WorldWideScience

Sample records for unit cell space

  1. A fuel cell energy storage system concept for the Space Station Freedom Extravehicular Mobility Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlhart, Otto J.; Rosso, Matthew J., Jr.; Marmolejo, Jose

    1989-01-01

    An update is given on work to design and build a Fuel Cell Energy Storage System (FCESS) bench-tested unit for the Space Station Freedom Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Fueled by oxygen and hydride-stored hydrogen, the FCESS is being considered as an alternative to the EMU zinc-silver oxide battery. Superior cycle life and quick recharge are the main attributes of FCESS. The design and performance of a nonventing, 28 V, 34 Ahr system with 7 amp rating are discussed.

  2. Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) Cell Culture Unit (CCU) and incubator for International Space Station (ISS) cell culture experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendriesche, Donald; Parrish, Joseph; Kirven-Brooks, Melissa; Fahlen, Thomas; Larenas, Patricia; Havens, Cindy; Nakamura, Gail; Sun, Liping; Krebs, Chris; de Luis, Javier; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Searby, Nancy D

    2004-03-01

    The CCU and Incubator are habitats under development by SSBRP for gravitational biology research on ISS. They will accommodate multiple specimen types and reside in either Habitat Holding Racks, or the Centrifuge Rotor, which provides selectable gravity levels of up to 2 g. The CCU can support multiple Cell Specimen Chambers, CSCs (18, 9 or 6 CSCs; 3, 10 or 30 mL in volume, respectively). CSCs are temperature controlled from 4-39 degrees C, with heat shock to 45 degrees C. CCU provides automated nutrient supply, magnetic stirring, pH/O2 monitoring, gas supply, specimen lighting, and video microscopy. Sixty sample containers holding up to 2 mL each, stored at 4-39 degrees C, are available for automated cell sampling, subculture, and injection of additives and fixatives. CSCs, sample containers, and fresh/spent media bags are crew-replaceable for long-term experiments. The Incubator provides a 4-45 degrees C controlled environment for life science experiments or storage of experimental reagents. Specimen containers and experiment unique equipment are experimenter-provided. The Specimen Chamber exchanges air with ISS cabin and has 18.8 liters of usable volume that can accommodate six trays and the following instrumentation: five relocatable thermometers, two 60 W power outlets, four analog ports, and one each relative humidity sensor, video port, ethernet port and digital input/output port.

  3. United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI)

    CERN Document Server

    Ochiai, M; Steffens, H; Balogh, W; Haubold, H J; Othman, M; Doi, T

    2015-01-01

    The Human Space Technology Initiative was launched in 2010 within the framework of the United Nations Programme on Space Applications implemented by the Office for Outer Space Affairs of the United Nations. It aims to involve more countries in activities related to human spaceflight and space exploration and to increase the benefits from the outcome of such activities through international cooperation, to make space exploration a truly international effort. The role of the Initiative in these efforts is to provide a platform to exchange information, foster collaboration between partners from spacefaring and non-spacefaring countries, and encourage emerging and developing countries to take part in space research and benefit from space applications. The Initiative organizes expert meetings and workshops annually to raise awareness of the current status of space exploration activities as well as of the benefits of utilizing human space technology and its applications. The Initiative is also carrying out primary ...

  4. Bi-Cell Unit for Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The patent concerns a bi-cell unit for a fuel cell . The bi-cell unit is comprised of two electrode packs. Each of the electrode packs includes an...invention relates in general to a bi-cell unit for a fuel cell and in particular, to a bi-cell unit for a hydrazine-air fuel cell .

  5. Additively Manufactured Open-Cell Porous Biomaterials Made from Six Different Space-Filling Unit Cells: The Mechanical and Morphological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Ahmadi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the mechanical properties of bone-mimicking porous biomaterials are a function of the morphological properties of the porous structure, including the configuration and size of the repeating unit cell from which they are made. However, the literature on this topic is limited, primarily because of the challenge in fabricating porous biomaterials with arbitrarily complex morphological designs. In the present work, we studied the relationship between relative density (RD of porous Ti6Al4V EFI alloy and five compressive properties of the material, namely elastic gradient or modulus (Es20–70, first maximum stress, plateau stress, yield stress, and energy absorption. Porous structures with different RD and six different unit cell configurations (cubic (C, diamond (D, truncated cube (TC, truncated cuboctahedron (TCO, rhombic dodecahedron (RD, and rhombicuboctahedron (RCO were fabricated using selective laser melting. Each of the compressive properties increased with increase in RD, the relationship being of a power law type. Clear trends were seen in the influence of unit cell configuration and porosity on each of the compressive properties. For example, in terms of Es20–70, the structures may be divided into two groups: those that are stiff (comprising those made using C, TC, TCO, and RCO unit cell and those that are compliant (comprising those made using D and RD unit cell.

  6. Sickle Cell Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canipe, Stephen L.

    Included in this high school biology unit on sickle cell anemia are the following materials: a synopsis of the history of the discovery and the genetic qualities of the disease; electrophoresis diagrams comparing normal, homozygous and heterozygous conditions of the disease; and biochemical characteristics and population genetics of the disease. A…

  7. Holomorphic Spaces in the Unit Ball of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Guadalupe Miss Paredes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the and vector spaces of holomorphic functions defined in the unit ball of , generalizing previous work like Ouyang et al. (1998, Stroethoff (1989, and Choa et al. (1992. Likewise, we characterize those spaces in terms of harmonic majorants as a generalization of Arellano et al. (2000.

  8. Additively Manufactured Open-Cell Porous Biomaterials Made from Six Different Space-Filling Unit Cells: The Mechanical and Morphological Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadi, S.M.; Yavari, S.A.; Wauthle, R.; Pouran, B.; Schrooten, J.; Weinans, H.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    It is known that the mechanical properties of bone-mimicking porous biomaterials are a function of the morphological properties of the porous structure, including the configuration and size of the repeating unit cell from which they are made. However, the literature on this topic is limited, primari

  9. The United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Werner; Miyoshi, Takanori

    2016-07-01

    The United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (OOSA) launched the Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI) in 2010 within the United Nations Programme on Space Applications, based on relevant recommendations of the Third United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNISPACE III). The activities of HSTI are characterized by the following "Three Pillars": International Cooperation, Outreach, and Capacity-building. For International Cooperation, OOSA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) jointly launched a new programme entitled "KiboCUBE". KiboCUBE aims to provide educational or research institutions located in developing countries with opportunities to deploy cube satellites of their own design and manufacture from Japanese Experiment Module "Kibo" on-board the International Space Station (ISS). The Announcement of Opportunity was released on 8 September 2015 and the selected institution is to be announced by 1 August 2016. OOSA is also collaborating with WHO and with the COPUOS Expert Group on Space and Global Health to promote space technologies and ground- and space-based research activities that can contribute to improving global health. For Outreach, OOSA and the government of Costa Rica are jointly organising the United Nations/Costa Rica Workshop on Human Space Technology from 7 to 11 March 2016. Participants will exchange information on achievements in human space programmes and discuss how to promote international cooperation by further facilitating the participation of developing countries in human space exploration-related activities. Also, it will address the role of space industries in human space exploration and its related activities, considering that they have become significant stakeholders in this field. For Capacity-building, OOSA has been carrying out two activities: the Zero-Gravity Instrument Project (ZGIP) and the Drop Tower Experiment Series (DropTES). In ZGIP, OOSA has annually distributed

  10. Unit distances and diameters in Euclidean spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Swanepoel, Konrad J

    2007-01-01

    We show that the maximum number of unit distances or of diameters in a set of n points in d-dimensional Euclidean space is attained only by specific types of Lenz constructions, for all d >= 4 and n sufficiently large, depending on d. As a corollary we determine the exact maximum number of unit distances for all even d >= 6, and the exact maximum number of diameters for all d >= 4, for all $n$ sufficiently large, depending on d.

  11. Estimation of Cartesian Space Robot Trajectories Using Unit Quaternion Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Ude

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability to estimate Cartesian space trajectories that include orientation is of great importance for many practical applications. While it is becoming easier to acquire trajectory data by computer vision methods, data measured by general-purpose vision or depth sensors are often rather noisy. Appropriate smoothing methods are thus needed in order to reconstruct smooth Cartesian space trajectories given noisy measurements. In this paper, we propose an optimality criterion for the problem of the smooth estimation of Cartesian space trajectories that include the end-effector orientation.Based on this criterion, we develop an optimization method for trajectory estimation which takes into account the special properties of the orientation space, which we represent by unit quaternions.The efficiency of the developed approach is discussed and experimental results are presented.

  12. The United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubold, Hans; Balogh, Werner

    2014-05-01

    The basic space science initiative was a long-term effort for the development of astronomy and space science through regional and international cooperation in this field on a worldwide basis, particularly in developing nations. Basic space science workshops were co-sponsored and co-organized by ESA, JAXA, and NASA. A series of workshops on basic space science was held from 1991 to 2004 (India 1991, Costa Rica and Colombia 1992, Nigeria 1993, Egypt 1994, Sri Lanka 1995, Germany 1996, Honduras 1997, Jordan 1999, France 2000, Mauritius 2001, Argentina 2002, and China 2004; http://neutrino.aquaphoenix.com/un-esa/) and addressed the status of astronomy in Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, and Western Asia. Through the lead of the National Astronomical Observatory Japan, astronomical telescope facilities were inaugurated in seven developing nations and planetariums were established in twenty developing nations based on the donation of respective equipment by Japan.Pursuant to resolutions of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space of the United Nations (COPUOS) and its Scientific and Technical Subcommittee, since 2005, these workshops focused on the preparations for and the follow-ups to the International Heliophysical Year 2007 (UAE 2005, India 2006, Japan 2007, Bulgaria 2008, South Korea 2009; www.unoosa.org/oosa/SAP/bss/ihy2007/index.html). IHY's legacy is the current operation of 16 worldwide instrument arrays with more than 1000 instruments recording data on solar-terrestrial interaction from coronal mass ejections to variations of the total electron content in the ionosphere (http://iswisecretariat.org/). Instruments are provided to hosting institutions by entities of Armenia, Brazil, France, Israel, Japan, Switzerland, and the United States. Starting in 2010, the workshops focused on the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) as mandated in a three-year-work plan as part of the deliberations of COPUOS. Workshops on ISWI

  13. Alkaline RFC Space Station prototype - 'Next step Space Station'. [Regenerative Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackler, I. M.

    1986-01-01

    The regenerative fuel cell, a candidate technology for the Space Station's energy storage system, is described. An advanced development program was initiated to design, manufacture, and integrate a regenerative fuel cell Space Station prototype (RFC SSP). The RFC SSP incorporates long-life fuel cell technology, increased cell area for the fuel cells, and high voltage cell stacks for both units. The RFC SSP's potential for integration with the Space Station's life support and propulsion systems is discussed.

  14. Space Shuttle Orbiter auxiliary power unit status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, M.; Loken, G.; Horton, J.; Lukens, W.; Scott, W.; Baughman, J.; Bauch, T.

    An overview of the United States Space Shuttle Orbiter APU, which provides power to the Orbiter vehicle hydraulic system, is presented. Three complete APU systems, each with its own separate fuel system, supply power to three dedicated hydraulic systems. These in turn provide power to all Orbiter vehicle critical flight functions including launch, orbit, reentry, and landing. The basic APU logic diagram is presented. The APU includes a hydrazine-powered turbine that drives a hydraulic pump and various accessories through a high-speed gearbox. The APU also features a sophisticated thermal management system designed to ensure safe and reliable operation in the various launch, orbit, reentry, and landing environments.

  15. Current issues of space law before the United Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosenball, S. N.

    1974-01-01

    The United Nations' activities in the area of space law and the accomplishments of the Outer Space Committee are discussed. Two draft conventions, the draft treaty on the moon and the draft treaty on the registration of space objects are considered. Other issues covered include the direct broadcast by satellite, the boundary between air space and outer space, and remote sensing from space.

  16. Proposal for a United Nations Basic Space Technology Initiative

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, W R

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Programme on Space Applications, implemented by the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs, promotes the benefits of space-based solutions for sustainable economic and social development. The Programme assists Member States of the United Nations to establish indigenous capacities for the use of space technology and its applications. In the past the Programme has primarily been focusing on the use of space applications and on basic space science activities. However, in recent years there has been a strong interest in a growing number of space-using countries to build space technology capacities, for example, the ability to develop and operate small satellites. In reaction to this development, the United Nations in cooperation with the International Academy of Astronautics has been organizing annual workshops on small satellites in the service of developing countries. Space technology related issues have also been addressed as part of various other activities of the Programme on Space ...

  17. Space solar cells - tradeoff analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M.R. [ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore (India). Power Systems Group

    2003-05-15

    This paper summarizes the study that had the objective to tradeoff space solar cells and solar array designs to determine the best choice of solar cell and array technology that would be more beneficial in terms of mass, area and cost for different types of space missions. Space solar cells, which are commercially now available in the market and to be available in the near future, were considered for this trade study. Four solar array designs: rigid, flexible, thin film flexible and concentrator solar arrays were considered for assessment. Performance of the solar cells along with solar array designs were studied for two types of space missions:geo synchronous orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft. The Solar array designs assumed were to provide 15 kW power for 15 years mission life in GEO and 5 kW power for 5 years mission life in LEO altitudes. To perform tradeoff analysis a spread sheet model was developed that calculates the size, mass and estimates the cost of solar arrays based on different solar cell and array technologies for given set of mission requirements. Comparative performance metrics (W/kg, W/m{sup 2}, kg/m{sup 2}, and $/W) were calculated for all solar arrays studied and compared, at the solar array subsystem level and also at the spacecraft system level. The trade analysis results show that high-efficiency multijunction solar cells bring lot of cost advantages for both types of missions. The trade study also shows that thin film solar cells with moderate efficiency with ultra lightweight flexible array design may become competitive with well-established single crystalline solar cell technologies in the future. (author)

  18. Space solar cells. Tradeoff analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M. Raja [Power Systems Group, Solar Panels Division, ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore 560017 (India)

    2003-05-15

    This paper summarizes the study that had the objective to tradeoff space solar cells and solar array designs to determine the best choice of solar cell and array technology that would be more beneficial in terms of mass, area and cost for different types of space missions. Space solar cells, which are commercially now available in the market and to be available in the near future, were considered for this trade study. Four solar array designs: rigid, flexible, thin film flexible and concentrator solar arrays were considered for assessment. Performance of the solar cells along with solar array designs were studied for two types of space missions: geo synchronous orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft. The Solar array designs assumed were to provide 15kW power for 15 years mission life in GEO and 5kW power for 5 years mission life in LEO altitudes. To perform tradeoff analysis a spread sheet model was developed that calculates the size, mass and estimates the cost of solar arrays based on different solar cell and array technologies for given set of mission requirements. Comparative performance metrics (W/kg, W/m{sup 2}, kg/m{sup 2}, and $/W) were calculated for all solar arrays studied and compared, at the solar array subsystem level and also at the spacecraft system level. The trade analysis results show that high-efficiency multijunction solar cells bring lot of cost advantages for both types of missions. The trade study also show that thin film solar cells with moderate efficiency with ultra lightweight flexible array design may become competitive with well-established single crystalline solar cell technologies in the future.

  19. Population and dwelling unit estimates from space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, C J

    1996-05-01

    "To increase the utility of satellite imagery as a source of cheap and current information for planning and managing cities some problems have to be resolved.... One answer is to adopt interpretation methods that use the increased information in a more detailed scene. This paper reports on attempts to measure the morphological patterns in an urban satellite scene and to use these for image interpretation. The interpretation task addressed is the estimation of residential dwelling units from the patterns discernible in high resolution satellite images of cities. The practical results include dwelling estimates that can be aggregated to any geographical unit of analysis, population estimates for cities and a dwelling density surface that can be categorised into any number of residential land-use classes."

  20. Riesz Isomorphisms of Tensor Products of Order Unit Banach Spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T S S R K Rao

    2009-06-01

    In this paper we formulate and prove an order unit Banach space version of a Banach–Stone theorem type theorem for Riesz isomorphisms of the space of vector-valued continuous functions. Similar results were obtained recently for the case of lattice-valued continuous functions in [5] and [6].

  1. The indigenous space and marginalized peoples in the United Nations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens

    For more than 20 years, Jens Dahl has observed and now analyzed how a relatively independent space, the Indigenous Space, has been constructed within the confines of the United Nations. In the UN, indigenous peoples have achieved more than any other group of people, minorities included. The book...

  2. Traction sheave elevator, hoisting unit and machine space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakala, Harri; Mustalahti, Jorma; Aulanko, Esko

    2000-01-01

    Traction sheave elevator consisting of an elevator car moving along elevator guide rails, a counterweight moving along counterweight guide rails, a set of hoisting ropes (3) on which the elevator car and counterweight are suspended, and a drive machine unit (6) driving a traction sheave (7) acting on the hoisting ropes (3) and placed in the elevator shaft. The drive machine unit (6) is of a flat construction. A wall of the elevator shaft is provided with a machine space with its open side facing towards the shaft, the essential parts of the drive machine unit (6) being placed in the space. The hoisting unit (9) of the traction sheave elevator consists of a substantially discoidal drive machine unit (6) and an instrument panel (8) mounted on the frame (20) of the hoisting unit.

  3. Poletsky-Stessin Hardy Spaces on the Unit Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, K. R.

    The holomorphic functions on the unit disk D in the complex plane C have a remarkable property: to know the values of a holomorphic function on D it suffices to know only its values on the unit circle T. However not all holomorphic functions on D are defined on T and the major problem of establishing such values (called boundary values) led to the appearance of Hardy spaces Hp(D), p ≥ 1. If a function lies in a Hardy space then its boundary values can be defined and its values on D can be obtained using standard Cauchy or Poisson formulas. The theory of Hardy spaces Hp( D) was well developed in the last century and the spaces became the fundamental ground for complex analysis. To create analogous spaces in higher dimensions Poletsky and Stessin introduced new spaces on hyperconvex domains in Cn in 20. We call these spaces the Poletsky-Stessin Hardy spaces. Poletsky and Stessin used them to study composition operators but did not look at their detailed properties. In this thesis we fill this gap studying Poletsky-Stessin Hardy spaces on the unit disk D. As in 20 for their definition we use subharmonic exhaustion functions u and denote these spaces by H( p/u)(D). It was mentioned in 20 that the classical Hardy spaces form a subclass of Poletsky-Stessin Hardy spaces. Our work begins with producing an example that shows that there are subharmonic exhaustion functions u on D for which the Poletsky-Stessin Hardy spaces H( p/u)(D) are different from classical Hardy spaces Hp(D). Thus we have an abundance of new function spaces to be explored. We show that the theory of boundary values for functions in Poletsky-Stessin Hardy spaces is analogous to the classical theory of Hardy spaces and the most of the classical properties stay true for these new spaces. Since by 20 the space H(p/u)(D) lies in H p(D) we can use the classical boundary values for functions in H(p/u)(D). This allows us to redefine Poletsky-Stessin Hardy spaces as spaces whose boundary values belong to

  4. Ongoing Space Nuclear Systems Development in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Werner; S. Johnson; Michael G. Houts; Donald T. Palac; Lee S. Mason; David I. Poston; A. Lou Qualls

    2011-10-01

    Reliable, long-life power systems are required for ambitious space exploration missions. Nuclear power and propulsion options can enable a bold, new set of missions and introduce propulsion capabilities to achieve access to science destinations that are not possible with more conventional systems. Space nuclear power options can be divided into three main categories: radioisotope power for heating or low power applications; fission power systems for non-terrestrial surface application or for spacecraft power; and fission power systems for electric propulsion or direct thermal propulsion. Each of these areas has been investigated in the United States since the 1950s, achieving various stages of development. While some nuclear systems have achieved flight deployment, others continue to be researched today. This paper will provide a brief overview of historical space nuclear programs in the U.S. and will provide a summary of the ongoing space nuclear systems research, development, and deployment in the United States.

  5. A Representation of Quantum Measurement in Order-Unit Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Niestegge, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    A certain generalization of the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics beyond operator algebras is considered. The approach is based on the concept of conditional probability and the interpretation of the Lueders - von Neumann quantum measurement as a probability conditionalization rule. A major result shows that the operator algebras must be replaced by order-unit spaces with some specific properties in the generalized approach, and it is analyzed under which conditions these order-unit spaces become Jordan algebras. An application of this result provides a characterization of the projection lattices in operator algebras.

  6. Cell biology experiments conducted in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    A review of cell biology experiments conducted during the first two decades of space flight is provided. References are tabulated for work done with six types of living test system: isolated viruses, bacteriophage-host, bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, protozoans, and small groups of cells (such as hamster cell tissue and fertilized frog eggs). The general results of studies involving the survival of cells in space, the effect of space flight on growing cultures, the biological effects of multicharged high-energy particles, and the effects of space flight on the genetic apparatus of microorganisms are summarized. It is concluded that cell systems remain sufficiently stable during space flight to permit experimentation with models requiring a fixed cell line during the space shuttle era.

  7. Cell biology experiments conducted in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    A review of cell biology experiments conducted during the first two decades of space flight is provided. References are tabulated for work done with six types of living test system: isolated viruses, bacteriophage-host, bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, protozoans, and small groups of cells (such as hamster cell tissue and fertilized frog eggs). The general results of studies involving the survival of cells in space, the effect of space flight on growing cultures, the biological effects of multicharged high-energy particles, and the effects of space flight on the genetic apparatus of microorganisms are summarized. It is concluded that cell systems remain sufficiently stable during space flight to permit experimentation with models requiring a fixed cell line during the space shuttle era.

  8. Unit: Cells, Inspection Set, National Trial Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Science Education Project, Toorak, Victoria.

    This trial version of a unit is the series being produced by the Australian Science Education Project provides instructions for students to prepare a variety of cell types and examine them with microscopes. It also gives some information about the variety and function of cells. The core of the unit, which all students are expected to complete,…

  9. Replacement Capability Options for the United States Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    first designed for reuse ” (NASA, 2000). 1. United States Space Shuttle Program (1981–2011) The first operational Space Shuttle was Columbia (OV-102...Week article on China’s future plans for their Long March Launch vehicles, “China is developing three basic rocket modules, with diameters of 2.25... wastewater , which will burn up with the spacecraft when it re-enters the Earth’s atmosphere. The Cargo Module can hold 1,000 to 1,700 kilograms (2,205

  10. The United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI): Science Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Niu, A; Haubold, H J; Doi, T

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI) aims at promoting international cooperation in human spaceflight and space exploration-related activities; creating awareness among countries on the benefits of utilizing human space technology and its applications; and building capacity in microgravity education and research. HSTI has been conducting various scientific activities to promote microgravity education and research. The primary science activity is called 'Zero-gravity Instrument Distribution Project', in which one-axis clinostats will be distributed worldwide. The distribution project will provide unique opportunities for students and researchers to observe the growth of indigenous plants in their countries in a simulated microgravity condition and is expected to create a huge dataset of plant species with their responses to gravity.

  11. 14 CFR 1217.106 - Articles brought into the United States by NASA from space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... NASA from space. 1217.106 Section 1217.106 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES § 1217.106 Articles brought into the United States by NASA from... territory of the United States by NASA from space shall not be considered an importation, and...

  12. Space Solar Cell Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Measures, characterizes, and analyzes photovoltaic materials and devices. The primary focus is the measurement and characterization of solar cell response...

  13. Accelerated space object tracking via graphic processing unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bin; Liu, Kui; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik; Chen, Genshe

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a hybrid Monte Carlo Gauss mixture Kalman filter is proposed for the continuous orbit estimation problem. Specifically, the graphic processing unit (GPU) aided Monte Carlo method is used to propagate the uncertainty of the estimation when the observation is not available and the Gauss mixture Kalman filter is used to update the estimation when the observation sequences are available. A typical space object tracking problem using the ground radar is used to test the performance of the proposed algorithm. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with the popular cubature Kalman filter (CKF). The simulation results show that the ordinary CKF diverges in 5 observation periods. In contrast, the proposed hybrid Monte Carlo Gauss mixture Kalman filter achieves satisfactory performance in all observation periods. In addition, by using the GPU, the computational time is over 100 times less than that using the conventional central processing unit (CPU).

  14. Performance/Power Space Exploration for Binary64 Division Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nannarelli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The digit-recurrence division algorithm is used in several high-performance processors because it provides good tradeoffs in terms of latency, area and power dissipation. In this work we develop a minimally redundant radix-8 divider for binary64 (double-precision) aiming at obtaining better energ...... efficiency in the performance-per-watt space. The results show that the radix-8 divider, when compared to radix-4 and radix-16 units, requires less energy to complete a division for high clock rates....

  15. Nickel hydrogen cell development for space applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, J.M. (Marconi Elliott Avionic Systems Ltd., Borehamwood (UK))

    1990-01-01

    A number of types of Nickel Hydrogen cells for space applications - geostationary or low earth orbit satellites - have been designed within the UK. Testing under various charge/discharge conditions and at various temperatures has been done for a 50 Ah GEO cell, and is currently under way for a LEO cell. The paper describes the design developments and performance achievements of the Nickel Hydrogen cells.

  16. United Nations/European Space Agency Workshops on Basic Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubold, H. J.; Ocampo, A.; Torres, S.; Wamsteker, W.

    1995-01-01

    In 1958, the United Nations (UN) formally recognized a new potential for international cooperation by establishing an ad hoc Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS). A year later the Committee became a permanent body, and by 1983 membership had expanded to 53 states, with more than half of the members coming from the developing world. In 1970, COPUOS established the UN Program on Space Applications in order to strengthen cooperation in space science and technology between non-industrialized and industrialized countries. In the last few years, the UN and its COPUOS have paid increasing attention to education and research in space science and technology, including basic space science. In 1991 the UN, in cooperation with ESA, initiated the organization of annual Workshops in Basic Space Science for developing countries. These Workshops are designed to be held in one of the following major regions: Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, Western Asia, and Europe. Accordingly, Basic Space Science Workshops have already been held in India (1991), Costa Rica andColombia (1992), and Nigeria (1993). The fourth Workshop was held from 27 June to 1 July 1994 at the Cairo University, in Egypt, for Western Asia.

  17. United Nations/European Space Agency Workshops on Basic Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubold, H. J.; Ocampo, A.; Torres, S.; Wamsteker, W.

    1995-02-01

    In 1958, the United Nations (UN) formally recognized a new potential for international cooperation by establishing an ad hoc Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS). A year later the Committee became a permanent body, and by 1983 membership had expanded to 53 states, with more than half of the members coming from the developing world. In 1970, COPUOS established the UN Program on Space Applications in order to strengthen cooperation in space science and technology between non-industrialized and industrialized countries. In the last few years, the UN and its COPUOS have paid increasing attention to education and research in space science and technology, including basic space science. In 1991 the UN, in cooperation with ESA, initiated the organization of annual Workshops in Basic Space Science for developing countries. These Workshops are designed to be held in one of the following major regions: Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, Western Asia, and Europe. Accordingly, Basic Space Science Workshops have already been held in India (1991), Costa Rica and Colombia (1992), and Nigeria (1993). The fourth Workshop was held from 27 June to 1 July 1994 at the Cairo University, in Egypt, for Western Asia.

  18. Research opportunities in loss of red blood cell mass in space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, J. M.; Fisher, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    Decreases of red blood cell mass and plasma volume have been observed consistently following manned space flights. Losses of red cell mass by United States astronauts have averaged 10 to 15% (range: 2 to 21%). Based on postflight estimates of total hemoglobin, Soviet cosmonauts engaged in space missions lasting from 1 to 7 months have exhibited somewhat greater losses. Restoration of red cell mass requires from 4 to 6 weeks following return to Earth, regardless of the duration of space flight.

  19. Advanced Composite Bipolar Plate for Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell/Electrolyzer Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of an advanced composite bipolar plate is proposed for a unitized regenerative fuel cell and electrolyzer system that operates on pure feed streams...

  20. Stimulation of elongation growth and cell wall loosening in rice coleoptiles under microgravity conditions in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Soga, Kouichi; Mori, Ryuji; Saiki, Mizue; Nakamura, Yukiko; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro

    2002-09-01

    We analyzed the growth rate and the cell wall properties of coleoptiles of rice seedlings grown at 23.6 degrees C for 68.5, 91.5 and 136 h during the Space Shuttle STS-95 mission. In space, elongation growth of coleoptiles was stimulated and the cell wall extensibility increased. Also, the levels of the cell wall polysaccharides per unit length of coleoptiles and the relative content of the high molecular mass matrix polysaccharides decreased in space. These differences in the cell wall polysaccharides could be involved in increasing the cell wall extensibility, leading to growth stimulation of rice coleoptiles in space.

  1. Contributions of the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs to the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI)

    CERN Document Server

    Haubold, H J; Balogh, W

    2010-01-01

    In 2010, the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space began consideration of a new agenda item under a three-year work plan on the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI). The main objectives of ISWI are to contribute to the development of the scientific insight necessary to improve understanding and forecasting capabilities of space weather as well as to education and public outreach. The United Nations Programme on Space Applications, implemented by the Office for Outer Space Affairs, is implementing ISWI in the framework of its United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI), a long-term effort, launched in 1991, for the development of basic space science and for international and regional cooperation in this field on a worldwide basis, particularly in developing countries. UNBSSI encompassed a series of workshops, held from 1991 to 2004, which addressed the status of basic space science in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Western Asia. As ...

  2. Reversible (unitized) PEM fuel cell devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitlitsky, F; Myers, B; Smith, W F; Weisberg, Molter, T M

    1999-06-01

    Regenerative fuel cells (RFCs) are enabling for many weight-critical portable applications, since the packaged specific energy (>400 Wh/kg) of properly designed lightweight RFC systems is several-fold higher than that of the lightest weight rechargeable batteries. RFC systems can be rapidly refueled (like primary fuel cells), or can be electrically recharged (like secondary batteries) if a refueling infrastructure is not conveniently available. Higher energy capacity systems with higher performance, reduced weight, and freedom from fueling infrastructure are the features that RFCs promise for portable applications. Reversible proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, also known as unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs), or reversible regenerative fuel cells, are RFC systems which use reversible PEM cells, where each cell is capable of operating both as a fuel cell and as an electrolyzer. URFCs further economize portable device weight, volume, and complexity by combining the functions of fuel cells and electrolyzers in the same hardware, generally without any system performance or efficiency reduction. URFCs are being made in many forms, some of which are already small enough to be portable. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has worked with industrial partners to design, develop, and demonstrate high performance and high cycle life URFC systems. LLNL is also working with industrial partners to develop breakthroughs in lightweight pressure vessels that are necessary for URFC systems to achieve the specific energy advantages over rechargeable batteries. Proton Energy Systems, Inc. (Proton) is concurrently developing and commercializing URFC systems (UNIGEN' product line), in addition to PEM electrolyzer systems (HOGEN' product line), and primary PEM fuel cell systems. LLNL is constructing demonstration URFC units in order to persuade potential sponsors, often in their own conference rooms, that advanced applications based on URFC s are

  3. Space solar cell technology development - A perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Monck, J.

    1982-01-01

    The developmental history of photovoltaics is examined as a basis for predicting further advances to the year 2000. Transistor technology was the precursor of solar cell development. Terrestrial cells were modified for space through changes in geometry and size, as well as the use of Ag-Ti contacts and manufacture of a p-type base. The violet cell was produced for Comsat, and involved shallow junctions, new contacts, and an enhanced antireflection coating for better radiation tolerance. The driving force was the desire by private companies to reduce cost and weight for commercial satellite power supplies. Liquid phase epitaxial (LPE) GaAs cells are the latest advancement, having a 4 sq cm area and increased efficiency. GaAs cells are expected to be flight ready in the 1980s. Testing is still necessary to verify production techniques and the resistance to electron and photon damage. Research will continue in CVD cell technology, new panel technology, and ultrathin Si cells.

  4. A space solar cell bonding robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zhuang; ZHAO Yan-zheng; LIU Ren-qiang; DONG Zhi

    2006-01-01

    A space solar cell bonding robot system which consists of a three-axis Cartesian coordinate's robot,coating device,bonding device,orientation plate,and control subsystem was studied.A method,which can control the thickness of adhesive layer on the solar cell,was put forward and the mechanism was designed.Another method which can achieve the auto-bonding between thin coverglass and the space solar cell was studied and realized.It produced no air bubble in the adhesives layer under the condition of no vacuum environment,and ensures the assembly dislocation ≤0.1 mm.Compared to the conventional method,it has advantages such as no fragment exists,and no adhesives outflow onto the cover-glass and solar cells.

  5. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  6. The isometric extension of “into” mappings on unit spheres of AL-spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we show that if V0 is an isometric mapping from the unit sphere of an AL-space onto the unit sphere of a Banach space E, then V0 can be extended to a linear isometry defined on the whole space.

  7. HYBRID FUEL CELL-SOLAR CELL SPACE POWER SUBSYSTEM CAPABILITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report outlines the capabilities and limitations of a hybrid solar cell- fuel cell space power subsystem by comparing the proposed hybrid system...to conventional power subsystem devices. The comparisons are based on projected 1968 capability in the areas of primary and secondary battery, fuel ... cell , solar cell, and chemical dynamic power subsystems. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the relative merits of a hybrid power

  8. United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI) 1991-2012 and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Mathai, A M; Balogh, W R

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains an overview and summary on the achievements of the United Nations basic space science initiative in terms of donated and provided planetariums, astronomical telescopes, and space weather instruments, particularly operating in developing nations. This scientific equipment has been made available to respective host countries, particularly developing nations, through the series of twenty basic space science workshops, organized through the United Nations Programme on Space Applications since 1991. Organized by the United Nations, the European Space Agency (ESA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States of America, and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the basic space science workshops were organized as a series of workshops that focused on basic space science (1991-2004), the International Heliophysical Year 2007 (2005-2009), and the International Space Weather Initiative (2010-2012) proposed by the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Spac...

  9. United States Changing Demographics - English/Spanish Space Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, R.

    2002-01-01

    Accordingly the United States Census Bureau, the ethnic group adding the largest number of people to the national population is the Hispanic exceeding 12 percent of the population and growing by almost 60 percent between 1990 and 2000. The status of the nation's educational system with respect to Hispanic students is perhaps one of the most influential issues facing the largest economy of the world. The low income, lack of language skills, highest drop-out rate in the nation, are some of the reasons why Hispanics are less likely to receive a university degree than any other ethical group. In short, the government requires to implement compensatory programs and bilingual education to ensure global leadership. Because of ongoing immigration, Spanish persists longer among Hispanics than it did among other immigrant groups. Spanish is the fourth most spoken language in the world after Mandarin, Hindustani and English. Although not all U.S. Hispanics speak Spanish, almost all U.S. Spanish speakers are Hispanics. This paper is intended to outline the challenging implementation of a bilingual education project affiliated to NASA Johnson Space Center encouraging greater academic success of Hispanics in engineering, math and science. The prospective project covers the overall role of space activities in the development of science and technology, socioeconomic issues and international cooperation. An existent JSC project is the starting stage to keep on developing an interactive video teleconference and web-media technology and produce stimulating learning products in English and Spanish for students and teachers across the nation and around the world.

  10. United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative: 2010 Status Report on the International Space Weather Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadimova, S.; Haubold, H. J.; Danov, D.; Georgieva, K.; Maeda, G.; Yumoto, K.; Davila, J. M.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2011-11-01

    The UNBSSI is a long-term effort for the development of astronomy and space science through regional and international cooperation in this field on a worldwide basis. A series of workshops on BSS was held from 1991 to 2004 (India 1991, Costa Rica and Colombia 1992, Nigeria 1993, Egypt 1994, Sri Lanka 1995, Germany 1996, Honduras 1997, Jordan 1999, France 2000, Mauritius 2001, Argentina 2002, and China 2004) Pursuant to resolutions of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNCOPUOS) and its Scientific and Technical Subcommittee, since 2005, these workshops focused on the International Heliophysical Year 2007 (UAE 2005, India 2006, Japan 2007, Bulgaria 2008, Ro Korea 2009) Starting in 2010, the workshops focus on the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) as recommended in a three-year-work plan as part of the deliberations of UNCOPUOS (www.iswi-secretariat.org/). Workshops on the ISWI have been scheduled to be hosted by Egypt in 2010 for Western Asia, Nigeria in 2011 for Africa, and Ecuador in 2012 for Latin America and the Caribbean. Currently, fourteen IHY/ISWI instrument arrays with more than five hundred instruments are operational in ninety countries.

  11. Culture of human cells in experimental units for spaceflight impacts on their behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Alessandra; Moscheni, Claudia; Maier, Jeanette Am; Castiglioni, Sara

    2017-05-01

    Because space missions produce pathophysiological alterations such as cardiovascular disorders and bone demineralization which are very common on Earth, biomedical research in space is a frontier that holds important promises not only to counterbalance space-associated disorders in astronauts but also to ameliorate the health of Earth-bound population. Experiments in space are complex to design. Cells must be cultured in closed cell culture systems (from now defined experimental units (EUs)), which are biocompatible, functional, safe to minimize any potential hazard to the crew, and with a high degree of automation. Therefore, to perform experiments in orbit, it is relevant to know how closely culture in the EUs reflects cellular behavior under normal growth conditions. We compared the performances in these units of three different human cell types, which were recently space flown, i.e. bone mesenchymal stem cells, micro- and macrovascular endothelial cells. Endothelial cells are only slightly and transiently affected by culture in the EUs, whereas these devices accelerate mesenchymal stem cell reprogramming toward osteogenic differentiation, in part by increasing the amounts of reactive oxygen species. We conclude that cell culture conditions in the EUs do not exactly mimic what happens in a culture dish and that more efforts are necessary to optimize these devices for biomedical experiments in space. Impact statement Cell cultures represent valuable preclinical models to decipher pathogenic circuitries. This is true also for biomedical research in space. A lot has been learnt about cell adaptation and reaction from the experiments performed on many different cell types flown to space. Obviously, cell culture in space has to meet specific requirements for the safety of the crew and to comply with the unique environmental challenges. For these reasons, specific devices for cell culture in space have been developed. It is important to clarify whether these

  12. Toeplitz and Hankel Products on Bergman Spaces of the Unit Ball

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yufeng LU; Chaomei LIU

    2009-01-01

    The authors give some new necessary conditions for the boundedness of Toeplitzproducts TafTagon the weighted Bergman space A2a of the unit ball, where f and g are analytic on the unit ball. Hankel products HfH*g on the weighted Bergman space of the unit ball are studied, and the results analogous to those Stroethoff and Zheng obtained in the setting of unit disk are proved.

  13. A fuel cell energy storage system for Space Station extravehicular activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Matthew J., Jr.; Adlhart, Otto J.; Marmolejo, Jose A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of a fuel cell energy storage system for the Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) is discussed. The ion-exchange membrane fuel cell uses hydrogen stored as a metal hydride. Several features of the hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell are examined, including its construction, hydrogen storage, hydride recharge, water heat, water removal, and operational parameters.

  14. United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative: 2011 Status Report on the International Space Weather Initiative

    CERN Document Server

    Gadimova, S; Danov, D; Georgieva, K; Maeda, G; Yumoto, K; Davila, J M; Gopalswami, N

    2011-01-01

    The UNBSSI is a long-term effort for the development of astronomy and space science through regional and international cooperation in this field on a worldwide basis. A series of workshops on BSS was held from 1991 to 2004 (India 1991, Costa Rica and Colombia 1992, Nigeria 1993, Egypt 1994, Sri Lanka 1995, Germany 1996, Honduras 1997, Jordan 1999, France 2000, Mauritius 2001, Argentina 2002, and China 2004; http://www.seas.columbia.edu/~ah297/un-esa/) and addressed the status of astronomy in Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, and Western Asia. One major recommendation that emanated from these workshops was the establishment of astronomical facilities in developing nations for research and education programmes at the university level. Such workshops on BSS emphasized the particular importance of astrophysical data systems and the virtual observatory concept for the development of astronomy on a worldwide basis. Pursuant to resolutions of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful ...

  15. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CellRad)": Hardware and biological system tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CellRad, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CellRad in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  16. United States Civil Space Policy: Summary of a Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    What are the principal purposes, goals, and priorities of the U.S. civil space program? This question was the focus of the workshop on civil space policy held November 29-30, 2007, by the Space Studies Board (SSB) and the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) of the National Research Council (NRC). In addressing this question, invited speakers and panelists and the general discussion from this public workshop explored a series of topics, including the following: (1) Key changes and developments in the U.S. civil space program since the new national Vision for Space Exploration2 (the Vision) was articulated by the executive branch in 2004; (2) The fit of space exploration within a broader national and international context; (3) Affordability, public interest, and political will to sustain the civil space program; (4) Definitions, metrics, and decision criteria for the mix and balance of activities within the program portfolio; (5) Roles of government in Earth observations from space; and (6) Gaps in capabilities and infrastructure to support the program.

  17. EXTENSION OF ISOMETRIES BETWEEN THE UNIT SPHERES OF COMPLEX lp(Γ)(p>1) SPACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jijin YI; Ruidong WANG; Xiaoxiao WANG

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the extension of isometries between the unit spheres of complex Banach spaces lp(Γ) and lp(∆)(p > 1). We first derive the representation of isometries between the unit spheres of complex Banach spaces lp(Γ) and lp(∆). Then we arrive at a conclusion that any surjective isometry between the unit spheres of complex Banach spaces lp(Γ)and lp(∆) can be extended to be a linear isometry on the whole space.

  18. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  19. Fuel Cells: Power System Option for Space Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaneeth, M.; Mohanty, Surajeet

    2012-07-01

    Fuel Cells are direct energy conversion devices and, thereby, they deliver electrical energy at very high efficiency levels. Hydrogen and Oxygen gases are electrochemically processed, producing clean electric power with water as the only by product. A typical, Fuel Cell based power system involve a Electrochemical power converter, gas storage and management systems, thermal management systems and relevant control units. While there exists different types of Fuel cells, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells are considered as the most suitable one for portable applications. Generally, Fuel Cells are considered as the primary power system option in space missions requiring high power ( > 5kW) and long durations and also where water is a consumable, such as manned missions. This is primarily due to the advantage that fuel cell based power systems offer, in terms of specific energy. Fuel cells have the potential to attain specific energy > 500Wh/kg, specific power >500W/kg, energy density > 400Whr/L and also power density > 200 W/L. This apart, a fuel cell system operate totally independent of sun light, whereas as battery based system is fully dependent on the same. This uniqueness provides added flexibility and capabilities to the missions and modularity for power system. High power requiring missions involving reusable launch vehicles, manned missions etc are expected to be richly benefited from this. Another potential application of Fuel Cell would be interplanetary exploration. Unpredictable and dusty atmospheres of heavenly bodies limits sun light significantly and there fuel cells of different types, eg, Bio-Fuel Cells, PEMFC, DMFCs would be able to work effectively. Manned or unmanned lunar out post would require continuous power even during extra long lunar nights and high power levels are expected. Regenerative Fuel Cells, a combination of Fuel Cells and Electrolysers, are identified as strong candidate. While application of Fuel Cells in high power

  20. China’s Military Space Program: A Threat to the United States or a Peaceful Endeavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    seizure of Taiwan.”29 Japan has historically advocated for the peaceful use of space in large part due to its pacifist constitution. So it was no...space objectives, and the judgments of space experts from the United States, Russia, Japan , and India. The paper concludes that the Chinese are...boom has propelled the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) ahead of Japan as the second largest economy behind the United States (U.S.) and has

  1. Fuel cell energy storage for Space Station enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedman, J. K.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on fuel cell energy storage for space station enhancement are presented. Topics covered include: power profile; solar dynamic power system; photovoltaic battery; space station energy demands; orbiter fuel cell power plant; space station energy storage; fuel cell system modularity; energy storage system development; and survival power supply.

  2. State Space Formulas for a Solution of the Suboptimal Nehari Problem on the Unit Disc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtain, Ruth F.; Opmeer, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    We give state space formulas for a ("central") solution of the suboptimal Nehari problem for functions defined on the unit disc and taking values in the space of bounded operators in separable Hilbert spaces. Instead of assuming exponential stability, we assume a weaker stability concept (the combin

  3. Robotics technology developments in the United States space telerobotics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, David

    1994-01-01

    In the same way that the launch of Yuri Gagarin in April 1961 announced the beginning of human space flight, last year's flight of the German ROTEX robot flight experiment is heralding the start of a new era of space robotics. After a gap of twelve years since the introduction of a new capability in space remote manipulation, ROTEX is the first of at least ten new robotic systems and experiments which will fly before the year 2000. As a result of redefining the development approach for space robotic systems, and capitalizing on opportunities associated with the assembly and maintenance of the space station, the space robotics community is preparing a whole new generation of operational robotic capabilities. Expanding on the capabilities of earlier manipulation systems such as the Viking and Surveyor soil scoops, the Russian Lunakhods, and the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS), these new space robots will augment astronaut on-orbit capabilities and extend virtual human presence to lunar and planetary surfaces.

  4. The United States Space Force: Not If, But When

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    this is the merger of the terms “air and space” and “aerospace.” He indicates that this was done to irreversibly marry the two domains together as...that precipitated the Commission’s report. In other words, the issues of leadership, doctrine, personnel, funding, acquisition , and the support to...who is symmetrical with respect to its space capabilities. It is unquestionable that US reliance on space is great and the asymmetric advantages

  5. SL(2,Z)-Invariant Spaces Spanned by Modular Units

    CERN Document Server

    Eholzer, W; Eholzer, Wolfgang; Skoruppa, Nils-Peter

    1997-01-01

    Characters of rational vertex operator algebras (RVOAs) arising in 2-dimensional conformal field theories often belong (after suitable normalization) to the (multiplicative) semigroup E^+ of modular units whose Fourier expansions are in 1+q Z_{>=0}[[q

  6. Space vehicle field unit and ground station system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Stephen; Dallmann, Nicholas; Delapp, Jerry; Proicou, Michael; Seitz, Daniel; Michel, John; Enemark, Donald

    2017-09-19

    A field unit and ground station may use commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components and share a common architecture, where differences in functionality are governed by software. The field units and ground stations may be easy to deploy, relatively inexpensive, and be relatively easy to operate. A novel file system may be used where datagrams of a file may be stored across multiple drives and/or devices. The datagrams may be received out of order and reassembled at the receiving device.

  7. Space vehicle field unit and ground station system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Stephen; Dallmann, Nicholas; Delapp, Jerry; Proicou, Michael; Seitz, Daniel; Michel, John; Enemark, Donald

    2016-10-25

    A field unit and ground station may use commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components and share a common architecture, where differences in functionality are governed by software. The field units and ground stations may be easy to deploy, relatively inexpensive, and be relatively easy to operate. A novel file system may be used where datagrams of a file may be stored across multiple drives and/or devices. The datagrams may be received out of order and reassembled at the receiving device.

  8. Frequency Selective Surfaces with Nanoparticles Unit Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nga Hung Poon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency selective surface (FSS is a periodic structure with filtering performance for optical and microwave signals. The general periodic arrays made with patterned metallic elements can act as an aperture or patch on a substrate. In this work, two kinds of materials were used to produce unit cells with various patterns. Gold nanoparticles of 25 nm diameter were used to form periodic monolayer arrays by a confined photocatalytic oxidation-based surface modification method. As the other material, silver gel was used to create multiple layers of silver. Due to the ultra-thin nature of the self-assembled gold nanoparticle monolayer, it is very easy to penetrate the FSS with terahertz radiation. However, the isolated silver islands made from silver gel form thicker multiple layers and contribute to much higher reflectance. This work demonstrated that multiple silver layers are more suitable than gold nanoparticles for use in the fabrication of FSS structures.

  9. The United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI): Activity Status in 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Ochiai, M; Haubold, H J; Doi, T

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI) was launched by the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) within the United Nations Programme on Space Applications. The Initiative aims at promoting international cooperation in human spaceflight and space exploration-related activities, creating awareness among countries on the benefits of utilizing human space technology and its applications, and building capacity in microgravity education and research. HSTI has conducted a series of outreach activities and expert meetings bringing together participants from around the world. HSTI will also be implementing science and educational activities in relevant areas to raise the capacities, particularly in developing countries, in pursuit of the development goals of the United Nations, thus contributing to promoting the peaceful uses of outer space.

  10. Randomization of Qp spaces on the unit ball of Cn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Bo; OUYANG; Caiheng

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we study the random power series of several complex variables,and give some sufficient conditions for random power series to belong to Qp and Qp,0spaces by means of their characterizations of Carleson measure. Moreover, we show that such conditions are best possible in some sense.

  11. Cell bioprocessing in space - Applications of analytical cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, P.; Hymer, W. C.; Goolsby, C. L.; Hatfield, J. M.; Morrison, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    Cell bioprocessing experiments in space are reviewed and the development of on-board cell analytical cytology techniques that can serve such experiments is discussed. Methods and results of experiments involving the cultivation and separation of eukaryotic cells in space are presented. It is suggested that an advanced cytometer should be developed for the quantitative analysis of large numbers of specimens of suspended eukaryotic cells and bioparticles in experiments on the Space Station.

  12. Evaluation of SPACE code for natural circulation test of Hanbit unit 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seyun; Kim, Minhee [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    SPACE (Safety and Performance Analysis Code for Nuclear Power Plants) has been developed by KHNP with the cooperation with KEPCO E and C and KAERI. SPACE code is expected to be applied to the safety analysis for LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) and Non-LOCA scenarios. SPACE code solves two-fluid, three-field governing equations and programmed with C++ computer language using object-oriented concepts. To evaluate the analysis capability for the passive cooling phenomenon in the actual nuclear power plant, a natural circulation test of Hanbit unit 2 was simulated with SPACE code. To evaluate the analysis capability for the passive cooling phenomenon in the actual nuclear power plant, a natural circulation test of Hanbit unit 2 was simulated with SPACE code. The major parameters of natural circulation in transient are well predicted in SPACE calculations when compared to the plant data. The SPACE code has sufficient capability to simulate passive cooling phenomena.

  13. Lithium-Ion Cell Charge-Control Unit Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Buton, Robert M.; Gemeiner, Russel

    2005-01-01

    A lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell charge-control unit was developed as part of a Li-ion cell verification program. This unit manages the complex charging scheme that is required when Li-ion cells are charged in series. It enables researchers to test cells together as a pack, while allowing each cell to charge individually. This allows the inherent cell-to-cell variations to be addressed on a series string of cells and reduces test costs substantially in comparison to individual cell testing.

  14. Novel negative mass density resonant metamaterial unit cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cselyuszka, Norbert, E-mail: cselyu@yahoo.com; Sečujski, Milan, E-mail: secujski@uns.ac.rs; Crnojević-Bengin, Vesna, E-mail: bengin@uns.ac.rs

    2015-01-02

    In this paper a novel resonant unit cell of one-dimensional acoustic metamaterials is presented, which exhibits negative effective mass density. We theoretically analyze the unit cell and develop a closed analytical formula for its effective mass density. Then we proceed to demonstrate left-handed propagation of acoustic waves using the proposed unit cell. Finally, we present its dual-band version, capable of operating at two independent frequencies. - Highlights: • A novel acoustic metamaterial unit cell provides Lorentz-type resonant effective mass density. • Analytical formula for effective mass density is derived. • Acoustic bandstop medium and left-handed metamaterial based on the novel unit cell are presented. • Modified version of the unit cell, operating at two independent frequencies, is proposed.

  15. Toeplitz Operators on Dirichlet-Type Space of Unit Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We construct a function u in L2Bn, dV which is unbounded on any neighborhood of each boundary point of Bn such that Toeplitz operator Tu is a Schatten p-class 0space DBn, dV. Then, we discuss some algebraic properties of Toeplitz operators with radial symbols on the Dirichlet-type space DBn, dV. We determine when the product of two Toeplitz operators with radial symbols is a Toeplitz operator. We investigate the zero-product problem for several Toeplitz operators with radial symbols. Furthermore, the corresponding commuting problem of Toeplitz operators whose symbols are of the form ξku is studied, where k ∈ Zn, ξ ∈ ∂Bn, and u is a radial function.

  16. Advanced In-Space Propulsion (AISP): High Temperature Boost Power Processing Unit (PPU) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The task is to investigate the technology path to develop a 10kW modular Silicon Carbide (SiC) based power processing unit (PPU). The PPU utilizes the high...

  17. Toeplitz Operators with Quasihomogeneous Symbols on the Bergman Space of the Unit Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2012-01-01

    symbols on the Bergman space of the unit ball equals a Toeplitz operator with quasihomogeneous symbols. We also characterize finite-rank semicommutators or commutators of two Toeplitz operators with quasihomogeneous symbols.

  18. Evapotranspiration from Urban Green Spaces in the Northeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovanni, K. A.; Montalto, F. A.; Gaffin, S.

    2012-12-01

    The measurement and estimation of urban evapotranspiration (ET) has historically received limited consideration from researchers in the hydrologic and climatologic communities yet are arguably vital to both. In the studies presented, ET rates from four different urban green spaces have been measured using weighing lysimeter setups for periods ranging from one to three years. The experimental sites predominantly include in-situ engineered urban green spaces or green infrastructure installations throughout the boroughs of New York City, specifically a green roof, irrigated bioretention area, un-irrigated bioretention area, and a wooded area in one of the last remaining sections of old growth urban forest in NYC. Comparison of ET rates between these urban green spaces at a daily time-step show statistically significant differences between the rates at each site at the 0.05 significance level. Examination of the factors impacting ET rates across sites (including net radiation, wind speed, relative humidity, air temperature and media volumetric water content) was also performed for a total of eight (8) sites including the four at which ET was directly measured using weighing lysimeters. Findings suggest that statistically significant differences in micro-climate conditions do exist across the city and that these are partially responsible for differences in rates of ET. Soil moisture (irrigated vs. un-irrigated bioretention areas) conditions and vegetation types (green roof vs. bioretention area) also play a role.

  19. United Airlines Assists Tsunami Relief Effort United donates cargo space for relief supplies going to southern Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ United Airlines today announced several initiatives to assist with the tsunami relief effort in Asia, including the donation of available cargo space to ship relief supplies to southern Thailand,Indonesia, Sri Lanka and other coastal areas on the Indian Ocean.

  20. United Airlines Assists Tsunami Relief Effort United donates cargo space for relief supplies going to southern Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

      United Airlines today announced several initiatives to assist with the tsunami relief effort in Asia, including the donation of available cargo space to ship relief supplies to southern Thailand,Indonesia, Sri Lanka and other coastal areas on the Indian Ocean.……

  1. Advanced Space Power Systems (ASPS): Regenerative Fuel Cells (RFC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the regenerative fuel cell project element is to develop power and energy storage technologies that enable new capabilities for future human space...

  2. Phase Space Cell in Nonextensive Classical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Quarati

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We calculate the phase space volume Ω occupied by a nonextensive system of N classical particles described by an equilibrium (or steady-state, or long-term stationary state of a nonequilibrium system distribution function, which slightly deviates from Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB distribution in the high energy tail. We explicitly require that the number of accessible microstates does not change respect to the extensive MB case. We also derive, within a classical scheme, an analytical expression of the elementary cell that can be seen as a macrocell, different from the third power of Planck constant. Thermodynamic quantities like entropy, chemical potential and free energy of a classical ideal gas, depending on elementary cell, are evaluated. Considering the fractional deviation from MB distribution we can deduce a physical meaning of the nonextensive parameter q of the Tsallis nonextensive thermostatistics in terms of particle correlation functions (valid at least in the case, discussed in this work, of small deviations from MB standard case.

  3. Weaponizing the Final Frontier: The United States and the New Space Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    allowing foreign nations to rapidly expand their space portfolio . The United States has the opportunity to take advantage and leverage its...affecting military operations. The sub-variables of this variable are the demographic mix, social volatility , education level, ethnic diversity...capability or social volatility that could a factor in shaping a policy that could impact U.S. interest in space

  4. Unveiling Third Space: A Case Study of International Educators in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saudelli, Mary Gene

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights one aspect of a case study of international educators at Dubai Women's College (DWC), United Arab Emirates (UAE). It examines perceptions of international educators in third space teaching female Emirati, higher-education students in the UAE. Drawing on third space theory (Bhabha, 1994), this study explored the nature of…

  5. Midpoint sets contained in the unit sphere of a normed space

    CERN Document Server

    Swanepoel, Konrad J

    2010-01-01

    The midpoint set M(S) of a set S of points is the set of all midpoints of pairs of points in S. We study the largest cardinality of a midpoint set M(S) in a finite-dimensional normed space, such that M(S) is contained in the unit sphere, and S is outside the closed unit ball. We show in three dimensions that this maximum (if it exists) is determined by the facial structure of the unit ball. In higher dimensions no such relationship exists. We also determine the maximum for euclidean and sup norm spaces.

  6. A Unit Cell Laboratory Experiment: Marbles, Magnets, and Stacking Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David C.

    2011-01-01

    An undergraduate first-semester general chemistry laboratory experiment introducing face-centered, body-centered, and simple cubic unit cells is presented. Emphasis is placed on the stacking arrangement of solid spheres used to produce a particular unit cell. Marbles and spherical magnets are employed to prepare each stacking arrangement. Packing…

  7. Three-dimensional growth of human endothelial cells in an automated cell culture experiment container during the SpaceX CRS-8 ISS space mission - The SPHEROIDS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Jessica; Gass, Samuel; Nebuloni, Stefano; Echegoyen, David; Riwaldt, Stefan; Baake, Christin; Bauer, Johann; Corydon, Thomas J; Egli, Marcel; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    Human endothelial cells (ECs) were sent to the International Space Station (ISS) to determine the impact of microgravity on the formation of three-dimensional structures. For this project, an automatic experiment unit (EU) was designed allowing cell culture in space. In order to enable a safe cell culture, cell nourishment and fixation after a pre-programmed timeframe, the materials used for construction of the EUs were tested in regard to their biocompatibility. These tests revealed a high biocompatibility for all parts of the EUs, which were in contact with the cells or the medium used. Most importantly, we found polyether ether ketones for surrounding the incubation chamber, which kept cellular viability above 80% and allowed the cells to adhere as long as they were exposed to normal gravity. After assembling the EU the ECs were cultured therein, where they showed good cell viability at least for 14 days. In addition, the functionality of the automatic medium exchange, and fixation procedures were confirmed. Two days before launch, the ECs were cultured in the EUs, which were afterwards mounted on the SpaceX CRS-8 rocket. 5 and 12 days after launch the cells were fixed. Subsequent analyses revealed a scaffold-free formation of spheroids in space.

  8. Status Report on the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI)

    CERN Document Server

    Haubold, H J

    2010-01-01

    Since 1990, the UN Programme on Space Applications leads the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative by contributing to the international and regional development of astronomy and space science through annual UN/ESA/NASA/JAXA workshops on basic space science, International Heliophysical Year 2007, and the International Space Weather Initiative. Space weather is the conditions on the Sun and in the solar wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere that can influence the performance and reliability of space-borne and ground-based technological systems and can endanger human life or health. The programme also coordinates the development of IHY/ISWI low-cost, ground-based, world-wide instrument arrays. To date, 14 world-wide instrument arrays comprising approximately 1000 instruments (GPS receivers, magnetometers, spectrometers, particle detectors) are operating in more than 71 countries. The most recent workshop was hosted by the Republic of Korea in 2009 for Asia and the Pacific. Annual workshops on ...

  9. The Applied Meteorology Unit: Nineteen Years Successfully Transitioning Research Into Operations for America's Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, John T.; Bauman, William H., III; Merceret, Francis J.; Roeder, William P.; Brody, Frank C.; Hagemeyer, Bartlett C.

    2011-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) provides technology development and transition services to improve operational weather support to America's space program . The AMU was founded in 1991 and operates under a triagency Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the United States Air Force (USAF) and the National Weather Service (NWS) (Ernst and Merceret, 1995). It is colocated with the 45th Weather Squadron (45WS) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) and funded by the Space Shuttle Program . Its primary customers are the 45WS, the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) operated for NASA by the NWS at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, TX, and the NWS forecast office in Melbourne, FL (MLB). The gap between research and operations is well known. All too frequently, the process of transitioning research to operations fails for various reasons. The mission of the AMU is in essence to bridge this gap for America's space program.

  10. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  11. Command decoder unit. [performance tests of data processing terminals and data converters for space shuttle orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The design and testing of laboratory hardware (a command decoder unit) used in evaluating space shuttle instrumentation, data processing, and ground check-out operations is described. The hardware was a modification of another similar instrumentation system. A data bus coupler was designed and tested to interface the equipment to a central bus controller (computer). A serial digital data transfer mechanism was also designed. Redundant power supplies and overhead modules were provided to minimize the probability of a single component failure causing a catastrophic failure. The command decoder unit is packaged in a modular configuration to allow maximum user flexibility in configuring a system. Test procedures and special test equipment for use in testing the hardware are described. Results indicate that the unit will allow NASA to evaluate future software systems for use in space shuttles. The units were delivered to NASA and appear to be adequately performing their intended function. Engineering sketches and photographs of the command decoder unit are included.

  12. The free abelian topological group and the free locally convex space on the unit interval

    CERN Document Server

    Leiderman, A G; Pestov, V G

    1992-01-01

    We give a complete description of the topological spaces $X$ such that the free abelian topological group $A(X)$ embeds into the free abelian topological group $A(I)$ of the closed unit interval. In particular, the free abelian topological group $A(X)$ of any finite-dimensional compact metrizable space $X$ embeds into $A(I)$. The situation turns out to be somewhat different for free locally convex spaces. Some results for the spaces of continuous functions with the pointwise topology are also obtained. Proofs are based on the classical Kolmogorov's Superposition Theorem.

  13. The free abelian topological group and the free locally convex space on the unit interval

    OpenAIRE

    Leiderman, A. G.; Morris, S. A.; Pestov, V. G.

    1992-01-01

    We give a complete description of the topological spaces $X$ such that the free abelian topological group $A(X)$ embeds into the free abelian topological group $A(I)$ of the closed unit interval. In particular, the free abelian topological group $A(X)$ of any finite-dimensional compact metrizable space $X$ embeds into $A(I)$. The situation turns out to be somewhat different for free locally convex spaces. Some results for the spaces of continuous functions with the pointwise topology are also...

  14. Cell culture experiments planned for the space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cross, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Culturing of cells in a pilot-scale bioreactor remains to be done in microgravity. An approach is presented based on several studies of cell culture systems. Previous and current cell culture research in microgravity which is specifically directed towards development of a space bioprocess is described. Cell culture experiments planned for a microgravity sciences mission are described in abstract form.

  15. Potential high efficiency solar cells: Applications from space photovoltaic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    NASA involvement in photovoltaic energy conversion research development and applications spans over two decades of continuous progress. Solar cell research and development programs conducted by the Lewis Research Center's Photovoltaic Branch have produced a sound technology base not only for the space program, but for terrestrial applications as well. The fundamental goals which have guided the NASA photovoltaic program are to improve the efficiency and lifetime, and to reduce the mass and cost of photovoltaic energy conversion devices and arrays for use in space. The major efforts in the current Lewis program are on high efficiency, single crystal GaAs planar and concentrator cells, radiation hard InP cells, and superlattice solar cells. A brief historical perspective of accomplishments in high efficiency space solar cells will be given, and current work in all of the above categories will be described. The applicability of space cell research and technology to terrestrial photovoltaics will be discussed.

  16. Extension of isometries on the unit sphere of l~p (Γ) space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper,we obtain that every isometry from the unit sphere S(l p (Γ)) of l p (Γ) (1 < p < ∞,p≠2) onto the unit sphere S(E) of a Banach space E can be extended to be a (real) linear isometry of l p (Γ) onto E,so,we give an affirmative answer to the corresponding Tingley’s problem.

  17. A Reliability Improvement Program Planning Report for the SNAP 10A Space Nuclear Power Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coombs, M. G.; Smith, C. K.; Wilson, L. A.

    1961-03-14

    The estimated achieved reliability of SNAP 10A space nuclear power units will be relatively low at the timeof the first SNAPSHOT flight test in April 1963 and the existing R&D program does not provide a significant reliabiity growth thereafter. The total costs of an 8-satellite network using SNAP 10A units over a 5-year period has been approximated for the case where the total cost of a single satellite launched is 8 million dollars.

  18. United Nations deliberations of the use of nuclear power sources in space: 1978-1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Gary L.; Sholtis, Joseph A., Jr.; Rashkow, Bruce C.

    1988-01-01

    The United Nations (U.N.) is continuing its deliberations on the use of nuclear power sources (NPS) in space. Although no complete set of legal principles has yet been agreed upon, certain scientific and technical criteria for the safe design and use of NPS have been accepted. In this respect, it should be noted that in its 1981 report, the Working Group on the Use of Power Sources in Outer Space concluded that power sources can be used safely in outer space, provided that all necessary safety requirements are met. This is also a succinct statement of the U.S. position.

  19. An overview of United States manned space flight from Mercury to the Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faget, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Technical considerations in the design, development and operation of United States manned spacecraft from Project Mercury to the Space Shuttle are reviewed. The design and mission philosophies, launch vehicle and spacecraft characteristics, mode of operation, flight results and influence on later programs are discussed for Project Mercury, and Gemini Apollo and Skylab programs, the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project and the Space Shuttle program. The Space Shuttle is shown to represent a major departure from the trend established in previous programs, requiring major advancements in the fields of flight control, thermal protection, and liquid-propellant rocket technology.

  20. The pituitary growth hormone cell in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, Wesley C.; Grindeland, R.

    1989-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), produced and secreted from specialized cells in the pituitary gland, controls the metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. It is also probably involved in the regulation of proper function of bone, muscle and immune systems. The behavior of the GH cell system was studied by flying either isolated pituitary cells or live rats. In the latter case, pituitary GH cells are prepared on return to earth and then either transplanted into hypophysectomized rats or placed into cell culture so that function of GH cells in-vivo vs. in-vitro can be compared. The results from three flights to date (STS-8, 1983; SL-3, 1985; Cosmos 1887, 1987) established that the ability of GH cells to release hormone, on return to earth, is compromised. The mechanism(s) responsible for this attenuation response is unknown. However, the data are sufficiently positive to indicate that the nature of the secretory defect resides directly within the GH cells.

  1. Research of united model of knowledge discovery state space and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You Fucheng; Song Wei; Yang Bingru

    2005-01-01

    There are both associations and differences between structured and unstructured data mining. How to unite them together to be a united theoretical framework and to guide the research of knowledge discovery and data mining has become an urgent problem to be solved. On the base of analysis and study of existing research results, the united model of knowledge discovery state space (UMKDSS) is presented, and the structured data mining and the complex type data mining are associated together. UMKDSS can provide theoretical guidance for complex type data mining. An application example of UMKDSS is given at last.

  2. Optimization and performance of Space Station Freedom solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemthong, S.; Hansen, N.; Bower, M.

    1991-01-01

    High efficiency, large area and low cost solar cells are the drivers for Space Station solar array designs. The manufacturing throughput, process complexity, yield of the cells, and array manufacturing technique determine the economics of the solar array design. The cell efficiency optimization of large area (8 x 8 m), dielectric wrapthrough contact solar cells are described. The results of the optimization are reported and the solar cell performance of limited production runs is reported.

  3. A Novel Robot of Manufacturing Space Solar Cell Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yuexin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel robot employed to manufacture space solar cell arrays. First of all including the mechanical configuration and control system, the architecture of the robot is described. Then the flow velocity field of adhesive in the dispensing needles is acquired based on hydrodynamics. The accurate section form model of adhesive dispensed on the solar cells is obtained, which is essential for the robot to control the uniformity of dispensing adhesive. Finally the experiment validates the feasibility and reliability of the robot system. The application of robots instead of manual work in manufacturing space solar cell arrays will enhance the development of space industry.

  4. A Novel Robot of Manufacturing Space Solar Cell Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yuexin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel robot employed to manufacture space solar cell arrays. First of all including the mechanical configuration and control system, the architecture of the robot is described. Then the flow velocity field of adhesive in the dispensing needles is acquired based on hydrodynamics. The accurate section form model of adhesive dispensed on the solar cells is obtained, which is essential for the robot to control the uniformity of dispensing adhesive. Finally the experiment validates the feasibility and reliability of the robot system. The application of robots instead of manual work in manufacturing space solar cell arrays will enhance the development of space industry.

  5. Chromosomes and plant cell division in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives were: examination of chromosomal aberrations; development of an experimental system; and engineering design units (EDUs) evaluation. Evaluation criteria are presented. Procedures were developed for shuttle-based investigations which result in the procurement of plant root tips for subsequent cytological examination.

  6. Network of Spaces and Interaction-Related Behaviors in Adult Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbub Rashid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Using three spatial network measures of “space syntax”, this correlational study describes four interaction-related behaviors among three groups of users in relation to visibility and accessibility of spaces in four adult intensive care units (ICUs of different size, geometry, and specialty. Systematic field observations of interaction-related behaviors show significant differences in spatial distribution of interaction-related behaviors in the ICUs. Despite differences in unit characteristics and interaction-related behaviors, the study finds that when nurses and physicians “interact while sitting” they prefer spaces that help maintain a high level of environmental awareness; that when nurses “walk” and “interact while walking” they avoid spaces with better global access and visibility; and that everyone in ICUs “walk” more in spaces with higher control over neighboring spaces. It is argued that such consistent behavioral patterns occur due to the structural similarities of spatial networks over and above the more general functional similarities of ICUs.

  7. Skeletal stem cells in space and time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Bianco, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The nature, biological characteristics, and contribution to organ physiology of skeletal stem cells are not completely determined. Chan et al. and Worthley et al. demonstrate that a stem cell for skeletal tissues, and a system of more restricted, downstream progenitors, can be identified in mice...

  8. Red blood cell and iron metabolism during space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight anemia is a widely recognized phenomenon in astronauts. Reduction in circulating red blood cells and plasma volume results in a 10% to 15% decrement in circulatory volume. This effect appears to be a normal physiologic adaptation to weightlessness and results from the removal of newly released blood cells from the circulation. Iron availability increases, and (in the few subjects studied) iron stores increase during long-duration space flight. The consequences of these changes are not fully understood.

  9. Sodium Borohydride/Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells For Space Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Deelo, M. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines Sodium Borohydride and Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells as they are applied to space applications. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) The Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell; 3) Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell Test Stands; 4) Fuel Cell Comparisons; 5) MEA Performance; 6) Anode Polarization; and 7) Electrode Analysis. The benefits of hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant and benefits of sodium borohydride as a fuel are also addressed.

  10. NASA's PEM Fuel Cell Power Plant Development Program for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberecht, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    A three-center NASA team led by the Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio is completing a five-year PEM fuel cell power plant development program for future space applications. The focus of the program has been to adapt commercial PEM fuel cell technology for space applications by addressing the key mission requirements of using pure oxygen as an oxidant and operating in a multi-gravity environment. Competing vendors developed breadboard units in the 1 to 5 kW power range during the first phase of the program, and a single vendor developed a nominal 10-kW engineering model power pant during the second phase of the program. Successful performance and environmental tests conducted by NASA established confidence that PEM fuel cell technology will be ready to meet the electrical power needs of future space missions.

  11. Clifford algebra-valued orthogonal polynomials in the open unit ball of Euclidean space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Brackx

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for constructing Clifford algebra-valued orthogonal polynomials in the open unit ball of Euclidean space is presented. In earlier research, we only dealt with scalar-valued weight functions. Now the class of weight functions involved is enlarged to encompass Clifford algebra-valued functions. The method consists in transforming the orthogonality relation on the open unit ball into an orthogonality relation on the real axis by means of the so-called Clifford-Heaviside functions. Consequently, appropriate orthogonal polynomials on the real axis give rise to Clifford algebra-valued orthogonal polynomials in the unit ball. Three specific examples of such orthogonal polynomials in the unit ball are discussed, namely, the generalized Clifford-Jacobi polynomials, the generalized Clifford-Gegenbauer polynomials, and the shifted Clifford-Jacobi polynomials.

  12. Fabrication and characteristics of unit cell for SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gwi-Yeol; Eom, Seung-Wook; Moon, Seong-In [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Kyongnam (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Research and development on solid oxide fuel cells in Korea have been mainly focused on unit cell and small stack. Fuel cell system is called clean generation system which not cause NOx or SOx. It is generation efficiency come to 50-60% in contrast to 40% of combustion generation system. Among the fuel cell system, solid oxide fuel cell is constructed of ceramics, so stack construction is simple, power density is very high, and there are no corrosion problems. The object of this study is to develop various composing material for SOFC generation system, and to test unit cell performance manufactured. So we try to present a guidance for developing mass power generation system. We concentrated on development of manufacturing process for cathode, anode and electrolyte.

  13. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Seigo; Roach, Allana-Nicole; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Riley, Danny A.; Gonda, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) might countermeasure various space-caused disorders so as to maintain astronauts' homeostasis. If this were achievable, the HSCT could promote human exploration of deep space. Using animal models of disorders (hindlimb suspension unloading system and beta-thalassemia), the HSCT was tested for muscle loss, immunodeficiency and space anemia. The results indicate feasibility of HSCT for these disorders. To facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs were optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  14. Longevity in space; experiment on the life span of Paramecium cell clone in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogami, Y; Tokunaga, N; Baba, S A

    1999-01-01

    Life span is the most interesting and also the most important biologically relevant time to be investigated on the space station. As a model experiment, we proposed an investigation to assess the life span of clone generation of the ciliate Paramecium. In space, clone generation will be artificially started by conjugation or autogamy, and the life span of the cell populations in different gravitational fields (microgravity and onboard 1 x g control) will be precisely assessed in terms of fission age as compared with the clock time. In order to perform the space experiment including long-lasting culture and continuous measurement of cell division, we tested the methods of cell culture and of cell-density measurement, which will be available in closed environments under microgravity. The basic design of experimental hardware and a preliminary result of the cultivation procedure are described. c1999 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. Silicon space solar cells: progression and radiation-resistance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Atteq ur; Lee, Sang Hee; Lee, Soo Hong

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, an overview of the solar cell technology based on silicon for applications in space is presented. First, the space environment and its effects on the basis of satellite orbits, such as geostationary earth orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO), are described. The space solar cell technology based on silicon-based materials, including thin-film silicon solar cells, for use in space was appraised. The evolution of the design for silicon solar cell for use in space, such as a backsurface field (BSF), selective doping, and both-side passivation, etc., is illustrated. This paper also describes the nature of radiation-induced defects and the models proposed for understanding the output power degradation in silicon space solar cells. The phenomenon of an anomalous increase in the short-circuit current ( I sc) in the fluence irradiation range from 2 × 1016 cm-2 to 5 × 1016 cm-2 is also described explicitly from the view point of the various presented models.

  16. Software Graphics Processing Unit (sGPU) for Deep Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Mary; Salazar, George; Steele, Glen

    2015-01-01

    A graphics processing capability will be required for deep space missions and must include a range of applications, from safety-critical vehicle health status to telemedicine for crew health. However, preliminary radiation testing of commercial graphics processing cards suggest they cannot operate in the deep space radiation environment. Investigation into an Software Graphics Processing Unit (sGPU)comprised of commercial-equivalent radiation hardened/tolerant single board computers, field programmable gate arrays, and safety-critical display software shows promising results. Preliminary performance of approximately 30 frames per second (FPS) has been achieved. Use of multi-core processors may provide a significant increase in performance.

  17. DERIVATIVES OF HARMONIC MIXED NORM AND BLOCH-TYPE SPACES IN THE UNIT BALL OF Rn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Xiaomin; Hu Zhangjian; Lu Xiaofen

    2011-01-01

    Let H(B) be the set of all harmonic functions f on the unit ball B of Rn.For 0 < p,q ≤ ∞ and a normal weight φ, the mixed norm space Hp,q,φ(B) consists of all functions f in H(B) for which the mixed norm ||·||p,q,φ < ∞. In this article, we obtain some characterizations in terms of radial, tangential, and partial derivative norms in Hp,q,φ(B).The parallel results for the Bloch-type space are also obtained. As an application, the analogous problems for polyharmonic functions are discussed.

  18. Thyroid Function Changes Related to Use of Iodinated Water in United States Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMonigal, Kathleen A.; Braverman, Lewis E.; Dunn, John T.; Stanbury, John B.; Wear, Mary L.; Hamm, Peggy B.; Sauer, Richard L.; Billica, Roger D.; Pool, Sam L.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used iodination as a method of microbial disinfection of potable water systems in United States spacecraft and long-duration habitability modules. A review of the effects on the thyroid following consumption o iodinated water by NASA astronauts was conducted. Pharmacological doses of iodine consumed by astronauts transiently decreased thyroid function, as reflected in serum TSH values. Although the adverse effects of excess iodine consumption in susceptible individuals are well documented, exposure to high doses of iodine during space flight did not result in a statistically significant increase in long-term thyroid disease in the astronaut population.

  19. On Materiality and Dimensionality of the Space. Is There Some Unit of the Field?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyakov A. V.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents arguments with a view to recognize that space is material and has possibly a fractal dimension in the range of from three to two. It is proposed that along to the unit of substance (atom Some Unit of the field (vortex tubes should be set. It is shown that the formation of the field structures being a kind “ doubles” of atomic ones is possible. The existence of the three-zone electron structure is confirmed. It is indicated that this concept have already resulted in to the successful explanation of phenomena and to finding of their important parameters at different levels of the organization of matter.

  20. The JPL space photovoltaic program. [energy efficient so1 silicon solar cells for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The development of energy efficient solar cells for space applications is discussed. The electrical performance of solar cells as a function of temperature and solar intensity and the influence of radiation and subsequent thermal annealing on the electrical behavior of cells are among the factors studied. Progress in GaAs solar cell development is reported with emphasis on improvement of output power and radiation resistance to demonstrate a solar cell array to meet the specific power and stability requirements of solar power satellites.

  1. An advanced space photovoltaic concentrator array using Fresnel lenses, gallium arsenide cells, and prismatic cell covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Mark J.; Piszczor, Michael F.

    1988-01-01

    The current status of a space concentrator array which uses refractive optics, gallium arsenide cells, and prismatic cell covers to achieve excellent performance at a very low array mass is documented. The prismatically covered cells have established records for space cell performance (24.2 percent efficient at 100 AM0 suns and 25 C) and terrestrial single-junction cell performance (29.3 percent efficient at 200 AM1.5 suns and 25 C).

  2. Weighted composition operators from F(p, q, s) spaces to Bers-type spaces in the unit ball

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Xiao-fen

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the boundedness and compactness of the weighted compo-sition operators from the F(p, q, s) spaces, including Hardy space, Bergman space, Q~p space,BMOA space, Besov space and α-Bloch space, to Bers-type spaces H_ν~∞( or little Bets-type spaces H_(ν,0)~∞ ), where ν is normal.

  3. Advantages of thin silicon solar cells for use in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A system definition study on the Solar Power Satellite System showed that a thin, 50 micrometers, silicon solar cell has significant advantages. The advantages include a significantly lower performance degradation in a radiation environment and high power-to-mass ratios. The advantages of such cells for an employment in space is further investigated. Basic questions concerning the operation of solar cells are considered along with aspects of radiation induced performance degradation. The question arose in this connection how thin a silicon solar cell had to be to achieve resistance to radiation degradation and still have good initial performance. It was found that single-crystal silicon solar cells could be as thin as 50 micrometers and still develop high conversion efficiencies. It is concluded that the use of 50 micrometer silicon solar cells in space-based photovoltaic power systems would be advantageous.

  4. EXTENDED CES(A)RO OPERATORS ON THE BLOCH SPACE IN THE UNIT BALL OF Cn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡璋剑

    2003-01-01

    The paper defines an extended Cesàro operator Tg with holomorphic symbolg in the unit ball B of Cn asWhere g(z)= ∑j=1∑n zj g/ zj is the radial derivative of g. In this paper, the author characterizes g for which Tg is bounded (or compact) on the Bloch spaceB and the little Blochspace B0.

  5. Towards cryogenic liquid –vapor energy storage units for space applications

    OpenAIRE

    Afonso, Josiana Prado

    2013-01-01

    Dissertation to obtain the Doctoral degree in Physics Engineering With the development of mechanical coolers and very sensitive cryogenic sensors, it could be interesting to use Energy Storage Units (ESU) and turn off the cryocooler to operate in a free micro vibration environment. An ESU would also avoid cryogenic systems oversized to attenuate temperature fluctuations due to thermal load variations which is useful particularly for space applications. In both cases, the temperature dri...

  6. The deformed conifold as a geometry on the space of unit charge CP^1 lumps

    CERN Document Server

    Speight, J M

    2001-01-01

    The strong structural similarity between the deformed conifold of Candelas and de la Ossa (a noncompact Calabi-Yau manifold) and the moduli space of unit charge CP^1 lumps equipped with its L^2 metric is pointed out. This allows one to reinterpret certain recent results on D3 branes in terms of lump dynamics, and to deduce certain curvature properties of the deformed conifold.

  7. Preparing normal tissue cells for space flight experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Claudia; Kohn, Florian P M; Bauer, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Deterioration of health is a problem in modern space flight business. In order to develop countermeasures, research has been done on human bodies and also on single cells. Relevant experiments on human cells in vitro are feasible when microgravity is simulated by devices such as the Random Positioning Machine or generated for a short time during parabolic flights. However, they become difficult in regard to performance and interpretation when long-term experiments are designed that need a prolonged stay on the International Space Station (ISS). One huge problem is the transport of living cells from a laboratory on Earth to the ISS. For this reason, mainly rapidly growing, rather robust human cells such as cancer cells, embryonic cells, or progenitor cells have been investigated on the ISS up to now. Moreover, better knowledge on the behavior of normal mature cells, which mimic the in vivo situation, is strongly desirable. One solution to the problem could be the use of redifferentiable cells, which grow rapidly and behave like cancer cells in plain medium, but are reprogrammed to normal cells when substances like retinoic acid are added. A list of cells capable of redifferentiation is provided, together with names of suitable drugs, in this review.

  8. Salad Machine - A vegetable production unit for long duration space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliss, M.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1990-01-01

    A review of NASA CELSS development specific to vegetable cultivation during space missions is presented in terms of enhancing the quality of life for space crews. A cultivation unit is being developed to permit the production of 600 grams of edible salad vegetables per week, thereby allowing one salad per crew member three times weekly. Plant-growth requirements are set forth for the specific vegetables, and environmental subsystems are listed. Several preprototype systems are discussed, and one particular integrated-systems design concept is presented in detail with views of the proposed rack configuration. The Salad Machine is developed exclusively from CELSS-derived technology, and the major challenge is the mitigation of the effects of plant-growth requirements on other space-mission facility operations.

  9. Modifiable temporal unit problem (MTUP and its effect on space-time cluster detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When analytical techniques are used to understand and analyse geographical events, adjustments to the datasets (e.g. aggregation, zoning, segmentation etc. in both the spatial and temporal dimensions are often carried out for various reasons. The 'Modifiable Areal Unit Problem' (MAUP, which is a consequence of adjustments in the spatial dimension, has been widely researched. However, its temporal counterpart is generally ignored, especially in space-time analysis. METHODS: In analogy to MAUP, the Modifiable Temporal Unit Problem (MTUP is defined as consisting of three temporal effects (aggregation, segmentation and boundary. The effects of MTUP on the detection of space-time clusters of crime datasets of Central London are examined using Space-Time Scan Statistics (STSS. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The case study reveals that MTUP has significant effects on the space-time clusters detected. The attributes of the clusters, i.e. temporal duration, spatial extent (size and significance value (p-value, vary as the aggregation, segmentation and boundaries of the datasets change. Aggregation could be used to find the significant clusters much more quickly than at lower scales; segmentation could be used to understand the cyclic patterns of crime types. The consistencies of the clusters appearing at different temporal scales could help in identifying strong or 'true' clusters.

  10. Spacing and Presentation Modes Affect the Unit-Decade Compatibility Effect During Number Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, Belinda; Scheuringer, Andrea; Harris, TiAnni

    2016-06-01

    The unit-decade compatibility effect has challenged the model of holistic number magnitude processing, suggesting decomposed processing of multi-digit numbers. Recent evidence confirms that decomposed processing of decade and unit magnitudes occurs in parallel. However, the mode of presentation of multi-digit numbers may affect the processing mode (holistic vs. decomposed, parallel vs. sequential). We therefore investigated in two studies, whether presentation mode (vertical, horizontal, or consecutive) or the distance between two vertically presented numbers affects the unit-decade compatibility effect during number comparison. We found that the compatibility effect did not differ significantly between vertical and horizontal presentation, adding to previous results on perceptual generality, but was nonsignificant with consecutive presentation. However, the compatibility effect was significantly smaller, if numbers are spaced further apart. Thus, stimulus size and distance between numbers affect the processing of multi-digit numbers and should be reported in future studies.

  11. Space radiation effects on plant and mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, C.; De Micco, V.; Macaeva, E.; Quintens, R.

    2014-11-01

    The study of the effects of ionizing radiation on organisms is related to different research aims. The current review emphasizes the studies on the effects of different doses of sparsely and densely ionizing radiation on living organisms, with the final purpose of highlighting specific and common effects of space radiation in mammals and plants. This topic is extremely relevant in the context of radiation protection from space environment. The response of different organisms to ionizing radiation depends on the radiation quality/dose and/or the intrinsic characteristics of the living system. Macromolecules, in particular DNA, are the critical targets of radiation, even if there is a strong difference between damages encountered by plant and mammalian cells. The differences in structure and metabolism between the two cell types are responsible for the higher resistance of the plant cell compared with its animal counterpart. In this review, we report some recent findings from studies performed in Space or on Earth, simulating space-like levels of radiation with ground-based facilities, to understand the effect of ionizing radiation on mammalian and plant cells. In particular, our attention is focused on genetic alterations and repair mechanisms in mammalian cells and on structures and mechanisms conferring radioresistance to plant cells.

  12. The Phase Space Elementary Cell in Classical and Generalized Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Quarati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the past, the phase-space elementary cell of a non-quantized system was set equal to the third power of the Planck constant; in fact, it is not a necessary assumption. We discuss how the phase space volume, the number of states and the elementary-cell volume of a system of non-interacting N particles, changes when an interaction is switched on and the system becomes or evolves to a system of correlated non-Boltzmann particles and derives the appropriate expressions. Even if we assume that nowadays the volume of the elementary cell is equal to the cube of the Planck constant, h3, at least for quantum systems, we show that there is a correspondence between different values of h in the past, with important and, in principle, measurable cosmological and astrophysical consequences, and systems with an effective smaller (or even larger phase-space volume described by non-extensive generalized statistics.

  13. Learning about the Unit Cell and Crystal Lattice with Computerized Simulations and Games: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luealamai, Sutha; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed a computer-based learning module on the unit cell of various types of crystal. The module has two components: the virtual unit cell (VUC) part and the subsequent unit cell hunter part. The VUC is a virtual reality simulation for students to actively arrive at the unit cell from exploring, from a broad view, the crystal…

  14. Learning about the Unit Cell and Crystal Lattice with Computerized Simulations and Games: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luealamai, Sutha; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed a computer-based learning module on the unit cell of various types of crystal. The module has two components: the virtual unit cell (VUC) part and the subsequent unit cell hunter part. The VUC is a virtual reality simulation for students to actively arrive at the unit cell from exploring, from a broad view, the crystal…

  15. On-Orbit Measurement of Next Generation Space Solar Cell Technology on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolford, David S.; Myers, Matthew G.; Prokop, Norman F.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Parker, David S.; Cassidy, Justin C.; Davies, William E.; Vorreiter, Janelle O.; Piszczor, Michael F.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement is essential for the evaluation of new photovoltaic (PV) technology for space solar cells. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is in the process of measuring several solar cells in a supplemental experiment on NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Robotic Refueling Mission's (RRM) Task Board 4 (TB4). Four industry and government partners have provided advanced PV devices for measurement and orbital environment testing. The experiment will be on-orbit for approximately 18 months. It is completely self-contained and will provide its own power and internal data storage. Several new cell technologies including four- junction (4J) Inverted Metamorphic Multijunction (IMM) cells will be evaluated and the results compared to ground-based measurements.

  16. Biology 23. Unit One -- The Cell: Structure and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederland Independent School District, TX.

    GRADES OR AGES: Not given. SUBJECT MATTER: Biology, the structure and physiology of the cell. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: There are four sections: a) objectives for the unit, b) bibliography, c) activities, and d) evaluation. The guide is directed to the student rather than the teacher. The guide is mimeographed and stapled, with no…

  17. Space Solar Cell Research and Development Projects at Emcore Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharps, Paul; Aiken,Dan; Stan, Mark; Cornfeld, Art; Newman, Fred; Endicter, Scott; Girard, Gerald; Doman, John; Turner, Michele; Sandoval, Annette; Fatemi, Navid

    2007-01-01

    The GaInP2/InGaAs/Ge triple junction device lattice matched to germanium has achieved the highest power conversion efficiency and the most commercial success for space applications [1]. What are the practical performance limits of this technology? In this paper we will describe what we consider to be the practical performance limits of the lattice matched GaInP2/InGaAs/Ge triple junction cell. In addition, we discuss the options for next generation space cell performance.

  18. Development of the Automated Bonding Robot for Space Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yue-xin; ZHAO Yan-zheng; FU Zhuang; ZHAO Hui; LUO Zhen

    2007-01-01

    The bonding process of space solar cells is a very complicated task undertaken by manual labor before. An automatic approach based on robot technology is presented to deal with the difficult problem. The architecture of the bonding robot for space solar cells is described. The two processes carried out by the robot, adhesive dispensing and cover-glass bonding, are studied. Based on the mechanical model, the flow velocity field of the adhesive in needles is obtained and the cover-glass bonding theory is interpreted. According to the studies, the thickness of the adhesive can be controlled accurately by robot and bubbles can be avoided coming about inside the adhesive.

  19. Biological responses to space: results of the experiment ``exobiological unit'' of ERA on EURECA I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.; Eschweiler, U.; Reitz, G.; Wehner, J.; Willimek, R.; Strauch, K.

    Spores of different strains of Bacillus subtilis and the Escherichia coli plasmid pUC19 were exposed to selected conditions of space (space vacuum and/or defined wavebands and intensities of solar ultraviolet radiation) in the experiment ER 161 ``Exobiological Unit'' of the Exobiology Radiation Assembly (ERA) on board of the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA). After the approximately 11 months lasting mission, their responses were studied in terms of survival, mutagenesis in the his (B. subtilis) or lac locus (pUC19), induction of DNA strand breaks, efficiency of DNA repair systems, and the role of external protective agents. The data were compared with those of a simultaneously running ground control experiment. The survival of spores treated with the vacuum of space, however shielded against solar radiation, is substantially increased, if they are exposed in multilayers and/or in the presence of glucose as protective, whereas all spores in ``artificial meteorites'', i.e. embedded in clays or simulated Martian soil, are killed. Vacuum treatment leads to an increase of mutation frequency in spores, but not in plasmid DNA. Extraterrestrial solar ultraviolet radiation is mutagenic, induces strand breaks in the DNA and reduces survival substantially; however, even at the highest fluences, i.e. 3 x 10^8 Jm^-2, a small but significant fraction of spores survives the insolation. Action spectroscopy confirms results of previous space experiments of a synergistic action of space vacuum and solar UV radiation with DNA being the critical target.

  20. Key Factors Influencing the Decision on the Number of Brayton Units for the Prometheus Space Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, John; Belanger, Sean; Burdge, Wayne; Clementoni, Eric; Jensen, Krista; Proctor, N. Beth; Zemo-Fulkerson, Annie

    2007-01-01

    The Naval Reactors (NR) Program and its DOE Laboratories, KAPL and Bettis, were assigned responsibility to develop space reactor systems for the Prometheus Program. After investigating all of the potential reactor and energy conversion options, KAPL and Bettis selected a direct gas Brayton system as the reference approach for the nuclear electric propulsion missions, including the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO). In order to determine the optimal plant architecture for the direct gas system, KAPL and Bettis investigated systems with one or two active Brayton units and up to two spare units. No final decision was made on the optimal system configuration for the NEP gas-Brayton system prior to closeout of the project. The two most promising options appear to be a single system without spares and a three Brayton system with two operating units, each producing half of the required load, with a single spare unit. The studies show that a single Brayton system, without spares, offers the lowest mass system, with potential for lower operating temperature, and a minimum of system and operational complexity. The lower required mass and increased system efficiency inherent in the single Brayton system may be exploited to satisfy other design objectives such as reduced reactor and radiator operating temperatures. While Brayton system lifetimes applicable to a JIMO or other nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) mission have not been demonstrated, there is no fundamental limit on the lifetime of the Brayton hardware. Use of additional Brayton units with installed spares will allow for continued operation in the event of a failure of an individual Brayton unit. However, preliminary system reliability evaluations do not point to any substantial reliability benefit provided by carrying spare Brayton units. If a spare unit is used, operating two of the units at full power with an unpowered spare proved more efficient than operating all three units at a reduced power and temperature

  1. Cancer cell motility: lessons from migration in confined spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Colin D.; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Time-lapse, deep-tissue imaging made possible by advances in intravital microscopy has demonstrated the importance of tumour cell migration through confining tracks in vivo. These tracks may either be endogenous features of tissues or be created by tumour or tumour-associated cells. Importantly, migration mechanisms through confining microenvironments are not predicted by 2D migration assays. Engineered in vitro models have been used to delineate the mechanisms of cell motility through confining spaces encountered in vivo. Understanding cancer cell locomotion through physiologically relevant confining tracks could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to combat metastasis. PMID:27909339

  2. Theories and models on the biological of cells in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, P.; Klaus, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    A wide variety of observations on cells in space, admittedly made under constraining and unnatural conditions in may cases, have led to experimental results that were surprising or unexpected. Reproducibility, freedom from artifacts, and plausibility must be considered in all cases, even when results are not surprising. The papers in symposium on 'Theories and Models on the Biology of Cells in Space' are dedicated to the subject of the plausibility of cellular responses to gravity -- inertial accelerations between 0 and 9.8 m/sq s and higher. The mechanical phenomena inside the cell, the gravitactic locomotion of single eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, and the effects of inertial unloading on cellular physiology are addressed in theoretical and experimental studies.

  3. Theories and models on the Biology of Cells in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, P.; Klaus, D. M.

    A wide variety of observations on cells in space, admittedly made under constraining and unnatural conditions in many cases, have led to experimental results that were surprising or unexpected. Reproducibility, freedom from artifacts, and plausibility must be considered in all cases, even when results are not surprising. The papers in the symposium on ``Theories and Models on the Biology of Cells in Space'' are dedicated to the subject of theplausibility of cellular responses to gravity -- inertial accelerations between 0 and 9.8 m/s^2 and higher. The mechanical phenomena inside the cell, the gravitactic locomotion of single eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, and the effects of inertial unloading on cellular physiology are addressed in theoretical and experimental studies.

  4. Cell Separations in Microgravity and Development of a Space Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    A bioreactor optimized for operations in space is now being developed. The current research is focused on determining the optimum cell-bead ratios, medium content and proper maintenance conditions required to keep living cell specimens alive and healthy for the entire flight. The bioreactor development project has recently added a microprocessor/computer to the JSC prototype for control and data analysis. Appropriate new technology is being combined with the current bioreactor designs and tested to determine what specific features must be included in the fabrication of a bioreactor designed to operate for STS demonstration tests. Considerations include: (1) circulation and resupply of culture media; (2) sensors required to monitor temperature, cell growth, mass transport, and oxygen consumption; and (3) inflight control of shear stress on cells, gas transfer in microgravity, diffusion, and intracellular transport. These data and results from the JSC prototype bioreactor test will be used for the design and construction of a small space bioreactor for the Orbiter middeck.

  5. Ground test challenges in the development of the Space Shuttle orbiter auxiliary power unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, N. H.; Lance, R. J.; Weary, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    A conventional aircraft hydraulic system design approach was selected to provide fluid power for the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Developing the power unit, known as the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), to drive the hydraulic pumps presented a major technological challenge. A small, high speed turbine drive unit powered by catalytically decomposed hydrazine and operating in the pulse mode was selected to meet the requirement. Because of limitations of vendor test facilities, significant portions of the development, flight qualification, and postflight anomaly testing of the Orbiter APU were accomplished at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) test facilities. This paper discusses the unique requirements of attitude, gravity forces, pressure profiles, and thermal environments which had to be satisfied by the APU, and presents the unique test facility and simulation techniques employed to meet the ground test requirements. In particular, the development of the zero-g lubrication system, the development of necessary APU thermal control techniques, the accomplishment of integrated systems tests, and the postflight investigation of the APU lube oil cooler behavior are discussed.

  6. Polymer electrolyte fuel cell mini power unit for portable application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, F.; Squadrito, G.; Barbera, O.; Giacoppo, G.; Passalacqua, E.; Zerbinati, O.

    This paper describes the design, realisation and test of a power unit based on a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, operating at room temperature, for portable application. The device is composed of an home made air breathing fuel cell stack, a metal hydride tank for H 2 supply, a dc-dc converter for power output control and a fan for stack cooling. The stack is composed by 10 cells with an active surface of 25 cm 2 and produces a rated power of 15 W at 6 V and 2 A. The stack successfully runs with end-off fed hydrogen without appreciable performance degradation during the time. The final assembled system is able to generate 12 W at 9.5 V, and power a portable DVD player for 3 h in continuous. The power unit has collected about 100 h of operation without maintenance.

  7. Polymer electrolyte fuel cell mini power unit for portable application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbani, F.; Squadrito, G.; Barbera, O.; Giacoppo, G.; Passalacqua, E. [CNR-ITAE, via Salita S. Lucia sopra Contesse n. 5, 98126 S. Lucia, Messina (Italy); Zerbinati, O. [Universita del Piemonte Orientale, Dip. di Scienze dell' Ambiente e della Vita, via Bellini 25/g, 15100 Alessandria (Italy)

    2007-06-20

    This paper describes the design, realisation and test of a power unit based on a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, operating at room temperature, for portable application. The device is composed of an home made air breathing fuel cell stack, a metal hydride tank for H{sub 2} supply, a dc-dc converter for power output control and a fan for stack cooling. The stack is composed by 10 cells with an active surface of 25 cm{sup 2} and produces a rated power of 15 W at 6 V and 2 A. The stack successfully runs with end-off fed hydrogen without appreciable performance degradation during the time. The final assembled system is able to generate 12 W at 9.5 V, and power a portable DVD player for 3 h in continuous. The power unit has collected about 100 h of operation without maintenance. (author)

  8. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Fuel Cell Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Fuel cell research focused on proton exchange membranes (PEM), solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Specific technologies included aircraft fuel cell reformers, new and improved electrodes, electrolytes, interconnect, and seals, modeling of fuel cells including CFD coupled with impedance spectroscopy. Research was conducted on new materials and designs for fuel cells, along with using embedded sensors with power management electronics to improve the power density delivered by fuel cells. Fuel cell applications considered were in-space operations, aviation, and ground-based fuel cells such as; powering auxiliary power units (APUs) in aircraft; high power density, long duration power supplies for interplanetary missions (space science probes and planetary rovers); regenerative capabilities for high altitude aircraft; and power supplies for reusable launch vehicles.

  9. Microbial fuel cells as pollutant treatment units: Research updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quanguo; Hu, Jianjun; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are a device that can convert chemical energy in influent substances to electricity via biological pathways. Based on the consent that MFC technology should be applied as a waste/wastewater treatment unit rather than a renewable energy source, this mini-review discussed recent R&D efforts on MFC technologies for pollutant treatments and highlighted the challenges and research and development needs. Owing to the low power density levels achievable by larger-scale MFC, the MFC should be used as a device other than energy source such as being a pollutant treatment unit.

  10. Options Studied for Managing Space Station Solar Array Electrical Hazards for Sequential Shunt Unit Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delleur, Ann M.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Levy, Robert K.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. solar array strings on the International Space Station are connected to a sequential shunt unit (SSU). The job of the SSU is to shunt, or short, the excess current from the solar array, such that just enough current is provided downstream to maintain the 160-V bus voltage while meeting the power load demand and recharging the batteries. Should an SSU fail on-orbit, it would be removed and replaced with the on-orbit spare during an astronaut space walk or extravehicular activity (EVA) (see the photograph). However, removing an SSU during an orbit Sun period with input solar array power connectors fully energized could result in substantial hardware damage and/or safety risk to the EVA astronaut. The open-circuit voltage of cold solar-array strings can exceed 320 V, and warm solar-array strings could feed a short circuit with a total current level exceeding 240 A.

  11. UNIT-RATE COMPLEX ORTHOGONAL SPACE-TIME BLOCK CODE CONCATENATED WITH TURBO CODING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Space-Time Block (STB) code has been an effective transmit diversity technique for combating fading due to its orthogonal design, simple decoding and high diversity gains. In this paper, a unit-rate complex orthogonal STB code for multiple antennas in Time Division Duplex (TDD) mode is proposed. Meanwhile, Turbo Coding (TC) is employed to improve the performance of proposed STB code further by utilizing its good ability to combat the burst error of fading channel. Compared with full-diversity multiple antennas STB codes, the proposed code can implement unit rate and partial diversity; and it has much smaller computational complexity under the same system throughput. Moreover, the application of TC can effectively make up for the performance loss due to partial diversity. Simulation results show that on the condition of same system throughput and concatenation of TC, the proposed code has lower Bit Error Rate (BER) than those full-diversity codes.

  12. High-resolution infrared detector and its electronic unit for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, M.; Montmessin, F.; Korablev, O.; Trokhimovsky, A.; Poiet, G.; Bel, J.-B.

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution infrared detector is used extensively for military and civilian purposes. Military applications include target acquisition, surveillance, night vision, and tracking. Civilian applications include, among others, scientific observations. For our space systems, we want to use the products developed by SOFRADIR Company. Thus, we have developed a space electronic unit that is used to control the high-resolution SCORPIO-MW infrared detector, which has a format of 640×512 pixels with 15μm×15μm pixel pitch. The detector within microelectronics based on infrared mid-wave (MW) complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) uses a micro-cooler in order to keep its temperature around 100 K. The standard wavelength range (3 to 5μm) is adapted to the 2.2 to 4.3μm wavelength range thanks to adaptation of the optical interface of the detector and with an antireflection coating. With our electronic system, we can acquire 3 images per second. To increase the signal to noise ratio, we have the opportunity to make a summation of 15 frames per image. Through this article, we will describe the space electronic system that we have developed in order to achieve space observations (e.g. Atmospheric Chemistry Suite package for ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter).

  13. Vibration isolation for launch of a space station orbital replacement unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Pendleton, Scott C.; James, George H., III; Mimovich, Mark

    2004-07-01

    Delivery of Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs) to the International Space Station (ISS) and other on-orbit destinations is an important component of the space program. ORUs are integrated on orbit with space assets to maintain and upgrade functionality. For ORUs comprised of sensitive equipment, the dynamic launch environment drives design and testing requirements, and high frequency random vibrations are generally the cause for failure. Vibration isolation can mitigate the structure-borne vibration environment during launch, and hardware has been developed that can provide a reduced environment for current and future launch environments. Random vibration testing of one ORU to equivalent Space Shuttle launch levels revealed that its qualification and acceptance requirements were exceeded. An isolation system was designed to mitigate the structure-borne launch vibration environment. To protect this ORU, the random vibration levels at 50 Hz must be attenuated by a factor of two and those at higher frequencies even more. Design load factors for Shuttle launch are high, so a metallic load path is needed to maintain strength margins. Isolation system design was performed using a finite element model of the ORU on its carrier with representative disturbance inputs. Iterations on the model led to an optimized design based on flight-proven SoftRide MultiFlex isolators. Component testing has been performed on prototype isolators to validate analytical predictions.

  14. International Space Station (ISS) Orbital Replaceable Unit (ORU) Wet Storage Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Michael D.; Rotter, Henry A.; Lee, Jason; Packham, Nigel; Brady, Timothy K.; Kelly, Robert; Ott, C. Mark

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Program requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to evaluate the risks posed by the practice of long-term wet storage of ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) regeneration system orbital replacement units (ORUs). The ISS ECLS regeneration system removes water from urine and humidity condensate and converts it into potable water and oxygen. A total of 29 ORUs are in the ECLS system, each designed to be replaced by the ISS crew when necessary. The NESC assembled a team to review the ISS ECLS regeneration system and evaluate the potential for biofouling and corrosion. This document contains the outcome of the evaluation.

  15. Development of a power electronics unit for the Space Station plasma contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamley, John A.; Hill, Gerald M.; Patterson, Michael J.; Saggio, Joseph, Jr.; Terdan, Fred; Mansell, Justin D.

    1994-02-01

    A hollow cathode plasma contactor has been baselined as a charge control device for the Space Station (SS) to prevent deleterious interactions of coated structural components with the ambient plasma. NASA LeRC Work Package 4 initiated the development of a plasma contactor system comprised of a Power Electronics Unit (PEU), an Expellant Management Unit (EMU), a command and data interface, and a Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU). A breadboard PEU was designed and fabricated. The breadboard PEU contains a cathode heater and discharge power supply, which were required to operate the PCU, a control and auxiliary power converter, an EMU interface, a command and telemetry interface, and a controller. The cathode heater and discharge supplies utilized a push-pull topology with a switching frequency of 20 kHz and pulse-width-modulated (PWM) control. A pulse ignition circuit derived from that used in arcjet power processors was incorporated in the discharge supply for discharge ignition. An 8088 based microcontroller was utilized in the breadboard model to provide a flexible platform for controller development with a simple command/data interface incorporating a direct connection to SS Mulitplexer/Demultiplexer (MDM) analog and digital I/O cards. Incorporating this in the flight model would eliminate the hardware and software overhead associated with a 1553 serial interface. The PEU autonomously operated the plasma contactor based on command inputs and was successfully integrated with a prototype plasma contactor unit demonstrating reliable ignition of the discharge and steady-state operation.

  16. Development of a Power Electronics Unit for the Space Station Plasma Contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamley, John A.; Hill, Gerald M.; Patterson, Michael J.; Saggio, Joseph, Jr.; Terdan, Fred; Mansell, Justin D.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode plasma contactor has been baselined as a charge control device for the Space Station (SS) to prevent deleterious interactions of coated structural components with the ambient plasma. NASA LeRC Work Package 4 initiated the development of a plasma contactor system comprised of a Power Electronics Unit (PEU), an Expellant Management Unit (EMU), a command and data interface, and a Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU). A breadboard PEU was designed and fabricated. The breadboard PEU contains a cathode heater and discharge power supply, which were required to operate the PCU, a control and auxiliary power converter, an EMU interface, a command and telemetry interface, and a controller. The cathode heater and discharge supplies utilized a push-pull topology with a switching frequency of 20 kHz and pulse-width-modulated (PWM) control. A pulse ignition circuit derived from that used in arcjet power processors was incorporated in the discharge supply for discharge ignition. An 8088 based microcontroller was utilized in the breadboard model to provide a flexible platform for controller development with a simple command/data interface incorporating a direct connection to SS Mulitplexer/Demultiplexer (MDM) analog and digital I/O cards. Incorporating this in the flight model would eliminate the hardware and software overhead associated with a 1553 serial interface. The PEU autonomously operated the plasma contactor based on command inputs and was successfully integrated with a prototype plasma contactor unit demonstrating reliable ignition of the discharge and steady-state operation.

  17. United States Human Access to Space, Exploration of the Moon and Preparation for Mars Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    In the past, men like Leonardo da Vinci and Jules Verne imagined the future and envisioned fantastic inventions such as winged flying machines, submarines, and parachutes, and posited human adventures like transoceanic flight and journeys to the Moon. Today, many of their ideas are reality and form the basis for our modern world. While individual visionaries like da Vinci and Verne are remembered for the accuracy of their predictions, today entire nations are involved in the process of envisioning and defining the future development of mankind, both on and beyond the Earth itself. Recently, Russian, European, and Chinese teams have all announced plans for developing their own next generation human space vehicles. The Chinese have announced their intention to conduct human lunar exploration, and have flown three crewed space missions since 2003, including a flight with three crew members to test their extravehicular (spacewalking) capabilities in September 2008. Very soon, the prestige, economic development, scientific discovery, and strategic security advantage historically associated with leadership in space exploration and exploitation may no longer be the undisputed province of the United States. Much like the sponsors of the seafaring explorers of da Vinci's age, we are motivated by the opportunity to obtain new knowledge and new resources for the growth and development of our own civilization. NASA's new Constellation Program, established in 2005, is tasked with maintaining the United States leadership in space, exploring the Moon, creating a sustained human lunar presence, and eventually extending human operations to Mars and beyond. Through 2008, the Constellation Program developed a full set of detailed program requirements and is now completing the preliminary design phase for the new Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, and the associated infrastructure necessary for humans to explore the Moon. Component testing is well

  18. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Allana Nicole; Brezo, Jelena

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts experience severe/invasive disorders caused by space environments. These include hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders and cancer. While the cause of these symptoms are not yet fully delineated, one possible explanation could be the inhibition of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) growth and hematopoiesis in space. HSCs differentiate into all types of blood cells, and growing evidence indicates that the HSCs also have the ability to transdifferentiate to various tissues, including muscle, skin, liver, neuronal cells and possibly bone. Therefore, a hypothesis was advanced in this laboratory that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), could mitigate some of the disorders described above. Due to the magnitude of this project our laboratory has subdivided it into 3 sections: a) HSCT for space anemia; b) HSCT for muscle and bone losses; and c) HSCT for immunodeficiency. Toward developing the HSCT protocol for space anemia, the HSC transplantation procedure was established using a mouse model of beta thalassemia. In addition, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system was used to grow HSCs in space condition. To investigate the HSCT for muscle loss and bone loss, donor HSCs were genetically marked either by transfecting the beta-galactosidase-containing plasmid, pCMV.SPORT-beta-gal or by preparing from b-galactosidase transgenic mice. The transdifferentiation of HSCs to muscle is traced by the reporter gene expression in the hindlimb suspended mice with some positive outcome, as studied by the X-gal staining procedure. The possible structural contribution of HSCs against muscle loss is being investigated histochemically.

  19. Cell cavities increase tortuosity in brain extracellular space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, A; Tao, L; Nicholson, C

    2005-06-21

    Brain extracellular space (ECS) forms hindered pathways for molecular diffusion in chemical signaling and drug delivery. Hindrance is quantified by the tortuosity lambda; the tortuosity obtained from simulations using uniformly spaced convex cells is significantly lower than that measured experimentally. To attempt to account for the difference in results, this study employed a variety of ECS models based on an array of cubic cells containing open rectangular cavities that provided the ECS with dead-space microdomains. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated that, in such ECS models, lambda can equal or exceed the typical experimental value of about 1.6. The simulations further revealed that lambda is relatively independent of cavity shape and the number of cavities per cell. It mainly depends on the total ECS volume fraction alpha, the cavity volume fraction alpha(c), and whether the cavity is located at the center of a cell face or formed at the junction of multiple cells. To describe the results from the different ECS models, an expression was obtained that related lambda to alpha, alpha(c), and an empirical exit factor beta that correlated with the ease with which a molecule could leave a cavity and its vicinity.

  20. GaAs solar cells for concentrator systems in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, R. Y.; Knechtli, R. C.; Kamath, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    Cells for operation in space up to more than 100 suns were made, and an AMO efficiency of 21% at 100 suns with these cells was obtained. The increased efficiency resulted not only from the higher open circuit voltage associated with the higher light intensity (higher short circuit current); it also benefitted from the increase in fill factor caused by the lower relative contribution of the generation recombination current to the forward bias current when the cell's operating current density is increased. The experimental cells exhibited an AMO efficiency close to 16% at 200 C. The prospect of exploiting this capability for the continuous annealing of radiation damage or for high temperature missions (e.g., near Sun missions) remains therefore open. Space systems with concentration ratios on the order of 100 suns are presently under development. The tradeoff between increased concentration ratio and increased loss due to the cell's series resistance remains attractive even for space applications at a solar concentrator ratio of 100 suns. In the design of contact configuration with low enough series resistance for such solar concentration ratios, the shallow junction depth needed for good radiation hardness and the thin AlGaAs layer thickness needed to avoid excessive optical absorption losses have to be retained.

  1. Polarity establishment, morphogenesis, and cultured plant cells in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1989-01-01

    Plant development entails an orderly progression of cellular events both in terms of time and geometry. There is only circumstantial evidence that, in the controlled environment of the higher plant embryo sac, gravity may play a role in embryo development. It is still not known whether or not normal embryo development and differentiation in higher plants can be expected to take place reliably and efficiently in the micro g space environment. It seems essential that more attention be given to studying aspects of reproductive biology in order to be confident that plants will survive seed to seed to seed in a space environment. Until the time arrives when successive generations of plants can be grown, the best that can be done is utilize the most appropriate systems and begin, piece meal, to accumulate information on important aspects of plant reproduction. Cultured plant cells can play an important role in these activities since they can be grown so as to be morphogenetically competent, and thus can simulate those embryogenic events more usually identified with fertilized eggs in the embryo sac of the ovule in the ovary. Also, they can be manipulated with relative ease. The extreme plasticity of such demonstrably totipotent cell systems provides a means to test environmental effects such as micro g on a potentially free-running entity. The successful manipulation and management of plant cells and propagules in space also has significance for exploitation of biotechnologies in space since such systems, perforce, are an important vehicle whereby many genetic engineering manipulations are achieved.

  2. Zero loss magnetic metamaterials using powered active unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yu; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2009-08-31

    We report the design and experimental measurement of a powered active magnetic metamaterial with tunable permeability. The unit cell is based on the combination of an embedded radiofrequency amplifier and a tunable phase shifter, which together control the response of the medium. The measurements show that a negative permeability metamaterial with zero loss or even gain can be achieved through an array of such metamaterial cells. This kind of active metamaterial can find use in applications that are performance limited due to material losses.

  3. A heated vapor cell unit for DAVLL in atomic rubidium

    OpenAIRE

    McCarron, Daniel J.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-01-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm-long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field...

  4. Composite Bipolar Plate for Unitized Fuel Cell/Electrolyzer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelsteadt, Cortney K.; Braff, William

    2009-01-01

    In a substantial improvement over present alkaline systems, an advanced hybrid bipolar plate for a unitized fuel cell/electrolyzer has been developed. This design, which operates on pure feed streams (H2/O2 and water, respectively) consists of a porous metallic foil filled with a polymer that has very high water transport properties. Combined with a second metallic plate, the pore-filled metallic plates form a bipolar plate with an empty cavity in the center.

  5. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells coupled with a biomass gasification unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrzypkiewicz Marek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A possibility of fuelling a solid oxide fuel cell stack (SOFC with biomass fuels can be realized by coupling a SOFC system with a self-standing gasification unit. Such a solution enables multi-fuel operation, elasticity of the system as well as the increase of the efficiency of small-scale biomass-to-electricity conversion units. A system of this type, consisting of biomass gasification unit, gas purification unit, SOFC stack, anode off-gas afterburner and peripherals was constructed and operated successfully. During the process, biomass fuel (wood chips was gasified with air as gasification agent. The gasifier was capable of converting up to 30 kW of fuel to syngas with efficiencies up to 75%. Syngas leaving the gasification unit is delivered to a medium temperature adsorber for sulphur compounds removal. Steam is added to the purified fuel to maintain steam to carbon ratio higher than 2. The syngas then is passed to a SOFC stack through a fuel preheater. In such a configuration it was possible to operate a commercial 1.3 kW stack within its working regime. Conducted tests confirmed successful operation of a SOFC stack fuelled by biomass-sourced syngas.

  6. Thermodynamics of Condensed Phases: Formula Unit Volume, "V[subscript m]", and the Determination of the Number of Formula Units, "Z", in a Crystallographic Unit Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Formula unit (or molecular) volume, "V[subscript m]", is related to many thermodynamic and physical properties of materials, so that knowledge of "V[subscript m]" is useful in prediction of such properties for known and even hypothetical materials. The symbol "Z" represents the number of formula units in a crystallographic unit cell; "Z" thus…

  7. The planar multijunction cell - A new solar cell for earth and space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Chai, A.-T.; Goradia, C.

    1980-01-01

    A new family of high-voltage solar cells, called the planar multijunction (PMJ) cell is being developed. The new cells combine the attractive features of planar cells with conventional or interdigitated back contacts and the vertical multijunction (VMJ) solar cell. The PMJ solar cell is internally divided into many voltage-generating regions, called unit cells, which are internally connected in series. The key to obtaining reasonable performance from this device was the separation of top surface field regions over each active unit cell area. Using existing solar cell fabricating methods, output voltages in excess of 20 volts per linear centimeter are possible. Analysis of the new device is complex, and numerous geometries are being studied which should provide substantial benefits in both normal sunlight usage as well as with concentrators.

  8. Cell Mechanisms of Bone Tissue Loss Under Space Flight Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, Natalia

    Investigations on the space biosatellites has shown that the bone skeleton is one of the most im-portant targets of the effect space flight factors on the organism. Bone tissue cells were studied by electron microscopy in biosamples of rats' long bones flown on the board american station "SLS-2" and in experiments with modelling of microgravity ("tail suspension" method) with using autoradiography. The analysis of data permits to suppose that the processes of remod-eling in bone tissue at microgravity include the following succession of cell-to-cell interactions. Osteocytes as mechanosensory cells are first who respond to a changing "mechanical field". The next stage is intensification of osteolytic processes in osteocytes, leading to a volume en-largement of the osteocytic lacunae and removal of the "excess bone". Then mechanical signals have been transmitted through a system of canals and processes of the osteocytic syncitium to certain superficial bone zones and are perceived by osteoblasts and bone-lining cells (superficial osteocytes), as well as by the bone-marrow stromal cells. The sensitivity of stromal cells, pre-osteoblasts and osteoblasts, under microgravity was shown in a number of works. As a response to microgravity, the system of stromal cells -preosteoblasts -osteoblasts displays retardation of proliferation, differentiation and specific functions of osteogenetic cells. This is supported by the 3H-thymidine studies of the dynamics of differentiation of osteogenetic cells in remodeling zones. But unloading is not adequate and in part of the osteocytes are apoptotic changes as shown by our electron microscopic investigations. An osteocytic apoptosis can play the role in attraction the osteoclasts and in regulation of bone remodeling. The apoptotic bodies with a liquid flow through a system of canals are transferred to the bone surface, where they fulfil the role of haemoattractants for monocytes come here and form osteoclasts. The osteoclasts destroy

  9. Cell Culture in Microgravity: Opening the Door to Space Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Adaptational response of human cell populations to microgravity is investigated using simulation, short-term Shuttle experiments, and long-term microgravity. Simulation consists of a clinostatically-rotated cell culture system. The system is a horizontally-rotated cylinder completely filled with culture medium. Low speed rotation results in continuous-fall of the cells through the fluid medium. In this setting, cells: 1) aggregate, 2) propagate in three dimensions, 3) synthesize matrix, 4) differentiate, and 5) form sinusoids that facilitate mass transfer. Space cell culture is conducted in flight bioreactors and in static incubators. Cells grown in microgravity are: bovine cartilage, promyelocytic leukemia, kidney proximal tubule cells, adrenal medulla, breast and colon cancer, and endothelium. Cells were cultured in space to test specific hypotheses. Cartilage cells were used to determine structural differences in cartilage grown in space compared to ground-based bioreactors. Results from a 130-day experiment on Mir revealed that cartilage grown in space was substantially more compressible due to insufficient glycosaminoglycan in the matrix. Interestingly, earth-grown cartilage conformed better to the dimensions of the scaffolding material, while the Mir specimens were spherical. The other cell populations are currently being analyzed for cell surface properties, gene expression, and differentiation. Results suggest that some cells spontaneously differentiate in microgravity. Additionally, vast changes in gene expression may occur in response to microgravity. In conclusion, the transition to microgravity may constitute a physical perturbation in cells resulting in unique gene expressions, the consequences of which may be useful in tissue engineering, disease modeling, and space cell biology.

  10. Cell Culture in Microgravity: Opening the Door to Space Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Adaptational response of human cell populations to microgravity is investigated using simulation, short-term Shuttle experiments, and long-term microgravity. Simulation consists of a clinostatically-rotated cell culture system. The system is a horizontally-rotated cylinder completely filled with culture medium. Low speed rotation results in continuous-fall of the cells through the fluid medium. In this setting, cells: 1) aggregate, 2) propagate in three dimensions, 3) synthesize matrix, 4) differentiate, and 5) form sinusoids that facilitate mass transfer. Space cell culture is conducted in flight bioreactors and in static incubators. Cells grown in microgravity are: bovine cartilage, promyelocytic leukemia, kidney proximal tubule cells, adrenal medulla, breast and colon cancer, and endothelium. Cells were cultured in space to test specific hypotheses. Cartilage cells were used to determine structural differences in cartilage grown in space compared to ground-based bioreactors. Results from a 130-day experiment on Mir revealed that cartilage grown in space was substantially more compressible due to insufficient glycosaminoglycan in the matrix. Interestingly, earth-grown cartilage conformed better to the dimensions of the scaffolding material, while the Mir specimens were spherical. The other cell populations are currently being analyzed for cell surface properties, gene expression, and differentiation. Results suggest that some cells spontaneously differentiate in microgravity. Additionally, vast changes in gene expression may occur in response to microgravity. In conclusion, the transition to microgravity may constitute a physical perturbation in cells resulting in unique gene expressions, the consequences of which may be useful in tissue engineering, disease modeling, and space cell biology.

  11. Zeroing in on red blood cell unit expiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyalil, Fathima; Irwin, Greg; Ross, Bryony; Manolis, Michael; Enjeti, Anoop K

    2017-09-20

    Expiry of red blood cell (RBC) units is a significant contributor to wastage of precious voluntary donations. Effective strategies aimed at optimal resource utilization are required to minimize wastage. This retrospective study analyzed the strategic measures implemented to reduce expiry of RBC units in an Australian tertiary regional hospital. The measures, which included inventory rearrangement, effective stock rotation, and the number of emergency courier services required during a 24-month period, were evaluated. There was no wastage of RBC units due to expiry over the 12 months after policy changes. Before these changes, approximately half of RBC wastage (261/511) was due to expiry. The total number of transfusions remained constant in this period and there was no increase in the use of emergency couriers. Policy changes implemented were decreasing the RBC inventory level by one-third and effective stock rotation and using a computerized system to link the transfusion services across the area. Effective stock rotation resulted in a reduction in older blood (>28 days) received in the main laboratory rotated from peripheral hospitals, down from 6%-41% to 0%-2.5%. Age-related expiry of blood products is preventable and can be significantly reduced by improving practices in the pathology service. This study provides proof of principle for "zero tolerance for RBC unit expiry" across a large networked blood banking service. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  12. A Closed Brayton Power Conversion Unit Concept for Nuclear Electric Propulsion for Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Claude Russell; Fowler, Bruce; Matthews, John

    2003-01-01

    In space, whether in a stable satellite orbit around a planetary body or traveling as a deep space exploration craft, power is just as important as the propulsion. The need for power is especially important for in-space vehicles that use Electric Propulsion. Using nuclear power with electric propulsion has the potential to provide increased payload fractions and reduced mission times to the outer planets. One of the critical engineering and design aspects of nuclear electric propulsion at required mission optimized power levels is the mechanism that is used to convert the thermal energy of the reactor to electrical power. The use of closed Brayton cycles has been studied over the past 30 or years and shown to be the optimum approach for power requirements that range from ten to hundreds of kilowatts of power. It also has been found to be scalable to higher power levels. The Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) engine power conversion unit (PCU) is the most flexible for a wide range of power conversion needs and uses state-of-the-art, demonstrated engineering approaches. It also is in use with many commercial power plants today. The long life requirements and need for uninterrupted operation for nuclear electric propulsion demands high reliability from a CBC engine. A CBC engine design for use with a Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) system has been defined based on Pratt & Whitney's data from designing long-life turbo-machines such as the Space Shuttle turbopumps and military gas turbines and the use of proven integrated control/health management systems (EHMS). An integrated CBC and EHMS design that is focused on using low-risk and proven technologies will over come many of the life-related design issues. This paper will discuss the use of a CBC engine as the power conversion unit coupled to a gas-cooled nuclear reactor and the design trends relative to its use for powering electric thrusters in the 25 kWe to 100kWe power level.

  13. Cell wall changes involved in the automorphic curvature of rice coleoptiles under microgravity conditions in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Soga, Kouichi; Mori, Ryuji; Saiki, Mizue; Nakamura, Yukiko; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro

    2004-12-01

    Seedlings of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Koshihikari and cv. Tan-ginbozu) were cultivated on board the Space Shuttle STS-95 mission and changes in the morphology and the cell wall properties of coleoptiles were analyzed. In space, rice coleoptiles showed a spontaneous (automorphic) curvature toward the caryopsis in the elongating region. The angle of automorphic curvature was larger in Koshihikari than in a gibberellin-deficient dwarf cultivar, Tan-ginbozu, and the angle gradually decreased during the growth of coleoptiles in both cultivars. The more quickly expanding convex side of the bending region of the rice coleoptiles showed a greater extensibility of the cell wall than the opposite side. There was a significant correlation between the angle of curvature and the difference in the cell wall extensibility between the convex and the concave sides. Both the levels of the cell wall polysaccharides per unit length of coleoptile and the ratio of high-molecular-mass polysaccharides in the hemicellulose fraction were lower in the convex side than the concave one. Also, the activity of (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta-glucanases in the cell wall was higher in the convex side than the concave one. These results suggest that the uneven modifications of cell wall metabolism bring about the difference in the levels and the molecular size of the cell wall polysaccharides, thereby causing the difference in capacity of the cell wall to expand between the dorsal and the ventral sides, leading to the automorphic curvature of rice coleoptiles in space. The data also suggest the involvement of gibberellins in inducing the automorphic curvature under microgravity conditions.

  14. Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed: A Facility for Space Calibration and Measurement of Solar Cells on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Jenkins, Phillip; Sexton, J. Andrew; Scheiman, David; Christie, Robert; Charpie, James; Gerber, Scott S.; Johnson, D. Bruce

    2001-01-01

    The Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed ("PET") is a facility to be flown on the International Space Station to perform calibration, measurement, and qualification of solar cells in the space environment and then returning the cells to Earth for laboratory use. PET will allow rapid turnaround testing of new photovoltaic technology under AM0 conditions.

  15. Sensitivity study on critical flow models of SPACE for inadvertent opening of containment spray valve in Shin Kori unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seyun; Kim, Minhee [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    SPACE (Safety and Performance Analysis Code for Nuclear Power Plants) has been developed by KHNP with the cooperation with KEPCO E and C and KAERI. SPACE code is expected to be applied to the safety analysis for LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) and Non-LOCA scenarios. SPACE code solves two-fluid, three-field governing equations and programmed with C++ computer language using object-oriented concepts. To evaluate the analysis capability for the transient phenomena in the actual nuclear power plant, an inadvertent opening of spray valve in startup test phase of Shin Kori unit 1 was simulated with SPACE. To assess the critical flow models of SPACE, the calculation with several critical flow models were carried out. The simulations of an inadvertent opening of spray valve of Shin Kori unit 1 with several critical flow models were carried out. The calculated transient behaviors of major reactor parameters with four critical flow models generally show good agreement with the measured.

  16. High Efficiency Quantum Dot III-V Multijunction Solar Cell for Space Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are proposing to utilize quantum dots to develop a super high-efficiency multijunction III-V solar cell for space. In metamorphic triple junction space solar...

  17. International Space Station United States Orbital Segment Oxygen Generation System On-Orbit Operational Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Robert J.; Howe, John, Jr.; Kulp, Galen W.; VanKeuren, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) United States Orbital Segment (USOS) Oxygen Generation System (OGS) was originally intended to be installed in ISS Node 3. The OGS rack delivery was accelerated, and it was launched to ISS in July of 2006 and installed in the US Laboratory Module. Various modification kits were installed to provide its interfaces, and the OGS was first activated in July of 2007 for 15 hours, In October of 2007 it was again activated for 76 hours with varied production rates and day/night cycling. Operational time in each instance was limited by the quantity of feedwater in a Payload Water Reservoir (PWR) bag. Feedwater will be provided by PWR bag until the USOS Water Recovery System (WRS) is delivered to SS in fall of 2008. This paper will discuss operating experience and characteristics of the OGS, as well as operational issues and their resolution.

  18. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, S.

    Departments of Biochemistry &Molecular Biology, Genetics &Human Genetics, Pediatrics &Child Long-duration space missions require countermeasures against severe/invasive disorders in astronauts that are caused by space environments, such as hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone/muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders, and cancer. Some, if not all, of these disorders may be amenable to hematopoietic stem cell therapy and gene therapy. Growing evidence indicates that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) possess extraordinary plasticity to differentiate not only to all types of blood cells but also to various tissues, including bone, muscle, skin, liver and neuronal cells. Therefore, our working hypothesis is that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called as the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), might provide countermeasure/prevention for hematological abnormalities, bone and muscle losses in space, thereby maintaining astronauts' homeostasis. Our expertise lies in recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene therapy for the hemoglobinopathies, -thalassemia and sickle cell disease (Ohi S, Kim BC, J Pharm Sci 85: 274-281, 1996; Ohi S, et al. Grav Space Biol Bull 14: 43, 2000). As the requisite steps in this protocol, we established procedures for purification of HSCs from both mouse and human bone marrow in 1 G. Furthermore, we developed an easily harvestable, long-term liquid suspension culture system, which lasts more than one year, for growing/expanding HSCs without stromal cells. Human globin cDNAs/gene were efficiently expressed from the rAAVs in the mouse HSCs in culture. Additionally, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system is being optimized for the HSC growth/expansion. Thus, using these technologies, the above hypothesis is being investigated by the ground-based experiments as follows: 1) -thalassemic mice (C57BL/6-Hbbth/Hbbth, Hbd-minor) are transplanted with normal isologous HSCs to correct the

  19. Summary results of the first United States manned orbital space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, J. H. Jr

    1963-01-01

    This paper describes the principal findings of the first United States manned orbital space flight in light of the flight mission. Consideration is given to the coordinated tracking network, recovery forces and to the spacecraft and its several functional systems. These include mechanisms for heat protection, escape maneuvers, spacecraft control, power supply, communications, life support and landing. A few difficulties encountered in the flight and deviations from the planned sequence are described. Craft preparation, aeromedical studies, flight plan and particularly flight observations--including the color, light, horizon visibility by day and by night, cloud formations and sunrise and sunset effects are given in some detail. The general conclusion from the MA-6 flight is that man can adapt well to new conditions encountered in space flight and that man can contribute importantly to mission reliability and toward mission achievement through his capacities to control the spacecraft and its multiple systems contribute to decision making and adaptation of programming as well as to direct exploratory and experimental observations.

  20. Isometries of a Bergman-Privalov-Type Space on the Unit Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevo Stević

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new space ANlog⁡,α(𝔹 consisting of all holomorphic functions on the unit ball 𝔹⊂ℂn such that ‖f‖ANlog⁡,α:=∫𝔹φe(ln⁡(1+|f(z|dVα(z−1, dVα(z=cα,n(1−|z|2αdV(z (dV(z is the normalized Lebesgue volume measure on 𝔹, and cα,n is a normalization constant, that is, Vα(𝔹=1, and φe(t=tln⁡(e+t for t∈[0,∞. Some basic properties of this space are presented. Among other results we proved that ANlog⁡,α(𝔹 with the metric d(f,g=‖f−g‖ANlog⁡,α is an F-algebra with respect to pointwise addition and multiplication. We also prove that every linear isometry T of ANlog⁡,α(𝔹 into itself has the form Tf=c(f∘ψ for some c∈ℂ such that |c|=1 and some ψ which is a holomorphic self-map of 𝔹 satisfying a measure-preserving property with respect to the measure dVα. As a consequence of this result we obtain a complete characterization of all linear bijective isometries of ANlog⁡,α(𝔹.

  1. Space Object Collision Probability via Monte Carlo on the Graphics Processing Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittaldev, Vivek; Russell, Ryan P.

    2017-09-01

    Fast and accurate collision probability computations are essential for protecting space assets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is the most accurate but computationally intensive method. A Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) is used to parallelize the computation and reduce the overall runtime. Using MC techniques to compute the collision probability is common in literature as the benchmark. An optimized implementation on the GPU, however, is a challenging problem and is the main focus of the current work. The MC simulation takes samples from the uncertainty distributions of the Resident Space Objects (RSOs) at any time during a time window of interest and outputs the separations at closest approach. Therefore, any uncertainty propagation method may be used and the collision probability is automatically computed as a function of RSO collision radii. Integration using a fixed time step and a quartic interpolation after every Runge Kutta step ensures that no close approaches are missed. Two orders of magnitude speedups over a serial CPU implementation are shown, and speedups improve moderately with higher fidelity dynamics. The tool makes the MC approach tractable on a single workstation, and can be used as a final product, or for verifying surrogate and analytical collision probability methods.

  2. Maximum geometrical hindrance to diffusion in brain extracellular space surrounding uniformly spaced convex cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, L; Nicholson, C

    2004-07-07

    Brain extracellular space (ECS) constitutes a porous medium in which diffusion is subject to hindrance, described by tortuosity, lambda = (D/D*)1/2, where D is the free diffusion coefficient and D* is the effective diffusion coefficient in brain. Experiments show that lambda is typically 1.6 in normal brain tissue although variations occur in specialized brain regions. In contrast, different theoretical models of cellular assemblies give ambiguous results: they either predict lambda-values similar to experimental data or indicate values of about 1.2. Here we constructed three different ECS geometries involving tens of thousands of cells and performed Monte Carlo simulation of 3-D diffusion. We conclude that the geometrical hindrance in the ECS surrounding uniformly spaced convex cells is independent of the cell shape and only depends on the volume fraction alpha (the ratio of the ECS volume to the whole tissue volume). This dependence can be described by the relation lambda = ((3-alpha)/2)1/2, indicating that the geometrical hindrance in such ECS cannot account for lambda > 1.225. Reasons for the discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental tortuosity values are discussed.

  3. Space experiment "Rad Gene"-report 1; p53-Dependent gene expression in human cultured cells exposed to space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki

    The space environment contains two major biologically significant influences: space radiations and microgravity. A p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a role as a guardian of the genome through the activity of p53-centered signal transduction pathways. The aim of this study was to clarify the biological effects of space radiations, microgravity and a space environment on the gene and protein expression of p53-dependent regulated genes. Space experiments were performed with two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines: one cells line (TSCE5) bears a wild-type p53 gene status, and another cells line (WTK1) bears a mutated p53 gene status. Un-der one gravity or microgravity condition, the cells were grown in the cell biology experimental facility (CBEF) of the International Space Station (ISS) for 8 days without experiencing the stress during launching and landing because the cells were frozen during these periods. Ground control samples also were cultured for 8 days in the CBEF on the ground during the same periods as space flight. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by using DNA chip (a 44k whole human genome microarray, Agilent Technologies Inc.) and protein chip (PanoramaTM Ab MicroArray, Sigma-Aldrich Co.), respectively. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression in cultured cells after space flight during 133 days with frozen condition. We report the results and discussion from the viewpoint of the functions of the up-regulated and down-regulated genes after an exposure to space radiations and/or microgravity. The initial goal of this space experiment was completely achieved. It is expected that data from this type of work will be helpful in designing physical protection from the deleterious effects of space radiations during long term stays in space.

  4. Photoluminescence in large fluence radiation irradiated space silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisamatsu, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Osamu; Matsuda, Sumio [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Space Center; Tsukamoto, Kazuyoshi

    1997-03-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements were carried out for silicon 50{mu}m BSFR space solar cells irradiated with 1MeV electrons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 16} e/cm{sup 2} and 10MeV protons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2}. The results were compared with the previous result performed in a relative low fluence region, and the radiation-induced defects which cause anomalous degradation of the cell performance in such large fluence regions were discussed. As far as we know, this is the first report which presents the PL measurement results at 4.2K of the large fluence radiation irradiated silicon solar cells. (author)

  5. Irradiation-induced degradation of amorphous silicon solar cells in space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, A.

    2007-01-01

    Solar cells are the prime power supply for satellites in space. Space is, however, a hostile environment for electronic devices, such as solar cells: in space the devices are subjected to large temperature cycles, atomic oxygen, space dust, meteorites, and high-energy charged-particle irradiation. I

  6. Irradiation-induced degradation of amorphous silicon solar cells in space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, A.

    2007-01-01

    Solar cells are the prime power supply for satellites in space. Space is, however, a hostile environment for electronic devices, such as solar cells: in space the devices are subjected to large temperature cycles, atomic oxygen, space dust, meteorites, and high-energy charged-particle irradiation. I

  7. Thin-film Solar Cells for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lush, Gregory B.

    2003-01-01

    The proposed work supports MURED goals by fostering research and development activities at Fisk and UTEP which contribute substantially to NASA's mission, preparing faculty and students at Fisk and UTEP to successfully participate in the conventional, competitive research and education process, and increasing the number of students to successfully complete degrees in NASA related fields. The project also addresses directly a core need of NASA for space power and is consistent with the Core Responsibilities of the John Glenn Space Center. Current orbital missions are limited by radiation from high energy particles trapped in the Van Allen Belt because that solar radiation degrades cell performance by damaging the crystalline lattice. Some potential orbits have been inaccessible because the radiation is too severe. Thin-film solar cells, if they can be adapted for use in the unfriendly space environment, could open new orbits to satellites by providing a radiation hard source of power. The manned mission to Mars requires photovoltaic devices for both the trip there and as a power supply on the surface. Solar arrays using thin films offer a low power/weight ratio solution that provides reliable photovoltaic power.

  8. Defining process design space for monoclonal antibody cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Absi, Susan Fugett; Yang, LiYing; Thompson, Patrick; Jiang, Canping; Kandula, Sunitha; Schilling, Bernhard; Shukla, Abhinav A

    2010-08-15

    The concept of design space has been taking root as a foundation of in-process control strategies for biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes. During mapping of the process design space, the multidimensional combination of operational variables is studied to quantify the impact on process performance in terms of productivity and product quality. An efficient methodology to map the design space for a monoclonal antibody cell culture process is described. A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) was used as the basis for the process characterization exercise. This was followed by an integrated study of the inoculum stage of the process which includes progressive shake flask and seed bioreactor steps. The operating conditions for the seed bioreactor were studied in an integrated fashion with the production bioreactor using a two stage design of experiments (DOE) methodology to enable optimization of operating conditions. A two level Resolution IV design was followed by a central composite design (CCD). These experiments enabled identification of the edge of failure and classification of the operational parameters as non-key, key or critical. In addition, the models generated from the data provide further insight into balancing productivity of the cell culture process with product quality considerations. Finally, process and product-related impurity clearance was evaluated by studies linking the upstream process with downstream purification. Production bioreactor parameters that directly influence antibody charge variants and glycosylation in CHO systems were identified.

  9. Effect of Deep Space Radiation on Human Hematopoietic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalota, Anna; Bennett, Paula; Swider, Cezary R.; Sutherland, Betsy M.; Gewirtz, Alan M.

    Astronaut flight crews on long-term missions in deep space will be exposed to a unique radiation environment as a result of exposure to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). This environment consists predominantly of high energy protons, helium and high charge, high energy (HZE) atomic nuclei from iron predominantly, but all other elements as well. The effect of such particles, alone, or in combination, on human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) has not been well studied but is clearly of interest since blood forming cells are known to be sensitive to radiation, and irreversible damage to these cells could quickly compromise a mission due to loss of marrow function. To better understand the effects of GCR and SPE on human stem/progenitor cell function, we have exposed partially purified CD34+ normal human marrow cells to protons, radioactive Fe, and Ti, alone, and in combination at varying doses up to 70cGy, and down to 1, 2, and 4 particle hits per nucleus. We then examined the effects of these radiations on HSPC function, as assessed by the ability to form CFU-GEMM, and LTCIC colonies in semi-solid culture medium. At the highest doses (50 and 70cGy), all radiation types tested significantly diminished the ability of CD34+ cells to form such colonies. The number of CFU-GEMM in irradiated samples was 70-90

  10. International Space Station (ISS) Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) Utilization Plan Assessment Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Pellerano, Amri; Iannello, Christopher J.; Garrett, Henry B.; Ging, Andrew T.; Katz, Ira; Keith, R. Lloyd; Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily M.; Schneider, Todd A.; Whittlesey, Edward J.; Wollack, Edward J.; Wright, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) vehicle undergoes spacecraft charging as it interacts with Earth's ionosphere and magnetic field. The interaction can result in a large potential difference developing between the ISS metal chassis and the local ionosphere plasma environment. If an astronaut conducting extravehicular activities (EVA) is exposed to the potential difference, then a possible electrical shock hazard arises. The control of this hazard was addressed by a number of documents within the ISS Program (ISSP) including Catastrophic Safety Hazard for Astronauts on EVA (ISS-EVA-312-4A_revE). The safety hazard identified the risk for an astronaut to experience an electrical shock in the event an arc was generated on an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) surface. A catastrophic safety hazard, by the ISS requirements, necessitates mitigation by a two-fault tolerant system of hazard controls. Traditionally, the plasma contactor units (PCUs) on the ISS have been used to limit the charging and serve as a "ground strap" between the ISS structure and the surrounding ionospheric plasma. In 2009, a previous NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) team evaluated the PCU utilization plan (NESC Request #07-054-E) with the objective to assess whether leaving PCUs off during non-EVA time periods presented risk to the ISS through assembly completion. For this study, in situ measurements of ISS charging, covering the installation of three of the four photovoltaic arrays, and laboratory testing results provided key data to underpin the assessment. The conclusion stated, "there appears to be no significant risk of damage to critical equipment nor excessive ISS thermal coating damage as a result of eliminating PCU operations during non- EVA times." In 2013, the ISSP was presented with recommendations from Boeing Space Environments for the "Conditional" Marginalization of Plasma Hazard. These recommendations include a plan that would keep the PCUs off during EVAs when the

  11. The Applied Meteorology Unit: Nineteen Years Successfully Transitioning Research into Operations for America's Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, John T.; Bauman, William H.; Merceret, Francis J.; Roeder, William P.; Brody, Frank C.; Hagemeyer, Bartlett C.

    2010-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) provides technology transition and technique development to improve operational weather support to the Space Shuttle and the entire American space program. The AMU is funded and managed by NASA and operated by a contractor that provides five meteorologists with a diverse mix of advanced degrees, operational experience, and associated skills including data processing, statistics, and the development of graphical user interfaces. The AMU's primary customers are the U.S. Air Force 45th Weather Squadron at Patrick Air Force Base, the National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group at NASA Johnson Space Center, and the National Weather Service Melbourne FL Forecast Office. The AMU has transitioned research into operations for nineteen years and worked on a wide range of topics, including new forecasting techniques for lightning probability, synoptic peak winds,.convective winds, and summer severe weather; satellite tools to predict anvil cloud trajectories and evaluate camera line of sight for Space Shuttle launch; optimized radar scan strategies; evaluated and implemented local numerical models; evaluated weather sensors; and many more. The AMU has completed 113 projects with 5 more scheduled to be completed by the end of 2010. During this rich history, the AMU and its customers have learned many lessons on how to effectively transition research into operations. Some of these lessons learned include collocating with the operational customer and periodically visiting geographically separated customers, operator submitted projects, consensus tasking process, use of operator primary advocates for each project, customer AMU liaisons with experience in both operations and research, flexibility in adapting the project plan based on lessons learned during the project, and incorporating training and other transition assistance into the project plans. Operator involvement has been critical to the AMU's remarkable success and many awards

  12. Evaluation of SPACE code for simulation of inadvertent opening of spray valve in Shin Kori unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seyun; Youn, Bumsoo [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    SPACE code is expected to be applied to the safety analysis for LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) and Non-LOCA scenarios. SPACE code solves two-fluid, three-field governing equations and programmed with C++ computer language using object-oriented concepts. To evaluate the analysis capability for the transient phenomena in the actual nuclear power plant, an inadvertent opening of spray valve in startup test phase of Shin Kori unit 1 was simulated with SPACE code. To evaluate the analysis capability for the transient phenomena in the actual nuclear power plant, an inadvertent opening of spray valve in startup test phase of Shin Kori unit 1 was simulated with SPACE code.

  13. Mechanical behavior of regular open-cell porous biomaterials made of diamond lattice unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, S M; Campoli, G; Amin Yavari, S; Sajadi, B; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2014-06-01

    Cellular structures with highly controlled micro-architectures are promising materials for orthopedic applications that require bone-substituting biomaterials or implants. The availability of additive manufacturing techniques has enabled manufacturing of biomaterials made of one or multiple types of unit cells. The diamond lattice unit cell is one of the relatively new types of unit cells that are used in manufacturing of regular porous biomaterials. As opposed to many other types of unit cells, there is currently no analytical solution that could be used for prediction of the mechanical properties of cellular structures made of the diamond lattice unit cells. In this paper, we present new analytical solutions and closed-form relationships for predicting the elastic modulus, Poisson׳s ratio, critical buckling load, and yield (plateau) stress of cellular structures made of the diamond lattice unit cell. The mechanical properties predicted using the analytical solutions are compared with those obtained using finite element models. A number of solid and porous titanium (Ti6Al4V) specimens were manufactured using selective laser melting. A series of experiments were then performed to determine the mechanical properties of the matrix material and cellular structures. The experimentally measured mechanical properties were compared with those obtained using analytical solutions and finite element (FE) models. It has been shown that, for small apparent density values, the mechanical properties obtained using analytical and numerical solutions are in agreement with each other and with experimental observations. The properties estimated using an analytical solution based on the Euler-Bernoulli theory markedly deviated from experimental results for large apparent density values. The mechanical properties estimated using FE models and another analytical solution based on the Timoshenko beam theory better matched the experimental observations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd

  14. Hippocampal place cells construct reward related sequences through unexplored space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ólafsdóttir, H Freyja; Barry, Caswell; Saleem, Aman B; Hassabis, Demis; Spiers, Hugo J

    2015-06-26

    Dominant theories of hippocampal function propose that place cell representations are formed during an animal's first encounter with a novel environment and are subsequently replayed during off-line states to support consolidation and future behaviour. Here we report that viewing the delivery of food to an unvisited portion of an environment leads to off-line pre-activation of place cells sequences corresponding to that space. Such 'preplay' was not observed for an unrewarded but otherwise similar portion of the environment. These results suggest that a hippocampal representation of a visible, yet unexplored environment can be formed if the environment is of motivational relevance to the animal. We hypothesise such goal-biased preplay may support preparation for future experiences in novel environments.

  15. Advancing cell biology through proteomics in space and time (PROSPECTS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamond, A.I.; Uhlen, M.; Horning, S.

    2012-01-01

    a range of sensitive and quantitative approaches for measuring protein structures and dynamics that promise to revolutionize our understanding of cell biology and molecular mechanisms in both human cells and model organisms. The Proteomics Specification in Time and Space (PROSPECTS) Network is a unique EU......-funded project that brings together leading European research groups, spanning from instrumentation to biomedicine, in a collaborative five year initiative to develop new methods and applications for the functional analysis of cellular proteins. This special issue of Molecular and Cellular Proteomics presents 16...... research papers reporting major recent progress by the PROSPECTS groups, including improvements to the resolution and sensitivity of the Orbitrap family of mass spectrometers, systematic detection of proteins using highly characterized antibody collections, and new methods for absolute as well as relative...

  16. The Habitat Demonstration Unit Project: A Modular Instrumentation System for a Deep Space Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Kennedy, Kriss J.; Yim, Hester; Williamsn, Robert M.; Hafermalz, Scott; Wagner, Raymond S.

    2011-01-01

    NASA is focused on developing human exploration capabilities in low Earth orbit (LEO), expanding to near Earth asteroids (NEA), and finally to Mars. Habitation is a crucial aspect of human exploration, and a current focus of NASA activities. The Habitation Demonstration Unit (HDU) is a project focused on developing an autonomous habitation system that enables human exploration of space by providing engineers and scientists with a test bed to develop, integrate, test, and evaluate habitation systems. A critical feature of the HDU is the instrumentation system, which monitors key subsystems within the habitat. The following paper will discuss the HDU instrumentation system performance and lessons learned during the 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RaTS). In addition, this paper will discuss the evolution of the instrumentation system to support the 2011 Deep Space Habitat configuration, the challenges, and the lessons learned of implementing this configuration. In 2010, the HDU was implemented as a pressurized excursion module (PEM) and was tested at NASA s D-RaTS in Arizona [1]. For this initial configuration, the instrumentation system design used features that were successful in previous habitat instrumentation projects, while also considering challenges, and implementing lessons learned [2]. The main feature of the PEM instrumentation system was the use of a standards-based wireless sensor node (WSN), implementing an IEEE 802.15.4 protocol. Many of the instruments were connected to several WSNs, which wirelessly transmitted data to the command and data handling system via a mesh network. The PEM instrumentation system monitored the HDU during field tests at D-RaTS, and the WSN data was later analyzed to understand the performance of this system. In addition, several lessons learned were gained from the field test experience, which fed into the instrumentation design of the next generation of the HDU.

  17. Hubble Space Telescope solar cell module thermal cycle test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Alexander; Edge, Ted; Willowby, Douglas; Gerlach, Lothar

    1992-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array consists of two identical double roll-out wings designed after the Hughes flexible roll-up solar array (FRUSA) and was developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) to meet specified HST power output requirements at the end of 2 years, with a functional lifetime of 5 years. The requirement that the HST solar array remain functional both mechanically and electrically during its 5-year lifetime meant that the array must withstand 30,000 low Earth orbit (LEO) thermal cycles between approximately +100 and -100 C. In order to evaluate the ability of the array to meet this requirement, an accelerated thermal cycle test in vacuum was conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), using two 128-cell solar array modules which duplicated the flight HST solar array. Several other tests were performed on the modules. The thermal cycle test was interrupted after 2,577 cycles, and a 'cold-roll' test was performed on one of the modules in order to evaluate the ability of the flight array to survive an emergency deployment during the dark (cold) portion of an orbit. A posttest static shadow test was performed on one of the modules in order to analyze temperature gradients across the module. Finally, current in-flight electrical performance data from the actual HST flight solar array will be tested.

  18. A non-local evolution equation model of cell-cell adhesion in higher dimensional space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Janet; Gourley, Stephen A; Webb, Glenn F

    2013-01-01

    A model for cell-cell adhesion, based on an equation originally proposed by Armstrong et al. [A continuum approach to modelling cell-cell adhesion, J. Theor. Biol. 243 (2006), pp. 98-113], is considered. The model consists of a nonlinear partial differential equation for the cell density in an N-dimensional infinite domain. It has a non-local flux term which models the component of cell motion attributable to cells having formed bonds with other nearby cells. Using the theory of fractional powers of analytic semigroup generators and working in spaces with bounded uniformly continuous derivatives, the local existence of classical solutions is proved. Positivity and boundedness of solutions is then established, leading to global existence of solutions. Finally, the asymptotic behaviour of solutions about the spatially uniform state is considered. The model is illustrated by simulations that can be applied to in vitro wound closure experiments.

  19. Recent Weather Technologies Delivered to America's Space Program by the Applied Meteorology Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, WIlliam, H., III; Crawford, Winifred

    2009-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) is a unique joint venture of NASA, the Air Force and the National Weather Service (NWS) and has been supporting the Space Program for nearly two decades. The AMU acts as a bridge between the meteorological research community and operational forecasters by developing, evaluating and transitioning new technology and techniques to improve weather support to spaceport operations at the Eastern Range (ER) and Kennedy Space Center. Its primary customers are the 45th Weather Squadron at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), the Spaceflight Meteorology Group at Johnson Space Center and the National Weather Service Office in Melbourne, FL. Its products are used to support NASA's Shuttle and ELV programs as well as Department of Defense and commercial launches from the ER. Shuttle support includes landing sites beyond the ER. The AMU is co-located with the Air Force operational forecasters at CCAFS to facilitate continuous two-way interaction between the AMU and its operational customers. It is operated under a NASA, Air Force, and NWS Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) by a competitively-selected contractor. The contract, which is funded and managed by NASA, provides five full time professionals with degrees in meteorology or related fields, some of whom also have operational experience. NASA provides a Ph.D.- level NASA civil service scientist as Chief of the AMU. The AMU is tasked by its customers through a unique, nationally recognized process. The tasks are limited to development, evaluation and operational transition of technology to improve weather support to spaceport operations and providing expert advice to the customers. The MOU expressly forbids using the AMU resources to conduct operations or do basic research. The presentation will provide a brief overview of the AMU and how it is tasked by its customers to provide high priority products and services. The balance of the presentation will cover a sampling of products

  20. Porous silicon for micro-sized fuel cell reformer units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presting, H.; Konle, J.; Starkov, V.; Vyatkin, A.; Koenig, U

    2004-04-25

    Randomly, self-organized and ordered anodically etched porous silicon with pore sizes down to hundred nanometers have been fabricated for a variety of automotive applications which range from carrier structures in fuel cell technology up to shower heads for fuel injection in combustion engines. The porous wafers are produced by deep anodic etching which is a very effective and cheap fabrication method compatible to standard Si CMOS fabrication technology. The density of nano- (and micro-) pores can be varied in a wide range by choice of substrate doping level and appropriate electrolyte solution. Surface enlargement up to a factor of 1000 can be achieved [J. Electrochem. Soc. 149 (1) (2002) G70]. After deposition of a catalyst on the inner surface of the pores these structures can be used as an effective catalytic reaction area for the injected hydrocarbons in a micro-steam reformer unit with a small reaction volume. In addition deep anodic etching (DAE) of a pinhole array with very high aspect ratios is demonstrated using a pre-patterned inverted pyramidal array which is produced by lithography and subsequent wet chemical potassium hydroxide (KOH) etch. The structures can also be used as carrier structures for the hydrogen separation membrane of the reforming gas in a reformer unit when a thin layer of palladium is evaporated prior to the anodic etching of the pores. The noble metal foil serves as anode contact during the etch as well as hydrogen separating membrane of the device.

  1. Policy and Practice: Claiming Space for Labour Rights within the United Kingdom Modern Slavery Crusade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Robinson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this article is on advocacy opportunities provided by the anti-trafficking framework in a new political climate. Through the case study of the United Kingdom (UK Modern Slavery Act 2015 deliberations the article explores opportunities to use political interest in human trafficking to advocate labour rights and protections for vulnerable workers. The article explores how, largely cynical, political motivations for the debate on ‘modern slavery’ in the UK, provided an opportunity to reframe the anti-trafficking discourse in this context. Whilst migration control and labour market deregulation are key priorities for the UK government, the Modern Slavery Act process enabled advocates to highlight the impact of such measures on vulnerable, predominantly migrant, workers. It also ultimately served to persuade decision makers to make a connection between widespread labour abuses and severe labour exploitation. Through this case study the article argues for engagement with anti-trafficking frameworks to both highlight and harness the political rhetoric, and maximise the space provided for promoting the rights of vulnerable workers.

  2. Design, Analysis and Fabrication of Secondary Structural Components for the Habitat Demonstration Unit-Deep Space Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Russell W.; Langford, William M.

    2012-01-01

    In support of NASA s Habitat Demonstration Unit - Deep Space Habitat Prototype, a number of evolved structural sections were designed, fabricated, analyzed and installed in the 5 meter diameter prototype. The hardware consisted of three principal structural sections, and included the development of novel fastener insert concepts. The articles developed consisted of: 1) 1/8th of the primary flooring section, 2) an inner radius floor beam support which interfaced with, and supported (1), 3) two upper hatch section prototypes, and 4) novel insert designs for mechanical fastener attachments. Advanced manufacturing approaches were utilized in the fabrication of the components. The structural components were developed using current commercial aircraft constructions as a baseline (for both the flooring components and their associated mechanical fastener inserts). The structural sections utilized honeycomb sandwich panels. The core section consisted of 1/8th inch cell size Nomex, at 9 lbs/cu ft, and which was 0.66 inches thick. The facesheets had 3 plys each, with a thickness of 0.010 inches per ply, made from woven E-glass with epoxy reinforcement. Analysis activities consisted of both analytical models, as well as initial closed form calculations. Testing was conducted to help verify analysis model inputs, as well as to facilitate correlation between testing and analysis. Test activities consisted of both 4 point bending tests as well as compressive core crush sequences. This paper presents an overview of this activity, and discusses issues encountered during the various phases of the applied research effort, and its relevance to future space based habitats.

  3. The “PHOENIX” Space Experiment: Study of Space Radiation Impact on Cells Genetic Apparatus on Board the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karganov, M. Yu; Alchinova, I. B.; Yakovenko, E. N.; Kushin, V. V.; Inozemtsev, K. O.; Strádi, A.; Szabó, J.; Shurshakov, V. A.; Tolochek, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    The preliminary results of the 1st session of Russian “PHOENIX” long-term space experiment are presented. The survival of dried human lymphocytes and mouse bone marrow cells in 199 days space flight is studied. The degree of DNA fragmentation is analysed for samples flown in different ISS compartments. It is shown that biological data correlates with the results of space radiation dose measurements.

  4. District space heating potential of low temperature hydrothermal geothermal resources in the southwestern United States. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDevitt, P.K.; Rao, C.R.

    1978-10-01

    A computer simulation model (GIRORA-Nonelectric) is developed to study the economics of district space heating using geothermal energy. GIRORA-Nonelectric is a discounted cashflow investment model which evaluates the financial return on investment for space heating. This model consists of two major submodels: the exploration for and development of a geothermal anomaly by a geothermal producer, and the purchase of geothermal fluid by a district heating unit. The primary output of the model is a calculated rate of return on investment earned by the geothermal producer. The results of the sensitivity analysis of the model subject to changes in physical and economic parameters are given in this report. Using the results of the economic analysis and technological screening criteria, all the low temperature geothermal sites in Southwestern United States are examined for economic viability for space heating application. The methodology adopted and the results are given.

  5. A UNIT, AN ASSEMBLY AND A METHOD FOR CONTROLLING IN A DYNAMIC EGOCENTRIC INTERACTIVE SPACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    A portable unit for providing instructions for navigation in menus or controlling equipment, the unit having a user interface and a camera pointing in the general direction of the user. The unit tracking relative movements between the unit and the user and converting the relative movement into th...... into the instructions. The unit may be used as a remote control for audio or video equipment or computers or the like.......A portable unit for providing instructions for navigation in menus or controlling equipment, the unit having a user interface and a camera pointing in the general direction of the user. The unit tracking relative movements between the unit and the user and converting the relative movement...

  6. Application of space syntax theory in the study of medical-surgical nursing units in urban hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzpuc, Stefnee J; Martin, Caren S

    2010-01-01

    Additional research is needed to explore how the design of urban, medical-surgical nursing units influences communication patterns, perceptions of social support, and overall job satisfaction for nurses. Space syntax theory has typically been used to study communication in office environments; more recently, it has been applied to the study of healthcare environments. The purpose of this study was to explore the applicability of space syntax theory as a theoretical framework for studying nurses' communication in medical-surgical nursing units in urban hospitals. The nursing profession is rapidly changing, and nurses' work is psychologically and physically intense. At the same time, nurses are responsible for patient safety, optimal care delivery, and patient outcomes (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2009; Clarke, 2007; Clarke & Donaldson, 2008; Institute of Medicine, 2000; Institute of Medicine, 2004). Nurses are central to the delivery of care and act as a conduit for communication among members of the patient care team. Some of the design characteristics that create a more appealing environment for patients, such as views of nature and single-patient rooms, may not be fully understood as they relate to nurses' tasks and responsibilities, and they could be detrimental to nursing communication. This study analyzed three medical-surgical nursing unit floor plans using two constructs of space syntax theory, and it verified analysis through three semi-structured interviews with end users. The use of space syntax theory for analyzing medical-surgical nursing unit floor plans is complex. Findings indicated that nurses' perceptions of two constructs of space syntax theory, visibility and accessibility, did not consistently match the anticipated benefits of the floor plan designs. Understanding how and when nurses communicate with each other could help designers of healthcare spaces create more effective environments that support nurses' work and personal health and welfare

  7. Varying likelihood of Megafire across space and time in the western contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavros, E.; Abatzoglou, J. T.; Larkin, N. K.; McKenzie, D.; Steel, E.

    2013-12-01

    Studies project that a warming climate will likely increase wildfire activity. These analyses, however, are of aggregate statistics of annual area burned and to anticipate future events, especially those of particular concern like megafires, we need more fire specific projections. Megafires account for a disproportionate amount of damage and are defined quantitatively here as fires that burn >20,234 ha ~50,000 ac. Megafires account for the top two percent of all fires and represent 33% of all area burned in the western contiguous United States from 1984 to 2010. Multiple megafires often occur in one region during a single fire season, suggesting that regional climate is a driver. Therefore, we used composite records of climate and fire to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of the megafire climate space. We then developed logistic regression models to predict the probability that a megafire will occur in a given week. Accuracy was good (AUC > 0.80) for all models. These analyses provide a coarse-scale assessment for operationally defined regions of megafire risk, which can be projected to determine how the likelihood of megafire varies across space and time using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change representative concentration pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5. In general, with the exception of Northern California (NCAL), Southern California, and the Western Great Basin, there is increasing proportional change over time in the probability of a megafire. There was a significant (p≤0.05) difference between the historical modeled ensemble mean probability of a megafire occurrence from 1979 to 2010 and both RCP 4.5 and 8.5 means during 2031 to 2060. Generally, with the exception of the Southwest and NCAL, there are higher probabilities of megafire occurrence more frequently and for longer periods both throughout the fire season and from year to year, with more pronounced patterns under RCP 8.5 than RCP 4.5. Our results provide a quantitative

  8. United Kingdom Infrared Telescope's Spectrograph Observations of Human-Made Space Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckalew, Brent; Abercromby, Kira; Lederer, Susan; Frith, James; Cowardin, Heather

    2017-01-01

    Presented here are the results of the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) spectral observations of human-made space objects taken from 2014 to 2015. The data collected using the UIST infrared spectrograph cover the wavelength range 0.7-2.5 micrometers. Overall, data were collected on 18 different orbiting objects at or near the geosynchronous (GEO) regime. Thirteen of the objects are spacecraft, one is a rocket body, and four are cataloged as debris pieces. The remotely collected data are compared to the laboratory-collected reflectance data on typical spacecraft materials; thereby general materials are identified but not specific types. These results highlight the usefulness of observations in the infrared by focusing on features from hydrocarbons and silicon. The spacecraft show distinct features due to the presence of solar panels. Signature variations between rocket bodies, due to the presence of various metals and paints on their surfaces, show a clear distinction from those objects with solar panels, demonstrating that one can distinguish most spacecraft from rocket bodies through infrared spectrum analysis. Finally, the debris pieces tend to show featureless, dark spectra. These results show that the laboratory data in its current state give excellent indications as to the nature of the surface materials on the objects. Further telescopic data collection and model updates to include more materials, noise, surface roughness, and material degradation are necessary to make better assessments of orbital object material types. A comparison conducted between objects observed previously with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) shows similar materials and trends from the two telescopes and from the two distinct data sets. However, based on the current state of the model, infrared spectroscopic data are adequate to classify objects in GEO as spacecraft, rocket bodies, or debris.

  9. United Kingdom Infrared Telescope's Spectrograph Observations of Human-Made Space Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckalew, Brent; Abercromby, Kira; Lederer, Susan; Cowardin, Heather; Frith, James

    2017-01-01

    Presented here are the results of the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) spectral observations of human-made space objects taken from 2014 to 2015. The data collected using the UKIRT 1-5 micron Imager Spectrometer (UIST) cover the wavelength range 0.7-2.5 micrometers. Overall, data were collected on 18 different orbiting objects at or near geosynchronous orbit (GEO). Two of the objects are controlled spacecraft, twelve are non-controlled spacecraft, one is a rocket body, and three are cataloged as debris. The remotely collected data are compared to the laboratory-collected reflectance data on typical spacecraft materials; thereby general materials are identified but not specific types. These results highlight the usefulness of observations in the infrared by focusing on features from hydrocarbons and silicon. The spacecraft, both the controlled and non-controlled, show distinct features due to the presence of solar panels whereas the rocket bodies do not. Signature variations between rocket bodies, due to the presence of various metals and paints on their surfaces, show a clear distinction from those objects with solar panels, demonstrating that one can distinguish most spacecraft from rocket bodies through infrared spectrum analysis. Finally, the debris pieces tend to show featureless, dark spectra. These results show that the laboratory data in its current state give well-correlated indications as to the nature of the surface materials on the objects. Further telescopic data collection and model updates to include noise, surface roughness, and material degradation are necessary to make better assessments of orbital object material types. A comparison conducted between objects observed previously with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) shows similar materials and trends from the two telescopes and different times. However, based on the current state of the model, infrared spectroscopic data are adequate to classify objects in GEO as spacecraft

  10. Advancing cell biology through proteomics in space and time (PROSPECTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamond, Angus I; Uhlen, Mathias; Horning, Stevan; Makarov, Alexander; Robinson, Carol V; Serrano, Luis; Hartl, F Ulrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Werenskiold, Anne Katrin; Andersen, Jens S; Vorm, Ole; Linial, Michal; Aebersold, Ruedi; Mann, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    The term "proteomics" encompasses the large-scale detection and analysis of proteins and their post-translational modifications. Driven by major improvements in mass spectrometric instrumentation, methodology, and data analysis, the proteomics field has burgeoned in recent years. It now provides a range of sensitive and quantitative approaches for measuring protein structures and dynamics that promise to revolutionize our understanding of cell biology and molecular mechanisms in both human cells and model organisms. The Proteomics Specification in Time and Space (PROSPECTS) Network is a unique EU-funded project that brings together leading European research groups, spanning from instrumentation to biomedicine, in a collaborative five year initiative to develop new methods and applications for the functional analysis of cellular proteins. This special issue of Molecular and Cellular Proteomics presents 16 research papers reporting major recent progress by the PROSPECTS groups, including improvements to the resolution and sensitivity of the Orbitrap family of mass spectrometers, systematic detection of proteins using highly characterized antibody collections, and new methods for absolute as well as relative quantification of protein levels. Manuscripts in this issue exemplify approaches for performing quantitative measurements of cell proteomes and for studying their dynamic responses to perturbation, both during normal cellular responses and in disease mechanisms. Here we present a perspective on how the proteomics field is moving beyond simply identifying proteins with high sensitivity toward providing a powerful and versatile set of assay systems for characterizing proteome dynamics and thereby creating a new "third generation" proteomics strategy that offers an indispensible tool for cell biology and molecular medicine.

  11. Detection of DNA damage by space radiation in human fibroblast cells flown on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Honglu; Feiveson, Alan; Karouia, Fathi; Stodieck, Louis; Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao; Wong, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Although charged particles in space have been detected with radiation detectors on board the spacecraft since the early discovery of the Van Allen Belts, reports on the effects of direct exposure to space radiation in biological systems have been limited. Measurement of biological effects of space radiation has been difficult due to the low dose and low dose rate nature of the radiation environment, and the difficulty in separating the radiation effects from microgravity and other space environmental factors. In astronauts, only a few changes, such as increased chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes and early onset of cataracts, attributed primarily to the exposure to space radiation. In a recent experiment, human fibroblast cells were flown on the International Space Station (ISS). Cells were kept at 370C in space and fixed on Days 3 and 14 after reaching orbit. After returning to the ground, the fixed cells were analyzed for phosphorylation of a histone protein H2AX by immunofluorescent staining of cells, which is a widely used biomarker for DNA double strand breaks. The 3-dimensional γg-H2AX foci were captured with a laser confocal microscope. Quantitative analysis revealed a small fraction of foci that were larger and displayed a track pattern in the flight samples in comparison to the ground controls. To confirm that the foci data from the flight study was actually induced from space radiation exposure, human fibroblast cells were exposed to low- and high-LET protons and high-LET Fe ions on the ground. High-LET protons and Fe ions were found to induce foci of the pattern that were observed in the flown cells.

  12. High-Efficiency Rad-Hard Ultra-Thin Si Photovoltaic Cell Technology for Space Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Improvements to solar cell efficiency that is consistent with low cost, high volume fabrication techniques are critical for future NASA space missions. In this...

  13. Lightweight, Flexible Solar Cells on Stainless Steel Foil and Polymer for Space and Stratospheric Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beernink, Kevin; Guha, Subhendu; Yang, Jeff; Banerjee, Arindam; Lord, Ken; DeMaggio, Greg; Liu, Frank; Pietka, Ginger; Johnson, Todd; Reinhout, Melanie; Younan, Kais; Wolf, David

    2007-01-01

    The availability of low-cost, lightweight and reliable photovoltaic (PV) modules is an important component in reducing the cost of satellites and spacecraft. In addition, future high-power spacecraft will require lightweight PV arrays with reduced stowage volume. In terms of the requirements for low mass, reduced stowage volume, and the harsh space environment, thin film amorphous silicon (a-Si) alloy cells have several advantages over other material technologies (1). The deposition process is relatively simple, inexpensive, and applicable to large area, lightweight, flexible substrates. The temperature coefficient has been found to be between -0.2 and -0.3 %/degC for high-efficiency triple-junction a-Si alloy cells, which is superior for high temperature operation compared to crystalline Si and triple-junction GaAs/InGaP/Ge devices at 0.53 %/degC and 0.45 %/degC, respectively (2). As a result, the reduction in efficiency at high temperature typical in space conditions is less for a-Si alloy cells than for their crystalline counterparts. Additionally, the a-Si alloy cells are relatively insensitive to electron and proton bombardment. We have shown that defects that are created by electrons with energies between 0.2 to 2 MeV with fluence up to 1x10(exp 15) e/sq cm and by protons with energy in the range 0.3 MeV to 5 MeV with fluence up to 1x10(exp 13) p/sq cm can be annealed out at 70 C in less than 50 hours (1). Further, modules incorporating United Solar s a-Si alloy cells have been tested on the MIR space station for 19 months with only minimal degradation (3). For stratospheric applications, such as the high altitude airship, the required PV arrays are typically of considerably higher power than current space arrays. Airships typically have a large area available for the PV, but weight is of critical importance. As a result, low cost and high specific power (W/kg) are key factors for airship PV arrays. Again, thin-film a-Si alloy solar cell technology is well

  14. The status of lightweight photovoltaic space array technology based on amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Kaschmitter, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Ultralight, flexible photovoltaic (PV) array of amorphous silicon (a-Si) was identified as a potential low cost power source for small satellites. A survey was conducted of the status of the a-Si PV array technology with respect to present and future performance, availability, cost, and risks. For existing, experimental array blankets made of commercial cell material, utilizing metal foil substrates, the Beginning of Life (BOL) performance at Air Mass Zero (AM0) and 35 C includes total power up to 200 W, power per area of 64 W/sq m and power per weight of 258 W/kg. Doubling of power per weight occurs when polyimide substrates are used. Estimated End of Life (EOL) power output after 10 years in a nominal low earth orbit would be 80 pct. of BOL, the degradation being due to largely light induced effects (-10 to -15 pct.) and in part (-5 pct.) to space radiation. Predictions for the year 1995 for flexible PV arrays, made on the basis of published results for rigid a-Si modules, indicate EOL power output per area and per weight of 105 W/sq m and 400 W/kg, respectively, while predictions for the late 1990s based on existing U.S. national PV program goals indicate EOL values of 157 W/sq m and 600 W/kg. Cost estimates by vendors for 200 W ultralight arrays in volume of over 1000 units range from $100/watt to $125/watt. Identified risks include the lack of flexible, space compatible encapsulant, the lack of space qualification effort, recent partial or full acquisitions of US manufacturers of a-Si cells by foreign firms, and the absence of a national commitment for a long range development program toward developing of this important power source for space.

  15. Bioculture System: Expanding ISS Space Bioscience Capabilities for Fundamental Stem Cell Research and Commercial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaber, Elizabeth; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo; Fitzpatrick, Garret; Ellingson, Lance; Mitchell, Sarah; Yang, Anthony; Kosnik, Cristine; Rayl, Nicole; Cannon, Tom; Austin, Edward; Sato, Kevin

    With the recent call by the 2011 Decadal Report and the 2010 Space Biosciences Roadmap for the International Space Station (ISS) to be used as a National Laboratory for scientific research, there is now a need for new laboratory instruments on ISS to enable such research to occur. The Bioculture System supports the extended culturing of multiple cell types and microbiological specimens. It consists of a docking station that carries ten independent incubation units or ‘Cassettes’. Each Cassette contains a cooling chamber (5(°) C) for temperature sensitive solutions and samples, or long duration fluids and sample storage, as well as an incubation chamber (ambient up to 42(°) C). Each Cassette houses an independent fluidics system comprised of a biochamber, medical-grade fluid tubing, medium warming module, oxygenation module, fluid pump, and sixteen solenoid valves for automated biochamber injections of sampling. The Bioculture System provides the user with the ability to select the incubation temperature, fluid flow rate and automated biochamber sampling or injection events for each separate Cassette. Furthermore, the ISS crew can access the biochamber, media bag, and accessory bags on-orbit using the Microgravity Science Glovebox. The Bioculture System also permits initiation of cultures, subculturing, injection of compounds, and removal of samples for on-orbit processing using ISS facilities. The Bioculture System therefore provides a unique opportunity for the study of stem cells and other cell types in space. The first validation flight of the Bioculture System will be conducted on SpaceX5, consisting of 8 Cassettes and lasting for 30-37 days. During this flight we plan to culture two different mammalian cell types in bioreactors: a mouse osteocytic-like cell line, and human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS)-derived cardiomyocytes. Specifically, the osteocytic line will enable the study of a type of cell that has been flown on the Bioculture System

  16. Super Unit Cells in Aperture-Based Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Tanasković

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An important class of electromagnetic metamaterials are aperture-based metasurfaces. Examples include extraordinary optical transmission arrays and double fishnets with negative refractive index. We analyze a generalization of such metamaterials where a simple aperture is now replaced by a compound object formed by superposition of two or more primitive objects (e.g., rectangles, circles, and ellipses. Thus obtained “super unit cell” shows far richer behavior than the subobjects that comprise it. We show that nonlocalities introduced by overlapping simple subobjects can be used to produce large deviations of spectral dispersion even for small additive modifications of the basic geometry. Technologically, some super cells may be fabricated by simple spatial shifting of the existing photolithographic masks. In our investigation we applied analytical calculations and ab initio finite element modeling to prove the possibility to tailor the dispersion including resonances for plasmonic nanocomposites by adjusting the local geometry and exploiting localized interactions at a subwavelength level. Any desired form could be defined using simple primitive objects, making the situation a geometrical analog of the case of series expansion of a function. Thus an additional degree of tunability of metamaterials is obtained. The obtained designer structures can be applied in different fields like waveguiding and sensing.

  17. Effect of Yttria Content on the Zirconia Unit Cell Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogstad, Jessica A.; Lepple, Maren; Gao, Yan; Lipkin, Don M.; Levi, Carlos G. (UCSB); (GE Global)

    2012-02-06

    The relationship between yttria concentration and the unit cell parameters in partially and fully stabilized zirconia has been reassessed, motivated by the need to improve the accuracy of phase analysis upon decomposition of t{prime}-based thermal barrier coatings. Compositions ranging from 6 to 18 mol% YO{sub 1.5} were synthesized and examined by means of high-resolution X-ray diffraction. Lattice parameters were determined using the Rietveld refinement method, a whole-pattern fitting procedure. The revised empirical relationships fall within the range of those published previously. However, efforts to achieve superior homogeneity of the materials, as well as accuracy of the composition and lattice parameters, provide increased confidence in the reliability of these correlations for use in future studies. Additional insight into the potential sources for scatter previously reported for the transition region ({approx}12-14 mol% YO{sub 1.5}), where tetragonal and cubic phases have been observed to coexist, is also provided. Implications on the current understanding of stabilization mechanisms in zirconia are discussed.

  18. Gender differences in relationships between urban green space and health in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Elizabeth A; Mitchell, Richard

    2010-08-01

    Natural environments, or 'green spaces', have been associated with a wide range of health benefits. Gender differences in neighbourhood effects on health have been found in a number of studies, although these have not been explored in relation to green space. We conducted the first UK-wide study of the relationship between urban green space and health, and the first such study to investigate gender differences in this relationship. An ecological approach was used. Two land use datasets were used to create a proportional green space measure (% by area) at the UK Census Area Statistic ward scale. Our sample consisted of 6432 urban wards, with a total population of 28.6 million adults aged 16-64 years in 2001. We selected health outcomes that were plausibly related to green space (cardiovascular disease mortality, respiratory disease mortality and self-reported limiting long-term illness) and another that was expected to be unrelated (lung cancer mortality). Negative binomial regression models examined associations between urban green space and these health outcomes, after controlling for relevant confounders. Gender differences in these associations were observed and tested. Male cardiovascular disease and respiratory disease mortality rates decreased with increasing green space, but no significant associations were found for women. No protective associations were observed between green space and lung cancer mortality or self-reported limiting long-term illness for either men or women. Possible explanations for the observed gender differences in the green space and health relationship are gender differences in perceptions and usage of urban green spaces. We conclude that it is important not to assume uniform health benefits of urban green space for all population subgroups. Additionally, urban green space measures that capture quality as well as quantity could be more suited to studying green space and health relationships for women. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All

  19. Characterizing the Radiation Survivability of Space Solar Cell Technologies for Heliospheric Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Walker, D.; Mann, C. J.; Yue, Y.; Nocerino, J. C.; Smith, B. S.; Mulligan, T.

    2016-12-01

    Space solar cells are responsible for powering the majority of heliospheric space missions. This paper will discuss methods for characterizing space solar cell technologies for on-orbit operations that rely on a series of laboratory tests that include measuring the solar cells' beginning of life performance under simulated (e.g. AM0 or air mass zero) sunlight over different operating temperatures and observing their end of life performance following exposure to laboratory-generated charged particle radiation (protons and electrons). The Aerospace Corporation operates a proton implanter as well as electron gun facilities and collaborates with external radiation effects facilities to expose space solar cells or other space technologies to representative space radiation environments (i.e. heliosphere or magnetosphere of Earth or other planets), with goals of characterizing how the technologies perform over an anticipated space mission timeline and, through the application of precision diagnostic capabilities, understanding what part of the solar cell is impacted by varying space radiation environments. More recently, Aerospace has been hosting solar cell flight tests on its previously-flown CubeSat avionics bus, providing opportunities to compare the laboratory tests to on-orbit observations. We hope through discussion of the lessons learned and methods we use to characterize how solar cells perform after space radiation exposure that similar methodology could be adopted by others to improve the state of knowledge on the survivability of other space technologies required for future space missions.

  20. Cell Churches and Stem Cell Marketing in South Korea and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipp, Douglas

    2016-05-23

    The commercial provision of putative stem cell-based medical interventions in the absence of conclusive evidence of safety and efficacy has formed the basis of an unregulated industry for more than a decade. Many clinics offering such supposed stem cell treatments include statements about the 'ethical' nature of somatic (often colloquially referred to as 'adult' stem cells) stem cells, in specific contrast to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which have been the subject of intensive political, legal, and religious controversy since their first derivation in 1998. Christian groups-both Roman Catholic and evangelical Protestant-in many countries have explicitly promoted the medical potential and current-day successes in the clinical application of somatic stem cells, lending indirect support to the activities of businesses marketing stem cells ahead of evidence. In this article, I make a preliminary examination of how the structures and belief systems of certain churches in South Korea and the United States, both of which are home to significant stem cell marketing industries, has complemented other factors, including national biomedical funding initiatives, international economic rivalries, permissive legal structures, which have lent impetus to a problematic and often exploitative sector of biomedical commerce.

  1. Space environment effect on cell cycle of proliferating FRTL-5 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, Francesco; Saverio Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco; Meli, Antonella; Perrella, Giuseppina; Spelat, Renza; Zambito, Anna Maria

    The space environment is a unique laboratory to study the response of living organisms to microgravity and cosmic radiation at the molecular and cellular levels. Significant results obtained by us during the Eneide Mission (Soyuz 9S and 10S 2005) showed a different sensitivity to space environment of cells in proliferative state as compared to those in physiological stand-by. The main object of our investigation was to validate these important findings and to study the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon. To this purpose, a cell model of normal cells derived from rat thyroids which can be kept unattended for up to 20 days in a proliferative medium and at room temperature (FRTL-5) were used in a 10 days experiment on a FOTON satellite and in a 15 days experiment in the STS-120 shuttle mission. Experimental design for both flights was planned on the basis of the "ENEIDE" mission results. Microarray analysis has been performed on the samples from Foton M3 and STS-120. Background subtraction, quality assessment and normalization as well as the definition of specific evaluation algorithms have been performed. Based on the hyper G Test function we computed the Hyper geometric p-values for over representation of genes at all Gene Ontology (GO) terms in the induced GO graphs; this test was performed for each GO category and applied also to KEGG pathways. Results show the good quality of the experiment and our data show that the pathways mostly affected by the flight are: a) the cell cycle, b) the ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, c) the repair mechanisms, d) the adherens junction and e) the pyrimidine metabolism. The patways studied indicate that the cells suffer a slowing of cell cycle as well as upregulation of the DNA and RNA repair processes and even further corroborate the validity of using the FRTL5 cells as biosensors for monitoring the effectiveness of countermeasures to damage caused by the Space.

  2. Single fibre and multifibre unit cell analysis of strength and cracking of unidirectional composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, H.W.; Zhou, H.W.; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulations of damage evolution in composites reinforced with single and multifibre are presented. Several types of unit cell models are considered: single fibre unit cell, multiple fibre unit cell with one and several damageable sections per fibres, unit cells with homogeneous...... damageable parts in composites (matrix cracks, fibre/matrix interface damage and fibre fracture) was observed in the simulations. The strength of interface begins to influence the deformation behaviour of the cell only after the fibre is broken. In this case, the higher interface layer strength leads...... and inhomogeneous interfaces, etc. Two numerical damage models, cohesive elements, and damageable layers are employed for the simulation of the damage evolution in single fibre and multifibre unit cells. The two modelling approaches were compared and lead to the very close results. Competition among the different...

  3. Basic statistical analyses of candidate nickel-hydrogen cells for the Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Thomas M.; Frate, David T.

    1993-01-01

    Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni/H2) secondary batteries will be implemented as a power source for the Space Station Freedom as well as for other NASA missions. Consequently, characterization tests of Ni/H2 cells from Eagle-Picher, Whittaker-Yardney, and Hughes were completed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Watt-hour efficiencies of each Ni/H2 cell were measured for regulated charge and discharge cycles as a function of temperature, charge rate, discharge rate, and state of charge. Temperatures ranged from -5 C to 30 C, charge rates ranged from C/10 to 1C, discharge rates ranged from C/10 to 2C, and states of charge ranged from 20 percent to 100 percent. Results from regression analyses and analyses of mean watt-hour efficiencies demonstrated that overall performance was best at temperatures between 10 C and 20 C while the discharge rate correlated most strongly with watt-hour efficiency. In general, the cell with back-to-back electrode arrangement, single stack, 26 percent KOH, and serrated zircar separator and the cell with a recirculating electrode arrangement, unit stack, 31 percent KOH, zircar separators performed best.

  4. Basic statistical analyses of candidate nickel-hydrogen cells for the Space Station Freedom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, T.M.; Frate, D.T.

    1993-05-01

    Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni/H2) secondary batteries will be implemented as a power source for the Space Station Freedom as well as for other NASA missions. Consequently, characterization tests of Ni/H2 cells from Eagle-Picher, Whittaker-Yardney, and Hughes were completed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Watt-hour efficiencies of each Ni/H2 cell were measured for regulated charge and discharge cycles as a function of temperature, charge rate, discharge rate, and state of charge. Temperatures ranged from -5 C to 30 C, charge rates ranged from C/10 to 1C, discharge rates ranged from C/10 to 2C, and states of charge ranged from 20 percent to 100 percent. Results from regression analyses and analyses of mean watt-hour efficiencies demonstrated that overall performance was best at temperatures between 10 C and 20 C while the discharge rate correlated most strongly with watt-hour efficiency. In general, the cell with back-to-back electrode arrangement, single stack, 26 percent KOH, and serrated zircar separator and the cell with a recirculating electrode arrangement, unit stack, 31 percent KOH, zircar separators performed best.

  5. A Web of Drones: A 2040 Strategy to Reduce the United States Dependance on Space Based Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-17

    2040. On the Design of the Aircraft The drone is required to keep a payload airborne for 24 hours unrefueled and 5 days with refueling but without... Design of the Web The altitude of the drones and the distance between them are not set in stone. A denser web (more nodes, shorter distances between...AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY A WEB OF DRONES : A 2040 STRATEGY TO REDUCE THE UNITED STATES DEPENDANCE ON SPACE BASED CAPABILITIES by

  6. Automated assembling of single fuel cell units for use in a fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalba, C. K.; Muminovic, A.; Barz, C.; Nasui, V.

    2017-05-01

    The manufacturing of PEMFC stacks (POLYMER ELEKTROLYT MEMBRAN Fuel Cell) is nowadays still done by hand. Over hundreds of identical single components have to be placed accurate together for the construction of a fuel cell stack. Beside logistic problems, higher total costs and disadvantages in weight the high number of components produce a higher statistic interference because of faulty erection or material defects and summation of manufacturing tolerances. The saving of costs is about 20 - 25 %. Furthermore, the total weight of the fuel cells will be reduced because of a new sealing technology. Overall a one minute cycle time has to be aimed per cell at the manufacturing of these single components. The change of the existing sealing concept to a bonded sealing is one of the important requisites to get an automated manufacturing of single cell units. One of the important steps for an automated gluing process is the checking of the glue application by using of an image processing system. After bonding the single fuel cell the sealing and electrical function can be checked, so that only functional and high qualitative cells can get into further manufacturing processes.

  7. Unit cell geometry of multiaxial preforms for structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Frank; Lei, Charles; Rahman, Anisur; Du, G. W.; Cai, Yun-Jia

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the yarn geometry of multiaxial preforms. The importance of multiaxial preforms for structural composites is well recognized by the industry but, to exploit their full potential, engineering design rules must be established. This study is a step in that direction. In this work the preform geometry for knitted and braided preforms was studied by making a range of well designed samples and studying them by photo microscopy. The structural geometry of the preforms is related to the processing parameters. Based on solid modeling and B-spline methodology a software package is developed. This computer code enables real time structural representations of complex fiber architecture based on the rule of preform manufacturing. The code has the capability of zooming and section plotting. These capabilities provide a powerful means to study the effect of processing variables on the preform geometry. the code also can be extended to an auto mesh generator for downstream structural analysis using finite element method. This report is organized into six sections. In the first section the scope and background of this work is elaborated. In section two the unit cell geometries of braided and multi-axial warp knitted preforms is discussed. The theoretical frame work of yarn path modeling and solid modeling is presented in section three. The thin section microscopy carried out to observe the structural geometry of the preforms is the subject in section four. The structural geometry is related to the processing parameters in section five. Section six documents the implementation of the modeling techniques into the computer code MP-CAD. A user manual for the software is also presented here. The source codes and published papers are listed in the Appendices.

  8. Real-space density functional theory on graphical processing units: computational approach and comparison to Gaussian basis set methods

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the application of graphical processing units (GPUs) to accelerate real-space density functional theory (DFT) calculations. To make our implementation efficient, we have developed a scheme to expose the data parallelism available in the DFT approach; this is applied to the different procedures required for a real-space DFT calculation. We present results for current-generation GPUs from AMD and Nvidia, which show that our scheme, implemented in the free code OCTOPUS, can reach a sustained performance of up to 90 GFlops for a single GPU, representing an important speed-up when compared to the CPU version of the code. Moreover, for some systems our implementation can outperform a GPU Gaussian basis set code, showing that the real-space approach is a competitive alternative for DFT simulations on GPUs.

  9. Real-Space Density Functional Theory on Graphical Processing Units: Computational Approach and Comparison to Gaussian Basis Set Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Xavier; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the application of graphical processing units (GPUs) to accelerate real-space density functional theory (DFT) calculations. To make our implementation efficient, we have developed a scheme to expose the data parallelism available in the DFT approach; this is applied to the different procedures required for a real-space DFT calculation. We present results for current-generation GPUs from AMD and Nvidia, which show that our scheme, implemented in the free code Octopus, can reach a sustained performance of up to 90 GFlops for a single GPU, representing a significant speed-up when compared to the CPU version of the code. Moreover, for some systems, our implementation can outperform a GPU Gaussian basis set code, showing that the real-space approach is a competitive alternative for DFT simulations on GPUs.

  10. Service data acquisition and onboard control for “GRIS-BD” unit in “GRIS” space experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyanenko, A. S.; Lupar, E. E.; Trofimov, Yu A.; Faradzhaev, R. M.; Yurov, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    Problems of onboard space scientific devices control, collecting auxiliary service information about working capacity, conditions of experiment carrying out and preliminary data processing for real time calibration and stabilizing of operational parameters are actual for any space devices. In this paper we describe and discuss service data acquisition and onboard control for “GRIS-BD” unit in “GRIS” space experiment onboard ISS. This system provides temperature measurements in different equipment parts (in power supplies, on scintillation crystals for energy ranges correction, etc.), precision thresholds measurements in discrimination circuits, status different switching on/off (in real time), precision control detector parameters by high-voltage regulation, fine thresholds changing (analog regulation), different switching on/off (in real time), statistical analysis of data flows and change of operation modes of the device.

  11. X-ray powder diffraction data and unit cells of ammonium paratungstate tetrahydrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Put, J.W. van; Verkroost, T.W.; Sonneveld, E.J.

    1990-01-01

    X-Ray powder diffraction data and unit cell parameters of industrially produced, as well as bench scale prepared, ammonium paratungstate tetrahydrate are reported and compared with current Powder Data file (PDF) (1989) patterns. A least-squares refinement resulted in two slightly different unit cell

  12. Radiation resistance of thin-film solar cells for space photovoltaic power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodyard, James R.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and amorphous silicon alloy solar cells have achieved noteworthy performance and are currently being studied for space power applications. Cadmium sulfide cells had been the subject of much effort but are no longer considered for space applications. A review is presented of what is known about the radiation degradation of thin film solar cells in space. Experimental cadmium telluride and amorphous silicon alloy cells are reviewed. Damage mechanisms and radiation induced defect generation and passivation in the amorphous silicon alloy cell are discussed in detail due to the greater amount of experimental data available.

  13. USE OF SPACE TECHNOLOGY IN FEDERALLY FUNDED LAND PROCESSES RESEARCH IN THE UNITED STATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorley, G.A.; McArdle, R.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the use of space technology in federally funded earth science research in the US was carried out in 1985 by the President's Office of Science and Technology Policy. Five departments and three independent agencies, representing the primary earth science research agencies in the Federal government, participated in the review. The review by the subcommittee indicated that, while there is considerable overlap in the legislated missions of the earth science agencies, most of the space-related land processes research is complementary. Summaries are provided of the current and projected uses of space technology in land processes activities within the eight Federal organizations.

  14. A diesel fuel processor for fuel-cell-based auxiliary power unit applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsun, Remzi Can; Krekel, Daniel; Pasel, Joachim; Prawitz, Matthias; Peters, Ralf; Stolten, Detlef

    2017-07-01

    Producing a hydrogen-rich gas from diesel fuel enables the efficient generation of electricity in a fuel-cell-based auxiliary power unit. In recent years, significant progress has been achieved in diesel reforming. One issue encountered is the stable operation of water-gas shift reactors with real reformates. A new fuel processor is developed using a commercial shift catalyst. The system is operated using optimized start-up and shut-down strategies. Experiments with diesel and kerosene fuels show slight performance drops in the shift reactor during continuous operation for 100 h. CO concentrations much lower than the target value are achieved during system operation in auxiliary power unit mode at partial loads of up to 60%. The regeneration leads to full recovery of the shift activity. Finally, a new operation strategy is developed whereby the gas hourly space velocity of the shift stages is re-designed. This strategy is validated using different diesel and kerosene fuels, showing a maximum CO concentration of 1.5% at the fuel processor outlet under extreme conditions, which can be tolerated by a high-temperature PEFC. The proposed operation strategy solves the issue of strong performance drop in the shift reactor and makes this technology available for reducing emissions in the transportation sector.

  15. Destination Station: Bringing The International Space Station to Communities Across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgington, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Today, space is no longer just a field of advanced technological development and of scientific research of excellence, but has become an essential asset for everyday life. Space has spurred countless scientific and technological achievements which are commonly used in aeronautics, medicine, material science and production, in information and communications technology. In parallel, more and more services are carried out through the use of space applications, ranging from detection of natural disasters and environmental monitoring to global navigation and telecommunication. Using space missions to build a better understanding of the universe fulfills our centuries-old curiosity and leads humanity into the future, opening up new frontiers of knowledge. The International Astronautical Congresses have always represented an arena in which issues have been discussed with friendship and among experts: scientists, technicians and managers from universities, agencies, research centres and industry. At the same time it introduces students and young professionals to the field.

  16. Past, present, and future activities in space power technology in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrus, Judith H.

    1987-01-01

    Space power technology research in the U.S. is examined. The objectives for advanced power systems are long life, safety, flexibility, modularity, growth capability, and autonomy. Research in the areas of photovoltaic arrays, electrical energy storage, and the development of solar dynamic power systems and radio thermal generators is described. The applications of advances in power generation, energy storage, and power management and distribution to the Space Station are discussed.

  17. Shadow Radiation Shield Required Thickness Estimation for Space Nuclear Power Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voevodina, E. V.; Martishin, V. M.; Ivanovsky, V. A.; Prasolova, N. O.

    The paper concerns theoretical possibility of visiting orbital transport vehicles based on nuclear power unit and electric propulsion system on the Earth's orbit by astronauts to maintain work with payload from the perspective of radiation safety. There has been done estimation of possible time of the crew's staying in the area of payload of orbital transport vehicles for different reactor powers, which is a consistent part of nuclear power unit.

  18. Solar cells in space. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning development, current applications, and potential uses of solar cells in outer space. Topics include design considerations and systems descriptions and evaluations. The use of solar cells to generate energy for electrical power in space is discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  19. Map service: United States Decadal Production History Cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map service displays present and past oil and gas production in the United States, as well as the location and intensity of exploratory drilling outside...

  20. Habitat Demonstration Unit-Deep Space Habitat (HDU-DSH) Integration and Preparation for Desert RATS 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeau, Zack

    2011-01-01

    The Habitat Demonstration Unit, or HDU, is a multi-purpose test bed that allows NASA scientists and engineers to design, develop, and test new living quarters, laboratories, and workspaces for the next generation space mission. Previous testing and integration has occurred during 2010 at the annual Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) field testing campaign in the Arizona desert. There the HDU team tests the configuration developed for the fiscal year, or FY configuration. For FY2011, the NASA mission calls for simulating a deep space condition. The HDU-DSH, or Deep Space Habitat, will be configured with new systems and modules that will outfit the test bed with new deep space capabilities. One such addition is the new X-HAB (eXploration Habitat) Inflatable Loft. With any deep space mission there is the need for safe, suitable living quarters. The current HDU configuration does not allow for any living space at all. In fact, Desert RATS 2010 saw the crew sleeping in the Space Exploration Vehicles (SEV) instead of the HDU. The X-HAB Challenge pitted three universities against each other: Oklahoma State University, University of Maryland, and the University of Wisconsin. The winning team will have their design implemented by NASA for field testing at DRATS 2011. This paper will highlight the primary objective of getting the X-HAB field ready which involves the implementation of an elevator/handrail system along with smaller logistical and integration tasks associated with getting the HDU-DSH ready for shipment to DRATS.

  1. A comparative analysis of evpapotranspiration from urban green spaces in the northeast united states

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovanni, K. A.; Gaffin, S. R.; Montalto, F. A.; Rosenzweig, C.

    2011-12-01

    City wide urban greening programs, like Green City, Clean Waters (Philadelphia) and the NYC Green Infrastructure Plan, can serve on a large scale to reintroduce and augment existing vegetated spaces in urbanized landscapes. Through these activities, hydrologic processes, including evapotranspiration can be restored to some degree of their predevelopment conditions. A variety of valuable benefits linked to evaporative processes, including reduction of the urban heat island effect, runoff reduction, and carbon sequestration, can be provided by urban green spaces, including engineered green infrastructure (GI) technologies. Accurate and representative measurements and estimates of urban evapotranspiration (ET) are necessary tools for quantifying and predicting such benefits and understanding the degree to which urban greening efforts can function in restoring pre-development hydrologic patterns. However, ET in the urban environment has historically received limited attention. In these studies, ET rates from four different types of urban green spaces have been directly measured using weighing lysimeter setups. Experimental sites predominantly include in-situ engineered urban green spaces or GI installations throughout the boroughs of New York City, specifically a green roof, an irrigated bioretention area, and an un-irrigated bioretention area, while also including a wooded area in one of the last remaining sections of old growth urban forest in NYC. A statistical analysis comparing microclimatic conditions at these four distinct sites, as measured with onsite instrumentation, in conjunction with directly measured ET rates will be presented, gaining insight regarding the relative importance of ET mediated processes in various types of urban green spaces.

  2. The German Joint Project "Flexible CIGSe Thin Film Solar Cells for Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, Kai; Brunner, Sebastian; John, Ralf; Kaufmann, Christian A.; Otte, Karsten; Rahm, Andreas; Kessler, Friedrich

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of the presented joint project is the development and verification of a flexible, lightweight and highly efficient Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) thin film solar cell technology on polyimide foil substrate for use in space. Due to the worldwide leading present German activities on the field of chalcopyrite based thin film solar cells a harmonisation of resources shall push this development. Furthermore, this project supports the European Space Agency (ESA) program for the development of thin film solar cell technology for space applications. Recent results of substrate evaluation and CIGSe solar cell and module manufacturing on polyimide foil substrate are presented.

  3. Flying the Friendly Skies May Not be so Friendly in Outer Space: International and Domestic Law Leaves United States’ Citizen Space Tourists without a Remedy for Injury Caused by Government Space Debris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marla Stayduhar

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available “Ladies and Gentlemen, we would like to welcome you to the moon. Please keep your seat belt fastened until the pilot completely stops at the gate. If this is your final destination, please collect your bags at baggage claim D. If you are headed on to Mars, your bags will be checked through to your final destination.”These words may sound funny now, but the possibility of them becoming a reality is not as far-fetched as it might seem. On September 18, 2006, Anousheh Ansari, a United States citizen of Iranian origin, became the fourth space tourist and the first female civilian to enter outer space.1 She also became the first astronaut to keep a space blog of her experiences to which readers could post a response.2 Shortly before Ms. Ansari’s adventure, on October 1, 2005, Gregory Olsen, scientist and entrepreneur, was the third paying civilian space tourist, and took flight on a Russian shuttle.3 Although his trip cost $20 million,4 it is not unforeseeable that  ordinary citizens will soon be able to take a short trip around the moon or visit a space resort. It has been estimated that space tourism has the potential to generate $10 billion to $20 billion in income in the next few decades.5 Counting on that projection, Virgin Galactic, founded by Richard Branson (the well-known billionaire adventurer6, recently reached an agreement with the State of New Mexico to build a space port on state land.7 Moreover, recent batches of space vehicle competitions and exhibits have piqued greater interest in space tourism for adventurers, scientists, travel agents and government officials alike.8

  4. The space experiment CERASP: Definition of a space-suited radiation source and growth conditions for human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Spitta, Luis; Thelen, Melanie; Arenz, Andrea; Franz, Markus; Schulze-Varnholt, Dirk; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Günther

    The combined action of ionizing radiation and microgravity will continue to influence future space missions, with special risks for astronauts on the Moon surface or for long duration missions to Mars. It has been estimated that on a 3-year mission to Mars about 3% of the bodies' cell nuclei would have been hit by one iron ion with the consequence that nuclear DNA will be heavily damaged. There is increasing evidence that basic cellular functions are sensitive not only to radiation but also to microgravity. DNA repair studies in space on bacteria, yeast cells and human fibroblasts, which were irradiated before, flight, gave contradictory results: from inhibition of repair by microgravity to enhancement, whereas others did not detect any influence of microgravity on repair. The space experiment CERASP (CEllular Responses to RAdiation in SPace) to be performed at the International Space Station (ISS) is aimed to supply basic information on the cellular response in microgravity to radiation applied during flight. It makes use of a recombinant human cell line as reporter for cellular signal transduction modulation by genotoxic environmental conditions. The main biological endpoints under investigation will be gene activation based on enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP, originally isolated from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria) expression controlled by a DNA damage-dependent promoter element which reflects the activity of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF- κB) pathway. The NF- κB family of proteins plays a major role in the inflammatory and immune response, cell proliferation and differentiation, anti-apoptosis and tumorgenesis. For radiation exposure during space flight a radiation source has been constructed as damage accumulation by cosmic radiation will certainly be insufficient for analysis. The space experiment specific hardware consists of a specially designed radiation source made up of the β-emitter promethium-147, combined with a

  5. Report to the Commission to Assess United States National Security Space Management and Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-11

    HLV DELTA II/ATLAS II GPS IIF GPS IIF/III SBIRS High SBIRS Low Future Surveillance & Threat Warning In the Lab Today Source: Headquarters Air Force and...in the world. 34 U.S. Objectives for Space to support anti- drug efforts and anti-terrorism operations, such as the pursuit of the terrorist Osama bin

  6. The War on Democratic Public Space: A Perspective from the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    There is a crisis in democratic public space in the USA. This essay explores key areas that are either causes or effects of the present predicament: post-9-11 fear, neoliberalisation/globalisation, migrating populations, and the growing power of right-wing fundamentalism, among others. (Contains 6 notes.)

  7. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Performance as Telecommunications Backup Power in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Working in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and industry project partners, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) acts as the central data repository for the data collected from real-world operation of fuel cell backup power systems. With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) co-funding awarded through DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office, more than 1,300 fuel cell units were deployed over a three-plus-year period in stationary, material handling equipment, auxiliary power, and backup power applications. This surpassed a Fuel Cell Technologies Office ARRA objective to spur commercialization of an early market technology by installing 1,000 fuel cell units across several different applications, including backup power. By December 2013, 852 backup power units out of 1,330 fuel cell units deployed were providing backup service, mainly for telecommunications towers. For 136 of the fuel cell backup units, project participants provided detailed operational data to the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center for analysis by NREL's technology validation team. NREL analyzed operational data collected from these government co-funded demonstration projects to characterize key fuel cell backup power performance metrics, including reliability and operation trends, and to highlight the business case for using fuel cells in these early market applications. NREL's analyses include these critical metrics, along with deployment, U.S. grid outage statistics, and infrastructure operation.

  8. Advances in Dilute Nitride Multi-Junction Solar Cells for Space Power Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suarez F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we review the latest performance and qualification results of Solar Junction Corp.’s lattice matched 4J-on-Ge space solar cells and CIC (Cell- Interconnect-Coverglass products incorporating GaInNAsSb dilute nitride material. We also report on the production readiness of these advanced space solar cells manufactured using an optimized hybrid Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE / Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE growth process.

  9. Lightweight InP Solar Cells for Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation in this Phase II SBIR is the development of a technology which will enable the manufacture of a lightweight, low cost, high radiation resistance InP...

  10. Lightweight InP Solar Cells for Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation in this Phase I SBIR is the development of a technology which will enable the manufacture of a lightweight, low cost, InP based compound semiconductor...

  11. International Space Station United States Laboratory Module Water Recovery Management Subsystem Verification from Flight 5A to Stage ULF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.; Labuda, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system comprises of seven subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), Vacuum System (VS), Water Recovery and Management (WRM), and Waste Management (WM). This paper provides a summary of the nominal operation of the United States (U.S.) Laboratory Module WRM design and detailed element methodologies utilized during the Qualification phase of the U.S. Laboratory Module prior to launch and the Qualification of all of the modification kits added to it from Flight 5A up and including Stage ULF2.

  12. Fundamentals of space biology research on cells, animals, and plants in space

    CERN Document Server

    DeLorenzo, Michael L; Slenzka, K

    2006-01-01

    This book is intended as an overview at an undergraduate or early university level and describes the effects of spaceflight at cellular and organism levels. Past, current, and future research on the effects of gravity - or its absence - and ionizing radiation on the evolution, development, and function of living organisms is presented in layman's terms by researchers who have been active in this field. The purpose is to enlighten science and non-science readers to the benefits of space biology research for conducting basic and applied research to support human exploration of space and to take

  13. Nickel-Hydrogen Battery Cell Life Test Program Update for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas B.

    2000-01-01

    NASA and Boeing North America are responsible for constructing the electrical power system for the International Space Station (ISS), which circles the Earth every 90 minutes in a low Earth orbit (LEO). For approximately 55 minutes of this orbit, the ISS is in sunlight, and for the remaining 35 minutes, the ISS is in the Earth s shadow (eclipse). The electrical power system must not only provide power during the sunlight portion by means of the solar arrays, but also store energy for use during the eclipse. Nickel-hydrogen (Ni/H2) battery cells were selected as the energy storage systems for ISS. Each battery Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) comprises 38 individual series-connected Ni/H2 battery cells, and there are 48 battery ORU s on the ISS. On the basis of a limited Ni/H2 LEO data base on life and performance characteristics, the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field commenced testing through two test programs: one in-house and one at the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Crane, Indiana.

  14. A Study on Improving United States Air Force Space Systems Engineering and Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    third iteration of a program formerly called Starlite in 1996 and then Discoverer II in 1997. It is intended to provide a radar reconnaissance... STARLITE . The STARLITE program was cancelled in early 1997 because of redundancies between the USAF and the NRO ( STARLITE , 2006). As a result of...in the path of STARLITE and was cancelled by Congress in 2000 (Cáceres, 2006). In 2001, Space-Based Radar (SBR) was initiated as a new major defense

  15. International Space Station Bus Regulation With NASA Glenn Research Center Flywheel Energy Storage System Development Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kascak, Peter E.; Kenny, Barbara H.; Dever, Timothy P.; Santiago, Walter; Jansen, Ralph H.

    2001-01-01

    An experimental flywheel energy storage system is described. This system is being used to develop a flywheel based replacement for the batteries on the International Space Station (ISS). Motor control algorithms which allow the flywheel to interface with a simplified model of the ISS power bus, and function similarly to the existing ISS battery system, are described. Results of controller experimental verification on a 300 W-hr flywheel are presented.

  16. Redundancy management of multiple KT-70 inertial measurement units applicable to the space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    Results of an investigation of velocity failure detection and isolation for 3 inertial measuring units (IMU) and 2 inertial measuring units (IMU) configurations are presented. The failure detection and isolation algorithm performance was highly successful and most types of velocity errors were detected and isolated. The failure detection and isolation algorithm also included attitude FDI but was not evaluated because of the lack of time and low resolution in the gimbal angle synchro outputs. The shuttle KT-70 IMUs will have dual-speed resolvers and high resolution gimbal angle readouts. It was demonstrated by these tests that a single computer utilizing a serial data bus can successfully control a redundant 3-IMU system and perform FDI.

  17. International Space Station (ISS) Bacterial Filter Elements (BFEs): Filter Efficiency and Pressure Testing of Returned Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert D.; Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.

    2017-01-01

    The air revitalization system aboard the International Space Station (ISS) provides the vital function of maintaining a clean cabin environment for the crew and the hardware. This becomes a serious challenge in pressurized space compartments since no outside air ventilation is possible, and a larger particulate load is imposed on the filtration system due to lack of sedimentation due to the microgravity environment in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system architecture in the U.S. Segment uses a distributed particulate filtration approach consisting of traditional High-Efficiency Particulate Adsorption (HEPA) media filters deployed at multiple locations in each U.S. Segment module; these filters are referred to as Bacterial Filter Elements, or BFEs. These filters see a replacement interval, as part of maintenance, of 2-5 years dependent on location in the ISS. In this work, we present particulate removal efficiency, pressure drop, and leak test results for a sample set of 8 BFEs returned from the ISS after filter replacement. The results can potentially be utilized by the ISS Program to ascertain whether the present replacement interval can be maintained or extended to balance the on-ground filter inventory with extension of the lifetime of ISS beyond 2024. These results can also provide meaningful guidance for particulate filter designs under consideration for future deep space exploration missions.

  18. Lightweight, Space and Power Efficient Solar Array Drive Design Implemented within Remote Interface Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivikyto, Tatu; Laaksoen, Jyrki

    2014-08-01

    PATRIA has implemented highly educated Remote Interface Units in various ESA missions. For the Sentinel-2 and EarthCARE it was constructed also to include Solar Array Drive Electronics. The same control design as for Solar Array Drive function was also piggybacked in Magneto Torque control drives and other mission specific stepper motor drives. The purpose of this paper is to summarise and present the PATRIA Solar Array Drive Electronics design advantages.

  19. Toeplitz Operators on the Weighted Bergman Space over the Two-Dimensional Unit Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma García

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend the known results on commutative Banach algebras generated by Toeplitz operators with radial quasi-homogeneous symbols on the two-dimensional unit ball. Spherical coordinates previously used hid a possibility to detect an essentially wider class of symbols that can generate commutative Banach Toeplitz operator algebras. We characterize these new algebras describing their properties and, under a certain extra condition, construct the corresponding Gelfand theory.

  20. Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells for Space Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jerry D.; Hehemann, David G.; Duraj, Stan A.

    2003-01-01

    During the course of this grant, dye-sensitized solar cells were prepared and characterized. The solar cells were prepared using materials (dyes, electrolytes, transparent conductive oxide coated glass, nanocrystalline TiO2) entirely prepared in-house, as well as prepared using materials available commercially. Complete cells were characterized under simulated AM0 illumination. The best cell prepared at NASA had an AM0 efficiency of 1.22% for a 1.1 sq cm cell. Short circuit current (Isc), open circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) for the cell were 6.95 mA, 618 mV and 42.8%, respectively. For comparison purposes, two commercially prepared dye-sensitized solar cells were obtained from Solaronix SA, Aubonne, Switzerland. The Solaronix cells were also characterized under simulated AM0 illumination. The best cell from Solaronix had an active area of 3.71 sq cm and measured an AM0 efficiency of 3.16%. with Isc, Voc and FF of 45.80 mA, 669.6 mV and 52.3%, respectively. Both cells from Solaronix were rapid thermal cycled between -80 C and 80 C. Thermal cycling led to a 4.6% loss of efficiency in one of the cells and led to nearly a complete failure in the second cell.

  1. The geometry of the light-cone cell decomposition of moduli space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, David, E-mail: d.p.r.garner@qmul.ac.uk; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye, E-mail: s.ramgoolam@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Research in String Theory, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    The moduli space of Riemann surfaces with at least two punctures can be decomposed into a cell complex by using a particular family of ribbon graphs called Nakamura graphs. We distinguish the moduli space with all punctures labelled from that with a single labelled puncture. In both cases, we describe a cell decomposition where the cells are parametrised by graphs or equivalence classes of finite sequences (tuples) of permutations. Each cell is a convex polytope defined by a system of linear equations and inequalities relating light-cone string parameters, quotiented by the automorphism group of the graph. We give explicit examples of the cell decomposition at low genus with few punctures.

  2. Alkaline water electrolysis technology for Space Station regenerative fuel cell energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, F. H.; Hoberecht, M. A.; Le, M.

    1986-01-01

    The regenerative fuel cell system (RFCS), designed for application to the Space Station energy storage system, is based on state-of-the-art alkaline electrolyte technology and incorporates a dedicated fuel cell system (FCS) and water electrolysis subsystem (WES). In the present study, emphasis is placed on the WES portion of the RFCS. To ensure RFCS availability for the Space Station, the RFCS Space Station Prototype design was undertaken which included a 46-cell 0.93 cu m static feed water electrolysis module and three integrated mechanical components.

  3. Recent Developments in Cell Vibration Testing at ABSL Space Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sam; Thwaite, Carl

    2014-08-01

    This paper will describe vibration testing performed at ABSL in recent years on 18650 lithium-ion cells, focussing on work done to expand knowledge of the newest cells (the HCM and NL cells) under random vibration loads. COTS cells as used by ABSL are not necessarily designed for vibration tolerance, and so understanding the conditions that cause failures, and the precise failure modes, is a critical activity.The approach used for cell testing will be described, including the test setup and overall test and analysis flow. In particular, two different approaches (using fixed and resonating interfaces) will be described. The results of survival testing performed on HCM and NL cells will be presented. In addition, the damping behaviour of the HC cell will be described.

  4. Super Unit Cells in Aperture-Based Metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Dragan Tanasković; Zoran Jakšić; Marko Obradov; Olga Jakšić

    2015-01-01

    An important class of electromagnetic metamaterials are aperture-based metasurfaces. Examples include extraordinary optical transmission arrays and double fishnets with negative refractive index. We analyze a generalization of such metamaterials where a simple aperture is now replaced by a compound object formed by superposition of two or more primitive objects (e.g., rectangles, circles, and ellipses). Thus obtained “super unit cell” shows far richer behavior than the subobjects that compris...

  5. In vitro cultured cells as probes for space radiation effects on biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meli, A.; Perrella, G.; Curcio, F.; Ambesi-Impiombato, F.S. [Dipartimento di Patologia e Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Universita di Udine, P.le S. Maria della Misericordia, 33100 Udine (Italy)

    1999-12-06

    Near future scenarios of long-term and far-reaching manned space missions, require more extensive knowledge of all possible biological consequences of space radiation, particularly in humans, on both a long-term and a short-term basis. In vitro cultured cells have significantly contributed to the tremendous advancement of biomedical research. It is therefore to be expected that simple biological systems such as cultured cells, will contribute to space biomedical sciences. Space represents a novel environment, to which life has not been previously exposed. Both microgravity and space radiation are the two relevant components of such an environment, but biological adaptive mechanisms and efficient countermeasures can significantly minimize microgravity effects. On the other hand, it is felt that space radiation risks may be more relevant and that defensive strategies can only stem from our deeper knowledge of biological effects and of cellular repair mechanisms. Cultured cells may play a key role in such studies. Particularly, thyroid cells may be relevant because of the exquisite sensitivity of the thyroid gland to radiation. In addition, a clone of differentiated, normal thyroid follicular cells (FRTL5 cells) is available in culture, which is well characterized and particularly fit for space research.

  6. Overview of commercialization of stationary fuel cell power plants in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooie, D.T.; Williams, M.C.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper, DOE`s efforts to assist private sector organizations to develop and commercialize stationary fuel cell power plants in the United States are discussed. The paper also provides a snapshot of the status of stationary power fuel cell development occurring in the US, addressing all fuel cell types. This paper discusses general characteristics, system configurations, and status of test units and demonstration projects. The US DOE, Morgantown Energy Technology Center is the lead center for implementing DOE`s program for fuel cells for stationary power.

  7. Dielectric Behavior of Low Microwave Loss Unit Cell for All Dielectric Metamaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Tianhuan Luo; Bo Li; Qian Zhao; Ji Zhou

    2015-01-01

    With a deep study of the metamaterial, its unit cells have been widely extended from metals to dielectrics. The dielectric based unit cells attract much attention because of the advantage of easy preparation, tunability, and higher frequency response, and so forth. Using the conventional solid state method, we prepared a kind of incipient ferroelectrics (calcium titanate, CaTiO3) with higher microwave permittivity and lower loss, which can be successfully used to construct metamaterials. The ...

  8. Recent insights into the cell biology of thyroid angiofollicular units.

    OpenAIRE

    Colin, Ides M.; Denef, Jean-François; Lengelé, Benoît; Many, Marie-Christine; Gérard, Anne-Catherine

    2013-01-01

    In thyrocytes, cell polarity is of crucial importance for proper thyroid function. Many intrinsic mechanisms of self-regulation control how the key players involved in thyroid hormone (TH) biosynthesis interact in apical microvilli, so that hazardous biochemical processes may occur without detriment to the cell. In some pathological conditions, this enzymatic complex is disrupted, with some components abnormally activated into the cytoplasm, which can lead to further morphological and functio...

  9. Investigation of a catalytic gas generator for the Space Shuttle APU. [hydrazine Auxiliary Propulsion Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, D. L.; Huxtable, D. D.; Blevins, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to establish the capability of a monopropellant hydrazine catalytic gas generator to meet the requirements specified for the Space Shuttle APU. Detailed analytical and experimental studies were conducted on potential problem areas including long-term nitriding effects on materials, design variables affecting catalyst life, vehicle vibration effects, and catalyst oxidation/contamination. A full-scale gas generator, designed to operate at a chamber pressure of 750 psia and a flow rate of 0.36 lbm/sec, was fabricated and subjected to three separate life test series. The objective of the first test series was to demonstrate the capability of the gas generator to successfully complete 20 simulated Space Shuttle missions in steady-state operation. The gas generator was then refurbished and subjected to a second series of tests to demonstrate the pulse-mode capability of the gas generator during 20 simulated missions. The third series of tests was conducted with a refurbished reactor to further demonstrate pulse-mode capability with a modified catalyst bed.

  10. Review, Analyses and Recommendations Related to Modern International Use of Nuclear Space Technologies with Focus on United States and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T.

    The current Administration under President Barack Obama has given NASA a new directive in manned spaceflight. Instead of building a fleet of Ares rockets with various load specifications to deliver astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) and return them to the Moon, the 2011 NASA Strategic Plan [1] states that NASA will develop ``integrated architecture and capabilities for safe crewed and cargo missions beyond Low Earth Orbit.'' The technologies developed within this architecture will take astronauts beyond the Moon, to destinations such as Mars or asteroids and will most likely require the use of Nuclear Space Technologies (NSTs).While there are other proposals for novel power generation and propulsion, such as fusion technology, these technologies are immature and it may be decades before they have demonstrated feasibility; in contrast NSTs are readily available, proven to work in space, and flight qualified. However, NSTs such as nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) may or may not reach completion - especially with the lack of a mission in which they may be developed. Prospects and progress in current NST projects, ranging from power sources to propulsion units, are explored within this study, mainly in the United States, with an overview of projects occurring in other countries. At the end of the study, recommendations are made in order to address budget and political realities, aerospace export control and nuclear non-proliferation programs, and international issues and potentials as related to NSTs. While this report is not fully comprehensive, the selection of chosen projects illustrates a range of issues for NSTs. Secondly, the reader would be keen to make a distinction between technologies that have flown in the past, projects that have been tested and developed yet not flown, and concepts that have not yet reached the bench for testing.

  11. Dominant unit CD34+ cell dose predicts engraftment after double-unit cord blood transplantation and is influenced by bank practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtill, Duncan; Smith, Katherine; Devlin, Sean; Meagher, Richard; Tonon, Joann; Lubin, Marissa; Ponce, Doris M; Giralt, Sergio; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Stevens, Cladd E; Barker, Juliet N

    2014-11-06

    We investigated the unit characteristics associated with engraftment after double-unit cord blood (CB) transplantation (dCBT) and whether these could be reliably identified during unit selection. Cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraftment in 129 myeloablative dCBT recipients was 95% (95% confidence interval: 90-98%). When precryopreservation characteristics were analyzed, the dominant unit CD34(+) cell dose was the only characteristic independently associated with engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.43; P = .002). When postthaw characteristics were also included, only dominant unit infused viable CD34(+) cell dose independently predicted engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.95; P banks were more likely to have low recovery (P banks and units with cryovolumes other than 24.5 to 26.0 mL were more likely to have poor postthaw viability. Precryopreservation CD34(+) cell dose and banking practices should be incorporated into CB unit selection.

  12. Acceleration of a Particle-in-Cell Code for Space Plasma Simulations with OpenACC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Vaivads, Andris; Vencels, Juris; Deca, Jan; Lapenta, Giovanni; Hart, Alistair; Laure, Erwin

    2015-04-01

    We simulate space plasmas with the Particle-in-cell (PIC) method that uses computational particles to mimic electrons and protons in solar wind and in Earth magnetosphere. The magnetic and electric fields are computed by solving the Maxwell's equations on a computational grid. In each PIC simulation step, there are four major phases: interpolation of fields to particles, updating the location and velocity of each particle, interpolation of particles to grids and solving the Maxwell's equations on the grid. We use the iPIC3D code, which was implemented in C++, using both MPI and OpenMP, for our case study. By November 2014, heterogeneous systems using hardware accelerators such as Graphics Processing Unit (GPUs) and the Many Integrated Core (MIC) coprocessors for high performance computing continue growth in the top 500 most powerful supercomputers world wide. Scientific applications for numerical simulations need to adapt to using accelerators to achieve portability and scalability in the coming exascale systems. In our work, we conduct a case study of using OpenACC to offload the computation intensive parts: particle mover and interpolation of particles to grids, in a massively parallel Particle-in-Cell simulation code, iPIC3D, to multi-GPU systems. We use MPI for inter-node communication for halo exchange and communicating particles. We identify the most promising parts suitable for GPUs accelerator by profiling using CrayPAT. We implemented manual deep copy to address the challenges of porting C++ classes to GPU. We document the necessary changes in the exiting algorithms to adapt for GPU computation. We present the challenges and findings as well as our methodology for porting a Particle-in-Cell code to multi-GPU systems using OpenACC. In this work, we will present the challenges, findings and our methodology of porting a Particle-in-Cell code for space applications as follows: We profile the iPIC3D code by Cray Performance Analysis Tool (CrayPAT) and identify

  13. Low-Profile, Corner Light Collections For Cropped Space Solar Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CropGlass is adhered to the top of CIC coverglass in the crops and overlapping a small area of the cell. Light enters through the top of CropGlass and is reflected...

  14. High Efficiency Quantum Dot III-V Thermophotovoltaic Cell for Space Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Quantum dots are nanoscale materials that have already improved the performance of optical sensors, lasers, light emitting diodes and solar cells. The unique...

  15. Fuel cell repeater unit including frame and separator plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanis, Jean; Hawkes, Justin R; Chiapetta, Jr., Louis; Bird, Connie E; Sun, Ellen Y; Croteau, Paul F

    2013-11-05

    An example fuel cell repeater includes a separator plate and a frame establishing at least a portion of a flow path that is operative to communicate fuel to or from at least one fuel cell held by the frame relative to the separator plate. The flow path has a perimeter and any fuel within the perimeter flow across the at least one fuel cell in a first direction. The separator plate, the frame, or both establish at least one conduit positioned outside the flow path perimeter. The conduit is outside of the flow path perimeter and is configured to direct flow in a second, different direction. The conduit is fluidly coupled with the flow path.

  16. High hydrogen production rate of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with reduced electrode spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-02-01

    Practical applications of microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) require high hydrogen production rates and a compact reactor. These goals can be achieved by reducing electrode spacing but high surface area anodes are needed. The brush anode MEC with electrode spacing of 2 cm had a higher hydrogen production rate and energy efficiency than an MEC with a flat cathode and a 1-cm electrode spacing. The maximum hydrogen production rate with a 2 cm electrode spacing was 17.8 m(3)/m(3)d at an applied voltage of E(ap)=1 V. Reducing electrode spacing increased hydrogen production rates at the lower applied voltages, but not at the higher (>0.6 V) applied voltages. These results demonstrate that reducing electrode spacing can increase hydrogen production rate, but that the closest electrode spacing do not necessarily produce the highest possible hydrogen production rates.

  17. [The art of uniting time and space: Fernand Braudel, geohistory and the long run].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the concept of geohistory, as developed by the French historian Fernand Braudel in his text "Géohistoire: la société, l'espace et le temps", written while he was imprisoned during the Second World War. The concept expresses his criticism of the boundaries of academic disciplines, and the importance of geography in the construction of his long-term history. Inspired both by the study of relations between society and environment based on the work of French geographers, and by the triangular link of space-economy-society of German geographers, Braudel's geohistory presents an approach more consistent and more complex than Lucien Febvre's theses found in The earth and human evolution: e geographical introduction to history.

  18. InP concentrator solar cells for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, J. S.; Wanlass, M. W.; Coutts, T. J.; Emery, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and characterization of high-performance, n(+)/p InP shallow-homojunction (SHJ) concentrator solar cells is described. The InP device structures were grown by atmospheric-pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (APMOVPE). A preliminary assessment of the effects of grid collection distance and emitter sheet resistance on cell performance is presented. At concentration ratios of over 100, cells with AM0 efficiencies in excess of 21 percent at 25 C and 19 percent at 80 C are reported. These results indicate that high-efficiency InP concentrator cells can be fabricated using existing technologies. The performance of these cells as a function of temperature is discussed, and areas for future improvement are outlined.

  19. Evaluation of the pneumatic tube system for transportation of packed red cell units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Dhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pneumatic tube system (PTS is commonly used in hospital settings to transport blood samples to diagnostic laboratories. At our blood center, we receive blood requisitions via the PTS, but units are carried to the ward by human courier. Recently we considered using the PTS for transporting blood units. Since, there are reports of hemolysis in blood samples sent through the PTS, we evaluated this system for transporting red cell units. Aims: The aim was to assess the effect of PTS transport on the quality of packed red cell units. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 red blood cells units (RBC, (25 non-irradiated and 25 irradiated were subjected to transportation through the PTS. The control arm in the study was age-matched RBC units not subjected to PTS transport. Each RBC unit was evaluated for hemoglobin (Hb, lactate dehydrogenase, potassium and plasma hemoglobin (Hb. The paired t-test was used to compare these parameters, and the P value was calculated. Results and Conclusion: The percentage of hemolysis after transportation through PTS was below the recommended guidelines. Delivery of the blood unit to the wrong station, bags lying unattended at the destination were few of the problems that had to be addressed. To conclude, though the PTS is a safe means of transporting blood products with reduction in the turn-around-time, it must be validated before use.

  20. Space-Time Unit-Level EBLUP for Large Data Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Aló Michele

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Most important large-scale surveys carried out by national statistical institutes are the repeated survey type, typically intended to produce estimates for several parameters of the whole population, as well as parameters related to some subpopulations. Small area estimation techniques are becoming more and more important for the production of official statistics where direct estimators are not able to produce reliable estimates. In order to exploit data from different survey cycles, unit-level linear mixed models with area and time random effects can be considered. However, the large amount of data to be processed may cause computational problems. To overcome the computational issues, a reformulation of predictors and the correspondent mean cross product estimator is given. The R code based on the new formulation enables the elaboration of about 7.2 millions of data records in a matter of minutes.

  1. Payload influences on technology development and utilization of the Space Shuttle extravehicular mobility unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, J. W.; Kraly, E. F.

    1976-01-01

    Historical EVA approaches are examined. The considered data emphasize the overall importance of EVA for Shuttle payload operations. Twenty requirement categories related to crew protection, crew performance, and payload protection are listed in a table. Attention is given to a preliminary assessment of payload related requirements, an evaluation of the natural thermal environment in the case of the Shuttle orbiter bay, and the ability of the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) to protect the crewman from induced or natural radiation as found in the Van Allen radiation belt South Atlantic anomaly. On the basis of the evaluation it appears very likely that design improvements alone can make the EMU meet payload requirements without requiring significant technology advances.

  2. Control of an afterburner in a diesel fuel cell power unit under variable load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolanc, Gregor; Pregelj, Boštjan; Petrovčič, Janko; Samsun, Remzi Can

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the control system for a catalytic afterburner in a diesel fuel cell auxiliary power unit is presented. The catalytic afterburner is used to burn the non-utilised hydrogen and other possible combustible components of the fuel cell anode off-gas. To increase the energy efficiency of the auxiliary power unit, the thermal energy released in the catalytic afterburner is utilised to generate the steam for the fuel processor. For optimal operation of the power unit in all modes of operation including load change, stable steam generation is required and overall energy balance must be kept within design range. To achieve this, the reaction temperature of the catalytic afterburner must be stable in all modes of operation. Therefore, we propose the afterburner temperature control based on mass and thermal balances. Finally, we demonstrate the control system using the existing prototype of the diesel fuel cell auxiliary power unit.

  3. Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Nekovee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive radio is being intensively researched as the enabling technology for license-exempt access to the so-called TV White Spaces (TVWS, large portions of spectrum in the UHF/VHF bands which become available on a geographical basis after digital switchover. Both in the US, and more recently, in the UK the regulators have given conditional endorsement to this new mode of access. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in technology, regulation, and standardisation of cognitive access to TVWS. It examines the spectrum opportunity and commercial use cases associated with this form of secondary access.

  4. Efficiency of the unit cell in rectangular finned tube arrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzzoni, Luca; Dall' Olio, Roberto; Spiga, Marco [Bologna Univ., DIENCA, Bologna (Italy)

    1999-11-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting an investigation concerning the efficiency of the single unit in finned air-cooled heat exchangers with staggered and in-line bundles of rectangular ducts, where a hot process fluid flows inside extended-surface tubes and atmospheric air is circulated outside, over the extended surface. The differential energy equation is numerically solved by a finite difference technique, in order to determine the spatial temperature profiles, then the fin efficiency and the augmentation factor are calculated by a simple numerical integration. The results show that the temperature distribution and the fin performance depend on four dimensionless parameters (m,{beta},p{sub x},p{sub y}), the first accounting for the heat transfer condition, the other ones accounting for the geometry of the extended surface (tube aspect ratio and pitches). Several tables are presented, allowing the efficiency of the extended surface to be deduced as a function of the thermal and geometric parameters. (Author)

  5. Quantification of Cell-Free DNA in Red Blood Cell Units in Different Whole Blood Processing Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Shih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Whole blood donations in Canada are processed by either the red cell filtration (RCF or whole blood filtration (WBF methods, where leukoreduction is potentially delayed in WBF. Fresh WBF red blood cells (RBCs have been associated with increased in-hospital mortality after transfusion. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA is released by neutrophils prior to leukoreduction, degraded during RBC storage, and is associated with adverse patient outcomes. We explored cfDNA levels in RBCs prepared by RCF and WBF and different storage durations. Methods. Equal numbers of fresh (stored ≤14 days and older RBCs were sampled. cfDNA was quantified by spectrophotometry and PicoGreen. Separate regression models determined the association with processing method and storage duration and their interaction on cfDNA. Results. cfDNA in 120 RBC units (73 RCF, 47 WBF were measured. Using PicoGreen, WBF units overall had higher cfDNA than RCF units (p=0.0010; fresh WBF units had higher cfDNA than fresh RCF units (p=0.0093. Using spectrophotometry, fresh RBC units overall had higher cfDNA than older units (p=0.0031; fresh WBF RBCs had higher cfDNA than older RCF RBCs (p=0.024. Conclusion. Higher cfDNA in fresh WBF was observed compared to older RCF blood. Further study is required for association with patient outcomes.

  6. Evaluation of thin-film solar cell temperature coefficients for space applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Simon H.; Simburger, Edward J.; Matsumoto, James; Garcia, Alexander; Ross, Jasen; Nocerino, John [Aerospace Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    At present, commercially available thin-film photovoltaic cells are evaluated for terrestrial applications. To apply thin-film photovoltaic cells for space applications, the assessment of the solar cell performance must be conducted in simulated space conditions. We investigated the temperature coefficients of the I-V characteristics of thin-film amorphous silicon (a-Si) solar cells manufactured by Uni-Solar and Iowa Thin Film Technologies, and CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells manufactured by MicroSat Systems with simulated space solar radiation. The temperature coefficient of the thin-film solar cells between temperatures of 15 and 100 deg C was measured with a temperature-controlled vacuum plate. The vacuum plate ensures maximum thermal contact between the plate and the solar cell as well as reducing the thermal gradient in the solar cell. The vacuum plate also serves as a thermal reservoir that provides temperature stability during the performance evaluation when the solar cell is exposed to simulated sunlight radiation. An X-25 sunlight simulator calibrated for AMO conditions provides the necessary radiation in performance characterization of the thin-film solar cell. The I-V characteristics of the solar cell were obtained at various temperatures to gain a thorough knowledge of the cell's performance at different temperatures. (Author)

  7. High performance internal reforming unit for high temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiwen; Venkataraman, Ramakrishnan; Novacco, Lawrence J.

    2008-10-07

    A fuel reformer having an enclosure with first and second opposing surfaces, a sidewall connecting the first and second opposing surfaces and an inlet port and an outlet port in the sidewall. A plate assembly supporting a catalyst and baffles are also disposed in the enclosure. A main baffle extends into the enclosure from a point of the sidewall between the inlet and outlet ports. The main baffle cooperates with the enclosure and the plate assembly to establish a path for the flow of fuel gas through the reformer from the inlet port to the outlet port. At least a first directing baffle extends in the enclosure from one of the sidewall and the main baffle and cooperates with the plate assembly and the enclosure to alter the gas flow path. Desired graded catalyst loading pattern has been defined for optimized thermal management for the internal reforming high temperature fuel cells so as to achieve high cell performance.

  8. A review of indium phosphide space solar cell fabrication technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, M. B.; Dingle, B.; Dingle, J.; Morrison, R.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the status of InP cell efficiency and of approaches to the reduction of cell cost is presented. The use of heteroepitaxial techniques such as InP-on-GaAs and InP-on-Si is discussed along with the use of chemical and mechanical techniques for removal and recovery of the substrate. The efficiency ultimately obtainable with designs made possible by such an approach is calculated.

  9. High Specific Energy Lithium Cells for Space Exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farmakis F.

    2017-01-01

    The developed and tested prototype cells exhibited energy density of around 208 Wh/Kg at room temperature under C/10 charge-discharge rate within voltage range of 2.8 V and 4.1 V. Moreover, the prototype cells could retain and deliver more than 75% of their capacity at room temperature upon cycling at −40 °C, demonstrating an energy density of 140 Wh/kg.

  10. Review of solar cell temperature coefficients for space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Energy conversion efficiency is an important parameter for solar cells, and well reported in the literature. However, solar cells heat up in sunlight, and the efficiency decreases. The temperature coefficient of the conversion efficiency is thus also extremely important, especially in mission modeling, but is much less well reported. It is of value to have a table which compiles into a single document values of temperature coefficients reported in the literature. In addition to modeling performance of solar cells in Earth orbit, where operating temperatures may range from about 20 C to as high as 85 C, it is of interest to model solar cells for several other recently proposed missions. These include use for the surface of Mars, for solar electric propulsion missions that may range from Venus to the Asteroid belt, and for laser-photovoltaic power that may involve laser intensities equivalent several suns. For all of these applications, variations in operating temperature away from the nominal test conditions result in significant changes in operating performance. In general the efficiency change with temperature is non-linear, however, in the range from negative 100 C through room temperature to a few hundred degrees C, efficiency is usually quite well modeled as a linear function of temperature (except for a few unusual cell types, such as amorphous silicon, and for extremely low bandgap cells, such as InGaAs).

  11. Transient Gene and miRNA Expression Profile Changes of Confluent Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao; Wong, Michael; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity or an altered gravity environment from the static 1 gravitational constant has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells. However, most of the reported studies conducted in space or using simulated microgravity on the ground have focused on the growth or differentiation of the cells. Whether non-dividing cultured cells will sense the presence of microgravity in space has not been specifically addressed. In an experiment conducted on the International Space Station, confluent human fibroblast cells were fixed after being cultured in space for 3 and 14 days for investigations of gene and miRNA (microRNA) expression profile changes in these cells. A fibroblast is a type of cell that synthesizes the extracellular matrix and collagen, the structural framework for tissues, and plays a critical role in wound healing and other functions. Results of the experiment showed that on Day 3, both the flown and ground cells were still proliferating slowly even though they were confluent, as measured by the expression of the protein Ki-67 positive cells, and the cells in space grew slightly faster. Gene and miRNA expression data indicated activation of NF(sub kappa)B (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) and other growth related pathways involving HGF and VEGF in the flown cells. On Day 14 when the cells were mostly non-dividing, the gene and miRNA expression profiles between the flight and ground samples were indistinguishable. Comparison of gene and miRNA expressions in the Day 3 samples in respect to Day 14 revealed that most of the changes observed on Day 3 were related to cell growth for both the flown and ground cells. Analysis of cytoskeleton changes by immunohistochemistry staining of the cells with antibodies for alpha-tubulin showed no difference between the flight and ground samples. Results of our study suggest that in true non-dividing human fibroblast cells, microgravity in

  12. Fuel Efficient Strategies for Reducing Contrail Formations in United States Air Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Banavar; Chen, Neil Y.; Ng, Hok K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a class of strategies for reducing persistent contrail formation in the United States airspace. The primary objective is to minimize potential contrail formation regions by altering the aircraft's cruising altitude in a fuel-efficient way. The results show that the contrail formations can be reduced significantly without extra fuel consumption and without adversely affecting congestion in the airspace. The contrail formations can be further reduced by using extra fuel. For the day tested, the maximal reduction strategy has a 53% contrail reduction rate. The most fuel-efficient strategy has an 8% reduction rate with 2.86% less fuel-burnt compared to the maximal reduction strategy. Using a cost function which penalizes extra fuel consumed while maximizing the amount of contrail reduction provides a flexible way to trade off between contrail reduction and fuel consumption. It can achieve a 35% contrail reduction rate with only 0.23% extra fuel consumption. The proposed fuel-efficient contrail reduction strategy provides a solution to reduce aviation-induced environmental impact on a daily basis.

  13. Interannual variability in soil nitric oxide emissions over the United States as viewed from space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Hudman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine the interannual variability in the NO2 column over North America measured by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI in 2005–2008. By comparison to a model of soil NOx emissions driven by the North American Regional Reanalysis precipitation and 0–10 cm soil temperature fields, we show the source of this observed interannual variability over much of the central United States in June is fertilizer application. We find that dry, warm conditions followed by convective precipitation induces pulsed emissions of NOx over the agricultural Great Plains. In June 2006 we infer a 50% increase in soil NOx emission and a 30% increase in the tropospheric NO2 column relative to the June 2005–2008 mean. In a case-study of fertilized corn and soybean fields over SE South Dakota, we find an associated rain-induced pulsing event reaching 4.6×1015 molec cm−2, equivalent to a surface concentration of ~2 ppbv. We calculate that soil NOx emissions resulted in a mean daily maximum 8-h ozone enhancement over the agricultural Great Plains of 5 ppbv in June 2006 (with predicted events reaching 16 ppbv compared with a mean enhancement of 3 ppbv for soil NOx in the years 2005–2008.

  14. Interannual variability in soil nitric oxide emissions over the United States as viewed from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudman, R. C.; Russell, A. R.; Valin, L. C.; Cohen, R. C.

    2010-10-01

    We examine the interannual variability in the NO2 column over North America measured by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) in 2005-2008. By comparison to a model of soil NOx emissions driven by the North American Regional Reanalysis precipitation and 0-10 cm soil temperature fields, we show the source of this observed interannual variability over much of the central United States in June is fertilizer application. We find that dry, warm conditions followed by convective precipitation induces pulsed emissions of NOx over the agricultural Great Plains. In June 2006 we infer a 50% increase in soil NOx emission and a 30% increase in the tropospheric NO2 column relative to the June 2005-2008 mean. In a case-study of fertilized corn and soybean fields over SE South Dakota, we find an associated rain-induced pulsing event reaching 4.6×1015 molec cm-2, equivalent to a surface concentration of ~2 ppbv. We calculate that soil NOx emissions resulted in a mean daily maximum 8-h ozone enhancement over the agricultural Great Plains of 5 ppbv in June 2006 (with predicted events reaching 16 ppbv) compared with a mean enhancement of 3 ppbv for soil NOx in the years 2005-2008.

  15. Transient Gene and MicroRNA Expression Profile Changes of Confluent Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao; Wong, Michael; Wang, Xiaoyu; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Story, Michael; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Microgravity, or an altered gravity environment from the Earth1g, has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells. However, most of the reported studies conducted in space or using simulated microgravity on the ground have focused on the growth or differentiation of these cells. Whether non-proliferating cultured cells will sense the presence of microgravity in space has not been specifically addressed. In an experiment conducted onboard the International Space Station (ISS), confluent human fibroblast cells were fixed after being cultured in space for 3 and 14 days, respectively, for investigations of gene and miRNA expression profile changes in these cells. Results of the experiment showed that on Day 3, both the flown and ground cells were still proliferating slowly, as measured by the percentage of Ki-67 positive cells. Gene and miRNA expression data indicated activation of NF(kappa)B and other growth related pathways involving HGF and Vegf along with down regulation of the Let-7 miRNA family. On Day 14 when the cells were mostly non-proliferating, the gene and miRNA expression profiles between the flight and ground samples were indistinguishable. Comparison of gene and miRNA expressions in the Day 3 samples with respect to Day 14 revealed that most of the changes observed on Day 3 were related to cell growth for both the flown and ground cells. Analysis of cytoskeletal changes via immunohistochemistry staining of the cells with antibodies for alpha-tubulin and fibronectin showed no difference between flown and ground samples. Taken together, our study suggests that in true non-dividing human fibroblast cells in culture, microgravity experienced in space has little effect on the gene and miRNA expression profiles.

  16. Transient gene and microRNA expression profile changes of confluent human fibroblast cells in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Honglu; Story, Michael; Karouia, Fathi; Stodieck, Louis; Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Microgravity, or an altered gravity environment from the Earth1g, has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells. However, most of the reported studies conducted in space or using simulated microgravity on the ground have focused on the growth or differentiation of these cells. Whether non-proliferating cultured cells will sense the presence of microgravity in space has not been specifically addressed. In an experiment conducted onboard the International Space Station (ISS), confluent human fibroblast cells were fixed after being cultured in space for 3 and 14 days, respectively, for investigations of gene and miRNA expression profile changes in these cells. Results of the experiment showed that on Day 3, both the flown and ground cells were still proliferating slowly, as measured by the percentage of Ki-67 positive cells. Gene and miRNA expression data indicated activation of NFkB and other growth related pathways involving HGF and Vegf along with down regulation of the Let-7 miRNA family. On Day 14 when the cells were mostly non-proliferating, the gene and miRNA expression profiles between the flight and ground samples were indistinguishable. Comparison of gene and miRNA expressions in the Day 3 samples with respect to Day 14 revealed that most of the changes observed on Day 3 were related to cell growth for both the flown and ground cells. Analysis of cytoskeletal changes via immunohistochemistry staining of the cells with antibodies for αa-tubulin and fibronectin showed no difference between flown and ground samples. Taken together, our study suggests that in true non-dividing human fibroblast cells in culture, microgravity experienced in space has little effect on the gene and miRNA expression profiles.

  17. Xenotransplantation of Human Neural Progenitor Cells to the Subretinal Space of Nonimmunosuppressed Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Warfvinge

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the feasibility of transplanting human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs to the retina of nonimmunosuppressed pigs, cultured hNPCs were injected into the subretinal space of 5 adult pigs after laser burns were applied to promote donor cell integration. Postoperatively, the retinal vessels appeared normal without signs of exudation, bleeding, or subretinal elevation. Eyes were harvested at 10–28 days. H&E consistently showed mild retinal vasculitis, depigmentation of the RPE, and marked mononuclear cell infiltrate in the choroid adjacent to the site of transplantation. Human-specific antibodies revealed donor cells in the subretinal space at 10–13 days and smaller numbers within the retina on days 12 and 13, with evidence suggesting a limited degree of morphological integration; however, no cells remained at 4 weeks. The strong mononuclear cell reaction and loss of donor cells indicate that modulation of host immunity is likely necessary for prolonged xenograft survival in this model.

  18. The Daniell cell, Ohm's law, and the emergence of the International System of Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayson, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    Telegraphy originated in the 1830s and 40 s and flourished in the following decades but with a patchwork of electrical standards. Electromotive force was for the most part measured in units of the predominant Daniell cell, but each telegraphy company had their own resistance standard. In 1862, the British Association for the Advancement of Science formed a committee to address this situation. By 1873, they had given definition to the electromagnetic system of units (emu) and defined the practical units of the ohm as 109 emu units of resistance and the volt as 108 emu units of electromotive force. These recommendations were ratified and expanded upon in a series of international congresses held between 1881 and 1904. A proposal by Giovanni Giorgi in 1901 took advantage of a coincidence between the conversion of the units of energy in the emu system (the erg) and in the practical system (the Joule). As it was, the same conversion factor existed between the cgs based emu system and a theretofore undefined MKS system. By introducing another unit X (where X could be any of the practical electrical units), Giorgi demonstrated that a self-consistent MKSX system was tenable without the need for multiplying factors. Ultimately, the ampere was selected as the fourth unit. It took nearly 60 years, but in 1960, Giorgi's proposal was incorporated as the core of the newly inaugurated International System of Units (SI). This article surveys the physics, physicists, and events that contributed to those developments.

  19. Annihilating time and space: The electrification of the United States Army, 1875--1920

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shannon Allen

    2000-10-01

    The United States Army embraced electrical technology in the 1870s as part of a wider initiative to meet the challenge of the coastal defense mission. As commercial power storage, generation, and transmission technology improved and the army came to recognize the value of the energy source as a means and method of improving command and control, localized electrical networks were integrated into the active service of the military. New vulnerabilities emerged as the army became ever more reliant upon electric power, however, and electrification---the institutional adoption and adaptation of electrical technologies---emerged as a very expensive and contentious process guided by technical, political, and economic pressures, and influenced by conflicting personalities within the service. This study considers the institutional evolution of the U.S. Army before and during World War I with respect to the adoption and application of electrical technology. The changing relationships between the military and electrical manufacturing and utilities industries during the period 1875--1920 are also explored. Using a combination of military archival sources and published primary materials, this study traces the effects of electrification on the army. In the end, this study proves that electrification was, at first, a symptom of, and later, a partial solution to the army's struggle to modernize and centralize during the period under consideration. Electrification produced a set of conditions that encouraged a new maturity within the ranks of the army, in technical, doctrinal, and administrative terms. This growth eventually led to the development of new capabilities, new forms of military organization, new missions, and new approaches to warfare.

  20. [THE MODEL OF NEUROVASCULAR UNIT IN VITRO CONSISTING OF THREE CELLS TYPES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khilazheva, E D; Boytsova, E B; Pozhilenkova, E A; Solonchuk, Yu R; Salmina, A B

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to model blood brain barrier and neurovascular unit in vitro. All existing models have their disadvantages, advantages and some peculiarities of preparation and usage. We obtained the three-cells neurovascular unit model in vitro using progenitor cells isolated from the rat embryos brain (Wistar, 14-16 d). After withdrawal of the progenitor cells the neurospheres were cultured with subsequent differentiation into astrocytes and neurons. Endothelial cells were isolated from embryonic brain too. During the differentiation of progenitor cells the astrocytes monolayer formation occurs after 7-9 d, neurons monolayer--after 10-14 d, endothelial cells monolayer--after 7 d. Our protocol for simultaneous isolation and cultivation of neurons, astrocytes and endothelial cells reduces the time needed to obtain neurovascular unit model in vitro, consisting of three cells types and reduce the number of animals used. It is also important to note the cerebral origin of all cell types, which is also an advantage of our model in vitro.

  1. The 100 kW space station. [regenerative fuel cells and nickel hydrogen and nickel cadmium batteries for solar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckhann, G.

    1977-01-01

    Solar array power systems for the space construction base are discussed. Nickel cadmium and nickel hydrogen batteries are equally attractive relative to regenerative fuel cell systems at 5 years life. Further evaluation of energy storage system life (low orbit conditions) is required. Shuttle and solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell technology appears adequate; large units (approximately four times shuttle) are most appropriate and should be studied for a 100 KWe SCB system. A conservative NiH2 battery DOD (18.6%) was elected due to lack of test data and offers considerable improvement potential. Multiorbit load averaging and reserve capacity requirements limit nominal DOD to 30% to 50% maximum, independent of life considerations.

  2. Xenotransplantation of human neural progenitor cells to the subretinal space of nonimmunosuppressed pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Schwartz, Philip H; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke;

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of transplanting human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) to the retina of nonimmunosuppressed pigs, cultured hNPCs were injected into the subretinal space of 5 adult pigs after laser burns were applied to promote donor cell integration. Postoperatively, the retinal ve...... that modulation of host immunity is likely necessary for prolonged xenograft survival in this model....

  3. Importance of unit cells in accurate evaluation of the characteristics of graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabzyan, Hassan; Sadeghpour, Narges [Isfahan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-08-01

    Effects of the size of the unit cell on energy, atomic charges, and phonon frequencies of graphene at the Γ point of the Brillouin zone are studied in the absence and presence of an electric field using density functional theory (DFT) methods (LDA and DFT-PBE functionals with Goedecker-Teter-Hutter (GTH) and Troullier-Martins (TM) norm-conserving pseudopotentials). Two types of unit cells containing n{sub c}=4-28 carbon atoms are considered. Results show that stability of graphene increases with increasing size of the unit cell. Energy, atomic charges, and phonon frequencies all converge above n{sub c}=24 for all functional-pseudopotentials used. Except for the LDA-GTH calculations, application of an electric field of 0.4 and 0.9 V/nm strengths does not change the trends with the size of the unit cell but instead slightly decreases the binding energy of graphene. Results of this study show that the choice of unit cell size and type is critical for calculation of reliable characteristics of graphene.

  4. New photosensitizer with phenylenebisthiophene central unit and cyanovinylene 4-nitrophenyl terminal units for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikroyannidis, J.A., E-mail: mikroyan@chemistry.upatras.gr [Chemical Technology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, GR-26500 Patras (Greece); Suresh, P. [Physics Department, Molecular Electronic and Optoelectronic Device Laboratory, JNV University, Jodhpur (Raj.) 342005 (India); Roy, M.S. [Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (Raj.) 342011 (India); Sharma, G.D., E-mail: sharmagd_in@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Molecular Electronic and Optoelectronic Device Laboratory, JNV University, Jodhpur (Raj.) 342005 (India); R and D Centre for Engineering and Science, Jaipur Engineering College, Kukas, Jaipur (Raj.) (India)

    2011-06-30

    Graphical abstract: A novel dye D was synthesized and used as photosensitizer for quasi solid state dye-sensitized solar cells. A power conversion efficiency of 4.4% was obtained which was improved to 5.52% when diphenylphosphinic acid (DPPA) was added as coadsorbent. Display Omitted Highlights: > A new low band gap photosensitizer with cyanovinylene 4-nitrophenyl terminal units was synthesized. > A power conversion efficiency of 4.4% was obtained for the dye-sensitized solar cell based on this photosensitizer. > The power conversion efficiency of the dye-sensitized solar cell was further improved to 5.52% when diphenylphosphinic acid was added as coadsorbent. - Abstract: A new low band gap photosensitizer, D, which contains 2,2'-(1,4-phenylene) bisthiophene central unit and cyanovinylene 4-nitrophenyl terminal units at both sides was synthesized. The two carboxyls attached to the 2,5-positions of the phenylene ring act as anchoring groups. Dye D was soluble in common organic solvents, showed long-wavelength absorption maximum at 620-636 nm and optical band gap of 1.72 eV. The electrochemical parameters, i.e. the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) (-5.1 eV) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) (-3.3 eV) energy levels of D show that this dye is suitable as molecular sensitizer. The quasi solid state dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) based on D shows a short circuit current (J{sub sc}) of 9.95 mA/cm{sup 2}, an open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 0.70 V, and a fill factor (FF) of 0.64 corresponding to an overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.40% under 100 mW/cm{sup 2} irradiation. The overall PCE has been further improved to 5.52% when diphenylphosphinic acid (DPPA) coadsorbent is incorporated into the D solution. This increased PCE has been attributed to the enhancement in the electron lifetime and reduced recombination of injected electrons with the iodide ions present in the electrolyte with the use of DPPA as coadsorbant. The

  5. Passivating Window/First Layer AR Coating for Space Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Bailey, S. G.; Flood, D. J.; Brinker, D. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Wheeler, D. R.; Matesscu, G.; Goradia, C.; Goradia, M.

    2004-01-01

    Chemically grown oxides, if well designed, offer excellent surface passivation of the emitter surface of space solar cells and can be used as effective passivating window/first layer AR coating. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of using a simple room temperature wet chemical technique to grow cost effective passivating layers on solar cell front surfaces after the front grid metallization step. These passivating layers can be grown both on planar and porous surfaces. Our results show that these oxide layers: (i) can effectively passivate the from the surface, (ii) can serve as an effective optical window/first layer AR coating, (iii) are chemically, thermally and UV stable, and (iv) have the potential of improving the BOL and especially the EOL efficiency of space solar cells. The potential of using this concept to simplify the III-V based space cell heterostructures while increasing their BOL and EOL efficiency is also discussed.

  6. Workshop on "What do you need to know about doing cell biology experiments in space?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    The "What do you need to know about doing cell biology experiments in space?" workshop represented a continued international collaboration between cell culture hardware developers and scientists, partly due to the enhanced collaboration in space life sciences spurred on by the International Space Life Sciences Working Group. The workshop was organized into three sessions. The first session provided an overview of the general effects of space flight, including definition of the microgravity environment, the radiation environment, and issues surrounding mass transport. The session concluded with an important overview of using space centrifuges as Earth gravity (1-g) controls, including understanding the contribution of inertial shear forces. The second session described existing and planned hardware facilities developed to support cell culture research, ranging from small hand-held hardware to breadbox-sized Shuttle middeck hardware to complete facility racks. Hardware designed for use on the Shuttle, ISS, and in free flyers was described. The third session provided advice from experienced space flight cell biology principal investigators to new investigators in the field. This special issue of the Journal of Gravitational Physiology includes externally peer-reviewed papers from all three sessions.

  7. Prediction of stress-strain behavior of ceramic matrix composites using unit cell model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the elastic modulus and the stress-strain curve of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs were predicted by using the unit cell model that consists of fiber bundles and matrix. The unit cell model was developed based on the observation of cross sections of CMCs. The elastic modulus of CMCs was calculated from the results of finite element analysis using the developed model. The non-linear behavior of stress-strain curve of CMCs was also predicted by taking the degradation of the elastic modulus into consideration, where the degradation was related to the experimentally measured crack density in CMCs. The approach using the unit cell model was applied to two kinds of CMCs, and good agreement was obtained between the experimental and the calculated results.

  8. Reduction in potassium concentration of stored red blood cell units using a resin filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Chisa; Heitmiller, Eugenie S; Ness, Paul M; King, Karen E

    2010-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a serious complication of rapid and massive blood transfusion due to high plasma potassium (K) in stored red blood cell (RBC) units. A potassium adsorption filter (PAF) was developed in Japan to remove K by exchanging with sodium (Na). We performed an in vitro evaluation of its efficacy and feasibility of use. Three AS-3 RBC units were filtered by each PAF using gravity; 10 PAFs were tested. Blood group, age, flow rate, and irradiation status were recorded. Total volume, K, Na, Cl, Mg, total Ca (tCa), RBC count, hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), and plasma Hb were measured before and after filtering each unit. Ionized Ca (iCa), pH, and glucose were measured for some units. After filtration, the mean decrease in K was 97.5% in the first RBC unit, 91.2% in the second unit, and 64.4% in the third unit. The mean increases in Na, Mg, and tCa were 33.0, 151.4, and 116.1%, respectively. iCa and pH remained low; glucose was unchanged. RBC count, Hb, and Hct decreased slightly after filtration of first units; plasma Hb was unchanged. After filtration, there was no visual evidence of increased hemolysis or clot formation. The PAF decreased K concentration in stored AS-3 RBC units to minimal levels in the first and second RBC units. Optimally, one filter could be used for 2 RBC units. Although Na increased, the level may not be clinically significant. PAF may be useful for at-risk patients receiving older units or blood that has been stored after gamma irradiation. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  9. Naive T cell homeostasis: from awareness of space to a sense of place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Kensuke; Jameson, Stephen C

    2009-12-01

    The peripheral naive T cell pool is fairly stable in number, diversity and functional competence in the absence of vigorous immune responses. However, this apparent tranquility is not an intrinsic property of T cells but involves continuous tuning of the T cell pool composition by homeostatic signals. In the past decade, studies have revealed that naive T cells rely on combinatorial signals from self-peptide-MHC complexes and interleukin-7 for their physical and functional maintenance. Competition for these factors dictates T cell 'space'. In addition, recent studies show that these and other homeostatic factors are offered to T cells on stromal cell networks, which also serve to guide T cell trafficking in secondary lymphoid organs. Such findings suggest the importance of 'place' in the perception and integration of homeostatic cues for the maintenance and functional tuning of the naive T cell pool.

  10. Interdigitated back contact silicon solar cell analysis and design recommendations for space use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, Dean C.; Froedge, Sharon L.

    1989-09-01

    The Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) solar cell is a relatively new design which has shown unprecedentedly high efficiencies. Silicon Interdigitated Back Contact cells have been fabricated that show greater than 25 percent efficiency at 100 suns Air Mass 1.5. This is far superior to conventional silicon concentrator cells which are approximately 18 percent efficient. The purpose of this report is to describe briefly the differences between this technology and conventional cells, demonstrate a near optimum design achieved by two-dimensional numerical simulation, and assess the utility of these cells for space application. The end of life (EOL) performance of this cell design in the radiation environment of space is a critical issue since the high efficiency of the design is predicated on the use of very high quality, long-diffusion length silicon. The radiation-induced degradation of this material is expected to lead to severe efficiency losses. The optimization of cell design to minimize these losses was carried out using a modified version of the two-dimensional PISCES semiconductor simulator. The final designs presented here show that the performance of IBC cells in space can significantly exceed that of conventional cells.

  11. Recent Progress Towards Space Applications Of Thin Film Solar Cells- The German Joint Project 'Flexible CIGSE Thin Film Solar Cells For Space Flight' And OOV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Sebastian; Zajac, Kai; Nadler, Michael; Seifart, Klaus; Kaufmann, Christian A.; Caballero, Raquel; Schock, Hans-Werner; Hartmann, Lars; Otte, Karten; Rahm, Andreas; Scheit, Christian; Zachmann, Hendrick; Kessler, Friedrich; Wurz, Roland; Schulke, Peter

    2011-10-01

    A group of partners from an academic and industrial background are developing a flexible Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) thin film solar cell technology on a polyimide substrate that aims to be a future alternative to current rigid solar cell technologies for space applications. In particular on missions with high radiation volumes, the superior tolerance of chalcopyrite based thin film solar cell (TFSC) technologies with respect to electron and proton radiation, when compared to the established Si- or III-V based technologies, can be advantageous. Of all thin film technologies, those based on CIGSe have the highest potential to reach attractive photovoltaic conversion efficiencies and combine these with low weight in order to realize high power densities on solar cell and generator level. The use of a flexible substrate ensures a high packing density. A working demonstrator is scheduled for flight this year.

  12. High light-extraction-efficiency OLED based on photonic crystal slab structures with taper unit cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Rong-jin; WANG Qing-kang

    2006-01-01

    To improve the light-extraction-efficiency of OLED,we introduced PCS (Photonic Crystal Slab) structures into the interface of ITO layer and glass substrate.PCS structures with Taper unit cells are proved to be effective in reducing the energy of guided wave trapped in high refractive index material,and an increase of light-extraction-efficiency to 95.26% is gained.This enhancement is much greater than the traditional PCS with cylinder unit cells (60%-70%).Physical mechanisms of light-extraction-efficiency enhancement in these structures are further discussed.

  13. Myoepithelial Cell-Rich Pleormorphic Adenoma of Minor Salivary Gland of Parapharyngeal Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Digvijay Singh Rawat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parapharyngeal space tumors are rare and constitute only 0.5–1.0% of head and neck tumors. Minor salivary gland tumor is still rare in parapharyngeal space. We are reporting a case of pleomorphic adenoma of minor salivary gland of parapharyngeal space. A 42-year-old female presented with a history of mass in the oropharynx for 3 years. She presented with “hot potato voice” and dysphagia. CECT and MRI were done, showing large parapharyngeal space tumor. FNAC was suspicious for tumor of nerve cell origin. Tumor was excised using “paramedian mandibulotomy with mandibular swing approach”. Histopathological examination was inconclusive, suggesting possibility of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, solitary fibrous tumor, neurogenic tumor. On immunohistochemistry, tumor was positive for cytokeratin, EMA (dim, S-100, and P 63 and negative for SMA thus proving the case as myoepithelial cell-rich pleomorphic adenoma.

  14. Investigation of IrO2/Pt Electrocatalysts in Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Baglio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available IrO2/Pt catalysts (at different concentrations were synthesized by incipient wetness technique and characterized by XRD, XRF, and SEM. Water electrolysis/fuel cell performances were evaluated in a 5 cm2 single cell under Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell (URFC configuration. The IrO2/Pt composition of 14/86 showed the highest performance for water electrolysis and the lowest one as fuel cell. It is derived that for fuel cell operation an excess of Pt favours the oxygen reduction process whereas IrO2 promotes oxygen evolution. From the present results, it appears that the diffusion characteristics and the reaction rate in fuel cell mode are significantly lower than in the electrolyser mode. This requires the enhancement of the gas diffusion properties of the electrodes and the catalytic properties for cathode operation in fuel cells.

  15. Water proton configurations in structures I, II, and H clathrate hydrate unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Fumihito; Hiratsuka, Masaki; Ohmura, Ryo; Alavi, Saman; Sum, Amadeu K; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2013-03-28

    Position and orientation of water protons need to be specified when the molecular simulation studies are performed for clathrate hydrates. Positions of oxygen atoms in water are experimentally determined by X-ray diffraction analysis of clathrate hydrate structures, but positions of water hydrogen atoms in the lattice are disordered. This study reports a determination of the water proton coordinates in unit cell of structure I (sI), II (sII), and H (sH) clathrate hydrates that satisfy the ice rules, have the lowest potential energy configuration for the protons, and give a net zero dipole moment. Possible proton coordinates in the unit cell were chosen by analyzing the symmetry of protons on the hexagonal or pentagonal faces in the hydrate cages and generating all possible proton distributions which satisfy the ice rules. We found that in the sI and sII unit cells, proton distributions with small net dipole moments have fairly narrow potential energy spreads of about 1 kJ∕mol. The total Coulomb potential on a test unit charge placed in the cage center for the minimum energy∕minimum dipole unit cell configurations was calculated. In the sI small cages, the Coulomb potential energy spread in each class of cage is less than 0.1 kJ∕mol, while the potential energy spread increases to values up to 6 kJ∕mol in sH and 15 kJ∕mol in the sII cages. The guest environments inside the cages can therefore be substantially different in the sII case. Cartesian coordinates for oxygen and hydrogen atoms in the sI, sII, and sH unit cells are reported for reference.

  16. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy as a Counter-Measure for Human Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, S.; Roach, A.-N.; Ramsahai, S.; Kim, B. C.; Fitzgerald, W.; Riley, D. A.; Gonda, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    Human exploration of deep space depends, in part, on our ability to counter severe/invasive disorders that astronauts experience in space environments. The known symptoms include hematological/cardiac abnormalities,bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders, and cancer. Exploiting the extraordinary plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which differentiate not only to all types of blood cells, but also to various tissues, we have advanced a hypothesis that ome of the space-caused disorders maybe amenable to hematopoietis stem cell therapy(HSCT) so as to maintain promote human exploration of deep space. Using mouse models of human anemia beta-thaiassemia) as well as spaceflight (hindlimb unloading system), we have obtained feasibility results of HSCT for space anemia, muscle loss, and immunodeficiency. For example, in the case of HSCT for muscle loss, the beta-galactosidese marked HSCs were detected in the hindlimbs of unloaded mouse following transplantation by -X-gal wholemaunt staining procedure. Histochemicaland physical analyses indicated structural contribution of HSCs to the muscle. HSCT for immunodeficiency was investigated ising beta-galactosidese gene-tagged Escherichia coli as the infectious agent. Results of the X-gal staining procedure indicated the rapeutic role of the HSCT. To facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs were optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  17. Building long-term constituencies for space exploration: The challenge of raising public awareness and engagement in the United States and in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenfreund, P.; Peter, N.; Billings, L.

    2010-08-01

    Space exploration is a multifaceted endeavor and will be a "grand challenge" of the 21st century. It has already become an element of the political agenda of a growing number of countries worldwide. However, the public is largely unaware of space exploration activities and in particular does not perceive any personal benefit. In order to achieve highly ambitious space exploration goals to explore robotically and with humans the inner solar system, space agencies must improve and expand their efforts to inform and raise the awareness of the public about what they are doing, and why. Therefore adopting new techniques aiming at informing and engaging the public using participatory ways, new communication techniques to reach, in particular, the younger generation will be a prerequisite for a sustainable long-term exploration program: as they will enable it and carry most of the associated financial burden. This paper presents an environmental analysis of space exploration in the United States and Europe and investigates the current branding stature of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA). We discuss how improved market research and new branding methods can increase public space awareness and improve the image of NASA and ESA. We propose a new participatory approach to engage the public as major stakeholder (along governments, the industrial space sector and the science community) that may provide sufficient resources for and sustainability of a long-term space exploration program.

  18. Efforts to Reduce International Space Station Crew Maintenance for the Management of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Loop Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John W.; Etter, David; Rector, Tony; Boyle, Robert; Vandezande, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) contains a semi-closed-loop re-circulating water circuit (Transport Loop) to absorb heat into a LCVG (Liquid Coolant and Ventilation Garment) worn by the astronaut. A second, single-pass water circuit (Feed-water Loop) provides water to a cooling device (Sublimator) containing porous plates, and that water sublimates through the porous plates to space vacuum. The cooling effect from the sublimation of this water translates to a cooling of the LCVG water that circulates through the Sublimator. The quality of the EMU Transport Loop water is maintained through the use of a water processing kit (ALCLR Airlock Cooling Loop Remediation) that is used to periodically clean and disinfect the water circuit. Opportunities to reduce crew time associated with on-orbit ALCLR operations include a detailed review of the historical water quality data for evidence to support an extension to the implementation cycle. Furthermore, an EMU returned after 2-years of use on the ISS (International Space Station) is being used as a test bed to evaluate the results of extended and repeated ALCLR implementation cycles. Finally, design, use and on-orbit location enhancements to the ALCLR kit components are being considered to allow the implementation cycle to occur in parallel with other EMU maintenance and check-out activities, and to extend the life of the ALCLR kit components. These efforts are undertaken to reduce the crew-time and logistics burdens for the EMU, while ensuring the long-term health of the EMU water circuits for a post-Shuttle 6-year service life.

  19. [Cell biology researches aboard the robotic space vehicles: preparation and performance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tairbekov, M G

    2006-01-01

    The article reviews the unique aspects of preparation and performance of cell biology experiments flown on robotic space vehicles Bion and Foton, and gives an overview of key findings in researches made under the author's leadership over the past decades. Described are the criteria of selecting test objects, and the conditions required for preparation and implementation of space and control (synchronous) experiments. The present-day status and issues of researches into cell responsivity to space microgravity and other factors are discussed. Also, potentialities of equipment designed to conduct experiments with cell cultures in vitro and populations of single-celled organisms are presented, as well as some ideas for new devices and systems. Unveiled are some circumstances inherent to the development and performance of space experiments, setting up laboratory facilities at the launch and landing site, and methods of safe transportation and storage of biosamples. In conclusion, the author puts forward his view on biospecies, equipment and areas of research aboard future space vehicles.

  20. A Micromechanical Unit Cell Model of 2 × 2 Twill Woven Fabric Textile Composite for Multi Scale Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, A.; Mali, H. S.; Misra, R. K.

    2014-04-01

    Woven fabric based composite materials are being considered for potential structural applications in automotive and aircraft industries due to their better out of plane strength, stiffness and toughness properties than ordinary composite laminates. This paper presents the micromechanical unit cell model of 2 × 2 twill woven fabric textile composite for the estimation of in-plane elastic properties. Modelling of unit cell and its analysis for this new model is developed by using open source coded tool TexGen and finite element software, ABAQUS® respectively. The predicted values are in good agreement with the experimental results reported in literature. To ascertain the effectiveness of the developed model parametric studies have also been conducted on the predicted elastic properties in order to investigate the effects of various geometric parameters such as yarn spacing, fabric thickness, yarn width and fibre volume fraction. The scope of altering weave pattern and yarn characteristics is facilitated in this developed model. Further this model can be implemented for the multi-scale micro/macro-mechanical analysis for the calculation of strength and stiffness of laminates structure made of 2 × 2 twill composite.

  1. Microorganisms in Confined Habitats: Microbial Monitoring and Control of Intensive Care Units, Operating Rooms, Cleanrooms and the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Maximilian; Mahnert, Alexander; Koskinen, Kaisa; Pausan, Manuela R; Oberauner-Wappis, Lisa; Krause, Robert; Perras, Alexandra K; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Berg, Gabriele; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Indoor environments, where people spend most of their time, are characterized by a specific microbial community, the indoor microbiome. Most indoor environments are connected to the natural environment by high ventilation, but some habitats are more confined: intensive care units, operating rooms, cleanrooms and the international space station (ISS) are extraordinary living and working areas for humans, with a limited exchange with the environment. The purposes for confinement are different: a patient has to be protected from infections (intensive care unit, operating room), product quality has to be assured (cleanrooms), or confinement is necessary due to extreme, health-threatening outer conditions, as on the ISS. The ISS represents the most secluded man-made habitat, constantly inhabited by humans since November 2000 - and, inevitably, also by microorganisms. All of these man-made confined habitats need to be microbiologically monitored and controlled, by e.g., microbial cleaning and disinfection. However, these measures apply constant selective pressures, which support microbes with resistance capacities against antibiotics or chemical and physical stresses and thus facilitate the rise of survival specialists and multi-resistant strains. In this article, we summarize the available data on the microbiome of aforementioned confined habitats. By comparing the different operating, maintenance and monitoring procedures as well as microbial communities therein, we emphasize the importance to properly understand the effects of confinement on the microbial diversity, the possible risks represented by some of these microorganisms and by the evolution of (antibiotic) resistances in such environments - and the need to reassess the current hygiene standards.

  2. Microorganisms in confined habitats: Microbial monitoring and control of intensive care units, operating rooms, cleanrooms and the International Space Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Mora

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Indoor environments, where people spend most of their time, are characterized by a specific microbial community, the indoor microbiome. Most indoor environments are connected to the natural environment by high ventilation, but some habitats are more confined: intensive care units, operating rooms, cleanrooms and the international space station (ISS are extraordinary living and working areas for humans, with a limited exchange with the environment. The purposes for confinement are different: a patient has to be protected from infections (intensive care unit, operating room, product quality has to be assured (cleanrooms, or confinement is necessary due to extreme, health-threatening outer conditions, as on the ISS. The ISS represents the most secluded man-made habitat, constantly inhabited by humans since November 2000 – and, inevitably, also by microorganisms. All of these man-made confined habitats need to be microbiologically monitored and controlled, by e.g. microbial cleaning and disinfection. However, these measures apply constant selective pressures, which support microbes with resistance capacities against antibiotics or chemical and physical stresses and thus facilitate the rise of survival specialists and multi-resistant strains. In this article, we summarize the available data on the microbiome of aforementioned confined habitats. By comparing the different operating, maintenance and monitoring procedures as well as microbial communities therein, we emphasize the importance to properly understand the effects of confinement on the microbial diversity, the possible risks represented by some of these microorganisms and by the evolution of (antibiotic resistances in such environments - and the need to reassess the current hygiene standards.

  3. T-cell immunity and cytokine production in cosmonauts after long-duration space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morukov, B.; Rykova, M.; Antropova, E.; Berendeeva, T.; Ponomaryov, S.; Larina, I.

    2011-04-01

    Long-duration spaceflight effects on T-cell immunity and cytokine production were studied in 12 Russian cosmonauts flown onto the International Space Station. Specific assays were performed before launch and after landing and included analysis of peripheral leukocyte distribution, analysis of T-cell phenotype, expression of activation markers, apoptosis, proliferation of T cells in response to a mitogen, concentrations of cytokines in supernatants of cell cultures. Statistically significant increase was observed in leukocytes', lymphocytes', monocytes' and granulocytes' total number, increase in percentage and absolutely number of CD3 +CD4 +-cells, CD4 +CD45RA +-cells and CD4 +CD45RA +/CD4 +CD45RО + ratio, CD4 +CD25 +Bright regulatory cells ( pIL-10. It revealed depression of IFN-g/IL-10 ratio after flight. Correlation analysis according to Spearman's rank correlation test established significant positive correlations ( p<0.05) between cytokine production and T-cell activation (CD25+, CD38+) and negative correlation ( p<0.05) between cytokine production and number of bulk memory CD4+T-cells (CD45RO+). Thus, these results suggest that T-cell dysfunction can be conditioned by cytokine dysbalance and could lead to development of disease after long-duration space flights.

  4. A cell complex structure for the space of heteroclines for a semilinear parabolic equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Robinson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that for many semilinear parabolic equations there is a global attractor which has a cell complex structure with finite dimensional cells. Additionally, many semilinear parabolic equations have equilibria with finite dimensional unstable manifolds. In this article, these results are unified to show that for a specific parabolic equation on an unbounded domain, the space of heteroclinic orbits has a cell complex structure with finite dimensional cells. The result depends crucially on the choice of spatial dimension and the degree of the nonlinearity in the parabolic equation, and thereby requires some delicate treatment.

  5. Design requirements for high-efficiency high concentration ratio space solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenbach, H.; Patterson, R.

    1980-01-01

    A miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator system concept was developed for low cost, multikilowatt space solar arrays. The system imposes some requirements on solar cells which are new and different from those imposed for conventional applications. The solar cells require a circular active area of approximately 4 mm in diameter. High reliability contacts are required on both front and back surfaces. The back area must be metallurgically bonded to a heat sink. The cell should be designed to achieve the highest practical efficiency at 100 AMO suns and at 80 C. The cell design must minimize losses due to nonuniform illumination intensity and nonnormal light incidence. The primary radiation concern is the omnidirectional proton environment.

  6. Education and Leisure in North European Urban Spaces, with Emphasis on Less Privileged Areas, Particularly in the United Kingdom. A Seminar (London, England, United Kingdom, April 13, 1989). Educational Buildings and Equipment 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Union of Architects, Paris (France).

    This collection was gathered from a seminar entitled "Education and Leisure in North European Urban Spaces," which was the result of cooperation between the Sports, Leisure, and Tourism Work Group of the International Union of Architects and the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Papers were given…

  7. Teaching Basic Science Environmentally, The Concept: The cell is basic unit of structure of most organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Phyllis S.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests simple ways to introduce students to the concept that the cell is the basic unit of structure of most organisms. Mentions materials for microscope study that are readily available and easy to handle, e.g., membranes from between the scales of the onion bulb, thin-leaved plants, pond water, and pollen. (JHZ)

  8. 3D-Printing Crystallographic Unit Cells for Learning Materials Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Vanti, William B.; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Introductory materials science and engineering courses universally include the study of crystal structure and unit cells, which are by their nature highly visual 3D concepts. Traditionally, such topics are explored with 2D drawings or perhaps a limited set of difficult-to-construct 3D models. The rise of 3D printing, coupled with the wealth of…

  9. Predication of Plastic Flow Characteristics in Ferrite/Pearlite Steel Using a Fern Unit Cell Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Li; Jingtao Han; Jing Liu; Lv Zhang

    2004-01-01

    The flow stress of ferrite/pearlite steel under uni-axial tension was simulated with finite element method (FEM) by applying commercial software MARC/MENTAT. Flow stress curves of ferrite/pearlite steels were calculated based on unit cell model. The effects of volume fraction, distribution and the aspect ratio of pearlite on tensile properties have been investigated.

  10. 3D-Printing Crystallographic Unit Cells for Learning Materials Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Vanti, William B.; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Introductory materials science and engineering courses universally include the study of crystal structure and unit cells, which are by their nature highly visual 3D concepts. Traditionally, such topics are explored with 2D drawings or perhaps a limited set of difficult-to-construct 3D models. The rise of 3D printing, coupled with the wealth of…

  11. Mitigation of Unwanted Forward Narrow-band Radiation from PCBs with a Metamaterial Unit Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruaro, Andrea; Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    Mitigation of EMI from a PCB is obtained through the use of a metamaterial unit cell. The focus is on the reduction of narrow-band radiation in the forward hemisphere when the resonant element is etched on a layer located between the source of radiation and the ground plane. As opposed to previou...

  12. Recovery Act. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxilliary Power Unit Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Gail E. [Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC., Gillingham (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-30

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxilliary Power Unit Demonstration Project. Summarizing development of Delphi’s next generation SOFC system as the core power plant to prove the viability of the market opportunity for a 3-5 kW diesel SOFC system. Report includes test and demonstration results from testing the diesel APU in a high visibility fleet customer vehicle application.

  13. Experimental broadband absorption enhancement in silicon nanohole structures with optimized complex unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chenxi; Martínez, Luis Javier; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2013-09-09

    We design silicon membranes with nanohole structures with optimized complex unit cells that maximize broadband absorption. We fabricate the optimized design and measure the optical absorption. We demonstrate an experimental broadband absorption about 3.5 times higher than an equally-thick thin film.

  14. Inulin isoforms differ by repeated additions of one crystal unit cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Peter D; Barclay, Thomas G; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Gerson, Andrea R; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2014-03-15

    Inulin isoforms, especially delta inulin, are important biologically as immune activators and clinically as vaccine adjuvants. In exploring action mechanisms, we previously found regular increments in thermal properties of the seven-member inulin isoform series that suggested regular additions of some energetic structural unit. Because the previous isolates carried additional longer chains that masked defining ranges, these were contrasted with new isoform isolates comprising only inulin chain lengths defining that isoform. The new series began with 19 fructose units per chain (alpha-1 inulin), increasing regularly by 6 fructose units per isoform. Thus the 'energetic unit' equates to 6 fructose residues per chain. All isoforms showed indistinguishable X-ray diffraction patterns that were also identical with known inulin crystals. We conclude that an 'energetic unit' equates to one helix turn of 6 fructose units per chain as found in one unit cell of the inulin crystal. Each isoform chain comprised progressively more helix turns plus one additional fructose and glucose residues per chain.

  15. Question 7: the first units of life were not simple cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Vic; Hunding, Axel; Kepes, Francois; Lancet, Doron; Minsky, Abraham; Raine, Derek; Root-Bernstein, Robert; Sriram, K

    2007-10-01

    Five common assumptions about the first cells are challenged by the pre-biotic ecology model and are replaced by the following propositions: firstly, early cells were more complex, more varied and had a greater diversity of constituents than modern cells; secondly, the complexity of a cell is not related to the number of genes it contains, indeed, modern bacteria are as complex as eukaryotes; thirdly, the unit of early life was an 'ecosystem' rather than a 'cell'; fourthly, the early cell needed no genes at all; fifthly, early life depended on non-covalent associations and on catalysts that were not confined to specific reactions. We present here the outlines of a theory that connects findings about modern bacteria with speculations about their origins.

  16. Further analyses of human kidney cell populations separated on the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robin M.; Todd, Paul; Cole, Kenneth D.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1992-01-01

    Cultured human embryonic kidney cells were separated into electrophoretic subpopulations in laboratory experiments and in two separation experiments on the STS-8 (Challenger) Space Shuttle flight using the mid-deck Continuous Flow Electrophoretic Separator (CFES). Populations of cells from each fraction were cultured for the lifetime of the cells, and supernatant medium was withdrawn and replaced at 4-day intervals. Withdrawn medium was frozen at -120 C for subsequent analysis. Enzyme assays, antibodies and gel electrophoresis were used as analytical tools for the detection and quantization of plasminogen activators in these samples. These assays of frozen-culture supernatant fluids confirmed the electrophoretic separation of plasminogen-activator-producing cells from nonproducing cells, the isolation of cells capable of sustained production, and the separation of cells that produce different plasminogen activators from one other.

  17. Analysis of silicon solar cell degradation in space using PC-1D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, E.G. (IMEC, Leuven (Belgium) DEE (UPC), Barcelona (Spain)); Demesmaeker, E.; Ghannam, M.; Nijs, J. (DEE (UPC), Barcelona (Spain))

    1992-04-01

    This work presents a computation method to evaluate the life expectance of cells in space. The effects of the radiation environment are taken into account as a reduction of carrier lifetime. This reduction is calculated for each particle type as a function of the incident energy and the traveled depth inside the cell. Afterwards the calculated lifetimes are supplied to the PC-1D in order to obtain the electrical characteristics of the cell. The method allows one to calculate the equivalent damage relative to 1 MeV electrons of the different particles in the space environment. But its main feature lies in the direct calculation of the cell degradation by adding the contribution to lifetime reduction of each particle type. Results on efficiency degradation versus time in a circular orbit of 4630 km and 90deg inclination are shown for different cover glass thicknesses. (orig.).

  18. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Daniel J; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D(2) transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude.

  19. Microbial Challenge Testing of Single Liquid Cathode Feed Water Electrolysis Cells for the International Space Station (ISS) Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Robert J.; Wilson, Mark E.; Diderich, Greg S.; Steele, John W.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA) operational performance may be adversely impacted by microbiological growth and biofilm formation over the electrolysis cell membranes. Biofilms could hinder the transport of water from the bulk fluid stream to the membranes and increase the cell concentration overpotential resulting in higher cell voltages and a shorter cell life. A microbial challenge test was performed on duplicate single liquid-cathode feed water electrolysis cells to evaluate operational performance with increasing levels of a mixture of five bacteria isolated from ISS and Space Shuttle potable water systems. Baseline performance of the single water electrolysis cells was determined for approximately one month with deionized water. Monthly performance was also determined following each inoculation of the feed tank with 100, 1000, 10,000 and 100,000 cells/ml of the mixed suspension of test bacteria. Water samples from the feed tank and recirculating water loops for each cell were periodically analyzed for enumeration and speciation of bacteria and total organic carbon. While initially a concern, this test program has demonstrated that the performance of the electrolysis cell is not adversely impacted by feed water containing the five species of bacteria tested at a concentration measured as high as 1,000,000 colony forming units (CFU)/ml. This paper presents the methodologies used in the conduct of this test program along with the performance test results at each level of bacteria concentration.

  20. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy to Countermeasure Cancer in Astronauts during Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, S.; Kindred, R. P.; Roach, A-N.; Edossa, A.; Kim, B. C.; Gonda, S. R.; Emami, K.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to cosmic radiation can cause chromosomal mutations, which may lead to cancer in astronauts engaged in space exploration. Therefore, our goals are to develop countermeasures to prevent space-induced cancer using hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) and gene therapy. This presentation focuses on HSCT for cancer. Our previous experiments on a simulated, space-induced immuno-deficiency model (mouse hind limb unloading ) indicated that transplanted hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) could enhance the host's immunity by effectively eliminating bacterial infection (Ohi S, et. al. J Grav Physiol 10, P63-64, 2003; Ohi S, et. al. Proceedings of the Space Technology and Applications International Forum (STAIF) . American Institute of Physics, New York, pp. 938-950, 2004). Hence, we hypothesized that the HSCs might be effective in combating cancer as well. Studies of cocultured mouse HSCs with beta-galactosidase marked rat gliosarcoma spheroids (9L/lacZ), a cancer model, indicated antagonistic interactions , resulting in destruction of the spheroids by HSCs. Trypan Blue dye-exclusion assays were consistent with the conclusion. These results show potential usehlness of HSCT for cancer. Currently, the NASA Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB), a space analog tissue/cell culture system, is being used to study invasion of the gliosarcoma (GS) spheroids into mouse brain with or without co-cultured HSCs. This may simulate the metastasis of gliosarcoma to brain. There is a tendency for the HSCs to inhibit invasion of GS spheroids into brain, as evidenced by the X-gal staining.

  1. Cigarette smoke exposure aggravates air space enlargement and alveolar cell apoptosis in Smad3 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Laszlo; Farkas, Daniela; Warburton, David; Gauldie, Jack; Shi, Wei; Stampfli, Martin R; Voelkel, Norbert F; Kolb, Martin

    2011-10-01

    The concept of genetic susceptibility factors predisposing cigarette smokers to develop emphysema stems from the clinical observation that only a fraction of smokers develop clinically significant chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We investigated whether Smad3 knockout mice, which develop spontaneous air space enlargement after birth because of a defect in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling, develop enhanced alveolar cell apoptosis and air space enlargement following cigarette smoke exposure. We investigated Smad3(-/-) and Smad3(+/+) mice at different adult ages and determined air space enlargement, alveolar cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Furthermore, laser-capture microdissection and real-time PCR were used to measure compartment-specific gene expression. We then compared the effects of cigarette smoke exposure on Smad3(-/-) and littermate controls. Smad3 knockout resulted in the development of air space enlargement in the adult mouse and was associated with decreased alveolar VEGF levels and activity and increased alveolar cell apoptosis. Cigarette smoke exposure aggravated air space enlargement and alveolar cell apoptosis. We also found increased Smad2 protein expression and phosphorylation, which was enhanced following cigarette smoke exposure, in Smad3-knockout animals. Double immunofluorescence analysis revealed that endothelial apoptosis started before epithelial apoptosis. Our data indicate that balanced TGF-β signaling is not only important for regulation of extracellular matrix turnover, but also for alveolar cell homeostasis. Impaired signaling via the Smad3 pathway results in alveolar cell apoptosis and alveolar destruction, likely via increased Smad2 and reduced VEGF expression and might represent a predisposition for accelerated development of emphysema due to cigarette smoke exposure.

  2. Dielectric process of space-charge polarization for an electrolytic cell with blocking electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Atsushi

    2008-08-14

    The dielectric process of space-charge polarization for an electrolytic cell with blocking electrodes is simulated considering bound charges externally supplied to the electrodes. A numerical calculation is performed to determine the distribution of mobile charges under an ac field satisfying Poisson's equation in which the dielectric constant varies with frequency. An exact frequency-dependent curve of the complex dielectric constant is obtained by including the contribution of bound charges induced by the space-charge polarization itself in Poisson's equation at every frequency. The present model of the space-charge polarization enables one to correctly understand the experimental results on the complex dielectric constant of electrolytic cells in low-frequency regions.

  3. Optimization of finger spacing for concentrator photovoltaic cells under non-uniform illumination using SPICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pratibha; Walker, Alex; Wheeldon, Jeff; Schriemer, Henry; Hinzer, Karin

    2013-10-01

    Concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) technology has come a long way, with multi-junction solar cell efficiencies now reaching up to 44.4%. Front contact grid design, crucial for improving efficiency, is typically performed for uniform illumination, but this does not account for the real world conditions of non-homogeneous irradiance distributions. In this work, we aim to optimize finger spacing for a linear grid under non-uniform illumination by using Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (SPICE) analysis. A two-dimensional distributed resistance model is used to simulate a lattice matched, triple-junction solar cell whose design parameters are determined by curve-fitting current-voltage curves from each sub-cell to a two-diode equivalent-circuit model. Cell efficiency is considered to be a unimodal function that varies with finger spacing so a golden-section search optimization algorithm is used to determine the optimal spacing. Various Gaussian profiles are used to simulate non-uniform illumination and their effects on device performance. Designs based on optimal spacing for non-uniform illumination show an efficiency increase of more than 0.5% absolute at concentrations greater than 500 suns.

  4. Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The official start of a bold new space program, essential to maintain the United States' leadership in space was signaled by a Presidential directive to move aggressively again into space by proceeding with the development of a space station. Development concepts for a permanently manned space station are discussed. Reasons for establishing an inhabited space station are given. Cost estimates and timetables are also cited.

  5. A switchable pH-differential unitized regenerative fuel cell with high performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xu; Xuan, Jin; Leung, Dennis Y. C.; Zou, Haiyang; Li, Jiantao; Wang, Hailiang; Wang, Huizhi

    2016-05-01

    Regenerative fuel cells are a potential candidate for future energy storage, but their applications are limited by the high cost and poor round-trip efficiency. Here we present a switchable pH-differential unitized regenerative fuel cell capable of addressing both the obstacles. Relying on a membraneless laminar flow-based design, pH environments in the cell are optimized independently for different electrode reactions and are switchable together with the cell process to ensure always favorable thermodynamics for each electrode reaction. Benefiting from the thermodynamic advantages of the switchable pH-differential arrangement, the cell allows water electrolysis at a voltage of 0.57 V, and a fuel cell open circuit voltage of 1.89 V, rendering round-trip efficiencies up to 74%. Under room conditions, operating the cell in fuel cell mode yields a power density of 1.3 W cm-2, which is the highest performance to date for laminar flow-based cells and is comparable to state-of-the-art polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  6. Single-unit transfusions and hemoglobin trigger: relative impact on red cell utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, William W; Thakkar, Rajiv N; Gehrie, Eric A; Chen, Weiyun; Frank, Steven M

    2017-05-01

    Patient blood management (PBM) programs can reduce unnecessary transfusions, but the optimal methods used to achieve this effect are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that encouraging single-unit red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in stable patients would have a greater impact on blood use than compliance with a specific hemoglobin (Hb) transfusion trigger alone. We analyzed blood utilization data at three community hospitals without previous PBM efforts before and after implementing a PBM program. Data were analyzed at monthly intervals to determine the relative impact of a "Why give 2 when 1 will do?" campaign promoting single-unit RBC transfusions and simultaneous efforts to promote evidence-based Hb triggers of 7 or 8 g/dL. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify independent effects of these two interventions on overall RBC utilization. Univariate analysis revealed that both the increase in single-unit transfusions (from 38.0% to 70.9%; p utilization. Multivariate analysis showed that the increase in single-unit transfusions was an independent predictor of decreased RBC utilization, but the Hb triggers of both 7 and 8 g/dL were not. Overall, our PBM efforts decreased RBC utilization from 0.254 to 0.185 units/patient (27.2%) across all three hospitals (p = 0.0009). A campaign promoting single-unit RBC transfusions had a greater impact on RBC utilization than did encouraging a restrictive transfusion trigger. © 2016 AABB.

  7. The Daniell Cell, Ohm's Law and the Emergence of the International System of Units

    CERN Document Server

    Jayson, Joel S

    2015-01-01

    Telegraphy originated in the 1830s and 40s and flourished in the following decades, but with a patchwork of electrical standards. Electromotive force was for the most part measured in units of the predominant Daniell cell. Each company had their own resistance standard. In 1862 the British Association for the Advancement of Science formed a committee to address this situation. By 1873 they had given definition to the electromagnetic system of units (emu) and defined the practical units of the ohm as ${10}^9$ emu units of resistance and the volt as ${10}^8$ emu units of electromotive force. These recommendations were ratified and expanded upon in a series of international congresses held between 1881 and 1904. A proposal by Giovanni Giorgi in 1901 took advantage of a coincidence between the conversion of the units of energy in the emu system (the erg) and in the practical system (the joule) in that the same conversion factor existed between the cgs based emu system and a theretofore undefined MKS system. By in...

  8. Determination of optimum sunlight concentration level in space for 3-4 cascade solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    The optimum range of concentration in space for III-V cascade cells has been calculated using a realistic solar cell diode equation. Temperature was varied with concentration using several models and ranged from 55 deg at one sun to between 80 deg and 200 deg C at 100 suns. A variety of series resistance and internal resistances were used. Coefficients of the diffusion and recombination terms are strongly temperature dependent. The study indicates that the maximum efficiency of 30 percent occurs in the 50 to 100 X sun concentration range provided series resistance is below 0.015 ohm sq cm and cell temperature is about 80 C at 100 suns.

  9. Determination of optimum sunlight concentration level in space for 3-5 cascade solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    The optimum range of concentration levels in space for III-V cascade cells was calculated using a realistic solar cell diode equation. Temperature was varied with concentration using several models and ranged from 55 C at 1 sun to between 80 and 200 C at 100 suns. A variety of series resistance and internal resistances were used. Coefficients of the diffusion and recombination terms are strongly temperature dependent. The study indicates that the maximum efficiency of 30 percent occurs in the 50 to 100 sun concentration range provided series resistance is below 0.015 ohm-sq cm and cell temperature is about 80 C at 100 suns.

  10. Caliste-SO: the x-ray spectrometer unit of the STIX instrument onboard the Solar Orbiter space mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuris, Aline; Limousin, Olivier; Gevin, Olivier; Vassal, Marie-Cécile; Soufflet, Fabrice; Fiant, Nicolas; Bednarzik, Martin; Wild, Christopher; Stutz, Stefan; Birrer, Guy; Blondel, Claire; Le Mer, Isabelle; Huynh, Duc-Dat; Donati, Modeste; Grimm, Oliver; Commichau, Volker; Hurford, Gordon; Krucker, Säm.; Gonzalez, François; Billot, Marc

    2014-07-01

    Caliste-SO is a hybrid detector integrating in a volume of 12 × 14 × 18 mm3 a 1 mm-thick CdTe pixel detector, a frontend IDeF-X HD ASIC and passive parts to perform high resolution spectroscopy in the 4-200 keV energy range with high count rate capability (104-105 photons/s/cm2). The detector hybridization concept was designed by CEA and 3DPlus to realize CdTe cameras for space astronomy missions with various pixel patterns. For the STIX instrument onboard the Solar Orbiter mission, the imaging system is made by 32 collimators that sample the visibilities of the spatial Fourier transform and doesn't require fine pitch pixels. The Al-Schottky CdTe detectors produced by Acrorad are then patterned and tested by the Paul Scherrer Institute to produce 12 pixels surrounded by a guard ring within 1 cm2. Electrical and spectroscopic performance tests of the Caliste-SO samples are performed in France at key manufacturing steps, before sending the samples to the principal investigator to mount them in the Detector Electronics Module of STIX in front of each collimator. Four samples were produced in 2013 to be part of the STIX engineering model. Best pixels show an energy resolution of 0.7 keV FWHM at 6 keV (1 keV resolution requirement for STIX) and a low-level detection threshold below 3 keV (4 keV requirement for STIX). The paper describes the design and the production of Caliste-SO and focuses on main performance tests performed so far to characterize the spectrometer unit.

  11. Production Cells in Construction: Considering Time, Space and Information Linkages to Seek Broader Implementations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Nunes Mariz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of production cells in manufacturing has achieved many benefits, motivating researchers to apply them in the construction environment. The aim of this research is to identify time, space, and information linkages in construction’s production cells applications, seeking opportunities for broader implementations. We adopted a literature review approach focusing on cases in the Brazilian construction sector that addressed cell applications. Subsequently, comparative tables of these publications were prepared, analyzing the consideration of time, space, and information linkages, as well as identified results. The article pointed out that there is a gap in publications that address the application of a production cell in almost all construction flows, except the job site flow, reflecting the tendency of most companies of applying lean concepts firstly in physical flows. By analyzing these aspects (group of features that enhance the use of the cell, it was found that “material flow and pull systems” and “operators interaction” were the aspects most often considered, but mostly partially. Few cases reported the use of “flexibility” and “equipment maintenance”. No case reported comprehensive considerations of the three important linkages of time, space, and information. Space was the linkage better considered compared to time and information linkages. Lead time reduction, cost savings and increased productivity were among the greatest benefits reported from the applications of production cells. There is also a positive correlation between the linkages coverage and the number of benefits obtained. Further research is suggested in order to investigate the results of a more comprehensive application considering all linkages.

  12. Regulations in the United States for cell transplantation clinical trials in neurological diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Zhu; Yuanqing Tan; Qi Gu; Weifang Han; Zhongwen Li; Jason S Meyer; Baoyang Hu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to use a systematic approach to evaluate the current utilization, safety, and effectiveness of cell therapies for neurological diseases in human. And review the present regulations, considering United States (US) as a representative country, for cell transplantation in neurological disease and discuss the challenges facing the field of neurology in the coming decades. Methods:A detailed search was performed in systematic literature reviews of cellular‐based therapies in neurological diseases, using PubMed, web of science, and clinical trials. Regulations of cell therapy products used for clinical trials were searched from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Results: Seven most common types of cell therapies for neurological diseases have been reported to be relatively safe with varying degrees of neurological recovery. And a series of regulations in US for cellular therapy was summarized including preclinical evaluations, sourcing material, stem cell manufacturing and characterization, cell therapy product, and clinical trials. Conclusions:Stem cell‐based therapy holds great promise for a cure of such diseases and will value a growing population of patients. However, regulatory permitting activity of the US in the sphere of stem cells, technologies of regenerative medicine and substitutive cell therapy are selective, theoretical and does not fit the existing norm and rules. Compiled well‐defined regulations to guide the application of stem cell products for clinical trials should be formulated.

  13. Constrained transcription factor spacing is prevalent and important for transcriptional control of mouse blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Felicia S L; Schütte, Judith; Ruau, David; Diamanti, Evangelia; Hannah, Rebecca; Kinston, Sarah J; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-12-16

    Combinatorial transcription factor (TF) binding is essential for cell-type-specific gene regulation. However, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms of TF interactions, including to what extent constrained spacing and orientation of interacting TFs are critical for regulatory element activity. To examine the relative prevalence of the 'enhanceosome' versus the 'TF collective' model of combinatorial TF binding, a comprehensive analysis of TF binding site sequences in large scale datasets is necessary. We developed a motif-pair discovery pipeline to identify motif co-occurrences with preferential distance(s) between motifs in TF-bound regions. Utilizing a compendium of 289 mouse haematopoietic TF ChIP-seq datasets, we demonstrate that haematopoietic-related motif-pairs commonly occur with highly conserved constrained spacing and orientation between motifs. Furthermore, motif clustering revealed specific associations for both heterotypic and homotypic motif-pairs with particular haematopoietic cell types. We also showed that disrupting the spacing between motif-pairs significantly affects transcriptional activity in a well-known motif-pair-E-box and GATA, and in two previously unknown motif-pairs with constrained spacing-Ets and Homeobox as well as Ets and E-box. In this study, we provide evidence for widespread sequence-specific TF pair interaction with DNA that conforms to the 'enhanceosome' model, and furthermore identify associations between specific haematopoietic cell-types and motif-pairs. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Xylem development and cell wall changes of soybean seedlings grown in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micco, Veronica; Aronne, Giovanna; Joseleau, Jean-Paul; Ruel, Katia

    2008-04-01

    Plants growing in altered gravity conditions encounter changes in vascular development and cell wall deposition. The aim of this study was to investigate xylem anatomy and arrangement of cellulose microfibrils in vessel walls of different organs of soybean seedlings grown in Space. Seeds germinated and seedlings grew for 5 d in Space during the Foton-M2 mission. The environmental conditions, other than gravity, of the ground control repeated those experienced in orbit. The seedlings developed in space were compared with those of the control test on the basis of numerous anatomical and ultrastructural parameters such as number of veins, size and shape of vessel lumens, thickness of cell walls and deposition of cellulose microfibrils. Observations made with light, fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy, together with the quantification of the structural features through digital image analysis, showed that the alterations due to microgravity do not occur at the same level in the various organs of soybean seedlings. The modifications induced by microgravity or by the indirect effect of space-flight conditions, became conspicuous only in developing vessels at the ultrastructural level. The results suggested that the orientation of microfibrils and their assembly in developing vessels are perturbed by microgravity at the beginning of wall deposition, while they are still able to orient and arrange in thicker and ordered structures at later stages of secondary wall deposition. The process of proper cell-wall building, although not prevented, is perturbed in Space at the early stage of development. This would explain the almost unaltered anatomy of mature structures, accompanied by a slower growth observed in seedlings grown in Space than on Earth.

  15. Fuel cell collaboration in the United States. Follow up report to the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    Fuel cell technology continues to grow in the United States, with strong sales in stationary applications and early markets such as data centers, materials handling equipment, and telecommunications sites. New fuel cell customers include Fortune 500 companies Apple, eBay, Coca-Cola, and Walmart, who will use fuel cells to provide reliable power to data centers, stores, and facilities. Some are purchasing multi-megawatt (MW) systems, including three of the largest non-utility purchases of stationary fuel cells in the world by AT and T, Apple and eBay - 17 MW, 10 MW and 6 MW respectively. Others are replacing fleets of battery forklifts with fuel cells. Sysco, the food distributor, has more than 700 fuel cell-powered forklifts operating at seven facilities, with more on order. Mega-retailer Walmart now operates more than 500 fuel cell forklifts at three warehouses, including a freezer facility. Although federal government budget reduction efforts are impacting a wide range of departments and programs, fuel cell and hydrogen technology continues to be funded, albeit at a lower level than in past years. The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently funding fuel cell and hydrogen R and D and has nearly 300 ongoing projects at companies, national labs, and universities/institutes universities. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 and DOE's Market Transformation efforts have acted as a government ''catalyst'' for market success of emerging technologies. Early market deployments of about 1,400 fuel cells under the ARRA have led to more than 5,000 additional fuel cell purchases by industry with no DOE funding. In addition, interest in Congress remains high. Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Chris Coons (D-DE), Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and John Hoeven (R-ND) re-launched the bipartisan Senate Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Caucus in August 2012 to promote the continued development and commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies

  16. Space Photovoltaic Concentrator Using Robust Fresnel Lenses, 4-Junction Cells, Graphene Radiators, and Articulating Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Mark; McDanal, A. J.; Brandhorst, Henry; Spence, Brian; Iqbal, Shawn; Sharps, Paul; McPheeters, Clay; Steinfeldt, Jeff; Piszczor, Michael; Myers, Matt

    2016-01-01

    At the 42nd PVSC, our team presented recent advances in our space photovoltaic concentrator technology. These advances include more robust Fresnel lenses for optical concentration, more thermally conductive graphene radiators for waste heat rejection, improved color-mixing lens technology to minimize chromatic aberration losses with 4-junction solar cells, and an articulating photovoltaic receiver enabling single-axis sun-tracking, while maintaining a sharp focal line despite large beta angles of incidence. In the past year, under a NASA Phase II SBIR program, our team has made much additional progress in the development of this new space photovoltaic concentrator technology, as described in this paper.

  17. 31% European InGaP/GaAs/InGaAs Solar Cells for Space Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campesato Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a triple junction InGaP/GaAs/InGaNAs solar cell with efficiency of ~31% at AM0, 25 °C fabricated using a combined molecular beam epitaxy (MBE and metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD processes. The prototype cells comprise of InGaNAs (Indium Gallium Nitride Arsenide bottom junction grown on a GaAs (Gallium Arsenide substrate by MBE and middle and top junctions deposited by MOCVD. Repeatable cell characteristics and uniform efficiency pattern over 4-inch wafers were obtained. Combining the advantages offered by MBE and MOCVD opens a new perspective for fabrication of high-efficiency space tandem solar cells with three or more junctions. Results of radiation resistance of the sub-cells are also presented and critically evaluated to achieve high efficiency in EOL conditions.

  18. A simple model of space radiation damage in GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Stith, J. J.; Stock, L. V.

    1983-01-01

    A simple model is derived for the radiation damage of shallow junction gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells. Reasonable agreement is found between the model and specific experimental studies of radiation effects with electron and proton beams. In particular, the extreme sensitivity of the cell to protons stopping near the cell junction is predicted by the model. The equivalent fluence concept is of questionable validity for monoenergetic proton beams. Angular factors are quite important in establishing the cell sensitivity to incident particle types and energies. A fluence of isotropic incidence 1 MeV electrons (assuming infinite backing) is equivalent to four times the fluence of normal incidence 1 MeV electrons. Spectral factors common to the space radiations are considered, and cover glass thickness required to minimize the initial damage for a typical cell configuration is calculated. Rough equivalence between the geosynchronous environment and an equivalent 1 MeV electron fluence (normal incidence) is established.

  19. Study on Unit Cell Models and the Effective Thermal Conductivities of Silica Aerogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Li, Zeng-Yao; Zhao, Xin-Peng; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, two modified unit cell models, truncated octahedron and cubic array of intersecting square rods with 45-degree rotation, are developed in consideration of the tortuous path of heat conduction in solid skeleton of silica aerogel. The heat conduction is analyzed for each model and the expressions of effective thermal conductivity of the modified unit cell models are derived. Considering the random microstructure of silica aerogel, the probability model is presented. We also discuss the effect of the thermal conductivity of aerogel backbone. The effective thermal conductivities calculated by the proposed probability model are in good agreement with available experimental data when the density of the aerogel is 110 kg/m3.

  20. A study on proton irradiation effects of home-made solar cell for space use

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Rong; Zhang Xin Hui; Guo Zeng Liang; Zhai Zuo Xu

    2001-01-01

    The proton irradiation effects of Si solar cell and GaAs/Ge solar cell for space use are studied. The cells are irradiated by protons with an energy of 10 MeV at fluences ranging from 1 x 10 sup 9 to 5 x 10 sup 1 sup 3 cm sup - sup 2 , and then photovoltaic properties are measured at AMO. It is shown that the degradation of electric performances of two kinds of solar cells is different as proton irradiation fluence increases. The electric parameters I sub s sub c and P sub m sub a sub x of GaAs/Ge solar cell degrade slower than that of Si solar cell under 3 x 10 sup 1 sup 2 cm sup - sup 2 , but degrade rapidly above 3 x 10 sup 1 sup 2 cm sup - sup 2 , and the irradiation tolerance of GaAs/Ge solar cell is better than that of Si solar cell. The degradation of the performance is related to proton irradiation-induced defects E sub c -0.41 eV in irradiated GaAs/Ge cell, and E sub v + 0.14 eV and E sub v + 0.43 eV in irradiated Si cell

  1. The effect of space microgravity on the physiological activity of mammalian resident cardiac stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belostotskaya, Galina; Zakharov, Eugeny

    Prolonged exposure to weightlessness during space flights is known to cause depression of heart function in mammals. The decrease in heart weight and its remodeling under the influence of prolonged weightlessness (or space microgravity) is assumed to be due to both morphological changes of working cardiomyocytes and their progressive loss, as well as to possible depletion of resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs) population, or their inability to self-renewal and regeneration of muscle tissue under conditions of weightlessness. We have previously shown that the presence of different maturity clones formed by resident CSCs not only in culture but also in the mammalian myocardium can be used as an indicator of the regenerative activity of myocardial cells [Belostotskaya, et al., 2013: 2014]. In this study, we were interested to investigate whether the 30-day near-Earth space flight on the spacecraft BION-M1 affects the regenerative potential of resident CSCs. Immediately after landing of the spacecraft, we had examined the presence of resident c-kit+, Sca-1+ and Isl1+ CSCs and their development in suspension of freshly isolated myocardial cells of C57BL mice in comparison to controls. Cardiac cell suspension was obtained by enzymatic digestion of the heart [Belostotskaya and Golovanova, 2014]. Immunocytochemically stained preparations of fixed cells were analyzed with confocal microscope Leica TCS SP5 (Germany) in the Resource Center of St-Petersburg State University. CSCs were labeled with appropriate antibodies. CSCs differentiation into mature cardiomyocytes was verified using antibodies to Sarcomeric α-Actinin and Cardiac Troponin T. Antibodies to Connexin43 were used to detect cell-cell contacts. All antibodies were conjugated with Alexa fluorochromes (488, 532, 546, 568, 594 and/or 647 nm), according to Zenon-technology (Invitrogen). It has been shown that, under identical conditions of cell isolation, more complete digestion of heart muscle was observed in

  2. On the Performance of Hybrid PV/Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell System in the Tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwan Dihrab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar hydrogen system is a unique power system that can meet the power requirements for future energy demands. Such a system uses the hydrogen as the energy carrier, which produces energy through the electrolyzer with assistance of the power from the PV during the sunny hours, and then uses stored hydrogen to produce energy through the fuel cell after sunset or on cloudy days. The current study has used premanufactured unitized regenerative fuel cells in which the electrolyzer and the fuel cell function within one cell at different modes. The system components were modeled and the one-day real operational and simulated data has been presented and compared. The measured results showed the ability of the system to meet the proposed load, and the total efficiency was about 4.5%.

  3. BioDiff - a neutron diffractometer optimized for crystals with large unit cell dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Schrader, Tobias Erich; Ostermann, Andreas; Monkenbusch, Michael; Laatsch, Bernhard; Jüttner, Philipp; Petry, Winfried; Richter, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    The research reactor Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) is a modern high flux neutron source which feeds some 30 state of the art neutron beam instruments. Currently 24 are operational, others in commissioning or under construction. The newly built neutron single crystal diffractometer BIODIFF is especially designed to collect data from crystals with large unit cells. The main field of application is the structural analysis of proteins, especially the determination of hydrogen atom positions. BIOD...

  4. Strategies for "minimal growth maintenance" of cell cultures: a perspective on management for extended duration experimentation in the microgravity environment of a Space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    have great value and practical consequences for experimentation on Earth as well as in Space. All of the parameters and conditions and procedural details needed to meet all the specific objectives will be the basis of the design and fabrication of cell culture units for use in the Space environment. It is expected that this will be an evolutionary process.

  5. Strategies for "minimal growth maintenance" of cell cultures: a perspective on management for extended duration experimentation in the microgravity environment of a Space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    have great value and practical consequences for experimentation on Earth as well as in Space. All of the parameters and conditions and procedural details needed to meet all the specific objectives will be the basis of the design and fabrication of cell culture units for use in the Space environment. It is expected that this will be an evolutionary process.

  6. Space qualification of UV and IR reflecting coverslides for GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulenberg, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    As part of the space qualification effort for blue-red reflecting coverslides designed for use with GaAs solar cells, the first long-term (3000 hours) UV testing of unirradiated and 1 MeV electron-irradiated GaAs solar cells, with 4 types of multilayer-coated coverslides to reduce operating temperature, has produced some unexpected results. Important conclusions from this study, which includes two parallel tests, are as follows: (1) All of the GaAs solar cells with multilayer-coated coverslides display UV degradation. The laboratory data, extrapolated to 10 years in orbit, point to a significant loss mechanism from a combination of absorption and a reduction in optical match in such coatings from this portion of the space environment; (2) The effects of contamination in a vacuum system, on the measured degradation in solar-cell short-circuit current during a UV test, depend upon the type of coverslide coatings present on the coverslide surfaces. This has implications for both coated coverslides and optical solar reflectors (OSR's) in space; and (3) Because of the observed trends in this test and uncertainties in the extrapolation of data for multilayer coated coverslides, the use of any multilayer-coated coverslides for extended missions (greater than 1 year) cannot be recommended without prior flight testing.

  7. Dielectric Behavior of Low Microwave Loss Unit Cell for All Dielectric Metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhuan Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With a deep study of the metamaterial, its unit cells have been widely extended from metals to dielectrics. The dielectric based unit cells attract much attention because of the advantage of easy preparation, tunability, and higher frequency response, and so forth. Using the conventional solid state method, we prepared a kind of incipient ferroelectrics (calcium titanate, CaTiO3 with higher microwave permittivity and lower loss, which can be successfully used to construct metamaterials. The temperature and frequency dependence of dielectric constant are also measured under different sintering temperatures. The dielectric spectra showed a slight permittivity decrease with the increase of temperature and exhibited a loss of 0.0005, combined with a higher microwave dielectric constant of ~167 and quality factor Q of 2049. Therefore, CaTiO3 is a kind of versatile and potential metamaterial unit cell. The permittivity of CaTiO3 at higher microwave frequency was also examined in the rectangular waveguide and we got the permittivity of 165, creating a new method to test permittivity at higher microwave frequency.

  8. Preliminary investigations of Spirulina effect on cancer cells: interest for long-term manned space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baatout, S.; Bekaert, S.; Hendrickx, L.; Derradji, H.; Mergeay, M.

    Background In view of long haul space exploration missions the development of regenerative life support systems is of crucial importance to increase the crew autonomy and decrease the cost associated to the mass embarked Therefore in the late 80 s the European Space Agency initiated the MELiSSA project Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative MELiSSA has been conceived as a micro-organisms and higher plant process enabling high recycling efficiency The cyanobacteria Arthrospira sp is occupying one of the MELiSSA compartments Its genome is now being sequenced and this will help to better understand or improve its food value as well as to have a look at its putative toxic potential Aim In this study we were interested in studying the threshold of intrinsic cytotoxic effects of Spirulina dry extract from Sigma containing washed and lyophilized mixed Arthrospira strains on human cancer cells and its cell type dependency Method For that purpose we used flow cytometry to estimate cell death apoptosis and necrosis in three human leukaemic cell lines HELA cervix carcinoma IM-9 multiple myeloma K562 chronic myelogenous leukaemia Cells were cultured in the presence of an aqueous extract of Spirulina concentrations ranging from 0 to 500 mu g ml for 15 to 40 hours Apoptosis and necrosis were evaluated by annexin-V-PI staining cell size and granularity Early apoptosis was monitored by analysing the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential DioC 6 3 and the

  9. A Note on Linearly Isometric Extension for 1-Lipschitz and Anti-1-Lipschitz Mappings between Unit Spheres of ALp(μ, H) Spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zihou ZHANG; Chunyan LIU

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we show that if V0 is a 1-Lipschitz mapping between unit spheres of Lp (μ,H) and Lp(v,H)(p > 2,H is a Hilbert space),and-Vo(S(Lp(μ,H))) (∪) Vo(S(Lp(μ,H))),then V0 can be extended to a linear isometry defined on the whole space.If 1 < p < 2 and V0 is an "anti-1-Lipschitz" mapping,then Vo can also be linearly and isometrically extended.

  10. What is the public's role in 'space' policymaking? Images of the public by practitioners of 'space' communication in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entradas, Marta

    2016-07-01

    Studies on experts' understanding of the public have mainly focused on the views of scientists. We add to the literature on constructions of the public by analyzing the views of decision-makers, professional science communicators and scientists involved in 'space' communication on the public and public participation in policy. Findings show that contextual situations and roles determine the way the public is conceptualised: the public is sophisticated and knowledgeable to participate in space activities/citizen science, but in matters of policy, a gullible image of the public is brought up. Despite the democratic talk on participation, practitioners delimited public involvement in policy in some way or other to protect their own power and decision-making capabilities. This conception of the public competes with the stated aims of scientific and political institutions for public engagement and the substantive value of public participation, leaving a limited role for the public in space policymaking.

  11. Evaluation of a low temperature Li-ion cell for space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gave, G. [CNES-DTA/ARE/SEA/ACE, Toulouse (France); Borthomieu, Y.; Lagattu, B.; Planchat, J.-P. [SAFT Div. Defense and Espace, Poitiers (France)

    2004-04-01

    Today, space applications are requiring on one hand low temperature operating batteries for application such as probes or exploration vehicles, and on the other one, high specific energy batteries. in order to answer the specification for high specific energy, Li-ion battery is the most promising system. However, the low temperature operating is an issue for such a battery. SAFT and CNES have conducted an evaluation of the Li-ion technology for this application, taking into account the results of research on this topic to adapt the definition of already space qualified Li-ion cells. This paper describes test plan (conducted by CNES in the LCIE Laboratories) that has been performed and analyses the result obtained on a full size cell in the operational conditions. (author)

  12. Some molecular/crystalline factors that affect the sensitivities of energetic materials: molecular surface electrostatic potentials, lattice free space and maximum heat of detonation per unit volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politzer, Peter; Murray, Jane S

    2015-02-01

    We discuss three molecular/crystalline properties that we believe to be among the factors that influence the impact/shock sensitivities of energetic materials (i.e., their vulnerabilities to unintended detonation due to impact or shock). These properties are (a) the anomalously strong positive electrostatic potentials in the central regions of their molecular surfaces, (b) the free space per molecule in their crystal lattices, and (c) their maximum heats of detonation per unit volume. Overall, sensitivity tends to become greater as these properties increase; however these are general trends, not correlations. Nitramines are exceptions in that their sensitivities show little or no variation with free space in the lattice and heat of detonation per unit volume. We outline some of the events involved in detonation initiation and show how the three properties are related to different ones of these events.

  13. Breaking the Space Charge Limit in Organic Solar Cells by a Novel Plasmonic-Electrical Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Sha, Wei E. I.; Xuanhua Li; Choy, Wallace C. H.

    2014-01-01

    As a fundamental electrostatic limit, space charge limit (SCL) for photocurrent is a universal phenomenon and of paramount importance for organic semiconductors with unbalanced photocarriers mobility and high exciton generation. Here we proposed a new plasmonic-electrical concept to manipulate electrical properties of organic devices including photocarriers recombination, transport and collection. As a proof-of-concept, organic solar cells (OSCs) comprising metallic planar and grating electro...

  14. Next-generation batteries and fuel cells for commercial, military, and space applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jha, A R

    2012-01-01

    Distilling complex theoretical physical concepts into an understandable technical framework, Next-Generation Batteries and Fuel Cells for Commercial, Military, and Space Applications describes primary and secondary (rechargeable) batteries for various commercial, military, spacecraft, and satellite applications for covert communications, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions. It emphasizes the cost, reliability, longevity, and safety of the next generation of high-capacity batteries for applications where high energy density, minimum weight and size, and reliability in harsh conditions are

  15. Neurophysiology of space travel: energetic solar particles cause cell type-specific plasticity of neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Dudok, Barna; Parihar, Vipan K; Jung, Kwang-Mook; Zöldi, Miklós; Kang, Young-Jin; Maroso, Mattia; Alexander, Allyson L; Nelson, Gregory A; Piomelli, Daniele; Katona, István; Limoli, Charles L; Soltesz, Ivan

    2016-11-30

    In the not too distant future, humankind will embark on one of its greatest adventures, the travel to distant planets. However, deep space travel is associated with an inevitable exposure to radiation fields. Space-relevant doses of protons elicit persistent disruptions in cognition and neuronal structure. However, whether space-relevant irradiation alters neurotransmission is unknown. Within the hippocampus, a brain region crucial for cognition, perisomatic inhibitory control of pyramidal cells (PCs) is supplied by two distinct cell types, the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1)-expressing basket cells (CB1BCs) and parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons (PVINs). Mice subjected to low-dose proton irradiation were analyzed using electrophysiological, biochemical and imaging techniques months after exposure. In irradiated mice, GABA release from CB1BCs onto PCs was dramatically increased. This effect was abolished by CB1 blockade, indicating that irradiation decreased CB1-dependent tonic inhibition of GABA release. These alterations in GABA release were accompanied by decreased levels of the major CB1 ligand 2-arachidonoylglycerol. In contrast, GABA release from PVINs was unchanged, and the excitatory connectivity from PCs to the interneurons also underwent cell type-specific alterations. These results demonstrate that energetic charged particles at space-relevant low doses elicit surprisingly selective long-term plasticity of synaptic microcircuits in the hippocampus. The magnitude and persistent nature of these alterations in synaptic function are consistent with the observed perturbations in cognitive performance after irradiation, while the high specificity of these changes indicates that it may be possible to develop targeted therapeutic interventions to decrease the risk of adverse events during interplanetary travel.

  16. HIGH-ENERGY PROTON IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON GaAs/Ge SPACE SOLAR CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. Wang; S.D. Yao

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the high-energy proton irradiation effects on GaAs/Ge space solarcells. The solar cells were irradiated by protons with energy of 5-20Me V at fluenceranging from 1 × 109 to 7× 1013 cra-2, and then their electric parameters were measuredat AM0. It was shown that the Isc, Voc and Pmax degrade as the fiuence increasingrespectively, but the degradation rates of Isc, Voc and Pmax decrease as the protonenergy increasing, and the degradation is relative to proton irradiation-induced defectwith a level of Ec -0. 41eV in irradiated GaAs/Ge cells.

  17. The solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell for the Space Shuttle Orbiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    Recent developments in the General Electric solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell have demonstrated the capability of 2000 hours of maintenance-free life and the potential for 5000 to 10,000 hours of useful life with invariant performance. Hardware developments for a 5 kW fuel cell module directed toward NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter application have demonstrated the capability of operation on propulsion-grade reactants, operation with simple stop/start procedures, and with a specific weight of 25 lb/kW for a complete module.

  18. Displacement Damage Effects in Solar Cells: Mining Damage From the Microelectronics and Photonics Test Bed Space Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardage, Donna (Technical Monitor); Walters, R. J.; Morton, T. L.; Messenger, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    The objective is to develop an improved space solar cell radiation response analysis capability and to produce a computer modeling tool which implements the analysis. This was accomplished through analysis of solar cell flight data taken on the Microelectronics and Photonics Test Bed experiment. This effort specifically addresses issues related to rapid technological change in the area of solar cells for space applications in order to enhance system performance, decrease risk, and reduce cost for future missions.

  19. Space Flight Effects on Intracellular Ions in Sublingual Cells of Non-Human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Dotsenko, R.; Fung, P.; Navidi, M.; Silver, B.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have used a novel technique that quantifies minerals and electrolytes from smears of sublingual cells by x-ray microanalysis to monitor metabolic changes in bed rest subjects. Increases in intracellular calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) were characteristic of subjects whose exercise regimen was inadequate to maintain calcium metabolism. To test the effects of space flight on intracellular ions, we analyzed cells from 2-4 kg Rhesus monkeys before and after 2 weeks in space or chair restraint (CR). There were increases in sublingual cell Ca, P and K after space flight which paralleled the clinical estimates of metabolic status of the animals and exceeded the levels found during CR on R+11. Increases after 2 weeks CR were 26% in Ca, 6% in P and 29% in K. Species similarity ill responses of intracellular ions to inactivity imposed by bed rest, restraint or microgravity suggest that this innovative non-invasive technique would be a useful in-flight monitor of exercise countermeasures directed toward maintaining calcium balance.

  20. Modulation of red cell mass by neocytolysis in space and on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.

    2000-01-01

    Astronauts predictably experience anemia after return from space. Upon entering microgravity, the blood volume in the extremities pools centrally and plasma volume decreases, causing plethora and erythropoietin suppression. There ensues neocytolysis, selective hemolysis of the youngest circulating red cells, allowing rapid adaptation to the space environment but becoming maladaptive on re-entry to a gravitational field. The existence of this physiologic control process was confirmed in polycythemic high-altitude dwellers transported to sea level. Pathologic neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal failure. Understanding the process has implications for optimizing erythropoietin-dosing schedules and the therapy of other human disorders. Human and rodent models of neocytolysis are being created to help find out how interactions between endothelial cells, reticuloendothelial phagocytes and young erythrocytes are altered, and to shed light on the expression of surface adhesion molecules underlying this process. Thus, unraveling a problem for space travelers has uncovered a physiologic process controlling the red cell mass that can be applied to human disorders on Earth.

  1. Optimization of large area solar cells for low cost space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthei, K. W.; Zemmrich, D. K.; Webb, M.

    1981-01-01

    The development of large-area solar cell manufacturing techniques for production of up to 10 kW/month of cells for use on the Shuttle Power Extension Package is detailed. Design goals for the cells were 14% efficiency at 135.3 mW/sq cm AM0 illumination for a 10 ohm-cm BSF/reflector cell, or 12.8% for a 2 ohm-cm BSR cell. Use of terrestrial cell technology to produce CVD SiO2 dielectric insulators for 3-in. ingot cells yielded satisfactory contact integrity. Fused silica coverings with thicknesses of 0.004 in. have allowed exploration of conventional and wraparound cell configurations due to inherent flexibilities of the frosted covers. One production run can now handle 108 3-in. wafers for the wraparound form or 216 in one-sided contact evaporations, with both processes taking 70 mins. Current contact grid designs for space use production permits average efficiencies of 12.8%.

  2. The Perception upon Landscape Revitalization of Industrial Spaces. Case Study – The Industrial Units Belvedere Cigarette Factory and S.C. Mefin Sinaia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINA E. HUZUI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many Romanian cities are confronted with difficulties regarding the insertion of redundant industrial objectives in the present urban landscape. This study focuses on two industrial units that have created a certain place identity through time, both undergoing a conversion process, due to relict or underused industrial structures. These industrial units are reclaimed by the increasingly public demand for new construction spaces that are more adapted to the cultural, social, economic and ecological context. Belvedere Cigarette Factory was an important factory in Bucharest because it initiated the tobacco manufacturing in the Romanian capital city. The buildings of the cigarette factory, which were constructed from the late 19th century until the early 20th century, are considered heritage objectives. Currently, some factory buildings and annexes are demolished and in their place shopping and entertainment spaces have been built. S.C. MEFIN S.A. Sinaia was established on a pre-existing industrial unit in 1953 and in 2007 it was decided to be integrated into the services sector (tourist accommodation, commercial spaces, sports and leisure in order to raise the attractiveness of the area. However, the transformation of this unit cannot be dissociated from the community`s preferences regarding the area`s revitalization (Stan A, 2009, p. 201. The methods applied in this study are the case study research and the survey that allows the comparison of the reuse perception of the industrial units. The need to return these productive areas to the urban context recognizes people (residents as active participants in the revitalization process of industrial landscapes.

  3. Major design issues of molten carbonate fuel cell power generation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    In addition to the stack, a fuel cell power generation unit requires fuel desulfurization and reforming, fuel and oxidant preheating, process heat removal, waste heat recovery, steam generation, oxidant supply, power conditioning, water supply and treatment, purge gas supply, instrument air supply, and system control. These support facilities add considerable cost and system complexity. Bechtel, as a system integrator of M-C Power`s molten carbonate fuel cell development team, has spent substantial effort to simplify and minimize these supporting facilities to meet cost and reliability goals for commercialization. Similiar to other fuels cells, MCFC faces design challenge of how to comply with codes and standards, achieve high efficiency and part load performance, and meanwhile minimize utility requirements, weight, plot area, and cost. However, MCFC has several unique design issues due to its high operating temperature, use of molten electrolyte, and the requirement of CO2 recycle.

  4. Cell phone recycling experiences in the United States and potential recycling options in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Geraldo T R; Chang, Shoou-Yuh

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of cell phone recycling programs currently available in the United States. At the same time, it also provides analyses of the current recycling situation and possible recycling alternatives for Brazil. Although there are several recycling options in the United States, collection rates are still only 10% of all potential devices because customers are not aware of these possibilities. The whole system is financially based on reselling refurbished cell phones and recycled materials to developing countries which represent an effective and strong market. Several recyclers offer funds to collection partners who are either charities or who work with charities while obtaining the materials that they need in order to run their operations. A mobile phone recycling system for Brazil considering the United States experience and the Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) principle is suggested. A deposit/refund/advance-recycling fee is proposed which might be implemented as a voluntary industrial initiative managed by PRO Brazil, a producer responsibility organization. One widespread public-private agreement will integrate all mobile phone stakeholders, and environmental education actions and promotional events will promote citizen's participation.

  5. Full-potential multiple scattering theory with space-filling cells for bound and continuum states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatada, Keisuke; Hayakawa, Kuniko; Benfatto, Maurizio; Natoli, Calogero R

    2010-05-12

    We present a rigorous derivation of a real-space full-potential multiple scattering theory (FP-MST) that is free from the drawbacks that up to now have impaired its development (in particular the need to expand cell shape functions in spherical harmonics and rectangular matrices), valid both for continuum and bound states, under conditions for space partitioning that are not excessively restrictive and easily implemented. In this connection we give a new scheme to generate local basis functions for the truncated potential cells that is simple, fast, efficient, valid for any shape of the cell and reduces to the minimum the number of spherical harmonics in the expansion of the scattering wavefunction. The method also avoids the need for saturating 'internal sums' due to the re-expansion of the spherical Hankel functions around another point in space (usually another cell center). Thus this approach provides a straightforward extension of MST in the muffin-tin (MT) approximation, with only one truncation parameter given by the classical relation l(max) = kR(b), where k is the electron wavevector (either in the excited or ground state of the system under consideration) and R(b) is the radius of the bounding sphere of the scattering cell. Moreover, the scattering path operator of the theory can be found in terms of an absolutely convergent procedure in the l(max) --> ∞ limit. Consequently, this feature provides a firm ground for the use of FP-MST as a viable method for electronic structure calculations and makes possible the computation of x-ray spectroscopies, notably photo-electron diffraction, absorption and anomalous scattering among others, with the ease and versatility of the corresponding MT theory. Some numerical applications of the theory are presented, both for continuum and bound states.

  6. Molecular and Cellular Characterization of Space Flight Effects on Microvascular Endothelial Cell Function - PreparatoryWork for the SFEF Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamo, Michele; Barravecchia, Ivana; Mariotti, Sara; Merenda, Alessandra; De Cesari, Chiara; Vukich, Marco; Angeloni, Debora

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to microgravity during space flight (SF) of variable length induces suffering of the endothelium (the cells lining all blood vessels), mostly responsible for health problems found in astronauts and animals returning from space. Of interest to pre-nosological medicine, the effects of microgravity on astronauts are strikingly similar to the consequences of sedentary life, senescence and degenerative diseases on Earth, although SF effects are accelerated and reversible. Thus, microgravity is a significant novel model for better understanding of common pathologies. A comprehensive cell and molecular biology study is needed in order to explain pathophysiological findings after SFs. This project will study the effects of microgravity and cosmic radiation on endothelial cells (ECs) cultured on the International Space Station through analysis of 1) cell transcriptome, 2) DNA methylome, 3) DNA damage and cell senescence, 4) variations in cell cycle and cell morphology. This project has been selected by the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency and is presently in preparation. The ground study presented here was performed to determine the biological and engineering requirements that will allow us to retrieve suitable samples after culturing, fixing and storing ECs in space. We expect to identify molecular pathways activated by space microgravity in microvascular ECs, which may shed light on pathogenic molecular mechanisms responsible for endothelial suffering shared by astronauts and individuals affected with aging, degenerative and sedentary life-associated pathologies on Earth.

  7. Gas/Water and Heat Management of PEM-Based Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer Systems for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Ye, Fang; Guo, Hang; Ma, Chong Fang

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells were successfully utilized in the field of space applications to provide electric energy and potable water in human-rated space mission since the 1960s. Proton exchange membrane (PEM) based fuel cells, which provide high power/energy densities, were reconsidered as a promising space power equipment for future space exploration. PEM-based water electrolyzers were employed to provide life support for crews or as major components of regenerative fuel cells for energy storage. Gas/water and heat are some of the key challenges in PEM-based fuel cells and electrolytic cells, especially when applied to space scenarios. In the past decades, efforts related to gas/water and thermal control have been reported to effectively improve cell performance, stability lifespan, and reduce mass, volume and costs of those space cell systems. This study aimed to present a primary review of research on gas/water and waste thermal management for PEM-based electrochemical cell systems applied to future space explorations. In the fuel cell system, technologies related to reactant supplement, gas humidification, water removal and active/passive water separation were summarized in detail. Experimental studies were discussed to provide a direct understanding of the effect of the gas-liquid two-phase flow on product removal and mass transfer for PEM-based fuel cell operating in a short-term microgravity environment. In the electrolyzer system, several active and static passive phaseseparation methods based on diverse water supplement approaches were discussed. A summary of two advanced passive thermal management approaches, which are available for various sizes of space cell stacks, was specifically provided

  8. Gas/Water and Heat Management of PEM-Based Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer Systems for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Ye, Fang; Guo, Hang; Ma, Chong Fang

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells were successfully utilized in the field of space applications to provide electric energy and potable water in human-rated space mission since the 1960s. Proton exchange membrane (PEM) based fuel cells, which provide high power/energy densities, were reconsidered as a promising space power equipment for future space exploration. PEM-based water electrolyzers were employed to provide life support for crews or as major components of regenerative fuel cells for energy storage. Gas/water and heat are some of the key challenges in PEM-based fuel cells and electrolytic cells, especially when applied to space scenarios. In the past decades, efforts related to gas/water and thermal control have been reported to effectively improve cell performance, stability lifespan, and reduce mass, volume and costs of those space cell systems. This study aimed to present a primary review of research on gas/water and waste thermal management for PEM-based electrochemical cell systems applied to future space explorations. In the fuel cell system, technologies related to reactant supplement, gas humidification, water removal and active/passive water separation were summarized in detail. Experimental studies were discussed to provide a direct understanding of the effect of the gas-liquid two-phase flow on product removal and mass transfer for PEM-based fuel cell operating in a short-term microgravity environment. In the electrolyzer system, several active and static passive phaseseparation methods based on diverse water supplement approaches were discussed. A summary of two advanced passive thermal management approaches, which are available for various sizes of space cell stacks, was specifically provided

  9. Production of Solar Cells in Space from Non Specific Ores by Utilization of Electronically Enhanced Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    An ideal method of construction in space would utilize some form of the Universal Differentiator and Universal Constructor as described by Von Neumann (1). The Universal Differentiator is an idealized non ore specific extractive device which is capable of breaking any ore into its constituent elements, and the Universal Constructor can utilize these elements to build any device with controllability to the nanometer scale. During the Human Exploration Initiative program in the early 1990s a conceptual study was done (2) to understand whether such devices were feasible with near term technology for the utilization of space resources and energy. A candidate system was proposed which would utilize electronically enhanced sputtering as the differentiator. Highly ionized ions would be accelerated to a kinetic energy at which the interaction between them and the lattice elections in the ore would be at a maximum. Experiments have shown that the maximum disintegration of raw material occurs at an ion kinetic energy of about 5 MeV, regardless of the composition and structure of the raw material. Devices that could produce charged ion beams in this energy range in space were being tested in the early 1990s. At this energy, for example an ion in a beam of fluorine ions yields about 8 uranium ions from uranium fluoride, 1,400 hydrogen and oxygen atoms from ice, or 7,000 atoms from sulfur dioxide ice. The ions from the disintegrated ore would then be driven by an electrical field into a discriminator in the form of a mass spectrometer, where the magnetic field would divert the ions into collectors for future use or used directly in molecular beam construction techniques. The process would require 10-7 Torr vacuum which would be available in space or on the moon. If the process were used to make thin film silicon solar cells (ignoring any energy inefficiency for beam production), then energy break even for solar cells in space would occur after 14 days.

  10. Thin-film Organic-based Solar Cells for Space Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Harris, Jerry D.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Anglin, Emily J.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Clark, Harry R., Jr.; Gardner, Susan T. P.; Sun, Sam S.

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances in dye-sensitized and organic polymer solar cells have lead NASA to investigate the potential of these devices for space power generation. Dye-sensitized solar cells were exposed to simulated low-earth orbit conditions and their performance evaluated. All cells were characterized under simulated air mass zero (AM0) illumination. Complete cells were exposed to pressures less than 1 x 10(exp -7) torr for over a month, with no sign of sealant failure or electrolyte leakage. Cells from Solaronix SA were rapid thermal cycled under simulated low-earth orbit conditions. The cells were cycled 100 times from -80 C to 80 C, which is equivalent to 6 days in orbit. The best cell had a 4.6 percent loss in efficiency as a result of the thermal cycling. In a separate project, novel -Bridge-Donor-Bridge- Acceptor- (-BDBA-) type conjugated block copolymer systems have been synthesized and characterized by photoluminescence (PL). In comparison to pristine donor or acceptor, the PL emissions of final -B-D-B-A- block copolymer films were quenched over 99 percent. Effective and efficient photo induced electron transfer and charge separation occurs due to the interfaces of micro phase separated donor and acceptor blocks. The system is very promising for a variety high efficiency light harvesting applications. Under an SBIR contract, fullerene-doped polymer-based photovoltaic devices were fabricated and characterized. The best devices showed overall power efficiencies of approx. 0.14 percent under white light. Devices fabricated from 2 percent solids content solutions in chlorobenzene gave the best results. Presently, device lifetimes are too short to be practical for space applications.

  11. Planar conjugated polymers containing 9,10-disubstituted phenanthrene units for efficient polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangwu; Kang, Chong; Li, Cuihong; Lu, Zhen; Zhang, Jicheng; Gong, Xue; Zhao, Guangyao; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping; Bo, Zhishan

    2014-06-01

    Four novel conjugated polymers (P1-4) with 9,10-disubstituted phenanthrene (PhA) as the donor unit and 5,6-bis(octyloxy)benzothiadiazole as the acceptor unit are synthesized and characterized. These polymers are of medium bandgaps (2.0 eV), low-lying HOMO energy levels (below -5.3 eV), and high hole mobilities (in the range of 3.6 × 10(-3) to 0.02 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) ). Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells (PSCs) with P1-4:PC71 BM blends as the active layer and an alcohol-soluble fullerene derivative (FN-C60) as the interfacial layer between the active layer and cathode give the best power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.24%, indicating that 9,10-disubstituted PhA are potential donor materials for high-efficiency BHJ PSCs.

  12. Mechanical properties of regular porous biomaterials made from truncated cube repeating unit cells: Analytical solutions and computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, R; Sadighi, M; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has enabled fabrication of open-cell porous biomaterials based on repeating unit cells. The micro-architecture of the porous biomaterials and, thus, their physical properties could then be precisely controlled. Due to their many favorable properties, porous biomaterials manufactured using AM are considered as promising candidates for bone substitution as well as for several other applications in orthopedic surgery. The mechanical properties of such porous structures including static and fatigue properties are shown to be strongly dependent on the type of the repeating unit cell based on which the porous biomaterial is built. In this paper, we study the mechanical properties of porous biomaterials made from a relatively new unit cell, namely truncated cube. We present analytical solutions that relate the dimensions of the repeating unit cell to the elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, yield stress, and buckling load of those porous structures. We also performed finite element modeling to predict the mechanical properties of the porous structures. The analytical solution and computational results were found to be in agreement with each other. The mechanical properties estimated using both the analytical and computational techniques were somewhat higher than the experimental data reported in one of our recent studies on selective laser melted Ti-6Al-4V porous biomaterials. In addition to porosity, the elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio of the porous structures were found to be strongly dependent on the ratio of the length of the inclined struts to that of the uninclined (i.e. vertical or horizontal) struts, α, in the truncated cube unit cell. The geometry of the truncated cube unit cell approaches the octahedral and cube unit cells when α respectively approaches zero and infinity. Consistent with those geometrical observations, the analytical solutions presented in this study approached those of the octahedral and cube unit cells when

  13. Micro space power system using MEMS fuel cell for nano-satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongkwang; Kim, Taegyu

    2014-08-01

    A micro space power system using micro fuel cell was developed for nano-satellites. The power system was fabricated using microelectromechanical system (MEMS) fabrication technologies. Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell was selected in consideration of space environment. Sodium borohydride (NaBH4) was selected as a hydrogen source while hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was selected as an oxygen source. The power system consists of a micro fuel cell, micro-reactor, micro-pump, and fuel cartridges. The micro fuel cell was fabricated on a light-weight and corrosion-resistant glass plates. The micro-reactor was used to generate hydrogen from NaBH4 alkaline solution via a catalytic hydrolysis reaction. All components such as micro-pump, fuel cartridges, and auxiliary battery were integrated for a complete power system. The storability of NaBH4 solution was evaluated at -25 °C and the performance of the micro power system was measured at various operating conditions. The power output of micro power system reasonably followed up the given electric load conditions.

  14. Real time confocal laser scanning microscopy: Potential applications in space medicine and cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollan, Ana; Ward, Thelma; McHale, Anthony P.

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), in which tissues may be rendered fatally light-sensitive represents a relatively novel treatment for cancer and other disorders such as cardiovascular disease. It offers significant application to disease control in an isolated environment such as space flight. In studying PDT in the laboratory, low energy lasers such as HeNe lasers are used to activate the photosensitized cellular target. A major problem associated with these studies is that events occurring during actual exposure of the target cells to the system cannot be examined in real time. In this study HeLa cells were photosensitized and photodynamic activation was accomplished using the scanning microbeam from a confocal laser scanning microscope. This form of activation allowed for simultaneous photoactivation and observation and facilitated the recording of events at a microscopic level during photoactivation. Effects of photodynamic activation on the target cells were monitored using the fluorophores rhodamine 123 and ethidium homodimer-1. Potential applications of these forms of analyses to space medicine and cell biology are discussed.

  15. Genome-wide transcriptional comparison of MPP+ treated human neuroblastoma cells with the state space model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hwan Do

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study compared a parkinsonian neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+ response in two distinct phenotypes of human neuroblastoma cell lines: neuronal N-type SH-SY5Y cells and flat substrate-adherent S-type SH-EP cells. SH-SY5Y and SH-EP cells shared only 14% of their own MPP+ response genes, and their gene ontology (GO analysis revealed significant endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress by misfolded proteins. Gene modules, which are groups of transcriptionally co-expressed genes with similar biological functions, were identified for SH-SY5Y and SH-EP cells by using time-series microarray data with the state space model (SSM. All modules of SH-SY5Y and SH-EP cells showed strong positive auto-regulation that was often mediated via signal molecules and may cause bi-stability. Interactions in gene levels were calculated by using SSM parameters obtained in the process of module identification. Gene networks that were constructed from the gene interaction matrix showed different hub genes with high node degrees between SH-SY5Y and SH-EP cells. That is, key hub genes of SH-SY5Y cells were DCN, HIST1H2BK, and C5orf40, whereas those of SH-EP cells were MSH6, RBCK1, MTHFD2, ZNF26, CTH, and CARS. These results suggest that inhibition of the mitochondrial complex I by MPP+ might induce different downstream processes that are cell type dependent.

  16. The Application of Load-cell Technique in the Study of Armour Unit Responses to Impact Loads Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The slender, complex types of armour units, such as Tetrapods and Dolosse are widely used for rubble mound breakwaters. Many of the recent failures of such structures were caused by unforeseen early breakage of the units, thus revealing an in balance between the strength (structural integrity....... slender armour units can be studied. by load-cell technique. Moreover, the paper presents DoJos design diagrams for the prediction of both breakage and hydraulic stability...

  17. The Application of Load-cell Technique in the Study of Armour Unit Responses to Impact Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Zhou

    1994-01-01

    The slender, complex types of armour units, such as Tetrapods and Dolosse are widely used for rubble mound breakwaters. Many of the recent failures of such structures were caused by unforeseen early breakage of the units, thus revealing an inbalance between the strength (structural integrity...... on slender armour units can be studied by load-cell technique. Moreover, the paper presents Dolos design diagrams for the prediction of both breakage and hydraulic stability....

  18. Space Heaters, Computers, Cell Phone Chargers: How Plugged In AreCommercial Buildings?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie; Brown, Richard; Busch, John; Pinckard, Margaret; Roberson, Judy

    2007-02-28

    Evidenceof electric plug loads in commercial buildings isvisible everyday: space heaters, portable fans, and the IT technician'stwo monitors connected to one PC. The Energy Information Administrationestimates that office and miscellaneous equipment together will consume2.18 quads in 2006, nearly 50 percent of U.S. commercial electricity use.Although the importance of commercial plug loads is documented, its verynature (diverse product types, products not installed when buildinginitially constructed, and products often hidden in closets) makes itdifficult to accurately count and categorize the end use.We auditedsixteen buildings in three cities (San Francisco, Atlanta, Pittsburgh)including office, medical and education building types. We inventoriedthe number and types of office and miscellaneous electric equipment aswell as estimated total energy consumption due to these product types. Intotal, we audited approximately 4,000 units of office equipment and 6,000units of miscellaneous equipment and covered a diverse range of productsranging from electric pencil sharpeners with a unit energy consumption(UEC) of 1 kWh/yr to a kiln with a UEC of 7,000 kWh/yr. Our paperpresents a summary of the density and type of plug load equipment foundas well as the estimated total energy consumption of the equipment.Additionally, we present equipment trends observed and provide insightsto how policy makers can target energy efficiency for this growing enduse.

  19. Hydrogen depolarized carbon dioxide concentrator performance improvements and cell pair structural tests. [for manned space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, J. D.; Aylward, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The investigations and testing associated with the CO2 removal efficiency and voltage degradation of a hydrogen depolarized carbon oxide concentrator are reported. Also discussed is the vibration testing of a water vapor electrolysis cell pair. Performance testing of various HDC cell pairs with Cs2CO3 electrolyte provided sufficient parametric and endurance data to size a six man space station prototype CO2 removal system as having 36 HDC cell pairs, and to verify a life capability exceeding six moths. Testing also demonstrated that tetramethylammonium carbonate is an acceptable HDC electrolyte for operating over the relative humidity range of 30 to 90 percent and over a temperature range of 50 to 80 F.

  20. Reduced lymphocyte activation in space - Role of cell-substratum interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmuender, F. K.; Kiess, M.; Lee, J.; Cogoli, A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of substratum adhesiveness on lymphocyte responsiveness was investigated by reducing and blocking cell adhesion with poly-HEMA in a simple on ground system. Cells grown on medium thick and thick poly-HEMA films were rounded in shape and displayed no signs of spreading. By contrast, on tissue culture plastic and very thin poly-HEMA films, they showed clear signs of spreading. The mitogenic response of lymphocytes grown on thick poly-HEMA films was reduced by up to 68 percent of the control (tissue culture plastic). Interferon gamma production was virtually nil when the cells were grown on the least adhesive substratum. These results show that activated lymphocytes need to anchor and spread prior to achieving an optimal proliferation response. It is concluded that decreased lymphocyte adhesion could contribute to the depressed in vitro lymphocyte responsiveness found in the microgravity conditions of space flight.

  1. A Mechanogenetic Toolkit for Interrogating Cell Signaling in Space and Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Daeha; Southard, Kaden M; Kim, Ji-Wook; Lee, Hyun Jung; Farlow, Justin; Lee, Jung-Uk; Litt, David B; Haas, Thomas; Alivisatos, A Paul; Cheon, Jinwoo; Gartner, Zev J; Jun, Young-Wook

    2016-06-02

    Tools capable of imaging and perturbing mechanical signaling pathways with fine spatiotemporal resolution have been elusive, despite their importance in diverse cellular processes. The challenge in developing a mechanogenetic toolkit (i.e., selective and quantitative activation of genetically encoded mechanoreceptors) stems from the fact that many mechanically activated processes are localized in space and time yet additionally require mechanical loading to become activated. To address this challenge, we synthesized magnetoplasmonic nanoparticles that can image, localize, and mechanically load targeted proteins with high spatiotemporal resolution. We demonstrate their utility by investigating the cell-surface activation of two mechanoreceptors: Notch and E-cadherin. By measuring cellular responses to a spectrum of spatial, chemical, temporal, and mechanical inputs at the single-molecule and single-cell levels, we reveal how spatial segregation and mechanical force cooperate to direct receptor activation dynamics. This generalizable technique can be used to control and understand diverse mechanosensitive processes in cell signaling. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  2. 520 MeV proton irradiation effects on GaAs/Ge space solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Rong; Guo Zeng Liang; Zhang Xin; Zhai Zuo Xu

    2002-01-01

    High-energy proton irradiation effects on GaAs/Ge solar cells for space use are studied. The cells are irradiated by protons with an energy of 5-20 MeV up to a fluence ranging from 1 x 10 sup 9 to 7 x 10 sup 1 sup 3 cm sup - sup 2 , and then the change of the photovoltaic performances is measured at AMO. It is shown that the performances of the cells keep no change under 1 x 10 sup 9 cm sup - sup 2 irradiation. Above 1 x 10 sup 9 cm sup - sup 2 irradiation, I sub s sub c , V sub o sub c and P sub m sub a sub x degrade, as proton irradiation fluence increases. But the higher the proton energy, the less the degradation of I sub s sub c , V sub o sub c and P sub m sub a sub x

  3. Suspension cell culture in microgravity and development of a space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1987-01-01

    NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first space bioreactor has been designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small (500 ml) bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption, and control of low shear stress on cells.

  4. Homojunction GaAs solar cells grown by close space vapor transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, Jason W. [University of Oregon; Ritenour, Andrew J. [University of Oregon; Greenaway, Ann L. [University of Oregon; Aloni, Shaul [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Boettcher, Shannon W. [University of Oregon

    2014-06-08

    We report on the first pn junction solar cells grown by homoepitaxy of GaAs using close space vapor transport (CSVT). Cells were grown both on commercial wafer substrates and on a CSVT absorber film, and had efficiencies reaching 8.1%, open circuit voltages reaching 909 mV, and internal quantum efficiency of 90%. The performance of these cells is partly limited by the electron diffusion lengths in the wafer substrates, as evidenced by the improved peak internal quantum efficiency in devices fabricated on a CSVT absorber film. Unoptimized highly-doped n-type emitters also limit the photocurrent, indicating that thinner emitters with reduced doping, and ultimately wider band gap window or surface passivation layers, are required to increase the efficiency.

  5. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Wind River Basin Province (035) Assessment Units Quarter-Mile Cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Cell maps for each oil and gas assessment unit were created by the USGS to illustrate the degree of exploration, type of production, and distribution of production...

  6. Failure mechanisms of additively manufactured porous biomaterials: Effects of porosity and type of unit cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadkhodapour, J; Montazerian, H; Darabi, A Ch; Anaraki, A P; Ahmadi, S M; Zadpoor, A A; Schmauder, S

    2015-10-01

    Since the advent of additive manufacturing techniques, regular porous biomaterials have emerged as promising candidates for tissue engineering scaffolds owing to their controllable pore architecture and feasibility in producing scaffolds from a variety of biomaterials. The architecture of scaffolds could be designed to achieve similar mechanical properties as in the host bone tissue, thereby avoiding issues such as stress shielding in bone replacement procedure. In this paper, the deformation and failure mechanisms of porous titanium (Ti6Al4V) biomaterials manufactured by selective laser melting from two different types of repeating unit cells, namely cubic and diamond lattice structures, with four different porosities are studied. The mechanical behavior of the above-mentioned porous biomaterials was studied using finite element models. The computational results were compared with the experimental findings from a previous study of ours. The Johnson-Cook plasticity and damage model was implemented in the finite element models to simulate the failure of the additively manufactured scaffolds under compression. The computationally predicted stress-strain curves were compared with the experimental ones. The computational models incorporating the Johnson-Cook damage model could predict the plateau stress and maximum stress at the first peak with less than 18% error. Moreover, the computationally predicted deformation modes were in good agreement with the results of scaling law analysis. A layer-by-layer failure mechanism was found for the stretch-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the cubic unit cell, while the failure of the bending-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the diamond unit cells, was accompanied by the shearing bands of 45°.

  7. Basic Space Science; United Nations/European Space Agency Workshops for Developing Countries, 2nd, Bogota, Colombia, November 9-13, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubold, Hans J. (Editor); Torres, Sergio (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The conference primarily covered astrophysical and astronomical topics on stellar and solar modeling and processes, high magnetic field influence on stellar spectra, cosmological topics utilizing Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) data and radioastronomic mapping as well as cosmic gravitational instability calculations, astrometry of open clusters amd solar gravitational focusing, extremely energetic gamma rays, interacting binaries, and balloon-borne instrumentation. Other papers proposed an active Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) communication scheme to neighboring solar-like systems and more direct involvement of and with the public in astronomy and space exploration projects.

  8. Identified metabolic signature for assessing red blood cell unit quality is associated with endothelial damage markers and clinical outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordbar, Aarash; Johansson, Pär I.; Paglia, Giuseppe;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been interest in determining whether older red blood cell (RBC) units have negative clinical effects. Numerous observational studies have shown that older RBC units are an independent factor for patient mortality. However, recently published randomized clinical trials have...

  9. High quality-factor fano metasurface comprising a single resonator unit cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Warne, Larry K.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Langston, William L.; Campione, Salvatore; Brener, Igal; Liu, Sheng

    2017-06-20

    A new monolithic resonator metasurface design achieves ultra-high Q-factors while using only one resonator per unit cell. The metasurface relies on breaking the symmetry of otherwise highly symmetric resonators to induce intra-resonator mixing of bright and dark modes (rather than inter-resonator couplings), and is scalable from the near-infrared to radio frequencies and can be easily implemented in dielectric materials. The resulting high-quality-factor Fano metasurface can be used in many sensing, spectral filtering, and modulation applications.

  10. Unit Cell Structure of Crystal Polytypes in InAs and InSb Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegner, Dominik; Panse, Christian; Mandl, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    , wurtzite, and 4H polytypes for InAs and InSb nanowires, using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results are compared to density functional theory calculations. Experiment and theory show that the occurrence of hexagonal bilayers tends to stretch the distances of atomic layers...... parallel to the c axis and to reduce the in-plane distances compared to those in zinc blende. The change of the lattice parameters scales linearly with the hexagonality of the polytype, defined as the fraction of bilayers with hexagonal character within one unit cell....

  11. Unit cell modeling in support of interim performance assessment for low level tank waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, N.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    A unit cell model is used to simulate the base analysis case and related sensitivity cases for the interim performance assessment of low level tank waste disposal. Simulation case results are summarized in terms of fractional contaminant release rates to the vadose zone and to the water table at the unconfined aquifer. Results suggest that the crushed glass water conditioning layer at the top of the facility and the chemical retardation pad at the bottom of the facility can be important components of the facility. Results also suggest that the release rates to the water table are dominated by the release rate from the waste form.

  12. Thin film CdTe solar cells by close spaced sublimation: Recent results from pilot line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siepchen, B., E-mail: bastian.siepchen@ctf-solar.com [CTF Solar GmbH, Industriestraße 2, 65779 Kelkheim (Germany); Drost, C.; Späth, B.; Krishnakumar, V.; Richter, H.; Harr, M. [CTF Solar GmbH, Industriestraße 2, 65779 Kelkheim (Germany); Bossert, S.; Grimm, M. [Roth and Rau AG, An der Baumschule 6-8, 09337 Hohenstein-Ernstthal (Germany); Häfner, K.; Modes, T.; Zywitzki, O.; Morgner, H. [Fraunhofer Institute for Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, Winterbergstrasse 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany)

    2013-05-01

    CdTe is an attractive material to produce high efficient and low cost thin film solar cells. The semiconducting layers of this kind of solar cell can be deposited by the Close Spaced Sublimation (CSS) process. The advantages of this technique are high deposition rates and an excellent utilization of the raw material, leading to low production costs and competitive module prices. CTF Solar GmbH is offering equipment and process knowhow for the production of CdTe solar modules. For further improvement of the technology, research is done at a pilot line, which covers all relevant process steps for manufacture of CdTe solar cells. Herein, we present the latest results from the process development and our research activities on single functional layers as well as for complete solar cell devices. Efficiencies above 13% have already been obtained with Cu-free back contacts. An additional focus is set on different transparent conducting oxide materials for the front contact and a Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} based back contact. - Highlights: ► Laboratory established on industrial level for CdTe solar cell research ► 13.0% cell efficiency with our standard front contact and Cu-free back contact ► Research on ZnO-based transparent conducting oxide and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} back contacts ► High resolution scanning electron microscopy analysis of ion polished cross section.

  13. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, David M.; Benoit, Michael R.; Nelson, Emily S.; Hammond, Timmothy G.

    2004-01-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  14. Mapping of error cells in clinical measure to symmetric power space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelman, H; Abelman, S

    2007-09-01

    During the refraction procedure, the power of the nearest equivalent sphere lens, known as the scalar power, is conserved within upper and lower bounds in the sphere (and cylinder) lens powers. Bounds are brought closer together while keeping the circle of least confusion on the retina. The sphere and cylinder powers and changes in these powers are thus dependent. Changes are depicted in the cylinder-sphere plane by error cells with one pair of parallel sides of negative gradient and the other pair aligned with the graph axis of cylinder power. Scalar power constitutes a vector space, is a meaningful ophthalmic quantity and is represented by the semi-trace of the dioptric power matrix. The purpose of this article is to map to error cells for the following: coordinates of the dioptric power matrix, its principal powers and meridians and its entries from error cells surrounding powers in sphere, cylinder and axis. Error cells in clinical measure for conserved scalar power now contain more compensatory lens powers. Such cells and their respective mappings in terms of most scientific and alternate clinical quantities now image consistently not only to the cells from where they originate but also to each other.

  15. Low cost, high concentration ratio solar cell array for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, R. E.; Rauschenbach, H. S.; Cannady, M. D.; Whang, U. S.; Crabtree, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    A miniaturized Cassegrainian-type concentrator solar array concept for space applications is described. In-orbit cell operating temperatures near 80 C are achieved with purely passive cell cooling and a net concentration ratio of 100. A multiplicity of miniaturized, rigid solar cell concentrator subassemblies are electrically interconnected in conventional fashion and mounted into rigid frames to form concentrator solar panel assemblies approximately 14-mm thick. A plurality of such interconnected panels forms a stowable and deployable solar cell blanket. It is projected that for 20% efficient silicon cells an array of 500 kW beginning-of-life output capability, including orbiter cradle structures, can be transported by a single shuttle orbiter flight into low earth orbit. In-orbit array specific performance is calculated to be approximately 100 W/sq m and 20 W/kg, including all stowage, deployment and array figure control equipment designed for a 30-year orbital life. Higher efficiency gallium arsenide and multiple band gap solar cells will improve these performance factors correspondingly.

  16. Neurotoxicity of human neural cells induced by space radiation: in vitro risk assessment and countermeasure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, P.; Vazquez, M.; Kim, A.

    As the duration of space missions increases the potential for neurological damage to astronauts resulting from exposure to radiation also increases To explore the cytotoxic effects of low and high LET radiation on cells of the central nervous system we utilized a model in vitro system consisting of a human neuronal progenitor cell line NT2 and its terminally differentiated derivative hNT neurons We found that exposure to numerous forms of ionizing radiation induced cell detachment necrosis and apoptosis in time dose and LET dependent manners From the slopes of the dose-response curves we calculated RBE values for each form of heavy ion radiation A sequential field of 1 GeV n protons and iron ions induced apoptosis to a greater extent than either ion alone and the time between hits was also an important determining factor In addition cycling neuronal progenitor cells underwent a dramatic G2 phase specific cell cycle delay within 6 hours following exposure to either low or high LET radiation The molecular effects of HZE radiation were also investigated with an emphasis on the cell stress response protein p53 Heavy ion radiation induced expression of p53 in a time and dose dependent manner in both neuronal progenitor and mature neuronal cells Furthermore several post-translational modifications to the p53 protein were detected 2 hours after exposure to gamma rays Experiments incorporating pifithrin- alpha a small molecule inhibitor of p53 suggest that induction of both apoptosis and the cell cycle delay in human NT2 cells is

  17. Auxiliary power unit based on a solid oxide fuel cell and fuelled with diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jeremy; Boltze, Matthias

    An auxiliary power unit (APU) is presented that is fuelled with diesel, thermally self-sustaining, and based on a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The APU is rated at 1 kW electrical, and can generate electrical power after a 3 h warm-up phase. System features include a "dry" catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) diesel reformer, a 30 cell SOFC stack with an open cathode, and a porous-media afterburner. The APU does not require a supply of external water. The SOFC stack is an outcome of a development partnership with H.C. Starck GmbH and Fraunhofer IKTS, and is discussed in detail in an accompanying paper.

  18. Root cause analysis of the degradation in a unitized regenerative fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Amit C.; Meenakshi, S.; Ghosh, Prakash C.

    2017-03-01

    The present study emphasizes the possible modes of failure of a unitized regenerative fuel cell (URFC) when operated in fuel cell as well as in electrolysis mode at different temperatures viz. 30 °C and 60 °C. The carbon based catalyst (Pt/C) and diffusion layers are used to characterize the degradation of the URFCs. The electrolysis mode of operation is found to dominate the root cause of failure with increase in temperature. Agglomeration and loss of catalyst along with delamination of electrode from membrane are observed. Membrane degradation owing to it's structural as well as chemical damage is seen to be prominent at higher temperature. Characterization techniques such as SEM, TEM and ICP-AES confirm the study showcasing the effect.

  19. Optimizing energy management of decentralized photovoltaic. Fuel cell - direct storage - power supply units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocklisch, Thilo; Schufft, Wolfgang; Bocklisch, Steffen [Chemnitz Univ. of Technology (TUC) (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a new optimizing energy management concept for decentralized power supply units. Main goal is the coordinated utilization of dynamically controllable combined-heat-and-power-plants (e.g. fuel cell cogeneration plants) and electrochemical direct storages (e.g. future electric car batteries) for the active balancing of fluctuating renewable energy generation (e.g. building integrated photovoltaics) and fluctuation electricity consumption. The self-utilization and partial storage of renewable energy helps to stabilize the grid in a ''bottom-up'' approach. The new energy mangement concept features a three-layer control structure, which aims for the optimization of the power flows, minimizing the fuel consumption and the dynamic stress imposed onto the fuel cell. (orig.)

  20. Space space space

    CERN Document Server

    Trembach, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Space is an introduction to the mysteries of the Universe. Included are Task Cards for independent learning, Journal Word Cards for creative writing, and Hands-On Activities for reinforcing skills in Math and Language Arts. Space is a perfect introduction to further research of the Solar System.

  1. Spherical TiO2 aggregates with different building units for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaohui; Su, Xunjia; Hou, Genliang; Bi, Song; Xiao, Zhou; Jia, Haipeng

    2013-09-07

    Tailoring the architectures of spherical TiO2 aggregates is crucial to obtain superior photovoltaic properties and promote their application in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Herein, we synthesized spherical TiO2 aggregates using different building units, including nanocrystallites, nanorods, nanosheets, and nanotubes, via a hydrothermal method, and studied the effect of the building units on the performances of DSSCs. The aggregates assembled by uniform nanosheet and nanotube building units were synthesized with the use of spherical TiO2 nanorod aggregates as titanium sources in an alkaline hydrothermal reaction. Compared with TiO2 nanoparticles, the spherical TiO2 aggregates possess higher surface area, more efficient light scattering ability, and better electron transport properties. Among the four types of spherical TiO2 aggregates; the nanorod, nanotube, and nanosheet aggregates demonstrate better electron transport properties than the nanocrystallite aggregates; the nanotube and nanosheet aggregates exhibit more efficient light scattering than the nanocrystallite and nanorod aggregates; and the nanotube aggregates show the highest surface area. Thus the DSSC based on nanotube aggregates exhibited the highest energy conversion efficiency of 7.48%, which is 16.0%, 9.7%, and 19.5% higher than those of the DSSCs based on the nanosheet, nanorod, and nanocrystallite aggregates, respectively.

  2. Compact Design of 10 kW Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack Systems with Microcontroller Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiaokang Ma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, fuel, oxidant supply and cooling systems with microcontroller units (MCU are developed in a compact design to fit two 5 kW proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC stacks. At the initial stage, the testing facility of the system has a large volume (2.0 m × 2.0 m × 1.5 m with a longer pipeline and excessive control sensors for safe testing. After recognizing the performance and stability of stack, the system is redesigned to fit in a limited space (0.4 m × 0.5 m × 0.8 m. Furthermore, the stack performance is studied under different hydrogen recycling modes. Then, two similar 5 kW stacks are directly coupled with diodes to obtain a higher power output and safe operation. The result shows that the efficiency of the 5 kW stack is 43.46% with a purge period of 2 min with hydrogen recycling and that the hydrogen utilization rate µf is 66.31%. In addition, the maximum power output of the twin-coupled module (a power module with two stacks in electrical cascade/parallel arrangement is 9.52 kW.

  3. Quantifying the Opportunity Space for Future Electricity Generation: An Application to Offshore Wind Energy in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcy, Cara [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beiter, Philipp [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report provides a high-level indicator of the future electricity demand for additional electric power generation that is not met by existing generation sources between 2015 and 2050. The indicator is applied to coastal regions, including the Great Lakes, to assess the regional opportunity space for offshore wind. An assessment of opportunity space can be a first step in determining the prospects and the system value of a technology. The metric provides the maximal amount of additional generation that is likely required to satisfy load in future years.

  4. On growth and covering theorems of quasi-convex mappings in the unit ball of a complex Banach space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文俊; 刘太顺

    2002-01-01

    A class of biholomorphic mappings named "quasi-convex mapping" is introduced in the unitball of a complex Banach space. It is proved that this class of mappings is a proper subset of the class ofstarlike mappings and contains the class of convex mappings properly, and it has the same growth and coveringtheorems as the convex mappings. Furthermore, when the Banach space is confined to Cn, the "quasi-convexmapping" is exactly the "quasi-convex mapping of type A" introduced by K. A. Roper and T. J. Suffridge.

  5. Thin-Film Solar Cells on Polymer Substrates for Space Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepps, A. F.; McNatt, Jeremiah; Morel, D. L.; Ferckides, C. S.; Jin, M. H.; Orbey, N.; Cushman, M.; Birkmire, R. W.; Shafarman, W. N.; Newton, R.

    2004-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays have played a key role in power generation in space. The current technology will continue to evolve but is limited in the important mass specific power metric (MSP or power/weight ratio) because it is based on bulk crystal technology. Solar cells based on thin-film materials offer the promise of much higher MSP and much lower cost. However, for many space applications, a 20% or greater AM0 efficiency (eta) may be required. The leading thin-film materials, amorphous Si, CuInSe, and CdTe have seen significant advances in efficiency over the last decade but will not achieve the required efficiency in the near future. Several new technologies are herein described to maximize both device eta and MSP. We will discuss these technologies in the context of space exploration and commercialization. One novel approach involves the use of very lightweight polyimide substrates. We describe efforts to enable this advance including materials processing and device fabrication and characterization. Another approach involves stacking two cells on top of each other. These tandem devices more effectively utilize solar radiation by passing through non-absorbed longer wavelength light to a narrow-bandgap bottom cell material. Modeling of current devices in tandem format indicates that AM0 efficiencies near 20% can be achieved with potential for 25% in the near future. Several important technical issues need to be resolved to realize the benefits of lightweight technologies for solar arrays, such as: monolithic interconnects, lightweight array structures, and new ultra-light support and deployment mechanisms. Recent advances will be stressed.

  6. Changes in functional activity of bone tissue cells under space flight conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, Natalia; Nesterenko, Olga; Kabitskaya, Olga

    The space flight conditions affect considerably the state of bone tissue, leading to the development of osteoporosis and osteopenia. Many aspects of reactions of bone tissue cells still remain unclear until now. With the use of electron microscopy we studied the samples gathered from the femoral bonеs metaphyses of rats flown on board the space laboratory (Spacelab - 2) during 2 weeks and samples from tibial bones of mice C57 Black ( Bion М-1). It was established, that under microgravity conditions there occur remodelling processes in a spongy bone related with a deficit of support load. In this work the main attention is focused on studying the ultrastructure of osteogenetic cells and osteoclasts. The degree of differentiation and functional state are evaluated according to the degree of development of organelles for specific biosynthesis: rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), Golgy complex (GC), as well as the state of mitochondria and cell nucleus. As compared with a synchronous control, the population of osteogenetic cells from zones of bone reconstruction shows a decrease in the number of functionally active forms. We can judge of this from the reduction of a specific volume of RER, GC, mitochondria in osteoblasts. RER loses architectonics typical for osteoblasts and, as against the control, is represented by short narrow canaliculi distributed throughout the cytoplasm; some canals disintegrate. GC is slightly pronounced, mitochondria become smaller in size and acquire an optically dark matrix. These phenomena are supposed to be associated with the desorganization of microtubules and microfilaments in the cells under microgravity conditions. The population of osteogenetic cells shows a decrease in the number of differentiating osteoblasts and an increase in the number of little-differentiated stromal cells. In the population of osteoblasts, degrading and apoptotic cells are sometimes encountered. Such zones show a numerical increase of monocytic cells and

  7. Unit cell-based computer-aided manufacturing system for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Wook; Park, Jeong Hun; Kang, Tae-Yun; Seol, Young-Joon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2012-03-01

    Scaffolds play an important role in the regeneration of artificial tissues or organs. A scaffold is a porous structure with a micro-scale inner architecture in the range of several to several hundreds of micrometers. Therefore, computer-aided construction of scaffolds should provide sophisticated functionality for porous structure design and a tool path generation strategy that can achieve micro-scale architecture. In this study, a new unit cell-based computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) system was developed for the automated design and fabrication of a porous structure with micro-scale inner architecture that can be applied to composite tissue regeneration. The CAM system was developed by first defining a data structure for the computing process of a unit cell representing a single pore structure. Next, an algorithm and software were developed and applied to construct porous structures with a single or multiple pore design using solid freeform fabrication technology and a 3D tooth/spine computer-aided design model. We showed that this system is quite feasible for the design and fabrication of a scaffold for tissue engineering.

  8. Imaging the impact on cuprate superconductivity of varying the interatomic distances within individual crystal unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, J A; Lee, Jinho; Wang, M; McElroy, K; Fujita, K; Andersen, B M; Hirschfeld, P J; Eisaki, H; Uchida, S; Davis, J C

    2008-03-04

    Many theoretical models of high-temperature superconductivity focus only on the doping dependence of the CuO(2)-plane electronic structure. However, such models are manifestly insufficient to explain the strong variations in superconducting critical temperature, T(c), among cuprates that have identical hole density but are crystallographically different outside of the CuO(2) plane. A key challenge, therefore, has been to identify a predominant out-of-plane influence controlling the superconductivity, with much attention focusing on the distance d(A) between the apical oxygen and the planar copper atom. Here we report direct determination of how variations in interatomic distances within individual crystalline unit cells affect the superconducting energy-gap maximum Delta of Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta). In this material, quasiperiodic variations of unit cell geometry occur in the form of a bulk crystalline "supermodulation." Within each supermodulation period, we find approximately 9 +/- 1% cosinusoidal variation in local Delta that is anticorrelated with the associated d(A) variations. Furthermore, we show that phenomenological consistency would exist between these effects and the random Delta variations found near dopant atoms if the primary effect of the interstitial dopant atom is to displace the apical oxygen so as to diminish d(A) or tilt the CuO(5) pyramid. Thus, we reveal a strong, nonrandom out-of-plane effect on cuprate superconductivity at atomic scale.

  9. Intra-unit-cell nematic charge order in the titanium-oxypnictide family of superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Benjamin A.; Bozin, Emil S.; Hu, Hefei; Zhu, Yimei; Nozaki, Yasumasa; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uemura, Yasutomo J.; Yin, Wei-Guo; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the role played by broken-symmetry states such as charge, spin and orbital orders in the mechanism of emergent properties, such as high-temperature superconductivity, is a major current topic in materials research. That the order may be within one unit cell, such as nematic, was only recently considered theoretically, but its observation in the iron-pnictide and doped cuprate superconductors places it at the forefront of current research. Here, we show that the recently discovered BaTi2Sb2O superconductor and its parent compound BaTi2As2O form a symmetry-breaking nematic ground state that can be naturally explained as an intra-unit-cell nematic charge order with d-wave symmetry, pointing to the ubiquity of the phenomenon. These findings, together with the key structural features in these materials being intermediate between the cuprate and iron-pnictide high-temperature superconducting materials, render the titanium oxypnictides an important new material system to understand the nature of nematic order and its relationship to superconductivity.

  10. Cell adhesion and polarisation on molecularly defined spacing gradient surfaces of cyclic RGDfK peptide patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld-Warneken, Vera C; Arnold, Marco; Cavalcanti-Adam, Ada; López-García, Mónica; Kessler, Horst; Spatz, Joachim P

    2008-09-01

    In vivo cell migration and location are orchestrally guided by soluble and bound chemical gradients. Here, gradients of extracellular matrix molecules are formed synthetically by the combination of a surface nanopatterning technique called block copolymer nanolithography (BCN) and a biofunctionalisation technique. A modified substrate dip-coating process of BCN allows for the formation of precise molecular gradients of cyclic RGDfK peptide patches at interfaces, which are presented to cells for testing cell adhesion and polarisation. Surfaces formed by BCN consist of hexagonally ordered gold dot patterns with a gradient in particle spacing. Each dot serves as a chemical anchor for the binding of cyclic RGDfK peptides, which are specifically recognised by alpha(v)beta(3) integrins. Due to steric hindrance only up to one integrin binds to one functionalised gold dot which forms a peptide patch spacing. We demonstrate how cell morphology, adhesion area, actin and vinculin distribution as well as cell body polarisation are influenced by the peptide patch spacing gradient. As a consequence, these gradients of adhesive ligands induce cell orientation towards smaller particle spacing when the gradient strength is 15nm/mm at least. This implicates that an adherent cell's sensitivity to differentiate between ligand patch spacing is approximately 1nm across the cell body.

  11. Topological recursion for chord diagrams, RNA complexes, and cells in moduli spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Chekhov, Leonid O.; Penner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    and free energies are convergent for small t and all s as a perturbation of the Gaussian potential, which arises for st=0. This perturbation is computed using the formalism of the topological recursion. The corresponding enumeration of chord diagrams gives at once the number of RNA complexes of a given...... topology as well as the number of cells in Riemann's moduli spaces for bordered surfaces. The free energies are computed here in principle for all genera and explicitly for genera less than four....

  12. High power density alkaline fuel cell technology for MMW space burst power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, J. Lawrence, Jr.; Trocciola, John C.; Wertheim, Ronald J.

    The use of advanced alkaline regenerative fuel cell energy storage systems to provide 10's to 100's of MWe of sprint (burst) power for 100's of seconds per orbit of SDI weapons platform was studied. Recharge power is supplied by a multimegawatt space based nuclear power system. Regenerative fuel cell energy storage systems offer the potential for significant platform mass reduction by reducing the size and mass of the nuclear power source required. This is because the reactor can be sized for the smaller average power level for the energy storage system, rather than the sprint power level. The regenerative fuel cell is a particularly attractive energy storage device because the fuel cell is essentially a static power conversion device, which results in excellent platform stability for weapon pointing and tracking. Based upon the detailed point design and conceptual layout, the alkaline regenerative fuel cell energy storage system is an attractive choice for integration with a nuclear thermionic system for providing multimegawatt burst power and multi orbit capability.

  13. International Space Station (ISS) Bacterial Filter Elements (BFEs): Filter Efficiency and Pressure Drop Testing of Returned Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert D.; Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.; Berger, Gordon M.; Perry, Jay L.

    2017-01-01

    The air quality control equipment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and future deep space exploration vehicles provide the vital function of maintaining a clean cabin environment for the crew and the hardware. This becomes a serious challenge in pressurized space compartments since no outside air ventilation is possible, and a larger particulate load is imposed on the filtration system due to lack of sedimentation. The ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system architecture in the U.S. Segment uses a distributed particulate filtration approach consisting of traditional High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters deployed at multiple locations in each U.S. Seg-ment module; these filters are referred to as Bacterial Filter Elements, or BFEs. In our previous work, we presented results of efficiency and pressure drop measurements for a sample set of two returned BFEs with a service life of 2.5 years. In this follow-on work, we present similar efficiency, pressure drop, and leak tests results for a larger sample set of six returned BFEs. The results of this work can aid the ISS Program in managing BFE logistics inventory through the stations planned lifetime as well as provide insight for managing filter element logistics for future exploration missions. These results also can provide meaningful guidance for particulate filter designs under consideration for future deep space exploration missions.

  14. Fuel cell collaboration in the United States. A report to the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-08-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide members of the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells with information regarding collaborative opportunities in the United States. The report is designed to provide an overview of key issues and activities and to provide guidance on strategies for finding U.S. research and commercial partners and gaining access to the U.S. market. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the key drivers of policy at the federal and state government levels regarding hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and provides a perspective of the U.S. industry and key players. It also suggests three general pathways for accessing U.S. opportunities: enhancing visibility; developing vendor relationships; and establishing a formal presence in the U.S. The next sections summarize focus areas for commercial and research activity that currently are of the greatest interest in the U.S. Section 2 describes major programs within the federal government and national laboratories, and discusses various methods for identifying R and D funding opportunities, with an overview of federal acquisition regulations. Section 3 reviews the efforts of several state governments engaging the fuel cell industry as an economic driver and presents an overview of acquisition at the state level. Section 4 discusses university research and development (R and D) and university-industry partnerships. There are 12 appendices attached to the report. These appendices provide more detailed information regarding the key federal government agencies involved in fuel cells and hydrogen, state-specific policies and activities, national laboratories and universities, and other information regarding the fuel cell and hydrogen industry in the U.S. (Author)

  15. STREAMLINED APPROACH FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 116: AREA 25 TEST CELL C FACILITYNEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada.

  16. MODELLING AND SIMULATION OF TWO-LEVEL SPACE VECTOR PWM INVERTER USING PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS AS DC SOURCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse KOCALMIS BILHAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A space vector PWM method for a two level inverter is proposed in this paper. A two level inverter using space vector modulation strategy has been modeled and simulated with a passive R-L load. Photovoltaic cells are used as DC source for input of two-level inverter. Simulation results are presented for various operation conditions to verify the system model. In this paper, MATLAB/Simulink package program has been used for modeling and simulation of PV cells and two-level space vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM inverter.

  17. Improving the Estimates of International Space Station (ISS) Induced K-Factor Failure Rates for On-Orbit Replacement Unit (ORU) Supportability Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Leif F.; Harrington, Sean P.; Omeke, Ojei, II; Schwaab, Douglas G.

    2009-01-01

    This is a case study on revised estimates of induced failure for International Space Station (ISS) on-orbit replacement units (ORUs). We devise a heuristic to leverage operational experience data by aggregating ORU, associated function (vehicle sub -system), and vehicle effective' k-factors using actual failure experience. With this input, we determine a significant failure threshold and minimize the difference between the actual and predicted failure rates. We conclude with a discussion on both qualitative and quantitative improvements the heuristic methods and potential benefits to ISS supportability engineering analysis.

  18. Impact of the irregular microgeometry of polyurethane foam on the macroscopic acoustic behavior predicted by a unit-cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutres, O; Ouisse, M; Atalla, N; Ichchou, M

    2014-10-01

    This paper deals with the prediction of the macroscopic sound absorption behavior of highly porous polyurethane foams using two unit-cell microstructure-based models recently developed by Doutres, Atalla, and Dong [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064901 (2011); J. Appl. Phys. 113, 054901 (2013)]. In these models, the porous material is idealized as a packing of a tetrakaidecahedra unit-cell representative of the disordered network that constitutes the porous frame. The non-acoustic parameters involved in the classical Johnson-Champoux-Allard model (i.e., porosity, airflow resistivity, tortuosity, etc.) are derived from characteristic properties of the unit-cell and semi-empirical relationships. A global sensitivity analysis is performed on these two models in order to investigate how the variability associated with the measured unit-cell characteristics affects the models outputs. This allows identification of the possible limitations of a unit-cell micro-macro approach due to microstructure irregularity. The sensitivity analysis mainly shows that for moderately and highly reticulated polyurethane foams, the strut length parameter is the key parameter since it greatly impacts three important non-acoustic parameters and causes large uncertainty on the sound absorption coefficient even if its measurement variability is moderate. For foams with a slight inhomogeneity and anisotropy, a micro-macro model associated to cell size measurements should be preferred.

  19. High content analysis of human fibroblast cell cultures after exposure to space radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieriks, Birger; De Vos, Winnok; Meesen, Geert; Van Oostveldt, Kaat; De Meyer, Tim; Ghardi, Myriam; Baatout, Sarah; Van Oostveldt, Patrick

    2009-10-01

    Space travel imposes risks to human health, in large part by the increased radiation levels compared to those on Earth. To understand the effects of space radiation on humans, it is important to determine the underlying cellular mechanisms. While general dosimetry describes average radiation levels accurately, it says little about the actual physiological impact and does not provide biological information about individual cellular events. In addition, there is no information about the nature and magnitude of a systemic response through extra- and intercellular communication. To assess the stress response in human fibroblasts that were sent into space with the Foton-M3 mission, we have developed a pluralistic setup to measure DNA damage and inflammation response by combining global and local dosimetry, image cytometry and multiplex array technology, thereby maximizing the scientific output. We were able to demonstrate a significant increase in DNA double-strand breaks, determined by a twofold increase of the gamma-H2AX signal at the level of the single cell and a threefold up-regulation of the soluble signal proteins CCL5, IL-6, IL-8, beta-2 microglobulin and EN-RAGE, which are key players in the process of inflammation, in the growth medium.

  20. Information Processing: Rate-Based Investigation of Cell Physiological Changes along Design Space Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagmeister, Patrick; Wechselberger, Patrick; Herwig, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Recent initiatives summarized under the term quality by design (QbD) urge for science and risk-based pharmaceutical bioprocess development strategies. One of the most accepted concepts communicated by the regulatory authorities is the concept of design space-a multidimensional combination of critical process parameter (CPP) ranges where the quality acceptance criteria (critical quality attributes, CQAs) are fulfilled. Current design space development along QbD principles focuses on the investigation of statistical CPP/CQA interactions, while the biological mechanistic of this interaction is hardly considered. Furthermore, the plethora of available online and offline data gathered within design space development is typically not used for the demonstration of process understanding. Here we present a methodology about how typical recorded process data can be processed and used to gather mechanistic process knowledge within upstream design space development, without the need for further experiments or additional analytical procedures. Data derived from online and offline measurements (off gas quantification, air flows, substrate flows, biomass dry cell weight measurements) were processed into scale-independent information in the form of specific rates and yield coefficients (data processing). Subsequently, the obtained information was regressed with the investigated process parameters aiming at the investigation of mechanistic interactions (information processing). The power of the presented approach was demonstrated on a multivariate study involving two process parameters (induction phase temperature and induction phase feeding strategy) aiming at the production of recombinant product in an Escherichia coli K12 strain. The knowledge successfully extracted indicated a time dependency of the metabolic load posed on the system, a possible down regulation of the promoter at reduced temperatures, and reduced cell lysis at higher specific feeding regimes. The presented data

  1. Operational Concept Evaluation of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for Space Vehicle Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poast, Kenneth I.

    2011-01-01

    With the end of the Space Shuttle Program, NASA is evaluating many different technologies to support future missions. Green propellants, like liquid methane and liquid oxygen, have potential advantages for some applications. A Lander propelled with LOX/methane engines is one such application. When the total vehicle design and infrastructure are considered, the advantages of the integration of propulsion, heat rejection, life support and power generation become attractive for further evaluation. Scavenged residual propellants from the propulsion tanks could be used to generate needed electric power, heat and water with a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell(SOFC). In-Situ Resource Utilization(ISRU) technologies may also generate quantities of green propellants to refill these tanks and/or supply these fuel cells. Technology demonstration projects such as the Morpheus Lander are currently underway to evaluate the practicality of such designs and operational concepts. Tethered tests are currently in progress on this vertical test bed to evaluate the propulsion and avionics systems. Evaluation of the SOFC seeks to determine the feasibility of using these green propellants to supply power and identify the limits to the integration of this technology into a space vehicle prototype.

  2. Techno-economic analysis of fuel cell auxiliary power units as alternative to idling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Semant; Chen, Hsieh-Yeh; Schwank, Johannes

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of fuel-cell-based auxiliary power units (APUs), with emphasis on applications in the trucking industry and the military. The APU system is intended to reduce the need for discretionary idling of diesel engines or gas turbines. The analysis considers the options for on-board fuel processing of diesel and compares the two leading fuel cell contenders for automotive APU applications: proton exchange membrane fuel cell and solid oxide fuel cell. As options for on-board diesel reforming, partial oxidation and auto-thermal reforming are considered. Finally, using estimated and projected efficiency data, fuel consumption patterns, capital investment, and operating costs of fuel-cell APUs, an economic evaluation of diesel-based APUs is presented, with emphasis on break-even periods as a function of fuel cost, investment cost, idling time, and idling efficiency. The analysis shows that within the range of parameters studied, there are many conditions where deployment of an SOFC-based APU is economically viable. Our analysis indicates that at an APU system cost of 100 kW -1, the economic break-even period is within 1 year for almost the entire range of conditions. At 500 kW -1 investment cost, a 2-year break-even period is possible except for the lowest end of the fuel consumption range considered. However, if the APU investment cost is 3000 kW -1, break-even would only be possible at the highest fuel consumption scenarios. For Abram tanks, even at typical land delivered fuel costs, a 2-year break-even period is possible for APU investment costs as high as 1100 kW -1.

  3. But science is international! Finding time and space to encourage intercultural learning in a content-driven physiology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etherington, Sarah J

    2014-06-01

    Internationalization of the curriculum is central to the strategic direction of many modern universities and has widespread benefits for student learning. However, these clear aspirations for internationalization of the curriculum have not been widely translated into more internationalized course content and teaching methods in the classroom, particularly in scientific disciplines. This study addressed one major challenge to promoting intercultural competence among undergraduate science students: finding time to scaffold such learning within the context of content-heavy, time-poor units. Small changes to enhance global and intercultural awareness were incorporated into existing assessments and teaching activities within a second-year biomedical physiology unit. Interventions were designed to start a conversation about global and intercultural perspectives on physiology, to embed the development of global awareness into the assessment and to promote cultural exchanges through peer interactions. In student surveys, 40% of domestic and 60% of international student respondents articulated specific learning about interactions in cross-cultural groups resulting from unit activities. Many students also identified specific examples of how cultural beliefs would impact on the place of biomedical physiology within the global community. In addition, staff observed more widespread benefits for student engagement and learning. It is concluded that a significant development of intercultural awareness and a more global perspective on scientific understanding can be supported among undergraduates with relatively modest, easy to implement adaptations to course content.

  4. Influence of space flight conditions on phenotypes and functionality of nephritic immune cells of fish (Xiphophorus helleri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepenbreier, K.; Renn, J.; Fischer, R.; Goerlich, R.

    Microgravity is considered to directly perturb a number of immunological and haematological parameters in mammalians, and therefore is of fundamental importance in space biology. The viviparous teleost Xiphophorus helleri (swordtail) was used as a "lower vertebrate model" in the shuttle missions STS-89 (Small Payload) and STS-90 (NEUROLAB). When developing a regenerative aquatic system (like the Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System - C.E.B.A.S.) to produce food fish on long-term space missions, we have to make sure that microgravity and other space conditions do not endanger the animals' health. Immunological aspects are very important in this field. The major research targets were immunological research of accessory (monocytes) and immunoreactive cells (lymphocytes) of the kidney from X. helleri, which were exposed to microgravity in comparison to ground control animals. Cell cycle analysis of the main haematopoetic organ (kidney), cell behaviour, cell cytochemistry, phagocytic ability and in vitro stimulation of immunoreactive cells from kidney after return to earth were investigated. The results are also important for basic research in immunotoxicology and developmental biology. As there is an interrelation between immune cells and bone metabolism, the investigations are also interesting for space medicine. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) (50 WB 9412, 50 WB 9996) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA 98HEDS-02-418)

  5. Algorithm and program for precise determination of unit-cell parameters of single crystal taking into account the sample eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudka, A. P.; Smirnova, E. S.; Verin, I. A.; Bolotina, N. B.

    2017-07-01

    A technique has been developed to refine the unit-cell parameters of single crystals with minimization of the influence of instrumental errors on the result. The corresponding computational procedure HuberUB is added to the software package of Huber-5042 diffractometer with a point detector and closedcycle helium cryostat Displex DE-202. The parameters of unit cell, its orientation, the goniometer zero angles, the sample eccentricity, the distances in the goniometer, and the radiation wavelength were refined by the nonlinear least-squares method, which allows imposition of constraints on the unit-cell parameters, depending on the crystal symmetry. The technique is approved on a LuB12 single crystal. The unit-cell parameters are determined in a temperature range of 20-295 K, with an absolute error not larger than 0.0004 Å (the relative error is of 5 × 10-5). The estimates of the unit-cell parameters obtained by the proposed method are evidenced to be unbiased. Some specific features of the behavior of parameters in the ranges of 120-140 and 20-50 K are revealed, which correlate with the anomalies of the physical properties of the crystal.

  6. Exfoliation of natural van der Waals heterostructures to a single unit cell thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velický, Matěj; Toth, Peter S.; Rakowski, Alexander M.; Rooney, Aidan P.; Kozikov, Aleksey; Woods, Colin R.; Mishchenko, Artem; Fumagalli, Laura; Yin, Jun; Zólyomi, Viktor; Georgiou, Thanasis; Haigh, Sarah J.; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Dryfe, Robert A. W.

    2017-02-01

    Weak interlayer interactions in van der Waals crystals facilitate their mechanical exfoliation to monolayer and few-layer two-dimensional materials, which often exhibit striking physical phenomena absent in their bulk form. Here we utilize mechanical exfoliation to produce a two-dimensional form of a mineral franckeite and show that the phase segregation of chemical species into discrete layers at the sub-nanometre scale facilitates franckeite's layered structure and basal cleavage down to a single unit cell thickness. This behaviour is likely to be common in a wider family of complex minerals and could be exploited for a single-step synthesis of van der Waals heterostructures, as an alternative to artificial stacking of individual two-dimensional crystals. We demonstrate p-type electrical conductivity and remarkable electrochemical properties of the exfoliated crystals, showing promise for a range of applications, and use the density functional theory calculations of franckeite's electronic band structure to rationalize the experimental results.

  7. Prognosis of Allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Recipients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgaard, Sidsel Christy; Nielsen, Jonas; Lindmark, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a procedure with inherent complications and intensive care may be necessary. We evaluated the short- and long-term outcomes of the HSCT recipients requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: We...... ventilation had a statistically significant effect on in-ICU (p = 0.02), 6-month (p = 0.049) and 1-year (p = 0.014) mortality. Renal replacement therapy also had a statistically significant effect on in-hospital (p = 0.038) and 6-month (p = 0.026) mortality. Short ICU admissions, i.e. ... to the ICU was confirmed in our study. Mechanical ventilation, renal replacement therapy and an ICU admission of ≥10 days were each risk factors for mortality in the first year after ICU admission....

  8. An explicit algorithm for fully flexible unit cell simulation with recursive thermostat chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwangsub; Cho, Maenghyo

    2008-10-28

    Through the combination of the recursive multiple thermostat (RMT) Nose-Poincare and Parrinello-Rahman methods, the recursive multiple thermostat chained fully flexible unit cell (RMT-NsigmaT) molecular dynamics method is proposed for isothermal-isobaric simulation. The RMT method is known to have the advantage of achieving the ergodicity that is required for canonical sampling of the harmonic oscillator. Thus, an explicit time integration algorithm is developed for RMT-NsigmaT. We examine the ergodicity for various parameters of RMT-NsigmaT using bulk and thin film structures with different numbers of copper atoms and thicknesses in various environments. Through the numerical simulations, we conclude that the RMT-NsigmaT method is advantageous in the cases of lower temperatures.

  9. Further Analyses of the NASA Glenn Research Center Solar Cell and Photovoltaic Materials Experiment Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Matthew G.; Prokop, Norman F.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Piszczor, Michael F.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate air mass zero (AM0) measurement is essential for the evaluation of new photovoltaic (PV) technology for space solar cells. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has flown an experiment designed to measure the electrical performance of several solar cells onboard NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Robotic Refueling Mission's (RRM) Task Board 4 (TB4) on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). Four industry and government partners provided advanced PV devices for measurement and orbital environment testing. The experiment was positioned on the exterior of the station for approximately eight months, and was completely self-contained, providing its own power and internal data storage. Several new cell technologies including four-junction (4J) Inverted Metamorphic Multi-Junction (IMM) cells were evaluated and the results will be compared to ground-based measurement methods.

  10. Unit operation optimization for the manufacturing of botanical injections using a design space approach: a case study of water precipitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingchu Gong

    Full Text Available Quality by design (QbD concept is a paradigm for the improvement of botanical injection quality control. In this work, water precipitation process for the manufacturing of Xueshuantong injection, a botanical injection made from Notoginseng Radix et Rhizoma, was optimized using a design space approach as a sample. Saponin recovery and total saponin purity (TSP in supernatant were identified as the critical quality attributes (CQAs of water precipitation using a risk assessment for all the processes of Xueshuantong injection. An Ishikawa diagram and experiments of fractional factorial design were applied to determine critical process parameters (CPPs. Dry matter content of concentrated extract (DMCC, amount of water added (AWA, and stirring speed (SS were identified as CPPs. Box-Behnken designed experiments were carried out to develop models between CPPs and process CQAs. Determination coefficients were higher than 0.86 for all the models. High TSP in supernatant can be obtained when DMCC is low and SS is high. Saponin recoveries decreased as DMCC increased. Incomplete collection of supernatant was the main reason for the loss of saponins. Design space was calculated using a Monte-Carlo simulation method with acceptable probability of 0.90. Recommended normal operation region are located in DMCC of 0.38-0.41 g/g, AWA of 3.7-4.9 g/g, and SS of 280-350 rpm, with a probability more than 0.919 to attain CQA criteria. Verification experiment results showed that operating DMCC, SS, and AWA within design space can attain CQA criteria with high probability.

  11. Unit operation optimization for the manufacturing of botanical injections using a design space approach: a case study of water precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xingchu; Chen, Huali; Chen, Teng; Qu, Haibin

    2014-01-01

    Quality by design (QbD) concept is a paradigm for the improvement of botanical injection quality control. In this work, water precipitation process for the manufacturing of Xueshuantong injection, a botanical injection made from Notoginseng Radix et Rhizoma, was optimized using a design space approach as a sample. Saponin recovery and total saponin purity (TSP) in supernatant were identified as the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of water precipitation using a risk assessment for all the processes of Xueshuantong injection. An Ishikawa diagram and experiments of fractional factorial design were applied to determine critical process parameters (CPPs). Dry matter content of concentrated extract (DMCC), amount of water added (AWA), and stirring speed (SS) were identified as CPPs. Box-Behnken designed experiments were carried out to develop models between CPPs and process CQAs. Determination coefficients were higher than 0.86 for all the models. High TSP in supernatant can be obtained when DMCC is low and SS is high. Saponin recoveries decreased as DMCC increased. Incomplete collection of supernatant was the main reason for the loss of saponins. Design space was calculated using a Monte-Carlo simulation method with acceptable probability of 0.90. Recommended normal operation region are located in DMCC of 0.38-0.41 g/g, AWA of 3.7-4.9 g/g, and SS of 280-350 rpm, with a probability more than 0.919 to attain CQA criteria. Verification experiment results showed that operating DMCC, SS, and AWA within design space can attain CQA criteria with high probability.

  12. Fuel cell system including a unit for electrical isolation of a fuel cell stack from a manifold assembly and method therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley; Dana A. , Farooque; Mohammad , Davis; Keith

    2007-10-02

    A fuel cell system with improved electrical isolation having a fuel cell stack with a positive potential end and a negative potential, a manifold for use in coupling gases to and from a face of the fuel cell stack, an electrical isolating assembly for electrically isolating the manifold from the stack, and a unit for adjusting an electrical potential of the manifold such as to impede the flow of electrolyte from the stack across the isolating assembly.

  13. Alternative procedure for the fabrication of close-spaced sublimated CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, H. R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Dhere, R. G. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Ballif, C. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Al-Jassim, M. M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Kazmerski, L. L. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2000-07-01

    We deposited CdTe thin films by close-spaced sublimtation using an alternative procedure, with temperatures about 170 degree sign C lower than the ones used in the standard procedure. These films were used in the fabrication of all thin-film CdTe/CdS solar cells. We treated the cells using the well-established CdCl{sub 2} dipping process as well as a new vapor treatment. The vapor process was more reproducible and easier to control, and it produced the best devices. This process was also much more effective in the recrystallization of the CdTe films. The best device that we produced had an efficiently of 11.6%, close to the 12.3% efficiency of the best device fabricated using the standard process. These results show that the new process has good potential, and besides being an alternative for lower-cost solar cell production, it can also produce high-efficiency devices. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society.

  14. Regenerative fuel cell energy storage system for a low earth orbit space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R. E.; Garow, J.; Michaels, K. B.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to define characteristics of a Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFCS) for low earth orbit Space Station missions. The RFCS's were defined and characterized based on both an alkaline electrolyte fuel cell integrated with an alkaline electrolyte water electrolyzer and an alkaline electrolyte fuel cell integrated with an acid solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) water electrolyzer. The study defined the operating characteristics of the systems including system weight, volume, and efficiency. A maintenance philosophy was defined and the implications of system reliability requirements and modularization were determined. Finally, an Engineering Model System was defined and a program to develop and demonstrate the EMS and pacing technology items that should be developed in parallel with the EMS were identified. The specific weight of an optimized RFCS operating at 140 F was defined as a function of system efficiency for a range of module sizes. An EMS operating at a nominal temperature of 180 F and capable of delivery of 10 kW at an overall efficiency of 55.4 percent is described. A program to develop the EMS is described including a technology development effort for pacing technology items.

  15. Typhoid fever acquired in the United States, 1999-2010: epidemiology, microbiology, and use of a space-time scan statistic for outbreak detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanishi, M; Newton, A E; Vieira, A R; Gonzalez-Aviles, G; Kendall Scott, M E; Manikonda, K; Maxwell, T N; Halpin, J L; Freeman, M M; Medalla, F; Ayers, T L; Derado, G; Mahon, B E; Mintz, E D

    2015-08-01

    Although rare, typhoid fever cases acquired in the United States continue to be reported. Detection and investigation of outbreaks in these domestically acquired cases offer opportunities to identify chronic carriers. We searched surveillance and laboratory databases for domestically acquired typhoid fever cases, used a space-time scan statistic to identify clusters, and classified clusters as outbreaks or non-outbreaks. From 1999 to 2010, domestically acquired cases accounted for 18% of 3373 reported typhoid fever cases; their isolates were less often multidrug-resistant (2% vs. 15%) compared to isolates from travel-associated cases. We identified 28 outbreaks and two possible outbreaks within 45 space-time clusters of ⩾2 domestically acquired cases, including three outbreaks involving ⩾2 molecular subtypes. The approach detected seven of the ten outbreaks published in the literature or reported to CDC. Although this approach did not definitively identify any previously unrecognized outbreaks, it showed the potential to detect outbreaks of typhoid fever that may escape detection by routine analysis of surveillance data. Sixteen outbreaks had been linked to a carrier. Every case of typhoid fever acquired in a non-endemic country warrants thorough investigation. Space-time scan statistics, together with shoe-leather epidemiology and molecular subtyping, may improve outbreak detection.

  16. Space Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    A robust and competitive commercial space sector is vital to continued progress in space. The United States is committed to encouraging and facilitating the growth of a U.S. commercial space sector that supports U.S. needs, is globally competitive, and advances U.S. leadership in the generation of new markets and innovation-driven entrepreneurship. Energize competitive domestic industries to participate in global markets and advance the development of: satellite manufacturing; satellite-based services; space launch; terrestrial applications; and increased entrepreneurship. Purchase and use commercial space capabilities and services to the maximum practical extent Actively explore the use of inventive, nontraditional arrangements for acquiring commercial space goods and services to meet United States Government requirements, including measures such as public-private partnerships, . Refrain from conducting United States Government space activities that preclude, discourage, or compete with U.S. commercial space activities. Pursue potential opportunities for transferring routine, operational space functions to the commercial space sector where beneficial and cost-effective.

  17. A Space Testbed for Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.

    1998-01-01

    The Ohio Aerospace Institute and the NASA Lewis Research Center are designing and building a solar-cell calibration facility, the Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed (PET) to fly on the International Space Station to test advanced solar cell types in the space environment. A wide variety of advanced solar cell types have become available in the last decade. Some of these solar cells offer more than twice the power per unit area of the silicon cells used for the space station power system. They also offer the possibilities of lower cost, lighter weight, and longer lifetime. The purpose of the PET facility is to reduce the cost of validating new technologies and bringing them to spaceflight readiness. The facility will be used for three primary functions: calibration, measurement, and qualification. It is scheduled to be launched in June of 2002.

  18. Bidirectional relationship of mast cells-neurovascular unit communication in neuroinflammation and its involvement in POCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nana; Zhang, Xiang; Dong, Hongquan; Hu, Youli; Qian, Yanning

    2017-03-30

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) has been hypothesized to be mediated by surgery-induced neuroinflammation, which is also a key element in the pathobiology of neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and neuropsychiatric disorders. There is extensive communication between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Inflammation resulting from activation of the innate immune system cells in the periphery can impact central nervous system behaviors, such as cognitive performance. Mast cells (MCs), as the"first responders" in the CNS, can initiate, amplify, and prolong other immune and nervous responses upon activation. In addition, MCs and their secreted mediators modulate inflammatory processes in multiple CNS pathologies and can thereby either contribute to neurological damage or confer neuroprotection. Neuroinflammation has been considered to be linked to neurovascular dysfunction in several neurological disorders. This review will provide a brief overview of the bidirectional relationship of MCs-neurovascular unit communication in neuroinflammation and its involvement in POCD, providing a new and unique therapeutic target for the adjuvant treatment of POCD.

  19. Two-Dimensional Simulation of Mass Transfer in Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cells under Operation Mode Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional, single-phase, isothermal, multicomponent, transient model is built to investigate the transport phenomena in unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs under the condition of switching from the fuel cell (FC mode to the water electrolysis (WE mode. The model is coupled with an electrochemical reaction. The proton exchange membrane (PEM is selected as the solid electrolyte of the URFC. The work is motivated by the need to elucidate the complex mass transfer and electrochemical process under operation mode switching in order to improve the performance of PEM URFC. A set of governing equations, including conservation of mass, momentum, species, and charge, are considered. These equations are solved by the finite element method. The simulation results indicate the distributions of hydrogen, oxygen, water mass fraction, and electrolyte potential response to the transient phenomena via saltation under operation mode switching. The hydrogen mass fraction gradients are smaller than the oxygen mass fraction gradients. The average mass fractions of the reactants (oxygen and hydrogen and product (water exhibit evident differences between each layer in the steady state of the FC mode. By contrast, the average mass fractions of the reactant (water and products (oxygen and hydrogen exhibit only slight differences between each layer in the steady state of the WE mode. Under either the FC mode or the WE mode, the duration of the transient state is only approximately 0.2 s.

  20. Nuclear Power in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    In the early years of the United States space program, lightweight batteries, fuel cells, and solar modules provided electric power for space missions. As missions became more ambitious and complex, power needs increased and scientists investigated various options to meet these challenging power requirements. One of the options was nuclear energy. By the mid-1950s, research had begun in earnest on ways to use nuclear power in space. These efforts resulted in the first radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), which are nuclear power generators build specifically for space and special terrestrial uses. These RTGs convert the heat generated from the natural decay of their radioactive fuel into electricity. RTGs have powered many spacecraft used for exploring the outer planets of the solar system and orbiting the sun and Earth. They have also landed on Mars and the moon. They provide the power that enables us to see and learn about even the farthermost objects in our solar system.

  1. The boot software of the control unit of the near infrared spectrograph of the Euclid space mission: technical specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Sáenz-de-Tejada, Jaime; Toledo-Moreo, Rafael; Colodro-Conde, Carlos; Pérez-Lizán, David; Fernández-Conde, Jesús; Sánchez-Prieto, Sebastián.

    2016-07-01

    The Near Infrared Spectrograph and Photometer (NISP) is one of the instruments on board the ESA EUCLID mission. The Boot Software (BSW) is in charge of initialization and communications after a reset occurs at hard- ware level. The Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena and Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias are responsible of the Instrument Control Unit of the NISP (NI-ICU) in the Euclid Consortium. The NI-ICU BSW is developed by Universidad de Alcaĺa, and its main functions are: communication with the S/C for memory management, self-tests and start of a patchable Application Software (ASW). This paper presents the NI-ICU BSW status of definition and design at the end of the Technical Specification phase.

  2. Feasibility of Biomass-based Fuel Cells for Manned Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipoli, Tiziana

    2005-05-01

    The increasing quantity of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and the decrease in fossil fuels availability are driving massive investigation of alternative, sustainable energy sources for Earth applications. Among others, different processes for the conversion of biomass into useful fuels are under development or have been already implemented in various Countries. The transfer of this technology to space is promising in view of the ambitious plans for future manned planetary exploration missions, where power generation represents a critical aspect. Recycling organic waste increases the availability of fuel and at the same time reduces the issues of waste disposal and planetary protection. This work presents a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of a biomass-based fuel cell system during a human mission to Mars.

  3. Advanced Solar Cell and Array Technology for NASA Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piszczor, Michael; Benson, Scott; Scheiman, David; Finacannon, Homer; Oleson, Steve; Landis, Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    A recent study by the NASA Glenn Research Center assessed the feasibility of using photovoltaics (PV) to power spacecraft for outer planetary, deep space missions. While the majority of spacecraft have relied on photovoltaics for primary power, the drastic reduction in solar intensity as the spacecraft moves farther from the sun has either limited the power available (severely curtailing scientific operations) or necessitated the use of nuclear systems. A desire by NASA and the scientific community to explore various bodies in the outer solar system and conduct "long-term" operations using using smaller, "lower-cost" spacecraft has renewed interest in exploring the feasibility of using photovoltaics for to Jupiter, Saturn and beyond. With recent advances in solar cell performance and continuing development in lightweight, high power solar array technology, the study determined that photovoltaics is indeed a viable option for many of these missions.

  4. Topological recursion for chord diagrams, RNA complexes, and cells in moduli spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Jorgen E. [Center for Quantum Geometry of Moduli Spaces, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Arhus C (Denmark); Chekhov, Leonid O. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Steklov Mathematical Institute, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); School of Mathematics, Loughborough University, Leicestershire (United Kingdom); Penner, R.C., E-mail: rpenner@caltech.edu [Center for Quantum Geometry of Moduli Spaces, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Arhus C (Denmark); Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States); Reidys, Christian M. [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Sulkowski, Piotr, E-mail: psulkows@theory.caltech.edu [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1090 GL, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-01-21

    We introduce and study the Hermitian matrix model with potential V{sub s,t}(x)=x{sup 2}/2-stx/(1-tx), which enumerates the number of linear chord diagrams with no isolated vertices of fixed genus with specified numbers of backbones generated by s and chords generated by t. For the one-cut solution, the partition function, correlators and free energies are convergent for small t and all s as a perturbation of the Gaussian potential, which arises for st=0. This perturbation is computed using the formalism of the topological recursion. The corresponding enumeration of chord diagrams gives at once the number of RNA complexes of a given topology as well as the number of cells in Riemann's moduli spaces for bordered surfaces. The free energies are computed here in principle for all genera and explicitly in genus less than four.

  5. Topological recursion for chord diagrams, RNA complexes, and cells in moduli spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Jørgen E; Penner, R C; Reidys, Christian M; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    We introduce and study the Hermitian matrix model with potential V(x)=x^2/2-stx/(1-tx), which enumerates the number of linear chord diagrams of fixed genus with specified numbers of backbones generated by s and chords generated by t. For the one-cut solution, the partition function, correlators and free energies are convergent for small t and all s as a perturbation of the Gaussian potential, which arises for st=0. This perturbation is computed using the formalism of the topological recursion. The corresponding enumeration of chord diagrams gives at once the number of RNA complexes of a given topology as well as the number of cells in Riemann's moduli spaces for bordered surfaces. The free energies are computed here in principle for all genera and explicitly for genera less than four.

  6. Breaking the Space Charge Limit in Organic Solar Cells by a Novel Plasmonic-Electrical Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Wei E. I.; Li, Xuanhua; Choy, Wallace C. H.

    2014-01-01

    As a fundamental electrostatic limit, space charge limit (SCL) for photocurrent is a universal phenomenon and of paramount importance for organic semiconductors with unbalanced photocarriers mobility and high exciton generation. Here we proposed a new plasmonic-electrical concept to manipulate electrical properties of organic devices including photocarriers recombination, transport and collection. As a proof-of-concept, organic solar cells (OSCs) comprising metallic planar and grating electrodes are systematically investigated with normal and inverted device structures. Interestingly, although strong plasmonic resonances induce abnormally dense photocarriers around a grating anode, the grating-inverted OSC is exempt from space charge accumulation (limit) and degradation of electrical properties in contrast to the planar-inverted and planar-normal ones. The particular reason is that plasmonically induced photocarriers redistribution shortens the transport path of low-mobility holes, which are collected by the grating anode. The work demonstrated and explained the SCL breaking with the plasmonic-electrical effect. Most importantly, the plasmonic-electrical concept will open up a new way to manipulate both optical and electrical properties of semiconductor devices simultaneously. PMID:25168122

  7. Effects of Tryptophan Content and Backbone Spacing on the Uptake Efficiency of Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A.

    2012-07-10

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to traverse cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo. Uptake occurs through both endocytotic and nonendocytotic pathways, but the molecular requirements for efficient internalization are not fully understood. Here we investigate how the presence of tryptophans and their position within an oligoarginine influence uptake mechanism and efficiency. Flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence imaging are used to estimate uptake efficiency, intracellular distribution and toxicity in Chinese hamster ovarian cells. Further, membrane leakage and lipid membrane affinity are investigated. The peptides contain eight arginine residues and one to four tryptophans, the tryptophans positioned either at the N-terminus, in the middle, or evenly distributed along the amino acid sequence. Our data show that the intracellular distribution varies among peptides with different tryptophan content and backbone spacing. Uptake efficiency is higher for the peptides with four tryptophans in the middle, or evenly distributed along the peptide sequence, than for the peptide with four tryptophans at the N-terminus. All peptides display low cytotoxicity except for the one with four tryptophans at the N-terminus, which was moderately toxic. This finding is consistent with their inability to induce efficient leakage of dye from lipid vesicles. All peptides have comparable affinities for lipid vesicles, showing that lipid binding is not a decisive parameter for uptake. Our results indicate that tryptophan content and backbone spacing can affect both the CPP uptake efficiency and the CPP uptake mechanism. The low cytotoxicity of these peptides and the possibilities of tuning their uptake mechanism are interesting from a therapeutic point of view. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  8. A roadmap for the development and validation of coated particle fuel for future space radioisotope heater units (RHUs) and radioisotope power systems (RPSs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholtis, Joseph A.

    2001-02-01

    In early 1999, coated particle fuel was identified as offering promising advancements in design flexibility, performance, specific mass and volume, as well as safety for future space radioisotope heater units (RHUs) and radioisotope power systems (RPSs). Subsequent study, conducted during Fiscal Year 1999, provided confidence that these potential benefits were substantial and demonstrable if a modest follow-on investigative test effort was pursued. This paper lays out a roadmap for both immediate and near-term decision making, as well as any full-scale development and validation of coated particle fuel undertaken for future space RHUs, and RPSs. In an effort to obtain adequate and timely information at a reasonable cost for immediate and near-term decision making, as well as any subsequent development, production, and application decisions, a four-phased regimen of testing is identified. The four phases of testing are: (1) Pre-Decisional Testing: (2) Pre-Production Analytical Verification Testing: (3) Production Quality Assurance Testing: and (4) Post-Production Safety Verification Testing. Although all four of these phases of testing are considered essential, the first two phases are especially important for immediate and near-term decisions to advance and pursue coated particle fuel for space RHUs and RPSs. The third and fourth phases of testing are primarily identified and included for completeness at this early stage. It is concluded that there is every reason to believe that the potential benefits of coated particle fuel can be readily demonstrated through a modest investigative test effort. If such an effort is pursued and proves successful, coated particle fuel could then be developed with assurance that its ultimate benefits would revolutionize the design and space use of future RHUs and RPSs. It is hoped that this paper will serve as a starting point for further discussions and more specific planning activities aimed at advancing coated particle fuel for

  9. Inhibition of Autophagy Enhances Curcumin United light irradiation-induced Oxidative Stress and Tumor Growth Suppression in Human Melanoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Tianhui; Tian, Yan; Mei, Zhusong; Guo, Guangjin

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin carcinoma, which possesses fast propagating and highly invasive characteristics. Curcumin is a natural phenol compound that has various biological activities, such as anti-proliferative and apoptosis-accelerating impacts on tumor cells. Unfortunately, the therapeutical activities of Cur are severely hindered due to its extremely low bioavailability. In this study, a cooperative therapy of low concentration Cur combined with red united blue light irradiation was performed to inspect the synergistic effects on the apoptosis, proliferation and autophagy in human melanoma A375 cell. The results showed that red united blue light irradiation efficaciously synergized with Cur to trigger oxidative stress-mediated cell death, induce apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. Meanwhile, Western blotting revealed that combined disposure induced the formation of autophagosomes. Conversely, inhibition of the autophagy enhanced apoptosis, obstructed cell cycle arrest and induced reversible proliferation arrest to senescence. These findings suggest that Cur combined with red united blue light irradiation could generate photochemo-preventive effects via enhancing apoptosis and triggering autophagy, and pharmacological inhibition of autophagy convert reversible arrested cells to senescence, therefore reducing the possibility that damaged cells might escape programmed death. PMID:27502897

  10. Immune suppression of human lymphoid tissues and cells in rotating suspension culture and onboard the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Wendy; Chen, Silvia; Walz, Carl; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Margolis, Leonid; Grivel, Jean-Charles

    2009-12-01

    The immune responses of human lymphoid tissue explants or cells isolated from this tissue were studied quantitatively under normal gravity and microgravity. Microgravity was either modeled by solid body suspension in a rotating, oxygenated culture vessel or was actually achieved on the International Space Station (ISS). Our experiments demonstrate that tissues or cells challenged by recall antigen or by polyclonal activator in modeled microgravity lose all their ability to produce antibodies and cytokines and to increase their metabolic activity. In contrast, if the cells were challenged before being exposed to modeled microgravity suspension culture, they maintained their responses. Similarly, in microgravity in the ISS, lymphoid cells did not respond to antigenic or polyclonal challenge, whereas cells challenged prior to the space flight maintained their antibody and cytokine responses in space. Thus, immune activation of cells of lymphoid tissue is severely blunted both in modeled and true microgravity. This suggests that suspension culture via solid body rotation is sufficient to induce the changes in cellular physiology seen in true microgravity. This phenomenon may reflect immune dysfunction observed in astronauts during space flights. If so, the ex vivo system described above can be used to understand cellular and molecular mechanisms of this dysfunction.

  11. Growth Factor Independence-1 (Gfi1) Is Required for Pancreatic Acinar Unit Formation and Centroacinar Cell Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Xiaoling; Nyeng, Pia; Xiao, Fan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The genetic specification of the compartmentalized pancreatic acinar/centroacinar unit is poorly understood. Growth factor independence-1 (Gfi1) is a zinc finger transcriptional repressor that regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, pre-T-cell differentiation, formation...... of pancreatic acinar cells as well as the centroacinar cells (CACs) in Gfi1(-/-) mice when compared with wild-type littermates. Pancreatic endocrine differentiation, islet architecture, and function were unaffected. Organ domain patterning and the formation of ductal cells occurred normally during the murine...... of granulocytes, inner ear hair cells, and the development of secretory cell types in the intestine. As GFI1/Gfi1 is expressed in human and rodent pancreas, we characterized the potential function of Gfi1 in mouse pancreatic development. METHODS: Gfi1 knockout mice were analyzed at histological and molecular...

  12. An Extended Objective Evaluation of the 29-km Eta Model for Weather Support to the United States Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, Paul; Manobianco, John

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the Applied Meteorology Unit's objective verification of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction 29-km eta model during separate warm and cool season periods from May 1996 through January 1998. The verification of surface and upper-air point forecasts was performed at three selected stations important for 45th Weather Squadron, Spaceflight Meteorology Group, and National Weather Service, Melbourne operational weather concerns. The statistical evaluation identified model biases that may result from inadequate parameterization of physical processes. Since model biases are relatively small compared to the random error component, most of the total model error results from day-to-day variability in the forecasts and/or observations. To some extent, these nonsystematic errors reflect the variability in point observations that sample spatial and temporal scales of atmospheric phenomena that cannot be resolved by the model. On average, Meso-Eta point forecasts provide useful guidance for predicting the evolution of the larger scale environment. A more substantial challenge facing model users in real time is the discrimination of nonsystematic errors that tend to inflate the total forecast error. It is important that model users maintain awareness of ongoing model changes. Such changes are likely to modify the basic error characteristics, particularly near the surface.

  13. Native Defect Control of CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells by Close-Spaced Sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Tamotsu; Kitamoto, Shinji; Yamada, Akira; Konagai, Makoto

    2001-05-01

    The control of native defects in the CdTe thin film solar cells was investigated using a novel source for close-spaced sublimation (CSS) process which was prepared by vacuum evaporation with elemental Cd and Te (evaporated source). The evaporated sources were prepared on glass substrates at room temperature, and the Cd/Te ratio was controlled by varying the Cd and Te beam equivalent pressures. In the cells using the Te-rich source, the conversion efficiency was less than 0.2% because of the extremely low shunt resistance. On the other hand, a conversion efficiency above 15% was obtained by using the Cd-rich source. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics revealed that the acceptor concentration in the CdTe layer increased with increasing Cd/Te ratio of the evaporated source. Furthermore, photoluminescence spectra implied that the formation of the Cd vacancies in the CdTe layer was suppressed using the Cd-rich source.

  14. Treating refinery wastewaters in microbial fuel cells using separator electrode assembly or spaced electrode configurations

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of refinery wastewater (RW) treatment using air-cathode, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was examined relative to previous tests based on completely anaerobic microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). MFCs were configured with separator electrode assembly (SEA) or spaced electrode (SPA) configurations to measure power production and relative impacts of oxygen crossover on organics removal. The SEA configuration produced a higher maximum power density (280±6mW/m2; 16.3±0.4W/m3) than the SPA arrangement (255±2mW/m2) due to lower internal resistance. Power production in both configurations was lower than that obtained with the domestic wastewater (positive control) due to less favorable (more positive) anode potentials, indicating poorer biodegradability of the RW. MFCs with RW achieved up to 84% total COD removal, 73% soluble COD removal and 92% HBOD removal. These removals were higher than those previously obtained in mini-MEC tests, as oxygen crossover from the cathode enhanced degradation in MFCs compared to MECs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Space exploration by dendritic cells requires maintenance of myosin II activity by IP3 receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanes, Paola; Heuzé, Mélina L; Maurin, Mathieu; Bretou, Marine; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Launay, Pierre; Piel, Matthieu; Vargas, Pablo; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-03-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) patrol the interstitial space of peripheral tissues. The mechanisms that regulate their migration in such constrained environment remain unknown. We here investigated the role of calcium in immature DCs migrating in confinement. We found that they displayed calcium oscillations that were independent of extracellular calcium and more frequently observed in DCs undergoing strong speed fluctuations. In these cells, calcium spikes were associated with fast motility phases. IP₃ receptors (IP₃Rs) channels, which allow calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, were identified as required for immature DCs to migrate at fast speed. The IP₃R1 isoform was further shown to specifically regulate the locomotion persistence of immature DCs, that is, their capacity to maintain directional migration. This function of IP₃R1 results from its ability to control the phosphorylation levels of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) and the back/front polarization of the motor protein. We propose that by upholding myosin II activity, constitutive calcium release from the ER through IP₃R1 maintains DC polarity during migration in confinement, facilitating the exploration of their environment.

  16. Space weather effects on the MAGION-4 and MAGION-5 solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tříska

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Data on solar array efficiency measured on board two Czech MAGION micro-satellites between August 1995 and June 2002, during the period of increasing and high solar activity, were used to study the space weather effects on photo-voltaic solar cells. A stronger degradation of the solar array was observed on MAGION-5 in comparison with MAGION-4. This fact can be explained by the essential difference between the two orbits. The MAGION-5 s/c was in the radiation belts more than 40% of the time, whereas the MAGION-4 was only present about 4% of the time. The experimental data refer to periods of low as well as high solar activity, with an enhanced occurrence of strong solar events. The evaluation of the data set covering a period of more than 6 years has shown that solar proton flares can have an almost immediate effect on the solar array efficiency. However, in the case of MAGION-5, an important role in solar cell degradation is played by the long-term effect of energetic particles in the radiation belts. Periods with a distinctly steeper decrease in the solar array output power were observed and can be explained by an increase of particle flux density in the radiation belts. Periods in slower decline of the solar array output power correspond to periods in low radiation belt indices based on the NOAA POES s/c data.

  17. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Magnetic Properties of Giant Unit Cell Intermetallics R117Co52+δSn112+γ (R = Y, La, Pr, Nd, Ho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Chai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ternary intermetallics R117Co52+δSn112+γ (R = Y, La, Pr, Nd, and Ho have been prepared by arc-melting followed by annealing at 800 °C. All the compounds belong to the Tb117Fe52Ge112 structure type (space group Fm 3 ¯ m characterized by a complex giant cubic unit cell with a ~ 30 Å. The single-crystal structure determination of Y- and La-containing compounds reveals a significant structural disorder. A comparison of these and earlier reported crystal structures of R117Co52+δSn112+γ suggests that more extensive disorder occurs for structures that contain larger lanthanide atoms. This observation can be explained by the need to maintain optimal bonding interactions as the size of the unit cell increases. Y117Co56Sn115 exhibits weak paramagnetism due to the Co sublattice and does not show magnetic ordering in the 1.8–300 K range. Ho117Co55Sn108 shows ferromagnetic ordering at 10.6 K. Both Pr117Co54Sn112 and Nd117Co54Sn111 exhibit antiferromagnetic ordering at 17 K and 24.7 K, respectively, followed by a spin reorientation transition at lower temperature.

  18. Picometer registration of zinc impurity states in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ for phase determination in intra-unit-cell Fourier transform STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidian, M. H.; Firmo, I. A.; Fujita, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Orenstein, J. W.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Lawler, M. J.; Kim, E.-A.; Davis, J. C.

    2012-05-01

    Direct visualization of electronic-structure symmetry within each crystalline unit cell is a new technique for complex electronic matter research (Lawler et al 2010 Nature 466 347-51, Schmidt et al 2011 New J. Phys. 13 065014, Fujita K et al 2012 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 81 011005). By studying the Bragg peaks in Fourier transforms of electronic structure images and particularly by resolving both the real and imaginary components of the Bragg amplitudes, distinct types of intra-unit-cell symmetry breaking can be studied. However, establishing the precise symmetry point of each unit cell in real space is crucial in defining the phase for such a Bragg-peak Fourier analysis. Exemplary of this challenge is the high-temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ for which the surface Bi atom locations are observable, while it is the invisible Cu atoms that define the relevant CuO2 unit-cell symmetry point. Here we demonstrate, by imaging with picometer precision the electronic impurity states at individual Zn atoms substituted at Cu sites, that the phase established using the Bi lattice produces a ˜2%(2π) error relative to the actual Cu lattice. Such a phase assignment error would not diminish reliability in the determination of intra-unit-cell rotational symmetry breaking at the CuO2 plane (Lawler et al 2010 Nature 466 347-51, Schmidt et al 2011 New J. Phys. 13 065014, Fujita K et al 2012 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 81 011005). Moreover, this type of impurity atom substitution at the relevant symmetry site can be of general utility in phase determination for the Bragg-peak Fourier analysis of intra-unit-cell symmetry.

  19. Study of plasma meniscus and beam halo in negative ion sources using three dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space particle in cell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishioka, S., E-mail: nishioka@ppl.appi.keio.ac.jp; Goto, I.; Hatayama, A. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Miyamoto, K. [School of Natural and Living Sciences Education, Naruto University of Education, 748 Nakashima, Takashima, Naruto-cho, Naruto-shi, Tokushima 772-8502 (Japan); Okuda, S.; Fukano, A. [Toshiba, 33 Isogo-chou, Isogo-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 235-001 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Our previous study by two dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space-particle in cell model shows that the curvature of the plasma meniscus causes the beam halo in the negative ion sources. The negative ions extracted from the periphery of the meniscus are over-focused in the extractor due to the electrostatic lens effect, and consequently become the beam halo. The purpose of this study is to verify this mechanism with the full 3D model. It is shown that the above mechanism is essentially unchanged even in the 3D model, while the fraction of the beam halo is significantly reduced to 6%. This value reasonably agrees with the experimental result.

  20. Out-of-Sequence Preventative Cell Dispatching for Multicast Input-Queued Space-Memory-Memory Clos-Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Hao; Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Berger, Michael Stübert

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes two out-of-sequence (OOS) preventative cell dispatching algorithms for the multicast input-queued space-memory-memory (IQ-SMM) Clos-network switch architecture, i.e. the multicast flow-based DSRR (MF-DSRR) and the multicast flow-based round-robin (MFRR). Treating each cell...... independently, the desynchronized static round-robin (DSRR) cell dispatching scheme can evenly distribute cells to the central switching modules, however, its frequent change of the input switching module connection pattern causes a serious OOS problem to the IQ-SMM architecture. Therefore large reassembly...

  1. Design and Simulation of a Fused Silica Space Cell Culture and Observation Cavity with Microfluidic and Temperature Controlling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangchun Fan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a principle prototype of space animal cell perfusion culture and observation. Unlike previous work, our cell culture system cannot only realize microfluidic and temperature controlling, automatic observation, and recording but also meet an increasing cell culture at large scale operation and overcome shear force for animal cells. A key component in the system is ingenious structural fused silica cell culture cavity with the wedge-shaped connection. Finite volume method (FVM is applied to calculate its multipoint flow field, pressure field, axial velocity, tangential velocity, and radial velocity. In order to provide appropriate flow rate, temperature, and shear force for space animal cell culture, a closed-loop microfluidic circuit and proportional, integrating, and differentiation (PID algorithm are employed. This paper also illustrates system architecture and operating method of the principle prototype. The dynamic culture, autofocus observation, and recording of M763 cells are performed successfully within 72 h in the laboratory environment. This research can provide a reference for space flight mission that carries an apparatus with similar functions.

  2. Effects of Dexamethasone on Satellite Cells and Tissue Engineered Skeletal Muscle Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syverud, Brian C; VanDusen, Keith W; Larkin, Lisa M

    2016-03-01

    Tissue engineered skeletal muscle has potential for application as a graft source for repairing soft tissue injuries, a model for testing pharmaceuticals, and a biomechanical actuator system for soft robots. However, engineered muscle to date has not produced forces comparable to native muscle, limiting its potential for repair and for use as an in vitro model for pharmaceutical testing. In this study, we examined the trophic effects of dexamethasone (DEX), a glucocorticoid that stimulates myoblast differentiation and fusion into myotubes, on our tissue engineered three-dimensional skeletal muscle units (SMUs). Using our established SMU fabrication protocol, muscle isolates were cultured with three experimental DEX concentrations (5, 10, and 25 nM) and compared to untreated controls. Following seeding onto a laminin-coated Sylgard substrate, the administration of DEX was initiated on day 0 or day 6 in growth medium or on day 9 after the switch to differentiation medium and was sustained until the completion of SMU fabrication. During this process, total cell proliferation was measured with a BrdU assay, and myogenesis and structural advancement of muscle cells were observed through immunostaining for MyoD, myogenin, desmin, and α-actinin. After SMU formation, isometric tetanic force production was measured to quantify function. The histological and functional assessment of the SMU showed that the administration of 10 nM DEX beginning on either day 0 or day 6 yielded optimal SMUs. These optimized SMUs exhibited formation of advanced sarcomeric structure and significant increases in myotube diameter and myotube fusion index, compared with untreated controls. Additionally, the optimized SMUs matured functionally, as indicated by a fivefold rise in force production. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the addition of DEX to our process of engineering skeletal muscle tissue improves myogenesis, advances muscle structure, and increases force production in the

  3. Progress in human embryonic stem cell research in the United States between 2001 and 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Vakili

    Full Text Available On August 9th, 2001, the federal government of the United States announced a policy restricting federal funds available for research on human embryonic stem cell (hESCs out of concern for the "vast ethical mine fields" associated with the creation of embryos for research purposes. Until the policy was repealed on March 9th, 2009, no U.S. federal funds were available for research on hESCs extracted after August 9, 2001, and only limited federal funds were available for research on a subset of hESC lines that had previously been extracted. This paper analyzes how the 2001 U.S. federal funding restrictions influenced the quantity and geography of peer-reviewed journal publications on hESC. The primary finding is that the 2001 policy did not have a significant aggregate effect on hESC research in the U.S. After a brief lag in early 2000s, U.S. hESC research maintained pace with other areas of stem cell and genetic research. The policy had several other consequences. First, it was tied to increased hESC research funding within the U.S. at the state level, leading to concentration of related activities in a relatively small number of states. Second, it stimulated increased collaborative research between US-based scientists and those in countries with flexible policies toward hESC research (including Canada, the U.K., Israel, China, Spain, and South Korea. Third, it encouraged independent hESC research in countries without restrictions.

  4. Highly Efficient and Exceptionally Durable CO2 Photoreduction to Methanol over Freestanding Defective Single-Unit-Cell Bismuth Vanadate Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Gu, Bingchuan; Jiao, Xingchen; Sun, Yongfu; Zu, Xiaolong; Yang, Fan; Zhu, Wenguang; Wang, Chengming; Feng, Zimou; Ye, Bangjiao; Xie, Yi

    2017-03-08

    Unearthing an ideal model for disclosing the role of defect sites in solar CO2 reduction remains a great challenge. Here, freestanding gram-scale single-unit-cell o-BiVO4 layers are successfully synthesized for the first time. Positron annihilation spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence unveil their distinct vanadium vacancy concentrations. Density functional calculations reveal that the introduction of vanadium vacancies brings a new defect level and higher hole concentration near Fermi level, resulting in increased photoabsorption and superior electronic conductivity. The higher surface photovoltage intensity of single-unit-cell o-BiVO4 layers with rich vanadium vacancies ensures their higher carriers separation efficiency, further confirmed by the increased carriers lifetime from 74.5 to 143.6 ns revealed by time-resolved fluorescence emission decay spectra. As a result, single-unit-cell o-BiVO4 layers with rich vanadium vacancies exhibit a high methanol formation rate up to 398.3 μmol g(-1) h(-1) and an apparent quantum efficiency of 5.96% at 350 nm, much larger than that of single-unit-cell o-BiVO4 layers with poor vanadium vacancies, and also the former's catalytic activity proceeds without deactivation even after 96 h. This highly efficient and spectrally stable CO2 photoconversion performances hold great promise for practical implementation of solar fuel production.

  5. An Ecosystem Assessment of Carbon Storage and Fluxes Over Space and Time in the Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Hawbaker, T.; Liu, S.; Reed, B.; Sleeter, B. M.; Sohl, T.; Stackpoole, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Ecosystem carbon stock, sequestration, and greenhouse gasl (GHG) flux were estimated for the conterminous United States (CONUS) in two time periods: baseline (annual average of 2001-2005) and future projection (annual average of 2006-2050). Major input data for baseline estimates included national resource inventories (such as forest and agricultural inventories and data from a national stream gage network), land use and land cover (LULC) map and soil carbon from national soil databases. The assessment covered 7,88 million km2 in land and water areas. Major input data for projected carbon estimates included future LULC scenarios developed in a framework consistent with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's future climate projections, and the future climate projection data. Estimated carbon stock and net ecosystem carbon balance for all major pools (live biomass, dead biomass, and soil organic matter) and terrestrial ecosystems (forests, agrcilture, wetlands, and grasslands) were produced using ecosystem models (Table 1). Emission from wildfires of the CONUS was evaluated based on remote sensing methods and fire behavior modeling. Emission fom inland water bodies (including rivers, lakes, and reservoirs), carbon transport by riverine systems, and carbon burial in sediments of lakes and reservoirs in the CONUS were estimated using input data from available aquatic measurements in a national water information system, water areas, and empirial methods (Table 2). Details of the methods used, and effects of drivers (both natural and anthropogenic processes) will be presented in the poster. Uncertainties from the assessment remained high as indicated by the major results shown above. Sources of uncertainties included scarcity of input data, structure differences of methods and models used, and parameterization and assumptions made in the modeling process.Table 1. Estimated carbon stock and net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) of the major ecosystems by two time

  6. Investigation of potential fluctuating intra-unit cell magnetic order in cuprates by μ SR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, A.; Akintola, K.; Potma, M.; Ishikado, M.; Eisaki, H.; Hardy, W. N.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R.; Sonier, J. E.

    2016-10-01

    We report low temperature muon spin relaxation (μ SR ) measurements of the high-transition-temperature (Tc) cuprate superconductors Bi2 +xSr2 -xCaCu2O8 +δ and YBa2Cu3O6.57 , aimed at detecting the mysterious intra-unit cell (IUC) magnetic order that has been observed by spin-polarized neutron scattering in the pseudogap phase of four different cuprate families. A lack of confirmation by local magnetic probe methods has raised the possibility that the magnetic order fluctuates slowly enough to appear static on the time scale of neutron scattering, but too fast to affect μ SR or nuclear magnetic resonance signals. The IUC magnetic order has been linked to a theoretical model for the cuprates, which predicts a long-range ordered phase of electron-current loop order that terminates at a quantum crictical point (QCP). Our study suggests that lowering the temperature to T ˜25 mK and moving far below the purported QCP does not cause enough of a slowing down of fluctuations for the IUC magnetic order to become detectable on the time scale of μ SR . Our measurements place narrow limits on the fluctuation rate of this unidentified magnetic order.

  7. Results and analysis of saltstone cores taken from saltstone disposal unit cell 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hill, K. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    As part of an ongoing Performance Assessment (PA) Maintenance Plan, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has developed a sampling and analyses strategy to facilitate the comparison of field-emplaced samples (i.e., saltstone placed and cured in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU)) with samples prepared and cured in the laboratory. The primary objectives of the Sampling and Analyses Plan (SAP) are; (1) to demonstrate a correlation between the measured properties of laboratory-prepared, simulant samples (termed Sample Set 3), and the field-emplaced saltstone samples (termed Sample Set 9), and (2) to validate property values assumed for the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) PA modeling. The analysis and property data for Sample Set 9 (i.e. six core samples extracted from SDU Cell 2A (SDU2A)) are documented in this report, and where applicable, the results are compared to the results for Sample Set 3. Relevant properties to demonstrate the aforementioned objectives include bulk density, porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity (SHC), and radionuclide leaching behavior.

  8. The modeling of a standalone solid-oxide fuel cell auxiliary power unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, N.; Li, Q.; Sun, X.; Khaleel, M. A.

    In this research, a Simulink model of a standalone vehicular solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) auxiliary power unit (APU) is developed. The SOFC APU model consists of three major components: a controller model; a power electronics system model; and an SOFC plant model, including an SOFC stack module, two heat exchanger modules, and a combustor module. This paper discusses the development of the nonlinear dynamic models for the SOFC stacks, the heat exchangers and the combustors. When coupling with a controller model and a power electronic circuit model, the developed SOFC plant model is able to model the thermal dynamics and the electrochemical dynamics inside the SOFC APU components, as well as the transient responses to the electric loading changes. It has been shown that having such a model for the SOFC APU will help design engineers to adjust design parameters to optimize the performance. The modeling results of the SOFC APU heat-up stage and the output voltage response to a sudden load change are presented in this paper. The fuel flow regulation based on fuel utilization is also briefly discussed.

  9. Fungal spore concentrations in two haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) units containing distinct air control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, C P; Miron, D; Silla, L M R; Pasqualotto, A C

    2013-04-01

    Invasive fungal diseases have emerged as important causes of morbidity and mortality in haematological patients. In this study air samples were collected in two haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) units, in which distinct air-control systems were in place. In hospital 1 no high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter was available whereas in hospital 2 HSCT rooms were equipped with HEPA filters, with positive air pressure in relation to the corridor. A total of 117 samples from rooms, toilets and corridors were obtained during December 2009 to January 2011, using a six-stage Andersen sampler. In both hospitals, the concentration of potentially pathogenic fungi in the air was reduced in patients' rooms compared to corridors (P < 0·0001). Despite the presence of a HEPA filter in hospital 2, rooms in both hospitals showed similar concentrations of potentially pathogenic fungi (P = 0·714). These findings may be explained by the implementation of additional protective measures in hospital 1, emphasizing the importance of such measures in protected environments.

  10. High-temperature superconductivity in one-unit-cell FeSe films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziqiao; Liu, Chaofei; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jian

    2017-04-01

    Since the dramatic enhancement of the superconducting transition temperature (T c) was reported in a one-unit-cell FeSe film grown on a SrTiO3 substrate (1-UC FeSe/STO) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), related research on this system has become a new frontier in condensed matter physics. In this paper, we present a brief review on this rapidly developing field, mainly focusing on the superconducting properties of 1-UC FeSe/STO. Experimental evidence for high-temperature superconductivity in 1-UC FeSe/STO, including direct evidence revealed by transport and diamagnetic measurements, as well as other evidence from scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), are overviewed. The potential mechanisms of the enhanced superconductivity are also discussed. There are accumulating arguments to suggest that the strengthened Cooper pairing in 1-UC FeSe/STO originates from the interface effects, specifically the charge transfer and coupling to phonon modes in the TiO2 plane. The study of superconductivity in 1-UC FeSe/STO not only sheds new light on the mechanism of high-temperature superconductors with layered structures, but also provides an insight into the exploration of new superconductors by interface engineering.

  11. Giant repeater F-wave in patients with anterior horn cell disorders. Role of motor unit size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I K; el-Abd, M A

    1997-01-01

    Conventional F-wave responses as well as single motor unit F-wave responses together with the volitionally recruited motor unit action potentials (MUAP) were studied in hand and feet muscles of 10 healthy subjects and 32 patients with anterior horn cell disorders. The amplitude of the largest F-wave (Fl) was significantly greater in the affected patients compared with healthy subjects. Giant repeater F-wave responses "up to 4 mV" were recorded in muscles having volitionally recruited giant MUAPs. Although, the group mean percentage of motor unit F-wave responses per stimulation in all tested orthodromic MUAPs was significantly decreased in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients, the group mean percentage of motor unit F-wave responses per stimulation in all tested orthodromic MUAPs that gave motor unit F-wave response was significantly increased compared with healthy subjects. The responding orthodromic MUAP gave identical motor unit F-wave response, even for complex polyphasic units. Enhanced monosynaptic (H-) reflex, proximal axon reflex (A-wave), and repetitive muscle response as possible explanations for the giant F-wave responses could be discounted. The electrophysiologic behavior of the giant late responses described here fits well with the criteria of F-waves modulated by newly formed distal (and or proximal) axonal branching.

  12. The role of nanostructures and quantum dots in detectors and solar cells for radiation hardened space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Edward W.

    2006-08-01

    Highly efficient IR detectors and photo-voltaic solar cells that incorporate nanotechnology composed of nanostructures and nanoparticles (including quantum dots) will play an important role in advanced photonic space applications. While the development of Si-based solar cells has successfully evolved into an efficient and economical technology these devices are predicted to soon reach their theoretical 29% limit efficiency. Alternative organic/polymer solar cells and IR detectors incorporating quantum dots and various nanoparticle or nanostructure materials are emerging which are expected to eventually outperform current state-of-the-art detectors and solar cell devices. By tailoring the QD design wavelength-optimized detectors and detector arrays operating over the UV-IR range can be realized. Specific examples for achieving near-IR photovoltaic and photoconductive detectors with high quantum efficiencies are presented along with brief examples of empirical data reported for assessing the radiation resistance of QD nanocrystalline devices for application in space environments.

  13. Nonlinear predictive control of a boiler-turbine unit: A state-space approach with successive on-line model linearisation and quadratic optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ławryńczuk, Maciej

    2017-03-01

    This paper details development of a Model Predictive Control (MPC) algorithm for a boiler-turbine unit, which is a nonlinear multiple-input multiple-output process. The control objective is to follow set-point changes imposed on two state (output) variables and to satisfy constraints imposed on three inputs and one output. In order to obtain a computationally efficient control scheme, the state-space model is successively linearised on-line for the current operating point and used for prediction. In consequence, the future control policy is easily calculated from a quadratic optimisation problem. For state estimation the extended Kalman filter is used. It is demonstrated that the MPC strategy based on constant linear models does not work satisfactorily for the boiler-turbine unit whereas the discussed algorithm with on-line successive model linearisation gives practically the same trajectories as the truly nonlinear MPC controller with nonlinear optimisation repeated at each sampling instant. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. HEp-2 Cell Classification: The Role of Gaussian Scale Space Theory as A Pre-processing Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Xianbiao; Zhao, Guoying; Chen, Jie; Pietikäinen, Matti

    2015-01-01

    \\textit{Indirect Immunofluorescence Imaging of Human Epithelial Type 2} (HEp-2) cells is an effective way to identify the presence of Anti-Nuclear Antibody (ANA). Most existing works on HEp-2 cell classification mainly focus on feature extraction, feature encoding and classifier design. Very few efforts have been devoted to study the importance of the pre-processing techniques. In this paper, we analyze the importance of the pre-processing, and investigate the role of Gaussian Scale Space (GS...

  15. Monocyte migration into the subendothelial space of a coculture of adult human aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Navab, M; Hough, G P; Stevenson, L W; Drinkwater, D C; Laks, H; Fogelman, A M

    1988-01-01

    Human aortic endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) were isolated and used to form a multilayer of EC-SMC separated by a layer of collagen. SMC and/or collagen layers exerted minimal effects on Na+ transport but impeded the transport of LDL. The presence of an endothelial monolayer markedly reduced the transport of Na+ and LDL. When monocytes were presented to the complete coculture, in the absence of added chemoattractant, one monocyte entered the subendothelial space for every...

  16. High Efficiency Quantum Dot III-V Thermophotovoltaic Cell for Space Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For NASA deep space science missions, radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) fueled by plutonium-238 are used to provide on-board source of heat, which is then...

  17. Correction of the equilibrium temperature caused by slight evaporation of water in protein crystal growth cells during long-term space experiments at International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takahisa; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Murayama, Kenta; Fukuyama, Seijiro; Hosokawa, Kouhei; Oshi, Kentaro; Ito, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Tachibana, Masaru; Miura, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    The normal growth rates of the {110} faces of tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystals, R, were measured as a function of the supersaturation σ parameter using a reflection type interferometer under μG at the International Space Station (NanoStep Project). Since water slightly evaporated from in situ observation cells during a long-term space station experiment for several months, equilibrium temperature T(e) changed, and the actual σ, however, significantly increased mainly due to the increase in salt concentration C(s). To correct σ, the actual C(s) and protein concentration C(p), which correctly represent the measured T(e) value in space, were first calculated. Second, a new solubility curve with the corrected C(s) was plotted. Finally, the revised σ was obtained from the new solubility curve. This correction method successfully revealed that the 2.8% water was evaporated from the solution, leading to 2.8% increase in the C(s) and C(p) of the solution.

  18. Computer modeling of gastric parietal cell: significance of canalicular space, gland lumen, and variable canalicular [K+].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers, James M; Forte, John G; Machen, Terry E

    2016-05-01

    A computer model, constructed for evaluation of integrated functioning of cellular components involved in acid secretion by the gastric parietal cell, has provided new interpretations of older experimental evidence, showing the functional significance of a canalicular space separated from a mucosal bath by a gland lumen and also shedding light on basolateral Cl(-) transport. The model shows 1) changes in levels of parietal cell secretion (with stimulation or H-K-ATPase inhibitors) result mainly from changes in electrochemical driving forces for apical K(+) and Cl(-) efflux, as canalicular [K(+)] ([K(+)]can) increases or decreases with changes in apical H(+)/K(+) exchange rate; 2) H-K-ATPase inhibition in frog gastric mucosa would increase [K(+)]can similarly with low or high mucosal [K(+)], depolarizing apical membrane voltage similarly, so electrogenic H(+) pumping is not indicated by inhibition causing similar increase in transepithelial potential difference (Vt) with 4 and 80 mM mucosal K(+); 3) decreased H(+) secretion during strongly mucosal-positive voltage clamping is consistent with an electroneutral H-K-ATPase being inhibited by greatly decreased [K(+)]can (Michaelis-Menten mechanism); 4) slow initial change ("long time-constant transient") in current or Vt with clamping of Vt or current involves slow change in [K(+)]can; 5) the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) symporter (NKCC) is likely to have a significant role in Cl(-) influx, despite evidence that it is not necessary for acid secretion; and 6) relative contributions of Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger (AE2) and NKCC to Cl(-) influx would differ greatly between resting and stimulated states, possibly explaining reported differences in physiological characteristics of stimulated open-circuit Cl(-) secretion (≈H(+)) and resting short-circuit Cl(-) secretion (>H(+)).

  19. Modeling high resolution space-time variations in energy demand/CO2 emissions of human inhabited landscapes in the United States under a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, A. V.; Gurney, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    With urban and exurban areas now accounting for more than 50% of the world's population, projected to increase 20% by 2050 (UN World Urbanization Prospects, 2009), urban-climate interactions are of renewed interest to the climate change scientific community (Karl et. al, 1988; Kalnay and Cai, 2003; Seto and Shepherd, 2009). Until recently, climate modeling efforts treated urban-human systems as independent of the earth system. With studies pointing to the disproportionately large influence of urban areas on their surrounding environment (Small et. al, 2010), modeling efforts have begun to explicitly account for urban processes in land models, like the CLM 4.0 urban layer, for example (Oleson.et. al, 2008, 2010). A significant portion of the urban energy demand comes from the space heating and cooling requirement of the residential and commercial sectors - as much as 51% (DOE, RECS 2005) and 11% (Belzer, D. 2006) respectively, in the United States. Thus, these sectors are both responsible for a significant fraction of fossil fuel CO2 emissions and will be influenced by a changing climate through changes in energy use and energy supply planning. This points to the possibility of interactive processes and feedbacks with the climate system. Space conditioning energy demand is strongly driven by external air temperature (Ruth, M. et.al, 2006) in addition to other socio-economic variables such as building characteristics (age of structure, activity cycle, weekend/weekday usage profile), occupant characteristics (age of householder, household income) and energy prices (Huang, 2006; Santin et. al, 2009; Isaac and van Vuuren, 2009). All of these variables vary both in space and time. Projections of climate change have begun to simulate changes in temperature at much higher resolution than in the past (Diffenbaugh et. al, 2005). Hence, in order to understand how climate change and variability will potentially impact energy use/emissions and energy planning, these two

  20. Effects of spaced learning in the water maze on development of dentate granule cells generated in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchero, Mariela F; Koehl, Muriel; Bechakra, Malik; Delage, Pauline; Charrier, Vanessa; Grosjean, Noelle; Ladeveze, Elodie; Schinder, Alejandro F; Abrous, D Nora

    2015-11-01

    New dentate granule cells (GCs) are generated in the hippocampus throughout life. These adult-born neurons are required for spatial learning in the Morris water maze (MWM). In rats, spatial learning shapes the network by regulating their number and dendritic development. Here, we explored whether such modulatory effects exist in mice. New GCs were tagged using thymidine analogs or a GFP-expressing retrovirus. Animals were exposed to a reference memory protocol for 10-14 days (spaced training) at different times after newborn cells labeling. Cell proliferation, cell survival, cell death, neuronal phenotype, and dendritic and spine development were examined using immunohistochemistry. Surprisingly, spatial learning did not modify any of the parameters under scrutiny including cell number and dendritic morphology. These results suggest that although new GCs are required in mice for spatial learning in the MWM, they are, at least for the developmental intervals analyzed here, refractory to behavioral stimuli generated in the course of learning in the MWM.