-01

    To compare 400 and 800 microg sublingual or vaginal misoprostol 24 hours after 200 mg mifepristone for noninferiority regarding efficacy in achieving complete abortion for pregnancy termination up to 63 days of gestation. Placebo-controlled, randomised, noninferiority factorial trial, stratified by centre and length of gestation. Misoprostol 400 or 800 microg, administered either sublingually or vaginally, with follow up after 2 and 6 weeks. Fifteen obstetrics/gynaecology departments in ten countries. Pregnant women (n = 3005) up to 63 days of gestation requesting medical abortion. Two-sided 95% CI for differences in failure of complete abortion and continuing pregnancy, with a 3% noninferiority margin, were calculated. Proportions of women with adverse effects were recorded. Complete abortion without surgical intervention (main); continuing live pregnancies, induction-to-abortion interval, adverse effects, women's perceptions (secondary). Efficacy outcomes analysed for 2962 women (98.6%): 90.5% had complete abortion after 400 microg misoprostol, 94.2% after 800 microg. Noninferiority of 400 microg misoprostol was not demonstrated for failure of complete abortion (difference: 3.7%; 95% CI 1.8-5.6%). The 400-microg dose showed higher risk of incomplete abortion (P abortion (P = 0.47, difference in sublingual minus vaginal -0.7%, 95% CI -2.6-1.2%). A similar pattern was observed for continuing pregnancies (P = 0.21). Fewer women reported adverse effects with vaginal than sublingual administration and with the 400-microg dose than the 800-microg dose. Of the women, 94% were satisfied or highly satisfied with the regimens, 53% preferred the sublingual route and 47% preferred the vaginal route. A 400-microg dose of misoprostol should not replace the 800-microg dose when administered 24 hours after 200 mg mifepristone for inducing abortion in pregnancies up to 63 days. Sublingual and vaginal misoprostol have similar efficacy, but vaginal administration is associated with

  8. Enhanced Engraftment of a Very Low-Dose Cord Blood Unit in an Adult Haemopoietic Transplant by Addition of Six Mismatched Viable Cord Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Proctor

    2010-01-01

    , supported by six mismatched cord blood units (one unit per 10 kg recipient weight. No adverse reaction occurred following the infusion of mismatched units and engraftment of the suboptimal-dose matched unit occurred rapidly, with no molecular evidence of engraftment of mismatched cords. Early molecular remission of ALL was demonstrated using a novel PCR for a mitochondrial DNA mutation in the leukaemic clone. The cell dose of the matched cord was well below that recommended to engraft a 70 kg recipient. We suggest that a factor or factors in the mismatched cords enhanced/supported engraftment of the matched cord.

  9. [Drugs dosing in intensive care unit during continuous renal replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourquin, Vincent; Ponte, Belén; Saudan, Patrick; Martin, Pierre-Yves

    2009-11-01

    Drug dosing in the intensive care unit can be challenging. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of sepsis and a part of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is increasingly used as dialysis therapy in this critically ill population. Available data demonstrate that sepsis, AKI and different modalities of CRRT can profoundly change drugs pharmacokinetic. The severity of these changes depends on molecules characteristics (volume of distribution, plasma protein binding, molecular weight, plasma half-life, plasma clearance), patient itself (volemia, residual renal function, tissue perfusion, hepatic dysfunction) and modality of CRRT (diffusion, convection, adsorption). There are no available recommendations to adapt drug dosing in a given critically ill patient with a given modality of CRRT. It is necessary to fully understand the different methods of CRRT and drug pharmacokinetic to prescribe the appropriate dose and to avoid under or potentially toxic overdosing. Monitoring the plasma level of drug - when available - can establish a relation between the blood concentration and its effect; thus, facilitating drug dosing.

  10. Professionalism among multicultural medical students in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrahman, Mahera; Alsalehi, Shahd; Husain, Zahra S M; Nair, Satish C; Carrick, Frederick Robert

    2017-01-01

    Moral competencies and ethical practices of medical professionals are among the desired outcomes of academic training. Unfortunately, academic dishonesty and misconduct are reported from medical colleges across the world. This study investigates the level of academic dishonesty/misconduct among multicultural medical students. The aim of this study is to investigate the level of academic dishonesty/misconduct among multicultural medical students. Validated and customized version of Dundee Polyprofessionalism Inventory-1 detailing lapses of professionalism in undergraduate health professions education was used to determine the perceived prevalence and self-reported lapses of academic integrity in this study. This study shows that the majority (458/554, 83%) of medical students have admitted to acts of academic dishonesty mentioned in the questionnaire. Approximately 42% (231/554) of the students have given proxy for attendance and 71% of them considered this as an offense. Similarly, 12% (66/554) have copied from the record books of others, and 86% (477/554) have considered it unethical. In addition, 5% (28/554) of the students revealed forging a teacher's signature in their record or logbooks, with 16% (91/554) of them reporting that they have seen others forge signatures. This is the first multi-center, multi-cultural and multi-ethnic study involving a large number of participants that addresses academic professionalism among medical students in the Middle East. Certainly, the paucity of data limits definitive conclusions about the best approach to prevent academic misconduct in the UAE medical schools. Yet, the results of our study are anticipated not only to benefit the UAE but also to find application in the Arab world, with similar medical school programs, values, culture and tradition.

  11. Estimating the Quantitative Demand of NOAC Antidote Doses on Stroke Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeilschifter, Waltraud; Farahmand, Dana; Niemann, Daniela; Ikenberg, Benno; Hohmann, Carina; Abruscato, Mario; Thonke, Sven; Strzelczyk, Adam; Hedtmann, Günther; Neumann-Haefelin, Tobias; Kollmar, Rainer; Singer, Oliver C; Ferbert, Andreas; Steiner, Thorsten; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Reihs, Anke; Misselwitz, Björn; Foerch, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The first specific antidote for non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOAC) has recently been approved. NOAC antidotes will allow specific treatment for 2 hitherto problematic patient groups: patients with oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT)-associated intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and maybe also thrombolysis candidates presenting on oral anticoagulation (OAT). We aimed to estimate the frequency of these events and hence the quantitative demand of antidote doses on a stroke unit. We extracted data of patients with acute ischemic stroke and ICH (demand for NOAC antidote doses on stroke units. Eighteen percent of ICH patients within 6 h of symptom onset or an unknown symptom onset were on OAT. Given a NOAC share at admission of 40%, about 7% of all ICH patients may qualify for NOAC reversal therapy. Thirteen percent of ischemic stroke patients admitted within 4 h presented on anticoagulation. Given the availability of an appropriate antidote, a NOAC share of 50% could lead to a 6.1% increase in thrombolysis rate. Stroke units serving populations with a comparable demographic structure should prepare to treat up to 1% of all acute ischemic stroke patients and 7% of all acute ICH patients with NOAC antidotes. These numbers may increase with the mounting prevalence of atrial fibrillation and an increasing use of NOAC. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. The effect of medical device dose-memory functions on patients’ adherence to treatment, confidence, and disease self-management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall RL

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca L Hall,1 Thomas Willgoss,1 Louise J Humphrey,1 Jens Harald Kongsø2 1Adelphi Values, Adelphi Mill, Bollington, Cheshire, UK; 2Novo Nordisk A/S, Novo Allé, Bagsværd, Denmark Background: Adherence to treatment is an important issue in chronic disease management and an indicator of patients’ ability to self-manage their condition and treatment. Some drug-dispensing and drug-delivery devices have been designed to support patients’ medication-taking behavior by including dose-memory and combined dose-memory and dose-reminder functions, which electronically store, and visually display dose-history information, enabling the patient to review, monitor, and/or be actively reminded about their medication doses.Purpose: This literature review explored the role and impact of these devices on patients’ treatment adherence, confidence with, and self-management of their condition and treatment.Materials and methods: A search of MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO was performed to identify articles published in English from 2003–2013 that studied the effect of devices with dose-memory and combined dose-memory and dose-reminder functions on treatment adherence and users’ (patients, health care professionals [HCPs], and caregivers confidence, self-management behavior, and attitudes.Results: The database searches yielded 940 abstracts from which 13 articles met the inclusion criteria and were retained. Devices with dose-memory and combined dose-memory and dose-reminder functions were found to improve self-reported and electronically monitored treatment adherence in chronic conditions such as asthma, diabetes, and HIV. The ability of the devices to provide dose-history information and active medication reminders was considered valuable in disease management by patients, caregivers, and HCPs. The devices were found to enhance patients’ confidence in, and motivation to manage their medication and condition, and help reduce forgotten or incorrect

  13. The effect of medical device dose-memory functions on patients' adherence to treatment, confidence, and disease self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Rebecca L; Willgoss, Thomas; Humphrey, Louise J; Kongsø, Jens Harald

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to treatment is an important issue in chronic disease management and an indicator of patients' ability to self-manage their condition and treatment. Some drug-dispensing and drug-delivery devices have been designed to support patients' medication-taking behavior by including dose-memory and combined dose-memory and dose-reminder functions, which electronically store, and visually display dose-history information, enabling the patient to review, monitor, and/or be actively reminded about their medication doses. This literature review explored the role and impact of these devices on patients' treatment adherence, confidence with, and self-management of their condition and treatment. A search of MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO was performed to identify articles published in English from 2003-2013 that studied the effect of devices with dose-memory and combined dose-memory and dose-reminder functions on treatment adherence and users' (patients, health care professionals [HCPs], and caregivers) confidence, self-management behavior, and attitudes. The database searches yielded 940 abstracts from which 13 articles met the inclusion criteria and were retained. Devices with dose-memory and combined dose-memory and dose-reminder functions were found to improve self-reported and electronically monitored treatment adherence in chronic conditions such as asthma, diabetes, and HIV. The ability of the devices to provide dose-history information and active medication reminders was considered valuable in disease management by patients, caregivers, and HCPs. The devices were found to enhance patients' confidence in, and motivation to manage their medication and condition, and help reduce forgotten or incorrect medication dosing. The incorporation of dose-memory and combined dose-memory and dose-reminder functions in drug-delivery devices can improve patients' adherence, confidence, and self-management behavior. They can target non-intentional barriers to adherence and can

  14. An efficient numerical tool for dose deposition prediction applied to synchrotron medical imaging and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittone, Alberto; Baldacci, Fabien; Bravin, Alberto; Brun, Emmanuel; Delaire, François; Ferrero, Claudio; Gasilov, Sergei; Freud, Nicolas; Létang, Jean Michel; Sarrut, David; Smekens, François; Coan, Paola

    2013-09-01

    Medical imaging and radiation therapy are widely used synchrotron-based techniques which have one thing in common: a significant dose delivery to typically biological samples. Among the ways to provide the experimenters with image guidance techniques indicating optimization strategies, Monte Carlo simulation has become the gold standard for accurately predicting radiation dose levels under specific irradiation conditions. A highly important hampering factor of this method is, however, its slow statistical convergence. A track length estimator (TLE) module has been coded and implemented for the first time in the open-source Monte Carlo code GATE/Geant4. Results obtained with the module and the procedures used to validate them are presented. A database of energy-absorption coefficients was also generated, which is used by the TLE calculations and is now also included in GATE/Geant4. The validation was carried out by comparing the TLE-simulated doses with experimental data in a synchrotron radiation computed tomography experiment. The TLE technique shows good agreement versus both experimental measurements and the results of a classical Monte Carlo simulation. Compared with the latter, it is possible to reach a pre-defined statistical uncertainty in about two to three orders of magnitude less time for complex geometries without loss of accuracy.

  15. Amikacin Dosing and Monitoring in Spinal Cord Injury Patients: Variation in Clinical Practice Between Spinal Injury Units and Differences in Experts' Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article was to determine the current practice on amikacin dosing and monitoring in spinal cord injury patients from spinal cord physicians and experts. Physicians from spinal units and clinical pharmacologists were asked to provide protocol for dosing and monitoring of amikacin therapy in spinal cord injury patients. In a spinal unit in Poland, amikacin is administered usually 0.5 g twice daily. A once-daily regimen of amikacin is never used and amikacin concentrations are not determined. In Belgium, Southport (U.K., Spain, and the VA McGuire Medical Center (Richmond, Virginia, amikacin is given once daily. Whereas peak and trough concentrations are determined in Belgium, only trough concentration is measured in Southport. In both these spinal units, modification of the dose is not routinely done with a nomogram. In Spain and the VA McGuire Medical Center, monitoring of serum amikacin concentration is not done unless a patient has renal impairment. In contrast, the dose/interval of amikacin is adjusted according to pharmacokinetic parameters at the Edward Hines VA Hospital (Hines, Illinois, where amikacin is administered q24h or q48h, depending on creatinine clearance. Spinal cord physicians from Denmark, Germany, and the Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation (West Orange, New Jersey state that they do not use amikacin in spinal injury patients. An expert from Canada does not recommend determining serum concentrations of amikacin, but emphasizes the value of monitoring ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Experts from New Zealand recommend amikacin in conventional twice- or thrice-daily dosing because of the theoretical increased risk of neuromuscular blockade and apnea with larger daily doses in spinal cord injury patients. On the contrary, experts from Greece, Israel, and the U.S. recommend once-daily dosing and determining amikacin pharmacokinetic parameters for each patient. As there is considerable variation in clinical

  16. Student Perspectives on Oncology Curricula at United States Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeley, Brandon C; Golden, Daniel W; Brower, Jeffrey V; Braunstein, Steve E; Hirsch, Ariel E; Mattes, Malcolm D

    2017-08-07

    Delivering a cohesive oncology curriculum to medical students is challenging due to oncology's multidisciplinary nature, predominantly outpatient clinical setting, and lack of data describing effective approaches to teaching it. We sought to better characterize approaches to oncology education at US medical schools by surveying third and fourth year medical students who serve on their institution's curriculum committee. We received responses from students at 19 schools (15.2% response rate). Key findings included the following: (1) an under-emphasis of cancer in the curriculum relative to other common diseases; (2) imbalanced involvement of different clinical subspecialists as educators; (3) infrequent requirements for students to rotate through non-surgical oncologic clerkships; and (4) students are less confident in their knowledge of cancer treatment compared to basic science/natural history or workup/diagnosis. Based on these findings, we provide several recommendations to achieve robust multidisciplinary curriculum design and implementation that better balances the clinical and classroom aspects of oncology education.

  17. Radiation doses received by premature babies in the neonatal intensive care unit; Doses d'irradiation recues par les prematures en service de reanimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thierry-Chef, I.; Maccia, C. [Centre d' Assurance de Qualite des Applications Technologiques dans le Domaine de la Sante, 92 - Bourg la Reine (France); Thierry-Chef, I.; Laurier, D.; Tirmarche, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/LRPID), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Costil, J. [Hopital Armand Trousseau, Service de Reanimation Neonatale, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-02-15

    Purpose. Because of frequent radiological investigations performed in 1 neonatal intensive care unit, a dosimetry study was carried out to assess the level of doses received by premature babies. Materials and methods. In vivo measurements were performed and effective doses were evaluated for single radiographs. Individual cumulative doses received over the period of stay were then estimated, for each premature baby entering the intensive care unit in 2002, taking into account the number of radiographs they underwent. Results. On average, babies stayed for a week and more than one radio-graph was taken per day. Results showed that, even if average doses per radiograph were relatively low (25{mu}Sv), cumulative doses strongly depended on the length of stay, and can reach a few mSv. Conclusion. Even if doses per radiograph are in agreement with European recommendations, optimisation of doses is particularly important because premature babies are more sensitive to radiation than adults and because they usually undergo further radiological examinations in other services. On the basis of the results of this dosimetry study, the implementation of a larger study is being discussed. (author)

  18. Perception of radiation dose and potential risks of computed tomography in emergency department medical personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Hee; Kim, Kyuseok; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kim, Yu Jin; Park, Chanjong; Kang, Changwoo; Lee, Soo Hoon; Jeong, Jin Hee; Rhee, Joong Eui

    2015-01-01

    Objective Use of computed tomography (CT) continues to increase, but the relatively high radiation doses associated with CT have raised health concerns such as future risk of cancer. We investigated the level of awareness regarding radiation doses and possible risks associated with CT in medical personnel (MP). Methods This study was conducted from April to May 2012 and included physicians and nurses who worked in the emergency department of 17 training hospitals. The questionnaire included measurement of the effect of CT or radiography on health using a 10-point numerical rating scale, estimation of the radiation dose of one abdominal CT scan compared with one chest radiograph, and perception of the increased lifetime risk of cancer associated with CT. Results A total of 354 MP participated in this study: 142 nurses, 87 interns, 86 residents, and 39 specialists. Interns were less aware of the effects of CT or radiography on health than other physicians or nurses (mean±SD of 4.8±2.7, 5.9±2.7, 6.1±2.7, and 6.0±2.2 for interns, residents, specialists, and nurses, respectively; P<0.05). There was a significant difference in knowledge about the relative radiation dose of one abdominal CT scan compared with one chest radiograph between physicians and nurses (48.6% vs. 28.9% for physicians vs. nurses, P<0.05). MP perceived an increased risk of cancer from radiation associated with CT. Conclusion MP perceive the risk of radiation associated with CT, but their level of knowledge seems to be insufficient.

  19. Co-prescription of opioids with benzodiazepine and other co-medications among opioid users: differential in opioid doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zin, Che Suraya; Ismail, Fadhilah

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the patterns of opioid co-prescription with benzodiazepine and other concomitant medications among opioid users. Opioid dose in each type of co-prescription was also examined. Patients and methods This cross-sectional study was conducted among opioid users receiving concomitant medications at an outpatient tertiary hospital setting in Malaysia. Opioid prescriptions (morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone, dihydrocodeine and tramadol) that were co-prescribed with other medications (opioid + benzodiazepines, opioid + antidepressants, opioid + anticonvulsants, opioid + antipsychotics and opioid + hypnotics) dispensed from January 2013 to December 2014 were identified. The number of patients, number of co-prescriptions and the individual mean opioid daily dose in each type of co-prescription were calculated. Results A total of 276 patients receiving 1059 co-prescription opioids with benzodiazepine and other co-medications were identified during the study period. Of these, 12.3% of patients received co-prescriptions of opioid + benzodiazepine, 19.3% received opioid + anticonvulsant, 6.3% received opioid + antidepressant and 10.9% received other co-prescriptions, including antipsychotics and hypnotics. The individual mean opioid dose was <100 mg/d of morphine equivalents in all types of co-prescriptions, and the dose ranged from 31 to 66 mg/d in the co-prescriptions of opioid + benzodiazepine. Conclusion Among the opioid users receiving concomitant medications, the co-prescriptions of opioid with benzodiazepine were prescribed to 12.3% of patients, and the individual opioid dose in this co-prescription was moderate. Other co-medications were also commonly used, and their opioid doses were within the recommended dose. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the adverse effect and clinical outcomes of the co-medications particularly in long-term opioid users with chronic non-cancer pain. PMID:28182128

  20. Managing medical technology: lessons for the United States from Quebec and France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenau, P V

    2000-01-01

    Important modifications to technology assessment, diffusion, adoption, and utilization must take place if the United States is to better employ medical technology and save resources so as to assure access for the uninsured and underinsured. The United States can learn from other health systems that are more successful in achieving these goals. The author selects for comparison the health systems of France and Quebec. The discussion focuses on the differences between the three systems in the management of medical technology on a range of policy-relevant dimensions, including health system structure, attitudes about planning versus market competition, government regulation, the balance between decentralization and centralization, the needs of the individual and those of the society, linkages between technology assessment and policy-making, and the importance of medical technology assessment for medical practice. Seven specific recommendations are made for better managing medical technology in the United States, drawing on what can be observed from the experiences of Quebec and France.

  1. United States Army Medical Department Journal, January-March 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    kidney dialysis treatment, and artificial nutrition and hydration. The term does not include the administration of pain management medication or the...person the right to refuse lifesaving hydration and nutrition . The Court noted that "most state courts have based a right to refuse treatment on...and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA) defines substantial evidence as ...evidence consisting of adequate and well-controlled investigations, including clinical

  2. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. October - December 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Hall et al14 compared the success rate of endotracheal intubation among paramedic students trained on a human patient simulator group or on human...Kang J, Hall CA. Human patient simulation is effective for teaching paramedic students endotracheal intubation . Acad Emerg Med. 2005;12(9):850-855...published in The Army Medical Department Journal are listed and indexed in MEDLINE, the National Library of Medicine’s premier bibliographic database of life

  3. The United States Army Medical Department Journal, April - June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Certification exam. Additionally, they are offered the opportunity to take the ServSafe ® certification examination.† The Navy trains Preventive Medicine...the ServSafe Exam.5(p5) Navy  Scope of practice – a concern because Navy PMTs operate clinically, unlike Army preventive medicine personnel...with other programs relocating and integrating into the Medical Education and Training Campus concept. *Army Training Course 322-68S10 †The ServSafe

  4. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. October - December 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 October – December 2012 The Army Medical Department Center...health benefits increase as you spend more time being active. Children and adolescents : get 60 minutes or more a day. Adults: get 2 hours and 30...AFB, Delaware ; and Fort Sam Houston, Texas.7 In addition, the Joint Pa- thology Center, the federal govern- ment’s pathology resource center, was

  5. Evaluating secondary neutron doses of a refined shielded design for a medical cyclotron using the TLD approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jye-Bin; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Liu, Wen-Shan; Lin, Ding-Bang; Hsieh, Teng-San; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2013-11-01

    An increasing number of cyclotrons at medical centers in Taiwan have been installed to generate radiopharmaceutical products. An operating cyclotron generates immense amounts of secondary neutrons from reactions such the 18O(p, n)18F, used in the production of FDG. This intense radiation can be hazardous to public health, particularly to medical personnel. To increase the yield of 18F-FDG from 4200 GBq in 2005 to 48,600 GBq in 2011, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital (CSMUH) has prolonged irradiation time without changing the target or target current to meet requirements regarding the production 18F. The CSMUH has redesigned the CTI Radioisotope Delivery System shield. The lack of data for a possible secondary neutron doses has increased due to newly designed cyclotron rooms. This work aims to evaluate secondary neutron doses at a CTI cyclotron center using a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD-600). Two-dimensional neutron doses were mapped and indicated that neutron doses were high as neutrons leaked through self-shielded blocks and through the L-shaped concrete shield in vault rooms. These neutron doses varied markedly among locations close to the H218O target. The Monte Carlo simulation and minimum detectable dose are also discussed and demonstrated the reliability of using the TLD-600 approach. Findings can be adopted by medical centers to identify radioactive hot spots and develop radiation protection.

  6. Medical abortion practices : a survey of National Abortion Federation members in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, Melanie M. J.; Jones, Heidi E.; O'Connell, Katharine; Lichtenberg, E. Steve; Paul, Maureen; Westhoff, Carolyn L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about clinical implementation of medical abortion in the United States following approval of mifepristone as an abortifacient by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000. We collected information regarding medical abortion practices of National Abortion Federation

  7. Aspects of medical migration with particular reference to the United Kingdom and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herfs, Paulus

    2014-01-01

    Background In most countries of the European Economic Area (EEA), there is no large-scale migration of medical graduates with diplomas obtained outside the EEA, which are international medical graduates (IMGs). In the United Kingdom however, health care is in part dependent on the influx of IMGs. In

  8. Aspects of medical migration with particular reference to the United Kingdom and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herfs, Paulus

    2014-01-01

    Background In most countries of the European Economic Area (EEA), there is no large-scale migration of medical graduates with diplomas obtained outside the EEA, which are international medical graduates (IMGs). In the United Kingdom however, health care is in part dependent on the influx of IMGs. In

  9. Medical abortion practices : a survey of National Abortion Federation members in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, Melanie M. J.; Jones, Heidi E.; O'Connell, Katharine; Lichtenberg, E. Steve; Paul, Maureen; Westhoff, Carolyn L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about clinical implementation of medical abortion in the United States following approval of mifepristone as an abortifacient by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000. We collected information regarding medical abortion practices of National Abortion Federation (

  10. [Medical and technical means for united circle of evacuation measures in military-medical organisations of the Ministry of Defence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisun, A Ya; Kalachev, O V; Shchegolev, A V; Vertii, B D

    2015-06-01

    Experts of the medical service of the Armed Forces carried out an analysis of capabilities of modern Russian enterprises and their innovative projects regarding creation of unified means of evacuation of wounded and providing to them necessary types of emergency care with the use of existing and future special and regular means of transport for medical evacuation. As a result of the work of industrial enterprises of the OAO Kazan "Vertoletniy Zavod", "Zarechie", "Vysota" was created a device for the medical evacuation of severe wounded patients. The device is designed for medical evacuation of severe wounded patients from the military medical unit to the site providing comprehensive medical care with maintenance of vital functions and monitoring of his condition. Testing was conducted on the products of regular vehicles medical company of one of the brigades of the Western Military District. The device was presented at the special tactical exercises the Armed Forces Medical Service "Frontier-2014", "Innovation Day" of the Defence Ministry in 2014.

  11. Using evidence to improve satisfaction with medication side-effects education on a neuro-medical surgical unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Susan L; Wirges, Ashley M

    2013-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is viewed as a significant indicator of quality of care. More specifically, improving patient satisfaction related to communication about medications and potential side effects can improve healthcare outcomes. Patient satisfaction scores related to medication side effects on a neuro-medical surgical unit were monitored following a quality improvement program. These patients frequently experience cognitive impairment and functional difficulties that can affect the way they understand and handle medications. The purpose of this quality improvement practice change was to (a) develop an educational approach for post acute neurosurgical patients and (b) evaluate whether the use of the approach is successful in improving patient satisfaction scores related to medication education on side effects. The quality improvement program interventions included (a) patient informational handouts inserted into admission folders, (b) nurse education about the importance of providing education on side effects to patient and discussion of their involvement with the program, (c) unit flyers with nurse education, and (d) various communications with bedside nurses through personal work mail and emails. The primary focus was for nurses to employ the "teach back" method to review and reinforce the medication side-effect teaching with patients. Evaluation of the data showed an increase in patient satisfaction after the implementation of the "Always Ask" program.

  12. Safety in numbers 1: Essential numerical and scientific principles underpinning medication dose calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Simon; Weeks, Keith W; Hutton, B Meriel

    2013-03-01

    Registered nurses spend up to 40% of their professional clinical practice engaged in the art and science of medication dosage calculation problem-solving (MDC-PS). In advancing this patient safety critical discipline it is our position that as a profession we must first situate MDC-PS within the context of the wider features of the nursing numeracy, medicines management and clinical pharmacokinetic domains that inform its practice. This paper focuses on the essential relationship between numeracy, healthcare numeracy, medicines management, pharmacokinetics and MDC-PS. We present a taxonomy of generic numerical competencies for the pre-registration curriculum, with examples of essential medication dosage calculation requirements mapped to each skills domain. This is followed by a review of the symbols and measurement units that represent essential components of calculation competence in healthcare and medicines management practice. Finally we outline the fundamental pharmacokinetic knowledge that explains how the body deals with medication and we illustrate through clinical correlations why numeric and scientific knowledge and skills must be mastered to ensure safe dosage calculation and medicines management practice. The findings inform nurse education practice via advancing our understanding of a number of issues, including a unified taxonomy of generic numerical competencies mapped to the 42 revised UK Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) Essential Skills Clusters (NMC, 2010a; NMC, 2010b). Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Prolonged high-dose intravenous magnesium therapy for severe tetanus in the intensive care unit: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fligou Fotini

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Tetanus rarely occurs in developed countries, but it can result in fatal complications including respiratory failure due to generalized muscle spasms. Magnesium infusion has been used to treat spasticity in tetanus, and its effectiveness is supported by several case reports and a recent randomized controlled trial. Case presentations Three Caucasian Greek men aged 30, 50 and 77 years old were diagnosed with tetanus and admitted to a general 12-bed intensive care unit in 2006 and 2007 for respiratory failure due to generalized spasticity. Intensive care unit treatment included antibiotics, hydration, enteral nutrition, early tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation. Intravenous magnesium therapy controlled spasticity without the need for additional muscle relaxants. Their medications were continued for up to 26 days, and adjusted as needed to control spasticity. Plasma magnesium levels, which were measured twice a day, remained in the 3 to 4.5 mmol/L range. We did not observe hemodynamic instability, arrhythmias or other complications related to magnesium therapy in these patients. All patients improved, came off mechanical ventilation, and were discharged from the intensive care unit in a stable condition. Conclusion In comparison with previous reports, our case series contributes the following meaningful additional information: intravenous magnesium therapy was used on patients already requiring mechanical ventilation and remained effective for up to 26 days (significantly longer than in previous reports without significant toxicity in two patients. The overall outcome was good in all our patients. However, the optimal dose, optimal duration and maximum safe duration of intravenous magnesium therapy are unknown. Therefore, until more data on the safety and efficacy of magnesium therapy are available, its use should be limited to carefully selected tetanus cases.

  14. Serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D profile after single large oral doses of cholecalciferol (vitamin D3 in medical staff in North India: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Priyambada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D deficiency is widely prevalent in India and subjects who have almost no exposure to sunlight are severely deficient. Daily oral doses of cholecalciferol (vitamin D3 are costly as compared to stoss doses and further, take a long time for the serum levels to reach a plateau. Compliance to supplementation may also be better if a regimen involves single oral doses of vitamin D at specified intervals rather than daily doses. Evidence-based guidelines regarding the dosing and the frequency of dosing for prophylactic intermittent supplementation (stoss doses in severely-deficient subjects are few. Materials and Methods: In a prospective intervention study, we serially assessed 30 asymptomatic healthy medical staff for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] and parathyroid hormone (PTH; (a at baseline; (b monthly for 3 months after single oral 60,000 units (U cholecalciferol; (c monthly for 3 months after 120,000 (or 180,000 for those with elevated alkaline phosphatase U cholecalciferol; and, (d subsequently, at 3 months after a repeat dose of 60,000 U cholecalciferol by repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: The baseline serum 25(OHD was 7.1 ± 5.4 ng/mL (< 10 ng/mL in 85% subjects which increased to 18.7 ± 8.9 ng/mL at 1 month after 60,000 U of cholecalciferol (P < 0.001 and decreased to 11.1 ± 5.3 ng/mL by the 3 rd month. The higher dose of 120,000 (or 180,000 U increased mean 25(OHD to 28.9 ± 9.9 ng/mL at the end of 1 st month, declining to 17.9 ± 4.9 ng/mL (P < 0.001 at 3 months. With the subsequent 60,000 U the serum 25(OHD was 18.4 ± 3.9 ng/mL at 3 months. PTH showed a corresponding negative trend. No hypercalcemia was observed. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent amongst medical staff in Northern India. An initial dose of 120,000-180,000 U of cholecalciferol is required to elevate 25(OHD out of the deficiency range. Maintenance dose is needed at 2 months.

  15. Assessment of annual average effective dose status in the cohort of medical staff in Lithuania during 1991-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samerdokiene, Vitalija; Mastauskas, Albinas; Atkocius, Vydmantas

    2015-12-01

    The use of radiation sources for various medical purposes is closely related to irradiation of the medical staff, which causes harmful effects to health and an increased risk of cancer. In total, 1463 medical staff who have been occupationally exposed to sources of ionising radiation (IR) had been monitored. Records with annual dose measurements (N = 19 157) were collected and regularly analysed for a 23-y period: from 01 January 1991 to 31 December 2013. The collected annual average effective dose (AAED) data have been analysed according to different socio-demographic parameters and will be used in future investigation in order to assess cancer risk among medical staff occupationally exposed to sources of IR. A thorough analysis of data extracted from medical staff's dose records allows one to conclude that the average annual effective dose of Lithuanian medical staff occupationally exposed to sources of IR was consistently decreased from 1991 (1.75 mSv) to 2013 (0.27 mSv) (p < 0.0001).

  16. Dose evaluation in medical staff during diagnostics procedures in interventional radiology; Avaliacao da dose na equipe medica durante procedimentos diagnoticos de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchim Neto, Fernando A.; Alves, Allan F.F.; Rosa, Maria E.D.; Miranda, Jose R.A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias. Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica; Moura, Regina [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Cirurgia e Ortopedia; Pina, Diana R., E-mail: bacchim@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2014-08-15

    Studies show that personal dosimeters may underestimate the dose values in interventional physicians, especially in extremities and crystalline. The objective of this work was to study the radiation exposure levels of medical staff in diagnostic interventional radiology procedures. For this purpose LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) dosimeters were placed in different regions of the physician body. When comparing with reference dose levels, the maximum numbers of annual procedures were found. This information is essential to ensure the radiological protection of those professionals. (author)

  17. Automated telecommunication-based reminders and adherence with once-daily glaucoma medication dosing: the automated dosing reminder study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Michael V; Chang, Dolly S; Frazier, Travis; Plyler, Ryan; Jefferys, Joan L; Friedman, David S

    2014-07-01

    Topical glaucoma medications lower intraocular pressure and alter the course of the disease. Because adherence with glaucoma medications is a known problem, interventions are needed to help those patients who do not take their medications as prescribed. To assess the ability of an automated telecommunication-based intervention to improve adherence with glaucoma medications. We performed a prospective cohort study of medication adherence, followed by a randomized intervention for those found to be nonadherent, of individuals recruited from a university-based glaucoma subspecialty clinic. A total of 491 participants were enrolled in the initial assessment of adherence. Of those, 70 were nonadherent with their medications after 3 months of electronic monitoring and randomized to intervention and control groups. A personal health record was used to store the list of patient medications and reminder preferences. On the basis of those data, participants randomized to the intervention received daily messages, either text or voice, reminding them to take their medication. Participants randomized to the control group received usual care. Difference in adherence before and after initiation of the intervention. Using an intent-to-treat analysis, we found that the median adherence rate in the 38 participants randomized to the intervention increased from 53% to 64% (P telecommunication-based reminders linked to data in a personal health record improved adherence with once-daily glaucoma medications. This is an effective method to improve adherence that could realistically be implemented in ophthalmology practices with a minimum amount of effort on the part of the practice or the patient.

  18. Estimation of organ doses from selfreported data of medical exposures; Bestimmung von Organdosen aus selbstberichteten retrospektiven Daten zur medizinischen Strahlenexposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ningo, Anye; Fiebich, Martin; Breckow, Joachim [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz; Poettgen, Saskia; Samkange-Zeeb, Florence; Obi, Nadia; Zeeb, Hajo [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Epidemiologie und Praeventionsforschung; Merzenich, Hiltrud [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Biometrie, Epidemiologie und Informatik

    2012-07-01

    Currently there is no feasible way for systematic data collection of individual medical radiation exposure for the assessment of cancer risk. Therefore in the frame of a feasibility study, the retrospective registration of medical radiation exposure and a methodology for estimating the organ dose has been investigated. Three methods have been developed that can be implemented for the organ dose calculation depending on the data available. Firstly, the entrance dose was calculated and thereafter, using conversion factors the organ dose was calculated. The most common X-ray examinations were Dental (80%) followed by radiographs of the chest area (58%). Less than half of all participants in the study (45%) had undergone a CT scan with head examinations (21%) having the highest frequency. The frequency distribution of the effective dose for each participant showed that 90% of all participants received a dose between 0 to 0,3 mSv from X-ray and 0 - 4,5 mSv from CT examinations. Although more X-ray examinations were performed, the CT examinations accounted for the most of the radiation exposure. In principle, using self-reported data, dose assessment and dose reconstruction can be carried out taking into account the different calendar periods. (orig.)

  19. Clinical neuro-oncology formal education opportunities for medical students in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Karan S; Nicholas, Martin Kelly; Lukas, Rimas V

    2014-12-01

    To develop an understanding of the availability of the formal clinical neuro-oncology educational opportunities for medical students. The curriculum websites of all medical schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education were reviewed for the presence of clinical neuro-oncology electives as well as other relevant data. Ten (6.8%) of medical schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education offer formal neuro-oncology electives. Half are clustered in the Midwest. Forty percent are at institutions with neuro-oncology fellowships. All are at institutions with neurosurgery and neurology residency programs. Formal clinical neuro-oncology elective opportunities for medical students in the United States and Canada are limited. Additional such opportunities may be of value in the education of medical students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dosimetric systems of high dose, dose rate and dose uniformity in food and medical products; Sistemas dosimetricos de altas dosis, tasa de dosis y uniformidad de dosis en alimentos y producto medico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, J.; Vivanco, M.; Castro, E., E-mail: jvargas@ipen.gob.pe [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, San Borja, Lima (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    In the Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN) we use the chemical dosimetry Astm-E-1026 Fricke as a standard dosimetric system of reference and different routine dosimetric systems of high doses, according to the applied doses to obtain the desired effects in the treated products and the doses range determined for each type of dosimeter. Fricke dosimetry is a chemical dosimeter in aqueous solution indicating the absorbed dose by means an increase in absorbance at a specific wavelength. A calibrated spectrophotometer with controlled temperature is used to measure absorbance. The adsorbed dose range should cover from 20 to 400 Gy, the Fricke solution is extremely sensitive to organic impurities, to traces of metal ions, in preparing chemical products of reactive grade must be used and the water purity is very important. Using the referential standard dosimetric system Fricke, was determined to March 5, 2013, using the referential standard dosimetric system Astm-1026 Fricke, were irradiated in triplicate Fricke dosimeters, to 5 irradiation times (20; 30; 40; 50 and 60 seconds) and by linear regression, the dose rate of 5.400648 kGy /h was determined in the central point of the irradiation chamber (irradiator Gamma cell 220 Excel), applying the decay formula, was compared with the obtained results by manufacturers by means the same dosimetric system in the year of its manufacture, being this to the date 5.44691 kGy /h, with an error rate of 0.85. After considering that the dosimetric solution responds to the results, we proceeded to the irradiation of a sample of 200 g of cereal instant food, 2 dosimeters were placed at the lateral ends of the central position to maximum dose and 2 dosimeters in upper and lower ends as minimum dose, they were applied same irradiation times; for statistical analysis, the maximum dose rate was 6.1006 kGy /h and the minimum dose rate of 5.2185 kGy /h; with a dose uniformity of 1.16. In medical material of micro pulverized bone for

  1. Diversity of United States medical students by region compared to US census data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith MM

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mark M Smith,1 Steven H Rose,1 Darrell R Schroeder,2 Timothy R Long1 1Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA Purpose: Increasing the diversity of the United States (US physician workforce to better represent the general population has received considerable attention. The purpose of this study was to compare medical student race data to that of the US general population. We hypothesized that race demographics of medical school matriculants would reflect that of the general population. Patients and methods: Published race data from the United States Census Bureau (USCB 2010 census and the 2011 Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC allopathic medical school application and enrollment by race and ethnicity survey were analyzed and compared. Race data of enrolled medical students was compared to race data of the general population within geographic regions and subregions. Additionally, race data of medical school applicants and matriculants were compared to race data of the overall general population. Results: Race distribution within US medical schools was significantly different than race distribution for the overall, regional, and subregional populations of the US (P<0.001. Additionally, the overall race distribution of medical school applicants differed significantly to the race distribution of the general population (P<0.001. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that race demographics of US medical school applicants and matriculants are significantly different from that of the general population, and may be resultant of societal quandaries present early in formal education. Initiatives targeting underrepresented minorities at an early stage to enhance health care career interest and provide academic support and mentorship will be required to address the racial disparity that exists in US

  2. United States Army Medical Department Journal. Leadership in the Army Medical Department, October - December 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    work, The Origin of Species,’ is that the key to survival in biological evolution is the ability of a species to adapt. A species that does not adapt...attorneys, military paralegals , and civilian paralegals providing legal support throughout the AMEDD at the 8 medical centers and numerous hospitals...Army Medical Command (MEDCOM), mobilized 18 Judge Advocates and paralegals in 2007 and has continued a cycle of mobilizations of legal personnel to

  3. [Medical short stay unit for geriatric patients in the emergency department: clinical and healthcare benefits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Teresa; Hornillos, Mercedes; Rodríguez, Miriam; Martínez, Javier; Madrigal, María; Mauleón, Coro; Alvarez, Bárbara

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of comprehensive geriatric assessment and management of high-risk elders in a medical short stay unit located in the emergency department of a general hospital. We performed a descriptive, prospective study of patients admitted to the medical short stay unit for geriatric patients of the emergency department in 2006. A total of 749 patients were evaluated, with a mean (standard deviation) stay in the unit of 37 (16) h. The mean age was 86 (7) years; 57% were women, and 50% had moderate-severe physical impairment and dementia. Thirty-five percent lived in a nursing home. The most frequent reason for admission was exacerbation of chronic cardiopulmonary disease. Multiple geriatric syndromes were identified. The most frequent were immobility, pressure sores and behavioral disorders related to dementia. Seventy percent of the patients were discharged to home after being stabilized and were followed-up by the geriatric clinic and day hospital (39%), the home care medical team (11%), or the nursing home or primary care physician (20%). During the month after discharge, 17% were readmitted and 7.7% died, especially patients with more advanced age or functional impairment. After the unit was opened, admissions to the acute geriatric unit fell by 18.2%. Medical short stay units for geriatric patients in emergency departments may be useful for geriatric assessment and treatment of exacerbations of chronic diseases. These units can help to reduce the number of admissions and optimize the care provided in other ambulatory and domiciliary geriatric settings.

  4. Pediatric medication errors in the postanesthesia care unit: analysis of MEDMARX data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Christopher H; Smith, Christopher R; Newkirk, Laura E; Hicks, Rodney W

    2007-04-01

    Medication errors involving pediatric patients in the postanesthesia care unit may occur as frequently as one in every 20 medication orders and are more likely to cause harm when compared to medication errors in the overall population. Researchers examined six years of records from the MEDMARX database and used consecutive nonprobability sampling and descriptive statistics to compare medication errors in the pediatric data set to those occurring in the total population data set. Nineteen different causes of error involving 28 different products were identified. The results of the study indicate that an organization can focus on causes of errors and products involved in errors to mitigate future error occurrence.

  5. Assessing Interprofessional Teamwork in Inpatient Medical Oncology Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, A Charlotta; Callaghan, Mary; Cooper, Abby L; Brandman, James; O'Leary, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Teamwork is important to providing safe and effective care for hospitalized patients with cancer; however, few studies have evaluated teamwork in this setting. We surveyed all nurses, residents, hospitalists, and oncology physicians in oncology units at a large urban teaching hospital from September to November 2012. Respondents rated teamwork using a validated instrument (Safety Attitudes Questionnaire; scale, 0 to 100) and rated the quality of collaboration they had experienced with other professionals using a 5-point ordinal response scale (1, very low quality; 5, very high quality). Respondents also rated potential barriers to collaboration using a 4-point ordinal response scale (1, not at all a barrier; 4, major barrier). We compared ratings by professionals using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Overall, 129 (67%) of 193 eligible participants completed the survey. Teamwork scores differed across professional types, with nurses providing the lowest ratings (69.7) and residents providing the highest (81.9; ANOVA P = .01). Ratings of collaboration with nurses were high across all types of professionals. Ratings of collaboration with physicians varied significantly by professional type (P ≤ .02), with nurses giving lower ratings of collaboration with all physician types. Similarly, perceived barriers to collaboration differed by professional type, with nurses perceiving the biggest barrier to be negative attitudes regarding the importance of communication. Oncologists did not perceive any of the listed options as major barriers to collaboration. In inpatient oncology units, discrepancies exist between nurses' and physicians' ratings of teamwork and collaboration. Oncologists seem to be unaware that teamwork is suboptimal in this setting. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Key considerations for the success of Medical Education Research and Innovation units in Canada: unit director perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varpio, Lara; Bidlake, Erin; Humphrey-Murto, Sue; Sutherland, Stephanie; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2014-08-01

    Growth in the field of medical education is evidenced by the proliferation of units dedicated to advancing Medical Education Research and Innovation (MERI). While a review of the literature discovered narrative accounts of MERI unit development, we found no systematic examinations of the dimensions of and structures that facilitate the success of these units. We conducted qualitative interviews with the directors of 12 MERI units across Canada. Data were analyzed using qualitative description (Sandelowski in Res Nurs Health 23:334-340, 2000). Final analysis drew on Bourdieu's (Outline of a theory of practice. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1977; Media, culture and society: a critical reader. Sage, London, 1986; Language and symbolic power. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1991) concepts of field, habitus, and capital, and more recent research investigating the field of MERI (Albert in Acad Med 79:948-954, 2004; Albert et al. in Adv Health Sci Educ 12:103-115, 2007). When asked about the metrics by which they define their success, directors cited: teaching, faculty mentoring, building collaborations, delivering conference presentations, winning grant funding, and disseminating publications. Analyzed using Bourdieu's concepts, these metrics are discussed as forms of capital that have been legitimized in the MERI field. All directors, with the exception of one, described success as being comprised of elements (capital) at both ends of the service-research spectrum (i.e., Albert's PP-PU structure). Our analysis highlights the forms of habitus (i.e., behaviors, attitudes, demeanors) directors use to negotiate, strategize and position the unit within their local context. These findings may assist institutions in developing a new-or reorganizing an existing-MERI unit. We posit that a better understanding of these complex social structures can help units become savvy participants in the MERI field. With such insight, units can improve their academic output and

  7. [Phenylephrine dosing error in Intensive Care Unit. Case of the trimester].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A real clinical case reported to SENSAR is presented. A patient admitted to the surgical intensive care unit following a lung resection, suffered arterial hypotension. The nurse was asked to give the patient 1 mL of phenylephrine. A few seconds afterwards, the patient experienced a hypertensive crisis, which resolved spontaneously without damage. Thereafter, the nurse was interviewed and a dosing error was identified: she had mistakenly given the patient 1 mg of phenylephrine (1 mL) instead of 100 mcg (1 mL of the standard dilution, 1mg in 10 mL). The incident analysis revealed latent factors (event triggers) due to the lack of protocols and standard operating procedures, communication errors among team members (physician-nurse), suboptimal training, and underdeveloped safety culture. In order to preempt similar incidents in the future, the following actions were implemented in the surgical intensive care unit: a protocol for bolus and short lived infusions (<30 min) was developed and to close the communication gap through the adoption of communication techniques. The protocol was designed by physicians and nurses to standardize the administration of drugs with high potential for errors. To close the communication gap, repeated checks about saying and understanding was proposed ("closed loop"). Labeling syringes with the drug dilution was also recommended. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Facilitated Nurse Medication-Related Event Reporting to Improve Medication Management Quality and Safety in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Reale, Carrie; Slagle, Jason M; Anders, Shilo; Shotwell, Matthew S; Dresselhaus, Timothy; Weinger, Matthew B

    Medication safety presents an ongoing challenge for nurses working in complex, fast-paced, intensive care unit (ICU) environments. Studying ICU nurse's medication management-especially medication-related events (MREs)-provides an approach to analyze and improve medication safety and quality. The goal of this study was to explore the utility of facilitated MRE reporting in identifying system deficiencies and the relationship between MREs and nurses' work in the ICUs. We conducted 124 structured 4-hour observations of nurses in three different ICUs. Each observation included measurement of nurse's moment-to-moment activity and self-reports of workload and negative mood. The observer then obtained MRE reports from the nurse using a structured tool. The MREs were analyzed by three experts. MREs were reported in 35% of observations. The 60 total MREs included four medication errors and seven adverse drug events. Of the 49 remaining MREs, 65% were associated with negative patient impact. Task/process deficiencies were the most common contributory factor for MREs. MRE occurrence was correlated with increased total task volume. MREs also correlated with increased workload, especially during night shifts. Most of these MREs would not be captured by traditional event reporting systems. Facilitated MRE reporting provides a robust information source about potential breakdowns in medication management safety and opportunities for system improvement.

  9. Smartphone and medical related App use among medical students and junior doctors in the United Kingdom (UK: a regional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payne Karl Frederick

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smartphone usage has spread to many settings including that of healthcare with numerous potential and realised benefits. The ability to download custom-built software applications (apps has created a new wealth of clinical resources available to healthcare staff, providing evidence-based decisional tools to reduce medical errors. Previous literature has examined how smartphones can be utilised by both medical student and doctor populations, to enhance educational and workplace activities, with the potential to improve overall patient care. However, this literature has not examined smartphone acceptance and patterns of medical app usage within the student and junior doctor populations. Methods An online survey of medical student and foundation level junior doctor cohorts was undertaken within one United Kingdom healthcare region. Participants were asked whether they owned a Smartphone and if they used apps on their Smartphones to support their education and practice activities. Frequency of use and type of app used was also investigated. Open response questions explored participants’ views on apps that were desired or recommended and the characteristics of apps that were useful. Results 257 medical students and 131 junior doctors responded, equating to a response rate of 15.0% and 21.8% respectively. 79.0% (n=203/257 of medical students and 74.8% (n=98/131 of junior doctors owned a smartphone, with 56.6% (n=115/203 of students and 68.4% (n=67/98 of doctors owning an iPhone. The majority of students and doctors owned 1–5 medical related applications, with very few owning more than 10, and iPhone owners significantly more likely to own apps (Chi sq, p Conclusions This study found a high level of smartphone ownership and usage among medical students and junior doctors. Both groups endorse the development of more apps to support their education and clinical practice.

  10. Computer-delivered patient simulations in the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Gerard F; Clauser, Brian E

    2009-01-01

    To obtain a full and unrestricted license to practice medicine in the United States, students and graduates of the MD-granting US medical schools and of medical schools located outside of the United States must take and pass the United States Medical Licensing Examination. United States Medical Licensing Examination began as a series of paper-and-pencil examinations in the early 1990s and converted to computer-delivery in 1999. With this change to the computerized format came the opportunity to introduce computer-simulated patients, which had been under development at the National Board of Medical Examiners for a number of years. This testing format, called a computer-based case simulation, requires the examinee to manage a simulated patient in simulated time. The examinee can select options for history-taking and physical examination. Diagnostic studies and treatment are ordered via free-text entry, and the examinee controls the advance of simulated time and the location of the patient in the health care setting. Although the inclusion of this format has brought a number of practical, psychometric, and security challenges, its addition has allowed a significant expansion in ways to assess examinees on their diagnostic decision making and therapeutic intervention skills and on developing and implementing a reasonable patient management plan.

  11. Occupational doses due to photoneutrons in medical linear accelerators rooms; Doses ocupacionais devido a neutrons em salas de aceleradores lineares de uso medico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Alessandro Facure Neves de Salles

    2006-04-15

    Medical linear accelerators, with maximum photon energies above 10 MeV, are becoming of common use in Brazil. Although desirable in the therapeutic point of view, the increase in photon energies causes the generation of undesired neutrons, which are produced through nuclear reactions between photons and the high Z target nuclei of the materials that constitute the accelerator head. In this work, MCNP simulation was undertaken to examine the neutron equivalent doses around the accelerators head and at the entrance of medical linear accelerators treatment rooms, some of them licensed in Brazil by the National Regulatory Agency (CNEN). The simulated neutron dose equivalents varied between 2 e 26 {mu} Sv/Gy{sub RX}, and the results were compared with calculations performed with the use of some semi-empirical equations found in literature. It was found that the semi-empirical equations underestimate the simulated neutron doses in the majority of the cases, if compared to the simulated values, suggesting that these equations must be revised, due to the increasing number of high energy machines in the country. (author)

  12. Information Specificity Vulnerability: Comparison of Medication Information Flows in Different Health Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnio, Eeva; Raitoharju, Reetta

    Information on patient's medication is often vital especially when patient's condition is critical. However, the information does not yet move freely between different health care units and organizations. Before reaching the point of putting into practice any system that makes the inter-organizational medication information transmission possible, some prerequisites and characteristics of the information in different user organization should be defined. There are for instance units with different level of urgency and data/information intensity (e.g. emergency department vs. medical floor). The higher the urgency level, the more vulnerable the medication information flow is to different discontinuation situations. As a conceptual framework, a scoring system based on the asset specificity in the transaction cost theory and previous literacy on information flows of different health care units is created to define the vulnerability of the information flows. As there is a national medication database under planning, the scoring system could be used to assess the prerequisites for the medication database in Finland.

  13. Ability of Saudi mothers to appropriately and accurately use dosing devices to administer oral liquid medications to their children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almazrou S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Saja Almazrou, Hind Alsahly, Huda Alwattar, Lamya Alturki, Mona Alamri Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Background: Most liquid medications are packaged with administration devices, which may be used inappropriately or inaccurately, and sometimes are not used at all. Because of the importance of their proper use for children's health, this study was designed to assess Saudi mothers' experiences with measuring cups, syringes, and droppers for oral liquid medications; to compare accuracy of dosing across these devices; and to determine the effects of mothers' education statuses and pharmacist counseling on dosing accuracy. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study in which mothers were observed as they used a set of commonly available dosing devices which are a dosing cup, syringe, and dropper. Interviews were conducted in the outpatient pharmacy waiting area in several tertiary hospitals and primary clinics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between March and April 2013. Saudi women who were mothers of children aged 12 years old or younger and who gave their consent were eligible. Caregivers other than mothers and subjects with vision problems or cognitive/physical disabilities were excluded. We gathered demographic information such as age, number of children, and education status. Subjects were asked if they had had counseling on how to use measuring devices and which device they preferred. Then, the mothers were required to demonstrate how to measure 5 mL of paracetamol (acetaminophen syrup using a cup and a syringe and 1 mL of paracetamol syrup using a dropper. Dosing errors were evaluated visually as overdosing, underdosing, or no error (if the dose was accurate. The data were entered into Microsoft Excel and evaluated using Stata 11.1. Logistic regression was employed to determine relationships. Results: The results revealed that 58% of participants measured an accurate dose of paracetamol

  14. Study of the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose in blood volumes irradiated using a teletherapy unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goes, E.G., E-mail: eggoes@terra.com.b [Regional Blood Center of Ribeirao Preto, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Nicolucci, P.; Nali, I.C. [Physics and Mathematics Department, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Pela, C.A.; Bruco, J.L. [Physics and Mathematics Department, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Center of Instrumentation, Dosimetry and Radioprotection, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Borges, J.C. [Center of Instrumentation, Dosimetry and Radioprotection, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Covas, D.T. [Regional Blood Center of Ribeirao Preto, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Center for Cell-Based Therapy, Ribeirao Preto Medical School, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2010-06-15

    Blood irradiation can be performed using a dedicated blood irradiator or a teletherapy unit. A thermal device providing appropriate storage conditions during blood components irradiation with a teletherapy unit has been recently proposed. However, the most appropriated volume of the thermal device was not indicated. The goal of this study was to indicate the most appropriated blood volume for irradiation using a teletherapy unit in order to minimize both the dose heterogeneity in the volume and the blood irradiation time using these equipments. Theoretical and experimental methods were used to study the dose distribution in the blood volume irradiated using a linear accelerator and a cobalt-60 therapy machine. The calculation of absorbed doses in the middle plane of cylindrical acrylic volumes was accomplished by a treatment planning system. Experimentally, we also used cylindrical acrylic phantoms and thermoluminescent dosimeters to confirm the calculated doses. The data obtained were represented by isodose curves. We observed that an irradiation volume should have a height of 28 cm and a diameter of 28 cm and a height of 35 cm and a diameter of 35 cm, when the irradiation is to be performed by a linear accelerator and a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit, respectively. Calculated values of relative doses varied from 93% to 100% in the smaller volume, and from 66% to 100% in the largest one. A difference of 5.0%, approximately, was observed between calculated and experimental data. The size of these volumes permits the irradiation of blood bags in only one bath without compromising the homogeneity of the absorbed dose over the irradiated volume. Thus, these irradiation volumes can be recommend to minimize the irradiation time when a teletherapy unit is used to irradiate blood.

  15. Study of the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose in blood volumes irradiated using a teletherapy unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góes, E. G.; Nicolucci, P.; Nali, I. C.; Pelá, C. A.; Bruço, J. L.; Borges, J. C.; Covas, D. T.

    2010-06-01

    Blood irradiation can be performed using a dedicated blood irradiator or a teletherapy unit. A thermal device providing appropriate storage conditions during blood components irradiation with a teletherapy unit has been recently proposed. However, the most appropriated volume of the thermal device was not indicated. The goal of this study was to indicate the most appropriated blood volume for irradiation using a teletherapy unit in order to minimize both the dose heterogeneity in the volume and the blood irradiation time using these equipments. Theoretical and experimental methods were used to study the dose distribution in the blood volume irradiated using a linear accelerator and a cobalt-60 therapy machine. The calculation of absorbed doses in the middle plane of cylindrical acrylic volumes was accomplished by a treatment planning system. Experimentally, we also used cylindrical acrylic phantoms and thermoluminescent dosimeters to confirm the calculated doses. The data obtained were represented by isodose curves. We observed that an irradiation volume should have a height of 28 cm and a diameter of 28 cm and a height of 35 cm and a diameter of 35 cm, when the irradiation is to be performed by a linear accelerator and a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit, respectively. Calculated values of relative doses varied from 93% to 100% in the smaller volume, and from 66% to 100% in the largest one. A difference of 5.0%, approximately, was observed between calculated and experimental data. The size of these volumes permits the irradiation of blood bags in only one bath without compromising the homogeneity of the absorbed dose over the irradiated volume. Thus, these irradiation volumes can be recommend to minimize the irradiation time when a teletherapy unit is used to irradiate blood.

  16. Medication errors in the intensive care unit: literature review using the SEIPS model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Karen H

    2013-01-01

    Medication errors in intensive care units put patients at risk for injury or death every day. Safety requires an organized and systematic approach to improving the tasks, technology, environment, and organizational culture associated with medication systems. The Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety model can help leaders and health care providers understand the complicated and high-risk work associated with critical care. Using this model, the author combines a human factors approach with the well-known structure-process-outcome model of quality improvement to examine research literature. The literature review reveals that human factors, including stress, high workloads, knowledge deficits, and performance deficits, are associated with medication errors. Factors contributing to medication errors are frequent interruptions, communication problems, and poor fit of health information technology to the workflow of providers. Multifaceted medication safety interventions are needed so that human factors and system problems can be addressed simultaneously.

  17. Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury in medical, surgical, and intensive care unit: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T B Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication in hospitalized patients. There are few comparative studies on hospital-acquired AKI (HAAKI in medical, surgical, and ICU patients. This study was conducted to compare the epidemiological characteristics, clinical profiles, and outcomes of HAAKI among these three units. All adult patients (>18 years of either gender who developed AKI based on RIFLE criteria (using serum creatinine, 48 h after hospitalization were included in the study. Patients of acute on chronic renal failure and AKI in pregnancy were excluded. Incidence of HAAKI in medical, surgical, and ICU wards were 0.54%, 0.72%, and 2.2% respectively ( P < 0.0001. There was no difference in age distribution among the groups, but onset of HAAKI was earliest in the medical ward ( P = 0.001. RIFLE-R was the most common AKI in medical (39.2% and ICU (50% wards but in the surgical ward, it was RIFLE-F that was most common (52.6%. Acute tubular necrosis was more common in ICU ( P = 0.043. Most common etiology of HAAKI in medical unit was drug induced (39.2%, whereas in surgical and ICU, it was sepsis (34% and 35.2% respectively. Mortality in ICU, surgical and medical units were 73.5%, 43.42%, and 37.2%, respectively ( P = 0.003. Length of hospital stay in surgical, ICU and medical units were different ( P = 0.007. This study highlights that the characters of HAAKI are different in some aspects among different hospital settings.

  18. Noncontact Infrared-Mediated Heat Transfer During Continuous Freeze-Drying of Unit Doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bockstal, Pieter-Jan; De Meyer, Laurens; Corver, Jos; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Recently, an innovative continuous freeze-drying concept for unit doses was proposed, based on spinning the vials during freezing. An efficient heat transfer during drying is essential to continuously process these spin frozen vials. Therefore, the applicability of noncontact infrared (IR) radiation was examined. The impact of several process and formulation variables on the mass of sublimed ice after 15 min of primary drying (i.e., sublimation rate) and the total drying time was examined. Two experimental designs were performed in which electrical power to the IR heaters, distance between the IR heaters and the spin frozen vial, chamber pressure, product layer thickness, and 5 model formulations were included as factors. A near-infrared spectroscopy method was developed to determine the end point of primary and secondary drying. The sublimation rate was mainly influenced by the electrical power to the IR heaters and the distance between the IR heaters and the vial. The layer thickness had the largest effect on total drying time. The chamber pressure and the 5 model formulations had no significant impact on sublimation rate and total drying time, respectively. This study shows that IR radiation is suitable to provide the energy during the continuous processing of spin frozen vials.

  19. Over-the-counter medication patterns in households in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaghloul AA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Ashraf Ahmad Zaghloull,1 Moetaz Elsergany,2 Nagwa Abou El-Enein,1 Hamda Alsuwaidi,3 Mohamed Ayoub3 1Health Administration and Behavioral Sciences Department, High Institute of Public Health, University of Alexandria, Alexandria, Egypt; 2e-School Health and Environmental Studies, Hamdan Bin Mohamed eUniversity, Dubai, United Arab Emirates; 3College of Health Sciences, University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates. Background: Self-medication and acquisition of over-the-counter (OTC medications are emerging community health issues. Besides being a cheap alternative for treating common illnesses, the behavior entails serious ramifications, such as medication wastage, increasing pathogen resistance, and adverse drug reactions. The present study was conducted to explore the extent of OTC medications in households in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates (UAE, including native UAE and expatriate families. Methods: The study employed a population-based, cross-sectional, analytical study design. The study population included native and expatriate households residing in the Emirate of Sharjah, UAE. The snowball sampling technique was used, and the sample included a total of 335 households. Results: Expatriate households acquired more OTC medications than did native households (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=1.7. The demographic determinants for expatriate households were number of family members (aOR=1.6, age of children in the family (aOR=1.8, and annual income (aOR=0.5. Expatriate households purchased more OTC medication practices than did native households (aOR=2.2. In the statistical sense, expatriate household practices were buying medication upon relatives' advice (aOR=0.3, storage condition of medication (aOR=2.4, and disposal of expired medication (aOR=0.6. The highest percentages of OTC medications in native and expatriate households were those related to gastric and ear, nose, and throat illnesses. Conclusion: The presence of OTC medications in expatriate

  20. Estimation of immunization providers' activities cost, medication cost, and immunization dose errors cost in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-lela, Omer Qutaiba B; Bahari, Mohd Baidi; Al-abbassi, Mustafa G; Salih, Muhannad R M; Basher, Amena Y

    2012-06-01

    The immunization status of children is improved by interventions that increase community demand for compulsory and non-compulsory vaccines, one of the most important interventions related to immunization providers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the activities of immunization providers in terms of activities time and cost, to calculate the immunization doses cost, and to determine the immunization dose errors cost. Time-motion and cost analysis study design was used. Five public health clinics in Mosul-Iraq participated in the study. Fifty (50) vaccine doses were required to estimate activities time and cost. Micro-costing method was used; time and cost data were collected for each immunization-related activity performed by the clinic staff. A stopwatch was used to measure the duration of activity interactions between the parents and clinic staff. The immunization service cost was calculated by multiplying the average salary/min by activity time per minute. 528 immunization cards of Iraqi children were scanned to determine the number and the cost of immunization doses errors (extraimmunization doses and invalid doses). The average time for child registration was 6.7 min per each immunization dose, and the physician spent more than 10 min per dose. Nurses needed more than 5 min to complete child vaccination. The total cost of immunization activities was 1.67 US$ per each immunization dose. Measles vaccine (fifth dose) has a lower price (0.42 US$) than all other immunization doses. The cost of a total of 288 invalid doses was 744.55 US$ and the cost of a total of 195 extra immunization doses was 503.85 US$. The time spent on physicians' activities was longer than that spent on registrars' and nurses' activities. Physician total cost was higher than registrar cost and nurse cost. The total immunization cost will increase by about 13.3% owing to dose errors.

  1. Study on radiation dose in the medical image data display method-focus on the DICOM standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Su [Dept. of Radio-technology, Health Welfare, Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) standards are generally introduced as de facto and de jure standards in modern medical imaging devices to store and to transmit medical image information. DICOM Dose Structured Report (DICOM dose SR) is implemented to report radiation exposure information in image acquiring process. and DIOCM Modality Performed Procedure Step (DICOM MPPS) is also partly used to report this exposure with the information in its DICOM tag. This article is focused on three type of radiation exposure information of DICOM standards, 1) DICOM dose SR, 2) DICOM MPPS and 3) Radiation Exposure Monitoring(REM) profile by Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise(IHE), to study on radiation exposure reporting. Healthcare facility and its staff of medical imaging related to radiation exposure should have a deep understanding of radiation exposure, and it required a standards to enhance the quality control of medical imaging and the safety of patients and staffs. Staff member have to pay attention on radiation exposures and controlling processes from the purchasing stage of X-ray devices.

  2. Evaluation of medical devices in thoracic radiograms in intensive care unit - time to pay attention!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ana Sofia Linhares; Afonso, Maria da Graça Alves; Dinis, Mónica Ribeiro dos Santos Alves; dos Santos, Maria Cristina Granja Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify and evaluate the correct positioning of the most commonly used medical devices as visualized in thoracic radiograms of patients in the intensive care unit of our center. Methods A literature search was conducted for the criteria used to evaluate the correct positioning of medical devices on thoracic radiograms. All the thoracic radiograms performed in the intensive care unit of our center over an 18-month period were analyzed. All admissions in which at least one thoracic radiogram was performed in the intensive care unit and in which at least one medical device was identifiable in the thoracic radiogram were included. One radiogram per admission was selected for analysis. The radiograms were evaluated by an independent observer. Results Out of the 2,312 thoracic radiograms analyzed, 568 were included in this study. Several medical devices were identified, including monitoring leads, endotracheal and tracheostomy tubes, central venous catheters, pacemakers and prosthetic cardiac valves. Of the central venous catheters that were identified, 33.6% of the subclavian and 23.8% of the jugular were malpositioned. Of the endotracheal tubes, 19.9% were malpositioned, while all the tracheostomy tubes were correctly positioned. Conclusion Malpositioning of central venous catheters and endotracheal tubes is frequently identified in radiograms of patients in an intensive care unit. This is relevant because malpositioned devices may be related to adverse events. In future studies, an association between malpositioning and adverse events should be investigated. PMID:27737432

  3. Medication errors in the adult emergency unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Addis Ababa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gediwon Negash

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Incidence and types of medication errors committed in Tikur Anbesa Specialized Hospital Adult Emergency Unit were substantiated; moreover, necessary information on factors within the healthcare delivery system that predispose healthcare professionals to commit errors have been pointed, which should be addressed by healthcare professionals through multidisciplinary efforts and involvement of decision makers at national level.

  4. The Role of International Medical Graduate Psychiatrists in the United States Healthcare System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, John Robin; Cassimatis, Emmanuel G.; Opalek, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: International medical graduates (IMGs) make up a substantial proportion of the United States physician workforce, including psychiatrists in practice. The purpose of this study was to describe, based on current data, the characteristics and qualities of IMG psychiatrists who provide patient care in the US. Method: Physician data from…

  5. Association between number of doses per day, number of medications and patient's non-compliance, and frequency of readmissions in a multi-ethnic Asian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ren Toh

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Complex medication regimen (i.e. multiple medications and multiple doses per day is a statistically significant predictor of number of readmissions. Simplifying therapeutic regimens with alternatives such as longer-acting or fixed-dose combination drugs may facilitate better patient adherence and reduce costly readmissions.

  6. Doses to patients from medical X-ray examinations in the UK. 2000 review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, D.; Hillier, M.C.; Wall, B.F

    2002-07-01

    In 1992 NRPB established a National Collation Centre for measurements of doses to patients made by x-ray departments throughout the UK. This report is the second in a series of five-yearly reviews of the national patient dose database and analyses the information collected during the period January 1996 to December 2000. It includes the results of 28,000 entrance surface dose (ESD) measurements and 13,000 dose-area product (DAP) measurements for single radiographs, and 140,000 DAP measurements and 128,000 records of the fluoroscopy time for complete examinations, collected from 371 hospitals throughout the UK. Information on the patient dose distributions and exposure conditions for over 30 types of examination and radiograph is presented. National reference doses based on the rounded third quartile values of these dose distributions are recommended and are seen to be about 20% lower than corresponding values in the previous (1995) review. They have approximately halved since the original UK national reference doses were derived from a survey in the mid-1980s. In this review reference doses have been derived for a larger number of examinations on adults than previously and, for the first time, for three examinations on children, with specific values for five standard-sized patients corresponding to new born babies, 1, 5, 10 and 15 year olds. NRPB gratefully acknowledges the co-operation of hospital physicists and radiology department staff in supplying patient dose data. The continued provision of data to the National Patient Dose Database will be essential in order to monitor the progress of patient dose reduction measures in the UK and to extend and revise national reference doses in the future. (author)

  7. AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline 5.a.: Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations - Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilowitz, Jennifer B; Das, Indra J; Feygelman, Vladimir; Fraass, Benedick A; Kry, Stephen F; Marshall, Ingrid R; Mihailidis, Dimitris N; Ouhib, Zoubir; Ritter, Timothy; Snyder, Michael G; Fairobent, Lynne

    2015-09-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science, education and professional practice of medical physics. The AAPM has more than 8,000 members and is the principal organization of medical physicists in the United States. The AAPM will periodically define new practice guidelines for medical physics practice to help advance the science of medical physics and to improve the quality of service to patients throughout the United States. Existing medical physics practice guidelines will be reviewed for the purpose of revision or renewal, as appropriate, on their fifth anniversary or sooner. Each medical physics practice guideline represents a policy statement by the AAPM, has undergone a thorough consensus process in which it has been subjected to extensive review, and requires the approval of the Professional Council. The medical physics practice guidelines recognize that the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology requires specific training, skills, and techniques, as described in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice guidelines and technical standards by those entities not providing these services is not authorized. The following terms are used in the AAPM practice guidelines:• Must and Must Not: Used to indicate that adherence to the recommendation is considered necessary to conform to this practice guideline.• Should and Should Not: Used to indicate a prudent practice to which exceptions may occasionally be made in appropriate circumstances.

  8. Otolaryngology in the medical school curriculum: Current trends in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscoe, Elizabeth F; Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    To identify trends in medical school otolaryngology curriculum requirements. Survey of United States allopathic medical schools. A survey was sent to deans of curriculum at allopathic medical schools. We identified opportunities for medical students to learn basic concepts in otolaryngology during their undergraduate medical training. The opportunities were classified into preclinical and clinical as well as elective and mandatory rotations. Of the schools surveyed, 60% responded. Mean class size was 149 students. Sixty-eight percent of surveyed schools noted that 75% to 100% of their students participated in preclinical otolaryngology experiences, with 59% reporting a mandatory preclinical otolaryngology module for all students. Eighty-nine percent of schools offered otolaryngology as a clinical elective rotation, with a mean of 12 students participating yearly. Only 7% of schools required a mandatory otolaryngology clinical rotation. Our data suggest that medical students do not receive sufficient exposure to otolaryngology during medical school. Increased requirements for otolaryngology curriculum may be beneficial to all medical students, regardless of their specialty choice. NA. Laryngoscope, 00:000-000, 2016 127:346-348, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Smartphone and medical related App use among medical students and junior doctors in the United Kingdom (UK): a regional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Smartphone usage has spread to many settings including that of healthcare with numerous potential and realised benefits. The ability to download custom-built software applications (apps) has created a new wealth of clinical resources available to healthcare staff, providing evidence-based decisional tools to reduce medical errors. Previous literature has examined how smartphones can be utilised by both medical student and doctor populations, to enhance educational and workplace activities, with the potential to improve overall patient care. However, this literature has not examined smartphone acceptance and patterns of medical app usage within the student and junior doctor populations. Methods An online survey of medical student and foundation level junior doctor cohorts was undertaken within one United Kingdom healthcare region. Participants were asked whether they owned a Smartphone and if they used apps on their Smartphones to support their education and practice activities. Frequency of use and type of app used was also investigated. Open response questions explored participants’ views on apps that were desired or recommended and the characteristics of apps that were useful. Results 257 medical students and 131 junior doctors responded, equating to a response rate of 15.0% and 21.8% respectively. 79.0% (n=203/257) of medical students and 74.8% (n=98/131) of junior doctors owned a smartphone, with 56.6% (n=115/203) of students and 68.4% (n=67/98) of doctors owning an iPhone. The majority of students and doctors owned 1–5 medical related applications, with very few owning more than 10, and iPhone owners significantly more likely to own apps (Chi sq, papp usage of several times a day. Over 24hours apps were used for between 1–30 minutes for students and 1–20 minutes for doctors, students used disease diagnosis/management and drug reference apps, with doctors favouring clinical score/calculator apps. Conclusions This study found a high level of

  10. Range and modulation dependencies for proton beam dose per monitor unit calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Schreuder, Andries N.; Moyers, Michael F.; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of dose per monitor unit (D∕MU) are required in addition to measurements to increase patient safety in the clinical practice of proton radiotherapy. As in conventional photon and electron therapy, the D∕MU depends on several factors. This study focused on obtaining range and modulation dependence factors used in D∕MU calculations for the double scattered proton beam line at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute. Three dependencies on range and one dependency on modulation were found. A carefully selected set of measurements was performed to discern these individual dependencies. Dependencies on range were due to: (1) the stopping power of the protons passing through the monitor chamber; (2) the reduction of proton fluence due to nuclear interactions within the patient; and (3) the variation of proton fluence passing through the monitor chamber due to different source-to-axis distances (SADs) for different beam ranges. Different SADs are produced by reconfigurations of beamline elements to provide different field sizes and ranges. The SAD effect on the D∕MU varies smoothly as the beam range is varied, except at the beam range for which the first scatterers are exchanged and relocated to accommodate low and high beam ranges. A geometry factor was devised to model the SAD variation effect on the D∕MU. The measured D∕MU variation as a function of range can be predicted within 1% using the three modeled dependencies on range. Investigation of modulated beams showed that an analytical formula can predict the D∕MU dependency as a function of modulation to within 1.5%. Special attention must be applied when measuring the D∕MU dependence on modulation to avoid interplay between range and SAD effects. PMID:19292004

  11. Range and modulation dependencies for proton beam dose per monitor unit calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Schreuder, Andries N.; Moyers, Michael F.; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E. [Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and University Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, Inc., Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); Proton Therapy, Inc., Colton, California 92324 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum, Universitaetsklinikum, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45147 Essen (Germany); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Calculations of dose per monitor unit (D/MU) are required in addition to measurements to increase patient safety in the clinical practice of proton radiotherapy. As in conventional photon and electron therapy, the D/MU depends on several factors. This study focused on obtaining range and modulation dependence factors used in D/MU calculations for the double scattered proton beam line at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute. Three dependencies on range and one dependency on modulation were found. A carefully selected set of measurements was performed to discern these individual dependencies. Dependencies on range were due to: (1) the stopping power of the protons passing through the monitor chamber; (2) the reduction of proton fluence due to nuclear interactions within the patient; and (3) the variation of proton fluence passing through the monitor chamber due to different source-to-axis distances (SADs) for different beam ranges. Different SADs are produced by reconfigurations of beamline elements to provide different field sizes and ranges. The SAD effect on the D/MU varies smoothly as the beam range is varied, except at the beam range for which the first scatterers are exchanged and relocated to accommodate low and high beam ranges. A geometry factor was devised to model the SAD variation effect on the D/MU. The measured D/MU variation as a function of range can be predicted within 1% using the three modeled dependencies on range. Investigation of modulated beams showed that an analytical formula can predict the D/MU dependency as a function of modulation to within 1.5%. Special attention must be applied when measuring the D/MU dependence on modulation to avoid interplay between range and SAD effects.

  12. Measurement of {sup 131}I activity in thyroid of nuclear medical staff and internal dose assessment in a Polish nuclear medical hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brudecki, K.; Mietelski, J.W. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Kowalska, A.; Szczodry, A. [Holy Cross Cancer Center, Department of Endocrinology and Nuclear Medicine, Kielce (Poland); Zagrodzki, P. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Jagiellonian University, Department of Food Chemistry and Nutrition, Medical College, Krakow (Poland); Mroz, T. [Pedagogical University in Cracow, Krakow (Poland); Janowski, P. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2017-03-15

    This paper presents results of {sup 131}I thyroid activity measurements in 30 members of the nuclear medicine personnel of the Department of Endocrinology and Nuclear Medicine Holy Cross Cancer Centre in Kielce, Poland. A whole-body spectrometer equipped with two semiconductor gamma radiation detectors served as the basic research instrument. In ten out of 30 examined staff members, the determined {sup 131}I activity was found to be above the detection limit (DL = 5 Bq of {sup 131}I in the thyroid). The measured activities ranged from (5 ± 2) Bq to (217 ± 56) Bq. The highest activities in thyroids were detected for technical and cleaning personnel, whereas the lowest values were recorded for medical doctors. Having measured the activities, an attempt has been made to estimate the corresponding annual effective doses, which were found to range from 0.02 to 0.8 mSv. The highest annual equivalent doses have been found for thyroid, ranging from 0.4 to 15.4 mSv, detected for a cleaner and a technician, respectively. The maximum estimated effective dose corresponds to 32% of the annual background dose in Poland, and to circa 4% of the annual limit for the effective dose due to occupational exposure of 20 mSv per year, which is in compliance with the value recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. (orig.)

  13. A snapshot of patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations at an Australian radiology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N; Mohacsy, A; Connell, D A; Schneider, M E

    2017-05-01

    Cumulative radiation exposure is linked to increasing the lifetime attributable risk of cancer. To avoid unnecessary radiation exposure and facilitate shared decision making, patients should be aware of these issues. This paper examines patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations. Consecutive patients attending a private radiology clinic over a nine week period in 2014 in Metropolitan Melbourne were surveyed while waiting to undergo an imaging examination. Patients who were under 18 years of age, did not speak English and/or were referred for interventional imaging procedures were excluded from participation. Survey questions addressed patients' awareness of radiation dose associated with various imaging modalities' and patients' experience and preferences regarding communication of information about radiation. Data was analysed using SPSS (Ver 20.1). A total of 242 surveys were completed. Most participants were male (143/239, 59.8%) and aged between 33 and 52 years (109/242, 45%). Over half of participants were not concerned about radiation from medical imaging (130/238, 54.6%). Only a third of participants (80/234, 34.2%) correctly reported that CT has a higher radiation dose than X-ray. Very few participants correctly identified mammography, DEXA, PET and PET/CT as radiation emitting examinations. The majority of participants (202/236, 85.6%) indicated that they were not informed about radiation dose and risks by their referring doctor in advance. This paper provides information relevant to a single private radiology clinic in Australia. Nevertheless, our results have shown that patients presenting for medical imaging have little awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with these examinations and received little information by their referring physicians or staff at the radiology clinic. Copyright © 2016 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Maternal high-dose folic acid during pregnancy and asthma medication in the offspring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zetstra-van der Woude, Priscilla A.; De Walle, Hermien E. K.; Hoek, Annemieke; Bos, H. Jens; Boezen, H. Marike; Koppelman, Gerhard H.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Scholtens, Salome

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Low-dose folic acid supplementation (0.5 mg) taken during pregnancy has been associated with an increased risk for childhood asthma. The effect of high-dose folic acid (5 mg) advised to women at risk for having a child with neural tube defect has not been assessed so far. Our aim was to inve

  15. Comparison of United States and Canadian Glaucoma Medication Costs and Price Change from 2006 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B. Schlenker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Compare glaucoma medication costs between the United States (USA and Canada. Methods. We modelled glaucoma brand name and generic medication annual costs in the USA and Canada based on October 2013 Costco prices and previously reported bottle overfill rates, drops per mL, and wastage adjustment. We also calculated real wholesale price changes from 2006 to 2013 based on the Average Wholesale Price (USA and the Ontario Drug Benefit Price (Canada. Results. US brand name medication costs were on average 4x more than Canadian medication costs (range: 1.9x–6.9x, averaging a cost difference of $859 annually. US generic costs were on average the same as Canadian costs, though variation exists. US brand name wholesale prices increased from 2006 to 2013 more than Canadian prices (US range: 29%–349%; Canadian range: 9%–16%. US generic wholesale prices increased modestly (US range: −23%–58%, and Canadian wholesale prices decreased (Canadian range: −38%–0%. Conclusions. US brand name glaucoma medications are more expensive than Canadian medications, though generic costs are similar (with some variation. The real prices of brand name medications increased more in the USA than in Canada. Generic price changes were more modest, with real prices actually decreasing in Canada.

  16. Formation of Medical Units in Response to Epidemics in the Australian Imperial Force in Palestine 1918

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. G Dennis Shanks MD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the closing days of the First World War, British cavalry operations defeated the Turkish Armies in Palestine. Australian Light Horse Regiments as part of the Australian Imperial Forces (AIF were prominent in the capture of Amman, Beirut and Damascus. Epidemic infectious diseases were part of the severe desert environment faced by soldiers in the Middle East. Cholera and dysentery epidemics required reformation of medical units to emphasize mobility in an austere environment. A large epidemic of falciparum malaria coinciding with pandemic influenza shut down military operations and caused many deaths in late 1918. Three separate military medical units were formed in Egypt to address epidemic infectious diseases during mobile operations in the desert: ANZAC Field Laboratory, 5th Malaria Diagnosis Station and 7th Mobile Sanitary Section. Laboratory and preventive medicine units were critical to the military’s ability to conduct operations in the Middle East in 1918 and are likely to become vital for future missions in developing countries. As was the case in 1918, military medical units may have to be acutely restructured to control infectious disease outbreaks

  17. United States academic medical centers: priorities and challenges amid market transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Irene M; Anason, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    United States academic medical centers (AMCs) have upheld their long-standing reputation for excellence by teaching and training the next generation of physicians, supporting medical research, providing world-class medical care, and offering breakthrough treatments for highly complex medical cases. In recent years, the pace and direction of change reshaping the American health care industry has created a set of new and profound challenges that AMC leaders must address in order to sustain their institutions. University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of 116 leading nonprofit academic medical centers and 276 of their affiliated hospitals, all of which are focused on delivering world-class patient care. Formed in 1984, UHC fosters collaboration with and among its members through its renowned programs and services in the areas of comparative data and analytics, performance improvement, supply chain management, strategic research, and public policy. Each year, UHC surveys the executives of its member institutions to understand the issues they view as most critical to sustaining the viability and success of their organizations. The results of UHC's most recent 2011 member survey, coupled with a 2012 Strategic Health Perspectives Harris Interactive presentation, based in parton surveys of major health care industry stakeholders reveal the most important and relevant issues and opportunities that hospital leaders face today, as the United States health care delivery system undergoes a period of unprecedented transformation.

  18. Hounsfield units variations. Impact on CT-density based conversion tables and their effects on dose distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurl, B.; Winkler, P.; Kapp, K.S. [University Medical School of Graz, Comprehensive Cancer Center Graz, Department of Therapeutic Radiotherapy and Oncology, Graz (Austria); Tiefling, R.; Kindl, P. [University of Technology, Institute of Materials Physics, Graz (Austria)

    2014-01-15

    Determination of dose error margins in radiation therapy planning due to variations in Hounsfield Units (HU) values dependent on the use of different CT scanning protocols. Based on a series of different CT scanning protocols used in clinical practice, conversion tables for radiation dose calculations were generated and subsequently tested on a phantom. These tables were then used to recalculate the radiation therapy plans of 28 real patients after an incorrect scanning protocol had inadvertently been used for these patients. Different CT parameter settings resulted in errors of HU values of up to 2.6 % for densities of < 1.1 g/cm{sup 3}, but up to 25.6 % for densities of > 1.1 g/cm{sup 3}. The largest errors were associated with changes in the tube voltage. Tests on a virtual water phantom with layers of variable thickness and density revealed a sawtooth-shaped curve for the increase of dose differences from 0.3 to 0.6 % and 1.5 % at layer thicknesses of 1, 3, and 7 cm, respectively. Use of a beam hardening filter resulted in a reference dose difference of 0.6 % in response to a density change of 5 %. The recalculation of data from 28 patients who received radiation therapy to the head revealed an overdose of 1.3 ± 0.4 % to the bone and 0.7 ± 0.1 % to brain tissue. On average, therefore, one monitor unit (range 0-3 MU) per 100 MU more than the correct dose had been given. Use of different CT scanning protocols leads to variations of up to 20 % in the HU values. This can result in a mean systematic dose error of 1.5 %. Specific conversion tables and automatic CT scanning protocol recognition could reduce dose errors of these types. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W. L.; Poston, J. W.; Warner, G. G.

    1978-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which uses Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms.

  20. Doses to patients from medical X-ray examinations in the UK. 2000 review

    CERN Document Server

    Hart, D; Wall, B F

    2002-01-01

    In 1992 NRPB established a National Collation Centre for measurements of doses to patients made by x-ray departments throughout the UK. This report is the second in a series of five-yearly reviews of the national patient dose database and analyses the information collected during the period January 1996 to December 2000. It includes the results of 28,000 entrance surface dose (ESD) measurements and 13,000 dose-area product (DAP) measurements for single radiographs, and 140,000 DAP measurements and 128,000 records of the fluoroscopy time for complete examinations, collected from 371 hospitals throughout the UK. Information on the patient dose distributions and exposure conditions for over 30 types of examination and radiograph is presented. National reference doses based on the rounded third quartile values of these dose distributions are recommended and are seen to be about 20% lower than corresponding values in the previous (1995) review. They have approximately halved since the original UK national referenc...

  1. Neutron dose rate for {sup 252} Cf AT source in medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, L.; Balcazar, M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Azorin, J. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Francois, J.L. [FI-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The AAPM TG-43 modified protocol was used for the calculation of the neutron dose rate of {sup 252}Cf sources for two tissue substitute materials, five normal tissues and six tumours. The {sup 252}Cf AT source model was simulated using the Monte Carlo MCNPX code in spherical geometry for the following factors: a) neutron air kerma strength conversion factor, b) dose rate constant, c) radial dose function, d) geometry factor, e) anisotropy function and f) neutron dose rate. The calculated dose rate in water at 1 cm and 90 degrees from the source long axis, using the Watt fission spectrum, was D{sub n}(r{sub 0}, {theta}{sub 0})= 1.9160 cGy/h-{mu}g. When this value is compared with Rivard et al. calculation using MCNP4B code, 1.8730 cGy/h-{mu}g, a difference of 2.30% is obtained. The results for the reference neutron dose rate in other media show how small variations in the elemental composition between the tissues and malignant tumours, produce variations in the neutron dose rate up to 12.25%. (Author)

  2. E-Cigarette Topics Shared by Medical Professionals: A Comparison of Tweets from the United States and United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Lazard, Allison J; Wilcox, Gary B

    2017-02-01

    Medical professionals are now relying on social media platforms like Twitter to express their recommendations for the use or avoidance of products like electronic cigarettes (e-cigs), which may have long-term health consequences for users. The goal of this study is to compare how physicians from the United States and the United Kingdom talk about e-cigs on Twitter and identify the topics that these groups perceive as salient. Comparing tweets from the U.S. and U.K. will allow for a better understanding of how medical professionals from these countries differ in their attitudes toward e-cigs. This information can be also used to inform policies designed to regulate the use of e-cigs. Using a text-mining program, we analyzed approximately 3,800 original tweets sent by physicians from the U.S. and the U.K. within a 1-year time span (June 2015 through June 2016). The program clustered the tweets by topics, which allowed us to categorize the topics by importance. Both sets of tweets contained debates about the degree to which e-cigs pose a threat to health, but the U.S. tweets emphasized the dangers of e-cig use for teens, while the U.K. tweets focused more on the potential that e-cigs have to be used as a smoking cessation aid. Doctors are using Twitter to share timely information about the potential risks, benefits, and regulations associated with e-cigs. Evaluating these tweets allows researchers to collect information about topics that doctors find important and make comparisons about how medical professionals from the U.S. and the U.K. regard e-cigs.

  3. Academic medicine amenities unit: developing a model to integrate academic medical care with luxury hotel services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David W; Kagan, Sarah H; Abramson, Kelly Brennen; Boberick, Cheryl; Kaiser, Larry R

    2009-02-01

    The interface between established values of academic medicine and the trend toward inpatient amenities units requires close examination. Opinions of such units can be polarized, reflecting traditional reservations about the ethical dilemma of offering exclusive services only to an elite patient group. An amenities unit was developed at the University of Pennsylvania Health System in 2007, using an approach that integrated academic medicine values with the benefits of philanthropy and service excellence to make amenities unit services available to all patients. Given inherent internal political concerns, a broadly based steering committee of academic and hospital leadership was developed. An academically appropriate model was conceived, anchored by four principles: (1) integration of academic values, (2) interdisciplinary senior leadership, (3) service excellence, and (4) recalibrated occupancy expectations based on multiple revenue streams. Foremost is ensuring the same health care is afforded all patients throughout the hospital, thereby overcoming ethical challenges and optimizing teaching experiences. Service excellence frames the service ethic for all staff, and this, in addition to luxury hotel-style amenities, differentiates the style and feel of the unit from others in the hospital. Recalibrated occupancy creates program viability given revenue streams redefined to encompass gifts and patient revenue, including both reimbursement and self-pay. The medical-surgical amenities patient-care unit has enjoyed a successful first year and a growing stream of returning patients and admitting physicians. Implications for other academic medical centers include opportunities to extrapolate service excellence throughout the hospital and to cultivate philanthropy to benefit services throughout the medical center.

  4. Medical Student Core Clinical Ultrasound Milestones: A Consensus Among Directors in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Vi Am; Lakoff, Daniel; Hess, Jamie; Bahner, David P; Hoppmann, Richard; Blaivas, Michael; Pellerito, John S; Abuhamad, Alfred; Khandelwal, Sorabh

    2016-02-01

    Many medical schools are implementing point-of-care ultrasound in their curricula to help augment teaching of the physical examination, anatomy, and ultimately clinical management. However, point-of-care ultrasound milestones for medical students remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to formulate a consensus on core medical student clinical point-of-care ultrasound milestones across allopathic and osteopathic medical schools in the United States. Directors who are leading the integration of ultrasound in medical education (USMED) at their respective institutions were surveyed. An initial list of 205 potential clinical ultrasound milestones was developed through a literature review. An expert panel consisting of 34 USMED directors across the United States was used to produce consensus on clinical ultrasound milestones through 2 rounds of a modified Delphi technique, an established anonymous process to obtain consensus through multiple rounds of quantitative questionnaires. There was a 100% response rate from the 34 USMED directors in both rounds 1 and 2 of the modified Delphi protocol. After the first round, 2 milestones were revised to improve clarity, and 9 were added on the basis of comments from the USMED directors, resulting in 214 milestones forwarded to round 2. After the second round, only 90 milestones were found to have a high level of agreement and were included in the final medical student core clinical ultrasound milestones. This study established 90 core clinical milestones that all graduating medical students should obtain before graduation, based on consensus from 34 USMED directors. These core milestones can serve as a guide for curriculum deans who are initiating ultrasound curricula at their institutions. The exact method of implementation and competency assessment needs further investigation. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  5. Radiation protection: Radiation dose units and fundamentals. Correct use of radiation dose units, measurements, risk assessment; Dosisbegriffe und Grundlagen im Strahlenschutz. Dosisbegriffe richtig anwenden, Messgroessen bestimmen, Risiken bewerten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkerts, K.H.; Wolf, H.

    2005-07-01

    Radiation protection intends to prevent radiation damage by appropriate staff-related and technical measures in accordance with the specifications of the German X-Ray Ordinance (RoV) and Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrlSchV) and in agreement with the ICRLP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). They require that radiation use must be justified, exposure conditions must be optimised, and exposure times must be limited to the shortest time necessary. In practical use, this requires considerable practical and theoretical knowledge from the user concerning the physical properties of radiation sources, interactions with tissue and matter of different types of radiation, and biological effects of radiation. National and international organizations and committees have specified the knowledge which a user must have as follows: Physical fundamentals of radiation protection; Measuring quantities and specified standard units; Organisational and constructional radiation protection; Legal knowledge. (orig.)

  6. Comparison of dietetics service delivery (demand and determinants within two Australian Medical Assessment and Planning Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela P Vivanti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims Assessment and Planning Units have increased globally however, models of care literature is limited. With high malnutrition prevalence amongst ageing populations, this case report identifies demands for dietetic services. Methods Descriptive data compared and contrasted two service including medical models, eligibility criteria, malnutrition screening, dietetic services, clinical follow-up, and team composition. Results High malnutrition prevalence (17 per cent, 31 per cent was evident with different screening approaches successfully implemented. Both units favoured rapid assessment and intervention. Conclusion Dietetic expertise was required for malnutrition assessment, and ongoing management in acute or community setting as determined by differing health-care system arrangements

  7. a protocol for setting dose reference level for medical radiography in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    radiation safety principle of justification of practice and optimization of protection ... A similar national survey by the Food and .... Zealand; baseline patient dose in Malaysia and guidance ... that safety standards are only effective however if they.

  8. Pediatricians' awareness of diagnostic medical radiation effects and doses: are the latest efforts paying off?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ayse Seçil Eksioglu; Çigdem Üner

    .... We assessed the current understanding of radiation doses and risks among a sample group of pediatricians and evaluated whether the latest efforts to improve radiation awareness affected the results...

  9. Measurement and analysis of the field dose using cobalt-60 therapy unit%钴-60治疗机射野剂量的测量分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗利; 李新民

    2012-01-01

    目的 通过测量钻-60治疗机在射野内的输出剂量率及其分布,获得当前剂量率的大小,并分析剂量分布的均匀性包括射野平坦度和对称性,以此来指导临床肿瘤放射治疗和放射医学实验.方法 用指形电离室剂量计在源皮距80 cm处对20 cm×20 cm射野Cross-Plane和In-Plane方向取点测量,通过数据分析来评估钴-60治疗机的剂量率和射野内剂量的均匀性.结果 得到5个方形野内当前的平均剂量率,可提供给使用者作为参考数据.钴-60治疗机的平坦度与对称性标准要求偏差±3%以内,分析结果基本符合.结论 该钴-60治疗机的射野剂量分布较均匀,对肿瘤治疗或者放射医学实验的影响较小.%Objective Measuring the field dose rate of cobalt-60 therapy unit to obtain the current dose rate and analyse the uniformity, including flatness and symmetry, of the dose distribution. Then the data can be used as guidance in tumor radiation therapy and radiation medical experiment. Methods U-sing thimble chamber to measure dose rate of radiation field(20 cm ×20 cm) at 80cm of source skin distance, including Cross-Plane and In-Plane direction, and analyse the flatness and symmetry. Results Five current mean dose rates of five square fields were obtained as user' s reference data. According to the tolerant deviation ( ±3% ) , the analysis results showed that the deviation accorded with the criterion basically. Conclusion It can be thought that,the dose distribution of radiation field is uniform. It has little influence on tumor therapy or radiation medical experiment.

  10. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. July-September 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    virus antigens were detected in hair follicles of nuchal skin biopsy specimens by direct immunofl uorescence, and rabies viral RNA was found in...be reprinted if credit is given to the author(s). OFFICIAL DISTRIBUTION: This publication is targeted to US Army Medical Department units and...Louis, MO: Saunders/Elsevier; 2006:676- 681. Godfrey MER. Non- target and secondary poison-24. ing hazards of “second generation” anticoagulants

  11. How to assess success of treatment when using multiple doses: the case of misoprostol for medical abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuc, Armando H; Shah, Iqbal H; Ali, Moazzam; Diaz-Olavarrieta, Claudia; Temmerman, Marleen

    2015-11-07

    The assessment of treatment success in clinical trials when multiple (repeated) doses (courses) are involved is quite common, for example, in the case of infertility treatment with assisted reproductive technology (ART), and medical abortion using misoprostol alone or in combination with mifepristone. Under these or similar circumstances, most researchers assess success using binomial proportions after a certain number of consecutive doses, and some have used survival analysis. In this paper we discuss the main problems in using binomial proportions to summarize (the overall) efficacy after two or more consecutive doses of the relevant treatment, particularly for the case of misoprostol in medical abortion studies. We later discuss why the survival analysis is best suited under these circumstances, and illustrate this by using simulated data. The formulas required for the binomial proportion and survival analysis (without and with competing risks) approaches are summarized and analytically compared. Additionally, numerical results are computed and compared between the two approaches, for several theoretical scenarios. The main conceptual limitations of the binomial proportion approach are identified and discussed, caused mainly by the presence of censoring and competing risks, and it is demonstrated how survival analysis can solve these problems. In general, the binomial proportion approach tends to underestimate the "real" success rate, and tends to overestimate the corresponding standard error. Depending on the rates of censored observations or competing events between repeated doses of the treatment, the bias of the binomial proportion approach as compared to the survival analysis approaches varies; however, the use of the binomial approach is unjustified as the survival analysis options are well known and available in multiple statistical packages. Our conclusions also apply to other situations where success is estimated after multiple (repeated) doses (courses

  12. Singly-qualified medical senior house officer in oral and maxillofacial surgery: perspectives from a unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Kohmal; Bhatti, Nabeel; Bridle, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Despite constituting a minority of senior house officers (SHO) in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS), the number of singly-qualified medical trainees is growing. We describe the experience of a singly qualified medical trainee in OMFS and the unique benefits and opportunities for potential trainees and the department. Overall, the advantages of synergistic training outweigh any deficiencies in knowledge, and in our experience, having both medical and dental trainees in our unit has maximised training opportunities and provided a more holistic approach to patient care. Increased exposure to conditions in the head and neck also benefits trainees who wish to pursue careers in other specialties such as ear, nose, and throat (ENT), neurosurgery, ophthalmology, and plastic surgery. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Focused Acute Medicine Ultrasound (FAMUS) - point of care ultrasound for the Acute Medical Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Nicholas; Dachsel, Martin; Matsa, Ramprasad; Tabiowo, Eugene; Walden, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Point of care ultrasound (POCU) is becoming increasingly popular as an extension to clinical examination techniques. Specific POCU training pathways have been developed in specialties such as Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine (CORE Emergency Ultrasound and Core UltraSound Intensive Care, for example), but until this time there has not been a curriculum for the acutely unwell medical patient outside of Critical Care. We describe the development of Focused Acute Medicine Ultrasound (FAMUS), a curriculum designed specifically for the Acute Physician to learn ultrasound techniques to aid in the management of the unwell adult patient. We detail both the outline of the curriculum and the process involved for a candidate to achieve FAMUS accreditation. It is anticipated this will appeal to both Acute Medical Unit (AMU) clinicians and general physicians who deal with the unwell or deteriorating medical or surgical patient. In time, the aspiration is for FAMUS to become a core part of the AIM curriculum.

  14. Development and Evaluation of the Habitat Demonstration Unit Medical Operations Workstation and Opportunities for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Robert L., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    As NASA develops missions to leave Earth orbit and explore distant destinations (Mars, Moon, Asteroids) it is necessary to rethink human spaceflight paradigms in the life sciences. Standards developed for low earth orbit human spaceflight may not be fully applicable and in-space research may be required to develop new standards. Preventative and emergency medical care may require new capabilities never before used in space. Due to spacecraft volume limitations, this work area may also be shared with various animal and plant life science research. This paper explores the prototype Medical Operations Workstation within the NASA Habitat Demonstration Unit and discusses some of the lessons learned from field analogue missions involving the workstation. Keywords: Exploration, medical, health, crew, injury emergency, biology, animal, plant, science, preventative, emergency.

  15. Assessment of the image contrast improvement and dose reduction in mammography with synchrotron radiation compared to standard units

    CERN Document Server

    Moeckli, R; Fiedler, S; Pachoud, M; Hessler, C; Meuli, R; Valley, J F

    2001-01-01

    An objective method was used to evaluate image quality and dose in mammography with synchrotron radiation and to compare them to standard units. It was performed systematically in the energy range of interest for mammography through the evaluation of the contrast and the measurement of the mean glandular dose. Synchrotron radiation measurements were performed at the ESRF and a slit was placed between the test object and the screen-film system in order to reduce scatter. The conventional films were obtained on mammography units with an anti-scatter grid. In a recent paper, it was shown that the use of synchrotron radiation leads to a noticeable improvement of the image quality-dose relationship (Moeckli et al. Phys. Med. Biol. 45(12)3509). The reason of that enhancement is partly due to the monochromaticity of the synchrotron beam and partly due to the use of a slit instead of a grid. The dose reduction with synchrotron radiation can be attributed to a better X-ray total transmission of the slit and the contra...

  16. Exposure Scenarios and Unit Dose Factors for the Hanford Immobilized Low Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RITTMANN, P.D.

    1999-12-29

    Exposure scenarios are defined to identify potential pathways and combinations of pathways that could lead to radiation exposure from immobilized tank waste. Appropriate data and models are selected to permit calculation of dose factors for each exposure

  17. Outcomes of Emergency Medical Patients Admitted to an Intermediate Care Unit With Detailed Admission Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Catherine E; Sahetya, Sarina K; Bradsher, Robert W; Scholten, Eric L; Bain, William; Siddique, Shazia M; Hager, David N

    2017-01-01

    An important, but not well characterized, population receiving intermediate care is that of medical patients admitted directly from the emergency department. To characterize emergency medical patients and their outcomes when admitted to an intermediate care unit with clearly defined admission guidelines. Demographic data, admitting diagnoses, illness severity, comorbid conditions, lengths of stay, and hospital mortality were characterized for all emergency medical patients admitted directly to an intermediate care unit from July through December 2012. A total of 317 unique patients were admitted (mean age, 54 [SD, 16] years). Most patients were admitted with respiratory (26.5%) or cardiac (17.0%) syndromes. The mean (SD) Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score version II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score version II, and Charlson Comorbidity Index were 15.6 (6.5), 20.7 (11.8), and 2.7 (2.3), respectively. Severity of illness and length of stay were significantly different for patients who required intensive care within 24 hours of admission (n = 16) or later (n = 25), patients who continued with inter mediate care for more than 24 hours (n = 247), and patients who were downgraded or discharged in less than 24 hours (n = 29). Overall hospital mortality was 4.4% (14 deaths). Emergency medical patients with moderate severity of illness and comorbidity can be admitted to an intermediate level of care with relatively infrequent transfer to intensive care and relatively low mortality. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  18. Pharmacist Remote Review of Medication Prescriptions for Appropriateness in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran Lazaryan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: One aspect of ordering and prescribing medication is the requirement for a trained professional to review medication orders or prescriptions for appropriateness. In practice, this review process is usually performed by a clinical pharmacist. However, in many medical centers there is a shortage of staff and a pharmacist is not always available.Objective: To determine whether remote review of medication orders by a pharmacist is a plausible method in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU. Methods: A pharmacist from the pharmacy department reviewed medication orders of patients admitted to our PICU over a 7-month period for appropriateness. A special form for medical orders was filled in and sent to the physician in the PICU, who replied informing whether the recommendation had been accepted. The time spent by the pharmacist for this activity was recorded.Results: The review time for one medical record was 8.9 (95% CI, 6.9-10.9 minutes. Every additional drug prescribed increased the total review time by 0.8 (95% CI, 0.45-1.11 minutes. The pharmacist filled in 186 forms on 117 admissions for 109 children. The median review time was 15 (12.8-18.8 and 12 (9-15 minutes, respectively, for patients with psychiatric-neurologic disorders compared to those without (p=0.032. Usually, a daily workload of 240 minutes was needed for the pharmacist accompanying the round in contrast to 108 minutes per day needed to review all the medical records in 95% of the cases. The physician accepted 51.2%, rejected 11.9% and made no comment on 36.9% of the recommendations. Conclusion: Hospitals facing budget shortages can carry out focused remote reviews of prescriptions by the pharmacist.

  19. Measurements of neutron effective doses and attenuation lengths for shielding materials at the heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Noda, Yutaka; Sato, Yukio; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Murakami, Takeshi

    2005-05-01

    The effective doses and attenuation lengths for concrete and iron were measured for the design of heavy ion facilities. Neutrons were produced through the reaction of copper, carbon, and lead bombarded by carbon ions at 230 and 400 MeV.A, neon ions at 400 and 600 MeV.A, and silicon ions at 600 and 800 MeV.A. The detectors used were a Linus and a Andersson-Braun-type rem counter and a detector based on the activation of a plastic scintillator. Representative effective dose rates (in units of 10(-8) microSv h(-1) pps(-1) at 1 m from the incident target surface, where pps means particles per second) and the attenuation lengths (in units of m) were 9.4 x 10(4), 0.46 for carbon ions at 230 MeV.A; 8.9 x 10(5), 0.48 for carbon ions at 400 MeV.A; 9.3 x 10(5), 0.48 for neon ions at 400 MeV.A; 3.8 x 10(6), 0.50 for neon ions at 600 MeV.A; 3.9 x 10(6), 0.50 for silicon ions at 600 MeV.A; and 1.1 x 10(7), 0.51 for silicon ions at 800 MeV.A. The attenuation provided by an iron plate approximately 20 cm thick (nearly equal to the attenuation length) corresponded to that of a 50-cm block of concrete in the present energy range. Miscellaneous results, such as the angular distributions of the neutron effective dose, narrow beam attenuation experiments, decay of gamma-ray doses after the bombardment of targets, doses around an irradiation room, order effects in the multi-layer (concrete and iron) shielding, the doses from different targets, the doses measured with a scintillator activation detector, the gamma-ray doses out of walls and the ratio of the response between the Andersson-Braun-type and the Linus rem counters are also reported.

  20. Medical Device Regulation: A Comparison of the United States and the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maak, Travis G; Wylie, James D

    2016-08-01

    Medical device regulation is a controversial topic in both the United States and the European Union. Many physicians and innovators in the United States cite a restrictive US FDA regulatory process as the reason for earlier and more rapid clinical advances in Europe. The FDA approval process mandates that a device be proved efficacious compared with a control or be substantially equivalent to a predicate device, whereas the European Union approval process mandates that the device perform its intended function. Stringent, peer-reviewed safety data have not been reported. However, after recent high-profile device failures, political pressure in both the United States and the European Union has favored more restrictive approval processes. Substantial reforms of the European Union process within the next 5 to 10 years will result in a more stringent approach to device regulation, similar to that of the FDA. Changes in the FDA regulatory process have been suggested but are not imminent.

  1. An effective system to measure and report quality indicators in acute medical units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, J; Barton, L; Harrison, A; Roper, N

    2012-01-01

    The Society for Acute Medicine has developed a number of clinical quality indicators by which all UK Acute Medicine Units can bench mark their activity. These will help to ensure high quality care for patients, inform the continuing development of acute medical services and demonstrate the positive impact of this new specialty. Prospective collection of these data may be a challenge for many busy units. This paper describes a local solution developed in house in a North East hospital. It demonstrates how the data collected can be analysed to assess the effect of changes in consultant presence on the unit and also time taken for patients to be seen by a doctor. The limitations of the system and potential for future development are considered.

  2. A randomized trial to compare two dosing intervals of misoprostol following mifepristone administration in second trimester medical abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, J; Tang, O S; Hong, Q Q; Chen, Q F; Cheng, L N; Ng, E; Ho, P C

    2009-02-01

    The conventional timing of misoprostol administration after mifepristone for second trimester medical abortion is 36-48 h, but simultaneous administration, which may make the regimen more convenient, has not been studied. The objective of this randomized comparison study is to compare two intervals of administration of misoprostol after pretreatment with mifepristone for second trimester medical abortion. Eligible women with gestational age between 12 and 20 weeks were randomized to receive mifepristone 200 mg orally followed by 600 microg misoprostol vaginally either immediately or 36-38 h later, followed by 400 microg vaginal misoprostol every 3 h for a maximum of four doses. The primary outcome measure was the success rate at 24 h after the start of misoprostol treatment and the secondary outcome measures were the induction-to-abortion interval and the frequency of side effects. There was a significant difference in the success rate at 24 h (36-38 h: 100%; immediate: 91.5%). The median induction-to-abortion interval was significantly shorter in the 36-38 h regimen (4.9 h) compared with the immediate regimen (10 h). Side effects in terms of febrile episodes and chills/rigors were significantly higher in the immediate administration group. Simultaneous use of mifepristone and misoprostol for second trimester medical abortion is not as effective as the regimen using a 36-38 h dosing interval.

  3. Improvement of dose distribution in breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field Linac-MR unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esmaeeli, A. D., E-mail: ali-esmaeeli-d@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Rasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Rasht, 41476-54919 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, S. R. [Department of Medical Physics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14174 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pouladian, M.; Bagheri, S. [Department of Medical Radiation Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, 14778-93855 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Monfared, A. S. [Department of Medical Physics, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, 47148-71167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate the improvement in dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field that maintains the same direction of Lorentz force between two fields. The investigation has a potential application in future Linac-MR units. Methods: Computed tomography images of four patients and magnetic fields of 0.25–1.5 Tesla (T) were used for Monte Carlo simulation. Two patients had intact breast while the other two had mastectomy. Simulations of planning and chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical process. The direction of superior-inferior magnetic field for the medial treatment beam was reversed for the lateral beam. Results: For the ipsilateral lung and heart mean doses were reduced by a mean (range) of 45.8% (27.6%–58.6%) and 26.0% (20.2%–38.9%), respectively, depending on various treatment plan setups. The mean V{sub 20} for ipsilateral lung was reduced by 55.0% (43.6%–77.3%). In addition acceptable results were shown after simulation of 0.25 T magnetic field demonstrated in dose-volume reductions of the heart, ipsilateral lung, and noninvolved skin. Conclusions: Applying a reversible magnetic field during breast radiotherapy, not only reduces the dose to the lung and heart but also produces a sharp drop dose volume histogram for planning target volume, because of bending of the path of secondary charged particles toward the chest wall by the Lorentz force. The simulations have shown that use of the magnetic field at 1.5 T is not feasible for clinical applications due to the increase of ipsilateral chest wall skin dose in comparison to the conventional planning while 0.25 T is suitable for all patients due to dose reduction to the chest wall skin.

  4. Latin American dose survey results in mammography studies under IAEA programme: radiological protection of patients in medical exposures (TSA3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Patricia; Blanco, Susana; Khoury, Helen; Leyton, Fernando; Cárdenas, Juan; Defaz, María Yolanda; Garay, Fernando; Telón, Flaviano; Aguilar, Juan Garcia; Roas, Norma; Gamarra, Mirtha; Blanco, Daniel; Quintero, Ana Rosa; Nader, Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela) working under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Cooperation Programme: TSA3 Radiological Protection of Patients in Medical Exposures have joined efforts in the optimisation of radiation protection in mammography practice. Through surveys of patient doses, the region has a unique database of diagnostic reference levels for analogue and digital equipment that will direct future optimisation activities towards the early detection of breast cancer among asymptomatic women. During RLA9/057 (2007-09) 24 institutions participated with analogue equipment in a dose survey. Regional training on methodology and measurement equipment was addressed in May 2007. The mean glandular dose (DG) was estimated using the incident kerma in air and relevant conversion coefficients for both projections craneo caudal and mediolateral oblique (CC and MLO). For Phase 2, RLA9/067 (2010-11), it was decided to include also digital systems in order to see their impact in future dose optimisation activities. Any new country that joined the project received training in the activities through IAEA expert missions. Twenty-nine new institutions participated (9 analogue and 20 digital equipment). A total of 2262 patient doses were collected during this study and from them D(G) (mGy) for both projections were estimated for each institution and country. Regional results (75 percentile in mGy) show for CC and MLO views, respectively: RLA9/057 (analogue) 2.63 and 3.17; RLA/067: 2.57 and 3.15 (analogue) and 2.69 and 2.90 (digital). Regarding only digital equipment for CC and MLO, respectively, computed radiography systems showed 2.59 and 2.78 and direct digital radiography (DDR) systems 2.78 and 3.04. Based on the IAEA Basic Safety Standard (BSS) reference dose (3 mGy), it can be observed that there is enough room to start

  5. Self-medication practice among pension housed patients at the central healthcare unit of Teresina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wemíria de Fátima Lima Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the prevalence and characteristics of self-medication among pension housed patients at the central healthcare unit of Teresina in the downtown region. Method: This is an exploratory epidemiological study with a quantitative, cross-sectional descriptive approach. For data collection a semi-structured questionnaire was applied on the behaviors of 300 patients. Results: Of the total respondents, the practice of self-medication was common in 241 (80.33% of individuals. The greatest achievement of this was seen in those coming from municipalities in the interior of Maranhao 116 (48.13%, which surpassed even that with a small gap the individuals from the interior of Piaui, to practice self-medication in 101 (41.91%. Conclusion: It is understood that self-medication is an old widespread practice. The search for relief from their ailments and the poor public healthcare offered to the population admits that individuals opt for self-medication as a first option.

  6. Discharge against medical advice from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: 10 years experience at a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim K Al-Turkistani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Discharging patients against medical advice is a problem of every age-group. However, because of their physiological vulnerability, the risk for the neonatal population is greater when discharged against medical advice (DAMA. This article is a study of the prevalence of the problem, the possible causes and/or risk factors. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 10 years of medical records of neonates discharged against medical advice from a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU at a university hospital. Results: The overall prevalence of DAMA was 1.6%. Most of the 51 infants who were taken out of hospital against medical advice (AMA were term (72.5% with a mean gestational age of 37.78 ± 2.5 weeks, of normal birth weight, with a mean of 2736 ± 661 g, Saudis (96%, those delivered vaginally (69%, and those that were provisionally diagnosed with transient tachypnea of newborn (TTN and/or query sepsis (49%. There was no difference between males and females (M/F = 1.2. There was an association between DAMA and the timing of DAMA (27.5% of DAMA at weekends and 67% of DAMA from May to October. Conclusion: DAMA of neonates is particularly critical. The causes and risk factors are many and difficult to predict. In addition to several other factors, its prevalence is influenced negatively by some socio-cultural beliefs.

  7. Sub-millimeter nuclear medical imaging with reduced dose application in positron emission tomography using beta-gamma coincidences

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, C; Parodi, K; Thirolf, P G

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) permits a functional understanding of the underlying causes of many diseases. Modern whole-body PET systems reach a spatial resolution of 2-6 mm (FWHM). A limitation of this technique occurs from the thermalization and diffusion of the positron before its annihilation, typically within the mm range. We present a nuclear medical imaging technique, able to reach sub-millimeter spatial resolution in 3 dimensions with a reduced effective dose application compared to conventional PET. This 'gamma-PET' technique draws on specific medical isotopes, simultaneously emitting an additional photon accompanying the beta^+ decay. Exploiting the triple coincidence between the positron annihilation and the third photon, it is possible to separate the reconstructed 'true' events from background. In order to characterize the potential of this technique, MC simulations and image reconstructions have been performed. The achievable spatial resolution has been found to reach ca. 0.4 mm (FWHM) in ...

  8. Increasing nursing students' understanding and accuracy with medical dose calculations: A collaborative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Jane E; Bruce, Catherine D

    2016-05-01

    Accurate calculation of medication dosages can be challenging for nursing students. Specific interventions related to types of errors made by nursing students may improve the learning of this important skill. The objective of this study was to determine areas of challenge for students in performing medication dosage calculations in order to design interventions to improve this skill. Strengths and weaknesses in the teaching and learning of medication dosage calculations were assessed. These data were used to create online interventions which were then measured for the impact on student ability to perform medication dosage calculations. The setting of the study is one university in Canada. The qualitative research participants were 8 nursing students from years 1-3 and 8 faculty members. Quantitative results are based on test data from the same second year clinical course during the academic years 2012 and 2013. Students and faculty participated in one-to-one interviews; responses were recorded and coded for themes. Tests were implemented and scored, then data were assessed to classify the types and number of errors. Students identified conceptual understanding deficits, anxiety, low self-efficacy, and numeracy skills as primary challenges in medication dosage calculations. Faculty identified long division as a particular content challenge, and a lack of online resources for students to practice calculations. Lessons and online resources designed as an intervention to target mathematical and concepts and skills led to improved results and increases in overall pass rates for second year students for medication dosage calculation tests. This study suggests that with concerted effort and a multi-modal approach to supporting nursing students, their abilities to calculate dosages can be improved. The positive results in this study also point to the promise of cross-discipline collaborations between nursing and education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  9. Economic benefits of using a dose dispensing system at hospital units of the Mexican Institute of Social Security.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Ofelia-Uc Coyoc

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate the potential economic benefits at The Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS per its abbreviation in spanish according to the drug expenditure of using drug dispensing system, based on literature information. Materials and methods. A systematic review was performed to identify savings from drugs and reduction of medication errors. The total and mean health expenditure by level of medical attention was calculated using the dispensed collective prescriptions at IMSS during 2009. Three savings scenarios were applied. Results. The total drug savings were in a range of 870.49 Mexican million pesos to 4050.05 Mexican million pesos. Reductions of medication errors can contribute with additional savings up to 3455.56 Mexican million pesos. Conclusion. The drug dispensing system unit generates savings opportunities at the second and third level of attention. The maximum economic benefit was observed in the last level.

  10. Quality of documentation of electronic medical information systems at primary health care units in Alexandria, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureldin, M; Mosallam, R; Hassan, S Z

    2014-03-13

    Limited data are available about the implementation of electronic records systems in primary care in developing countries. The present study aimed to assess the quality of documentation in the electronic medical records at primary health care units in Alexandria, Egypt and to elicit physician's feedback on barriers and facilitators to the system. Data were collected at 7 units selected randomly from each administrative region and in each unit 50 paper-based records and their corresponding e-records were randomly selected for patients who visited the unit in the first 3 months of 2011. Administrative data were almost complete in both paper and e-records, but the completeness of clinical data varied between 60.0% and 100.0% across different units and types of record. The accuracy rate of the main diagnosis in e-records compared with paper-based records ranged between 44.0% and 82.0%. High workload and system complexity were the most frequently mentioned barriers to implementation of the e-records system.

  11. Radiation dose to patients and radiologists during transcatheter arterial embolization: comparison of a digital flat-panel system and conventional unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Furui, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Ikuo; Yamauchi, Teiyu; Kohtake, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Koji; Takada, Koichi; Yamagishi, Masafumi

    2005-10-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the exposure doses to patients and radiologists during transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using a new angiographic unit with a digital flat-panel system. Doses were assessed for 24 procedures: 12 using a new unit with a digital flat-panel system and 12 using a conventional unit. Doses to patients' skin were evaluated with thermoluminescent dosimeters behind the left, middle, and right portions of the liver. The doses to the radiologists were measured by an electronic personal dosimeter placed on the chest outside a lead protector. The maximal skin doses to the patients and the dose equivalents, Hp(0.07), to the radiologists were compared between the two procedure groups with each angiographic unit. For procedures with the new unit, the mean maximal skin dose to the patients was 284 +/- 127 (SD) mGy (range, 130-467 mGy), and Hp(0.07) to the radiologists was 62.8 +/- 17.4 muSv. For procedures with the conventional unit, the maximal skin dose to the patients was 1,068 +/- 439 mGy (range, 510-1,882 mGy), and Hp(0.07) to the radiologists was 68.4 +/- 25.7 muSv. The maximal skin dose to the patients was significantly lower with the new unit than with the conventional unit (p < 0.0005). There was no significant difference in the Hp(0.07) to the radiologists between the two procedure groups. The new digital flat-panel system for angiographic imaging can reduce the radiation dose to patients' skin during TAE for HCC as compared with the conventional system.

  12. Medication incidents related to automated dose dispensing in community pharmacies and hospitals--a reporting system study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ka-Chun; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; Bouvy, Marcel L; Wensing, Michel; De Smet, Peter A G M

    2014-01-01

    Automated dose dispensing (ADD) is being introduced in several countries and the use of this technology is expected to increase as a growing number of elderly people need to manage their medication at home. ADD aims to improve medication safety and treatment adherence, but it may introduce new safety issues. This descriptive study provides insight into the nature and consequences of medication incidents related to ADD, as reported by healthcare professionals in community pharmacies and hospitals. The medication incidents that were submitted to the Dutch Central Medication incidents Registration (CMR) reporting system were selected and characterized independently by two researchers. Person discovering the incident, phase of the medication process in which the incident occurred, immediate cause of the incident, nature of incident from the healthcare provider's perspective, nature of incident from the patient's perspective, and consequent harm to the patient caused by the incident. From January 2012 to February 2013 the CMR received 15,113 incidents: 3,685 (24.4%) incidents from community pharmacies and 11,428 (75.6%) incidents from hospitals. Eventually 1 of 50 reported incidents (268/15,113 = 1.8%) were related to ADD; in community pharmacies more incidents (227/3,685 = 6.2%) were related to ADD than in hospitals (41/11,428 = 0.4%). The immediate cause of an incident was often a change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation. Most reported incidents occurred in two phases: entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag. A proportion of incidents was related to ADD and is reported regularly, especially by community pharmacies. In two phases, entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag, most incidents occurred. A change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation was the immediate causes of an incident.

  13. State-Level Lifetime Medical and Work-Loss Costs of Fatal Injuries - United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feijun; Florence, Curtis

    2017-01-13

    Injury-associated deaths have substantial economic consequences in the United States. The total estimated lifetime medical and work-loss costs associated with fatal injuries in 2013 were $214 billion (1). In 2014, unintentional injury, suicide, and homicide (the fourth, tenth, and seventeenth leading causes of death, respectively) accounted for 194,635 deaths in the United States (2). In 2014, a total of 199,756 fatal injuries occurred in the United States, and the associated lifetime medical and work-loss costs were $227 billion (3). This report examines the state-level economic burdens of fatal injuries by extending a previous national-level study (1). Numbers and rates of fatal injuries, lifetime costs, and lifetime costs per capita were calculated for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) and for four injury intent categories (all intents, unintentional, suicide, and homicide). During 2014, injury mortality rates and economic burdens varied widely among the states and DC. Among fatal injuries of all intents, the mortality rate and lifetime costs per capita ranged from 101.9 per 100,000 and $1,233, respectively (New Mexico) to 40.2 per 100,000 and $491 (New York). States can engage more effectively and efficiently in injury prevention if they are aware of the economic burden of injuries, identify areas for immediate improvement, and devote necessary resources to those areas.

  14. A collimated detection system for assessing leakage dose from medical linear accelerators at the patient plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonski, P; Taylor, M L; Franich, R D; Kron, T

    2014-03-01

    Leakage radiation from linear accelerators can make a significant contribution to healthy tissue dose in patients undergoing radiotherapy. In this work thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLD chips) were used in a focused lead cone loaded with TLD chips for the purpose of evaluating leakage dose at the patient plane. By placing the TLDs at one end of a stereotactic cone, a focused measurement device is created; this was tested both in and out of the primary beam of a Varian 21-iX linac using 6 MV photons. Acrylic build up material of 1.2 cm thickness was used inside the cone and measurements made with either one or three TLD chips at a given distance from the target. Comparing the readings of three dosimeters in one plane inside the cone offered information regarding the orientation of the cone relative to a radiation source. Measurements in the patient plane with the linac gantry at various angles demonstrated that leakage dose was approximately 0.01% of the primary beam out of field when the cone was pointed directly towards the target and 0.0025% elsewhere (due to scatter within the gantry). No specific 'hot spots' (e.g., insufficient shielding or gaps at abutments) were observed. Focused cone measurements facilitate leakage dose measurements from the linac head directly at the patient plane and allow one to infer the fraction of leakage due to 'direct' photons (along the ray-path from the bremsstrahlung target) and that due to scattered photons.

  15. MONITORING OF EXPOSURE RADIATION DOSES LOADS FROM MEDICAL EXPOSURE TO POPULATION OF THE KIROV REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Skolotnev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes medical exposure to population of the Kirov region during the period of 50 years (1961–2011 from the main types of X-ray procedures. Steady eduction trend of exposure levels to population with increase of X-ray surveys frequency has been found.

  16. Observations of the role of science in the United States medical cannabis state policies: Lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grbic, Jelica; Goddard, Perilou; Ryder, David

    2017-04-01

    Clinical trials have shown cannabis to be effective in the treatment of some medical conditions and there is mounting public and political pressure to enact laws enabling the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes. To date, 28 United States (U.S.) states and the District of Columbia have enacted medical cannabis laws. This study sought to identify the main issues pertaining to the development of medical cannabis laws in the U.S, including the role of scientific evidence. Data were collected from three groups of participants: government officials, lobbyists and medical professionals involved in the medical cannabis debate in five selected states in the U.S.; researchers from the same five states conducting funded research in the alcohol and other drugs field; and members of the International Society for the Study of Drug Policy. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Six major themes emerged in relation to the factors influencing policy: scientific evidence plays a limited role in the development of policy; the available research is limited and mixed; there is a need for clearer communication and active dissemination of evidence to policy makers; researchers need to consider what research is likely to impact on policy; scientific evidence is not a major factor in policy development; and there is a need to consider evidence within a political context. Researchers need to be aware of the political context in which medical cannabis laws are or are not enacted and consider ways in which research findings can achieve a higher profile within this context. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Current Practices in Assessing Professionalism in United States and Canadian Allopathic Medical Students and Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittur, Nandini

    2017-01-01

    Professionalism is a critically important competency that must be evaluated in medical trainees but is a complex construct that is hard to assess. A systematic review was undertaken to give insight into the current best practices for assessment of professionalism in medical trainees and to identify new research priorities in the field. A search was conducted on PubMed for behavioral assessments of medical students and residents among the United States and Canadian allopathic schools in the last 15 years. An initial search yielded 594 results, 28 of which met our inclusion criteria. Our analysis indicated that there are robust generic definitions of the major attributes of medical professionalism. The most commonly used assessment tools are survey instruments that use Likert scales tied to attributes of professionalism. While significant progress has been made in this field in recent years, several opportunities for system-wide improvement were identified that require further research. These include a paucity of information about assessment reliability, the need for rater training, a need to better define competency in professionalism according to learner level (preclinical, clerkship, resident etc.) and ways to remediate lapses in professionalism. Student acceptance of assessment of professionalism may be increased if assessment tools are shifted to better incorporate feedback. Tackling the impact of the hidden curriculum in which students may observe lapses in professionalism by faculty and other health care providers is another priority for further study. PMID:28652951

  18. Patterns of admissions in an acute medical unit: priorities for service development and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Natalie J; Hussain, Rumana; Moonie, Alasdair; Richardson, Donald; Waring, W Stephen

    2012-01-01

    An Acute Medical Unit has recently been established at York Hospital. The present study sought to characterise the case mix of acutely unwell medical patients to allow identification of priorities for ongoing service development and to assess educational opportunities for trainees in the region. Data were collected for 16001 admission episodes between January 2010 and April 2011 inclusive. These allowed characterisation of the case mix, and identified key priorities where clinical pathway do not yet exist, namely heart failure, urinary tract infection, and acute diarrhoea. Good educational opportunities exist for most aspects of the Acute Medicine curriculum; several weaknesses were identified, and trainees might address these by undertaking a specific period of specialty training in endocrinology and neurology.

  19. Patient dosimetry activities in the United States: the nationwide evaluation of X-ray trends (NEXT) and tissue dose handbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, O H; Stern, S H; Spelic, D C

    1999-01-01

    In the United States the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in collaboration with the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) and state and local government agencies surveys clinical facilities about X-ray system air kerma and ancillary data related to patient dosimetry for a variety of diagnostic X-ray examinations. The survey program is known as the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT). The survey utilizes reference patient-equivalent phantoms in the collection of comprehensive technical information. With knowledge of the skin-entrance air kerma, specific tissue doses can be calculated. An overview of NEXT and previously published FDA tissue dose handbooks for diagnostic X-ray examinations is presented.

  20. The Effects of Korean Medical Service Quality and Satisfaction on Revisit Intention of the United Arab Emirates Government Sponsored Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seoyoung Lee; Eun-Kyung Kim

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate medical service quality, satisfaction and to examine factors influencing hospital revisit intention of the United Arab Emirates government sponsored patients in Korea...

  1. [Health care units image development on the market of medical services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemicer-Chmielewska, Ewa; Karakiewicz, Beata

    2010-01-01

    The cause for this document is to present a deliberation on public health facility image development on the medical services market. Marketization of the health service, growing awareness of Polish citizens and their expectation of high service quality as well as increased competition in the healthcare system market is the reason why health unit managers need to put a lot of strength and effort in sustaining or improving the image of the facility they run. Such action gives a chance for obtaining a competitive advantage.

  2. GATEWAY Report Brief: Evaluating Tunable LED Lighting in the Swedish Medical Behavioral Health Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-08-23

    Summary of a GATEWAY report evaluation of a tunable LED lighting system installed in the new Swedish Medical Behavioral Health Unit in Seattle that incorporates color-tunable luminaires in common areas, and uses advanced controls for dimming and color tuning, with the goal of providing a better environment for staff and patients. The report reviews the design of the tunable lighting system, summarizes two sets of measurements, and discusses the circadian, energy, and commissioning implications as well as lessons learned from the project.

  3. Impact of Medical Tourism on Cosmetic Surgery in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E. Franzblau, BS

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Developing countries have been attracting more international patients by building state-of-the-art facilities and offering sought-after healthcare services at a fraction of the cost of the US healthcare system. These price differentials matter most for elective procedures, including cosmetic surgeries, which are paid for out of pocket. It is unclear how this rise in medical tourism will affect the practice of plastic surgery, which encompasses a uniquely large number of elective procedures. By examining trends in the globalization of the cosmetic surgery market, we can better understand the current situation and what plastic surgeons in the United States can expect. In this article, we explore both domestic and foreign factors that affect surgical tourism and the current state of this industry. We also discuss how it may affect the practice of cosmetic surgery within the United States.

  4. Improving safety culture on adult medical units through multidisciplinary teamwork and communication interventions: the TOPS Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blegen, M A; Sehgal, N L; Alldredge, B K; Gearhart, S; Auerbach, A A; Wachter, R M

    2010-08-01

    The goal of this project was to improve unit-based safety culture through implementation of a multidisciplinary (pharmacy, nursing, medicine) teamwork and communication intervention. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was used to determine the impact of the training with a before-after design. Surveys were returned from 454 healthcare staff before the training and 368 staff 1 year later. Five of eleven safety culture subscales showed significant improvement. Nurses perceived a stronger safety culture than physicians or pharmacists. While it is difficult to isolate the effects of the team training intervention from other events occurring during the year between training and postevaluation, overall the intervention seems to have improved the safety culture on these medical units.

  5. Impact of medical tourism on cosmetic surgery in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzblau, Lauren E; Chung, Kevin C

    2013-10-01

    Developing countries have been attracting more international patients by building state-of-the-art facilities and offering sought-after healthcare services at a fraction of the cost of the US healthcare system. These price differentials matter most for elective procedures, including cosmetic surgeries, which are paid for out of pocket. It is unclear how this rise in medical tourism will affect the practice of plastic surgery, which encompasses a uniquely large number of elective procedures. By examining trends in the globalization of the cosmetic surgery market, we can better understand the current situation and what plastic surgeons in the United States can expect. In this article, we explore both domestic and foreign factors that affect surgical tourism and the current state of this industry. We also discuss how it may affect the practice of cosmetic surgery within the United States.

  6. Impact of Medical Tourism on Cosmetic Surgery in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzblau, Lauren E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Developing countries have been attracting more international patients by building state-of-the-art facilities and offering sought-after healthcare services at a fraction of the cost of the US healthcare system. These price differentials matter most for elective procedures, including cosmetic surgeries, which are paid for out of pocket. It is unclear how this rise in medical tourism will affect the practice of plastic surgery, which encompasses a uniquely large number of elective procedures. By examining trends in the globalization of the cosmetic surgery market, we can better understand the current situation and what plastic surgeons in the United States can expect. In this article, we explore both domestic and foreign factors that affect surgical tourism and the current state of this industry. We also discuss how it may affect the practice of cosmetic surgery within the United States. PMID:25289258

  7. Pharmacokinetic Comparison of a Unit Dose Dry Powder Inhaler with a Multidose Dry Powder Inhaler for Delivery of Fluticasone Furoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rashmi; Moore, Alison; Riddell, Kylie; Joshi, Shashidhar; Chan, Robert

    2017-05-02

    The unit dose dry powder inhaler (UD-DPI) is being considered as an alternative inhaler platform that, if developed, has the potential to improve access to inhaled respiratory medicines in developing countries. This study compared the systemic exposure of fluticasone furoate after delivery from the UD-DPI with that from the ELLIPTA(®) inhaler. This open-label, five-way cross-over, randomized, single-dose study in healthy subjects evaluated fluticasone furoate systemic exposure of three dose strengths (using four inhalations), 4 × 80 μg [320 μg], 4 × 100 μg [400 μg], and 4 × 140 μg [560 μg]), and two percentages of drug in lactose blends (0.6% and 0.8% by weight) after delivery from the UD-DPI compared with systemic exposures from the ELLIPTA inhaler (4 × 100 μg [400 μg] dose, 0.8% lactose blend). The primary treatment comparisons were area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 to 6 hours [AUC0-6] and maximum plasma concentration [Cmax]. After single-dose administration of fluticasone furoate, systemic exposure was lower from all UD-DPI formulations versus the ELLIPTA inhaler in terms of both AUC0-6 [AUC0-6 geometric least squares mean (GLM) ratios confidence interval (90% CI) for: UD-DPI (400 μg 0.8% blend)/ELLIPTA: 0.61 (0.55-0.67) and Cmax GLM (90% CI) for: UD-DPI (400 μg 0.8% blend)/ELLIPTA: 0.56 (0.49-0.64)]. Systemic exposures were ∼10% lower for fluticasone furoate UD-DPI for the 0.8% blend versus the 0.6% blend [GLM ratio (90% CI); 0.90 (0.81-1.00) for AUC0-6 and 0.89 (0.77-1.01) for Cmax], and increasing doses of fluticasone furoate from the UD-DPI showed systemic exposures that were approximately dose proportional. All treatments were well tolerated. Fluticasone furoate systemic exposure was lower from the UD-DPI than from the ELLIPTA inhaler, but the UD-DPI formulations did demonstrate detectable systemic levels and approximate dose proportionality. Together with the good tolerability shown

  8. Pharmacokinetics of Imipenem/Cilastatin Burn Intensive Care Unit Patients Undergoing High-Dose Continuous Venovenous Hemofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Bradley A; Hudson, Joanna Q; Hill, David M; Swanson, Joseph M; Wood, G Christopher; Laizure, S Casey; Arnold-Ross, Angela; Hu, Zhe-Yi; Hickerson, William L

    2016-12-01

    High-dose continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) is a continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) used frequently in patients with burns. However, antibiotic dosing is based on inference from studies assessing substantially different methods of CRRT. To address this knowledge gap for imipenem/cilastatin (I/C), we evaluated the systemic and extracorporeal clearances (CLs) of I/C in patients with burns undergoing high-dose CVVH. Prospective clinical pharmacokinetic study. Ten adult patients with burns receiving I/C for a documented infection and requiring high-dose CVVH were studied. Blood and effluent samples for analysis of I/C concentrations were collected for up to 6 hours after the I/C infusion for calculation of I/C total CL (CLTotal ), CL by CVVH (CLHF ), half-life during CVVH, volume of distribution at steady state (Vdss ), and the percentage of drug eliminated by CVVH. In this patient sample, the mean age was 50 ± 17 years, total body surface area burns was 23 ± 27%, and 80% were male. Nine patients were treated with high-dose CVVH for acute kidney injury and one patient for sepsis. The mean delivered CVVH dose was 52 ± 14 ml/kg/hour (range 32-74 ml/kg/hr). The imipenem CLHF was 3.27 ± 0.48 L/hour, which accounted for 23 ± 4% of the CLTotal (14.74 ± 4.75 L/hr). Cilastatin CLHF was 1.98 ± 0.56 L/hour, which accounted for 45 ± 19% of the CLTotal (5.16 + 2.44 L/hr). The imipenem and cilastatin half-lives were 1.77 ± 0.38 hours and 4.21 ± 2.31 hours, respectively. Imipenem and cilastatin Vdss were 35.1 ± 10.3 and 32.8 ± 13.8 L, respectively. Efficient removal of I/C by high-dose CVVH, a high overall clearance, and a high volume of distribution in burn intensive care unit patients undergoing this CRRT method warrant aggressive dosing to treat serious infections effectively depending on the infection site and/or pathogen. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  9. Clinical and behavioral characteristics of adults receiving medical care for HIV infection --- Medical Monitoring Project, United States, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Janet M; McNaghten, A D; Frazier, Emma L; Skarbinski, Jacek; Huang, Ping; Heffelfinger, James D

    2011-09-02

    As of December 31, 2008, an estimated 663,084 persons were living with a diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the 40 U.S. states that have had confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2006. Although HIV surveillance programs in the United States collect information about persons who have received a diagnosis of HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), supplemental surveillance projects are needed to collect information about care-seeking behaviors, health-care use, and other behaviors among persons living with HIV. Data on the clinical and behavioral characteristics of persons receiving medical care for HIV infection are critical to reduce HIV-related morbidity and mortality and for program planning to allocate services and resources, guide prevention planning, assess unmet medical and ancillary service needs, and help develop intervention programs and health policies at the local, state, and national levels. Data were collected during June 2007-September 2008 for patients who received medical care in 2007 (sampled from January 1-April 30). The Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) is an ongoing, multisite supplemental surveillance project that assesses behaviors, clinical characteristics, and quality of care of HIV-infected persons who are receiving medical care. Participants must be aged ≥ 18 years and have received medical care at sampled facilities that provide HIV medical care within participating MMP project areas. Self-reported behavioral and selected clinical data are collected using an in-person interview. A total of 26 project areas in 19 states and Puerto Rico were funded to collect data during the 2007 MMP data collection cycle. The results from the 2007 MMP cycle indicated that among 3,643 participants, a total of 3,040 (84%) had some form of health insurance or coverage during the 12 months before the interview; of these, 45% reported having Medicaid, 37% reported having private

  10. Dose adjustment guidelines for medications in patients with renal impairment: how consistent are drug information sources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, A; Castelino, R L; Peterson, G M; Jose, M D

    2014-01-01

    It is known that patients with renal disease are often administered inappropriate dosages of drugs. A lack of quantitative data in the available drug information sources and inconsistency in dosing information may augment the problem of dosing error. To determine the concordance among five drug information sources regarding the dosing recommendations provided for drugs considered problematic in patients with renal impairment and to determine the consistency among the sources regarding the definition of renal impairment and categorisation of chronic kidney disease. Five standard drug information sources were reviewed for 61 drugs recommended to be used with caution in renal impairment. Information on recommendations for dosage adjustment in renal impairment was extracted and analysed. Further, the definition and classification of renal impairment were recorded. The recommendation for each drug was coded into six different categories and the intersource reliability was calculated. Only slight agreement was observed among the sources (Fleiss Kappa: 0.3). Qualitative data were not well defined, and there was a lack of consistency in quantitative values. Some drugs marked as contraindicated in one source were not mentioned as such in others. Also, drugs considered as not requiring dosage adjustment in one source had explicit recommendations in other sources. The definition and classification of renal impairment differed among the five information sources. There should be an evidence-based approach to drug dosage adjustment in order to bring uniformity to the recommendations. Regular updating of the content of the drug information sources is also important. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  11. [Children's medically complex diseases unit. A model required in all our hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climent Alcalá, Francisco José; García Fernández de Villalta, Marta; Escosa García, Luis; Rodríguez Alonso, Aroa; Albajara Velasco, Luis Adolfo

    2017-05-09

    The increase in survival of children with severe diseases has led to the rise of children with chronic diseases, sometimes with lifelong disabilities. In 2008, a unit for the specific care of medically complex children (MCC) was created in Hospital La Paz. To describe the work and care activities of this Unit. Patients and methods An analysis was performed on all discharge reports of the Unit between January 2014 and July 2016. The MCC Unit has 6 beds and daily outpatient clinic. A total of 1,027 patients have been treated since the creation of the unit, with 243 from 2014. The median age was 24.2 months (IQ: 10.21-84.25). The large majority (92.59%) have multiple diseases, the most frequent chronic conditions observed were neurological (76.95%), gastrointestinal (63.78%), and respiratory diseases (61.72%). More than two-thirds (69.54%) of MCC are dependent on technology, 53.49% on respiratory support, and 35.80% on nutritional support. Hospital admission rates have increased annually. There have been 403 admissions since 2014, of which 8.93% were re-admissions within 30 days of hospital discharge. The median stay during 2014-2016 was 6 days (IQ: 3-14). The occupancy rate has been above 100% for this period. Currently, 210 patients remain on follow-up (86.42%), and 11 children (4.53%) were discharged to their referral hospitals. The mortality rate is 9.05% (22 deaths). The main condition of these 22 patients was neurological (9 patients). Infectious diseases were the leading cause of death. MCC should be treated in specialized units in tertiary or high-level hospitals. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Patient safety culture at neonatal intensive care units: perspectives of the nursing and medical team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Tomazoni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to verify the assessment of the patient safety culture according to the function and length of experience of the nursing and medical teams at Neonatal Intensive Care Units.METHOD: quantitative survey undertaken at four Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Florianópolis, Brazil. The sample totaled 141 subjects. The data were collected between February and April 2013 through the application of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. For analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-Square tests and Cronbach's Alpha coefficient were used. Approval for the research project was obtained from the Ethics Committee, CAAE: 05274612.7.0000.0121.RESULTS: differences in the number of positive answers to the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, the safety grade and the number of reported events were found according to the professional characteristics. A significant association was found between a shorter Length of work at the hospital and Length of work at the unit and a larger number of positive answers; longer length of experience in the profession represented higher grades and less reported events. The physicians and nursing technicians assessed the patient safety culture more positively. Cronbach's alpha demonstrated the reliability of the instrument.CONCLUSION: the differences found reveal a possible relation between the assessment of the safety culture and the subjects' professional characteristics at the Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

  13. Criticality accident in uranium fuel processing plant. Emergency medical care and dose estimation for the severely overexposed patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akashi, Makoto; Ishigure, Nobuhito [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    A criticality accident occurred in JCO, a plant for nuclear fuel production in 1999 and three workers were exposed to extremely high-level radiation (neutron and {gamma}-ray). This report describes outlines of the clinical courses and the medical cares for the patients of this accident and the emergent medical system for radiation accident in Japan. One (A) of the three workers of JCO had vomiting and diarrhea within several minutes after the accident and another one (B) had also vomiting within one hour after. Based on these evidences, the exposure dose of A and B were estimated to be more than 8 and 4 GyEq, respectively. Generally, acute radiation syndrome (ARS) is assigned into three phases; prodromal phase, critical or manifestation phase and recovery phase or death. In the prodromal phase, anorexia, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea often develop, whereas the second phase is asymptotic. In the third phase, various syndromes including infection, hemorrhage, dehydration shock and neurotic syndromes are apt to occur. It is known that radiation exposure at 1 Gy or more might induce such acute radiation syndromes. Based on the clinical findings of Chernobyl accident, it has been thought that exposure at 0.5 Gy or more causes a lowering of lymphocyte level and a decrease in immunological activities within 48 hours. Lymphocyte count is available as an indicator for the evaluation of exposure dose in early phase, but not in later phase The three workers of JCO underwent chemical analysis of blood components, chromosomal analysis and analysis of blood {sup 24}Na immediately after the arrival at National Institute of Radiological Sciences via National Mito Hospital specified as the third and the second facility for the emergency medical care system in Japan, respectively. (M.N.)

  14. A dual-energy medical instrument for measurement of x-ray source voltage and dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikov, V. D.; Naydenov, S. V.; Volkov, V. G.; Opolonin, O. D.; Makhota, S.; Pochet, T.; Smith, C. F.

    2016-03-01

    An original dual-energy detector and medical instrument have been developed to measure the output voltages and dose rates of X-ray sources. Theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to characterize the parameters of a new scintillator-photodiode sandwich-detector based on specially-prepared zinc selenide crystals in which the low-energy detector (LED) works both as the detector of the low-energy radiation and as an absorption filter allowing the highenergy fraction of the radiation to pass through to the high-energy detector (HED). The use of the LED as a low-energy filter in combination with a separate HED opens broad possibilities for such sandwich structures. In particular, it becomes possible to analyze and process the sum, difference and ratio of signals coming from these detectors, ensuring a broad (up to 106) measurement range of X-ray intensity from the source and a leveling of the energy dependence. We have chosen an optimum design of the detector and the geometry of the component LED and HED parts that allow energy-dependence leveling to within specified limits. The deviation in energy dependence of the detector does not exceed about 5% in the energy range from 30 to 120 keV. The developed detector and instrument allow contactless measurement of the anode voltage of an X-ray emitter from 40 to 140 kV with an error no greater than 3%. The dose rate measurement range is from 1 to 200 R/min. An original medical instrument has passed clinical testing and was recommended for use in medical institutions for X-ray diagnostics.

  15. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Zhao, Yunzhe; Huang, Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Chun; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J; Osher, Stanley J; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Miao, Jianwei

    2013-03-01

    A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest scanner flux setting of 39 m

  16. End-of-Life and Palliative Care Issues in Medical and Nursing Schools in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Medical and nursing schools in the United States have traditionally had a limited emphasis on end-of-life care. The present study is a comparison of these 2 professional programs' current offerings on death education. Data were gathered via a mailed survey from the 122 medical schools in 2005 and the 580 baccalaureate nursing programs in 2006.…

  17. 42 CFR 436.1004 - FFP in expenditures for medical assistance for individuals who have declared United States...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FFP in expenditures for medical assistance for... Financial Participation (FFP) Ffp for Expenditures for Determining Eligibility and Providing Services § 436.1004 FFP in expenditures for medical assistance for individuals who have declared United...

  18. Validity of a clinical decision rule-based alert system for drug dose adjustment in patients with renal failure intended to improve pharmacists' analysis of medication orders in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussadi, A; Caruba, T; Karras, A; Berdot, S; Degoulet, P; Durieux, P; Sabatier, B

    2013-10-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic performances of an alert system integrated into the CPOE/EMR system for renally cleared drug dosing control. The generated alerts were compared with the daily routine practice of pharmacists as part of the analysis of medication orders. The pharmacists performed their analysis of medication orders as usual and were not aware of the alert system interventions that were not displayed for the purpose of the study neither to the physician nor to the pharmacist but kept with associate recommendations in a log file. A senior pharmacist analyzed the results of medication order analysis with and without the alert system. The unit of analysis was the drug prescription line. The primary study endpoints were the detection of drug dose prescription errors and inter-rater reliability (Kappa coefficient) between the alert system and the pharmacists in the detection of drug dose error. The alert system fired alerts in 8.41% (421/5006) of cases: 5.65% (283/5006) "exceeds max daily dose" alerts and 2.76% (138/5006) "under-dose" alerts. The alert system and the pharmacists showed a relatively poor concordance: 0.106 (CI 95% [0.068-0.144]). According to the senior pharmacist review, the alert system fired more appropriate alerts than pharmacists, and made fewer errors than pharmacists in analyzing drug dose prescriptions: 143 for the alert system and 261 for the pharmacists. Unlike the alert system, most diagnostic errors made by the pharmacists were 'false negatives'. The pharmacists were not able to analyze a significant number (2097; 25.42%) of drug prescription lines because understaffing. This study strongly suggests that an alert system would be complementary to the pharmacists' activity and contribute to drug prescription safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Web Implementation of Quality Assurance (QA) for X-ray Units in Balkanic Medical Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urošević, Vlade; Ristić, Olga; Milošević, Danijela; Košutić, Duško

    2015-08-01

    Diagnostic radiology is the major contributor to the total dose of the population from all artificial sources. In order to reduce radiation exposure and optimize diagnostic x-ray image quality, it is necessary to increase the quality and efficiency of quality assurance (QA) and audit programs. This work presents a web application providing completely new QA solutions for x-ray modalities and facilities. The software gives complete online information (using European standards) with which the corresponding institutions and individuals can evaluate and control a facility's Radiation Safety and QA program. The software enables storage of all data in one place and sharing the same information (data), regardless of whether the measured data is used by an individual user or by an authorized institution. The software overcomes the distance and time separation of institutions and individuals who take part in QA. Upgrading the software will enable assessment of the medical exposure level to ionizing radiation.

  20. Clinical medical sciences for undergraduate dental students in the United Kingdom and Ireland - a curriculum.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mighell, A J

    2011-08-01

    The technical aspects of dentistry need to be practised with insight into the spectrum of human diseases and illnesses and how these impact upon individuals and society. Application of this insight is critical to decision-making related to the planning and delivery of safe and appropriate patient-centred healthcare tailored to the needs of the individual. Provision for the necessary training is included in undergraduate programmes, but in the United Kingdom and Ireland there is considerable variation between centres without common outcomes. In 2009 representatives from 17 undergraduate dental schools in the United Kingdom and Ireland agreed to move towards a common, shared approach to meet their own immediate needs and that might also be of value to others in keeping with the Bologna Process. To provide a clear identity the term \\'Clinical Medical Sciences in Dentistry\\' was agreed in preference to other names such as \\'Human Disease\\' or \\'Medicine and Surgery\\'. The group was challenged to define consensus outcomes. Contemporary dental education documents informed, but did not drive the process. The consensus curriculum for undergraduate Clinical Medical Sciences in Dentistry teaching agreed by the participating centres is reported. Many of the issues are generic and it includes elements that are likely to be applicable to others. This document will act as a focus for a more unified approach to the outcomes required by graduates of the participating centres and act as a catalyst for future developments that ultimately aim to enhance the quality of patient care.

  1. Dialysis vascular access management by interventional nephrology programs at University Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachharajani, Tushar J; Moossavi, Shahriar; Salman, Loay; Wu, Steven; Dwyer, Amy C; Ross, Jamie; Dukkipati, Ramanath; Maya, Ivan D; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Agarwal, Anil; Abreo, Kenneth D; Work, Jack; Asif, Arif

    2011-01-01

    The development of interventional nephrology has undoubtedly led to an improvement in patient care at many facilities across the United States. However, these services have traditionally been offered by interventional nephrologists in the private practice arena. While interventional nephrology was born in the private practice setting, several academic medical centers across the United States have now developed interventional nephrology programs. University Medical Centers (UMCs) that offer interventional nephrology face challenges, such as smaller dialysis populations, limited financial resources, and real or perceived political "turf" issues." Despite these hurdles, several UMCs have successfully established interventional nephrology as an intricate part of a larger nephrology program. This has largely been accomplished by consolidating available resources and collaborating with other specialties irrespective of the size of the dialysis population. The collaboration with other specialties also offers an opportunity to perform advanced procedures, such as application of excimer laser and endovascular ultrasound. As more UMCs establish interventional nephrology programs, opportunities for developing standardized training centers will improve, resulting in better quality and availability of nephrology-related procedures, and providing an impetus for research activities.

  2. Special Needs Dentistry: Interdisciplinary Management of Medically-Complex Patients at Hospital-Based Dental Units in Tasmania, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increasing awareness of the interactions between oral and general health has led to the establishment of Special Needs Dentistry as a dental specialty in many countries. This specialty assists with the interdisciplinary management of patients between the medical and dental professions particularly those with complex medical problems, intellectual and physical impairments, and psychiatric conditions that may affect their oral health or the manner in which they receive treatment. However, little is known about the utilisation of specialised services provided to facilitate individuals with these needs. Aim: The aim of this study was to understand current utilisation of hospital-based dental services established to provide medically-necessary dental care. Methods: A retrospective review of the demographics and medical status of patients treated at referral hospital-based dental clinics in the state of Tasmania was completed for the month of August 2015. Results: Patients treated at these units had a variety of medical backgrounds. Most (46.4% were referred from medical professionals within the hospital. On average, patients treated at these units had 2.56 medical conditions and were taking 3.59 medications each. Many of these were chronic medical conditions known to have an interaction with oral health. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the growing recognition of dynamic interactions between oral and general health and the importance of these hospitalbased units and interprofessional relationships in providing timely and holistic health care to these patients.

  3. Evaluating the Frequency of Errors in Preparation and Administration of Intravenous Medications in the Intensive Care Unit of Shahid-Sadoughi Hospital in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SeyedMojtaba Sohrevardi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In most Iranian hospitals, the nurses in the wards prepare intravenous (IV drugs and unfortunately pharmacists are not involved in this process. The severity of the patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU heightens the risk of errors. More over the frequency of using IV drugs in this unit is high, so we decided to determine the frequency and types of errors, which occur in the preparation and administration of commonly, used IV medications in an ICU.Method: A prospective cross sectional study was performed from November 2013 to August 2014, in the intensive care unit in Shahid-Sadoughi hospital in Yazd. Medication errors occurred in the process of preparation and administration of IV drugs, were recorded by a pharmacy student and were evaluated by direct observation, according to the method established by Barker and McConnell.Results: A total number of 843 intravenous doses were evaluated. The most common type of error (34.26% was the injection of IV doses faster than the recommended rate followed by preparation (15.69%, administration (9.23% and compatibility with doctor’s order (6.24%. Amikacin was the most common drug involved in errors (41.67%. Most of errors were occurred at afternoon (8 p.m, 28.36%.Conclusion: According to our study the rate of errors in preparation and administration of IV drugs was high in this ICU. Employing more nurses, using developed medical instruments and clinical pharmacists can help to decrease these errors and improve the quality of patient care.

  4. Medical causes of temporary or definitive leaves from a French counterterrorist unit pre-internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabouillot, Oscar; Roffi, R; Bertho, K; Ramon, F; Commeau, D; Fressancourt, Y; Quemeneur, E; Roche, N-C; Dubourg, O

    2017-04-01

    Each year, the French Special Weapons And Tactics team, Groupe d'Intervention de la Gendarmerie Nationale, recruits new members through a physically demanding 8-week selection process. The goal of this study is to estimate the incidence and the causes for temporary or final interruptions during this process for medical reasons. All of the candidates for the November 2015 selection process were included in this prospective study. The number and reasons for temporary or final interruptions were documented by military general practitioners. The applicants were 48 law enforcement professionals (2 women, mean age 29.4 years, range 22-35). In 14 cases, a temporary interruption was required and in five cases the selection process prematurely ended. Fifty-two per cent of the temporary interruptions were due to sprains, tendinopathies, fractures or muscle tears, 11% were due to burns, wounds or subcutaneous bruises, 16% were due to cranial trauma and 21% were due to medical causes. The high prevalence of minor traumatology that we observed is similar to the ones observed in other cohorts describing initial training for military personnel in the conventional forces. However, the presence of other pathologies in our study, such as cranial trauma or medical causes, is due to the specificity of this internship selection granting access to an elite unit. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Frequency and outcome of patients with nonthyroidal illness syndrome in a medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plikat, Katharina; Langgartner, Julia; Buettner, Roland; Bollheimer, L Cornelius; Woenckhaus, Ulrike; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Wrede, Christian E

    2007-02-01

    Acute and chronic critical conditions are associated with reduced serum levels of free triiodothyronine (FT(3)), free thyroxine FT(4), and thyrotropin, known as nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). It is still controversial whether these changes reflect a protective mechanism or a maladaptive process during prolonged illness. However, larger studies to determine the prevalence of the NTIS and its association with outcome in medical intensive care units (ICUs) are missing. Complete thyroid hormone levels from 247 of 743 patients admitted to our ICU between October 2002 and February 2004 were retrospectively evaluated. From these patients, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health II scores, ICU mortality, length of stay, mechanical ventilation, and concomitant medication were recorded. Ninety-seven patients (44.1%) had low FT(3) levels indicating an NTIS, either with normal (23.6%) or reduced (20.5%) serum thyrotropin levels. Of 97 patients with NTIS, 24 (23.3%) also showed reduced serum FT(4) levels. The NTIS was significantly associated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health II scores, mortality, length of stay, and mechanical ventilation. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, the combination of low FT(3) and low FT(4) was an independent risk factor for survival. Nonthyroidal illness syndrome is frequent at a medical ICU. A reduction of FT(4) together with FT(3) is associated with an increase in mortality and might reflect a maladaptive process, thereby worsening the disease.

  6. An exploratory examination of medical gas booms versus traditional headwalls in intensive care unit design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Debajyoti; Evans, Jennie; Waggener, Laurie; Harvey, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Should power, medical gases, and monitoring and communications systems be located in a headwall or a ceiling-mounted boom in intensive care unit (ICU) rooms? Often, only the financial costs could be determined for the options, whereas data regarding its potential influence on teamwork, safety, and efficiency are lacking. Hence, purchase decisions are more arbitrary than evidence based. This study simulated care delivery in settings with a traditional headwall and a ceiling boom. Observed were the way the following elements were managed and the extent either system affected flexibility, ergonomics, and teamwork: tubing for intravenous fluids, medical gases, and suction drainage; monitoring leads and equipment power cords; and the medical equipment itself. Simulation runs involving 6 scenarios were conducted with the voluntary participation of 2 physicians, 2 nurse practitioners, 2 respiratory therapists, and 4 registered nurses at a children's tertiary care center in December 2007. Analysis suggests that booms have an advantage over headwalls in case of high-acuity ICU patients and when procedures are performed inside patient rooms. However, in case of lower-acuity ICU patients, as well as when procedures are not typically conducted in the patient room, booms may not provide a proportionate level of advantage when compared with the additional cost involved in its procurement.

  7. Lormetazepam addiction: data analysis from an Italian medical unit for addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faccini M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Marco Faccini,1 Roberto Leone,2 Benedetta Pajusco,1 Gianluca Quaglio,1 Rebecca Casari,1 Anna Albiero,1 Monia Donati,2 Fabio Lugoboni11Department of Internal Medicine, Addiction Unit, 2Pharmacology Unit, Reference Center for Education and Communication within the World Health Organization Program for International Drug Monitoring, University Hospital of Verona, Verona, ItalyBackground: The purpose of this study was to determine, in the context of a hospital addiction unit, which benzodiazepines were abused and to look for correlations with the characteristics of detoxified patients.Methods: A retrospective study was carried out using the database of hospital admissions to the addiction unit for detoxification from 2003 to 2010.Results: Of 879 admissions to the addiction unit during the seven-year period, 281 were for benzodiazepines. The percentage of patients addicted only to benzodiazepines was higher among females than males. Benzodiazepine consumption had started as a drug addiction behavior in only 10% of cases. The main sources of prescription identified were general practitioners (52% of cases or compliant pharmacists (25%. Overall, 15 different benzodiazepines were abused, with lormetazepam being the most commonly used (by 123 patients, 43.8% of the total.Conclusion: Our data show that, outside the population of multidrug addicts, there is an underestimated group of chronic benzodiazepine consumers who are often not referred to medical institutions for treatment. Even in the group of patients addicted to one substance only, we observed an abnormal number of requests for detoxification from lormetazepam, which appears to be more "popular" than other benzodiazepines. This drug should be prescribed according to stricter criteria and submitted to closer control.Keywords: lormetazepam, benzodiazepines, addiction, inpatient detoxification

  8. Normalizing Heterogeneous Medical Imaging Data to Measure the Impact of Radiation Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luís A Bastião; Ribeiro, Luís S; Santos, Milton; Neves, Nuno; Francisco, Dulce; Costa, Carlos; Oliveira, José Luis

    2015-12-01

    The production of medical imaging is a continuing trend in healthcare institutions. Quality assurance for planned radiation exposure situations (e.g. X-ray, computer tomography) requires examination-specific set-ups according to several parameters, such as patient's age and weight, body region and clinical indication. These data are normally stored in several formats and with different nomenclatures, which hinder the continuous and automatic monitoring of these indicators and the comparison between several institutions and equipment. This article proposes a framework that aggregates, normalizes and provides different views over collected indicators. The developed tool can be used to improve the quality of radiologic procedures and also for benchmarking and auditing purposes. Finally, a case study and several experimental results related to radiation exposure and productivity are presented and discussed.

  9. Cryopreserved CD34(+) Cell Dose, but Not Total Nucleated Cell Dose, Influences Hematopoietic Recovery and Extensive Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease after Single-Unit Cord Blood Transplantation in Adult Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konuma, Takaaki; Kato, Seiko; Oiwa-Monna, Maki; Tanoue, Susumu; Ogawa, Miho; Isobe, Masamichi; Tojo, Arinobu; Takahashi, Satoshi

    2017-07-01

    Low cryopreserved total nucleated cell (TNC) dose in a cord blood (CB) unit has been shown to be associated with engraftment failure and mortality after single-unit cord blood transplantation (CBT) in adults. Although CB banks offer specific characteristics of cryopreserved cell dose, such as TNC, CD34(+) cells, and colony-forming unit for granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM), the impact of each cell dose on engraftment and outcomes after single-unit CBT in adults remains unclear. We retrospectively analyzed the results of 306 CBTs for 261 adult patients in our institution between 1998 and 2016. The median age was 43 years (range, 16 to 68), the median actual body weight (ABW) was 56.2 kg (range, 36.2 to 104.0), the median ideal body weight (IBW) was 62.3 kg (range, 39.7 to 81.3), the median TNC dose was 2.46 × 10(7)/ABW kg (range, 1.07 to 5.69), the median CD34(+) cell dose was .91 × 10(5)/ABW kg (range, .15 to 7.75), and the median CFU-GM dose was 24.46 × 10(3)/ABW kg (range, .04 to 121.81). Among patients who achieved engraftment, the speed of neutrophil, platelet, and red blood cell engraftment significantly correlated with CD34(+) cell dose, but not with TNC and CFU-GM dose, based on both ABW and IBW. In multivariate analysis, the incidence of extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was significantly higher in patients receiving the highest CD34(+) cell dose, based on both ABW and IBW. Nevertheless, no cell dose was associated with survival, transplantation-related mortality, and relapse. In conclusion, cryopreserved CD34(+) cell dose was the best predictor for hematopoietic recovery and extensive chronic GVHD after CBT. The cryopreserved CD34(+) cell dose should be used for unit selection criteria in single-unit CBT for adults. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Infectious Dose of Listeria monocytogenes in Outbreak Linked to Ice Cream, United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouillot, Régis; Klontz, Karl C; Chen, Yi; Burall, Laurel S; Macarisin, Dumitru; Doyle, Matthew; Bally, Kären M; Strain, Errol; Datta, Atin R; Hammack, Thomas S; Van Doren, Jane M

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between the number of ingested Listeria monocytogenes cells in food and the likelihood of developing listeriosis is not well understood. Data from an outbreak of listeriosis linked to milkshakes made from ice cream produced in 1 factory showed that contaminated products were distributed widely to the public without any reported cases, except for 4 cases of severe illness in persons who were highly susceptible. The ingestion of high doses of L. monocytogenes by these patients infected through milkshakes was unlikely if possible additional contamination associated with the preparation of the milkshake is ruled out. This outbreak illustrated that the vast majority of the population did not become ill after ingesting a low level of L. monocytogenes but raises the question of listeriosis cases in highly susceptible persons after distribution of low-level contaminated products that did not support the growth of this pathogen.

  11. A study on scattered dose in operation room by C-arm unit

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    An, Sung Min; Oh, Jung Hwan; Kim, Sung Chul [Gachon Gil College, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-04-15

    This paper studied a C-arm's exposure condition and measured scatter rays by thickness and distance. This study reached the following conclusion. Approximately exposure dose for a patient using fluoroscopy is as follows: Mostly, an operating room was not shielding by lead and operator put on only apron without thyroid and facial part protection. 0.5 mmPb equivalent's apron shielded about 99% of scattered rays at 60 cm from x-ray tube. Scattered rays are depended on distance and thickness so operators are should be careful when using fluoroscopy by C-arm and if possible use high frequency equipment that has a large output.

  12. The effect of robotic telerounding in the surgical intensive care units impact on medical education.

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    Marini, Corrado Paolo; Ritter, Garry; Sharma, Cordelia; McNelis, John; Goldberg, Michael; Barrera, Rafael

    2015-03-01

    Robotic telerounding is effective from the standpoint of patients' satisfaction and patients' care in teaching and community hospitals. However, the impact of robotic telerounding by the intensivist rounding remotely in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU), on patients' outcome and on the education of medical students physician assistants and surgical residents, as well as on nurses' satisfaction has not been studied. Prospective evaluation of robotic telerounding (RT) using a Likert Scale measuring tool to assess whether it can replace conventional rounding (CR) from the standpoint of patients' care and outcome, nursing satisfaction, and educational effectiveness. RT did not have a negative impact on patients' outcome during the study interval: mortality 5/42 (12 %) versus 6/37 (16 %), RT versus CR, respectively, p = 0.747. The intensivists rounding in the SICU were satisfied with their ability to deliver the same patients' care remotely (Likert score 4.4 ± 0.2). The educational experience of medical students, physicia assistants, and surgical residents was not affected by RT (average Likert score 4.5 ± 0.2, 3.9 ± 0.4, and 4.4 ± 0.4 for surgical residents, medical students and PAs, respectively, p > 0.05). However, as shown by a Likert score of 3.5 ± 1.0, RT did not meet nurses' expectations from several standpoints. Intensivists regard robotic telerounding as an effective alternative to conventional rounding from the standpoint of patients' care and teaching. Medical students, physician assistants (PA's), and surgical residents do not believe that RT compromises their education. Despite similar patients' outcome, nurses have a less favorable opinion of RT; they believe that the physical presence of the intensivist is favorable at all times.

  13. Pathogen germs response to low-dose radiation — medical approach

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    Focea R.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The side effects of radiation therapy in the case of microbial loading of irradiated organs was considered as phenomenological basis of the experiment carried out on Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC germ exposed to low X-ray doses. The inoculum was prepared in a liquid culture medium with standard composition, the volumes of 3 ml identical samples (in sterile glass tubes being irradiated in hospital conditions. Five experimental variants were developed corresponding to irradiation time durations between 25 and 100 minutes. The spectro-colorimetric assay was accomplished at 560 nm and 420 nm, the resulting average values (for three repetitions being analyzed from the viewpoint of cell density in the irradiated variants compared to control ones. The resistance to antibiotics of the irradiated bacteria was tested on agarized cultures against five antibiotic molecules (ampicillin, cloramphenicol, tetracycline, tobramicin and ofloxacin by assessing the diameter of inhibition growth areas in each case. The increase of the inhibition area diameter with up to 15% (in the case of tetracycline was noticed for the lowest irradiation time for all five antibiotics, which is suggesting a weakening of the bacteria resistance to the pharmaceutical agents following the X-ray treatment. This was concordant with the results of the spectro-colorimetric assay of the cell density within the directly irradiated bacteria cultures. The main issue of this study is concerning the optimization of the radiotherapy protocol in patients with potential microbial loading.

  14. Pathogen germs response to low-dose radiation — medical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poiata, A.; Focea, R.; Creanga, D.

    2012-04-01

    The side effects of radiation therapy in the case of microbial loading of irradiated organs was considered as phenomenological basis of the experiment carried out on Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC germ) exposed to low X-ray doses. The inoculum was prepared in a liquid culture medium with standard composition, the volumes of 3 ml identical samples (in sterile glass tubes) being irradiated in hospital conditions. Five experimental variants were developed corresponding to irradiation time durations between 25 and 100 minutes. The spectro-colorimetric assay was accomplished at 560 nm and 420 nm, the resulting average values (for three repetitions) being analyzed from the viewpoint of cell density in the irradiated variants compared to control ones. The resistance to antibiotics of the irradiated bacteria was tested on agarized cultures against five antibiotic molecules (ampicillin, cloramphenicol, tetracycline, tobramicin and ofloxacin) by assessing the diameter of inhibition growth areas in each case. The increase of the inhibition area diameter with up to 15% (in the case of tetracycline) was noticed for the lowest irradiation time for all five antibiotics, which is suggesting a weakening of the bacteria resistance to the pharmaceutical agents following the X-ray treatment. This was concordant with the results of the spectro-colorimetric assay of the cell density within the directly irradiated bacteria cultures. The main issue of this study is concerning the optimization of the radiotherapy protocol in patients with potential microbial loading.

  15. MONITORING OF INDIVIDUAL DOSES FOR MEDICAL WORKERS OF DENTAL POLYCLINIC’S X-RAY ROOMS IN DUSHANBE, THE REPUBLIC OF TADJIKISTAN

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    N. U. Hakimova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data and analyses of personnel’s average annual external exposure doses monitoring via the thermoluminescent dosimetry method used for X-ray radiological personnel in dental polyclinics of Dushanbe, Tadjikistan Republic over a 5-year period ( 2010–2014 . Out of 42 registered medical institutions dental polyclinics amounted up to only just 14%. For this work thermoluminescent dosimeters were used ( with LiF: Mg, Ti with the thermoluminescent dosimetric installation “ Harshaw – 4500” as the reader device. Monitoring results comparison of individual dose equivalent Hp ( 10 values was conducted for two groups of medical workers: medical doctors and X-ray lab technicians. It is demonstrated that radiological technicians’ professional exposure doses are on the average by 23% higher than those for medical doctors.The average individual exposure doses over the above indicated period amount to 0,93 mSv and 1,3 mSv for doctors and X-ray lab technicians, respectively, and are in the range from 0,45 mSv to 2,39 mSv. The doses include contribution from the natural background. The values of doses recorded for the personnel in dental polyclinic correspond to those recorded for the workers in the routine X-ray rooms.

  16. Tobacco counseling experience prior to starting medical school, tobacco treatment self-efficacy and knowledge among first-year medical students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rui S; Hayes, Rashelle B; Waring, Molly E; Geller, Alan C; Churchill, Linda C; Okuyemi, Kolawole S; Adams, Michael; Huggett, Kathryn N; Ockene, Judith K

    2015-04-01

    To explore students' tobacco dependence counseling experiences prior to medical school and their associations with tobacco counseling self-efficacy, and familiarity with and perceived effectiveness of tobacco dependence treatment among first-year medical students in the United States. In 2010, 1266 first-year medical students from 10 US medical schools completed a survey reporting their clinical experiences with specific tobacco counseling skills (e.g., 5As) prior to medical school. The survey also included questions on tobacco counseling self-efficacy, perceived physician impact on smokers, and familiarity and effectiveness of tobacco-related treatments. Half (50.4%) reported some tobacco counseling experiences prior to medical school (i.e. at least one 5A). Students with prior counseling experiences were more likely to have higher tobacco counseling self-efficacy, and greater familiarity with medication treatment, nicotine replacement treatment, and behavioral counseling for smoking cessation, compared to those with no prior experiences. Perceived physician impact on patient smoking outcomes did not differ by prior tobacco counseling experiences. Many first-year medical students may already be primed to learn tobacco dependence counseling skills. Enhancing early exposure to learning these skills in medical school is likely to be beneficial to the skillset of our future physicians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Obesity in the United States—dysbiosis from exposure to low-dose antibiotics?

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    Lee W Riley

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase in obesity prevalence in the United States in the last 20 years is unprecedented and not well explained. Here, we explore a hypothesis that the obesity epidemic may be driven by population-wide chronic exposures to low-residue antibiotics that have increasingly entered the American food chain over the same time period. We propose this hypothesis based on two recent bodies of published reports—1 those that provide evidence for the spread of antibiotics into the American food chain, and 2 those that examine the relationship between the gut microbiota and body physiology. The livestock use of antimicrobial agents has sharply increased in the US over the same 20-year period of the obesity epidemic, especially with the expansion of intensified livestock production, such as the concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs. Observational and experimental studies support the idea that changes in the intestinal microbiota exert a profound effect on body physiology. We propose that chronic exposures to low-residue antimicrobial drugs in food could disrupt the equilibrium state of intestinal microbiota and cause dysbiosis that can contribute to changes in body physiology. The obesity epidemic in the United States may be partly driven by the mass exposure of Americans to food containing low-residue antimicrobial agents. While this hypothesis cannot discount the impact of diet and other factors associated with obesity, we believe studies are warranted to consider this possible driver of the epidemic.

  18. Digitoxin medication and cancer; case control and internal dose-response studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spigset Olav

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Digitoxin induces apoptosis in different human malignant cell lines in vitro. In this paper we investigated if patients taking digitoxin for cardiac disease have a different cancer incidence compared to the general population. Methods Computer stored data on digitoxin concentrations in plasma from 9271 patients with cardiac disease were used to define a user population. Age and sex matched controls from the Norwegian Cancer Registry were used to calculate the number of expected cancer cases. Results The population on digitoxin showed a higher incidence of cancer compared to the control population. However, an additional analysis showed that the population on digitoxin had a general increased risk of cancer already, before the start on digitoxin. Leukemia/lymphoma were the cancer types which stood out with the highest risk in the digitoxin population before starting on digitoxin. This indicates that yet unknown risk factors exist for cardiovascular disease and lymphoproliferative cancer. An internal dose-response analysis revealed a relationship between high plasma concentration of digitoxin and a lower risk for leukemia/lymphoma and for cancer of the kidney/urinary tract. Conclusion Morbidity and mortality are high in the population on digitoxin, due to high age and cardiac disease.These factors disturb efforts to isolate an eventual anticancer effect of digitoxin in this setting. Still, the results may indicate an anticancer effect of digitoxin for leukemia/lymphoma and kidney/urinary tract cancers. Prospective clinical cancer trials have to be done to find out if digitoxin and other cardiac glycosides are useful as anticancer agents.

  19. Protection against bubonic and pneumonic plague with a single dose microencapsulated sub-unit vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvin, Stephen J; Eyles, James E; Howard, Kenneth A; Ravichandran, Easwaran; Somavarappu, Satyanarayan; Alpar, H Oya; Williamson, E Diane

    2006-05-15

    Protection against virulent plague challenge by the parenteral and aerosol routes was afforded by a single administration of microencapsulated Caf1 and LcrV antigens from Yersinia pestis in BALB/c mice. Recombinant Caf1 and LcrV were individually encapsulated in polymeric microspheres, to the surface of which additional antigen was adsorbed. The microspheres containing either Caf1 or LcrV were blended and used to immunise mice on a single occasion, by either the intra-nasal or intra-muscular route. Both routes of immunisation induced systemic and local immune responses, with high levels of serum IgG being developed in response to both vaccine antigens. In Elispot assays, secretion of cytokines by spleen and draining lymph node cells was demonstrated, revealing activation of both Th1 and Th2 associated cytokines; and spleen cells from animals immunised by either route were found to proliferate in vitro in response to both vaccine antigens. Virulent challenge experiments demonstrated that non-invasive immunisation by intra-nasal instillation can provide strong systemic and local immune responses and protect against high level challenge. Microencapsulation of these vaccine antigens has the added advantage that controlled release of the antigens occurs in vivo, so that protective immunity can be induced after only a single immunising dose.

  20. A renewed Medication Adherence Alliance call to action: harnessing momentum to address medication nonadherence in the United States

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    Zullig LL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Leah L Zullig,1,2 Bradi B Granger,3 Hayden B Bosworth,1–4 On behalf of the Medication Adherence Alliance 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 2Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Duke University, 3Duke Heart Center Nursing Research Program, School of Nursing, Duke University, 4Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA The problem: Nonadherence to prescription medications is a common and costly problem with multiple contributing factors, spanning the dimensions of individual behavior change, psychology, medicine, and health policy, among others. Addressing the problem of medication nonadherence requires strategic input from key experts in a number of fields.Meeting of experts: The Medication Adherence Alliance is a group of key experts, predominately from the US, in the field of medication nonadherence. Members include representatives from consumer advocacy groups, community health providers, nonprofit groups, the academic community, decision-making government officials, and industry. In 2015, the Medication Adherence Alliance convened to review the current landscape of medication adherence. The group then established three working groups that will develop recommendations for shifting toward solutions-oriented science.Commentary of expert opinion: From the perspective of the Medication Adherence Alliance, the objective of this commentary is to describe changes in the US landscape of medication adherence, framing the evolving field in the context of a recent think tank meeting of experts in the field of medication adherence. Keywords: medication adherence, health planning recommendations, chronic disease

  1. The Effects of Korean Medical Service Quality and Satisfaction on Revisit Intention of the United Arab Emirates Government Sponsored Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seoyoung; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate medical service quality, satisfaction and to examine factors influencing hospital revisit intention of the United Arab Emirates government sponsored patients in Korea. A total of 152 UAE government sponsored patients who visited Korean hospitals participated in the questionnaire survey from August to November 2016. Stepwise multiple regression was used to identify the factors that affected the revisit intention of the participants. The mean scores of medical service quality, satisfaction, and revisit intention were 5.72 out of 7, 88.88 out of 100, 4.59 out of 5, respectively. Medical service quality and satisfaction, Medical service quality and revisit intention, satisfaction and revisit intention were positively correlated. Medical service of physician, visiting routes and responsiveness of medical service quality explained about 23.8% of revisit intention. There are needs for physicians to communicate with patients while ensuring sufficient consultation time based on excellent medical skills and nurses to respond immediately for the patients' needs through an empathic encounter in order to improve medical service quality and patient satisfaction so that to increase the revisit intention of the United Arab Emirates government sponsored patients. Further, it is necessary for the hospitals to have support plans for providing country specialized services in consideration of the UAE culture to ensure that physicians' and nurses' competencies are not undervalued by non-medical service elements such as interpreters and meals. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Magnitude of radiation doses received during diagnostic exposure in medical practice;Ordre de grandeur des doses recues lors des expositions diagnostiques en pratique medicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chateil, J.F. [CHU Bordeaux, 33 (France); Brisse, H. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2009-10-15

    It is essential that every radiologist is able to appreciate the level of the dose delivered by the usual explorations. The comparison with other source of radiation is possible by the appreciation of the efficient dose that takes into account the expected biological effect. The transcription on the examination report of elements allowing to know the delivered dose is compulsory. from this data, it is possible by simple calculations to evaluate the level of delivered dose and then to know the order of magnitude of irradiation. Simple formula taking into account the anatomical area are proposed from dose.surface product (conventional radiology) and dose.length product (CT scanning). This constitutes an important element of dialogue with the patient. (N.C.)

  3. Adolescents and young adults on the acute medical unit: how might we do it better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albon, Lorraine; Vaughan, Louella

    2014-12-01

    It is a common perception that young people do not become ill and do not pose a challenge in the unscheduled healthcare setting. The research, however, increasingly suggests that young adults and adolescents (YAAs) are a highly vulnerable group, with poorer outcomes than either older adults or children, and distinct healthcare needs. The acute medical unit (AMU) setting poses particular challenges to the care of this patient group. To improve care and patient experience, adult clinicians need to look critically at their services and seek to adapt them to meet the needs of YAAs. This requires cooperation and linkage with local paediatric and emergency services, as well as the input of other relevant stakeholder groups. Staff on AMUs also need to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes to communicate effectively and address the developmental and health needs of YAAs and their parents/carers at times of high risk and stress.

  4. [From empowerment to customer satisfaction: experience of a medical oncology unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifaldi, L; Gareri, R; Cristina, G; Felicetti, V; Gremigni, U

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was the objective assessment of the outpatients satisfaction of the Medical Oncology Unit in Colleferro (USL Roma G), Italy. A retrospective survey conducted on 584 patients using a closed questionnaire focusing on nine items assess the degree of satisfaction expressed by patients relating to the different aspects of the service. The main aspects object of analysis were the accommodation, the relationship with the staff, the comfort of the structure and the health assistance received. The survey showed a high percentage of overall satisfaction for each of the nine parameters evaluated. There were no significant differences appreciated on a personal variables. The evaluation of customer satisfaction is a useful tool to measure patients approval and to meet their needs.

  5. The Sociology of the Deceased Harvard Medical Unit at Boston City Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishler, Peter V

    2015-12-01

    Many graduates of the Harvard Medical Unit (HMU) at Boston City Hospital, in either the clinical training/residency program or the research program at the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, contributed in major ways to the HMU and constantly relived their HMU experiences. The HMU staff physicians, descending from founder and mentor physicians Francis W. Peabody, Soma Weiss, and George R. Minot, were dedicated to the teaching, development, and leadership of its clinical and research trainees, whose confidence and dedication to patient care as a result of their mentorship led many to lifelong achievements as clinicians, teachers, and mentors. Their experience also led to a lifelong love of the HMU (despite its loss), camaraderie, happiness, and intense friendships with their associates.

  6. Medical cautery units as a permanent and non-invasive method of marking lizards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ekner

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The identification of previously captured individuals is essential for a wide variety of ecological and behavioural studies. A lot of different methods are used for marking lizards, however they have many drawbacks. In presented study we used heat-branding method, using pen-like medical cautery units, previously employed to successfully mark other lizard species and snakes. The technique is permanent, readable and harmless for lizards, as well quick and easy. In 2009 we marked 111 individuals of sand lizard, Lacerta agilis. Next year we caught 88 lizards, 17 of them were re-captured. Among these re-captured lizards, five were caught after 26.8 (± 16.3 days (means in the same year and 12 after 308.8 (± 64.3 days (means in the next year. Recaptured individuals were still unambiguously recognisable.

  7. Description of Medication Administration by Emergency Medical Services during Mass-casualty Incidents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Mazen; Tamim, Hani; Mann, N Clay

    2016-04-01

    Emergency Medical Services (EMS) preparedness and availability of essential medications are important to reduce morbidity and mortality from mass-casualty incidents (MCIs). This study describes prehospital medication administration during MCIs by different EMS service levels. The US National EMS Public-Release Research Dataset maintained by the National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) was used to carry out the study. Emergency Medical Services activations coded as MCI at dispatch, or by EMS personnel, were included. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) service level was used for the level of service provided. A descriptive analysis of medication administration by EMS service level was carried out. Among the 19,831,189 EMS activations, 53,334 activations had an MCI code, of which 26,110 activations were included. There were 8,179 (31.3%) Advanced Life Support (ALS), 5,811 (22.3%) Basic Life Support (BLS), 399 (1.5%) Air Medical Transport (AMT; fixed or rotary), and 38 (0.2%) Specialty Care Transport (SCT) activations. More than 80 different medications from 18 groups were reported. Seven thousand twenty-one activations (26.9%) had at least one medication administered. Oxygen was most common (16.3%), followed by crystalloids (6.9%), unknown (5.2%), analgesics (3.2%) mainly narcotics, antiemetics (1.5%), cardiac/vasopressors/inotropes (0.9%), bronchodilators (0.9%), sedatives (0.8%), and vasodilators/antihypertensives (0.7%). Overall, medication administration rates and frequencies of medications groups significantly varied between EMS service levels (Psystems can use the findings of this study to better prepare their stockpiles for MCIs.

  8. Cases of organophosphate poisoning treated with high-dose of atropine in an intensive care unit and the novel treatment approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Ali; Celik, Muhammet Murat; Karcioglu, Murat; Tuzcu, Kasim; Erden, Ersin Sukru; Zeren, Cem

    2014-06-01

    Organophosphate poisoning is a life-threatening condition, which is being responsible for the symptoms due to cholinergic effects. Clinical status and blood levels of cholinesterase are used its diagnosis. While atropine and pralidoxime (PAM) appear as essential medications, hemofiltration treatments and lipid solutions have been widely studied in recent years. In this study, the importance of high-dose atropine therapy and early intervention and novel treatment approaches are discussed. Records of a total of 25 patients treated for organophosphate poisoning in the intensive care unit (ICU) between April 2007 and December 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 25 patients, 14 (56%) were male and 11 (44%) were female with a mean age of 34.8 ± 17.66 years (range: 14-77 years). The patients were most frequently admitted in June (n = 4) and July (n = 4) (16%). Of the 25 patients, 22 patients (88%) were poisoned by oral intake, two (8%) by inhalation, and one (4%) by dermal route. Of them, 20 patients (80%) took organophosphates intentionally for suicidal purposes, while five (20%) cases poisoned due to accidental exposure. The scores of Glasgow Coma Scale of nine patients (36%) were below 8 point upon admission to hospital. The highest dose of atropine given was 100 mg intravenously on admission and 100 mg/h/day during follow-up. The total dose given was 11.6 g/12 days. A total of 11 patients (44%) were on mechanical ventilation for a mean duration of 5.73 ± 4.83 days. The mean duration of ICU stay was 6.52 ± 4.80 days. Of all, 23 patients (92%) were discharged in good clinical condition and one patient (4%) was referred to another hospital. This study suggests that atropine can be administered until secretions disappear and intensive care should be exerted in follow-up of these patients. In addition, in case of necessity for high doses, sufficient amounts of atropine and PAM should be available in hospitals.

  9. THE ROLE OF AUTOPSY IN MEDICAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT: COMPARISON OF CLINICAL AND POSTMORTEM DIAGNOSES

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    Vandana Tukaram

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Autopsy is an essential auditing tool in clinical practice. The autopsy teaches us not only what is killing people right now, but points to what will kill us in the near future. This is the first autopsy study in Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU in India as per our knowledge. METHODS Retro-prospective study of total of 141 medical autopsies of MICU deaths performed in the Department of Pathology during a period of three years. A meticulous study was performed to compare ante-mortem clinical diagnosis and post-mortem final cause of death. Cases showing a discrepancy between the clinical diagnosis and post-mortem final cause of death were categorized into IV classes according to Goldman classification. RESULTS Maximum autopsies were performed in 21-40 years (58.15%. Female preponderance noted. Non-infectious aetiology was most common cause of death (50%, of which lesions of respiratory system were the most common (33.8%. Amongst the infections, pneumonia was the most common cause of death (29.23%. Discrepancies between ante-mortem and post-mortem were noted in 63 cases (44.68%. Class I and class II discrepancies were 49.21% and 44.45%, respectively. CONCLUSION Our study stresses that routine autopsy is still very useful in MICU and emphasis must be placed on autopsy evaluation for the improvement of quality of patient care.

  10. MEDICAL BRIGADES, GLOBAL HEALTH AND THE UNITED NATIONS: MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DEVELOPING NATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portman, Mark T; Martin, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Recently, recommendations have been made that global health initiatives change their focus from disease specific intervention to bolstering health systems and general health care. The aim of this is to ultimately increase access to primary care, clean water, education, hygiene, and prevent malnutrition, among other goals. While many major global health initiatives have followed this trend, so have many smaller scale programs including short-term medical brigades. Despite a trending increase in the number of privately run short-term medical brigades, until recently, little research has been done on the potential positive and negative effects that can arise from such programs. Now, guidelines have been initiated to create well-structured programs. When followed, these smaller scale initiatives can be successful in helping increase access to healthcare, sustainably strengthening communities in terms of general health. While recent legislation in the United States has addressed domestic policy in the Patient Protection Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA), the ACA should also consider some of the basic "sustainable" policies being implemented by international health care providers.

  11. [Quality analysis by external users of the non-medical health transport unit of Alicante].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano Clemor, C; Cano, F Soriano; Gimeno, F Morant

    2011-01-01

    Non-medical health transport has great health, media and social repercussions and requires a very considerable amount of human and economic resources. To describe the quality, evaluated by external users of our Health Department, in order to know what are the most important elements for external users. Cross-sectional, descriptive observational study. Population to study: patients with a social security health card who come to the Hospital of Alicante and are non-medical health transport unit users. Waiting time to be delivered to hospital in 92.7% of the cases was less than an hour, and was between one and two hours for 7.2%. The most frequent destinations were rehabilitation service and outpatient clinics. When users were asked if the would recommend this service, 60.9% said "for sure" and 39.1% said "probably yes". This study allows us to know patient needs and expectations, as well as the factors they value the most and which of our work areas to improve. Copyright © 2009 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Variation in use of antipsychotic medications in nursing homes in the United States: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioltan, Hannah; Alshehri, Samah; Howe, Carol; Lee, Jeannie; Fain, Mindy; Eng, Howard; Schachter, Kenneth; Mohler, Jane

    2017-01-26

    The use of antipsychotic medications (APMs) in nursing home residents in the U.S. is an increasingly prominent issue and has been associated with increased risk of hospitalization, cardiovascular events, hip fractures, and mortality, among other adverse health events. The Food and Drug Administration has placed a black box warning on these drugs, specifying that they are not meant for residents with dementia, and has asked providers to review their treatment plans. The purpose of this systematic PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses)-based review was to summarize original research studies on facility level characteristics contributing to the use of antipsychotics in nursing homes across the United States, in order to investigate the variation of use. We searched Ovid Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and Sociological Abstracts. Articles were selected according to the following criteria: (1) Population of interest: older adults (≥60 years of age) residing in nursing homes (not home-based or inpatient hospital settings) in the U.S. (2) Receiving APMs, typical and/or atypical. Specifically excluded were studies of psychotropic medications such as antidepressants, benzodiazepines, anxiolytics, hypnotics, mood stabilizers, and stimulants. All study designs were considered, though reviews, editorials, letters to the editor and opinion pieces were excluded. An expert consultant panel was consulted to categorize facility characteristics into domains and determine possible etiologies of APM use based upon each characteristic. Nineteen observational studies, both quantitative and qualitative, published from 2000 to 2015, met full inclusion criteria and were included in this review. APM use varied based on multiple facility characteristics across several domains: 1) physical, 2) staffing, 3) occupancy, 4) market, and 5) quality. Variation in use of APMs in U.S. nursing homes based upon facility

  13. Improving medical student intensive care unit communication skills: a novel educational initiative using standardized family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorin, Scott; Rho, Lisa; Wisnivesky, Juan P; Nierman, David M

    2006-09-01

    To determine whether intensive care unit (ICU) communication skills of fourth-year medical students could be improved by an educational intervention using a standardized family member. Prospective study conducted from August 2003 to May 2004. Tertiary care university teaching hospital. All fourth-year students were eligible to participate during their mandatory four-week critical care medicine clerkship. The educational intervention focused on the initial meeting with the family member of an ICU patient and included formal teaching of a communication framework followed by a practice session with an actor playing the role of a standardized family member of a fictional patient. At the beginning of the critical care medicine rotation, the intervention group received the educational session, whereas students in the control group did not. At the end of each critical care medicine rotation, all students interacted with a different standardized family member portraying a different fictional scenario. Sessions were videotaped and were scored by an investigator blinded to treatment assignment using a standardized grading tool across four domains: a) introduction; b) gathering information; c) imparting information; and d) setting goals and expectations. A total of 106 (97% of eligible) medical students agreed to participate in the study. The total mean score as well as the scores for the gathering information, imparting information, setting goals, and expectations domains for the intervention group were significantly higher than for the control group (p communication skills of fourth-year medical students can be improved by teaching and then practicing a framework for an initial ICU communication episode with a standardized family member.

  14. Globalization of health care delivery in the United States through medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sameer; Breuing, Richard; Chahal, Rajneet

    2012-01-01

    This study highlights some of the inefficiencies in the U.S. health care system and determines what effect medical tourism has had on the U.S. and global health care supply chains. This study also calls attention to insufficient health communication efforts to inform uninsured or underinsured medical tourists about the benefits and risks and determines the managerial and cost implications of various surgical procedures on the global health care system into the future. This study evaluated 3 years (2005, 2007, and 2011) of actual and projected surgical cost data. The authors selected 3 countries for analysis: the United States, India, and Thailand. The surgeries chosen for evaluation were total knee replacement (knee arthroplasty), hip replacement (hip arthroplasty), and heart bypass (coronary artery bypass graft). Comparisons of costs were made using Monte Carlo simulation with variability encapsulated by triangular distributions. The results are staggering. In 2005, the amount of money lost to India and Thailand on just these 3 surgeries because of cost inefficiencies in the U.S. health care system was between 1.3 to 2 billion dollars. In 2011, because many more Americans are expected to travel overseas for health care, this amount is anticipated to rise to between 20 and 30.2 billion dollars. Therefore, more attention should be paid to health communication efforts that truly illustrate the benefits/risks of medical travel. The challenge of finding reliable data for surgeries performed and associated surgical cost estimates was mitigated by the use of a Monte Carlo simulation of triangular distributions. The implications from this study are clear: If the U.S. health care industry is unable to eliminate waste and inefficiency and thus curb rising costs, it will continue to lose surgical revenue to foreign health providers. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  15. Implementation of unit-based interventions to improve teamwork and patient safety on a medical service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Kevin J; Creden, Amanda J; Slade, Maureen E; Landler, Matthew P; Kulkarni, Nita; Lee, Jungwha; Vozenilek, John A; Pfeifer, Pamela; Eller, Susan; Wayne, Diane B; Williams, Mark V

    2015-01-01

    In a prior study involving 2 medical units, Structured Interdisciplinary Rounds (SIDRs) improved teamwork and reduced adverse events (AEs). SIDR was implemented on 5 additional units, and a pre- versus postintervention comparison was performed. SIDR combined a structured format for communication with daily interprofessional meetings. Teamwork was assessed using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (score range = 0-100), and AEs were identified using queries of information systems confirmed by 2 physician researchers. Paired analyses for 82 professionals completing surveys both pre and post implementation revealed improved teamwork (mean 76.8 ± 14.3 vs 80.5 ± 11.6; P = .02), which was driven mainly by nurses (76.4 ± 14.1 vs 80.8 ± 10.4; P = .009). The AE rate was similar across study periods (3.90 vs 4.07 per 100 patient days; adjusted IRR = 1.08; P = .60). SIDR improved teamwork yet did not reduce AEs. Higher baseline teamwork scores and lower AE rates than the prior study may reflect a positive cultural shift that began prior to the current study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Screening difficult-to-reach populations for tuberculosis using a mobile medical unit, Punjab India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binepal, G.; Agarwal, P.; Kaur, N.; Singh, B.; Bhagat, V.; Verma, R. P.; Satyanarayana, S.; Oeltmann, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In India, the National Health Mission has provided one mobile medical unit (MMU) per district in the state of Punjab to provide primary health care services for difficult-to-reach populations. Objectives: To determine the number of patients with presumptive tuberculosis (TB) and the number of TB cases detected and treated among patients who used the MMU services from May to December 2012 in Mohali district, Punjab, India. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted and registers of the out-patient, laboratory, radiology, and TB departments of the MMU were reviewed to determine the number of persons presumed to have TB and the number of persons diagnosed with TB. Results: Of 8346 patients who attended the MMUs, 663 (8%) had symptoms suggestive of TB. Among those with TB symptoms, 540 (81%) were evaluated for pulmonary TB using sputum examination or chest X-ray. In total, 58 (11%) patients had clinical or laboratory evidence of pulmonary TB, of whom 21 (36%) started anti-tuberculosis treatment. Conclusion: As MMUs are an integral part of the general public health system, these units have the potential to detect TB cases among difficult-to-reach populations. Additional research is required to optimise the diagnosis of TB at MMUs and to increase rates of TB treatment initiation. PMID:26767177

  17. Advancing science diplomacy: Indonesia and the US Naval Medical Research Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Frank L

    2014-12-01

    Science diplomacy supposedly builds international cooperation through scientific and technical exchange. In practice, however, there are important but often overlooked instances where it might create conflict instead--as with accusations of espionage surrounding the US Naval Medical Research Unit 2 (NAMRU-2) in Indonesia. Did American science diplomacy backfire in Indonesia and, if so, why? Most literature fails to anticipate this possibility, let alone explain it, since science diplomacy is rarely subject to critical analysis. Rather than shun politics or, similarly, simply blame the demise of NAMRU-2 on the military or avian influenza, I consider both the successes and failures of this research unit in the context of Indonesia's transition to democracy and America's legacy from the Cold War. Based on this history, I propose that the effects of science diplomacy depend on strategic communication and exchange, as well as elite influence and material incentives. Therefore, by challenging the conventional wisdom about science diplomacy, NAMRU-2 can help advance the theory and practice of this potentially useful tool of statecraft.

  18. Recovery of cost of hospital and medical care and treatment furnished by the United States; delegation of authority. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    This rule amends Department of Justice regulations to increase the settlement and waiver authority delegated to heads of departments and agencies of the United States responsible for the furnishing of hospital, medical, surgical, or dental care. This change responds to the increase in medical costs since 1992, when the current level of delegated settlement and waiver authority was established, and will further the efficient operation of the government.

  19. Analysis of the discrepancies identified during medication reconciliation on patient admission in cardiology units: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Natália Fracaro; Mendes, Antonio Eduardo Matoso; Lucchetta, Rosa Camila; Reis, Wálleri Christini Torelli; Fávero, Maria Luiza Drechsel; Correr, Cassyano Januário

    2016-08-15

    this observational study aimed to describe the discrepancies identified during medication reconciliation on patient admission to cardiology units in a large hospital. the medication history of patients was collected within 48 hours after admission, and intentional and unintentional discrepancies were classified as omission, duplication, dose, frequency, timing, and route of drug administration. most of the patients evaluated were women (58.0%) with a mean age of 59 years, and 75.5% of the patients had a Charlson comorbidity index score between 1 and 3. Of the 117 discrepancies found, 50.4% were unintentional. Of these, 61.0% involved omission, 18.6% involved dosage, 18.6% involved timing, and 1.7% involved the route of drug administration. this study revealed a high prevalence of discrepancies, most of which were related to omissions, and 50% were unintentional. These results reveal the number of drugs that are not reincorporated into the treatment of patients, which can have important clinical consequences. este estudo observacional teve como objetivo descrever discrepâncias encontradas na realização de conciliação medicamentosa de pacientes admitidos em unidades de cardiologia de um hospital de grande porte. a história de medicação dos pacientes foi coletada dentro de 48h após a admissão, e as discrepâncias, identificadas como intencionais ou não intencionais, foram classificadas como de: omissão, duplicidade, dose, frequência, intervalo e via. a maioria dos pacientes incluídos pertençia ao sexo feminino (58,0%), com idade média de 59 anos, e com índice de comorbidades de Charlson entre 1 e 3 (75,5% dos casos). Das 117 discrepâncias encontradas, 50,4% foram não intencionais. Dessas, 61,0% foram de omissão, 18,6% de dose, 18,6% de intervalo e 1,7% de via de administração. o estudo mostra a alta prevalência de discrepâncias, principalmente de omissão, sendo quase metade não intencionais. Esse dado remete ao número de medicamentos que n

  20. Timing of HPV vaccine intervals among United States teens with consideration to the current ACIP schedule and the WHO 2-dose schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloessner, Emily A; Stokley, Shannon; Yankey, David; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2016-06-02

    The current recommendation for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in the United States is for 3 doses to be administered over a 6 month period. In April 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended adoption of a 2-dose schedule, with doses spaced a minimum of 6 months apart, for teens who begin the series before age 15. We analyzed data from the 2013 National Immunization Survey-Teen to examine the timing of second and third dose receipt among US adolescents. All analyses were restricted to adolescents age 13-17 y who had adequate provider data. The Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test measured differences in time to receive vaccine doses among demographic and socioeconomic groups. Logistic regression identified socioeconomic characteristics associated with receiving the second dose of HPV vaccine at least 6 months after the first dose. The median time for teens to receive the second dose of HPV vaccine was 2.6 months after the first dose, and the median time to receive the third dose was 4.9 months after the second dose. Minority teens and teens living below the poverty level took significantly longer to receive doses. Among teens that initiated the HPV vaccine series before age 15 y, 28.6% received the second dose at least 6 months after the first dose. If these teens, who met the WHO criteria for up-to-date HPV vaccination, were classified as having completed the vaccination series, overall coverage in the US would increase 3.9 percentage points, with African American and Hispanic teens having the greatest increases in coverage.

  1. Individual and work-unit measures of psychological demands and decision latitude and the use of antihypertensive medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, S; Andersen, JH; Grynderup, M B

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyse whether psychological demands and decision latitude measured on individual and work-unit level were related to prescription of antihypertensive medication. METHODS: A total of 3,421 women and 897 men within 388 small work units completed a questionnaire concerning psychological...... working conditions according to the job strain model. Mean levels of psychological demands and decision latitude were computed for each work unit to obtain exposure measures that were less influenced by reporting bias. Dispensed antihypertensive medication prescriptions were identified in The Danish...... National Prescription Registry. Odds ratios (OR) comparing the highest and lowest third of the population at individual and work-unit level, respectively, were estimated by multilevel logistic regression adjusted for confounders. Psychological demands and decision latitude were tested for interaction...

  2. Maximum dose angle for oblique incidence on primary beam protective barriers in the design of medical radiation therapy facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondevila, Damián; Arbiser, Silvio; Sansogne, Rosana; Brunetto, Mónica; Dosoretz, Bernardo

    2008-05-01

    Primary barrier determinations for the shielding of medical radiation therapy facilities are generally made assuming normal beam incidence on the barrier, since this is geometrically the most unfavorable condition for that shielding barrier whenever the occupation line is allowed to run along the barrier. However, when the occupation line (for example, the wall of an adjacent building) runs perpendicular to the barrier (especially roof barrier), then two opposing factors come in to play: increasing obliquity angle with respect to the barrier increases the attenuation, while the distance to the calculation point decreases, hence, increasing the dose. As a result, there exists an angle (alpha(max)) for which the equivalent dose results in a maximum, constituting the most unfavorable geometric condition for that shielding barrier. Based on the usual NCRP Report No. 151 model, this article presents a simple formula for obtaining alpha(max), which is a function of the thickness of the barrier (t(E)) and the equilibrium tenth-value layer (TVL(e)) of the shielding material for the nominal energy of the beam. It can be seen that alpha(max) increases for increasing TVL(e) (hence, beam energy) and decreases for increasing t(E), with a range of variation that goes from 13 to 40 deg for concrete barriers thicknesses in the range of 50-300 cm and most commercially available teletherapy machines. This parameter has not been calculated in the existing literature for radiotherapy facilities design and has practical applications, as in calculating the required unoccupied roof shielding for the protection of a nearby building located in the plane of the primary beam rotation.

  3. Dose optimization for different medical imaging tasks from exposure index, exposure control factor, and MAS in digital radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Menglong; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yaying; Chen, Weixia; Hou, Lixia

    2012-09-01

    In radiographic examination, not all medical imaging tasks require the same level of image quality or diagnostic information. Criteria should be established for different imaging tasks to avoid excessive doses where there is no clear net benefit in the diagnosis or the image quality. An exposure index provided by manufacturers would be a useful tool for this purpose. This study aims to establish an optimum exposure index to be used as a guideline for clinical imaging tasks to minimize radiation exposure for chest digital radiography. A three-level classification of image quality (high, medium, and low) for chest imaging tasks was carried out. An anthropomorphic phantom was employed to establish minimum exposure index and exposure (mAs) for clinical imaging task type I (corresponding to high image quality). The exposures of medium and low quality images derived from it. Thirty patients were exposed consecutively with these optimized exposure factors, and clinical tasks were considered, while another 30 patients were exposed with the exposure factors routinely used in practice. Image quality was assessed objectively by a consensus panel. The optimized exposure provided a significant reduction of the mean exposure index from 1,556 to 1,207 (p < 0.0001) and mean patient's entrance surface dose from 0.168 mGy to 0.092 mGy (p < 0.0001). The results show that a clinical-task-determined radiographic procedure is more conducive to radiation protection of patients. In this study, the posteroanterior chest imaging examination was chosen as an example. This procedure can also apply to other body parts and views.

  4. Erros medicamentosos em unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal Medication errors in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Bandeira de Melo Escovedo Lerner

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a incidência e o tipo de erros médicos em uma unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal e a relação entre o erro e o estado clínico do paciente. MÉTODOS: Revisamos os prontuários médicos, durante os primeiros 7 dias de hospitalização, de todos os recém-nascidos de alto risco admitidos por um período de 3 meses. RESULTADOS: Setenta e três pacientes foram admitidos durante o período de estudo. A média de peso de nascimento foi de 2.140 g (640-5.020 g, e a idade gestacional média foi de 34 semanas (25-40 semanas. Dos 73 prontuários analisados, 40 (55% apresentaram um ou mais erros. Um total de 365 dias de hospitalização foi analisado, e 95 erros médicos foram detectados (um erro por 3,9 dias de hospitalização. O erro mais freqüente esteve associado com uso de medicamentos (84,2%. Uso de procedimentos terapêuticos (medicamentos, fototerapia, etc. sem prescrição adequada no prontuário do paciente (erro de comissão representou 7,4% dos erros, e a incidência de erros de omissão foi de 8,4%. A incidência de erros médicos foi significativamente maior em recém-nascidos com idade gestacional menor. CONCLUSÕES: A incidência de erros no cuidado de recém-nascidos de alto risco é elevada. Deve-se incentivar estratégias para melhorar a educação de profissionais da saúde envolvidos no cuidado e o desenvolvimento da cultura local, divulgando algoritmos claros e acessíveis para orientar o comportamento quando há ocorrência de erros.OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence and type of medical errors in a newborn intensive care unit and the relationship between the error and the patient's clinical status. METHODS: We reviewed the medical charts, during the first 7 days of hospitalization, of all high-risk newborn infants admitted for a period of 3 months. RESULTS: Seventy-three patients were admitted during the study period. Their mean birth weight was 2,140 g (640-5,020 g and mean gestational age was 34

  5. Impact of individualized learning plans on United States senior medical students advanced clinical rotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Guardiola

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The individualized learning plan (ILP is a tool that promotes self-directed learning. The aim of this pilot study was to look at the perception of the ILPs in United States senior medical school students as a way to improve their learning experience during their advanced practice clerkship. We conducted a survey of graduating medical students that contained both quantitative and open-ended questions regarding the students’ experiences with the ILP during their advanced practice clerkship from July 2014 to March 2016. We systematically identified and compiled themes among the qualitative responses. Responses from 294 out of 460 subjects were included for analysis (63.9%. Ninety students (30.6% reported that the ILP was definitely reviewed at the midpoint and 88 (29.9% at the final evaluation. One hundred sixty one students (54.8% felt the ILP provided a framework for learning. One hundred sixty one students (61.6% felt it was a useful tool in helping open a discussion between the student and faculty. The qualitative data was grouped by areas most mentioned and these areas of concern centered on lack of faculty knowledge about ILP, time to complete ILP, and uncertainty of appropriate goal setting. The majority of students perceive the ILP to be helpful. Our results suggest that active intervention is needed by dedicated and trained faculty to improve ILP utilization. It is recommended that faculty gives students examples of learning goals to create their own learning framework and encourages them to discuss and review the ILP.

  6. Annual effective dose of ionizing radiation from natural sources received by airline aircrew members compared with that received by non-flying residents of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, W.; Copeland, K.; O'Brien, K., III

    In evaluating health aspects of the ionizing radiation exposure of aircrews, risk estimates are normally based on the amount of cosmic radiation received in flight. Not considered is that aircrews spend most of their time on the ground. In this report, annual total effective doses of ionizing radiation from natural sources received by aircrews on and off the job, flying between Los Angeles and Tokyo or Chicago and London, are compared with doses to non-flying residents of the United States and non-flying residents of Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 (Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado --- the region in the United States with the highest dose rates of natural ionizing radiation at ground level). Occupational exposure of aircrews to ionizing radiation is thought to increase their risk of fatal cancer. It may not be a significant concern if one considers: (a) the annual dose of ionizing radiation to the crewmembers in our study is only 7-41% higher than that received by non-flying residents of Region 8 (terrestrial gamma and cosmic radiation in the Denver, Colorado, area of Region 8); (b) the dose to non-flying residents of Region 8 is 87% higher than the average dose to non-flying residents of the United States; and (c) the estimated death rate from cancer in the six states in Region 8 is 3-26% lower than the average for the United States. When considering health concerns of aircrew members, one should recognize that the standard risk coefficient for radiation-induced fatal cancer is derived primarily from studies on individuals exposed to radiation at higher doses and dose rates and of generally lower energy, than the galactic cosmic radiation to which aircrews are exposed. These differences are a major reason that epidemiology studies are important in evaluating health aspects of the occupational radiation exposure of aircrews.

  7. Comparison of two methods for assessing leakage radiation dose around the head of the medical linear accelerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ehab M Attalla

    2013-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to measure the leakage by two methods with ion chamber and ready packs film, and to investigate the feasibility and the advantages of using two dosimetry methods for assessing leakage radiation around the head of the linear accelerators. Methods:Measurements were performed using a 30 cm3 ion chamber;the gantry at 0°, the X-ray head at 0°, the field size at between the central axis and a plane surface at a FSD of 100 as a reference, a series of concentric circles having radi of 50, 75, and 100 cm with their common centre at the reference point. The absorbed dose was measured at the reference point, and this would be used as the reference dose. With the diaphragm closed, the measurements were taken along the circumference of the three circles and at 45° intervals. Results:Leakage radiations while the treatment head was in the vertical position varied between 0.016%–0.04%. With the head lying horizontal y, leak-age radiation was the same order magnitude and varied between 0.02%–0.07%. In the second method, the verification was accomplished by closing the col imator jaws and covering the head of the treatment unit with the ready pack films. The films were marked to permit the determination of their positions on the machine after exposed and processed. With the diaphragm closed, and the ready packs films around the linear accelerator the beam turned on for 2500 cGy (2500 MU). The optical den-sity of these films was measured and compared with this of the reference dose. Leakage radiation varied according to the film positions and the magnitude of leakage was between 0.005%–0.075%. Conclusion:The dif erences between the values of the leakage radiation levels observed at dif erent measurement points do not only reflect dif erences in the ef ective shielding thickness of the head wal , but are also related to dif erences in the distances between the target and the measurement points. The experimental errors involved in dosimetric

  8. Impact of different leaf velocities and dose rates on the number of monitor units and the dose-volume-histograms using intensity modulated radiotherapy with sliding-window technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hess Clemens F

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT using sliding window technique utilises a leaf sequencing algorithm, which takes some control system limitations like dose rates (DR and velocity of the leafs (LV into account. The effect of altering these limitations on the number of monitor units and radiation dose to the organs at risk (OAR were analysed. Methods IMRT plans for different LVs from 1.0 cm/sec to 10.0 cm/sec and different DRs from 100 MU/min to 600 MU/min for two patients with prostate cancer and two patients with squamous cell cancer of the scalp (SCCscalp were calculated using the same "optimal fluence map". For each field the number of monitor units, the dose volume histograms and the differences in the "actual fluence maps" of the fields were analysed. Results With increase of the DR and decrease of the LV the number of monitor units increased and consequentially the radiation dose given to the OAR. In particular the serial OARs of patients with SCCscalp, which are located outside the end position of the leafs and inside the open field, received an additional dose of a higher DR and lower LV is used. Conclusion For best protection of organs at risk, a low DR and high LV should be applied. But the consequence of a low DR is both a long treatment time and also that a LV of higher than 3.0 cm/sec is mechanically not applicable. Our recommendation for an optimisation of the discussed parameters is a leaf velocity of 2.5 cm/sec and a dose rate of 300–400 MU/min (prostate cancer and 100–200 MU/min (SCCscalp for best protection of organs at risk, short treatment time and number of monitor units.

  9. A Commentary on: "A History of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 1998-2008".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Antone L

    2015-04-01

    This commentary provides a very brief overview of the book "A History of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 1998-2008" ( http://lowdose.energy.gov ). The book summarizes and evaluates the research progress, publications and impact of the U.S. Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research Program over its first 10 years. The purpose of this book was to summarize the impact of the program's research on the current thinking and low-dose paradigms associated with the radiation biology field and to help stimulate research on the potential adverse and/or protective health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. In addition, this book provides a summary of the data generated in the low dose program and a scientific background for anyone interested in conducting future research on the effects of low-dose or low-dose-rate radiation exposure. This book's exhaustive list of publications coupled with discussions of major observations should provide a significant resource for future research in the low-dose and dose-rate region. However, because of space limitations, only a limited number of critical references are mentioned. Finally, this history book provides a list of major advancements that were accomplished by the program in the field of radiation biology, and these bulleted highlights can be found in last part of chapters 4-10.

  10. Survey of doses and frequency of X-ray examinations on children at the intensive care unit of a large reference pediatric hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa de Azevedo, Ana Cecilia [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz-FIOCRUZ, Escola Nacional de Saude Publica Sergio Arouca, Centro de Estudos da Saude do Trabalhador e Ecologia Humana-CESTEH, Rua Leopoldo Bulhoes 1480, Manguinhos 21041-210, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)]. E-mail: acpa@ensp.fiocruz.br; Osibote, Adelaja Otolorin [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz-FIOCRUZ, Escola Nacional de Saude Publica Sergio Arouca, Centro de Estudos da Saude do Trabalhador e Ecologia Humana-CESTEH, Rua Leopoldo Bulhoes 1480, Manguinhos 21041-210, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Bastos Boechat, Marcia Cristina [Instituto Fernandes Figueira, Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz-FIOCRUZ (Brazil)

    2006-12-15

    Objective: This work aims to evaluate the entrance surface dose (ESD), the body organ dose (BOD) and the effective dose (E) resulting from pediatric radiological procedures with the use of portable X-ray equipments. Materials and methods: The software DoseCal was used to evaluate the doses imparted to patients. The children were classified according to their weight and age groups, and the study included three sectors of the intensive care unit of a large reference pediatric hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Results: A total of 518 radiographs have been performed (424 for chest and 94 for abdomen). The statistical data were compared with previously published results. The BOD is presented for the most exposed organs. Conclusion: The mean value of ESD and E varied widely among neonates. The highest number of radiographs per infant peaked 33 for chest examination in the age group 0-1 year.

  11. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo; Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Caramella, Davide

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; Pradiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (Pradiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (PRadiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological examinations. Both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching needs to be effectively implemented with radiation safety courses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. More Medical Comorbidities in Patients With Bipolar Disorder From the United States Than From the Netherlands and Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Robert M.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Frye, Mark A.; Suppes, Trish; McElroy, Susan L.; Keck, Paul E.; Nolen, Willem A.; Kupka, Ralph W.; Grunze, Heinz; Rowe, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Medical comorbidities are common in patients with bipolar (BP) disorder but have not been previously examined for differences between United States and Europe. More than 900 outpatients with BP I and BP II disorder (mean age, 41 years) filled out a questionnaire including the occurrence of 30 listed

  13. A Daily Goals Tool to Facilitate Indirect Nurse-Physician Communication During Morning Rounds on a Medical-Surgical Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Veronica; Christiansen, Mollie; Simmons, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional bedside rounds are essential for patient-centered care. However, it may be difficult for nurses to round with physicians on medical-surgical units. Using a daily goals tool for indirect rounds improved nurse-physician communication and interprofessional care for patients.

  14. Intra- and intercultural comparisons of the personality profiles of medical students in Argentina and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Horacio J A; Raimondo, Roberto; Erdmann, James B; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2002-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the personality profiles of medical students in Argentina and the United States. The ultimate purpose of the research was to study the value of personality measures in predicting academic and professional performances. Participants were 421 medical students in Argentina (254 women, 167 men) and 623 medical students in the United States (207 women, 416 men). Eight personality measures were administered: Perception of Stressful Life Events, Test Anxiety, General Anxiety, Loneliness, Self-Esteem, Locus of Control, Extraversion, and Neuroticism. Intracultural comparisons showed some minor gender differences in personality profiles within each culture (e.g., in the United States, women scored higher than men on the Perception of Stressful Life Events and General Anxiety scales, and in Argentina, women scored higher on the Test Anxiety scale). Intercultural comparisons of personality profiles showed that Argentine medical students obtained higher average scores than did their American counterparts on the Perception of Stressful Life Events, Test Anxiety, General Anxiety, External Locus of Control, Extraversion, and Neuroticism scales. Argentine students scored lower on the Loneliness scale than did their American counterparts. Psychometric findings supported the measurement properties of the personality measures in the two cultures (e.g., construct validity, and internal consistency aspect of reliability). Further study of the implications of the findings in predicting academic attainment in medical school and to physician performance is recommended.

  15. RECALMIN: The association between management of Spanish National Health Service Internal Medical Units and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapatero-Gaviria, Antonio; Javier Elola-Somoza, Francisco; Casariego-Vales, Emilio; Fernandez-Perez, Cristina; Gomez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Bernal, José Luis; Barba-Martín, Raquel

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the association between management of Internal Medical Units (IMUs) with outcomes (mortality and length of stay) within the Spanish National Health Service. Data on management were obtained from a descriptive transversal study performed among IMUs of the acute hospitals. Outcome indicators were taken from an administrative database of all hospital discharges from the IMUs. Spanish National Health Service. One hundred and twenty-four acute general hospitals with available data of management and outcomes (401 424 discharges). IMU risk standardized mortality rates were calculated using a multilevel model adjusted by Charlson Index. Risk standardized myocardial infarction and heart failure mortality rates were calculated using specific multilevel models. Length of stay was adjusted by complexity. Greater hospital complexity was associated with longer average length of stays (r: 0.42; P hospital mortality rates were higher at larger hospitals, but no significant differences were found when mortality was risk adjusted. There was an association between nurse workload with mortality rate for selected conditions (r: 0.25; P = 0.009). Safety committee and multidisciplinary ward rounds were also associated with outcomes. We have not found any association between complexity and intra-hospital mortality. There is an association between some management indicators with intra-hospital mortality and the length of stay. Better disease-specific outcomes adjustments and a larger number of IMUs in the sample may provide more insights about the association between management of IMUs with healthcare outcomes.

  16. Clinical Trial of an Educational Program to Decrease Monitor Alarms in a Medical Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, Arian; Collins-Brown, Sandra; Kirkland, Jasmine; Knapp, Meghan; Pressley, Jackie; Higgins, Melinda; McMurtry, James P

    2016-07-01

    Clinical research to identify effective interventions for decreasing nonactionable alarms has been limited. The objective of this study was to determine if a staff educational program on customizing alarm settings on bedside monitors decreased alarms in a medical intensive care unit (MICU). A preintervention, postintervention, nonequivalent group design was used to evaluate an educational program on alarm management in a convenience sample of MICU nurses. A 15-minute session was provided in a 1-week period. The outcome variable (number of alarms for low oxygen saturation via pulse oximetry [SpO2]) was determined from monitor log files adjusted by patient census. Data were collected for 15 days before and after the intervention. χ(2) analysis was used, with P less than .05 considered significant. After 1 week of education, low SpO2 alarms decreased from 502 to 306 alarms per patient monitored per day, a 39% reduction (P alarm settings to patients' clinical condition decreased common monitor alarms by 39%. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  17. Successful strategy to decrease indwelling catheter utilization rates in an academic medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sushilkumar Satish; Irukulla, Pavan Kumar; Shenoy, Mangalore Amith; Nyemba, Vimbai; Yacoub, Diana; Kupfer, Yizhak

    2017-08-22

    Duration of indwelling urinary catheterization is an important risk factor for urinary tract infections. We devised a strategy to decrease the utilization of indwelling urinary catheters (IUCs). We also highlight the challenges of managing critically ill patients without IUCs and demonstrate some of the initiatives that we undertook to overcome these challenges. A retrospective observational outcomes review was performed in an adult medical intensive care unit (ICU) between January 2012 and December 2016. This period included a baseline and series of intervals, whereby different aspects of the strategies were implemented. IUC utilization ratio and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) rates were calculated. Our IUC utilization ratio had a statistically significant decrease from 0.92 (baseline) to 0.28 (after 3 interventions) (P decrease from 5.47 (baseline) to 1.08 (after 3 intervention) (P = .0134). These rates sustained a statistically significant difference over the 2-year follow-up period from the last intervention. Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) was identified as a potential complication of not using an IUC. There was no statistically significant change in the IAD rates during 2013-2016. Our interventions demonstrated that aggressive and comprehensive IUC restriction protocol and provider training can lead to a successful decrease in IUC use, leading to a lower IUC utilization ratio and CAUTI rate in a large complex academic ICU setting. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Patients with hematological disorders requiring admission to medical intensive care unit: Characteristics, survival and prognostic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash H

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This retrospective chart review assessed the characteristics and outcome of patients with hematological disorders who required admission to medical intensive care unit over a 4 year period (January 1998 to December 2001. Results: There were a total of 104 patients, 67 (64% male, 37 (36% female subjects, with a mean age of 36.3 ± 15.3 years (range 10 to 65 years. The mean duration from hospital admission to ICU transfer was 11 days. Sixty-nine (66% had malignant and 35 (34% had non-malignant conditions. Respiratory distress was the commonest reason for ICU admission 58 (56%. The other indications were hemodynamic instability 38 (36%, low sensorium 22 (21%, following cardio-pulmonary arrest 12 (11.5% and generalized tonic-clonic seizures 5 (5%. Forty-three (42% patients had absolute neutophil count (ANC less than 500, 48 (47.5% had platelet count < 20000. The mean duration of ICU stay was 4 days (range < 24 hours to 28 days. Sixty-nine (66% patients required mechanical ventilation, 61 (59% required hemodynamic support. Pneumonia or sepsis was diagnosed in 71 (68%. Twenty-five (24% survived ICU stay and 20 (19% survived to hospital discharge. ICU admission following cardio-pulmonary arrest, advanced malignancy, requirement of mechanical ventilation, vasopressor support, ANC count < 500 and platelet count < 20000 were the predictors of adverse outcome. Associated organ dysfunction further increases the mortality.

  19. Does magnesium matter in patients of Medical Intensive Care Unit: A study in rural Central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Honmode, Akshay; Jain, Shraddha; Bhagat, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hypomagnesemia has been common, but mostly underdiagnosed electrolyte abnormality. Studies regarding this is lacking in India especially in rural setting. Here, we have correlated serum magnesium (Mg) level with outcome in patients of medicine Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with respect to length of ICU stay, need for mechanical ventilatory support and its duration and ultimate outcome (discharge/death). Materials and Methods: This is a prospective observational study carried out over a period of 1-year enrolling 601 patients of Medical ICU (MICU). The Chi-square test is applied to correlate hypomagnesemia with the outcome. Result and Observation: About 25% patients had admission hypomagnesemia. When compared with the normal Mg group, there was significant association of hypomagnesemia with outcome in terms of duration of MICU stay 5.46 (5.75) versus 3.93 (3.88), need for mechanical ventilation (56.86% vs. 24.33%), discharge/cured from ICU (61.43% vs. 85.26%), and death (38.56% vs. 14.73%). However, no significant difference was found in the duration of ventilation between the two groups. Conclusion: Hypomagnesemia is associated with a higher mortality rate in critically ill patients. The need for ventilatory support, but not its duration is significantly higher in hypomagnesemic patients. Hypomagnesemia is commonly associated with sepsis and diabetes mellitus. The duration of MICU stay is significantly higher in patients with low serum Mg. PMID:26180429

  20. Reasons underlying interhospital transfers to an academic medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jason; Iwashyna, Theodore J; Kahn, Jeremy M

    2013-04-01

    Interhospital critical care transfers are common, yet few studies address the underlying reasons for transfers. We examined clinician and patient/surrogate perceptions about interhospital transfers and assessed their agreement on these transfers. This is a mixed-mode survey of 3 major stakeholders in interhospital transfers to an academic medical intensive care unit from August 2007 to April 2008. Sixty-two hospitals transferred 138 patients during the study period. Response rates varied among stakeholders (accepting physician, 90%; referring physicians, 20%; patients/surrogates, 33%). All 3 groups frequently endorsed quality of care and need for a specific test/procedure as important. Referring hospital reputation and quality were rarely endorsed. Accepting physicians and patients/surrogates substantially agreed on the need for a specific test (κ = 0.70) and increased survival (κ = 0.78) but, otherwise, had fair to poor agreement. Referring physicians and patients/surrogates rarely agreed and sometimes disagreed greater than expected by chance (κ hospital experience (κ = 0.96) but agreed less on patient satisfaction at the referring hospital (κ = 0.37) and referring hospital reputation (κ = 0.35). Stakeholders do not always agree on the reasons for critical care transfers. Efforts to improve communication are warranted to ensure informed patient choices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Analysis of cost and efficiency of a medical nursing unit using time-driven activity-based costing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ji Young; Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi

    2011-08-01

    Time-driven activity-based costing was applied to analyze the nursing activity cost and efficiency of a medical unit. Data were collected at a medical unit of a general hospital. Nursing activities were measured using a nursing activities inventory and classified as 6 domains using Easley-Storfjell Instrument. Descriptive statistics were used to identify general characteristics of the unit, nursing activities and activity time, and stochastic frontier model was adopted to estimate true activity time. The average efficiency of the medical unit using theoretical resource capacity was 77%, however the efficiency using practical resource capacity was 96%. According to these results, the portion of non-added value time was estimated 23% and 4% each. The sums of total nursing activity costs were estimated 109,860,977 won in traditional activity-based costing and 84,427,126 won in time-driven activity-based costing. The difference in the two cost calculating methods was 25,433,851 won. These results indicate that the time-driven activity-based costing provides useful and more realistic information about the efficiency of unit operation compared to traditional activity-based costing. So time-driven activity-based costing is recommended as a performance evaluation framework for nursing departments based on cost management.

  2. A prospective study on medication and total parenteral nutrition practices at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar Arumugam

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: TPN and medication practices at the NICU should be highly monitored for avoiding medication errors, drug interactions, and mortality rate in neonates. The most effective method can be achieved when a clinical pharmacist become a part of it.

  3. Evaluation of spin freezing versus conventional freezing as part of a continuous pharmaceutical freeze-drying concept for unit doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, L; Van Bockstal, P-J; Corver, J; Vervaet, C; Remon, J P; De Beer, T

    2015-12-30

    Spin-freezing as alternative freezing approach was evaluated as part of an innovative continuous pharmaceutical freeze-drying concept for unit doses. The aim of this paper was to compare the sublimation rate of spin-frozen vials versus traditionally frozen vials in a batch freeze-dryer, and its impact on total drying time. Five different formulations, each having a different dry cake resistance, were tested. After freezing, the traditionally frozen vials were placed on the shelves while the spin-frozen vials were placed in aluminum vial holders providing radial energy supply during drying. Different primary drying conditions and chamber pressures were evaluated. After 2h of primary drying, the amount of sublimed ice was determined in each vial. Each formulation was monitored in-line using NIR spectroscopy during drying to determine the sublimation endpoint and the influence of drying conditions upon total drying time. For all tested formulations and applied freeze-drying conditions, there was a significant higher sublimation rate in the spin-frozen vials. This can be explained by the larger product surface and the lower importance of product resistance because of the much thinner product layers in the spin frozen vials. The in-line NIR measurements allowed evaluating the influence of applied drying conditions on the drying trajectories.

  4. Clinical and epidemiological study of stress hyperglycemia among medical intensive care unit patients in Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress hyperglycemia is common in patients presenting at the emergency medical ward and is associated with poor prognosis and increased risk of mortality. Aims and Objective: To study and determine the prevalence and factors associated with stress hyperglycemia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was performed on 536 nondiabetic patients presented to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU at Gandhi Medical College and allied Hamidia Hospital, Bhopal, between March 31, 2015, and May 28, 2015. A detailed history including demographic profile, presence of chronic disease, history of hospitalization and ICU admission, surgical status, and major reason for ICU admission (i.e., predominant diagnostic category was collected. Hematological and other parameters based on profile of study population were also analyzed. Results: Out of 536 patients, 109 (20.33% had stress hyperglycemia. Out of 109 patients with stress hyperglycemia, 87 (16.23% patients had glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c <5.7% and 22 (4.10% patients had HbA1c between 5.7% and 6.4%. Mean age of the study population was 40.27 ± 1.44 years, with male dominance. Mean random blood glucose level was 181.46 ± 3.80 mg/dl. Frequency of stress hyperglycemia was 24.13% in stroke, 19.54% in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS, 17.24% in chronic kidney disease (CKD, 12.64% in central nervous system (CNS infection, 8.05% in chronic liver disease (CLD, and 8.05% in seizure patients. Association between stroke and stress hyperglycemia was significant (P = 0.036. Association between hospital stay more than 7 days and stress hyperglycemia was significant in stroke patients (P = 0.0029, CKD patients (P = 0.0036, CLD (P = 0.0099, and MODS patients (P = 0.0328. Conclusions: The factors associated with stress hyperglycemia were stroke, MODS, CKD, CNS infection, CLD, seizure patients, with prolonged hospital stay and expected proportion.

  5. Clinical and epidemiological study of stress hyperglycemia among medical intensive care unit patients in Central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jitendra; Chittawar, Sachin; Maniram, Ram Singh; Dubey, T. N.; Singh, Ambrish

    2017-01-01

    Background: Stress hyperglycemia is common in patients presenting at the emergency medical ward and is associated with poor prognosis and increased risk of mortality. Aims and Objective: To study and determine the prevalence and factors associated with stress hyperglycemia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was performed on 536 nondiabetic patients presented to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at Gandhi Medical College and allied Hamidia Hospital, Bhopal, between March 31, 2015, and May 28, 2015. A detailed history including demographic profile, presence of chronic disease, history of hospitalization and ICU admission, surgical status, and major reason for ICU admission (i.e., predominant diagnostic category) was collected. Hematological and other parameters based on profile of study population were also analyzed. Results: Out of 536 patients, 109 (20.33%) had stress hyperglycemia. Out of 109 patients with stress hyperglycemia, 87 (16.23%) patients had glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) <5.7% and 22 (4.10%) patients had HbA1c between 5.7% and 6.4%. Mean age of the study population was 40.27 ± 1.44 years, with male dominance. Mean random blood glucose level was 181.46 ± 3.80 mg/dl. Frequency of stress hyperglycemia was 24.13% in stroke, 19.54% in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), 17.24% in chronic kidney disease (CKD), 12.64% in central nervous system (CNS) infection, 8.05% in chronic liver disease (CLD), and 8.05% in seizure patients. Association between stroke and stress hyperglycemia was significant (P = 0.036). Association between hospital stay more than 7 days and stress hyperglycemia was significant in stroke patients (P = 0.0029), CKD patients (P = 0.0036), CLD (P = 0.0099), and MODS patients (P = 0.0328). Conclusions: The factors associated with stress hyperglycemia were stroke, MODS, CKD, CNS infection, CLD, seizure patients, with prolonged hospital stay and expected proportion. PMID:28217513

  6. Is a single infant priming dose of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine in the United Kingdom sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlow, Helen; Borrow, Ray

    2015-01-01

    In 1999, the UK introduced meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccination at 2, 3, 4 months of age with a single dose for children 1-18 y In 2006, the schedule was refined to a 2 dose priming schedule with a booster in the second year of life. In 2013, the number of priming doses was reduced to a single priming dose, the booster maintained at 12 months of age and an adolescent booster dose introduced. The paper presents the evidence supporting the reduction in the number of priming doses. A UK study provided evidence for reducing the priming doses of MCC-TT together with the positive correlation of lower quantity of antigen and serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) levels post-primary but a higher magnitude of the booster response. Another UK study, demonstrated one dose of MCC-TT or MCC-CRM197 at 3 months gave comparable responses to 2 doses (SBA titres ≥8) both post-primary vaccination and post-booster Hib/MCC-TT at 12 months. However, the magnitude of the SBA GMT was higher in the MCC-TT primed post-booster. A single priming dose of MCC-TT (at 4 or 6 months) compared to 2 doses (2 and 4 months) gave higher SBA titres in all groups, post-primary and post-booster at 12-13 months, with the highest SBA responses observed in the 4 month single dose group. A study in Malta, comparing one dose of MCC-TT or MCC-CRM197 at (3 months) versus 2 doses of MCC-CRM197 (3 and 4 months), showed a high proportion (>84.72%) of subjects achieving SBA titres ≥8 following a single dose. These studies show that a single-dose priming MCC vaccination in infancy is sufficient.

  7. Assessment of medical students' proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulman, Catherine A; Binder, Stephen Bruce; Borges, Nicole J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students' ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students' confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%). Many students (87.6%) felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  8. Assessment of medical students’ proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A. Ulman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students’ ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students’ confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%. Many students (87.6% felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  9. Assessment of medical students’ proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Ulman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students’ ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students’ confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%. Many students (87.6% felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  10. SU-C-BRC-01: A Monte Carlo Study of Out-Of-Field Doses From Cobalt-60 Teletherapy Units Intended for Historical Correlations of Dose to Normal Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroccia, H [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Olguin, E [Gainesville, FL (United States); Culberson, W [University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Bednarz, B [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Mendenhall, N [UF Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Bolch, W [University Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Innovations in radiotherapy treatments, such as dynamic IMRT, VMAT, and SBRT/SRS, result in larger proportions of low-dose regions where normal tissues are exposed to low doses levels. Low doses of radiation have been linked to secondary cancers and cardiac toxicities. The AAPM TG Committee No.158 entitled, ‘Measurements and Calculations of Doses outside the Treatment Volume from External-Beam Radiation Therapy’, has been formed to review the dosimetry of non-target and out-of-field exposures using experimental and computational approaches. Studies on historical patients can provide comprehensive information about secondary effects from out-of-field doses when combined with long-term patient follow-up, thus providing significant insight into projecting future outcomes of patients undergoing modern-day treatments. Methods: We present a Monte Carlo model of a Theratron-1000 cobalt-60 teletherapy unit, which historically treated patients at the University of Florida, as a means of determining doses located outside the primary beam. Experimental data for a similar Theratron-1000 was obtained at the University of Wisconsin’s ADCL to benchmark the model for out-of-field dosimetry. An Exradin A12 ion chamber and TLD100 chips were used to measure doses in an extended water phantom to 60 cm outside the primary field at 5 and 10 cm depths. Results: Comparison between simulated and experimental measurements of PDDs and lateral profiles show good agreement for in-field and out-of-field doses. At 10 cm away from the edge of a 6×6, 10×10, and 20×20 cm2 field, relative out-of-field doses were measured in the range of 0.5% to 3% of the dose measured at 5 cm depth along the CAX. Conclusion: Out-of-field doses can be as high as 90 to 180 cGy assuming historical prescription doses of 30 to 60 Gy and should be considered when correlating late effects with normal tissue dose.

  11. Complementary and alternative medical therapy utilization by people with chronic fatiguing illnesses in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Ann-Britt

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatiguing illnesses, including chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS, pose a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Previous clinical reports addressed the utilization of health care provided to patients with CFS by a variety of practitioners with other than allopathic training, but did not examine the spectrum of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies used. This study was designed to measure CAM therapy use by persons with fatiguing illnesses in the United States population. Methods During a random-digit dialing survey to estimate the prevalence of CFS-like illness in urban and rural populations from different geographic regions of the United States, we queried the utilization of CAM including manipulation or body-based therapies, alternative medical systems, mind-body, biologically-based, and energy modalities. Results Four hundred forty fatigued and 444 non-fatigued persons from 2,728 households completed screening. Fatigued subjects included 53 persons with prolonged fatigue, 338 with chronic fatigue, and 49 with CFS-like illness. Mind-body therapy (primarily personal prayer and prayer by others was the most frequently used CAM across all groups. Among women, there was a significant trend of increasing overall CAM use across all subgroups (p-trend = 0.003. All categories of CAM use were associated with significantly poorer physical health scores, and all but one (alternative medicine systems were associated with significantly poorer mental health scores. People with CFS-like illness were significantly more likely to use body-based therapy (chiropractic and massage than non-fatigued participants (OR = 2.52, CI = 1.32, 4.82. Use of body-based therapies increased significantly in a linear trend across subgroups of non-fatigued, prolonged fatigued, chronic fatigued, and CFS-like subjects (p-trend = 0.002. People with chronic fatigue were also significantly more likely to use body-based therapy (OR = 1.52, CI = 1

  12. Prevalence of GMC performance assessments in the United Kingdom: a retrospective cohort analysis by country of medical qualification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, L; Potts, H W W; Sturrock, A; Dacre, J

    2017-04-04

    The demographics of doctors working in the UK are changing. The United Kingdom (UK) has voted to leave the European Union (EU) and there is heightened political discourse around the world about the impact of migration on healthcare services. Previous work suggests that foreign trained doctors perform worse than UK graduates in postgraduate medical examinations. We analysed the prevalence by country of primary medical qualification of doctors who were required to take an assessment by the General Medical Council (GMC) because of performance concerns. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of data routinely collected by the GMC. We compared doctors who had a GMC performance assessment between 1996 and 2013 with the medical register in the same period. The outcome measures were numbers experiencing performance assessments by country or region of medical qualification. The rate of performance assessment varied significantly by place of medical qualification and by year; χ (2)(17) = 188, p medical qualification. This is the first study to explore the risk of performance assessment by individual places of medical qualification. While concern has largely focused on the competence of non-EEA, International Medical Graduates, we discuss implications for how to ensure European trained doctors are fit to practise before their medical licence in the UK is granted. Further research is needed to investigate whether these country effects hold true when controlling for factors like doctors' sex, age, length of time working in the UK, and English language skills. This will allow evidence-based decisions to be made around the regulatory environment the UK should adopt once it leaves the EU. Patients should be reassured that the vast majority of all doctors working in the UK are competent.

  13. Variation in cash price of the generic medications most prescribed by dermatologists in pharmacies across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghanem, Noor; Abokwidir, Manal; Fleischer, Alan B; Feldman, Steven R; Alghanem, Ward

    2017-03-01

    The United States has the highest drug costs in the world. Consumers complain about large price differences at pharmacies on generic drugs. To evaluate variation in cash prices of generic medications most prescribed in dermatology across different drugstores and states in United States. The 11 generic drugs most prescribed by dermatologists according to National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were assessed. By using Google, the most common used pharmacies in United States were listed, which are located at a random selection of six states. By calling the first available number of each pharmacy in the six states and asking about the generic cash price of the smallest stock size and the most prescribed type, the data were collected. Drug prices varied; the median cumulative price of the 11 medications was highest at Rite Aid ($1226) and lowest at Walmart ($795.34) with 35% difference. The prices at CVS differed by 20% across different states; however, the prices at Walmart, Rite Aid and Walgreens were consistent. New York has the highest and Iowa the lowest prices, especially at CVS, ($1160.79) versus ($931.32). There are varieties in the prices for the generic medications in different pharmacies and States.

  14. An Evaluation of Shared Mental Models and Mutual Trust on General Medical Units: Implications for Collaboration, Teamwork, and Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Sara A; Lemaster, Matthew; Henneman, Elizabeth A; Hinchey, Kevin T

    2015-02-24

    This study examines nurse-physician teamwork and collaboration, a critical component in the delivery of safe patient care, on general medical units. To that end, we assess shared mental models and mutual trust, 2 coordinating mechanisms that help facilitate teamwork, among nurses and physicians working on general medical units. Data were collected from 37 nurses and 42 physicians at an urban teaching medical center in the Northeastern United States. Shared mental model questionnaire items were iteratively developed with experts' input to ensure content validity. Mutual trust items were adapted from an existing scale; items were reliable. Data were analyzed using χ and independent 2-tailed t tests. Physicians and nurses reported significant differences in their perceptions of the professional responsible for a variety of roles (e.g., advocating for the patient [P = 0.0007], identifying a near miss/error [P = 0.003]). Medication reconciliation is only role for which nurses perceive less responsibility than physicians perceive nurses have. Regarding mutual trust, both groups reported significantly more trust within their own professions; both groups reported similar levels of trust in physicians, with physicians reporting significantly less trust in their nursing colleagues than nurses perceive (P collaboration, more work is needed. To that end, we propose increasing knowledge about their respective roles, providing opportunities for nurse and physician collaboration through rounding or committee work and enhancing the preparedness and professionalism of interactions.

  15. Implementing medical revalidation in the United Kingdom: Findings about organisational changes and impacts from a survey of Responsible Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Alan; Bryce, Marie; Luscombe, Kayleigh; Tazzyman, Abigail; Tredinnick-Rowe, John; Archer, Julian

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe the implementation of medical revalidation in healthcare organisations in the United Kingdom and to examine reported changes and impacts on the quality of care. Design A cross-sectional online survey gathering both quantitative and qualitative data about structures and processes for medical revalidation and wider quality management in the organisations which employ or contract with doctors (termed ‘designated bodies’) from the senior doctor in each organisation with statutory responsibility for medical revalidation (termed the ‘Responsible Officer’). Setting United Kingdom Participants Responsible Officers in designated bodies in the United Kingdom. Five hundred and ninety-five survey invitations were sent and 374 completed surveys were returned (63%). Main outcome measures The role of Responsible Officers, the development of organisational mechanisms for quality assurance or improvement, decision-making on revalidation recommendations, impact of revalidation and mechanisms for quality assurance or improvement on clinical practice and suggested improvements to revalidation arrangements. Results Responsible Officers report that revalidation has had some impacts on the way medical performance is assured and improved, particularly strengthening appraisal and oversight of quality within organisations and having some impact on clinical practice. They suggest changes to make revalidation less ‘one size fits all’ and more responsive to individual, organisational and professional contexts. Conclusions Revalidation appears primarily to have improved systems for quality improvement and the management of poor performance to date. There is more to be done to ensure it produces wider benefits, particularly in relation to doctors who already perform well. PMID:28084166

  16. Emergency Medical Services Public Health Implications and Interim Guidance for the Ebola Virus in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E. McCoy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The 25th known outbreak of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD is now a global public health emergency and the World Health Organization (WHO has declared the epidemic to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC. Since the first cases of the West African epidemic were reported in March 2014, there has been an increase in infection rates of over 13,000% over a 6-month period. The Ebola virus has now arrived in the United States and public health professionals, doctors, hospitals, Emergency Medial Services Administrators, Medical Directors, and policy makers have been working with haste to develop strategies to prevent the disease from reaching epidemic proportions. Prehospital care providers (emergency medical technicians and paramedics and medical first responders (including but not limited to firefighters and law enforcement are the healthcare systems front lines when it comes to first medical contact with patients outside of the hospital setting. Risk of contracting Ebola can be particularly high in this population of first responders if the appropriate precautions are not implemented. This article provides a brief clinical overview of the Ebola Virus Disease and provides a comprehensive summary of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Interim Guidance for Emergency Medical Services (EMS Systems and 9-1-1 Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPS for Management of Patients with Known of Suspected Ebola Virus Disease in the United States. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  17. Evaluation of the Medical Care of Patients with Hypertension in an Emergency Department and in Ambulatory Hypertension Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Nobre

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the characteristics of the patients receiving medical care in the Ambulatory of Hypertension of the Emergency Department, Division of Cardiology, and in the Emergency Unit of the Clinical Hospital of the Ribeirão Preto Medical School. METHODS: Using a protocol, we compared the care of the same hypertensive patients in on different occasions in the 2 different places. The characteristics of 62 patients, 29 men with a mean age of 57 years, were analyzed between January 1996 and December 1997. RESULTS: The care of these patients resulted in different medical treatment regardless of their clinical features and blood pressure levels. Thus, in the Emergency Unit, 97% presented with symptoms, and 64.5% received medication to rapidly reduce blood pressure. In 50% of the cases, nifedipine SL was the elected medication. Patients who applied to the Ambulatory of Hypertension presenting with similar features, or, in some cases, presenting with similar clinically higher levels of blood pressure, were not prescribed medication for a rapid reduction of blood pressure at any of the appointments. CONCLUSION: The therapeutic approach to patients with high blood pressure levels, symptomatic or asymptomatic, was dependent on the place of treatment. In the Emergency Unit, the conduct was, in the majority of cases, to decrease blood pressure immediately, whereas in the Ambulatory of Hypertension, the same levels of blood pressure, in the same individuals, resulted in therapeutic adjustment with nonpharmacological management. These results show the need to reconsider the concept of hypertensive crises and their therapeutical implications.

  18. Monte Carlo modeling of a 6 and 18 MV Varian Clinac medical accelerator for in-field and out-of-field dose calculations: development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Xu, X George

    2009-02-21

    There is a serious and growing concern about the increased risk of radiation-induced second cancers and late tissue injuries associated with radiation treatment. To better understand and to more accurately quantify non-target organ doses due to scatter and leakage radiation from medical accelerators, a detailed Monte Carlo model of the medical linear accelerator is needed. This paper describes the development and validation of a detailed accelerator model of the Varian Clinac operating at 6 and 18 MV beam energies. Over 100 accelerator components have been defined and integrated using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. A series of in-field and out-of-field dose validation studies were performed. In-field dose distributions calculated using the accelerator models were tuned to match measurement data that are considered the de facto 'gold standard' for the Varian Clinac accelerator provided by the manufacturer. Field sizes of 4 cm x 4 cm, 10 cm x 10 cm, 20 cm x 20 cm and 40 cm x 40 cm were considered. The local difference between calculated and measured dose on the percent depth dose curve was less than 2% for all locations. The local difference between calculated and measured dose on the dose profile curve was less than 2% in the plateau region and less than 2 mm in the penumbra region for all locations. Out-of-field dose profiles were calculated and compared to measurement data for both beam energies for field sizes of 4 cm x 4 cm, 10 cm x 10 cm and 20 cm x 20 cm. For all field sizes considered in this study, the average local difference between calculated and measured dose for the 6 and 18 MV beams was 14 and 16%, respectively. In addition, a method for determining neutron contamination in the 18 MV operating model was validated by comparing calculated in-air neutron fluence with reported calculations and measurements. The average difference between calculated and measured neutron fluence was 20%. As one of the most detailed accelerator models for both in-field and out

  19. Development of the Medical Intensive Care Unit Shift Report Communication Scale as a measure of nurses' perception of communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available David James,1 Angela Jukkala,2 Andres Azuero,2 Pamela Autrey,3 Lynne Vining,4 Rebecca Miltner2 1Center for Nursing Excellence, University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital, 2School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 3Nursing Administration, University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital, 4Medical Intensive Care Unit, University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital, Birmingham, Alabama, USA Objective: Evidence documenting the negative impact of poor communication on patient safety during intra-hospital transfer is prevalent and attributed to 80% of serious medical errors. An event particularly vulnerable to communication error is the patient "handoff." One of the more common handoffs occurring in health care settings is the report provided between nurses at the change of shift. The objective of this article is to report the process used to develop and examine the reliability and validity of a Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU Shift Report Communication Scale to measure nurses' perception of the quality and quantity of communication during shift report. Design and participants: This was a scale development and descriptive study undertaken at the Medical Intensive Care Unit within an Academic Health Center. Forty-three medical intensive care nurses took part. Results: An exploratory factor analysis revealed three domains: communication openness, quality of information, and shift report. Medical Intensive Care Unit Shift Report Communication Scale scores ranged from 12 to 27 (mean = 18.78; standard deviation = 3.28. Perception of communication did not vary between nurses based on years of nursing experience or age. Scale reliability was good (Cronbach's alpha = 0.079. Nurses were likely to have had a positive perception of the openness of communication on the unit. However, they had a less favorable perception of peer ability to fully understand information shared during shift report and identified as a common problem the frequent need to

  20. [Medical care unit -- a suitable instrument for ambulatory patient-adequate care and performance-related remuneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, P; Isensee, D; Gerlach, E; Gross, H

    2013-02-01

    The question of whether a medical care unit is an appropriate tool for outpatient care has been discussed for a long time. Our aim is to investigate whether the MCU is an effective instrument for outpatient care and adequate performance-related remuneration. This retro- and prospective overview of the work included statements on legal foundations for medical care units, for reimbursement of services in medical care units, the development of medical care centres in Germany and a listing of the specific advantages and disadvantages of an MCU. This article focuses on the generally applicable facts and complements them with examples from general, visceral and vascular surgery. The main quantitative data on medical centre statistics come from different publications of the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance for Physicians. From a legal point of view the instrument MCU allows the participating of ambulatory and stationary care in the framework of medical care contracts. This has been especially extended for stationary applications, including the spectrum of possibilities that can contribute under certain circumstances for the provision of medical care in underdeveloped regions. Freelancers can benefit primarily from financial risk and minimising bureaucratic routine. The remuneration for services performed in the MCU is analogous to that of other ambulatory care providers. Basically, there are no disadvantages, but a greater design freedom and opportunities for the generation of aggregates are visible. The number of MCU in Germany has quadrupled in the last five years, indicating an establishment of an outpatient care landscape. MCU offers from the patient's perspective, providers and policy specific advantages and disadvantages. Indeed the benefits outweigh the disadvantages, but this is not yet verified by qualitative studies. The question of the appropriateness of medical care units as outpatient care instrumentation must be considered differentially

  1. Establishing cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory in Saudi Arabia and producing preliminary calibration curve of dicentric chromosomes as biomarker for medical dose estimation in response to radiation emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadyan, Khaled; Elewisy, Sara; Moftah, Belal; Shoukri, Mohamed; Alzahrany, Awad; Alsbeih, Ghazi

    2014-12-01

    In cases of public or occupational radiation overexposure and eventual radiological accidents, it is important to provide dose assessment, medical triage, diagnoses and treatment to victims. Cytogenetic bio-dosimetry based on scoring of dicentric chromosomal aberrations assay (DCA) is the "gold standard" biotechnology technique for estimating medically relevant radiation doses. Under the auspices of the National Science, Technology and Innovation Plan in Saudi Arabia, we have set up a biodosimetry laboratory and produced a national standard dose-response calibration curve for DCA, pre-required to estimate the doses received. For this, the basic cytogenetic DCA technique needed to be established. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were collected from four healthy volunteers and irradiated with radiation doses between 0 and 5 Gy of 320 keV X-rays. Then, lymphocytes were PHA stimulated, Colcemid division arrested and stained cytogenetic slides were prepared. The Metafer4 system (MetaSystem) was used for automatic and manually assisted metaphase finding and scoring of dicentric chromosomes. Results were fit to the linear-quadratic dose-effect model according to the IAEA EPR-Biodosimetry-2011 report. The resulting manually assisted dose-response calibration curve (Y = 0.0017 + 0.026 × D + 0.081 × D(2)) was in the range of those described in other populations. Although the automated scoring over-and-under estimates DCA at low (2 Gy) doses, respectively, it showed potential for use in triage mode to segregate between victims with potential risk to develop acute radiotoxicity syndromes. In conclusion, we have successfully established the first biodosimetry laboratory in the region and have produced a preliminary national dose-response calibration curve. The laboratory can now contribute to the national preparedness plan in response to eventual radiation emergencies in addition to providing information for decision makers and public health officials who assess the

  2. [The process of death in the intensive care unit (ICU). From a medical, thanatological and legislative point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko-Wada, Francisco de J Takao; Domínguez-Cherit, Guillermo; Colmenares-Vásquez, Ariadna Marcela; Santana-Martínez, Paola; Gutiérrez-Mejía, Juan; Arroliga, Alejandro C

    2015-01-01

    Traditional goals in the intensive care unit are to reduce morbidity and mortality. Despite medical and technological advances, death in the intensive care unit remains commonplace and the modern critical care team should be familiar with palliative care and legislation in Mexico. Preserving the dignity of patients, avoiding harm, and maintaining communication with the relatives is fundamental. There is no unique, universally accepted technical approach in the management of the terminal critical care patient, so it is important to individualize each case and define objectives together under the legal framework in Mexico.

  3. DOSPERT+M: A survey of medical risk attitudes in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Rosman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Domain-Specific Risk Taking scale (DOSPERT has been recommended as a tool for measuring risk attitudes in medical studies, but does not contain items specific to health care. Butler, et al. (2012 developed a medical risk domain subscale for DOSPERT. Objective: To characterize medical risk attitudes in a nationally-representative U.S. sample using the full DOSPERT scale with the medical risk domain add-on (DOSPERT+M, and examine associations with other risk domains. Methods: Members of a nationally-representative online panel (KnowledgePanel were randomized to complete pairs of DOSPERT+M tasks (risk attitude, risk perception, expected benefits. We explored relationships among domains through correlational and factor analysis; we tested the hypothesis that the medical risk domain and DOSPERT's health/safety domains were not highly correlated. Participants: Three hundred forty-four panelists. Results: The medical risk domain subscale had low inter-item reliability in the risk-taking task and moderate inter-item reliability in the other tasks. Medical risk domain scores were poorly correlated with the DOSPERT health/safety domain. Exploratory factor analysis largely recovered the expected DOSPERT domain structure. Conclusion: Attitudes toward risky medical activities may constitute a distinct domain from those measured by the standard DOSPERT items. Additional work is required to develop a medical risk subscale with higher inter-item reliability.

  4. 医学影像曝光剂量个体化控制%Individual Control of Exposure Dose in Medical Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骏

    2011-01-01

    介绍了电离辐射的利弊,探讨了CT曝光剂量增加对临床诊断及患者造成的影响,指出放射防护不应该变成主观逛想或臆断,应加强时患者CT检查放封剂童个体化拉制.合理使用低剂量.%ndividual Control of Exposure Dose in Medical Imaging The advantages and disadvantages of ionizing radiation were described. and also the effects of increase in CT exposure dose on clinical diagnosis and patients were discussed. The author pointed out that radiological protection should not become a subjective imagination or assumption. and individual control of patient CT examination should be strengthened with rational low doae.[Chinese Medical Equipment Joumal. 2011 , 32 ( 3) : 87-89

  5. Intravenous iron isomaltoside 1000 administered by high single-dose infusions or standard medical care for the treatment of fatigue in women after postpartum haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Charlotte; Thomsen, Lars Lykke; Norgaard, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postpartum haemorrhage can lead to iron deficiency with and without anaemia, the clinical consequences of which include physical fatigue. Although oral iron is the standard treatment, it is often associated with gastrointestinal side effects and poor compliance. To date, no published...... randomised controlled studies have compared the clinical efficacy and safety of standard medical care with intravenous administration of iron supplementation after postpartum haemorrhage.The primary objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of an intravenous high single-dose of iron isomaltoside...... 1000 with standard medical care on physical fatigue in women with postpartum haemorrhage. METHODS/DESIGN: In a single centre, open-labelled, randomised trial, women with postpartum haemorrhage exceeding 700 mL will be allocated to either a single dose of 1,200 mg of iron isomaltoside 1000 or standard...

  6. Overcoming the Challenges of Conducting Early Feasibility Studies of Medical Devices in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, David R; Califf, Robert; Farb, Andrew; Abel, Dorothy; Mack, Michael; Syrek Jensen, Tamara; Zuckerman, Bram; Leon, Martin; Shuren, Jeff

    2016-10-25

    Initial clinical studies of new medical technologies involve a complex balance of research participant benefits versus risks and costs of uncertainty when novel concepts are tested. The Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health has recently introduced the Early Feasibility Study (EFS) Program for facilitating the conduct of these studies under the Investigational Device Exemption regulations. However, a systematic approach is needed to successfully implement this program while affording appropriate preservation of the rights and interests of patients. For this to succeed, a holistic reform of the clinical studies ecosystem for performing early-stage clinical research in the United States is necessary. The authors review the current landscape of the U.S. EFS and make recommendations for developing an efficient EFS process to meet the goal of improving access to early-stage, potentially beneficial medical devices in the United States.

  7. Proposal for the Implementation of Quality Standards in a Medical Unit Through Integration to the Hospital Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampela, Irene; Tzortzis, Evangelos; Kefala, Ioanna; Zygoura, Eleutheria; Mantzana, Vasiliki; Armaganidis, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    Quality standards (QS) support and enhance health care services provided to patients and citizens, especially in sophisticated medical departments, such as Intensive Care Units (ICU). However, ICU staff lag behind in the adoption and compliance of QS protocols. In this paper, QS protocols implemented in the Intensive Care Unit of the Attiko University Hospital, a tertiary teaching hospital of the University of Athens, will be discussed. In this hospital, standardized procedures are implemented through the HIS, facilitating routine administration and services. We are aiming to facilitate educational processes and enhance staff compliance with the protocols by utilizing the Hospital Information System (HIS). In doing this, we propose the application of pop-up windows on the different user (medical or nursing) interfaces of the HIS, inter-connecting every electronic process with the corresponding QS protocol that has been developed in the ICU. This application may prove a valuable educational tool and may reinforce staff training and enhance compliance with the QS protocols.

  8. [Incidence of adverse medical events in the neonatal intensive care unit with the help of a global trigger tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Фастовец, Марина Н; Белорус, Андрей И; Лысак, Виктор П; Зюзина, Лариса С; Ковалева, Елена М

    Identification and monitoring of the frequency of adverse medical events are important in the organization of the patient's safety system in the intensive care units (ICU). The consistent and accurate identification of adverse events remains a problem for most medical institutions, even in developed countries of the world. To determine the frequency of adverse medical events in the NICU by using Global and Pediatric Trigger Instruments. To achieve the goal, the cross-sectional study was conducted in which in retrospect analyzed 160 newborn development records which were treated in the ICU of the newborn in the perinatal center of the M.V. Sklifosovsky Poltava Regional Clinical Hospital in 2016 to identify in them certain neonatal triggers. In 21.3% of newborns, after detecting the triggers of the "Care" module, the hospital infection was confirmed, which we regarded as medical adverse event. The trigger "Infiltration / extravasation" of the same module was detected in 1.9% medical records. Triggers "Glucose less than 3.0 mmol / L after 48 hours from birth", "Increase in creatinine" and trigger "deviation of electrolytes" of the module "Laboratory" were accordingly found in 21.9%, 6.3% and 11.3% medical records of newborns. Trigger tool is an effective way to identify adverse events that cause to patient harm. Our results can form the basis for the development of a national neonatal trigger instrument that will effectively monitor the frequency of such events in the ICU of newborn.

  9. Application of space syntax theory in the study of medical-surgical nursing units in urban hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzpuc, Stefnee J; Martin, Caren S

    2010-01-01

    Additional research is needed to explore how the design of urban, medical-surgical nursing units influences communication patterns, perceptions of social support, and overall job satisfaction for nurses. Space syntax theory has typically been used to study communication in office environments; more recently, it has been applied to the study of healthcare environments. The purpose of this study was to explore the applicability of space syntax theory as a theoretical framework for studying nurses' communication in medical-surgical nursing units in urban hospitals. The nursing profession is rapidly changing, and nurses' work is psychologically and physically intense. At the same time, nurses are responsible for patient safety, optimal care delivery, and patient outcomes (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2009; Clarke, 2007; Clarke & Donaldson, 2008; Institute of Medicine, 2000; Institute of Medicine, 2004). Nurses are central to the delivery of care and act as a conduit for communication among members of the patient care team. Some of the design characteristics that create a more appealing environment for patients, such as views of nature and single-patient rooms, may not be fully understood as they relate to nurses' tasks and responsibilities, and they could be detrimental to nursing communication. This study analyzed three medical-surgical nursing unit floor plans using two constructs of space syntax theory, and it verified analysis through three semi-structured interviews with end users. The use of space syntax theory for analyzing medical-surgical nursing unit floor plans is complex. Findings indicated that nurses' perceptions of two constructs of space syntax theory, visibility and accessibility, did not consistently match the anticipated benefits of the floor plan designs. Understanding how and when nurses communicate with each other could help designers of healthcare spaces create more effective environments that support nurses' work and personal health and welfare

  10. Health disparities among highly vulnerable populations in the United States: a call to action for medical and oral health care

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderbilt, Allison A; Isringhausen, Kim T; VanderWielen, Lynn M.; Wright, Marcie S.; Slashcheva, Lyubov D.; Madden, Molly A.

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare in the United States (US) is burdened with enormous healthcare disparities associated with a variety of factors including insurance status, income, and race. Highly vulnerable populations, classified as those with complex medical problems and/or social needs, are one of the fastest growing segments within the US. Over a decade ago, the US Surgeon General publically challenged the nation to realize the importance of oral health and its relationship to general health and well-being, ...

  11. Influence of signal colored hand disinfectant dispensers on hand hygiene compliance at a medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheithauer, Simone; Häfner, Helga; Schröder, Jörg; Nowicki, Katharina; Lemmen, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    To assess the influence of signal colors on hand disinfectant dispenser activities, health care workers (HCWs) at a medical intensive care unit were analyzed for a total of 20 weeks with 8 weeks before and 12 weeks after exchange to signal color. No significant increase in hand rubs (HRs) per patient day (PD) was observed (about 40 HRs/PD); however, HCW-adjusted compliance showed a 6% increase with signal colored devices. Therefore, colored devices may help to improve hand hygiene compliance.

  12. Inter-unit variability in two ParvoMedics TrueOne 2400 automated metabolic gas analysis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, D J; Wu, H L

    2013-03-01

    Knowing the inter-unit variability, especially the technological error, is important when using many physiological measurement systems, yet no such inter-unit analysis has been undertaken on duplicate automated gas analysis systems. This study investigated the inter-unit performance of two identical ParvoMedics TrueOne 2400 automated gas analysis systems during a range of submaximal steady-state exercises performed on an electromagnetic cycle ergometer. Fifteen adult males were tested on two separate days a rest, 30, 60, 90, and 120 Watts with the duplicate gas analysis units arranged (1) collaterally (2 min of steady-state expired gas was alternately passed through each system), and (2) simultaneously (identical steady-state expired gas was passed simultaneously through both systems). Total within-subject variation (biological + technological) was determined from the collateral tests, but the unique inter-unit variability (technological error between identical systems) was shown by the simultaneous tests. Absolute percentage errors (APE), coefficient of variations (CV), effect sizes and Bland-Altman analyses were undertaken on the metabolic data, including expired ventilation (V (E)), oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and carbon dioxide production (VCO(2)). The few statistically significant differences detected between the two duplicate systems were determined to have small or trivial effect sizes, and their magnitudes to be of little physiological importance. The total within-subject variations for VO(2), VCO(2) and V (E) each equated to a mean CV and mean APE value of ~4 and ~6 %, whilst the respective inter-unit technological errors equated to ~1.5 and ~2.1 %. The two ParvoMedics TrueOne 2400 systems demonstrated excellent inter-unit agreement.

  13. Use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to facilitate real-time 3D graphic presentation of the patient skin-dose distribution during fluoroscopic interventional procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Vijay; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R

    2012-02-23

    We have developed a dose-tracking system (DTS) that calculates the radiation dose to the patient's skin in real-time by acquiring exposure parameters and imaging-system-geometry from the digital bus on a Toshiba Infinix C-arm unit. The cumulative dose values are then displayed as a color map on an OpenGL-based 3D graphic of the patient for immediate feedback to the interventionalist. Determination of those elements on the surface of the patient 3D-graphic that intersect the beam and calculation of the dose for these elements in real time demands fast computation. Reducing the size of the elements results in more computation load on the computer processor and therefore a tradeoff occurs between the resolution of the patient graphic and the real-time performance of the DTS. The speed of the DTS for calculating dose to the skin is limited by the central processing unit (CPU) and can be improved by using the parallel processing power of a graphics processing unit (GPU). Here, we compare the performance speed of GPU-based DTS software to that of the current CPU-based software as a function of the resolution of the patient graphics. Results show a tremendous improvement in speed using the GPU. While an increase in the spatial resolution of the patient graphics resulted in slowing down the computational speed of the DTS on the CPU, the speed of the GPU-based DTS was hardly affected. This GPU-based DTS can be a powerful tool for providing accurate, real-time feedback about patient skin-dose to physicians while performing interventional procedures.

  14. Use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to facilitate real-time 3D graphic presentation of the patient skin-dose distribution during fluoroscopic interventional procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Vijay; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a dose-tracking system (DTS) that calculates the radiation dose to the patient's skin in realtime by acquiring exposure parameters and imaging-system-geometry from the digital bus on a Toshiba Infinix C-arm unit. The cumulative dose values are then displayed as a color map on an OpenGL-based 3D graphic of the patient for immediate feedback to the interventionalist. Determination of those elements on the surface of the patient 3D-graphic that intersect the beam and calculation of the dose for these elements in real time demands fast computation. Reducing the size of the elements results in more computation load on the computer processor and therefore a tradeoff occurs between the resolution of the patient graphic and the real-time performance of the DTS. The speed of the DTS for calculating dose to the skin is limited by the central processing unit (CPU) and can be improved by using the parallel processing power of a graphics processing unit (GPU). Here, we compare the performance speed of GPU-based DTS software to that of the current CPU-based software as a function of the resolution of the patient graphics. Results show a tremendous improvement in speed using the GPU. While an increase in the spatial resolution of the patient graphics resulted in slowing down the computational speed of the DTS on the CPU, the speed of the GPU-based DTS was hardly affected. This GPU-based DTS can be a powerful tool for providing accurate, real-time feedback about patient skin-dose to physicians while performing interventional procedures.

  15. Survey of pharmacy involvement in hospital medication reconciliation programs across the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R Stein

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to conduct a review of pertinent literature, assess pharmacy involvement in medication reconciliation, and offer insight into best practices for hospitals to implement and enhance their medication reconciliation programs. Method: Pharmacists in hospitals nationwide were asked to complete an anonymous survey via the American College of Clinical Pharmacy online database. The multiple choice survey analyzed the roles that healthcare professionals play in medication reconciliation programs at hospitals. Results: Of the survey responses received, 32/91 (35% came from pharmacists at hospitals with a pharmacy-led medication reconciliation program. Of these pharmacy-led programs, 17/32 (53% have a dedicated pharmacist or pharmacy staff to perform medication reconciliation. Conclusion: A comprehensive review of literature suggests that pharmacy involvement has the potential to reduce medication reconciliation errors and may improve patient satisfaction. Focused, full-time medication reconciliation pharmacists can help hospitals save time and money, improve outcomes, and meet higher standards issued by the Joint Commission. Data obtained in this study show the extent to which pharmacists contribute to achieving these goals in healthcare systems nationwide. This baseline study provides a strong case for hospitals to implement a pharmacy-led medication reconciliation program.

  16. Influence of Clerkship on Attitudes of Medical Students toward Psychiatry across Cultures: United States and Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgut, F. Tuna; Polan, H. Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assure adequate treatment for patients with mental illness worldwide, medical schools must impart positive attitudes toward psychiatry. The authors examined the effect of culture on changes in attitudes toward psychiatry among medical students receiving the same psychiatry clerkship curriculum in two different countries. Methods: A…

  17. Collective dose estimation in Portuguese population due to medical exams of diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine; Estimativa da dose coletiva na populacao portuguesa devido a exames medicos de radiologia de diagnostico e de medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teles, Pedro; Vaz, Pedro [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem (Portugal). Instituto Superior Tecnico; Sousa, M. Carmen de [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia de Coimbra (Portugal); Paulo, Graciano; Santos, Joana [Escola Superior de Tecnologia da Saude de Coimbra (Portugal); Pascoal, Ana [Kings College Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Kings Health Partners; Cardoso, Gabriela; Santos, Ana isabel [Hospital Garcia de Orta, Almada (Portugal); Lanca, Isabel [Administracao Regional de Saude, Coimbra (Portugal); Matela, Nuno [Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal). Fac. de Ciencias. Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica; Janeiro, Luis [Escola superior de Saude da Cruz Vermelha Portuguesa, Lisboa (Portugal); Sousa, Patrick [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Lisboa (Portugal); Carvoeiras, Pedro; Parafita, Rui [Medical Consult, SA, Lisboa (Portugal); Simaozinho, Paula [Administracao Regional de Saude, Faro (Portugal)

    2013-11-01

    In order to assess the exposure of the Portuguese population to ionizing radiation due to medical examinations of diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine, a working group, consisting of 40 institutions, public and private, was created to evaluation the coletive dose in the Portuguese population in 2010. This work was conducted in collaboration with the Dose Datamed European consortium, which aims to assess the exposure of the European population to ionizing radiation due to 20 diagnostic radiology examinations most frequent in Europe (the 'TOP 20') and nuclear medicine examinations. We obtained an average value of collective dose of Almost-Equal-To 1 mSv/caput, which puts Portugal in the category of countries medium to high exposure to Europe. We hope that this work can be a starting point to bridge the persistent lack of studies in the areas referred to in Portugal, and to enable the characterization periodic exposure of the Portuguese population to ionizing radiation in the context of medical applications.

  18. SU-E-T-409: Evaluation of Tissue Composition Effect On Dose Distribution in Radiotherapy with 6 MV Photon Beam of a Medical Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbani, M; Tabatabaei, Z; Noghreiyan, A Vejdani [Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meigooni, A Soleimani [Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate soft tissue composition effect on dose distribution for various soft tissues and various depths in radiotherapy with 6 MV photon beam of a medical linac. Methods: A phantom and Siemens Primus linear accelerator were simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In a homogeneous cubic phantom, six types of soft tissue and three types of tissue-equivalent materials were defined separately. The soft tissues were muscle (skeletal), adipose tissue, blood (whole), breast tissue, soft tissue (9-component) and soft tissue (4-component). The tissue-equivalent materials included: water, A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic and perspex. Photon dose relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue at various depths on the beam’s central axis was determined for the 6 MV photon beam. The relative dose was also calculated and compared for various MCNPX tallies including,F8, F6 and,F4. Results: The results of the relative photon dose in various materials relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue and using different tallies are reported in the form of tabulated data. Minor differences between dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials were observed. The results from F6 and F4 were practically the same but different with,F8 tally. Conclusion: Based on the calculations performed, the differences in dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials are minor but they could be corrected in radiotherapy calculations to upgrade the accuracy of the dosimetric calculations.

  19. Trends, productivity losses, and associated medical conditions among toxoplasmosis deaths in the United States, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Patricia L; Kuo, Tony; Javanbakht, Marjan; Sorvillo, Frank

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have quantified toxoplasmosis mortality, associated medical conditions, and productivity losses in the United States. We examined national multiple cause of death data and estimated productivity losses caused by toxoplasmosis during 2000-2010. A matched case-control analysis examined associations between comorbid medical conditions and toxoplasmosis deaths. In total, 789 toxoplasmosis deaths were identified during the 11-year study period. Blacks and Hispanics had the highest toxoplasmosis mortality compared with whites. Several medical conditions were associated with toxoplasmosis deaths, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), lymphoma, leukemia, and connective tissue disorders. The number of toxoplasmosis deaths with an HIV codiagnosis declined from 2000 to 2010; the numbers without such a codiagnosis remained static. Cumulative disease-related productivity losses for the 11-year period were nearly $815 million. Although toxoplasmosis mortality has declined in the last decade, the infection remains costly and is an important cause of preventable death among non-HIV subgroups.

  20. A comparison of dose and dose-rate conversion factors from the Soviet Union, United Kingdom, US Department of Energy, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, A.S.; Abbott, M.L.

    1991-12-01

    Several independent data sets of radiological dose and dose-rate conversion factors (DCF/DRCF) have been tabulated or developed by the international community both for fission and fusion safety purposes. This report compares sets from the US Department of Energy, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom with those calculated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program. The objectives were to identify trends and potential outlying values for specific radionuclides and contribute to a future benchmark evaluation of the CARR computer code. Fifty-year committed effective dose equivalent factors were compared for the inhalation and ingestion pathways. External effective dose equivalent rates were compared for the air immersion and ground surface exposure pathways. Comparisons were made by dividing dose factors in the different data bases by the values in the FSP data base. Differences in DCF/DRCF values less than a factor of 2 were considered to be in good agreement and are likely due to the use of slightly different decay data, variations in the number of organs considered for calculating CEDE, and rounding errors. DCF/DRCF values that differed by greater than a factor of 10 were considered to be significant. These differences are attributed primarily to the use of different radionuclide decay data, selection and nomenclature for different isomeric states, treatment of progeny radionuclides, differences in calculational methodology, and assumptions on a radionuclide`s chemical form.

  1. A comparison of dose and dose-rate conversion factors from the Soviet Union, United Kingdom, US Department of Energy, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, A.S.; Abbott, M.L.

    1991-12-01

    Several independent data sets of radiological dose and dose-rate conversion factors (DCF/DRCF) have been tabulated or developed by the international community both for fission and fusion safety purposes. This report compares sets from the US Department of Energy, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom with those calculated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program. The objectives were to identify trends and potential outlying values for specific radionuclides and contribute to a future benchmark evaluation of the CARR computer code. Fifty-year committed effective dose equivalent factors were compared for the inhalation and ingestion pathways. External effective dose equivalent rates were compared for the air immersion and ground surface exposure pathways. Comparisons were made by dividing dose factors in the different data bases by the values in the FSP data base. Differences in DCF/DRCF values less than a factor of 2 were considered to be in good agreement and are likely due to the use of slightly different decay data, variations in the number of organs considered for calculating CEDE, and rounding errors. DCF/DRCF values that differed by greater than a factor of 10 were considered to be significant. These differences are attributed primarily to the use of different radionuclide decay data, selection and nomenclature for different isomeric states, treatment of progeny radionuclides, differences in calculational methodology, and assumptions on a radionuclide's chemical form.

  2. Self-medication among non-healthcare students of the University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleiman Ibrahim Sharif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of the following study is to estimate the prevalence of self-medication among university students and evaluate factors associated with the practice. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted during May, 2012 using a pre-validated questionnaire distributed to 250 students of the 4 years of study at the college of business administration. Data were analyzed using PASW Statistics for Windows, Version 18.0. Chicago: SPSS Inc and results are expressed as counts and percentages. Chi-square test was used to evaluate significant association among the study variables and P < 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Results: The response rate was 80% and all respondents were Arabs with 114 (57% females and 86 (43% males. Self-medication was practiced by 118 (59% students and most (88.1% of them obtained medications from pharmacies. About 21 (11% respondents self-medicated with antibiotics. Only 34 (17% and 16 (8% of respondents were aware of bacterial resistance and rational drug use respectively. The most common reasons for self-medication were seeking quick relief (134, 67%, physician′s advice of self-management (100, 50%, illness is minor (91, 45.5%. Common reasons against self-medication include risk of misdiagnosis of illness (160, 80%, risk of using the wrong medication (154, 77%, risk of adverse effects (140, 70%. Self-medication was practiced for headache or mild pain, eye and ear symptoms, gastric problems, cold, fever and allergy. Conclusion: Self-medication among non-healthcare students is common with high prevalence. Knowledge of students of reasons for and against self-medication was adequate, but awareness of respondents of rational drug use and risk of bacterial resistance in response to misuse was poor. Orientation courses/workshops directed to university students would be beneficial.

  3. The origin of the medical research grant in the United States: the Rockefeller Foundation and the NIH Extramural Funding Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, William H

    2015-04-01

    The establishment of National Institutes of Health (NIH) extramural grants in the second half of the twentieth century marked a signal shift in support for medical research in the United States and created an influential model for the rest of the world. A similar landmark development occurred in the first half of the twentieth century with the creation of the Rockefeller Foundation and its funding programs for medical research. The programs and support of the foundation had a dramatic impact on medical research in the United States and globally. This paper examines early connections between these two developments. The NIH grants have usually been seen as having their roots primarily in the government programs of the Second World War. This article finds direct and indirect influence by the Rockefeller Foundation, as well as parallel developments in these two monumental programs of support for medical research. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The contribution of a clinical pharmacist to the improvement of medication at a geriatric hospital unit in Norway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veggeland T

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to use a clinical pharmacist in order to improve the medication of patients in a geriatric hospital unit. The hospital had no experience of using a clinical pharmacist before.Methods: A clinical pharmacist participated in the therapeutic team for 27 days during a 4-year period. Drug-related problems were recorded prospectively and discussed before and at the ward round. The results of the physician’s decisions on the current day about potential changes in medication proposed by the pharmacist were continuously recorded.Results: The pharmacist evaluated the medication of 250 patients. At least one drug- related problem was found in 188 (75% of the patients. For these patients, the physician made 606 decisions concerning potential changes in the medication (3.2 per patient. Thirty percent (184/606 of the decisions were connected to further measurements and to the follow-up of laboratory results, mainly (82%, 151/184 for cardiovascular drugs. Forty-two percent (255/606 of the decisions resulted in the discontinuation of drugs, dosage reduction or a decision to revise the assessment at a later stage during hospitalisation. Medicines with anticholinergic adverse effects were to a great extent withdrawn. Twenty-one percent (129/606 of the decisions were made on drugs with an addiction potential: hypnotics, anxiolytics, as well as analgesics containing tramadol and codeine. The result was often (71%, 91/129 dosage reduction, a change from fixed medication to medication on demand or to discontinuation. Conclusion: Even with a modest participation of once a month, the evaluation of a patient’s medication by a clinical pharmacist led to improved changes and the follow-up of the medication of the elderly.

  5. Historical development of radiation dose calculations for the public in the vicinity of nuclear sites in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettengill, H.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Soldat, J.K.; Swinth, K.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Most Manhattan District (MD) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) sites began environmental monitoring programs in the earliest years of their operation. The results were used to establish trends and to monitor for effluent releases that might be otherwise undetected. Very few data concerning radiation doses to the public in the vicinity of the sites were generated prior to 1960. Authoritative guidelines for controlling doses to the public were issued by national and international bodies beginning in the 1950s. In 1957, the Hanford Site began calculating and reporting maximum potential radiation doses to the public from several environmental pathways of exposure. Shortly thereafter, most AEC sites began programs aimed at either determining public doses, or ensuring that the doses were below the regulatory limits. Calculations of radiation doses to Maximally Exposed Individuals (MEI) at the Hanford Site have been recently completed by the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) project. Collective doses for the public at Hanford were generated for this paper by utilizing the data developed by HEDR and approximate demographic data.

  6. Correlation of United States Medical Licensing Examination and Internal Medicine In-Training Examination Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jose A., Jr.; Greer, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (ITE) is administered during residency training in the United States as a self-assessment and program assessment tool. Performance on this exam correlates with outcome on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying examination. Internal Medicine Program Directors use the United States Medical…

  7. Shielding evaluation of a medical linear accelerator vault in preparation for installing a high-dose rate 252Cf remote afterloader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhus, C S; Rivard, M J; Kurkomelis, J; Liddle, C B; Massé, F X

    2005-01-01

    In support of the effort to begin high-dose rate 252Cf brachytherapy treatments at Tufts-New England Medical Center, the shielding capabilities of a clinical accelerator vault against the neutron and photon emissions from a 1.124 mg 252Cf source were examined. Outside the clinical accelerator vault, the fast neutron dose equivalent rate was below the lower limit of detection of a CR-39 etched track detector and below 0.14 +/- 0.02 muSv h(-1) with a proportional counter, which is consistent, within the uncertainties, with natural background. The photon dose equivalent rate was also measured to be below background levels (0.1 muSv h(-1)) using an ionisation chamber and an optically stimulated luminescence dosemeter. A Monte Carlo simulation of neutron transport through the accelerator vault was performed to validate measured values and determine the thermal-energy to low-energy neutron component. Monte Carlo results showed that the dose equivalent rate from fast neutrons was reduced by a factor of 100,000 after attenuation through the vault wall, and the thermal-energy neutron dose equivalent rate would be an additional factor of 1000 below that of the fast neutrons. Based on these findings, the shielding installed in this facility is sufficient for the use of at least 5.0 mg of 252Cf.

  8. Measurement of photoneutron doses in and out of high-energy X-ray beam of a SATURNE-20 medical linear accelerator by ECE polycarbonate detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sohrabi, M

    1999-01-01

    Photoneutron contaminations in and out of high energy X-ray beams of the medical linear accelerator SATURNE 20 (CGR) of the Radiotherapy Department of Omeed Hospital in Isfahan, Iran, have been determined using 250 mu m polycarbonate (PC) dosimeters, in strips or in sheets, processed by electrochemical etching (ECE) using specially designed ECE chambers to etch larger sheets. A two dimensional or topographical distribution of neutron contamination was also determined in a full size beam. The neutron dose equivalents (Hn) in the beam of 18 MV X-rays at 80 cm FSD were determined to be linear functions of X-ray dose equivalents (Hx) up to 1400 cSv. The distribution of the Hn at different X-ray doses showed bell-shape profiles with maxima at the isocenter. The ratios of dose equivalents of neutrons to those of X-rays increased as the field size increased having values of 0.22%, 0.28%, 0.31% and 0.37% for field sizes of 10x10, 20x20, 30x30, and 40x40 cm sup 2 respectively. Although such neutron dose equivalents ca...

  9. Medication Use Among Ethnically Diverse Older Adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang-Hanisko, Lenny; Williams, Christine L; Newman, David; Tappen, Ruth M

    2015-01-01

    As primary consumers of health care and prescription medication, older adults are more susceptible to potential drug-related adverse effects and medication interactions. With growing diversity among the older adult population, understanding ethnic differences in medication use becomes increasingly important. The current study describes polypharmacy and the occurrence of underprescribing among community-dwelling, low-income individuals 55 and older from four ethnic groups: (a) African American, (b) Afro-Caribbean, (c) European American, and (d) Hispanic American. Results revealed that number of illnesses, income level, and age were three major predictors associated with polypharmacy. No underprescription was identified. Overall, prevalence of polypharmacy was 47.5%. European American individuals had the highest prevalence followed by Hispanic American, African American, and Afro-Caribbean individuals. When caring for older adults from various ethnic groups, nurses should focus their efforts on those who have multiple illnesses and sufficient income to purchase medications to reduce the risk of polypharmacy.

  10. Electrostatics and inhaled medications: influence on delivery via pressurized metered-dose inhalers and add-on devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Jolyon P; Coppolo, Dominic P; Nagel, Mark W

    2007-01-01

    .... Spacers and valved holding chambers used with pressurized metered-dose inhalers to treat obstructive lung diseases are particularly prone to this behavior, which increases variability in the amount...

  11. Identification of microorganisms on mobile phones of intensive care unit health care workers and medical students in the tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotris, Ivan; Drenjančević, Domagoj; Talapko, Jasminka; Bukovski, Suzana

    2017-02-01

    Aim To identify and investigate a difference between microorganisms present on intensive care unit (ICU) health care workers' (HCW, doctors, nurses or medical technicians) and medical students' mobile phones as well as to investigate a difference between the frequency and the way of cleaning mobile phones. Methods Fifty swabs were collected from HCWs who work in the ICU (University Hospital Centre Osijek) and 60 swabs from medical students (School of Medicine, University of Osijek). Microorganisms were identified according to standard microbiological methods and biochemical tests to the genus/species level. Results Out of 110 processed mobile phones, mobile phones microorganisms were not detected on 25 (22.7%), 15 (25%) students' and 10 (20%) HCW's mobile phones. No statistically significant difference was found between the number of isolated bacteria between the HCW' and students' mobile phones (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference was found between both HCW and students and frequency of cleaning their mobile phones (pmobile phones between HCWs and students (pmobile phones at least once a week, 35 (52.0%), and most medical students several times per year, 20 (33.3%). HCW clean their mobile phones with alcohol disinfectant in 26 (40.0%) and medical students with dry cloth in 20 (33.3%) cases.

  12. Improving medication administration safety in solid organ transplant patients through barcode-assisted medication administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonkowski, Josesph; Weber, Robert J; Melucci, Joseph; Pesavento, Todd; Henry, Mitchell; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients are prescribed a high number of medications, increasing the potential for medication errors. Barcode-assisted medication administration (BCMA) is technology that reduces medication administration errors. An observational study was conducted at an academic medical center solid organ transplant unit before and after BMCA implementation. Medication accuracy was determined and administration errors were categorized by type and therapeutic class of medication. A baseline medication administration error rate of 4.8% was observed with wrong dose errors representing 78% of the errors. During the post-BCMA period the medication administration error rate was reduced by 68% to 1.5% (P = .0001). Wrong dose errors were reduced by 67% (P = .001), and unauthorized medication administrations were reduced by 73%. Steroids were associated with the highest error rate. The results of this study suggest that routinely adopting BCMA has the potential to reduce medication administration errors in transplant patients.

  13. [Prescription and drug expenditure in gynecology and obstetrics in Northwest medical units from IMSS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Gómez, Luis Guillermo; Canales Muñoz, José Luis

    2006-08-01

    Drug prescription is the most frequent medical intervention in Gynecology and Obstetrics; however, studies of prescription profile are limited. In this study, we analyzed differences of expense by drug prescription for gynecologic and obstetrics health problems. It was performed a cross sectional study for one year analysis in each medical area that shape IMSS western district. We calculated spending and consumption coefficients for each drug and therapeutic groups. User coefficients were ordered to compare consumption differences. Besides the statistical ratio of consumption between drugs groups, we described the differences found and analyzed the prescription profile among medical regions. Data related to the expenses in each one of the regions show important differences in each one of the drugs and therapeutic groups. The most common expense for drugs is related to the treatment of osteoporosis, menopause and fertility problems. We also found differences in prescription drug preferences in each therapeutic subgroup. Drug prescription studies are useful as a basis for further specific studies in each pharmacologic subgroup. There are few studies that analyze the drug prescription profile on Gynecology and Obstetrics. In this study it is possible to suppose that medical prescription was not based on known medical evidences; therefore, we must reconsider the need of a permanent actualization and systematic medical evaluation.

  14. The humanising power of medical history: responses to biomedicine in the 20th century United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, John Harley

    2011-12-01

    Most American historians of medicine today would be very hesitant about any claim that medical history humanises doctors, medical students or the larger health care enterprise. Yet, the idea that history can and ought to serve modern medicine as a humanising force has been a persistent refrain in American medicine. This essay explores the emergence of this idea from the end of the 19th century, precisely the moment when modern biomedicine became ascendant. At the same institutions where the new version of scientific medicine was most energetically embraced, some professional leaders warned that the allegiance to science driving the profession's technical and cultural success was endangering humanistic values fundamental to professionalism and the art of medicine. They saw in history a means for rehumanising modern medicine and countering the risk of cultural crisis. While some iteration of this vision of history was remarkably durable, the meanings attached to 'humanism' were both multiple and changing, and the role envisioned for history in a humanistic intervention was transformed. Starting in the 1960s as part of a larger cultural critique of the putative 'dehumanisation' of the medical establishment, some advocates promoted medical history as a tool to help fashion a new kind of humanist physician and to confront social inequities in the health care system. What has persisted across time is the way that the idea of history as a humanising force has almost always functioned as a discourse of deficiency-a response to perceived shortcomings of biomedicine, medical institutions and medical professionalism.

  15. Healthcare reform and the next generation: United States medical student attitudes toward the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Huntoon

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Over one year after passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA, legislators, healthcare experts, physicians, and the general public continue to debate the implications of the law and its repeal. The PPACA will have a significant impact on future physicians, yet medical student perspectives on the legislation have not been well documented. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate medical students' understanding of and attitudes toward healthcare reform and the PPACA including issues of quality, access and cost. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: An anonymous electronic survey was sent to medical students at 10 medical schools (total of 6982 students between October-December 2010, with 1232 students responding and a response rate of 18%. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Medical students' views and attitudes regarding the PPACA and related topics, measured with Likert scale and open response items. RESULTS: Of medical students surveyed, 94.8% agreed that the existing United States healthcare system needs to be reformed, 31.4% believed the PPACA will improve healthcare quality, while 20.9% disagreed and almost half (47.7% were unsure if quality will be improved. Two thirds (67.6% believed that the PPACA will increase access, 6.5% disagreed and the remaining 25.9% were unsure. With regard to containing healthcare costs, 45.4% of participants indicated that they are unsure if the provisions of the PPACA will do so. Overall, 80.1% of respondents indicated that they support the PPACA, and 78.3% also indicated that they did not feel that reform efforts had gone far enough. A majority of respondents (58.8% opposed repeal of the PPACA, while 15.0% supported repeal, and 26.1% were undecided. CONCLUSION: The overwhelming majority of medical students recognized healthcare reform is needed and expressed support for the PPACA but echoed concerns about whether it will address issues of quality or cost containment.

  16. Nursing assessment of continuous vital sign surveillance to improve patient safety on the medical/surgical unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Terri; Whisman, Lynn; Booker, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Evaluate continuous vital sign surveillance as a tool to improve patient safety in the medical/surgical unit. Failure-to-rescue is an important measure of hospital quality. Patient deterioration is often preceded by changes in vital signs. However, continuous multi-parameter vital sign monitoring may decrease patient safety with an abundance of unnecessary alarms. Prospective observational study at two geographically disperse hospitals in a single hospital system. A multi-parameter vital sign monitoring system was installed in a medical/surgical unit in Utah and one in Alabama providing continuous display of SpO2, heart rate, blood pressure and respiration rate on a central station. Alarm thresholds and time to alert annunciations were set based on prior analysis of the distribution of each vital sign. At the end of 4 weeks, nurses completed a survey on their experience. An average alert per patient, per day was determined retrospectively from the saved vital signs data and knowledge of the alarm settings. Ninety-two per cent of the nurses agreed that the number of alarms and alerts were appropriate; 54% strongly agreed. On average, both units experienced 10·8 alarms per patient, per day. One hundred per cent agreed the monitor provided valuable patient data that increased patient safety; 79% strongly agreed. Continuous, multi-parameter patient monitoring could be performed on medical/surgical units with a small and appropriate level of alarms. Continuous vital sign assessment may have initiated nursing interventions that prevented failure-to-rescue events. Nurses surveyed unanimously agreed that continuous vital sign surveillance will help enhance patient safety. Nursing response to abnormal vital signs is one of the most important levers in patient safety, by providing timely recognition of early clinical deterioration. This occurs through diligent nursing surveillance, involving assessment, interpretation of data, recognition of a problem and meaningful

  17. A Survey of Intravenous Remifentanil Use for Labor Analgesia at Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaronson, Jaime; Abramovitz, Sharon; Smiley, Richard; Tangel, Virginia; Landau, Ruth

    2017-04-01

    Remifentanil is most commonly offered when neuraxial labor analgesia is contraindicated. There is no consensus regarding the optimal administration, dosing strategy, or requirements for maternal monitoring, which may pose a patient safety issue. This exploratory survey evaluated the current practices regarding remifentanil use for labor analgesia at academic centers in the United States. Of 126 obstetric anesthesia directors surveyed, 84 (67%) responded. In 2014 to 2015, an estimated 36% (95% confidence interval: 25.7-46.3) of centers used remifentanil, most of which did so less than 5 times. Some serious maternal and neonatal respiratory complications occurred, emphasizing that clinical protocols and adequate monitoring are key to ensure maternal and neonatal safety.

  18. Medical professionalism in China and the United States: a transcultural interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jing-Bao; Smith, Kirk L; Cong, Yali; Hu, Linying; Tucker, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    As in other societies, medical professionalism in the Peoples' Republic of China has been rapidly evolving. One of the major events in this process was the endorsement in 2005 of the document, "Medical Professionalism in the New Millennium: A Physician Charter," by the Chinese Medical Doctor Association (hereafter, the Charter)(1). More recently, a national survey, the first on such a large scale, was conducted on Chinese physicians' attitudes toward the fundamental principles and core commitments put forward in the Charter. Based on empirical findings from that study and comparing them to the published results of a similar American survey, the authors offer an in-depth interpretation of significant cross-cultural differences and important transcultural commonalities. The broader historical, socio-economic, and ethical issues relating to salient Chinese cultural practices such as family consent, familism (the custom of deferring decisions to family members), and the withholding of medical information, as well as controversial topics such as not respecting patients' autonomy, are examined. The Chinese Survey found that Chinese physicians supported the principles of the Charter in general. Here we argue that Chinese culture and traditional medical ethics are broadly compatible with the moral commitments demanded by modern medical professionalism. Methodologically and theoretically-recognizing the problems inherent in the hoary but still popular habit of dichotomizing cultures and in relativism-a transcultural approach is adopted that gives greater (due) weight to the internal moral diversity present within every culture, the common ground shared by different cultures, and the primacy of morality. Genuine cross-cultural dialogue, including a constructive Chinese-American dialogue in the area of medical professionalism, is not only possible, but necessary. Copyright 2015 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a Whole Body Flying-Spot X-Ray Medical Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    address of the contractor or grantee who prepared the report and identify the appropriate corporate division, school, laboratory, etc., of the author. List...A3-13I .... . 2__ " : , - ! , ... .- - 0 04PCTO SYSTEM r- Figure A3-8. Power Supply Controller Front Panel IMICRO-DOSE INSPECION SYSTEM Figure A3-9

  20. United States medical school graduate interest in radiology residency programs as depicted by online search tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Nora M; Kinsella, Stuart D; Morey, José M

    2014-02-01

    Recent media publications have indicated a tough job market in medical specialty positions for medical school graduates, specifically in the field of radiology. Internet search tools, such as Google Trends, have proved useful in the prediction of certain diseases on the basis of the search volume index for a specific term. The authors hypothesized that online search tools might be useful in the prediction of US medical school graduates' interest in residency positions in radiology. Google Trends indicated an increase over time in searches for "radiology salary" and a decrease over time in searches for "radiology residency." National Resident Matching Program results for diagnostic radiology showed an increase from 2004 to 2009 in the percentage of US graduates entering radiology but a dramatic drop from 2010 to 2013. This occurred even while the total number of US graduates active in the National Resident Matching Program increased. This finding might have been foretold on the basis of online query result trends. Online search data may be a useful insight into the interests of US medical school graduates and may be predictive of unfilled radiology residency positions and eventual increased shortages of community radiologists coming from US medical schools.

  1. The impact of safety organizing, trusted leadership, and care pathways on reported medication errors in hospital nursing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogus, Timothy J; Sutcliffe, Kathleen M

    2011-01-01

    Prior research has found that safety organizing behaviors of registered nurses (RNs) positively impact patient safety. However, little research exists on the joint benefits of safety organizing and other contextual factors that help foster safety. Although we know that organizational practices often have more powerful effects when combined with other mutually reinforcing practices, little research exists on the joint benefits of safety organizing and other contextual factors believed to foster safety. Specifically, we examined the benefits of bundling safety organizing with leadership (trust in manager) and design (use of care pathways) factors on reported medication errors. A total of 1033 RNs and 78 nurse managers in 78 emergency, internal medicine, intensive care, and surgery nursing units in 10 acute-care hospitals in Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, and Ohio who completed questionnaires between December 2003 and June 2004. Cross-sectional analysis of medication errors reported to the hospital incident reporting system for the 6 months after the administration of the survey linked to survey data on safety organizing, trust in manager, use of care pathways, and RN characteristics and staffing. Multilevel Poisson regression analyses indicated that the benefits of safety organizing on reported medication errors were amplified when paired with high levels of trust in manager or the use of care pathways. Safety organizing plays a key role in improving patient safety on hospital nursing units especially when bundled with other organizational components of a safety supportive system.

  2. Mental ill health in the elderly: medical students’ social representations in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Medeiros

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study aims to explore medical students’ social representations of mental ill health in older adults. Method It comprises an exploratory and qualitative investigation based on the theory of social representations. Two focus groups with pre-clinical medics (group 1, N=4; group 2, N=4 and 10 individual interviews with clinical medical students were conducted. Thematic analysis at a latent level explored meanings and differences between groups. Results Three overarching themes reflect participants’ representations of mental health problems in later life – mental ill health in old age, polarisation of care, and challenges to care. Primary health care appears as an important strategy to overcome barriers to mental health care in the community. Nevertheless, disqualifying representations, stigma and organization of services constitute the main challenges to quality mental health care in later life. Conclusion This paper highlights the need to address cultural and organizational barriers to promote quality care.

  3. Comprehensive geriatric assessment on an acute medical unit: a qualitative study of older people's and informal carer's perspectives of the care and treatment received.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, Janet; Williamson, Tracey; Logan, Pip; Gladman, John

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study was imbedded in a randomized controlled trial evaluating the addition of geriatricians to usual care to enable the comprehensive geriatric assessment process with older patients on acute medical units. The qualitative study explored the perspectives of intervention participants on their care and treatment. A constructivist study incorporating semi-structured interviews that were conducted in patients' homes within six weeks of discharge from the acute medical unit. These interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using thematic analysis. An acute medical unit in the United Kingdom. Older patients ( n = 18) and their informal carers ( n = 6) discharged directly home from an acute medical unit, who had been in the intervention group of the randomized controlled trial. Three core themes were constructed: (1) perceived lack of treatment on the acute medical unit; (2) nebulous grasp of the role of the geriatrician; and (3) on-going health and activities of daily living needs postdischarge. These needs impacted upon the informal carers, who either took over, or helped the patients to complete their activities of daily living. Despite the help received with activities of daily living, a lot of the patients voiced a desire to complete these activities themselves. The participants perceived they were just monitored and observed on the acute medical unit, rather than receiving active treatment, and spoke of on-going unresolved health and activity of daily living needs following discharge, despite receiving the additional intervention of a geriatrician.

  4. Race/Ethnicity in Medical Education: An Analysis of a Question Bank for Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripp, Kelsey; Braun, Lundy

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: There is growing concern over racial/ethnic bias in clinical care, yet how best to reduce bias remains challenging, in part because the sources of bias in medical education are poorly understood. One possible source is the routinized use of race/ethnicity in lectures, assessment, and preparatory materials, including question banks for licensing examinations. Because students worldwide use question banks to prepare for the United States Medical Licensing Examination, we examined how race/ethnicity was used in one of the most commonly recommended question banks. We analyzed the use of race/ethnicity in all 2,211 questions in a question bank for Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination for the following: the frequency of mentions of racial/ethnic groups, whether the use of race/ethnicity was merely descriptive or was central to any part of the question, and whether the question associated race/ethnicity with genetic difference. In sum, 455 of the 2,011 (20.6%) of the questions in the question bank referred to race/ethnicity in the question stem, answer, or educational objective. The frequency of mentions of racial/ethnicity was disproportionate to the U.S. 85.8% referred to White/Caucasians, 9.70% to Black/African Americans, 3.16% to Asian, 0.633% to Hispanics, and 0.633% to Native Americans. No cases referred to Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders. The proportion of mentions of race/ethnicity classified as either a routine descriptor or central to the case varied by racial/ethnic category. The association between genetics and disease in cases also varied by racial/ethnic category. Insights. The routinized use of race/ethnicity with no specific goal in preparation materials, such as question banks, risks contributing to racial bias. The implications of routinized use extend to assessment in medical education. Race/ethnicity should be used only when referring to social experiences of groups relevant to their health, not as a proxy for

  5. Measurementof photo-neutron dose from an 18-MV medical linac using a foil activation method in view of radiation protection of patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuecel, Haluk; Kolbasi, Asuman; Yueksel, Alptug Oezer [Ankara University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Ankara (Turkmenistan); Cobanbas, Ibrahim; Kaya, Vildan [Sueleyman Demirel University, School of Medicine, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Isparta (Turkmenistan)

    2016-04-15

    High-energy linear accelerators are increasingly used in the medical field. However, the unwanted photo-neutrons can also be contributed to the dose delivered to the patients during their treatments. In this study, neutron fluxes were measured in a solid water phantom placed at the isocenter 1-m distance from the head of an 18-MV linac using the foil activation method. The produced activities were measured with a calibrated well-type Ge detector. From the measured fluxes, the total neutron fluence was found to be (1.17 ± 0.06) X 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} per Gy at the phantom surface in a 20 X 20 cm{sup 2} X-ray field size. The maximum photo-neutron dose was measured to be 0.67 ± 0.04 mSv/Gy at d{sub max} = 5 cm depth in the phantom at isocenter. The present results are compared with those obtained for different field sizes of 10 X 10cm{sup 2}, 15 X 15cm{sup 2}, and 20 X 20cm{sup 2} from 10-, 15-, and 18-MV linacs. Additionally, ambient neutron dose equivalents were determined at different locations in the room and they were found to be negligibly low. The results indicate that the photo-neutron dose at the patient position is not a negligible fraction of the therapeutic photon dose. Thus, there is a need for reduction of the contaminated neutron dose by taking some additional measures, for instance, neutron absorbing-protective materials might be used as aprons during the treatment.

  6. Subterranean medicine: an inquiry into underground medical treatment protocols in cave rescue situations in national parks in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, K; Shalit, M

    2000-01-01

    Caving and spelunking have become increasingly popular over the years, with hundreds of thousands of amateur spelunkers across the country visiting caves. National parks in the United States offer hundreds of caves for all levels of spelunkers and, in fact, many national parks boast caves as either their main or major attraction. In an effort to increase visitor safety and establish subterranean medical treatment protocols, we began an investigation into cave rescue, medical protocols, previously published recommendations concerning cave safety, and visitor and rescue statistics in the national parks. Our inquiry provided little guidance from either the literature or the present US National Parks database for treating underground injuries. However, 2 predominant trends did appear. First, despite the nearly 2 million visitors to the caves in the 14 parks surveyed, there were only about 200 total calls for medical care. The vast number of those calls were for minor injuries. Second, no strict evidence-based treatment protocols for underground injuries exist, probably because they are not feasible. A caving incident database for the national parks would facilitate suggestions for preventative measures for the minor injuries and would help catalog the creative solutions for the rare serious subterranean medical incident.

  7. Unmet Needs for Ancillary Services Among Hispanics/Latinos Receiving HIV Medical Care - United States, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Lauren C; DeGroote, Nicholas P; Shouse, R Luke; Valleroy, Linda A; Prejean, Joseph; Bradley, Heather

    2016-10-14

    The prevalence of diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States is more than twice as high as the prevalence among non-Hispanic whites (1). Services that support retention in HIV medical care and assist with day-to-day living, referred to here as ancillary services, help persons living with HIV access HIV medical care, adhere to HIV treatment, and attain HIV viral suppression. The needs for these ancillary services among Hispanics/Latinos are not well described (2). To obtain nationally representative estimates of and reasons for unmet needs for such services among Hispanic/Latino adults receiving outpatient HIV medical care during 2013-2014, CDC analyzed data from the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP). The analysis found that Hispanics/Latinos in all age and sexual orientation/behavior subgroups reported substantial unmet needs, including 24% needing dental care, 21% needing eye or vision care, 15% needing food and nutrition services, and 9% needing transportation assistance. Addressing unmet needs for ancillary services among Hispanics/Latinos living with HIV might help increase access to HIV care, improve health outcomes, and reduce health disparities.

  8. Medical and Family Leave: Benefits Available to Female Workers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council of Jewish Women, New York, NY. Center for the Child.

    This paper discusses a national survey of employee benefits designed to investigate the extent to which employers have independently implemented basic components of a comprehensive maternity plan. Components include: (1) standard policies that set the period of leave; (2) job-protected medical leave for maternity; (3) employer contributions to…

  9. Strategies for safe medication use in ambulatory care settings in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Asta V; Bernard, Shulamit L

    2009-09-01

    This study aims to identify strategies for safe medication use practices in ambulatory care settings, with a special focus on clinical pharmacy services. We conducted case studies on 34 organizations, more than half of which were safety net providers. Data included discussions with 186 key informants, 3 interim debriefings, and a technical expert panel. We analyzed qualitative data using inductive analysis techniques and grounded theory approach. Ambulatory care organizations practice a broad range of safe medication use strategies. The inclusion of clinical pharmacy services is a culture change that supports efforts to improve patient safety and patient-centered care. Organizations integrated clinical pharmacy services when they introduced such services in a purposefully paced and gradual manner. Organizations sustained such services when they collected and reported data demonstrating improvements in patient outcomes and cost savings. Clinical pharmacy services were generally accompanied by strategies that helped organizations to provide patient-centered care; collect and measure process, safety, and clinical outcomes; promote leadership commitment; and integrate care delivery processes. These strategies interacted within organizations in synergistic rather than hierarchical or linear way. Organizational ability to provide safe, patient-centered, and efficient care that is supported by measurable data largely depends on leadership commitment and ability to integrate care processes. Ambulatory care organizations use multiple strategies for safe medication use systems. Understanding processes that promote such strategies will provide a helpful road map for other organizations in implementation and sustainability of safe medication use systems.

  10. National survey of clinical communication assessment in medical education in the United Kingdom (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background All medical schools in the UK are required to be able to provide evidence of competence in clinical communication in their graduates. This is usually provided by summative assessment of clinical communication, but there is considerable variation in how this is carried out. This study aimed to gain insight into the current assessment of clinical communication in UK medical schools. Methods The survey was sent via e-mail to communication leads who then were asked to consult with all staff within their medical school involved in the assessment of communication. Results Results were obtained from 27 out of 33 schools (response rate 82%) and a total of 34 courses. The average number of assessments per year was 2.4 (minimum 0, maximum 10). The Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) was the most commonly used method of assessment (53%). Other assessments included MCQ and workplace based assessments. Only nine courses used a single method of assessment. Issues raised included, logistics and costs of assessing mainly by OSCE, the robustness and reliability of such exams and integration with other clinical skills. Conclusions It is encouraging that a variety of assessment methods are being used within UK medical schools and that these methods target different components of clinical communication skills acquisition. PMID:24417939

  11. Medical Entomology in the United States Department of Defense: Challenging and Rewarding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    insect and vector control programs. In 2003, the Republic of Palau requested US assist- ance in conducting surveillance for Aedes aegypti , a primary...preventive medi- cine teams remain vigilant on a global basis. Military medical entomologists have a long and proud history of ‘serving those who

  12. Medical Diplomacy in the United States Army: A Concept Whose Time Has Come

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-13

    medical diplomacy, comparing the five million dollars spent refurbishing the Rabia Balkhi hospital in Kabul Afghanistan with the eight billion dollars...tat once saw nearly one in five children die at birth”, Mr. Thompson pointed out. Those patients being born and treated today in the Rabia Balkhi

  13. Training Groups and Foreign-Born Psychiatric Medical Residents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Andrea; Juthani, Nalini

    1991-01-01

    About two-thirds of all psychiatry residents are foreign-born medical graduates. Discusses the operation, content, focus, challenges, and benefits of a training group experience for the psychiatry residents at Bronx Lebanon Hospital. The goals are to aid acculturation, improve group psychotherapeutic skills, encourage self-awareness, and promote…

  14. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. April-June 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    deep breathing, journaling, tai chi, meditation , guided imagery, and biofeedback, just to name a few. These are techniques that most medical...doubled as a classroom . The clinic could accommodate instruction of up to 6 hearing technician students who not only used the training systems

  15. [Initiation to military medical corps activity modalities: a teaching unit providing a new approach to recruiting reserve pharmacists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrude, P

    2004-07-01

    During the last ten Years, major reforms have been implemented in the French armies due to discontinuation of mandatory enlistment. For the medical corps, recruitment and training for reservists has ceased since the national school for reserve officers in Libourne was closed. During this same time, the number of foreign engagements of the French armies has revealed the need for available young reserve officers in the medical corps. Reserve training of students in medicine, pharmacy, odontology, or nursing has been considered and different possibilities considered. One option is to develop a teaching unit during the third Year of the curriculum allowing volunteer students to become junior officers. For pharmacy students, specific training on drug supply, nuclear, biological and chemical weapons and terrorism as well as clinical chemistry, toxicology, and hygiene are also organized.

  16. An Analysis of Information Technology Adoption by IRBs of Large Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Hurdle, John F

    2015-02-01

    The clinical research landscape has changed dramatically in recent years in terms of both volume and complexity. This poses new challenges for Institutional Review Boards' (IRBs) review efficiency and quality, especially at large academic medical centers. This article discusses the technical facets of IRB modernization. We analyzed the information technology used by IRBs in large academic institutions across the United States. We found that large academic medical centers have a high electronic IRB adoption rate; however, the capabilities of electronic IRB systems vary greatly. We discuss potential use-cases of a fully exploited electronic IRB system that promise to streamline the clinical research work flow. The key to that approach utilizes a structured and standardized information model for the IRB application.

  17. Effect of Dietary Intake of Stable Iodine on Dose-per-unit-intake Factors for 99Tc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2003-09-30

    of stable iodine in the diet on the dose per unit intake factors for 99Tc without developing an improved biokinetic model for technetium. Specific experiments should be designed to quantitatively evaluate 99TcO4? metabolism, excretion, and secretion, as well as to evaluate its chemical toxicity It is recommended that the ICRP reexamine its biokinetics models for Tc based on nuclear medicine data that have accumulated over the years. In particular, the ICRP ignores the lactation pathway, the enhanced concentration of Tc in breast and breast milk, and enhanced concentration of Tc (and I) in the salivary glands as well as in the thyroid. The ICRP should also explicitly incorporate the effect of stable iodine in the diet into both its models for iodine and technetium. The effect of concentration of Tc in breast milk needs further study for dosimetric implications to nursing infants whose mothers may ingest 99TcO4? from groundwater sources. The ICRP should also investigate the possibility of enhanced concentration of both I and Tc in the non-lactating female breast. To do these re-evaluations of biokinetic models, new experiments designed specifically to evaluate these questions concerning the biokinetics of Tc and I are needed.

  18. SU-E-T-516: Measurement of the Absorbed Dose Rate in Water Under Reference Conditions in a CyberKnife Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragon-Martinez, N; Hernandez-Guzman, A [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City, DF (Mexico); Gomez-Munoz, A [Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI, Mexico City, DF (Mexico); Massillon-JL, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to measure the absorbed-dose-rate in a CyberKnife unit reference-field (6cm diameter) using three ionization chambers (IC) following the new IAEA/AAPM formalism and Gafchromic film (MD-V3-55 and EBT3) protocol according to our work reported previously. Methods: The absorbed-dose-rates were measured at 90cm and 70cm SSD in a 10cmx10cm field and at 70cm SSD in a 5.4cmx5.4cm equivalent to 6cm diameter field using a linac Varian iX. All measurements were performed at 10cm depth in water. The correction factors that account for the difference between the IC response on the reference field and the CyberKnife reference field, k-(Q-msr,Q)^(f-msr,f-ref), were evaluated and Gafchromic film were calibrated using the results obtained above. Under the CyberKnife reference conditions, the factors were used to measure the absorbed-dose-rate with IC according to the new formalism and the calibrated film was irradiated in water. The film calibration curve was used to evaluate the absorbed-dose-rate in the CyberKnife unit. Results: Difference up to 2.56% is observed between dose-rate measured with IC in the reference 10cmx10cm field, depending where the chamber was calibrated, which was not reflected in the correction factor k-(Q-msr,Q)^(f-msr,f-ref ) where variations of ~0.15%-0.5% were obtained. Within measurements uncertainties, maximum difference of 1.8% on the absorbed-dose-rate in the CyberKnife reference field is observed between all IC and the films Conclusion: Absorbed-dose-rate to water was measured in a CyberKnife reference field with acceptable accuracy (combined uncertainties ~1.32%-1.73%, k=1) using three IC and films. The MD-V3-55 film as well as the new IAEA/AAPM formalism can be considered as a suitable dosimetric method to measure absorbed-dose-rate to water in small and non-standard CyberKnife fields used in clinical treatments However, the EBT3 film is not appropriated due to the high uncertainty provided (combined uncertainty ~9%, k=1

  19. Cell Type-dependent Gene Transcription Profile in Three Dimensional Human Skin Tissue Model Exposed to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Implications for Medical Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Shankaran, Harish; Karin, Norman J.; Kauer, Paula M.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Robinson, Robert J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2012-04-17

    The concern over possible health risks from exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation has been driven largely by the increase in medical exposures, the routine implementation of X-ray backscatter devices for airport security screening, and, most recently, the nuclear incident in Japan. Due to a paucity of direct epidemiological data at very low doses, cancer risk must be estimated from high dose exposure scenarios. However, there is increasing evidence that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events and may have different mechanisms of cancer induction. We have examined the radiation induced temporal response of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model using microarray-based transcriptional profiling. Our data shows that exposure to 100 mGy of X-rays is sufficient to affect gene transcription. Cell type specific analysis showed significant changes in gene expression with the levels of > 1400 genes altered in the dermis and > 400 genes regulated in the epidermis. The two cell types rarely exhibited overlapping responses at the mRNA level. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) measurements validated the microarray data in both regulation direction and value. Key pathways identified relate to cell cycle regulation, immune responses, hypoxia, reactive oxygen signaling, and DNA damage repair. We discuss in particular the role of proliferation and emphasizing how the disregulation of cellular signaling in normal tissue may impact progression towards radiation induced secondary diseases.

  20. Introducing geriatric health in medical training in Ajman, United Arab Emirates: A co-curricular approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMedical students’ knowledge and understanding of theelderly will affect the quality of care to the rising populationof older adults which points to a need to identify geriatrichealth training methods appropriate for the region andcurriculum. Therefore the study assessed the effect of a cocurricularintroductory workshop on knowledge regardinggeriatric health and attitude towards the elderly amongfourth year medical students in a medical universityMethodA quasi-experimental before-after study, with control wasconducted at Gulf Medical College among 60 medicalstudents from discipline-based curriculum in year IV duringMay–June 2010 of whom 16 had opted (attendees toundergo the introductory course, a five day workshop of 10hours duration. Pre- and post-testing used self-administeredquestionnaires for demographic variables: age, gender,nationality, close contact with older people; a quiz on oldpeople’s health, and Kogan’s Old People Scale (KOPS forattitude. The difference in scores on quiz and KOPS werecompared for the attendees and 26 non-attendees whoparticipated in both pre and post testing.ResultsThe attendees group had 38% male and 62% femaleparticipants and the non-attendees group had 21% and 79%respectively. The groups were not significantly different inage, sex, nationality and close contact with the elderly. Thescores on the quiz and KOPS showed no statisticallysignificant difference between the two groups before orafter the workshop. Almost all the participants evaluatedthe workshop very positively especially the interaction withhealthy elderly and inmates of old people’s home.ConclusionA 10-hour introductory co-curricular workshop made nosignificant change in the knowledge on geriatric health orattitude of fourth year medical students though theyreported it as a very enriching experience. A reflectivereport may have been a better assessment tool and theimpact on their clinical practice cannot be predicted.

  1. Vital signs: health burden and medical costs of nonfatal injuries to motor vehicle occupants - United States, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Gwen; Peterson, Cora; Ederer, David; Florence, Curtis; Haileyesus, Tadesse; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Xu, Likang

    2014-10-10

    Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death and injury in the United States. The purpose of this study was to describe the current health burden and medical and work loss costs of nonfatal crash injuries among vehicle occupants in the United States. CDC analyzed data on emergency department (ED) visits resulting from nonfatal crash injuries among vehicle occupants in 2012 using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System – All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) and the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS). The number and rate of all ED visits for the treatment of crash injuries that resulted in the patient being released and the number and rate of hospitalizations for the treatment of crash injuries were estimated, as were the associated number of hospital days and lifetime medical and work loss costs. In 2012, an estimated 2,519,471 ED visits resulted from nonfatal crash injuries, with an estimated lifetime medical cost of $18.4 billion (2012 U.S. dollars). Approximately 7.5% of these visits resulted in hospitalizations that required an estimated 1,057,465 hospital days in 2012. Nonfatal crash injuries occur frequently and result in substantial costs to individuals, employers, and society. For each motor vehicle crash death in 2012, eight persons were hospitalized, and 100 were treated and released from the ED. Public health practices and laws, such as primary seat belt laws, child passenger restraint laws, ignition interlocks to prevent alcohol impaired driving, sobriety checkpoints, and graduated driver licensing systems have demonstrated effectiveness for reducing motor vehicle crashes and injuries. They might also substantially reduce associated ED visits, hospitalizations, and medical costs.

  2. Republished paper: Improving safety culture on adult medical units through multidisciplinary teamwork and communication interventions: the TOPS Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blegen, M A; Sehgal, N L; Alldredge, B K; Gearhart, S; Auerbach, A A; Wachter, R M

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this project was to improve unit-based safety culture through implementation of a multidisciplinary (pharmacy, nursing, medicine) teamwork and communication intervention. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was used to determine the impact of the training with a before-after design. Surveys were returned from 454 healthcare staff before the training and 368 staff 1 year later. Five of eleven safety culture subscales showed significant improvement. Nurses perceived a stronger safety culture than physicians or pharmacists. While it is difficult to isolate the effects of the team training intervention from other events occurring during the year between training and postevaluation, overall the intervention seems to have improved the safety culture on these medical units.

  3. The effect of the TIM program (Transfer ICU Medication reconciliation) on medication transfer errors in two Dutch intensive care units : Design of a prospective 8-month observational study with a before and after period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.E. Bosma; E. Meuwese; Tan, S.S. (Siok Swan); J. van Bommel (Jasper); Melief, P.H.G.J. (Piet Herman Gerard Jan); N.G. Hunfeld; P.M.L.A. van den Bemt (Patricia)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The transfer of patients to and from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is prone to medication errors. The aim of the present study is to determine whether the number of medication errors at ICU admission and discharge and the associated potential harm and costs are reduced by usi

  4. [Complexity of care and organizational effectiveness: a survey among medical care units in nine Lombardy region hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Sara; Capitoni, Enrica; Tiraboschi, Giuseppina; Alborghetti, Adriana; De Luca, Giuseppe; Di Mauro, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    Eleven medical care units of nine Lombardy Region hospitals organized by levels of care model or by the traditional departmental model have been analyzed, in order to evaluate if methods for complexity of patient-care evaluation represent an index factor of nursing organizational effectiveness. Survey with nine Nurses in managerial position was conducted between Nov. 2013-Jan. 2014. The following factors have been described: context and nursing care model, staffing, complexity evaluation, patient satisfaction, staff well-being. Data were processed through Microsoft Excel. Among Units analysed ,all Units in levels of care and one organized by the departmental model systematically evaluate nursing complexity. Registered Nurses (RN) and Health Care Assistants (HCA) are on average numerically higher in Units that measure complexity (0.55/ 0.49 RN, 0.38/0.23 HCA - ratio per bed). Adopted measures in relation to changes in complexity are:rewarding systems, supporting interventions, such as moving personnel within different Units or additional required working hours; reduction in number of beds is adopted when no other solution is available. Patient satisfaction is evaluated through Customer Satisfaction questionnaires. Turnover, stress and rate of absenteeism data are not available in all Units. Complexity evaluation through appropriate methods is carried out in all hospitals organized in levels of care with personalized nursing care models, though complexity is detected with different methods. No significant differences in applied managerial strategies are present. Patient's satisfaction is evaluated everywhere. Data on staffing wellbeing is scarcely available. Coordinated regional actions are recommended in order to gather comparable data for research, improve decision making and effectiveness of Nursing care.

  5. The Association between Non-Medical Prescription Drug Use and Suicidal Behavior among United States Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Divin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence represents a vulnerable time for the development of both drug use/abuse and mental illness. Although previous research has substantiated a relationship between drug use and suicidal behavior, little research has examined this relationship with non-medical prescription drug use. Given the growing prevalence of non-medical prescription drug use (NMPDU among adolescents, this study explored the association between NMPDU and suicidal behavior. Nationally representative data were derived from 16, 410 adolescents who completed the 2009 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Approximately 19.8% of participants reported lifetime NMPDU. NMPDU was associated with significantly increased odds of suicidal behavior (P < 0.01, with seriously considering attempting suicide and making a plan about attempting suicide representing the strongest correlates for males and females. Results suggest the importance of 1 continued reinforcement of drug education programs in high school begun at earlier ages and 2 mental health care and screenings among adolescents.

  6. The transformation of continuing medical education (CME in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balmer JT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Jann Torrance Balmer Continuing Medical Education, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: This article describes five major themes that inform and highlight the transformation of continuing medical education in the USA. Over the past decade, the Institute of Medicine (IOM and other national entities have voiced concern over the cost of health care, prevalence of medical errors, fragmentation of care, commercial influence, and competence of health professionals. The recommendations from these entities, as well as the work of other regulatory, professional, academic, and government organizations, have fostered discussion and development of strategies to address these challenges. The five themes in this paper reflect the changing expectations of multiple stakeholders engaged in health care. Each theme is grounded in educational, politico-economic priorities for health care in the USA. The themes include (1 a shift in expectation from simple attendance or a time-based metric (credit to a measurement that infers competence in performance for successful continuing professional development (CPD; (2 an increased focus on interprofessional education to augment profession-specific continuing education; (3 the integration of CPD with quality improvement; (4 the expansion of CPD to address population and public health issues; and (5 identification and standardization of continuing education (CE professional competencies. The CE profession plays an essential role in the transformation of the US CPD system for health professionals. Coordination of the five themes described in this paper will foster an improved, effective, and efficient health system that truly meets the needs of patients. Keywords: continuing medical education, continued professional development, independence, competencies, CE professional

  7. Impact of Endotracheal Intubation on Interventional Endoscopy Unit Efficiency Metrics at a Tertiary Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perbtani, Yaseen B; Summerlee, Robert J; Yang, Dennis; An, Qi; Suarez, Alejandro; Williamson, J Blair; Shrode, Charles W; Gupte, Anand R; Chauhan, Shailendra S; Draganov, Peter V; Forsmark, Chris E; Chang, Myron; Wagh, Mihir S

    2016-06-01

    Measures for evaluating interventional endoscopy unit efficiency have not been adequately validated, especially in reference to the involvement of anesthesia services for endoscopy. Primary aim was to compare process measures/metrics of interventional endoscopy unit efficiency between intubated and non-intubated patients. Secondary aim was to assess variables associated with the need for endotracheal intubation. The prospectively collected endoscopy unit metrics database at UF Health was reviewed for procedures performed in the interventional endoscopy unit for 6 months. Parameters included hospital-mandated metrics available from the database. A total of 1,421 patients underwent 1,635 interventional endoscopic procedures and 271/1,421 patients (19.1%) were intubated. There was no significant difference between intubated and non-intubated cohorts with respect to age, gender, BMI, ASA Score, Mallampati Score, or the Charlson Comorbidity Index. Patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) were more frequently intubated than those undergoing non-ERCP procedures (41.3 vs. 12.4%, Pintubated patients, whereas only 29.2% of non-intubated patients were inpatients (Pintubated per anesthesiologist preference. All process efficiency metrics were significantly prolonged in the intubated compared with the non-intubated patient cohort, except the time interval between successive procedures. Multivariate analysis revealed that patients with an anesthesiologist who had performed a greater number of total endoscopic sedations were less likely to be intubated than patients with an anesthesiologist who had performed fewer total procedures (P=0.0066). Endotracheal intubation negatively impacts efficiency metrics in an interventional endoscopy unit. Careful assessment for the need for intubation should be emphasized.

  8. How Does Medical Device Regulation Perform in the United States and the European Union? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Daniel B.; Xu, Shuai; Kesselheim, Aaron S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Policymakers and regulators in the United States (US) and the European Union (EU) are weighing reforms to their medical device approval and post-market surveillance systems. Data may be available that identify strengths and weakness of the approaches to medical device regulation in these settings. Methods and Findings We performed a systematic review to find empirical studies evaluating medical device regulation in the US or EU. We searched Medline using two nested categories that included medical devices and glossary terms attributable to the US Food and Drug Administration and the EU, following PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews. We supplemented this search with a review of the US Government Accountability Office online database for reports on US Food and Drug Administration device regulation, consultations with local experts in the field, manual reference mining of selected articles, and Google searches using the same key terms used in the Medline search. We found studies of premarket evaluation and timing (n = 9), studies of device recalls (n = 8), and surveys of device manufacturers (n = 3). These studies provide evidence of quality problems in pre-market submissions in the US, provide conflicting views of device safety based largely on recall data, and relay perceptions of some industry leaders from self-surveys. Conclusions Few studies have quantitatively assessed medical device regulation in either the US or EU. Existing studies of US and EU device approval and post-market evaluation performance suggest that policy reforms are necessary for both systems, including improving classification of devices in the US and promoting transparency and post-market oversight in the EU. Assessment of regulatory performance in both settings is limited by lack of data on post-approval safety outcomes. Changes to these device approval and post-marketing systems must be accompanied by ongoing research to ensure that there is better assessment of

  9. How does medical device regulation perform in the United States and the European union? A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B Kramer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Policymakers and regulators in the United States (US and the European Union (EU are weighing reforms to their medical device approval and post-market surveillance systems. Data may be available that identify strengths and weakness of the approaches to medical device regulation in these settings. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a systematic review to find empirical studies evaluating medical device regulation in the US or EU. We searched Medline using two nested categories that included medical devices and glossary terms attributable to the US Food and Drug Administration and the EU, following PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews. We supplemented this search with a review of the US Government Accountability Office online database for reports on US Food and Drug Administration device regulation, consultations with local experts in the field, manual reference mining of selected articles, and Google searches using the same key terms used in the Medline search. We found studies of premarket evaluation and timing (n = 9, studies of device recalls (n = 8, and surveys of device manufacturers (n = 3. These studies provide evidence of quality problems in pre-market submissions in the US, provide conflicting views of device safety based largely on recall data, and relay perceptions of some industry leaders from self-surveys. CONCLUSIONS: Few studies have quantitatively assessed medical device regulation in either the US or EU. Existing studies of US and EU device approval and post-market evaluation performance suggest that policy reforms are necessary for both systems, including improving classification of devices in the US and promoting transparency and post-market oversight in the EU. Assessment of regulatory performance in both settings is limited by lack of data on post-approval safety outcomes. Changes to these device approval and post-marketing systems must be accompanied by ongoing research to ensure that there is

  10. Use of Curricular and Extracurricular Assessments to Predict Performance on the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1: A Multi-Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, Robyn A.; Herial, Nabeel A.; Khuder, Sadik A.; Metting, Patricia J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies student performance predictions based on the United States Medical Licensure Exam (USMLE) Step 1. Subjects were second-year medical students from academic years of 2002 through 2006 (n = 711). Three measures of basic science knowledge (two curricular and one extracurricular) were evaluated as predictors of USMLE Step 1 scores.…

  11. [Medical expert consensus in AH on the clinical use of triple fixed-dose antihypertensive therapy in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazón, P; Galve, E; Gómez, J; Gorostidi, M; Górriz, J L; Mediavilla, J D

    The opinion of experts (different specialties) on the triple fixed-dose antihypertensive therapy in clinical practice may differ. Online questionnaire with controversial aspects of the triple therapy answered by panel of experts in hypertension (HT) using two-round modified Delphi method. The questionnaire was completed by 158 experts: Internal Medicine (49), Nephrology (26), Cardiology (83). Consensus was reached (agreement) on 27/45 items (60%); 7 items showed differences statistically significant. Consensus was reached regarding: Predictive factors in the need for combination therapy and its efficacy vs. increasing the dose of a pretreatment, and advantage of triple therapy (prescription/adherence/cost/pressure control) vs. free combination. This consensus provides an overview of the clinical use of triple therapy in moderate-severe and resistant/difficult to control HT. Copyright © 2016 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Dose around a lineal accelerator of medical use;Dosis en torno a un acelerador lineal de uso medico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez A, B.; Ortiz H, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J., E-mail: ice_bere_nice@hotmail.co [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    By means of a measures series the dosimetric characteristics of the photo neutrons that take place around a lineal accelerator of radiotherapy of 18 MV has been determinate, this it is a linac Varian model 21EX Platinum Plus. The neutron spectrum was established to 100 cm of the isocenter, when it is locates to 10 cm inside an equivalent water phantom. The spectrum was measured with a spectrometric system of Bonner spheres, the used spheres were of 0, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 inches of diameter. In the spheres center they were inserted pairs of thermoluminescent dosemeters of the type 600 and 700 as thermal neutrons detector. The due net signal to the neutrons measured with each sphere was used to reconstruct the neutron spectrum; this reconstruction was made with the BUNKIUT code and the response matrix UTA4. The phantom isocenter was exposed at 600 U M and during the irradiation process the rates of environmental equivalent dose were measured by neutrons and photons on the control area of the accelerator. Immediately after having applied the 600 U M the rate of environmental equivalent dose it was measured inside the enclosure and in points around the stretcher due to the neutronic activation. The measured spectrum presents two maxima, one in the thermal neutrons area and the other between 0.1 and 1 MeV, this spectrum is similar to those reported in the literature. The thermal neutrons are produced mainly the {sup r}oom return{sup ,} while the neutrons of approximately 0.5 MeV are those transmitted through the linac head stock. The dose rates in the control area of the accelerator are 3.1 and 0.93 muSv-h{sup -1} for photons and neutrons respectively. Around the stretcher the rates of due dose to the activation photons vary from 6 to 26.1 muSv-h{sup -1}, depending on the measurement place. (Author)

  13. Survival of Serratia marcescens in benzalkonium chloride and in multiple-dose medication vials: relationship to epidemic septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, A K; Highsmith, A K; Martone, W J

    1987-01-01

    In an epidemic of septic arthritis due to Serratia marcescens, the intra-articular injection of contaminated methylprednisolone may have played a key role. The epidemic strain was found in used multiple-dose vials of methylprednisolone and in a canister of cotton balls soaked in benzalkonium chloride. The cotton balls had been used for antisepsis and disinfection. Growth characteristics of the epidemic strain of S. marcescens were compared with those of control strains of S. marcescens which had been obtained from unrelated nosocomial outbreaks. The epidemic strain was able to survive in 1:100 dilutions of benzalkonium chloride and was able to grow to greater than 10(5) CFU/ml in multiple-dose vials of methylprednisoline; control strains could not be recovered after 24 h in the same solutions. The preservative in methylprednisolone is gamma-myristyl picolinium chloride, a compound chemically related to benzalkonium chloride. We speculate that the epidemic strain of S. marcescens, which was resistant to benzalkonium chloride, had cross-resistance to gamma-myristyl picolinium chloride. If the cotton balls were used to disinfect the tops of the multiple-dose vials of methylprednisolone, small numbers of organisms subsequently introduced into the solution could have grown to high concentrations. PMID:3298309

  14. Blood Program in World War II. Medical Department, United States Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-01-01

    fowl malaria at the Naval Medical School had indicated that this variety of Pl43modium does not survive in dried plasma. Recent observations in Puerto ...1)4 )11 Ivs prm Idell shill)III1,111 . I I V \\1 VP A :14 I’ll I )FIFF It \\1 I N \\’III( JINS :opper SidlIkalle Falling- I )rojo Tesi A .1111...Pacific airlift, 602-603 in fractionation of plasma, 343 Puerperal hemorrhage, transfusion for, I in gelatin, 375, 376 Puerto Rico, 143 in intravenous

  15. Frequency and causes of discharges against medical advice from hospital cardiac care units of East Azerbaijan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Azami-Aghdash

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Discharges against medical advice (DAMA is a common problem of hospitals that could lead increasing the complications and readmission. For this, the aim of this study is to investigate the frequency and effective factors of DAMA in patients with cardiovascular disease in hospital cardiac care units (CCU of East Azerbaijan, Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed, in 2013, in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Required information was extracted using valid and reliable forms of medical records of 2000 patients admitted to 20 CCU in 17 hospitals of East Azerbaijan, by two trained interviewers. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean, percentage, etc., chi-square test, and linear regression model using the SPSS software. The tests were considered a statistically significant level of 0.05%. Results: The results showed that 272 patients (13.6% were DAMA from the hospital. The frequency of DAMA was in men more than women. The most frequency of discharge has occurred in the range of 40-80 years old. Results of linear regression showed that there was a significant correlation between DAMA and type of insurance, history of myocardial infarction (MI, comorbid disease, cause of hospitalization, location of hospital, and staying < 48 hours (P < 0.050. Conclusion: In this study, the rate of DAMA was relatively high compared with similar studies and it is considered as a concern problem that should study the reasons and its effective factors and plan effective interventions to reduce them.

  16. Accounting for medical communication: parents' perceptions of communicative roles and responsibilities in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Cynthia; Barton, Ellen; Meert, Kathleen L; Eggly, Susan; Pollacks, Murray; Zimmerman, Jerry; Anand, K J S; Carcillo, Joseph; Newth, Christopher J L; Dean, J Michael; Willson, Douglas F; Nicholson, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Through discourse analysis of transcribed interviews conducted over the phone with parents whose child died in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) (n = 51), this study uncovers parents' perceptions of clinicians' and their own communicative roles and responsibilities in the context of team-based care. We examine parents' descriptions and narratives of communicative experiences they had with PICU clinicians, focusing on how parents use accounts to evaluate the communicative behaviors they report (n = 47). Findings indicate that parental perceptions of communicative responsibilities are more nuanced than assumed in previous research: Parents identified their own responsibilities as participating as part of the team of care, gathering information, interacting with appropriate affect, and working to understand complex and uncertain medical information. Complementarily, parents identified clinician responsibilities as communicating professionally, providing medical information clearly, managing parents' hope responsibly, and communicating with appropriate affect. Through the accounts they provide, parents evaluate both parental and clinician role-responsibilities as fulfilled and unfulfilled. Clinicians' management of prognostic uncertainty and parents' struggles to understand that uncertainty emerged as key, complementary themes with practical implications for incorporating parents into the PICU care team. The study also highlights insights retrospective interview data bring to the examination of medical communication.

  17. The Study of Life Change Unit as Stressor Agents among Tehran University of Medical Sciences Hospitals' Employees

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    Hossein Dargahi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Life crises as stressor agents can disrupt the best stress management regime. Different life crises have different impacts. A standard scale to rate change and its related stress impact has been developed commonly referred to as LCU (Life Change Unit Rating. This allocates a number of Life Crisis Units or Life Change Units (LCUs to different event and then evaluates them and takes action accordingly. This idea behind this approach of is to rundown the LCU table, totaling the LCUs for life crisis that have occurred in the previous one year. A Cross - sectional, descriptive and analytical study was conducted among 900 Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS Employees by a Holms and Rahe LCU questionnaire at 15 hospitals. The respondents were asked to determine their demographic information, list of stress symptoms which suffered from these diseases in the previous one year and finally, responded to 45 Life Change Unit as stressful life events and the value of each in "stress units" which occurred in the previous one year. The results showed that there is significant correlation between the employees LCU rating by sex, educational degree and size of hospital. Also we found that there are significant correlations between the employees stress symptoms with their LCU rating. Totally, 40% of the employees have less than 150 LCU rating (normal range and 60% of them have 150-300 or more than 300 LCU rating (abnormal range. In conclusion most of TUMS hospitals' employees who had stress symptoms have more LCU rating. One third of these employees are not in danger of suffering the illness effect, while two third of them are in danger.

  18. The study of life change unit as stressor agents among Tehran University of Medical Sciences Hospitals' employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargahi, Hossein; Sharifiy Yazdi, Mohammad Kazem

    2010-01-01

    Life crises as stressor agents can disrupt the best stress management regime. Different life crises have different impacts. A standard scale to rate change and its related stress impact has been developed commonly referred to as LCU (life change unit) rating. This allocates a number of life crisis units or life change units (LCUs) to different event and then evaluates them and takes action accordingly. This idea behind this approach of is to rundown the LCU table, totaling the LCUs for life crisis that have occurred in the previous one year. A cross-sectional, descriptive and analytical study was conducted among 900 Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) employees by a Holms and Rahe LCU questionnaire at 15 hospitals. The respondents were asked to determine their demographic information, list of stress symptoms which suffered from these diseases in the previous one year and finally, responded to 45 Life Change Unit as stressful life events and the value of each in "stress units" which occurred in the previous one year. The results showed that there is significant correlation between the employees LCU rating by sex, educational degree and size of hospital. Also we found that there are significant correlations between the employees stress symptoms with their LCU rating. Totally, 40% of the employees have less than 150 LCU rating (normal range) and 60% of them have 150-300 or more than 300 LCU rating (abnormal range). In conclusion most of TUMS hospitals' employees who had stress symptoms have more LCU rating. One third of these employees are not in danger of suffering the illness effect, while two third of them are in danger.

  19. The Study of Life Change Unit as Stressor Agents among Tehran University of Medical Sciences Hospitals' Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dargahi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "nLife crises as stressor agents can disrupt the best stress management regime. Different life crises have different impacts. A standard scale to rate change and its related stress impact has been developed commonly referred to as LCU (Life Change Unit Rating. This allocates a number of Life Crisis Units or Life Change Units (LCUs to different event and then evaluates them and takes action accordingly. This idea behind this approach of is to rundown the LCU table, totaling the LCUs for life crisis that have occurred in the previous one year. A Cross - sectional, descriptive and analytical study was conducted among 900 Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS Employees by a Holms and Rahe LCU questionnaire at 15 hospitals. The respondents were asked to determine their demographic information, list of stress symptoms which suffered from these diseases in the previous one year and finally, responded to 45 Life Change Unit as stressful life events and the value of each in "stress units" which occurred in the previous one year. The results showed that there is significant correlation between the employees LCU rating by sex, educational degree and size of hospital. Also we found that there are significant correlations between the employees stress symptoms with their LCU rating. Totally, 40% of the employees have less than 150 LCU rating (normal range and 60% of them have 150-300 or more than 300 LCU rating (abnormal range. In conclusion most of TUMS hospitals' employees who had stress symptoms have more LCU rating. One third of these employees are not in danger of suffering the illness effect, while two third of them are in danger.

  20. Receipt of HIV/STD Prevention Counseling by HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Medical Care in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIZUNO, Yuko; ZHU, Julia; CREPAZ, Nicole; BEER, Linda; PURCELL, David W.; JOHNSON, Christopher H.; VALVERDE, Eduardo E.; SKARBINSKI, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Objective Guidelines recommend risk-reduction counseling by HIV providers to all HIV-infected persons. Among HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States, we estimated prevalence of exposure to three types of HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) risk-reduction interventions and described the characteristics of persons who received these interventions. Design Data were from the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP), a supplemental HIV surveillance system designed to produce nationally representative estimates of behavioral and clinical characteristics of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Methods Descriptive analyses were conducted to estimate the exposure to each type of HIV/STD risk-reduction intervention. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to assess associations between the selected correlates with each exposure variable. Results About 44% of participants reported a one-on-one conversation with a health care provider about HIV/STD prevention, 30% with a prevention program worker, 16% reported participation in a small group risk-reduction intervention, and 52% reported receiving at least one of the three interventions in the past 12 months. Minority race/ethnicity, low income, and risky sexual behavior consistently predicted greater intervention exposure. However, 39% of persons who reported risky sex did not receive any HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. Conclusions HIV-infected persons in care with fewer resources or those who engaged in risk behaviors were more likely to receive HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. However, less than half of HIV-infected persons in care received HIV/STD prevention counseling from their provider, an intervention that has been shown to be effective and is supported by guidelines. PMID:24056066

  1. Nurses\\' perception of caring behaviors in intensive care units in hospitals of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadi SE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Caring is the core of nursing however, different individules have different perceptions of it. Continuous assessment and measurement of caring behaviors results in the identification of their problems. The careful planning of interventions and problem solving will improve care. The aim of this study was to identify nurses' perception of caring behaviors in the intensive care units. Materials and Method: In this descriptive-analytic study, 140 nurses were selected from intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, using the census method in 2012. The data collection tool was the Caring Behaviors Inventory for Elders (CBI-E. This questionnaire consisted of two parts including demographic information and 28 items related to care. Face and content validity of the Persian version of the questionnaire were provided by professionals, and after deletion of 4 items a 24-item questionnaire was provided. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was calculated to assess reliability (&alpha = 0.71. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 18 and descriptive-analytic statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. Results: Based on the findings, nurses paid more attention to the physical–technical aspects (95.71 ± 12.76 of care in comparison to its psychosocial aspects (75.41 ± 27.91. Nurses had the highest score in care behavior of "timely performance of medical procedures and medication administration". Conclusion: Since nurses paid more attention to the technical aspects of care than its psychosocial aspects, by providing nurses with a correct perception of care, patients can be provided with needs-based care. This will increase patient satisfaction with nursing care, and indirectly result in the positive attitude of patients and society toward the nursing profession and its services. Moreover, nursing education officials can use these results to assist nurses in meeting

  2. Research in progress: Medical Research Council United Kingdom Refractory Asthma Stratification Programme (RASP-UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Liam G; Djukanovic, Ratko; Woodcock, Ashley; Walker, Samantha; Matthews, John G; Pavord, Ian D; Bradding, Peter; Niven, Robert; Brightling, Chris E; Chaudhuri, Rekha; Arron, Joseph R; Choy, David F; Cowan, Douglas; Mansur, Adel; Menzies-Gow, Andrew; Adcock, Ian; Chung, Kian F; Corrigan, Chris; Coyle, Peter; Harrison, Timothy; Johnston, Sebastian; Howarth, Peter; Lordan, James; Sabroe, Ian; Bigler, Jeannette; Smith, Dirk; Catley, Matthew; May, Richard; Pierre, Lisa; Stevenson, Chris; Crater, Glenn; Keane, Frank; Costello, Richard W; Hudson, Val; Supple, David; Hardman, Tim

    2016-02-01

    The UK Refractory Asthma Stratification Programme (RASP-UK) will explore novel biomarker stratification strategies in severe asthma to improve clinical management and accelerate development of new therapies. Prior asthma mechanistic studies have not stratified on inflammatory phenotype and the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms in asthma without Type 2 cytokine inflammation is limited. RASP-UK will objectively assess adherence to corticosteroids (CS) and examine a novel composite biomarker strategy to optimise CS dose; this will also address what proportion of patients with severe asthma have persistent symptoms without eosinophilic airways inflammation after progressive CS withdrawal. There will be interactive partnership with the pharmaceutical industry to facilitate access to stratified populations for novel therapeutic studies.

  3. Medical conditions among Iraqi refugees in Jordan: data from the United Nations Refugee Assistance Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carone, Marco; Al-Saedy, Huda; Nyce, Sayre; Ghosn, Jad; Mutuerandu, Timothy; Black, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the range and burden of health services utilization among Iraqi refugees receiving health assistance in Jordan, a country of first asylum. Methods Medical conditions, diagnosed in accordance with the tenth revision of the International classification of diseases, were actively monitored from 1January to 31December 2010 using a pilot centralized database in Jordan called the Refugee Assistance Information System. Findings There were 27 166 medical visits by 7642 Iraqi refugees (mean age: 37.4 years; 49% male; 70% from Baghdad; 6% disabled; 3% with a history of torture). Chronic diseases were common, including essential hypertension (22% of refugees), visual disturbances (12%), joint disorders (11%) and type II diabetes mellitus (11%). The most common reasons for seeking acute care were upper respiratory tract infection (11%), supervision of normal pregnancy (4%) and urinary disorders (3%). The conditions requiring the highest number of visits per refugee were cerebrovascular disease (1.46 visits), senile cataract (1.46) and glaucoma (1.44). Sponsored care included 31 747 referrals or consultations to a specialty service, 18 432 drug dispensations, 2307 laboratory studies and 1090 X-rays. The specialties most commonly required were ophthalmology, dentistry, gynaecology and orthopaedic surgery. Conclusion Iraqi refugees in countries of first asylum and resettlement require targeted health services, health education and sustainable prevention and control strategies for predominantly chronic diseases. PMID:22690034

  4. Barriers to discharge in an acute care medical teaching unit: a qualitative analysis of health providers' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoniewska, Barbara; Santana, Maria Jose; Groshaus, Horacio; Stajkovic, Svetlana; Cowles, Jennifer; Chakrovorty, David; Ghali, William A

    2015-01-01

    The complex process of discharging patients from acute care to community care requires a multifaceted interaction between all health care providers and patients. Poor communication in a patient's discharge can result in post hospital adverse events, readmission, and mortality. Because of the gravity of these problems, discharge planning has been emphasized as a potential solution. The purpose of this paper is to identify communication barriers to effective discharge planning in an acute care unit of a tertiary care center and to suggest solutions to these barriers. Health care providers provided comments to a single open-ended question: "What are the communication barriers between the different health care providers that limit an effective discharge of patients from Unit 36?" We conducted qualitative thematic analysis by identifying themes related to communication barriers affecting a successful discharge process. Three broad themes related to barriers to the discharge process were identified: communication, lack of role clarity and lack of resources. We also identified two themes for opportunities for improvement, ie, structure and function of the medical team and need for leadership. While it was evident that poor communication was an overarching barrier identified by health care providers, other themes emerged. In an effort to increase inter-team communication, "bullet rounds", a condensed form of discharge rounds, were introduced to the medical teaching unit and occurred on a daily basis between the multidisciplinary team. To help facilitate provider-patient communication, electronic transfer of care summaries were suggested as a potential solution. To help role clarity, a discharge coordinator and/or liaison was suggested. Communication can be enhanced through use of electronic discharge summaries, bullet rounds, and implementation of a discharge coordinator(s). The findings from this study can be used to aid future researchers in devising appropriate

  5. Association of nursing overtime, nurse staffing and unit occupancy with medical incidents and outcomes of very preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltempo, M; Lacroix, G; Cabot, M; Blais, R; Piedboeuf, B

    2017-09-21

    To examine the association of nursing overtime, nursing provision and unit occupancy rate with medical incident rates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and the risk of mortality or major morbidity among very preterm infants. Single center retrospective cohort study of infants born within 23 to 29 weeks of gestational age or birth weight bed, level III NICU. Nursing overtime ratios (nursing overtime hours/total nursing hours), nursing provision ratios (nursing hours/recommended nursing hours based on patient dependency categories) and unit occupancy rates were pooled for all shifts during NICU hospitalization of each infant. Log-binomial models assessed their association with the composite outcome (mortality or major morbidity). Of the 257 infants that met the inclusion criteria, 131 (51%) developed the composite outcome. In the adjusted multivariable analyses, high (>3.4%) relative to low nursing overtime ratios (⩽3.4%) were not associated with the composite outcome (relative risk (RR): 0.93; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.86 to 1.02). High nursing provision ratios (>1) were associated with a lower risk of the composite outcome relative to low ones (⩽1) (RR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90). NICU occupancy rates were not associated with the composite outcome (RR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.89 to 1.07, high (>100%) vs low (⩽100%)). Days with high nursing provision ratios (>1) were also associated with lower risk of having medical incidents (RR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.82 to 0.99). High nursing provision ratio during NICU hospitalization is associated with a lower risk of a composite adverse outcome in very preterm infants.Journal of Perinatology advance online publication, 21 September 2017; doi:10.1038/jp.2017.146.

  6. A comprehensive study of the association between drug hepatotoxicity and daily dose, liver metabolism, and lipophilicity using 975 oral medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Zuquan; Wang, Kejian; Li, Haibo; Shi, Qiang

    2015-07-10

    It was recently suggested that daily dose, liver metabolism and lipophilicity were associated with an oral drug's potential to cause hepatotoxicity, but this has not been widely accepted. A likely reason is that published data lack comprehensiveness, as they were based on only about one third of all FDA approved single-active-ingredient oral prescription drugs. Here the 975 oral drugs used worldwide which have a Defined Daily Dose (DDD) designated in the World Health Organization's Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system and whose hADRs potential and metabolism data are available in the Micromedex Drugdex® compendium were studied, with their lipophilicity calculated by the partition coefficient LogP. Of the 975 drugs examined, 49% (478) have the potential to induce at least one type of hepatic adverse drug reactions (hADRs) such as fatal hepatotoxicity, acute liver failure, significant ALT/AST elevation, hepatitis, and jaundice. By single factor analysis, a higher DDD (≥100 mg) was found to be associated with all types of hADRs, and extensive liver metabolism (≥50%) was associated with a subset of hADRs including fatal hADRs, hepatitis and jaundice, while LogP showed no relation to any types of hADRs. Contrary to previous reports, none of the combination, neither DDD and liver metabolism, nor DDD and LogP, was found to be more predictive of hADRs than using DDD or liver metabolism alone. These data provide convincing evidence that a higher daily dose and extensive liver metabolism, but not lipophilicity, are independent but not synergistic risk factors for oral drugs to induce hepatotoxicity.

  7. Multimethod and Interpersonal Assessment in Medical Settings: A Case Study from the Dermatology Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Vari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease with multifactorial aetiology. The psychological impact of skin diseases is increasingly recognised, but only scant attention has been given to the possible role of couple relationships as protective factors for dermatology patients. This article presents a multimethod assessment conducted along with physical examination at a Dermatology Unit. Specifically, the assessment includes measures of emotion regulation and attachment. The first aim of the article is to support an integrated assessment of dermatological and psychological factors together. The second aim is to highlight the possible role of couple relationships in the management of skin diseases.

  8. Web-based, virtual course units as a didactic concept for medical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan; Zielinski, Thomas; Lochner, Jürgen

    2004-06-01

    The objective was to develop a web-based, virtual series of lectures for evidence-based, standardized knowledge transfer independent of location and time with possibilities for interactive participation and a concluding web-based online examination. Within the framework of a research project, specific Intranet and Internet capable course modules were developed together with a concluding examination. The concept of integrating digital and analogue course units supported by sound was based on FlashCam (Nexus Concepts), Flash MX (Macromedia), HTML and JavaScript. A Web server/SGI Indigo Unix server was used as a platform by the course provider. A variety of independent formats (swf, avi, mpeg, DivX, etc.) were integrated in the individual swf modules. An online examination was developed to monitor the learning effect. The examination papers are automatically forwarded by email after completion. The results are also returned to the user automatically after they have been processed by a key program and an evaluation program. The system requirements for the user PC have deliberately been kept low (Internet Explorer 5.0, Flash-Player 6, 56 kbit/s modem, 200 MHz PC). Navigation is intuitive. Users were provided with a technical online introduction and a FAQ list. Eighty-two students of dentistry in their 3rd to 5th years of study completed a questionnaire to assess the course content and the user friendliness (SPSS V11) with grades 1 to 6 (1 = 'excellent' and 6 = 'unsatisfactory'). The course units can be viewed under the URL: http://giga.rrze.uni-erlangen.de/movies/MKG/trailer and URL: http://giga.rrze.uni-erlangen.de/movies/MKG/demo/index. Some 89% of the students gave grades 1 (excellent) and 2 (good) for accessibility independent of time and 83% for access independent of location. Grades 1 and 2 were allocated for an objectivization of the knowledge transfer by 67% of the students and for the use of video sequences for demonstrating surgical techniques by 91% of the

  9. Medication Errors in an Internal Intensive Care Unit of a Large Teaching Hospital: A Direct Observation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadat Delfani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Medication errors account for about 78% of serious medical errors in intensive care unit (ICU. So far no study has been performed in Iran to evaluate all type of possible medication errors in ICU. Therefore the objective of this study was to reveal the frequency, type and consequences of all type of errors in an ICU of a large teaching hospital. The prospective observational study was conducted in an 11 bed internal ICU of a university hospital in Shiraz. In each shift all processes that were performed on one selected patient was observed and recorded by a trained pharmacist. Observer would intervene only if medication error would cause substantial harm. The data was evaluated and then were entered in a form that was designed for this purpose. The study continued for 38 shifts. During this period, a total of 442 errors per 5785 opportunities for errors (7.6% occurred. Of those, there were 9.8% administration errors, 6.8% prescribing errors, 3.3% transcription errors and, 2.3% dispensing errors. Totally 45 interventions were made, 40% of interventions result in the correction of errors. The most common causes of errors were observed to be: rule violations, slip and memory lapses and lack of drug knowledge. According to our results, the rate of errors is alarming and requires implementation of a serious solution. Since our system lacks a well-organize detection and reporting mechanism, there is no means for preventing errors in the first place. Hence, as the first step we must implement a system where errors are routinely detected and reported.

  10. Complementary and alternative medical therapies for interstitial cystitis: an update from the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, Megan Danielle; Shah, Nima M; Whitmore, Kristene E

    2015-12-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) has shifted from organ-specific to a multifactorial, multidisciplinary and individualized approach. Patients with refractory and debilitating symptoms may respond to complementary and alternative medical treatments (CAM). Through CAM therapies, practitioners assist the patient to be at the center of their care, empowering them to be emotionally and physically involved. Multi-disciplinary care, including urology, gynecology, gastroenterology, neurology, psychology, physiotherapy and pain medicine, is also identified to be the crux of adequate management of patients with chronic pelvic pain because of its variable etiology. The purpose of this review is to emphasize these changes and discuss management strategies.

  11. [Practice and research into multi-unit teaching of Medical Genetics.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shao-Ling; Xu, Si-Bin; Gong, Lei; Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Ping; Lin, Ai-Qin

    2010-10-01

    In order to fully arise the enthusiasm of students in active learning and promote their development, we attempted such multiple class teaching methods in teaching medical science of genetics as elaboration of the basic theory of genetics, synopsis on the advance of this field, application of multimedia teaching, case-based teaching, role-play change in class teaching, instructions on writing of reviewing articles and academic assessment by diverse examination. The results suggest that multiple teaching methods can greatly enhance the efficiency of class teaching and comprehensively cultivate the academic ability of the students as well as improve the quality of teachers. Compared with the conventional class teaching, students are much interested in giving lessons by case-based study, CAI teaching and role change of teachers and students in class teaching, which resulted in improvement of self-disciplined study of students, problem settlement, class performance, awareness of the importance of scientific research and reinforcement of team work.

  12. Response of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy phosphor based TLD badge system to high energy electron beams from medical linear accelerator and estimation of whole body dose and skin dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, S. [TLD Unit, RPAD, VECC/BARC, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Bakshi, A.K. [RPAD, BARC, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)], E-mail: akbakshi123@yahoo.com; Kinhikar, R.A. [Department of Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital, Earnest Borges Marg, Parel, Mumbai 400 012 (India); Chourasiya, G.; Kher, R.K. [RPAD, BARC, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2009-03-15

    Response of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badge based on CaSO{sub 4}:Dy phosphor to high energy electron beams from medical linear accelerators was simulated using FLUKA Monte Carlo code and experimentally verified. This study was carried out in order to determine the response of TL discs under different filter regions of the TLD badge and their ratios under different irradiation conditions in the energy range 6-20 MeV of high energy electron beams. It was found that the response of TL disc under metal filters of the TLD badge (D1) is always higher than the response of the TL discs under Polystyrene filter (D2) and open window (D3) and its response was found to decrease with increase in the energy of the electron beam. Estimation of whole body dose and skin dose including its error was carried out as an extension of the present study in case of accidental exposure of radiation worker to high energy electron beam.

  13. Passive dosing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mixtures to terrestrial springtails: Linking mixture toxicity to chemical activities, equilibrium lipid concentrations, and toxic units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard; Holmstrup, Martin; Smith, Kilian E. C.

    2013-01-01

    treatments, containing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. Springtail lethality was then linked to sum chemical activities (∑a), sum equilibrium lipid concentrations (∑Clipid eq.), and sum toxic units (∑TU). In each case, the effects of all 12 mixture treatments...... could be fitted to one sigmoidal exposure-response relationship. The effective lethal chemical activity (La50) of 0.027 was well within the expected range for baseline toxicity of 0.01-0.1. Linking the effects to the lipid-based exposure parameter yielded an effective lethal concentration (LClipid eq....... 50) of 133 mmol kg-1 lipid in good correspondence with the lethal membrane burden for baseline toxicity (40-160 mmol kg-1 lipid). Finally, the effective lethal toxic unit (LTU50) of 1.20 was rather close to the expected value of 1. Altogether, passive dosing provided tightly controlled mixture...

  14. Barriers to discharge in an acute care medical teaching unit: a qualitative analysis of health providers’ perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okoniewska B

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Okoniewska,1 Maria Jose Santana,1 Horacio Groshaus,2 Svetlana Stajkovic,3 Jennifer Cowles,4 David Chakrovorty,5 William A Ghali1 1Department of Community Health Sciences, W21C Research and Innovation Centre, Institute of Public Health, 2Department of Internal Medicine, University of Calgary, 3Community Based Practice, 4Foothills Medical Centre, 5Department of Quality and Healthcare Improvement, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB, Canada Background: The complex process of discharging patients from acute care to community care requires a multifaceted interaction between all health care providers and patients. Poor communication in a patient’s discharge can result in post hospital adverse events, readmission, and mortality. Because of the gravity of these problems, discharge planning has been emphasized as a potential solution. The purpose of this paper is to identify communication barriers to effective discharge planning in an acute care unit of a tertiary care center and to suggest solutions to these barriers. Methods: Health care providers provided comments to a single open-ended question: “What are the communication barriers between the different health care providers that limit an effective discharge of patients from Unit 36?” We conducted qualitative thematic analysis by identifying themes related to communication barriers affecting a successful discharge process. Results: Three broad themes related to barriers to the discharge process were identified: communication, lack of role clarity and lack of resources. We also identified two themes for opportunities for improvement, ie, structure and function of the medical team and need for leadership. Conclusion: While it was evident that poor communication was an overarching barrier identified by health care providers, other themes emerged. In an effort to increase inter-team communication, “bullet rounds”, a condensed form of discharge rounds, were introduced to the medical

  15. Effect of PACS/CR on cost of care and length of stay in a medical intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlotz, Curtis P.; Kundel, Harold L.; Brikman, Inna; Pratt, Hugh M.; Redfern, Regina O.; Horii, Steven C.; Schwartz, J. Sanford

    1996-05-01

    Our purpose was to determine the economic effects associated with the introduction of PACS and computed radiology (CR) in a medical intensive care unit (MICU). Clinical and financial data were collected over a period of 6 months, both before and after the introduction of PACS/CR in our medical intensive care unit. Administrative claims data resulting from the MICU stay of each patient enrolled in our study were transferred online to our research database from the administrative databases of our hospital and its affiliated clinical practices. These data included all charge entries, sociodemographic data, admissions/discharge/transfer chronologies, ICD9 diagnostic and procedure codes, and diagnostic related groups. APACHE III scores and other case mix adjusters were computed from the diagnostic codes, and from the contemporaneous medical record. Departmental charge to cost ratios and the Medicare Resource-Based Relative Value Scale fee schedule were used to estimate costs from hospital and professional charges. Data were analyzed using both the patient and the exam as the unit of analysis. Univariate analyses by patient show that patients enrolled during the PACS periods were similar to those enrolled during the Film periods in age, sex, APACHE III score, and other measures of case mix. No significant differences in unadjusted median length of stay between the two Film and two PACS periods were detected. Likewise, no significant differences in unadjusted total hospital and professional costs were found between the Film and PACS periods. In our univariate analyses by exam, we focused on the subgroup of exams that had triggered primary clinical actions in any period. Those action-triggering exams were divided into two groups according to whether the referring clinician elected to obtain imaging results from the workstation or from the usual channels. Patients whose imaging results were obtain from the workstation had significantly lower professional costs in the 7 days

  16. Is the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment unit superior to conventional acute medical care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekerstad N

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Niklas Ekerstad,1,2 Björn W Karlson,3 Synneve Dahlin Ivanoff,4 Sten Landahl,5 David Andersson,6 Emelie Heintz,7 Magnus Husberg,2 Jenny Alwin2 1Department of Cardiology, NU (NÄL-Uddevalla Hospital Group, Trollhattan, 2Division of Health Care Analysis, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, 3Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, 4Centre for Ageing and Health, AGECAP, Department of Health and Rehabilitation, 5Department of Geriatrics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, 6Division of Economics, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, 7Health Outcomes and Economic Evaluation Research Group, Medical Management Centre, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA unit is superior to the care in a conventional acute medical care unit. Design: This is a clinical, prospective, randomized, controlled, one-center intervention study. Setting: This study was conducted in a large county hospital in western Sweden. Participants: The study included 408 frail elderly patients, aged ≥75 years, in need of acute in-hospital treatment. The patients were allocated to the intervention group (n=206 or control group (n=202. Mean age of the patients was 85.7 years, and 56% were female. Intervention: This organizational form of care is characterized by a structured, systematic interdisciplinary CGA-based care at an acute elderly care unit. Measurements: The primary outcome was the change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL 3 months after discharge from hospital, measured by the Health Utilities Index-3 (HUI-3. Secondary outcomes were all-cause mortality, rehospitalizations, and hospital care costs. Results: After adjustment by

  17. Involvement of consumers in studies run by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit: Results of a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vale Claire L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to establish levels of consumer involvement in randomised controlled trials (RCTs, meta-analyses and other studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC Clinical Trials Unit across the range of research programs, predominantly in cancer and HIV. Methods Staff responsible for studies that were included in a Unit Progress Report (MRC CTU, April 2009 were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire survey regarding consumer involvement. This was defined as active involvement of consumers as partners in the research process and not as subjects of that research. The electronic questionnaires combined open and closed questions, intended to capture quantitative and qualitative information on whether studies had involved consumers; types of activities undertaken; recruitment and support; advantages and disadvantages of involvement and its perceived impact on aspects of the research. Results Between October 2009 and April 2010, 138 completed questionnaires (86% were returned. Studies had been conducted over a 20 year period from 1989, and around half were in cancer; 30% in HIV and 20% were in other disease areas including arthritis, tuberculosis and blood transfusion medicine. Forty-three studies (31% had some consumer involvement, most commonly as members of trial management groups (TMG [88%]. A number of positive impacts on both the research and the researcher were identified. Researchers generally felt involvement was worthwhile and some felt that consumer involvement had improved the credibility of the research. Benefits in design and quality, trial recruitment, dissemination and decision making were also perceived. Researchers felt they learned from consumer involvement, albeit that there were some barriers. Conclusions Whilst most researchers identified benefits of involving consumers, most of studies included in the survey had no involvement. Information from this survey will inform the development

  18. Near Real-Time Assessment of Anatomic and Dosimetric Variations for Head and Neck Radiation Therapy via Graphics Processing Unit-based Dose Deformation Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, X Sharon; Santhanam, Anand; Neylon, John; Min, Yugang; Armstrong, Tess; Sheng, Ke; Staton, Robert J; Pukala, Jason; Pham, Andrew; Low, Daniel A; Lee, Steve P; Steinberg, Michael; Manon, Rafael; Chen, Allen M; Kupelian, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically monitor anatomic variations and their dosimetric consequences during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck (H&N) cancer by using a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based deformable image registration (DIR) framework. Eleven IMRT H&N patients undergoing IMRT with daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) and weekly kilovoltage CT (kVCT) scans were included in this analysis. Pretreatment kVCTs were automatically registered with their corresponding planning CTs through a GPU-based DIR framework. The deformation of each contoured structure in the H&N region was computed to account for nonrigid change in the patient setup. The Jacobian determinant of the planning target volumes and the surrounding critical structures were used to quantify anatomical volume changes. The actual delivered dose was calculated accounting for the organ deformation. The dose distribution uncertainties due to registration errors were estimated using a landmark-based gamma evaluation. Dramatic interfractional anatomic changes were observed. During the treatment course of 6 to 7 weeks, the parotid gland volumes changed up to 34.7%, and the center-of-mass displacement of the 2 parotid glands varied in the range of 0.9 to 8.8 mm. For the primary treatment volume, the cumulative minimum and mean and equivalent uniform doses assessed by the weekly kVCTs were lower than the planned doses by up to 14.9% (P=.14), 2% (P=.39), and 7.3% (P=.05), respectively. The cumulative mean doses were significantly higher than the planned dose for the left parotid (P=.03) and right parotid glands (P=.006). The computation including DIR and dose accumulation was ultrafast (∼45 seconds) with registration accuracy at the subvoxel level. A systematic analysis of anatomic variations in the H&N region and their dosimetric consequences is critical in improving treatment efficacy. Nearly real-time assessment of anatomic and dosimetric variations is

  19. Screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography: grand rounds discussion from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Gerald W; Boiselle, Phillip M; Schwartzstein, Richard M

    2015-04-21

    In December 2013, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) for selected current and former smokers. The Task Force based the recommendation primarily on the results of the NLST (National Lung Screening Trial). In this trial, patients randomly assigned to LDCT screening for 3 years had lower rates of both lung cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality (relative risk reduction, 6.7% [95% CI, 1.2% to 13.6%]; absolute risk reduction, 0.46% [CI, 0% to 0.9%]). Clinicians and health systems confront questions and challenges as they begin to implement lung cancer screening. This paper summarizes a conference during which an internist and a radiologist discuss the application of the Task Force recommendation to an individual patient.

  20. Is the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment unit superior to conventional acute medical care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerstad, Niklas; Karlson, Björn W; Dahlin Ivanoff, Synneve; Landahl, Sten; Andersson, David; Heintz, Emelie; Husberg, Magnus; Alwin, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) unit is superior to the care in a conventional acute medical care unit. Design This is a clinical, prospective, randomized, controlled, one-center intervention study. Setting This study was conducted in a large county hospital in western Sweden. Participants The study included 408 frail elderly patients, aged ≥75 years, in need of acute in-hospital treatment. The patients were allocated to the intervention group (n=206) or control group (n=202). Mean age of the patients was 85.7 years, and 56% were female. Intervention This organizational form of care is characterized by a structured, systematic interdisciplinary CGA-based care at an acute elderly care unit. Measurements The primary outcome was the change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 3 months after discharge from hospital, measured by the Health Utilities Index-3 (HUI-3). Secondary outcomes were all-cause mortality, rehospitalizations, and hospital care costs. Results After adjustment by regression analysis, patients in the intervention group were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months for the following dimensions: vision (odds ratio [OR] =0.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.14–0.79), ambulation (OR =0.19, 95% CI =0.1–0.37), dexterity (OR =0.38, 95% CI =0.19–0.75), emotion (OR =0.43, 95% CI =0.22–0.84), cognition (OR = 0.076, 95% CI =0.033–0.18) and pain (OR =0.28, 95% CI =0.15–0.50). Treatment in a CGA unit was independently associated with lower 3-month mortality adjusted by Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio [HR] =0.55, 95% CI =0.32–0.96), and the two groups did not differ significantly in terms of hospital care costs (P>0.05). Conclusion Patients in an acute CGA unit were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months, and the care in a CGA unit was also independently associated with lower mortality

  1. Trends in use of medical abortion in the United States: reanalysis of surveillance data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2001-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazol, Karen; Creanga, Andreea A; Zane, Suzanne B

    2012-12-01

    With changing patterns and increasing use of medical abortion in the United States, it is important to have accurate statistics on the use of this method regularly available. This study assesses the accuracy of medical abortion data reported annually to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and describes trends over time in the use of medical abortion relative to other methods. This analysis included data reported to CDC for 2001-2008. Year-specific analyses included all states that monitored medical abortion for a given year, while trend analyses were restricted to states that monitored medical abortion continuously from 2001 to 2008. Data quality and completeness were assessed by (a) examining abortions reported with an unspecified method type within the gestational age limit for medical abortion (med-eligible abortions) and (b) comparing the percentage of all abortions and med-eligible abortions reported to CDC as medical abortions with estimates based on published mifepristone sales data for the United States from 2001 to 2007. During 2001-2008, the percentage of med-eligible abortions reported to CDC with an unspecified method type remained low (1.0%-2.2%); CDC data and mifepristone sales estimates for 2001-2007 demonstrated strong agreement [all abortions: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.983; med-eligible abortions: ICC=0.988]. During 2001-2008, the percentage of abortions reported to CDC as medical abortions increased (pabortions and for med-eligible abortions). Among states that reported medical abortions for 2008, 15% of all abortions and 23% of med-eligible abortions were reported as medical abortions. CDC's Abortion Surveillance System provides an important annual data source that accurately describes the use of medical abortion relative to other methods in the United States. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. In vivo measurement of Pu dissolution parameters of MOX aerosols and related uncertainties in the values of the dose per unit intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramounet-Le Gall, B; Rateau, G; Abram, M C; Grillon, G; Ansoborlo, E; Bérard, P; Delforge, J; Fritsch, P

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare dissolution parameter values for Pu from industrial MOX with different Pu contents. For this purpose, preliminary results obtained after inhalation exposure of rats to MOX containing 2.5% Pu are reported and compared to those obtained previously with MOX containing 5% Pu. Dissolution parameter values appear to increase when the amount of Pu decreases. Rapid fractions, f(r), of 4 x 10(-3) (s.d. = 2 x 10(-3)) and 1 x 10(-3) (s.d. = 6 x 10(-4)) and slow dissolution rates, s(s) of 2 x 10(-4) d(-1) (standard deviation, sigma = 5 x 10(-5)) and 5 x 10(-5) d(-1) (sigma = 1 x 10(-5)) were derived for MOX containing 2.5 and 5% of Pu, respectively. Simulations were performed to assess uncertainties on dose due to experimental errors. The relative standard deviations of the dose per unit intake (DPUI) due to f(r) (4-8%), are far less than those due to s(s) (about 20%), which is the main parameter altering the dose. Although quite different dissolution parameter values were derived, similar DPUIs were obtained for MOX aerosols containing 2.5 and 5% Pu which appear close to that for default Type S values.

  3. Health disparities among highly vulnerable populations in the United States: a call to action for medical and oral health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison A. Vanderbilt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare in the United States (US is burdened with enormous healthcare disparities associated with a variety of factors including insurance status, income, and race. Highly vulnerable populations, classified as those with complex medical problems and/or social needs, are one of the fastest growing segments within the US. Over a decade ago, the US Surgeon General publically challenged the nation to realize the importance of oral health and its relationship to general health and well-being, yet oral health disparities continue to plague the US healthcare system. Interprofessional education and teamwork has been demonstrated to improve patient outcomes and provide benefits to participating health professionals. We propose the implementation of interprofessional education and teamwork as a solution to meet the increasing oral and systemic healthcare demands of highly vulnerable US populations.

  4. Health disparities among highly vulnerable populations in the United States: a call to action for medical and oral health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Allison A; Isringhausen, Kim T; VanderWielen, Lynn M; Wright, Marcie S; Slashcheva, Lyubov D; Madden, Molly A

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare in the United States (US) is burdened with enormous healthcare disparities associated with a variety of factors including insurance status, income, and race. Highly vulnerable populations, classified as those with complex medical problems and/or social needs, are one of the fastest growing segments within the US. Over a decade ago, the US Surgeon General publically challenged the nation to realize the importance of oral health and its relationship to general health and well-being, yet oral health disparities continue to plague the US healthcare system. Interprofessional education and teamwork has been demonstrated to improve patient outcomes and provide benefits to participating health professionals. We propose the implementation of interprofessional education and teamwork as a solution to meet the increasing oral and systemic healthcare demands of highly vulnerable US populations.

  5. A UK wide survey on attitudes to point of care ultrasound training amongst clinicians working on the Acute Medical Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Nicholas; Matsa, Ramprasad; Lawrenson, Philip; Messenger, Jenny; Walden, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The use of point of care ultrasound (POCU) is increasing across a number of specialties, becoming mandatory within some specialist training programmes (for example respiratory and emergency medicine). Despite this, there are few data looking at the prevalence of use or the training clinicians have undertaken; this survey sought to address this. It shows that the majority of POCU undertaken on the Acute Medical Unit (AMU) is without formal accreditation, with significant arriers to training highlighted including a lack of supervision, time and equipment. For those who undertook POCU, it was shown to regularly speed up clinical decision making, while 76.3% respondents believed a lack of access to POCU out of hours may affect patient safety. The data provide support to the concept of developing AMU specific POCU accreditation, to ensure robust and safe use of this modality on the AMU.

  6. Medical exposure assessment: the global approach of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannoun, F

    2015-07-01

    The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) was established in 1955 to systematically collect, evaluate, publish and share data on the global levels and effects of ionizing radiation from natural and artificial sources. Regular surveys have been conducted to determinate the frequencies of medical radiological procedure, the number of equipment and staffing and the level of global exposure using the health care level (HCL) extrapolation model. UNSCEAR surveys revealed a range of issues relating to participation, survey process, data quality and analysis. Thus, UNSCEAR developed an improvement strategy to address the existing deficiencies in data quality and collection. The major element of this strategy is the introduction of an on-line platform to facilitate the data collection and archiving process. It is anticipated that the number of countries participating in UNSCEAR's surveys will increase in the future, particularly from HCL II-IV countries.

  7. Comparing the effect of non-medical mechanical restraint preventive factors between psychiatric units in Denmark and Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jesper; Zoffmann, V.; Sestoft, D.M.;

    2015-01-01

    -medical origin may explain the differing number of MR episodes between Denmark and Norway. METHODS: This study is a cross-sectional survey of psychiatric units. Linear regression was used to assess the confounding effects of the MR preventive factors, i.e. whether a difference in the impact of these factors......BACKGROUND: The use of mechanical restraint (MR) is controversial, and large differences regarding the use of MR are often found among countries. In an earlier study, we observed that MR was used twice as frequently in Denmark than Norway. AIMS: To examine how presumed MR preventive factors of non......-staff ratio (- 11%), and the identification of the patient's crisis triggers (- 10%). CONCLUSIONS: These six MR preventive factors might partially explain the difference in the frequency of MR episodes observed in the two countries, i.e. higher numbers in Denmark than Norway. One MR preventive factor...

  8. Commercial support of continuing medical education in the United States: the politics of doubt, the value of studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazmanian, Paul E

    2009-01-01

    The continuing medical education (CME) system of the United States is being questioned for its integrity. Leaders in medicine and in government are asking about the effectiveness of CME, the influence of commercial support, and the value of CME credit and accreditation in assuring CME courses offer valid content, free of commercial bias. Nationally accredited CME organizations received $1.2B in commercial support during 2007, much of it associated with CME in formats shown to be less effective for improving clinical behavior and patient outcomes. There are few reliable data to respond to careful criticism. In 2007, U.S. expenditures for health exceed $2.2 trillion, with physicians responsible for clinical decisions that account for a large part of the spending. Approximately $4013 was spent per physician on CME. Rigorous studies are required to describe and explain relationships of CME accreditation and credit to better education and improved patient outcomes.

  9. Screening difficult-to-reach populations for tuberculosis using a mobile medical unit, Punjab India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binepal, G; Agarwal, P; Kaur, N; Singh, B; Bhagat, V; Verma, R P; Satyanarayana, S; Oeltmann, J E; Moonan, P K

    2015-12-21

    Contexte : En Inde, la Mission nationale santé a fourni une unité médicale mobile (MMU) par district dans l'état du Penjab afin d'offrir des services de soins de santé primaires aux populations difficilement accessibles.Objectifs : Déterminer le nombre de patients présumés atteints de la tuberculose (TB) et le nombre de cas de TB détectés et traités parmi les patients qui ont utilisé les services de la MMU de mai à décembre 2012 dans le district de Mohali de l'état du Penjab, Inde.Méthodes : Une étude transversale a été réalisée et l'étude des registres des consultations, du laboratoire, de la radiologie et des services de TB de la MMU a permis de compter le nombre de personnes présumées atteintes de TB et le nombre de personnes ayant eu un diagnostic de TB.Résultats : Un total de 8346 patients ont fréquenté la MMU, dont 663 (8%) avaient des symptômes suggérant une TB. Parmi ces derniers, 540 (81%) ont bénéficié d'une recherche de TB pulmonaire g