WorldWideScience

Sample records for unit cell geometry

  1. Unit cell geometry of multiaxial preforms for structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Frank; Lei, Charles; Rahman, Anisur; Du, G. W.; Cai, Yun-Jia

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the yarn geometry of multiaxial preforms. The importance of multiaxial preforms for structural composites is well recognized by the industry but, to exploit their full potential, engineering design rules must be established. This study is a step in that direction. In this work the preform geometry for knitted and braided preforms was studied by making a range of well designed samples and studying them by photo microscopy. The structural geometry of the preforms is related to the processing parameters. Based on solid modeling and B-spline methodology a software package is developed. This computer code enables real time structural representations of complex fiber architecture based on the rule of preform manufacturing. The code has the capability of zooming and section plotting. These capabilities provide a powerful means to study the effect of processing variables on the preform geometry. the code also can be extended to an auto mesh generator for downstream structural analysis using finite element method. This report is organized into six sections. In the first section the scope and background of this work is elaborated. In section two the unit cell geometries of braided and multi-axial warp knitted preforms is discussed. The theoretical frame work of yarn path modeling and solid modeling is presented in section three. The thin section microscopy carried out to observe the structural geometry of the preforms is the subject in section four. The structural geometry is related to the processing parameters in section five. Section six documents the implementation of the modeling techniques into the computer code MP-CAD. A user manual for the software is also presented here. The source codes and published papers are listed in the Appendices.

  2. Transformations of units and world's geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Quirós, I

    2000-01-01

    The issue of the transformations of units is treated, mainly, in a geometrical context. Spacetime singularities are shown to be a consequence of a wrong choice of the geometrical formulation of the laws of gravitation. This result is discussed, in particular, for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology. It is also shown that Weyl geometry is a consistent framework for the formulation of the gravitational laws since the basic laws on which this geometry rests are invariant under the one-parameter Abelian group of units transformations studied in the paper. Riemann geometry does not fulfill this requirement. Arguments are given that point at Weyl geometry as a geometry implicitly containing the quantum effects of matter. The notion of geometrical relativity is presented. This notion may represent a natural extension of general relativity to include invariance under the group of units transformations.

  3. Differential geometry meets the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Wallace F

    2013-07-18

    A new study by Terasaki et al. highlights the role of physical forces in biological form by showing that connections between stacked endoplasmic reticulum cisternae have a shape well known in classical differential geometry, the helicoid, and that this shape is a predictable consequence of membrane physics.

  4. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  5. Controlling Cell Function with Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrksich, Milan

    2012-02-01

    This presentation will describe the use of patterned substrates to control cell shape with examples that illustrate the ways in which cell shape can regulate cell function. Most cells are adherent and must attach to and spread on a surface in order to survive, proliferate and function. In tissue, this surface is the extracellular matrix (ECM), an insoluble scaffold formed by the assembly of several large proteins---including fibronectin, the laminins and collagens and others---but in the laboratory, the surface is prepared by adsorbing protein to glass slides. To pattern cells, gold-coated slides are patterned with microcontact printing to create geometric features that promote cell attachment and that are surrounded by inert regions. Cells attach to these substrates and spread to adopt the shape defined by the underlying pattern and remain stable in culture for several days. Examples will be described that used a series of shapes to reveal the relationship between the shape of the cell and the structure of its cytoskeleton. These geometric cues were used to control cell polarity and the tension, or contractility, present in the cytoskeleton. These rules were further used to control the shapes of mesenchymal stem cells and in turn to control the differentiation of these cells into specialized cell types. For example, stem cells that were patterned into a ``star'' shape preferentially differentiated into bone cells whereas those that were patterned into a ``flower'' shape preferred a fat cell fate. These influences of shape on differentiation depend on the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton. These examples, and others, reveal that shape is an important cue that informs cell function and that can be combined with the more common soluble cues to direct and study cell function.

  6. Dancoff factors of unit cells in cluster geometry with partial absorption of neutrons; Fatores de Dancoff de celulas unitarias em geometria cluster com absorcao parcial de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Leticia Jenisch

    2011-01-15

    In its classical formulation, the Dancoff factor for a perfectly absorbing fuel rod is defined as the relative reduction in the incurrent of resonance neutrons into the rod in the presence of neighboring rods, as compared to the incurrent into a single fuel rod immersed in an infinite moderator. Alternatively, this factor can be viewed as the probability that a neutron emerging from the surface of a fuel rod will enter another fuel rod without any collision in the moderator or cladding. For perfectly absorbing fuel these definitions are equivalent. In the last years, several works appeared in literature reporting improvements in the calculation of Dancoff factors, using both the classical and the collision probability definitions. In this work, we step further reporting Dancoff factors for perfectly absorbing (Black) and partially absorbing (Grey) fuel rods calculated by the collision probability method, in cluster cells with square outer boundaries. In order to validate the results, comparisons are made with the equivalent cylindricalized cell in hypothetical test cases. The calculation is performed considering specularly reflecting boundary conditions, for the square lattice, and diffusive reflecting boundary conditions, for the cylindrical geometry. The results show the expected asymptotic behavior of the solution with increasing cell sizes. In addition, Dancoff factors are computed for the Canadian cells CANDU-37 and CANFLEX by the Monte Carlo and Direct methods. Finally, the effective multiplication factors, k{sub eff}, for these cells (cluster cell with square outer boundaries and the equivalent cylindricalized cell) are also computed, and the differences reported for the cases using the perfect and partial absorption assumptions. (author)

  7. Geometry and Topology of Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouligand, Y.

    Cells are limited by a membrane which is a fluid bilayer of phospholipids to which are associated numerous components, such as cholesterol, polysaccharides, proteins and, among them, many enzymes. organelles within cells are made for a large part of similar bilayers including phospholipids and various molecules. The cell membrane forms architectures closely related to those observed in liquid crystalline phases given by water-lipid systems (purified amphiphilic molecules in presence of water and oily components). The cell is divided into a series of compartments with definite topological relations, which are rehandled more or less profoundly in diverse circumstances as endocytosis, exocytosis, mitosis etc. There are several geometric arrangements of membrane sets : parallel membranes, hexagonal packing of tubes, cubic systems made of tubes joining either three by three, or four by four, or six by six. There are other arrangements less directly related to liquid crysyalline structures (annulate lamellae, tubes and lamellae with nematic symmetries, randomly joining tubes). Comparisons of structures in cellular membranes and in water-lipid systems reveal important differences. If geometries are often similar, water percentage and scales are distinct and bilayers observed in vitro present a symmetry which is broken in cell membrane bilayers. The curvature effects observed in water-lipid systems mainly come from a density difference between polar heads and corresponding paraffinic chains within a monolayer, whereas, in biological membranes, the asymmetry lies between the two monolayers and their associated molecules. Both systems produce saddle-shaped bilayers arranging into cubic lattices separating two aqueous compartments. In water-lipid systems, the coupling at an interface of two different areas seems to predominate, whereas in biological membranes, mechanisms are different and probably originate from geometric properties of proteins included within bilayers.

  8. Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Pedoe, Dan

    1988-01-01

    ""A lucid and masterly survey."" - Mathematics Gazette Professor Pedoe is widely known as a fine teacher and a fine geometer. His abilities in both areas are clearly evident in this self-contained, well-written, and lucid introduction to the scope and methods of elementary geometry. It covers the geometry usually included in undergraduate courses in mathematics, except for the theory of convex sets. Based on a course given by the author for several years at the University of Minnesota, the main purpose of the book is to increase geometrical, and therefore mathematical, understanding and to he

  9. Bi-Cell Unit for Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The patent concerns a bi-cell unit for a fuel cell . The bi-cell unit is comprised of two electrode packs. Each of the electrode packs includes an...invention relates in general to a bi-cell unit for a fuel cell and in particular, to a bi-cell unit for a hydrazine-air fuel cell .

  10. Analytic Geometry. Student's Text, Unit No. 64. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayre, H. Glenn; And Others

    This text provides a one-semester study of analytic geometry for secondary school students. It is designed for use at the 12th grade level. A deliberate effort was made to tie this text to previous SMSG texts; the usual language of sets, ordered pairs, number properties, etc. are included. This flavor is what distinguishes this book from others in…

  11. Active mechanics and geometry of adherent cells and cell colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of traction stresses exerted by adherent cells or cell colonies on elastic substrates have yielded new insight on how the mechanical and geometrical properties of the substrate regulate cellular force distribution, mechanical energy, spreading, morphology or stress ber architecture. We have developed a generic mechanical model of adherent cells as an active contractile gel mechanically coupled to an elastic substrate and to neighboring cells in a tissue. The contractile gel model accurately predicts the distribution of cellular and traction stresses as observed in single cell experiments, and captures the dependence of cell shape, traction stresses and stress ber polarization on the substrate's mechanical and geometrical properties. The model further predicts that the total strain energy of an adherent cell is solely regulated by its spread area, in agreement with recent experiments on micropatterned substrates with controlled geometry. When used to describe the behavior of colonies of adherent epithelial cells, the model demonstrates the crucial role of the mechanical cross-talk between intercellular and extracellular adhesion in regulating traction force distribution. Strong intercellular mechanical coupling organizes traction forces to the colony periphery, whereas weaker intercellular coupling leads to the build up of traction stresses at intercellular junctions. Furthermore, in agreement with experiments on large cohesive keratinocyte colonies, the model predicts a linear scaling of traction forces with the colony size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension as a scale-free material property of the adherent tissue, originating from actomyosin contractility.

  12. Analytic Geometry. Teacher's Commentary, Unit No. 65. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayre, H. Glenn; And Others

    This is the teacher's guide to the SMSG text ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. The text is designed to be used as a one-semester course for 12th grade students. Included in this guide are: (1) suggested length of study for each chapter; (2) discussion of each chapter that is in the student text; (3) comments keyed to the pages of the student's text to provide…

  13. Kinetics of binding and geometry of cells on molecular biochips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chechetkin, V.R. [Theoretical Department of Division for Perspective Investigations, Troitsk Institute of Innovation and Thermonuclear Investigations (TRINITI), Troitsk 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: chechet@biochip.ru

    2007-07-02

    We examine how the shape of cells and the geometry of experiment affect the reaction-diffusion kinetics at the binding between target and probe molecules on molecular biochips. In particular, we compare the binding kinetics for the probes immobilized on surface of the hemispherical and flat circular cells, the limit of thin slab of analyte solution over probe cell as well as hemispherical gel pads and cells printed in gel slab over a substrate. It is shown that hemispherical geometry provides significantly faster binding kinetics and ensures more spatially homogeneous distribution of local (from a pixel) signals over a cell in the transient regime. The advantage of using thin slabs with small volume of analyte solution may be hampered by the much longer binding kinetics needing the auxiliary mixing devices. Our analysis proves that the shape of cells and the geometry of experiment should be included to the list of essential factors at biochip designing.

  14. Cell dipole behaviour revealed by ECM sub-cellular geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Kalpana; Wang, Irène; Vitiello, Elisa; Orellana, Laura Andreina Chacòn; Balland, Martial

    2014-12-01

    Cells sense and respond to their mechanical environment by exerting forces on their surroundings. The way forces are modulated by extra-cellular matrix (ECM) properties plays a key role in tissue homoeostasis. Using highly resolved micropatterns that constrain cells into the same square envelope but vary the adhesive geometry, here we investigate how the adhesive micro-environment affects the architecture of actin cytoskeleton and the orientation of traction forces. Our data demonstrate that local adhesive changes can trigger orientational ordering of stress fibres throughout the cell, suggesting that cells are capable of integrating information on ECM geometry at the whole-cell level. Finally, we show that cells tend to generate highly polarized force pattern, that is, unidirectional pinching, in response to adequate adhesive conditions. Hence, the geometry of adhesive environment can induce cellular orientation, a process which may have significant implications for the formation and mechanical properties of tissues.

  15. Sickle Cell Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canipe, Stephen L.

    Included in this high school biology unit on sickle cell anemia are the following materials: a synopsis of the history of the discovery and the genetic qualities of the disease; electrophoresis diagrams comparing normal, homozygous and heterozygous conditions of the disease; and biochemical characteristics and population genetics of the disease. A…

  16. Cell geometry dictates TNFα-induced genome response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Aninda; Venkatachalapathy, Saradha; Ratna, Prasuna; Wang, Yejun; Jokhun, Doorgesh Sharma; Shivashankar, G V

    2017-05-16

    Cells in physiology integrate local soluble and mechanical signals to regulate genomic programs. Whereas the individual roles of these signals are well studied, the cellular responses to the combined chemical and physical signals are less explored. Here, we investigated the cross-talk between cellular geometry and TNFα signaling. We stabilized NIH 3T3 fibroblasts into rectangular anisotropic or circular isotropic geometries and stimulated them with TNFα and analyzed nuclear translocation of transcription regulators -NFκB (p65) and MKL and downstream gene-expression patterns. We found that TNFα induces geometry-dependent actin depolymerization, which enhances IκB degradation, p65 nuclear translocation, nuclear exit of MKL, and sequestration of p65 at the RNA-polymerase-II foci. Further, global transcription profile of cells under matrix-TNFα interplay reveals a geometry-dependent gene-expression pattern. At a functional level, we find cell geometry affects TNFα-induced cell proliferation. Our results provide compelling evidence that fibroblasts, depending on their geometries, elicit distinct cellular responses for the same cytokine.

  17. Plant cells use auxin efflux to explore geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaban, Beatrix; Liu, Wenwen; Jiang, Xingyu; Nick, Peter

    2014-07-28

    Cell movement is the central mechanism for animal morphogenesis. Plant cell development rather relies on flexible alignment of cell axis adjusting cellular differentiation to directional cues. As central input, vectorial fields of mechanical stress and gradients of the phytohormone auxin have been discussed. In tissue contexts, mechanical and chemical signals will always act in concert; experimentally it is difficult to dissect their individual roles. We have designed a novel approach, based on cells, where directionality has been eliminated by removal of the cell wall. We impose a new axis using a microfluidic set-up to generate auxin gradients. Rectangular microvessels are integrated orthogonally with the gradient. Cells in these microvessels align their new axis with microvessel geometry before touching the wall. Auxin efflux is necessary for this touch-independent geometry exploration and we suggest a model, where auxin gradients can be used to align cell axis in tissues with minimized mechanical tensions.

  18. Designing an educative curriculum unit for teaching molecular geometry in high school chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarious, Nader N.

    Chemistry is a highly abstract discipline that is taught and learned with the aid of various models. Among the most challenging, yet a fundamental topic in general chemistry at the high school level, is molecular geometry. This study focused on developing exemplary educative curriculum materials pertaining to the topic of molecular geometry. The methodology used in this study consisted of several steps. First, a diverse set of models were analyzed to determine to what extent each model serves its purpose in teaching molecular geometry. Second, a number of high school teachers and college chemistry professors were asked to share their experiences on using models in teaching molecular geometry through an online questionnaire. Third, findings from the comparative analysis of models, teachers’ experiences, literature review on models and students’ misconceptions, the curriculum expectations of the Next Generation Science Standards and their emphasis on three-dimensional learning and nature of science (NOS) contributed to the development of the molecular geometry unit. Fourth, the developed unit was reviewed by fellow teachers and doctoral-level science education experts and was revised to further improve its coherence and clarity in support of teaching and learning of the molecular geometry concepts. The produced educative curriculum materials focus on the scientific practice of developing and using models as promoted in the Next Generations Science Standards (NGSS) while also addressing nature of science (NOS) goals. The educative features of the newly developed unit support teachers’ pedagogical knowledge (PK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The unit includes an overview, teacher’s guide, and eight detailed lesson plans with inquiry oriented modeling activities replete with models and suggestions for teachers, as well as formative and summative assessment tasks. The unit design process serves as a model for redesigning other instructional units in

  19. Controlling cell-matrix traction forces by extracellular geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2013-03-01

    We present a minimal continuum model of strongly adhering cells as active contractile isotropic media and use the model for studying the effect of the geometry of the adhesion patch in controlling the spatial distribution of traction and cellular stresses. Activity is introduced as a contractile, hence negative, spatially homogeneous contribution to the pressure. The model shows that patterning of adhesion regions can be used to control traction stress distribution and yields several results consistent with experimental observations. Specifically, the cell spread area is found to increase with substrate stiffness and an analytic expression of the dependence is obtained for circular cells. The correlation between the magnitude of traction stresses and cell boundary curvature is also demonstrated and analyzed.

  20. Geometry-Driven Polarity in Motile Amoeboid Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Nagel

    Full Text Available Motile eukaryotic cells, such as leukocytes, cancer cells, and amoeba, typically move inside the narrow interstitial spacings of tissue or soil. While most of our knowledge of actin-driven eukaryotic motility was obtained from cells that move on planar open surfaces, recent work has demonstrated that confinement can lead to strongly altered motile behavior. Here, we report experimental evidence that motile amoeboid cells undergo a spontaneous symmetry breaking in confined interstitial spaces. Inside narrow channels, the cells switch to a highly persistent, unidirectional mode of motion, moving at a constant speed along the channel. They remain in contact with the two opposing channel side walls and alternate protrusions of their leading edge near each wall. Their actin cytoskeleton exhibits a characteristic arrangement that is dominated by dense, stationary actin foci at the side walls, in conjunction with less dense dynamic regions at the leading edge. Our experimental findings can be explained based on an excitable network model that accounts for the confinement-induced symmetry breaking and correctly recovers the spatio-temporal pattern of protrusions at the leading edge. Since motile cells typically live in the narrow interstitial spacings of tissue or soil, we expect that the geometry-driven polarity we report here plays an important role for movement of cells in their natural environment.

  1. Mechanical Cell-Cell Communication in Fibrous Networks: The Importance of Network Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, D L; Grogan, J A; Gaffney, E A

    2017-03-01

    Cells contracting in extracellular matrix (ECM) can transmit stress over long distances, communicating their position and orientation to cells many tens of micrometres away. Such phenomena are not observed when cells are seeded on substrates with linear elastic properties, such as polyacrylamide (PA) gel. The ability for fibrous substrates to support far reaching stress and strain fields has implications for many physiological processes, while the mechanical properties of ECM are central to several pathological processes, including tumour invasion and fibrosis. Theoretical models have investigated the properties of ECM in a variety of network geometries. However, the effects of network architecture on mechanical cell-cell communication have received little attention. This work investigates the effects of geometry on network mechanics, and thus the ability for cells to communicate mechanically through different networks. Cell-derived displacement fields are quantified for various network geometries while controlling for network topology, cross-link density and micromechanical properties. We find that the heterogeneity of response, fibre alignment, and substrate displacement fields are sensitive to network choice. Further, we show that certain geometries support mechanical communication over longer distances than others. As such, we predict that the choice of network geometry is important in fundamental modelling of cell-cell interactions in fibrous substrates, as well as in experimental settings, where mechanical signalling at the cellular scale plays an important role. This work thus informs the construction of theoretical models for substrate mechanics and experimental explorations of mechanical cell-cell communication.

  2. Streamflow characteristics related to channel geometry of streams in western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, E.R.; Osterkamp, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    Assessment of surface-mining and reclamation activities generally requires extensive hydrologic data. Adequate streamflow data from instrumented gaging stations rarely are available, and estimates of surface- water discharge based on rainfall-runoff models, drainage area, and basin characteristics sometimes have proven unreliable. Channel-geometry measurements offer an alternative method of quickly and inexpensively estimating stream-flow characteristics for ungaged streams. The method uses the empirical development of equations to yield a discharge value from channel-geometry and channel-material data. The equations are developed by collecting data at numerous streamflow-gaging sites and statistically relating those data to selected discharge characteristics. Mean annual runoff and flood discharges with selected recurrence intervals can be estimated for perennial, intermittent, and ephemeral streams. The equations were developed from data collected in the western one-half of the conterminous United States. The effect of the channel-material and runoff characteristics are accounted for with the equations.

  3. Effects of cell geometry on reversible vesicular transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamched, Bhargav R.; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2017-02-01

    A major question in cell biology concerns the biophysical mechanism underlying delivery of newly synthesized macromolecules to specific targets within a cell. A recent modeling paper investigated this phenomenon in the context of vesicular delivery to en passant synapses in neurons (Bressloff and Levien 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett.). It was shown how reversibility in vesicular delivery to synapses could play a crucial role in achieving uniformity in the distribution of resources throughout an axon, which is consistent with experimental observations in C. elegans and Drosophila. In this work we generalize the previous model by investigating steady-state vesicular distributions on a Cayley tree, a disk, and a sphere. We show that for irreversible transport on a tree, branching increases the rate of decay of the steady-state distribution of vesicles. On the other hand, the steady-state profiles for reversible transport are similar to the 1D case. In the case of higher-dimensional geometries, we consider two distinct types of radially-symmetric microtubular network: (i) a continuum and (ii) a discrete set. In the continuum case, we model the motor-cargo dynamics using a phenomenologically-based advection-diffusion equation in polar (2D) and spherical (3D) coordinates. On the other-hand, in the discrete case, we derive the population model from a stochastic model of a single motor switching between ballistic motion and diffusion. For all of the geometries we find that reversibility in vesicular delivery to target sites allows for a more uniform distribution of vesicles, provided that cargo-carrying motors are not significantly slowed by their cargo. In each case we characterize the loss of uniformity as a function of the dispersion in velocities.

  4. Criticality safety validation: Simple geometry, single unit {sup 233}U systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putman, V.L.

    1997-06-01

    Typically used LMITCO criticality safety computational methods are evaluated for suitability when applied to INEEL {sup 233}U systems which reasonably can be modeled as simple-geometry, single-unit systems. Sixty-seven critical experiments of uranium highly enriched in {sup 233}U, including 57 aqueous solution, thermal-energy systems and 10 metal, fast-energy systems, were modeled. These experiments include 41 cylindrical and 26 spherical cores, and 41 reflected and 26 unreflected systems. No experiments were found for intermediate-neutron-energy ranges, or with interstitial non-hydrogenous materials typical of waste systems, mixed {sup 233}U and plutonium, or reflectors such as steel, lead, or concrete. No simple geometry experiments were found with cubic or annular cores, or approximating infinite sea systems. Calculations were performed with various tools and methodologies. Nine cross-section libraries, based on ENDF/B-IV, -V, or -VI.2, or on Hansen-Roach source data, were used with cross-section processing methods of MCNP or SCALE. The k{sub eff} calculations were performed with neutral-particle transport and Monte Carlo methods of criticality codes DANT, MCNP 4A, and KENO Va.

  5. Spatial pattern of cell geometry and cell-division orientation in zebrafish lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Mochizuki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell proliferation is a key regulator of tissue morphogenesis. We examined cell proliferation and cell division in zebrafish lens epithelium by visualizing cell-cycle phases and nuclear positions, using fluorescent-labeled geminin and histone proteins. Proliferation was low in the anterior region of lens epithelium and higher in the marginal zone anterior to the equator, suggesting that the proliferation zone, called the germinative zone, is formed in zebrafish lens. Interestingly, cell-division orientation was biased longitudinally in the anterior region, shifted from longitudinal to circumferential along the anterior–posterior axis of lens sphere, and was biased circumferentially in the peripheral region. These data suggest that cell-division orientation is spatially regulated in zebrafish lens epithelium. The Hertwig rule indicates that cells tend to divide along their long axes. Orientation of long axes and cell division were biased similarly in zebrafish lens epithelium, suggesting that cell geometry correlates with cell-division orientation. A cell adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, is expressed in lens epithelium. In a zebrafish e-cadherin mutant, the long axes and cell-division orientation were shifted more longitudinally. These data suggest that E-cadherin is required for the spatial pattern of cell geometry and cell-division orientation in zebrafish lens epithelium.

  6. NMII forms a contractile transcellular sarcomeric network to regulate apical cell junctions and tissue geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Seham; Fujita, Tomoki; Millis, Bryan A; Kozin, Elliott; Ma, Xuefei; Kawamoto, Sachiyo; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hisa, Yasuo; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S; Sakaguchi, Hirofumi; Kachar, Bechara

    2013-04-22

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NMII) is thought to be the master integrator of force within epithelial apical junctions, mediating epithelial tissue morphogenesis and tensional homeostasis. Mutations in NMII are associated with a number of diseases due to failures in cell-cell adhesion. However, the organization and the precise mechanism by which NMII generates and responds to tension along the intercellular junctional line are still not known. We discovered that periodic assemblies of bipolar NMII filaments interlace with perijunctional actin and α-actinin to form a continuous belt of muscle-like sarcomeric units (∼400-600 nm) around each epithelial cell. Remarkably, the sarcomeres of adjacent cells are precisely paired across the junctional line, forming an integrated, transcellular contractile network. The contraction/relaxation of paired sarcomeres concomitantly impacts changes in apical cell shape and tissue geometry. We show differential distribution of NMII isoforms across heterotypic junctions and evidence for compensation between isoforms. Our results provide a model for how NMII force generation is effected along the junctional perimeter of each cell and communicated across neighboring cells in the epithelial organization. The sarcomeric network also provides a well-defined target to investigate the multiple roles of NMII in junctional homeostasis as well as in development and disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of Cell Composition and Geometry on Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells-Derived Engineered Cardiac Tissue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Takeichiro Nakane; Hidetoshi Masumoto; Joseph P Tinney; Fangping Yuan; William J Kowalski; Fei Ye; Amanda J Leblanc; Ryuzo Sakata; Jun K Yamashita; Bradley B Keller

    2017-01-01

    ...) composed of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) derived multiple lineage cardiac cells with varied 3D geometries and cell densities developed towards the goal of scale-up for large animal pre-clinical studies...

  8. Geometry with Coordinates, Student's Text, Part II, Unit 48. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Frank B.; And Others

    This is part two of a two-part SMSG geometry text for high school students. One of the goals of the text is the development of analytic geometry hand-in-hand with synthetic geometry. The authors emphasize that both are deductive systems and that it is useful to have more than one mode of attack in solving problems. The text begins the development…

  9. Geometry with Coordinates, Student's Text, Part I, Unit 47. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Frank B.; And Others

    This is part one of a two-part SMSG geometry text for high school students. One of the goals of the text is the development of analytic geometry hand-in-hand with synthetic geometry. The authors emphasize that both are deductive systems and that it is useful to have more than one mode of attack in solving problems. The text begins the development…

  10. Development of bankfull hydraulic geometry relationships for the physiographic divisions of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankfull hydraulic geometry relationships are used to estimate channel dimensions for stream flow simulation models, which require channel geometry data as input parameters. Often, one nationwide curve is used across the entire U.S. (e.g. in SWAT), even though studies have shown that the use of reg...

  11. Designing an Educative Curriculum Unit for Teaching Molecular Geometry in High School Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarious, Nader N.

    2017-01-01

    Chemistry is a highly abstract discipline that is taught and learned with the aid of various models. Among the most challenging, yet a fundamental topic in general chemistry at the high school level, is molecular geometry. This study focused on developing exemplary educative curriculum materials pertaining to the topic of molecular geometry. The…

  12. Plasto-hydrodynamic pressure in a simple tapered and combined geometry units for drawing and coating wires

    OpenAIRE

    Nwir, Mohamed Abubaker

    1994-01-01

    In plasto-hydrodynamic die-less wire drawing process, the conventional reduction die is replaced by a pressure unit of certain internal geometry. The deformation is induced by the combined effect of hydro-dynamic pressure and stress generated in the unit due to the motion of the wire and the viscous action of the polymer melt. The dimensions of the unit are such that the smallest bore size is greater than the incoming wire diameter. In this system, larger magnitude of the hydro-dynamic pressu...

  13. Critical experiments on single-unit spherical plutonium geometries reflected and moderated by oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1997-05-01

    Experimental critical configurations are reported for several dozen spherical and hemispherical single-unit assemblies of plutonium metal. Most were solid but many were hollow-centered, thick, shell-like geometries. All were constructed of nested plutonium (mostly {sup 2139}Pu) metal hemispherical shells. Three kinds of critical configurations are reported. Two required interpolation and/or extrapolation of data to obtain the critical mass because reflector conditions were essentially infinite. The first finds the plutonium essentially fully reflected by a hydrogen-rich oil; the second is essentially unreflected. The third kind reports the critical oil reflector height above a large plutonium metal assembly of accurately known mass (no interpolation required) when that mass was too great to permit full oil reflection. Some configurations had thicknesses of mild steel just outside the plutonium metal, separating it from the oil. These experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory in the late 1960s. They have not been published in a form suitable for benchmark-quality comparisons against state-of-the-art computational techniques until this paper. The age of the data and other factors lead to some difficulty in reconstructing aspects of the program and may, in turn, decrease confidence in certain details. Whenever this is true, the point is acknowledged. The plutonium metal was alpha-phase {sup 239}Pu containing 5.9 wt-% {sup 240}Pu. All assemblies were formed by nesting 1.667-mm-thick (nominal) bare plutonium metal hemispherical shells, also called hemishells, until the desired configuration was achieved. Very small tolerance gaps machined into radial dimensions reduced the effective density a small amount in all cases. Steel components were also nested hemispherical shells; but these were nominally 3.333-mm thick. Oil was used as the reflector because of its chemical compatibility with plutonium metal.

  14. Nanoindentation characterisation of human colorectal cancer cells considering cell geometry, surface roughness and hyperelastic constitutive behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Uva, Antonio E.; Papi, Massimiliano; Fiorentino, Michele; De Spirito, Marco; Monno, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Characterisation of the mechanical behaviour of cancer cells is an issue of crucial importance as specific cell mechanical properties have been measured and utilized as possible biomarkers of cancer progression. Atomic force microscopy certainly occupies a prominent place in the field of the mechanical characterisation devices. We developed a hybrid approach to characterise different cell lines (SW620 and SW480) of the human colon carcinoma submitted to nanoindentation measurements. An ad hoc algorithm was written that compares the force-indentation curves experimentally retrieved with those predicted by a finite element model that simulates the nanoindentation process and reproduces the cell geometry and the surface roughness. The algorithm perturbs iteratively the values of the cell mechanical properties implemented in the finite element model until the difference between the experimental and numerical force-indentation curves reaches the minimum value. The occurrence of this indicates that the implemented material properties are very close to the real ones. Different hyperelastic constitutive models, such as Arruda-Boyce, Mooney-Rivlin and Neo-Hookean were utilized to describe the structural behaviour of indented cells. The algorithm was capable of separating, for all the cell lines investigated, the mechanical properties of cell cortex and cytoskeleton. Material properties determined via the algorithm were different with respect to those obtained with the Hertzian contact theory. This demonstrates that factors such as: the cell geometry/anatomy and the hyperelastic constitutive behaviour, which are not contemplated in the Hertz’s theory hypotheses, do affect the nanoindentation measurements. The proposed approach represents a powerful tool that, only on the basis of nanoindentation measurements, is capable of characterising material at the subcellular level.

  15. Host epithelial geometry regulates breast cancer cell invasiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghaert, Eline; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Lee, KangAe; Gjorevski, Nikolce; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast tumor development is regulated in part by cues from the local microenvironment, including interactions with neighboring nontumor cells as well as the ECM. Studies using homogeneous populations of breast cancer cell lines cultured in 3D ECM have shown that increased ECM stiffness stimulates tumor cell invasion. However, at early stages of breast cancer development, malignant cells are surrounded by normal epithelial cells, which have been shown to exert a tumor-suppressive effect on cocultured cancer cells. Here we explored how the biophysical characteristics of the host microenvironment affect the proliferative and invasive tumor phenotype of the earliest stages of tumor development, by using a 3D microfabrication-based approach to engineer ducts composed of normal mammary epithelial cells that contained a single tumor cell. We found that the phenotype of the tumor cell was dictated by its position in the duct: proliferation and invasion were enhanced at the ends and blocked when the tumor cell was located elsewhere within the tissue. Regions of invasion correlated with high endogenous mechanical stress, as shown by finite element modeling and bead displacement experiments, and modulating the contractility of the host epithelium controlled the subsequent invasion of tumor cells. Combining microcomputed tomographic analysis with finite element modeling suggested that predicted regions of high mechanical stress correspond to regions of tumor formation in vivo. This work suggests that the mechanical tone of nontumorigenic host epithelium directs the phenotype of tumor cells and provides additional insight into the instructive role of the mechanical tumor microenvironment. PMID:23150585

  16. Lateral inhibition-induced pattern formation controlled by the size and geometry of the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim

    2016-09-01

    Pattern formation in development biology is one of the fundamental processes by which cells change their functions. It is based on the communication of cells via intra- and intercellular dynamics of biochemicals. Thus, the cell is directly involved in biochemical interactions. However, many theoretical approaches describing biochemical pattern formation have usually neglected the cell's role or have simplified the subcellular process without considering cellular aspects despite the cell being the environment where biochemicals interact. On the other hand, recent experimental observations suggest that a change in the physical conditions of cell-to-cell contact can result in a change in cell fate and tissue patterning in a lateral inhibition system. Here we develop a mathematical model by which biochemical dynamics can be directly observed with explicitly expressed cell structure and geometry in higher dimensions, and reconsider pattern formation by lateral inhibition of the Notch-Delta signaling pathway. We explore how the physical characteristic of cell, such as cell geometry or size, influences the biochemical pattern formation in a multi-cellular system. Our results suggest that a property based on cell geometry can be a novel mechanism for symmetry breaking inducing cell asymmetry. We show that cell volume can critically influence cell fate determination and pattern formation at the tissue level, and the surface area of the cell-to-cell contact can directly affect the spatial range of patterning.

  17. Parametric studies of AC plasma display panel cells in complex geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punset, C.; Boeuf, J.P.; Pitchford, L.C. [Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France). CPAT

    1996-12-31

    The authors have developed a two-dimensional fluid model of AC plasma panel cells. This model was used to study the operation of a plasma panel cell in a barrier rib geometry in single pulse operation. In this communication, they report results from calculations in several different geometries and for a series of applied voltage pulses. The purpose of this work is to study the effect of geometry on the electrical characteristics of AC plasma display panel cells. The calculations reported here are representative of actual device operation. They have also used the model to study the effect of the geometrical parameters of the cell, to optimize the discharge efficiency in producing UV photons and to study cross-talk, i.e., interaction between adjacent cells. The conclusions of these parametric studies will be presented.

  18. Modeling thalamocortical cell: impact of Ca2+ channel distribution and cell geometry on firing pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Zomorrodi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of calcium channel distribution and geometry of the thalamocortical cell upon its tonic firing and the low threshold spike (LTS generation was studied in a 3-compartment model, which represents soma, proximal and distal dendrites as well as in multi-compartment model using the morphology of a real reconstructed neuron. Using an uniform distribution of Ca2+ channels, we determined the minimal number of low threshold voltage-activated calcium channels and their permeability required for the onset of LTS in response to a hyperpolarizing current pulse. In the 3-compartment model, we found that the channel distribution influences the firing pattern only in the range of 3% below the threshold value of total T-channel density. In the multi-compartmental model, the LTS could be generated by only 64% of unequally distributed T-channels compared to the minimal number of equally distributed T-channels. For a given channel density and injected current, the tonic firing frequency was found to be inversely proportional to the size of the cell. However, when the Ca2+ channel density was elevated in soma or proximal dendrites, then the amplitude of LTS response and burst spike frequencies were determined by the ratio of total to threshold number of T-channels in the cell for a specific geometry.

  19. Modeling Thalamocortical Cell: Impact of Ca2+ Channel Distribution and Cell Geometry on Firing Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomorrodi, Reza; Kröger, Helmut; Timofeev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    The influence of calcium channel distribution and geometry of the thalamocortical cell upon its tonic firing and the low threshold spike (LTS) generation was studied in a 3-compartment model, which represents soma, proximal and distal dendrites as well as in multi-compartment model using the morphology of a real reconstructed neuron. Using an uniform distribution of Ca2+ channels, we determined the minimal number of low threshold voltage-activated calcium channels and their permeability required for the onset of LTS in response to a hyperpolarizing current pulse. In the 3-compartment model, we found that the channel distribution influences the firing pattern only in the range of 3% below the threshold value of total T-channel density. In the multi-compartmental model, the LTS could be generated by only 64% of unequally distributed T-channels compared to the minimal number of equally distributed T-channels. For a given channel density and injected current, the tonic firing frequency was found to be inversely proportional to the size of the cell. However, when the Ca2+ channel density was elevated in soma or proximal dendrites, then the amplitude of LTS response and burst spike frequencies were determined by the ratio of total to threshold number of T-channels in the cell for a specific geometry. PMID:19129908

  20. Plasmonic silicon solar cells: impact of material quality and geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pahud, C.; Isabella, O.; Naqavi, A.; Haug, F.J.; Zeman, M.; Herzig, H.P.; Ballif, C.

    2013-01-01

    We study n-i-p amorphous silicon solar cells with light-scattering nanoparticles in the back reflector. In one configuration, the particles are fully embedded in the zinc oxide buffer layer; In a second configuration, the particles are placed between the buffer layer and the flat back electrode. We

  1. CIF2Cell: Generating geometries for electronic structure programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Torbjörn

    2011-05-01

    The CIF2Cell program generates the geometrical setup for a number of electronic structure programs based on the crystallographic information in a Crystallographic Information Framework (CIF) file. The program will retrieve the space group number, Wyckoff positions and crystallographic parameters, make a sensible choice for Bravais lattice vectors (primitive or principal cell) and generate all atomic positions. Supercells can be generated and alloys are handled gracefully. The code currently has output interfaces to the electronic structure programs ABINIT, CASTEP, CPMD, Crystal, Elk, Exciting, EMTO, Fleur, RSPt, Siesta and VASP. Program summaryProgram title: CIF2Cell Catalogue identifier: AEIM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEIM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 691 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 74 933 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Computer: Any computer that can run Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Operating system: Any operating system that can run Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Classification: 7.3, 7.8, 8 External routines: PyCIFRW [1] Nature of problem: Generate the geometrical setup of a crystallographic cell for a variety of electronic structure programs from data contained in a CIF file. Solution method: The CIF file is parsed using routines contained in the library PyCIFRW [1], and crystallographic as well as bibliographic information is extracted. The program then generates the principal cell from symmetry information, crystal parameters, space group number and Wyckoff sites. Reduction to a primitive cell is then performed, and the resulting cell is output to suitably named files along with documentation of the information source generated from any bibliographic information contained in the CIF

  2. Unit: Cells, Inspection Set, National Trial Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Science Education Project, Toorak, Victoria.

    This trial version of a unit is the series being produced by the Australian Science Education Project provides instructions for students to prepare a variety of cell types and examine them with microscopes. It also gives some information about the variety and function of cells. The core of the unit, which all students are expected to complete,…

  3. Assessing awareness, interest, and knowledge of fractal geometry among secondary mathematics teachers in the United States and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Suanrong

    Fractal geometry has gained great attention from mathematicians and scientists in the past three decades (Fraboni & Moller, 2008). As a new geometry language and subject, fractal geometry has significant value in teaching and learning secondary mathematics. The present study focused on investigating the current state of mathematics teachers' awareness, interest, and knowledge of fractal geometry in the United States (U.S.) and China, as well as the factors that influence them. The instrument of the study included a survey and a test designed by the researcher and validated by five experts. The results of the study indicated that secondary math teachers in the U.S. and China had very low levels of awareness of fractals and lack the knowledge and skills of solving fractal problems, but they had a higher level of interest in fractals related to classroom teaching and professional development as compared with their levels of awareness. Furthermore, the results of this study indicated that the factor 'experience of learning fractals' had the most positive effect on the average score of awareness. The factor nationality (U.S.) had the most positive effect on the average score of interest. The factor nationality (U.S.) had the most negative effect on the average score of knowledge.

  4. The influence of polyol type on cell geometry and the thermal stability of polyurethane foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prendžov Slobodan J.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the influence of substituting defined amounts of polyol Voranol 3322 by polyol Voranol CP 1055 on the cell geometry and thermal stability of the synthesized flexible polyurethane foams. The influence of the amount of antipyrene on the cell geometry and their thermal stability was also investigated. The following components were used in the synthesis of the polyurethanes: a mixture of two polyols (Voranol 3322 with the hydroxyl number 47 mg KOH/g, mean molecular mass 3400 and Voranol CP 1055 with the hydroxyl number 156 mg KOH/g, mean molecular mass 1000, toluene discarnate as the isocyanate component, a combination of an organic-metallic compound and a tertiary amine as catalysts, surfactant and water as the coreactant. The thermal stability was determined by thermogravimetric analysis (in a nitrogen atmosphere. The cell geometry was analyzed by optical microscopy. Examination of the cell geometry revealed different cell shapes. The form factor as an indicator of cell deviation from spherical shape increased (more round forms were observed with increasing amount of Voranol CP 1055. The TG examination showed that specimens with 6 and 8 g of Voranol 3322 substituted by Voranol CP 1055 completely degraded at 350 °C, while foams with 10 and 12 g of Voranol 3322 substituted by Voranol CP 1055 displayed lower mass loss at higher temperatures and had residual masses of 46 % and 43 % at 600°C respectively. The addition of antipyrene in an amount of 1% (based on the amount of polyol contributed to improved thermal stability, no visible color change of the specimen tested at 210°C for 40 minutes, and to rounder cell forms. Considering the obtained results it can be concluded that an increase in the amount of Voranol CP 1055 yielded more spherically shaped cells and better thermal stability of the synthesized flexible polyurethane foams. The addition of antipyrene improves the thermal stability and the cell geometry.

  5. Emerging of fractal geometry on surface of human cervical epithelial cells during progression towards cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukin, M. E.; Guz, N. V.; Woodworth, C.D.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in understanding the molecular nature of cancer, many biophysical aspects of malignant development are still unclear. Here we study physical alterations of the surface of human cervical epithelial cells during stepwise in vitro development of cancer (from normal to immortal (premalignant), to malignant). We use atomic force microscopy to demonstrate that development of cancer is associated with emergence of simple fractal geometry on the cell surface. Contrary to the previously expected correlation between cancer and fractals, we find that fractal geometry occurs only at a limited period of development when immortal cells become cancerous; further cancer progression demonstrates deviation from fractal. Because of the connection between fractal behaviour and chaos (or far from equilibrium behaviour), these results suggest that chaotic behaviour coincides with the cancer transformation of the immortalization stage of cancer development, whereas further cancer progression recovers determinism of processes responsible for cell surface formation. PMID:25844044

  6. Geometry of Prismatic Tensegrity Constructions Composed of Three and Four-strut Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olejníková Tatiana

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the paper there is described geometry of double layer tensegrity constructions composed of prismatic cells with rhombic configuration of three or four strut bases so-called prismatic Tensegrity constructions. There are described bi-dimensional assemblies creating double layer grids of three or four-strut cells with a node-on-node junction. The grids can be planar, of one or two curvature constructions.

  7. Effect of Microscale Surface Geometry of Electrodes on Performance of Microbial Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Tomonori; Suito, Eiichi; Hishida, Koichi; Miki, Norihisa

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we experimentally revealed that the microscale surface geometry of anodes strongly affects the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). MFCs have much need to be improved in their power. The power generated by an MFC is considered to be strongly affected by the interaction between the organic bacteria and the inorganic electrode surfaces. In prior work, the nanoscale surface roughness of the anode was discussed; however, we consider that the microscale surface geometry may play a crucial role given the bacteria size of micrometer order. We used a two-chamber MFC and the direct electron transfer bacteria Shewanella putrefaciens. We prepared seven types of anode electrodes with different microscale surface geometries and experimentally found that the MFC performance depended on the contact area between the bacteria and the anode. The MFC generated the maximum power when the contact area between the anode and bacteria was the largest.

  8. Geometry from Information Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Caticha, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    We use the method of maximum entropy to model physical space as a curved statistical manifold. It is then natural to use information geometry to explain the geometry of space. We find that the resultant information metric does not describe the full geometry of space but only its conformal geometry -- the geometry up to local changes of scale. Remarkably, this is precisely what is needed to model "physical" space in general relativity.

  9. A dummy cell immersed boundary method for incompressible turbulence simulations over dirty geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Keiji; Tsubokura, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    A methodology to eliminate the manual work required for correcting the surface imperfections of computer-aided-design (CAD) data, will be proposed. Such a technique is indispensable for CFD analysis of industrial applications involving complex geometries. The CAD geometry is degenerated into cell-oriented values based on Cartesian grid. This enables the parallel pre-processing as well as the ability to handle 'dirty' CAD data that has gaps, overlaps, or sharp edges without necessitating any fixes. An arbitrary boundary representation is used with a dummy-cell technique based on immersed boundary (IB) method. To model the IB, a forcing term is directly imposed at arbitrary ghost cells by linear interpolation of the momentum. The mass conservation is satisfied in the approximate domain that covers fluid region except the wall including cells. Attempts to Satisfy mass conservation in the wall containing cells leads to pressure oscillations near the IB. The consequence of this approximation will be discussed through fundamental study of an LES based channel flow simulation, and high Reynolds number flow around a sphere. And, an analysis comparing our results with wind tunnel experiments of flow around a full-vehicle geometry will also be presented.

  10. Enhancing the biocompatibility of microfluidics-assisted fabrication of cell-laden microgels with channel geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suntae; Oh, Jonghyun; Cha, Chaenyung

    2016-11-01

    Microfluidic flow-focusing devices (FFD) are widely used to generate monodisperse droplets and microgels with controllable size, shape and composition for various biomedical applications. However, highly inconsistent and often low viability of cells encapsulated within the microgels prepared via microfluidic FFD has been a major concern, and yet this aspect has not been systematically explored. In this study, we demonstrate that the biocompatibility of microfluidic FFD to fabricate cell-laden microgels can be significantly enhanced by controlling the channel geometry. When a single emulsion ("single") microfluidic FFD is used to fabricate cell-laden microgels, there is a significant decrease and batch-to-batch variability in the cell viability, regardless of their size and composition. It is determined that during droplet generation, some of the cells are exposed to the oil phase which is shown to have a cytotoxic effect. Therefore, a microfluidic device with a sequential ('double') flow-focusing channels is employed instead, in which a secondary aqueous phase containing cells enters the primary aqueous phase, so the cells' exposure to the oil phase is minimized by directing them to the center of droplets. This microfluidic channel geometry significantly enhances the biocompatibility of cell-laden microgels, while maintaining the benefits of a typical microfluidic process. This study therefore provides a simple and yet highly effective strategy to improve the biocompatibility of microfluidic fabrication of cell-laden microgels.

  11. Differential integrin expression regulates cell sensing of the matrix nanoscale geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cio, Stefania; Bøggild, Thea M L; Connelly, John; Sutherland, Duncan S; Gautrot, Julien E

    2017-03-01

    The nanoscale geometry and topography of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) is an important parameter controlling cell adhesion and phenotype. Similarly, integrin expression and the geometrical maturation of adhesions they regulate have been correlated with important changes in cell spreading and phenotype. However, how integrin expression controls the nanoscale sensing of the ECM geometry is not clearly understood. Here we develop a new nanopatterning technique, electrospun nanofiber lithography (ENL), which allows the production of a quasi-2D fibrous nanopattern with controlled dimensions (250-1000nm) and densities. ENL relies on electrospun fibres to act as a mask for the controlled growth of protein-resistant polymer brushes. SEM, AFM and immunofluorescence imaging were used to characterise the resulting patterns and the adsorption of the extra-cellular matrix protein fibronectin to the patterned fibres. The control of adhesion formation was studied, as well as the remodelling and deposition of novel matrix. Cell spreading was found to be regulated by the size of fibres, similarly to previous observations made on circular nanopatterns. However, cell shape and polarity were more significantly affected. These changes correlated with important cytoskeleton reorganisation, with a gradual decrease in stress fibre formation as the pattern dimensions decrease. Finally, the differential expression of αvβ3 and α5β1 integrins in engineered cell lines was found to be an important mediator of cell sensing of the nanoscale geometry of the ECM. The novel nanofiber patterns developed in this study, via ENL, mimic the geometry and continuity of natural matrices found in the stroma of tissues, whilst preserving a quasi-2D character (to facilitate imaging and for comparison with other 2D systems such as micropatterned monolayers and circular nanopatches generated by colloidal lithography). These results demonstrate that the nanoscale geometry of the ECM plays an important role

  12. Maximizing negative thermal expansion via rigid unit modes: a geometry-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grima, J N; Bajada, M; Scerri, S; Attard, D; Dudek, K K; Gatt, R

    2015-07-08

    Existent rigid unit mode (RUM) models based on rotating squares, which may explain the phenomenon of negative thermal expansion (NTE), are generalized so as to assess the NTE potential for novel systems made from rectangular or rhombic rigid units. Analytical models for the area coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of these innovative networks are derived in an attempt to determine the optimal geometrical parameters and connectivity for maximum NTE. It was found that all systems exhibit NTE, the extent of which is determined by the shape and connectivity of the elemental rigid units (side lengths ratio or internal angle). It was also found that some of the networks proposed here should exhibit significantly superior NTE properties when compared with the well-known network of squares, and that for optimal NTE characteristics, pencil-like rigid units should be used rather than square-shaped ones, as these permit larger pore sizes that are more conducive to NTE. All this compliments earlier work on the negative Poisson's ratio (auxetic) potential of such systems and may provide a route for the design of new materials exhibiting superior thermo-mechanical characteristics including specifically tailored CTEs or giant NTE characteristics.

  13. The effect of pore-scale geometry and wettability on two-phase relative permeabilities within elementary cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi Janetti, Emanuela; Riva, Monica; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    We study the relative role of the complex pore space geometry and wettability of the solid matrix on the quantification of relative permeabilities characterizing steady state immiscible two-phase flow in porous media. We do so by considering elementary cells, which are typically employed in upscaling frameworks based on, e.g., homogenization or volume averaging. In this context one typically relies on the solution of pore-scale physics at a scale which is much smaller than that of an investigated porous system. Pressure-driven two-phase flow following simultaneous co-current injection of water and oil is numerically solved for a suite of regular and stochastically generated two-dimensional explicit elementary cells with fixed porosity and sharing main topological/morphological features. We show that relative permeabilities of the randomly generated elementary cells are significantly influenced by the formation of preferential percolation paths (principal pathways), giving rise to a strongly nonuniform distribution of fluid fluxes. These pathways are a result of the spatially variable resistance that the random pore structures exert on the fluid. The overall effect on relative permeabilities of the diverse organization of principal pathways, as driven by a given random realization at the scale of the unit cell, is significantly larger than that of the wettability of the host rock. In contrast to what can be observed for the random cells analyzed, relative permeabilities of regular cells display a clear trend with contact angle at the investigated scale. Our findings suggest the need to perform systematic upscaling studies in a stochastic context, to propagate the effects of uncertain pore space geometries to a probabilistic description of relative permeability curves at the continuum scale.

  14. The effect of cover geometry on the productivity of a modified solar still desalination unit

    KAUST Repository

    Malaeb, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Desalination methods based on renewable energy offer a promising solution to both water shortage and environmental degradation problems that continue to grow globally. The solar still is one such method that uses a sustainable energy source to produce potable water albeit at a relatively low productivity rate. A new modification has been introduced to the conventional solar still to enhance its productivity. The modification consists of a light weight, black finished, slowly-rotating drum, which leads to a sustainable, cost-effective, and low-tech amendment that preserves the key features of the still while considerably increasing its yield compared to a control still that does not include the drum. In this paper, three different cover geometries of the modified still are studied and the effect of cover design on the performance of the still in terms of measured temperatures and productivity is considered. The three cover designs are as follows: double-sloped or triangular, single-sloped and curved cover. In addition, a conventional double-sloped still without the rotating drum is operated in parallel as a control and the findings of this study are reported and discussed. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. On the Geometry of the Unit Ball of a JB*-Triple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifa M. Tahlawi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We explore a JB*-triple analogue of the notion of quasi invertible elements, originally studied by Brown and Pedersen in the setting of C*-algebras. This class of BP-quasi invertible elements properly includes all invertible elements and all extreme points of the unit ball and is properly included in von Neumann regular elements in a JB*-triple; this indicates their structural richness. We initiate a study of the unit ball of a JB*-triple investigating some structural properties of the BP-quasi invertible elements; here and in sequent papers, we show that various results on unitary convex decompositions and regular approximations can be extended to the setting of BP-quasi invertible elements. Some C*-algebra and JB*-algebra results, due to Kadison and Pedersen, Rørdam, Brown, Wright and Youngson, and Siddiqui, including the Russo-Dye theorem, are extended to JB*-triples.

  16. The deformed conifold as a geometry on the space of unit charge CP^1 lumps

    CERN Document Server

    Speight, J M

    2001-01-01

    The strong structural similarity between the deformed conifold of Candelas and de la Ossa (a noncompact Calabi-Yau manifold) and the moduli space of unit charge CP^1 lumps equipped with its L^2 metric is pointed out. This allows one to reinterpret certain recent results on D3 branes in terms of lump dynamics, and to deduce certain curvature properties of the deformed conifold.

  17. Development of Particle-in-Cell Simulation in a Two Dimensional Trench Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Tai-Lu

    2016-01-01

    A two dimensional electrostatic Particle-in-Cell simulation code is developed to investigate anisotropy of ions in a trench geometry for plasma etching. The numerical simulation results suggest that if the trench width is larger than Debye length scale, anisotropy can be lost due to potential development across the trench. Furthermore, the effects of ion charge build up on the trench bottom is investigated, which can degrade the anisotropy.

  18. Effect of neck geometry of resonance cells on noise reduction efficiency in sound-absorbing structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarev, P. V.; Anoshkin, A. N.; Pan'kov, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The present work formulates the physical and mathematical models capable to forecast acoustic properties of resonance cells in sound absorbing structures. Distribution of acoustic pressure inside the duct and on sidewall cell was found, loss factor of output acoustic pressure wave was calculated for variety of geometric forms of cell's chamber and neck for monochromatic wave in 100-600Hz frequency range. Analysis of the acoustic pressure fields revealed that cell neck geometry strongly influences on cell resonant frequency and on outlet acoustic pressure loss factor. The effectiveness of the proposed by the authors biconical design of the resonant cell was proved, which increased acoustic radiation at the resonance frequency resulting significant increase of loss ratio of wave acoustic pressure at duct outlet.

  19. Numerical Investigation of Channel Geometry on the Performance of a Pem Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaee, I.; Mohammadiun, M.

    2013-03-01

    A complete three-dimensional and single phase model for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells was used to investigate the effect of using different channels geometry on the performances, current density and gas concentration. The proposed model was a full cell model, which includes all the parts of the PEM fuel cell, flow channels, gas diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers and the membrane. Coupled transport and electrochemical kinetics equations were solved in a single domain; therefore no interfacial boundary condition was required at the internal boundaries between cell components. This computational fluid dynamics code was employed as the direct problem solver, which was used to simulate the three-dimensional mass, momentum, energy and species transport phenomena as well as the electron- and proton-transfer process taking place in a PEMFC. The results showed that the predicted polarization curves by using this model were in good agreement with the experimental results and a high performance was observed by using circle geometry for the channels of anode and cathode sides. Also, the results showed that the performance of the fuel cell improved when a rectangular channel was used.

  20. An immersed-boundary method for modeling flow of deformable blood cells in complex geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-11-01

    We present a computational methodology for simulating blood flow at the cellular scale in highly complex geometries, such as microvascular networks. Immersed boundary methods provide the foundation for our approach, as they allow modeling flows in arbitrary geometries, in addition to resolving the large deformation and dynamics of individual blood cell with high fidelity. Different simulation components are seamlessly integrated into the present methodology that can simultaneously model stationary rigid boundaries of arbitrary and complex shape, moving rigid bodies, and highly deformable interfaces of blood cells that are governed by non-linear elasticity. This permits physiologically realistic simulations of blood cells flowing in complex microvascular networks characterized by multiple bifurcating and merging vessels. The methodology is validated against analytical theory, experimental data, and previous numerical results. We then demonstrate the capabilities of the methodology by simulating deformable blood cells and heterogeneous cell suspensions flowing in both physiologically realistic microvascular networks and geometrically intricate microfluidic devices. The methodology offers the potential of scaling up to large microvascular networks at organ levels. Funded by NSF CBET 1604308.

  1. Chromatographic behaviour of single cells in a microchannel with dynamic geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Thomas; Woo, Sangpil; Ma, Hongshen

    2011-08-21

    We present the design of a microchannel with dynamic geometry that imparts different flow rates to different cells based on their physical properties. This dynamic microchannel is formed between a textured surface and a flexible membrane. As cells flow through the microchannel, the height of the channel oscillates causing periodic entrapment of the larger cells, and as a result, attenuating their velocity relative to the bulk liquid. The smaller cells are not slowed by the moving microstructure, and move synchronously with the bulk liquid. The ability of the dynamic microchannel to selectively attenuate the flow rate of eukaryotic cells is similar to a size-exclusion chromatography column, but with the opposite behavior. The speed of smaller substances is attenuated relative to the larger substances in traditional size-exclusion chromatography columns, whereas the speed of the larger substances that is attenuated in the dynamic microchannel. We verified this property by tracking the flow of single cells through the dynamic microchannel. L1210 mouse lymphoma cells (MLCs), peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and red blood cells (RBCs) were used as model cells. We showed that the flow rate of MLC is slowed by more than 50% compared to PBMCs and RBCs. We characterized the operation of the microchannel by measuring the velocity of each of the three cell types as a function of the pressures used to oscillate the membrane position, as well as the duty cycle of the oscillation.

  2. Reversible (unitized) PEM fuel cell devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitlitsky, F; Myers, B; Smith, W F; Weisberg, Molter, T M

    1999-06-01

    Regenerative fuel cells (RFCs) are enabling for many weight-critical portable applications, since the packaged specific energy (>400 Wh/kg) of properly designed lightweight RFC systems is several-fold higher than that of the lightest weight rechargeable batteries. RFC systems can be rapidly refueled (like primary fuel cells), or can be electrically recharged (like secondary batteries) if a refueling infrastructure is not conveniently available. Higher energy capacity systems with higher performance, reduced weight, and freedom from fueling infrastructure are the features that RFCs promise for portable applications. Reversible proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, also known as unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs), or reversible regenerative fuel cells, are RFC systems which use reversible PEM cells, where each cell is capable of operating both as a fuel cell and as an electrolyzer. URFCs further economize portable device weight, volume, and complexity by combining the functions of fuel cells and electrolyzers in the same hardware, generally without any system performance or efficiency reduction. URFCs are being made in many forms, some of which are already small enough to be portable. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has worked with industrial partners to design, develop, and demonstrate high performance and high cycle life URFC systems. LLNL is also working with industrial partners to develop breakthroughs in lightweight pressure vessels that are necessary for URFC systems to achieve the specific energy advantages over rechargeable batteries. Proton Energy Systems, Inc. (Proton) is concurrently developing and commercializing URFC systems (UNIGEN' product line), in addition to PEM electrolyzer systems (HOGEN' product line), and primary PEM fuel cell systems. LLNL is constructing demonstration URFC units in order to persuade potential sponsors, often in their own conference rooms, that advanced applications based on URFC s are

  3. Magnesium regulates intracellular ionized calcium concentration and cell geometry in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, A.; Cheng, T.P.; Altura, B.M. (State Univ. of New York, Brooklyn (United States))

    1991-03-11

    It has been suggested that the extracellular Mg{sup 2+} may modulate contractility of VSMC by controlling the cellular level of free Ca{sup 2+}. The present studies were designed to determine the effects of (Mg{sup 2+}) on the distribution of intracellular free Ca{sup 2+} using digital imaging fluorescence microscopy of Fura-2 fluorescence of single VSMC cultured from rat aortas. When incubated with HEPES buffer solution containing 1.2mM Mg{sup 2+}, the myocytes are spindle-shaped, and the basal level of (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} estimated from the ratio (F340/F380) is 96.6 {plus minus} 7.9nM with a heterogeneous distribution. (Mg{sup 2+}){sub o} withdrawal from the incubation medium induces consistently a dramatic increment of (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} up to 579.6 {plus minus} 39.3nM, about a 5.8-fold elevation compared to control experiments. Similarly, lowering (Mg{sup 2+}){sub o} to 0.3mM (the lowest physiological range) elevates (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} to the intermediate level of 348.0 {plus minus} 31.5nM. However, the heterogeneous distribution of (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} is still evident when (Mg{sup 2+}){sub o} is lowered. Simultaneously to the (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} increments, cell shapes were changed. In contrast, elevation of (Mg{sup 2+}){sub o} to 4.8mM was found to decrease (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} to 72.0 {plus minus} 4.6nM. Removal of (Ca{sup 2+}){sub o}, however, abolished the increments of (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} induced by (Mg{sup 2+}){sub o} withdrawal. These results demonstrate that (Mg{sup 2+}){sub o} regulated (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} and geometry of VSMC, probably through controlling plasma membrane permeability to Ca{sup 2+}.

  4. Effects of nanostructure geometry on polymer chain alignment and device performance in nanoimprinted polymer solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Mielczarek, Kamil; Zakhidov, Anvar; Hu, Walter

    2013-03-01

    Among the various organic photovoltaic devices, the conjugated polymer/fullerene approach has drawn the most research interest. The performance of these types of solar cells is greatly determined by the nanoscale morphology of the two components (donor/acceptor) and the molecular orientation/crystallinity in the photoactive layer. This article demonstrates our recent studies on the nanostructure geometry effects on the nanoimprint induced poly(3 hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) chain alignment and photovoltaic performance. Out-of-plane and in-plane grazing incident X-ray diffractions are employed to characterize the chain orientations in P3HT nanogratings with different widths and heights. It is found that nanoimprint procedure changes the initial edge-on alignment in non-imprinted P3HT thin film to a vertical orientation which favors the hole transport, with an organization height H≥ 170 nm and width in the range of 60 nmImprinted P3HT/[6,6]-penyl-C61-butyric-acid-methyl-ester (PCBM) solar cells show an increase in power conversion efficiency (PCE) with the decrease of nanostructure width, and with the increase of height and junction area. Devices with the highest PCE are made by the fully aligned and highest P3HT nanostructures (width w= 60 nm, height h= 170 nm), allowing for the most efficient charge separation, transport and light absorption. We believe this work will contribute to the optimal geometry design of nanoimprinted polymer solar cells.

  5. Role of receptor patch geometry for cell adhesion in hydrodynamic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Christian; Schwarz, Ulrich

    2008-03-01

    Motivated by the physiological and biotechnological importance of cell adhesion under hydrodynamic flow, we theoretically investigate the efficiency of initial binding between a receptor-coated sphere and a ligand-coated wall in linear shear flow. Using a Langevin equation that accounts for both hydrodynamic interactions and Browian motion, we numerically calculate the mean first passage time (MFPT) for receptor-ligand encounter. We study how the MFPT is influenced by flow rate, receptor and ligand coverage, and receptor patch geometry. With increasing shear rate, the MFPT decreases monotonically. Above a threshold value of a few hundreds, binding efficiency is enhanced only weakly upon increasing the number of receptor patches. Increasing the height of the receptor patches increases binding efficiency much more strongly than increasing their lateral size. This strong dependance on out-off-plane geometry explains why white blood cells adhere to the vessel walls through receptor patches localized to the tips of microvilli, and why malaria-infected red blood cells form elevated receptor patches (knobs). [1] C. Korn and U. S. Schwarz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97: 138103, 2006. [2] C. B. Korn and U. S. Schwarz. J. Chem. Phys. 126: 095103, 2007

  6. A Closer Look at Multi-Cell Cooperation via Stochastic Geometry and Large Deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Kaibin

    2012-01-01

    Multi-cell cooperation (MCC) is an approach for mitigating inter-cell interference in dense cellular networks. Existing studies on MCC performance typically rely on either over-simplified Wyner-type models or complex system-level simulations. The promising theoretical results (typically using Wyner models) seem to not materialize in either complex simulations or particularly in practice. To more accurately investigate the theoretical performance of MCC, this paper models an entire plane of interfering cells as a Poisson random tessellation. The base stations (BSs) are then clustered using a regular lattice, whereby BSs in the same cluster mitigate mutual interference by beamforming with perfect channel state information. Techniques from stochastic geometry and large deviation theory are applied to analyze the outage probability as a function of the mobile locations, scattering environment, and the average number of cooperating BSs per cluster, L. For mobiles near the centers of BS clusters, it is shown that a...

  7. Super Unit Cells in Aperture-Based Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Tanasković

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An important class of electromagnetic metamaterials are aperture-based metasurfaces. Examples include extraordinary optical transmission arrays and double fishnets with negative refractive index. We analyze a generalization of such metamaterials where a simple aperture is now replaced by a compound object formed by superposition of two or more primitive objects (e.g., rectangles, circles, and ellipses. Thus obtained “super unit cell” shows far richer behavior than the subobjects that comprise it. We show that nonlocalities introduced by overlapping simple subobjects can be used to produce large deviations of spectral dispersion even for small additive modifications of the basic geometry. Technologically, some super cells may be fabricated by simple spatial shifting of the existing photolithographic masks. In our investigation we applied analytical calculations and ab initio finite element modeling to prove the possibility to tailor the dispersion including resonances for plasmonic nanocomposites by adjusting the local geometry and exploiting localized interactions at a subwavelength level. Any desired form could be defined using simple primitive objects, making the situation a geometrical analog of the case of series expansion of a function. Thus an additional degree of tunability of metamaterials is obtained. The obtained designer structures can be applied in different fields like waveguiding and sensing.

  8. Systematic Perturbation of Cytoskeletal Function Reveals a Linear Scaling Relationship between Cell Geometry and Fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell D. Monds

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diversification of cell size is hypothesized to have occurred through a process of evolutionary optimization, but direct demonstrations of causal relationships between cell geometry and fitness are lacking. Here, we identify a mutation from a laboratory-evolved bacterium that dramatically increases cell size through cytoskeletal perturbation and confers a large fitness advantage. We engineer a library of cytoskeletal mutants of different sizes and show that fitness scales linearly with respect to cell size over a wide physiological range. Quantification of the growth rates of single cells during the exit from stationary phase reveals that transitions between “feast-or-famine” growth regimes are a key determinant of cell-size-dependent fitness effects. We also uncover environments that suppress the fitness advantage of larger cells, indicating that cell-size-dependent fitness effects are subject to both biophysical and metabolic constraints. Together, our results highlight laboratory-based evolution as a powerful framework for studying the quantitative relationships between morphology and fitness.

  9. The effect of material properties on the performance of a new geometry PEM fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaee, Iman; Ghazikhani, Mohsen

    2012-05-01

    In this paper a computational dynamics model for duct-shaped geometry proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell was used to investigate the effect of changing gas diffusion layer and membrane properties on the performances, current density and gas concentration. The proposed model is a full cell model, which includes all the parts of the PEM fuel cell, flow channels, gas diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers and the membrane. Coupled transport and electrochemical kinetics equations are solved in a single domain; therefore no interfacial boundary condition is required at the internal boundaries between cell components. This computational fluid dynamics code is used as the direct problem solver, which is used to simulate the 2-dimensional mass, momentum and species transport phenomena as well as the electron- and proton-transfer process taking place in a PEMFC that cannot be investigated experimentally. The results show that by increasing the thickness and decreasing the porosity of GDL the performance of the cell enhances that it is different with planner PEM fuel cell. Also the results show that by increasing the thermal conductivity of the GDL and membrane, the overall cell performance increases.

  10. Numerical study of changing the geometry of the flow field of a PEM fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaee, I.; Sabadbafan, H.

    2016-05-01

    The geometry of channels of a PEM fuel cell is an important parameter that affects the performance of it that the lower voltage loss in polarization curve can indicate the better performance. In this study a complete three-dimensional and single phase model is used to investigate the effect of increasing the number of serpentine channels in the bipolar plates and also increasing the area (depth) of channels of a PEM fuel cell with rectangular, triangular and elliptical cross-section geometry. A single set of conservation equations which are valid for the flow channels, gas-diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers, and the membrane region is developed and numerically solved using a finite volume based computational fluid dynamics technique. The results show that there are good agreement with the numerical results and experimental results of the previous work of authors. Also the results show that by increasing the number of channels from one to four and eight, the performance improved about 18 % and by decreasing the area of channels from 2 to 1 mm2 the performance improved about 13 %.

  11. Control of Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Altering the Geometry of Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Fujita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is required for clinical applications. To control MSC differentiation, induction media containing different types of soluble factors have been used to date; however, it remains challenging to obtain a uniformly differentiated population of an appropriate quality for clinical application by this approach. We attempted to develop nanofiber scaffolds for effective MSC differentiation by mimicking anisotropy of the extracellular matrix structure, to assess whether differentiation of these cells can be controlled by using geometrically different scaffolds. We evaluated MSC differentiation on aligned and random nanofibers, fabricated by electrospinning. We found that induction of MSCs into adipocytes was markedly more inhibited on random nanofibers than on aligned nanofibers. In addition, adipoinduction on aligned nanofibers was also inhibited in the presence of mixed adipoinduction and osteoinduction medium, although osteoinduction was not affected by a change in scaffold geometry. Thus, we have achieved localized control over the direction of differentiation through changes in the alignment of the scaffold even in the presence of a mixed medium. These findings indicate that precise control of MSC differentiation can be attained by using scaffolds with different geometry, rather than by the conventional use of soluble factors in the medium.

  12. Chitooligomer-Immobilized Biointerfaces with Micropatterned Geometries for Unidirectional Alignment of Myoblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornthida Poosala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle possesses a robust capacity to regenerate functional architectures with a unidirectional orientation. In this study, we successfully arranged skeletal myoblast (C2C12 cells along micropatterned gold strips on which chitohexaose was deposited via a vectorial chain immobilization approach. Hexa-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc6 was site-selectively modified at its reducing end with thiosemicarbazide, then immobilized on a gold substrate in striped micropatterns via S–Au chemisorption. Gold micropatterns ranged from 100 to 1000 µm in width. Effects of patterning geometries on C2C12 cell alignment, morphology, and gene expression were investigated. Unidirectional alignment of C2C12 cells having GlcNAc6 receptors was clearly observed along the micropatterns. Decreasing striped pattern width increased cell attachment and proliferation, suggesting that the fixed GlcNAc6 and micropatterns impacted cell function. Possibly, interactions between nonreducing end groups of fixed GlcNAc6 and cell surface receptors initiated cellular alignment. Our technique for mimicking native tissue organization should advance applications in tissue engineering.

  13. A cell-centered lagrangian scheme in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN ZhiJun; YUAN GuangWei; YUE JingYan; LIU XueZhe

    2008-01-01

    A new Lagrangian cell-centered scheme for two-dimensional compressible flows in planar geometry is proposed by Malre et al. The main new feature of the algorithm is that the vertex velocities and the numerical fluxes through the cell interfaces are all evaluated in a coherent manner contrary to standard approaches. In this paper the method introduced by Malre et al. is extended for the equations of Lagrangian gas dynamics in cylindrical symmetry. Two different schemes are proposed, whose difference is that one uses volume weighting and the other area weighting in the discretization of the momentum equation. In the both schemes the conservation of total energy is ensured, and the nodal solver is adopted which has the same formulation as that in Cartesian coordinates. The volume weighting scheme preserves the momentum conservation and the area-weighting scheme preserves spherical symmetry. The numerical examples demonstrate our theoretical considerations and the robustness of the new method.

  14. Geometry-driven cell organization determines tissue growths in scaffold pores: consequences for fibronectin organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Joly

    Full Text Available To heal tissue defects, cells have to bridge gaps and generate new extracellular matrix (ECM. Macroporous scaffolds are frequently used to support the process of defect filling and thus foster tissue regeneration. Such biomaterials contain micro-voids (pores that the cells fill with their own ECM over time. There is only limited knowledge on how pore geometry influences cell organization and matrix production, even though it is highly relevant for scaffold design. This study hypothesized that 1 a simple geometric description predicts cellular organization during pore filling at the cell level and that 2 pore closure results in a reorganization of ECM. Scaffolds with a broad distribution of pore sizes (macroporous starPEG-heparin cryogel were used as a model system and seeded with primary fibroblasts. The strategies of cells to fill pores could be explained by a simple geometrical model considering cells as tensioned chords. The model matched qualitatively as well as quantitatively by means of cell number vs. open cross-sectional area for all pore sizes. The correlation between ECM location and cell position was higher when the pores were not filled with tissue (Pearson's coefficient ρ = 0.45±0.01 and reduced once the pores were closed (ρ = 0.26±0.04 indicating a reorganization of the cell/ECM network. Scaffold pore size directed the time required for pore closure and furthermore impacted the organization of the fibronectin matrix. Understanding how cells fill micro-voids will help to design biomaterial scaffolds that support the endogenous healing process and thus allow a fast filling of tissue defects.

  15. Performance improvement of proton exchange membrane fuel cell by using annular shaped geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaee, I.; Ghazikhani, M.

    2011-03-01

    A complete three-dimensional and single phase CFD model for a different geometry of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is used to investigate the effect of using different connections between bipolar plate and gas diffusion layer on the performances, current density and gas concentration. The proposed model is a full cell model, which includes all the parts of the PEM fuel cell, flow channels, gas diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers and the membrane. Coupled transport and electrochemical kinetics equations are solved in a single domain; therefore no interfacial boundary condition is required at the internal boundaries between cell components. This computational fluid dynamics code is used as the direct problem solver, which is used to simulate the three-dimensional mass, momentum and species transport phenomena as well as the electron- and proton-transfer process taking place in a PEMFC that cannot be investigated experimentally. The results show that the predicted polarization curves by using this model are in good agreement with the experimental results. Also the results show that by increasing the number of connection between GDL and bipolar plate the performance of the fuel cell enhances.

  16. A Stochastic-Geometry Approach to Coverage in Cellular Networks with Multi-Cell Cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Kaibin

    2011-01-01

    Multi-cell cooperation is a promising approach for mitigating inter-cell interference in dense cellular networks. Quantifying the performance of multi-cell cooperation is challenging as it integrates physical-layer techniques and network topologies. For tractability, existing work typically relies on the over-simplified Wyner-type models. In this paper, we propose a new stochastic-geometry model for a cellular network with multi-cell cooperation, which accounts for practical factors including the irregular locations of base stations (BSs) and the resultant path-losses. In particular, the proposed network-topology model has three key features: i) the cells are modeled using a Poisson random tessellation generated by Poisson distributed BSs, ii) multi-antenna BSs are clustered using a hexagonal lattice and BSs in the same cluster mitigate mutual interference by spatial interference avoidance, iii) BSs near cluster edges access a different sub-channel from that by other BSs, shielding cluster-edge mobiles from s...

  17. A Predictive Model of Cell Traction Forces Based on Cell Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Lemmon, Christopher A.; Romer, Lewis H

    2010-01-01

    Recent work has indicated that the shape and size of a cell can influence how a cell spreads, develops focal adhesions, and exerts forces on the substrate. However, it is unclear how cell shape regulates these events. Here we present a computational model that uses cell shape to predict the magnitude and direction of forces generated by cells. The predicted results are compared to experimentally measured traction forces, and show that the model can predict traction force direction, relative m...

  18. Oriented cell division affects the global stress and cell packing geometry of a monolayer under stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Yang; Zheng, Zhaoliang

    2016-02-08

    Cell division plays a vital role in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, and the division plane is crucial for cell fate. For isolated cells, extensive studies show that the orientation of divisions is sensitive to cell shape and the direction of extrinsic mechanical forces. However, it is poorly understood that how the cell divides within a cell monolayer and how the local stress change, due to the division, affects the global stress of epithelial monolayers. Here, we use the vertex dynamics models to investigate the effects of division orientation on the configurations and mechanics of a cell monolayer under stretch. We examine three scenarios of the divisions: dividing along the stretch axis, dividing along the geometric long axis of cells, and dividing at a random angle. It is found that the division along the long cell axis can induce the minimal energy difference, and the global stress of the monolayer after stretch releases more rapidly in this case. Moreover, the long-axis division can result in more random cell orientations and more isotropic cell shapes within the monolayer, comparing with other two cases. This study helps understand the division orientation of cells within a monolayer under mechanical stimuli, and may shed light on linking individual cell's behaviors to the global mechanics and patterns of tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High-content imaging with micropatterned multiwell plates reveals influence of cell geometry and cytoskeleton on chromatin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Ty; McNulty, Jason D; Prestil, Ryan; Seymour, Stephanie K; Klann, Tyler; Murrell, Michael; Ashton, Randolph S; Saha, Krishanu

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underpinning cellular responses to microenvironmental cues requires tight control not only of the complex milieu of soluble signaling factors, extracellular matrix (ECM) connections and cell-cell contacts within cell culture, but also of the biophysics of human cells. Advances in biomaterial fabrication technologies have recently facilitated detailed examination of cellular biophysics and revealed that constraints on cell geometry arising from the cellular microenvironment influence a wide variety of human cell behaviors. Here, we create an in vitro platform capable of precise and independent control of biochemical and biophysical microenvironmental cues by adapting microcontact printing technology into the format of standard six- to 96-well plates to create MicroContact Printed Well Plates (μCP Well Plates). Automated high-content imaging of human cells seeded on μCP Well Plates revealed tight, highly consistent control of single-cell geometry, cytoskeletal organization, and nuclear elongation. Detailed subcellular imaging of the actin cytoskeleton and chromatin within live human fibroblasts on μCP Well Plates was then used to describe a new relationship between cellular geometry and chromatin dynamics. In summary, the μCP Well Plate platform is an enabling high-content screening technology for human cell biology and cellular engineering efforts that seek to identify key biochemical and biophysical cues in the cellular microenvironment.

  20. A cell-centered lagrangian scheme in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new Lagrangian cell-centered scheme for two-dimensional compressible flows in planar geometry is proposed by Maire et al.The main new feature of the algorithm is that the vertex velocities and the numerical fluxes through the cell interfaces are all evaluated in a coherent manner contrary to standard approaches.In this paper the method introduced by Maire et al.is extended for the equations of Lagrangian gas dynamics in cylindrical symmetry.Two different schemes are proposed,whose difference is that one uses volume weighting and the other area weighting in the discretization of the momentum equation.In the both schemes the conservation of total energy is ensured,and the nodal solver is adopted which has the same formulation as that in Cartesian coordinates.The volume weighting scheme preserves the momentum conservation and the area-weighting scheme preserves spherical symmetry.The numerical examples demonstrate our theoretical considerations and the robustness of the new method.

  1. Dependence of performance of Si nanowire solar cells on geometry of the nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Firoz; Baek, Seong-Ho; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The dependence of performance of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) solar cells on the growth condition of the SiNWs has been described. Metal-assisted electroless etching (MAE) technique has been used to grow SiNWs array. Different concentration of aqueous solution containing AgNO3 and HF for Ag deposition is used. The diameter and density of SiNWs are found to be dependent on concentration of solution used for Ag deposition. The diameter and density of SiNWs have been used to calculate the filling ratio of the SINWs arrays. The filling ratio is increased with increase in AgNO3 concentration, whereas it is decreased with increase in HF concentration. The minimum reflectance value achieved is ~1% for SiNWs of length of ~1.2 μ m in the wavelength range of 300-1000 nm. The performance and diode parameters strongly depend on the geometry of SiNWs. The maximum short circuit current density achieved is 35.6 mA/cm(2). The conversion efficiency of solar cell is 9.73% for SiNWs with length, diameter, and wire density of ~1.2 μ m, ~75 nm, and 90 μ m(-2), respectively.

  2. Dependence of Performance of Si Nanowire Solar Cells on Geometry of the Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoz Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of performance of silicon nanowires (SiNWs solar cells on the growth condition of the SiNWs has been described. Metal-assisted electroless etching (MAE technique has been used to grow SiNWs array. Different concentration of aqueous solution containing AgNO3 and HF for Ag deposition is used. The diameter and density of SiNWs are found to be dependent on concentration of solution used for Ag deposition. The diameter and density of SiNWs have been used to calculate the filling ratio of the SINWs arrays. The filling ratio is increased with increase in AgNO3 concentration, whereas it is decreased with increase in HF concentration. The minimum reflectance value achieved is ~1% for SiNWs of length of ~1.2 μm in the wavelength range of 300–1000 nm. The performance and diode parameters strongly depend on the geometry of SiNWs. The maximum short circuit current density achieved is 35.6 mA/cm2. The conversion efficiency of solar cell is 9.73% for SiNWs with length, diameter, and wire density of ~1.2 μm, ~75 nm, and 90 μm−2, respectively.

  3. Study of flow channel geometry using current distribution measurement in a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Justo; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A.; Pinar, F. Javier; Úbeda, Diego

    To improve fuel cell design and performance, research studies supported by a wide variety of physical and electrochemical methods have to be carried out. Among the different techniques, current distribution measurement owns the desired feature that can be performed during operation, revealing information about internal phenomena when the fuel cell is working. Moreover, short durability is one of the main problems that is hindering fuel cell wide implementation and it is known to be related to current density heterogeneities over the electrode surface. A good flow channel geometry design can favor a uniform current density profile, hence hypothetically extending fuel cell life. With this, it was thought that a study on the influence of flow channel geometry on the performance of a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell using current distribution measurement should be a very solid work to optimize flow field design. Results demonstrate that the 4 step serpentine and pin-type geometries distribute the reactants more effectively, obtaining a relatively flat current density map at higher current densities than parallel or interdigitated ones and yielding maximum powers up to 25% higher when using oxygen as comburent. If air is the oxidant chosen, interdigitated flow channels perform almost as well as serpentine or pin-type due to that the flow conditions are very important for this geometry.

  4. Frequency Selective Surfaces with Nanoparticles Unit Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nga Hung Poon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency selective surface (FSS is a periodic structure with filtering performance for optical and microwave signals. The general periodic arrays made with patterned metallic elements can act as an aperture or patch on a substrate. In this work, two kinds of materials were used to produce unit cells with various patterns. Gold nanoparticles of 25 nm diameter were used to form periodic monolayer arrays by a confined photocatalytic oxidation-based surface modification method. As the other material, silver gel was used to create multiple layers of silver. Due to the ultra-thin nature of the self-assembled gold nanoparticle monolayer, it is very easy to penetrate the FSS with terahertz radiation. However, the isolated silver islands made from silver gel form thicker multiple layers and contribute to much higher reflectance. This work demonstrated that multiple silver layers are more suitable than gold nanoparticles for use in the fabrication of FSS structures.

  5. Influence of patterned electrode geometry on performance of co-planar, single-chamber, solid oxide fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sung-Jin; Kim, Yong-Bum; Moon, Jooho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea); Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Joosun [Nano-Materials Research Center, KIST, Seoul 136-791 (Korea)

    2007-09-27

    Co-planar, single-chamber, solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFCs) with linearly patterned electrode structures on one surface of the electrolyte are fabricated via a robo-dispensing method. The SC-SOFCs with various electrode patterns are prepared to investigate the relationship between electrode geometry and cell performance. The open-circuit voltage (OCV) for cells with a single electrode pair is unaffected by the anode-to-cathode distance. By contrast, for cells with multiple electrode pairs, increasing the number of electrode pairs leads to a gradual decrease in OCV. These observations confirm that the inter-mixing of product gases causes a loss in OCV and power density, which in turn reduces the oxygen partial pressure gradient between the anode and cathode. Keeping the electrode pairs apart by {proportional_to}4 mm permits cells with complex electrode geometry to exhibit higher OCVs and power densities. (author)

  6. Influence of patterned electrode geometry on performance of co-planar, single-chamber, solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sung-Jin; Kim, Yong-Bum; Moon, Jooho; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Joosun

    Co-planar, single-chamber, solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFCs) with linearly patterned electrode structures on one surface of the electrolyte are fabricated via a robo-dispensing method. The SC-SOFCs with various electrode patterns are prepared to investigate the relationship between electrode geometry and cell performance. The open-circuit voltage (OCV) for cells with a single electrode pair is unaffected by the anode-to-cathode distance. By contrast, for cells with multiple electrode pairs, increasing the number of electrode pairs leads to a gradual decrease in OCV. These observations confirm that the inter-mixing of product gases causes a loss in OCV and power density, which in turn reduces the oxygen partial pressure gradient between the anode and cathode. Keeping the electrode pairs apart by ∼4 mm permits cells with complex electrode geometry to exhibit higher OCVs and power densities.

  7. Experimental investigation and numerical comparison of the performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell at different channel geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaee, I.

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the performance of a PEM fuel cell is investigated experimentally and numerically by changing the geometry of the channels. At first an experimental setup is used and three different fuel cells with rectangular, elliptical and triangular serpentine channels are constructed. The active area of each cell is 25 cm2 that its weight is 1,300 g. The material of the gas diffusion layer is carbon clothes, the membrane is nafion 117 and the catalyst layer is a plane with 0.004 g cm-2 platinum. Then a complete three-dimensional model for fuel cell is used to investigate the effect of using this channels geometry on the performance. The proposed model is a full cell model, which includes all the parts of the PEM fuel cell, flow channels, gas diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers and the membrane. Coupled transport and electrochemical kinetics equations are solved in a single domain; therefore no interfacial boundary condition is required at the internal boundaries between cell components. The results show that the predicted polarization curves by using this model are in good agreement with the experimental results. Also the results show that when the geometry of channel is rectangular the performance of the cell is better than the triangular and elliptical channel.

  8. Lithium-Ion Cell Charge-Control Unit Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Buton, Robert M.; Gemeiner, Russel

    2005-01-01

    A lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell charge-control unit was developed as part of a Li-ion cell verification program. This unit manages the complex charging scheme that is required when Li-ion cells are charged in series. It enables researchers to test cells together as a pack, while allowing each cell to charge individually. This allows the inherent cell-to-cell variations to be addressed on a series string of cells and reduces test costs substantially in comparison to individual cell testing.

  9. Novel negative mass density resonant metamaterial unit cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cselyuszka, Norbert, E-mail: cselyu@yahoo.com; Sečujski, Milan, E-mail: secujski@uns.ac.rs; Crnojević-Bengin, Vesna, E-mail: bengin@uns.ac.rs

    2015-01-02

    In this paper a novel resonant unit cell of one-dimensional acoustic metamaterials is presented, which exhibits negative effective mass density. We theoretically analyze the unit cell and develop a closed analytical formula for its effective mass density. Then we proceed to demonstrate left-handed propagation of acoustic waves using the proposed unit cell. Finally, we present its dual-band version, capable of operating at two independent frequencies. - Highlights: • A novel acoustic metamaterial unit cell provides Lorentz-type resonant effective mass density. • Analytical formula for effective mass density is derived. • Acoustic bandstop medium and left-handed metamaterial based on the novel unit cell are presented. • Modified version of the unit cell, operating at two independent frequencies, is proposed.

  10. A correlative microscopy approach relates microtubule behaviour, local organ geometry, and cell growth at the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burian, Agata; Ludynia, Michal; Uyttewaal, Magalie; Traas, Jan; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier; Kwiatkowska, Dorota

    2013-12-01

    Cortical microtubules (CMTs) are often aligned in a particular direction in individual cells or even in groups of cells and play a central role in the definition of growth anisotropy. How the CMTs themselves are aligned is not well known, but two hypotheses have been proposed. According to the first hypothesis, CMTs align perpendicular to the maximal growth direction, and, according to the second, CMTs align parallel to the maximal stress direction. Since both hypotheses were formulated on the basis of mainly qualitative assessments, the link between CMT organization, organ geometry, and cell growth is revisited using a quantitative approach. For this purpose, CMT orientation, local curvature, and growth parameters for each cell were measured in the growing shoot apical meristem (SAM) of Arabidopsis thaliana. Using this approach, it has been shown that stable CMTs tend to be perpendicular to the direction of maximal growth in cells at the SAM periphery, but parallel in the cells at the boundary domain. When examining the local curvature of the SAM surface, no strict correlation between curvature and CMT arrangement was found, which implies that SAM geometry, and presumed geometry-derived stress distribution, is not sufficient to prescribe the CMT orientation. However, a better match between stress and CMTs was found when mechanical stress derived from differential growth was also considered.

  11. Gingerbread-House Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emenaker, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a sixth-grade interdisciplinary geometry unit based on Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol". Focuses on finding area, volume, and perimeter, and working with estimation, decimals, and fractions in the context of making gingerbread houses. (ASK)

  12. Analysis of the influence of the cell geometry, orientation and cell proximity effects on the electric field distribution from direct RF exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián, J. L.; Muñoz, S.; Sancho, M.; Miranda, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper shows the importance of using a cell model with the proper geometry, orientation and internal structure to study possible cellular effects from direct radiofrequency exposure. For this purpose, the electric field intensity is calculated, using the finite element numerical technique, in single- and multilayer spherical, cylindrical and ellipsoidal mammalian cell models exposed to linearly polarized electromagnetic plane waves of frequencies 900 and 2450 MHz. An extensive analysis is performed on the influence that the cell geometry and orientation with respect to the external field have in the value of the electric field induced in the membrane and cytoplasm. We also show the significant role that the cytoplasmic and extracellular bound water layers play in determining the electric field intensity for the cylindrical and ellipsoidal cell models. Finally, a study of the mutual interactions between cells shows that polarizing effects between cells significantly modify the values of field intensity within the cell.

  13. Quality control in the geometry of the beam of a unit of volumetric modulated arcotheraphy; Control de calidad en la geometria del haz de una unidad de arcoterapia volumetrica modulada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemente Gutierrez, F.; Ramirez Ros, J. C.; Cabello Murillo, E.; Casa de Julian, M. A. de la

    2011-07-01

    We report here the evidence offered for the regular quality control (monthly) beam geometry (flatness and symmetry) for a unit of 6 MV Elekta Synergy with VMAT, belonging to the Radiation Oncology Service of the Defense Central Hospital Gomez Ulla.

  14. A Unit Cell Laboratory Experiment: Marbles, Magnets, and Stacking Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David C.

    2011-01-01

    An undergraduate first-semester general chemistry laboratory experiment introducing face-centered, body-centered, and simple cubic unit cells is presented. Emphasis is placed on the stacking arrangement of solid spheres used to produce a particular unit cell. Marbles and spherical magnets are employed to prepare each stacking arrangement. Packing…

  15. The influence of flow cell geometry related shear stresses on the distribution, structure and susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 01 biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salek, M Mehdi; Jones, Steven M; Martinuzzi, Robert J

    2009-11-01

    The effects of non-uniform hydrodynamic conditions resulting from flow cell geometry (square and rectangular cross-section) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa 01 (PAO1) biofilm formation, location, and structure were investigated for nominally similar flow conditions using a combination of confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The thickness and surface coverage of PAO1 biofilms were observed to vary depending on the location in the flow cell and thus also the local wall shear stress. The biofilm structure in a 5:1 (width to height) aspect ratio rectangular flow cell was observed to consist mainly of a layer of bacterial cells with thicker biofilm formation observed in the flow cell corners. For square cross-section (1:1 aspect ratio) flow cells, generally thicker and more uniform surface coverage biofilms were observed. Mushroom shaped structures with hollow centers and wall breaks, indicative of 'seeding' dispersal structures, were found exclusively in the square cross-section tubes. Exposure of PAO1 biofilms grown in the flow cells to gentamicin revealed a difference in susceptibility. Biofilms grown in the rectangular flow cell overall exhibited a greater susceptibility to gentamicin compared to those grown in square flow cells. However, even within a given flow cell, differences in susceptibility were observed depending on location. This study demonstrates that the spanwise shear stress distribution within the flow cells has an important impact on the location of colonization and structure of the resultant biofilm. These differences in biofilm structure have a significant impact on the susceptibility of the biofilms grown within flow channels. The impact of flow modification due to flow cell geometry should be considered when designing flow cells for laboratory investigation of bacterial biofilms.

  16. Twistor geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a detailed exposition of the relation between the geometry of twistor space and the geometry of Minkowski space. The paper has a didactical purpose; no use has been made of differential geometry and cohomology.

  17. Dynamics of a ±1/2 defect pair in a confined geometry:A thin hybrid aligned nematic cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路丽霞; 张志东

    2015-01-01

    Confined geometry can change defect structure and properties. In this paper, we investigate numerically the dynamics of a dipole of ±1/2 parallel wedge disclination lines in a confined geometry: a thin hybrid aligned nematic (HAN) cell, based on Landau–de Gennes theory. When the cell gap d is larger than a critical value of 12ξ (whereξ is the characteristic length for order-parameter change), the pair annihilates. A pure HAN configuration without defect is formed in an equi-librium state. In the confined geometry of d≤12ξ, the diffusion process is discovered for the first time and an eigenvalue exchange configuration is formed in an equilibrium state. The eigenvalue exchange configuration is induced by different essential reasons. When 10ξ

  18. Evidence for distributed clockwise rotation of the crust in the northwestern United States from fault geometries and focal mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Wells, Ray E.; Lamb, Andrew P.; Weaver, Craig S.

    2017-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and GPS data indicate that Washington and Oregon have rotated clockwise for the past 16 Myr. Late Cenozoic and Quaternary fault geometries, seismicity lineaments, and focal mechanisms provide evidence that this rotation is accommodated by north directed thrusting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting in Washington, and SW to W directed normal faulting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting to the east. Several curvilinear NW to NNW trending high-angle strike-slip faults and seismicity lineaments in Washington and NW Oregon define a geologic pole (117.7°W, 47.9°N) of rotation relative to North America. Many faults and focal mechanisms throughout northwestern U.S. and southwestern British Columbia have orientations consistent with this geologic pole as do GPS surface velocities corrected for elastic Cascadia subduction zone coupling. Large Quaternary normal faults radial to the geologic pole, which appear to accommodate crustal rotation via crustal extension, are widespread and can be found along the Lewis and Clark zone in Montana, within the Centennial fault system north of the Snake River Plain in Idaho and Montana, to the west of the Wasatch Front in Utah, and within the northern Basin and Range in Oregon and Nevada. Distributed strike-slip faults are most prominent in western Washington and Oregon and may serve to transfer slip between faults throughout the northwestern U.S.

  19. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Guggenheimer, Heinrich W

    1977-01-01

    This is a text of local differential geometry considered as an application of advanced calculus and linear algebra. The discussion is designed for advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate study, and presumes of readers only a fair knowledge of matrix algebra and of advanced calculus of functions of several real variables. The author, who is a Professor of Mathematics at the Polytechnic Institute of New York, begins with a discussion of plane geometry and then treats the local theory of Lie groups and transformation groups, solid differential geometry, and Riemannian geometry, leading to a

  20. Molecular geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rodger, Alison

    1995-01-01

    Molecular Geometry discusses topics relevant to the arrangement of atoms. The book is comprised of seven chapters that tackle several areas of molecular geometry. Chapter 1 reviews the definition and determination of molecular geometry, while Chapter 2 discusses the unified view of stereochemistry and stereochemical changes. Chapter 3 covers the geometry of molecules of second row atoms, and Chapter 4 deals with the main group elements beyond the second row. The book also talks about the complexes of transition metals and f-block elements, and then covers the organometallic compounds and trans

  1. Enabling Lorentz boosted frame particle-in-cell simulations of laser wakefield acceleration in quasi-3D geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Li, Fei; Meyers, Michael D.; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank S.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Fiuza, Frederico; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O.; Mori, Warren B.

    2016-07-01

    When modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in a Lorentz boosted frame, the plasma is drifting relativistically at βb c towards the laser, which can lead to a computational speedup of ∼ γb2 = (1 - βb2)-1. Meanwhile, when LWFA is modeled in the quasi-3D geometry in which the electromagnetic fields and current are decomposed into a limited number of azimuthal harmonics, speedups are achieved by modeling three dimensional (3D) problems with the computational loads on the order of two dimensional r - z simulations. Here, we describe a method to combine the speedups from the Lorentz boosted frame and quasi-3D algorithms. The key to the combination is the use of a hybrid Yee-FFT solver in the quasi-3D geometry that significantly mitigates the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI) which inevitably arises in a Lorentz boosted frame due to the unphysical coupling of Langmuir modes and EM modes of the relativistically drifting plasma in these simulations. In addition, based on the space-time distribution of the LWFA data in the lab and boosted frame, we propose to use a moving window to follow the drifting plasma, instead of following the laser driver as is done in the LWFA lab frame simulations, in order to further reduce the computational loads. We describe the details of how the NCI is mitigated for the quasi-3D geometry, the setups for simulations which combine the Lorentz boosted frame, quasi-3D geometry, and the use of a moving window, and compare the results from these simulations against their corresponding lab frame cases. Good agreement is obtained among these sample simulations, particularly when there is no self-trapping, which demonstrates it is possible to combine the Lorentz boosted frame and the quasi-3D algorithms when modeling LWFA. We also discuss the preliminary speedups achieved in these sample simulations.

  2. The Effect of Network Geometry on Electron Transport in a Titanium Dioxide Photoanode of a Dye-sensitized Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Sonia Susan

    The dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is a photoelectrochemical cell that has garnered considerable attention because of its high efficiencies and potentially low production costs. The technology is based on a layer of mesoscopic TiO 2 particles, which significantly increases the optical path of the incident light that is harvested by the surface-anchored sensitizer molecules, whilst keeping an efficient contact with the electrolytic solution. The solar cell configuration that first achieved a high efficiency (˜7.5%) had a randomly connected network of titania nanoparticles, ruthenium polypyridyl complexes as the sensitizer, and an iodide/triiodide redox couple dissolved in an organic electrolyte. While the disordered nanoparticle network has a high surface area which maximizes the photogenerated electron density, the nanostructure also has a large number of surface states. These surface states act as traps and are known to limit the transport of electrons within such electrodes thereby hindering progress in achieving higher efficiencies. The structural disorder at the contact between two crystalline nanoparticles leads to enhanced scattering of free electrons, thus reducing electron mobility. An interconnected photoanode architecture offers the potential for improved electron transport by reducing the degree of disorder. This Thesis investigates the effect of the TiO2 network geometry on electron movement within the DSSC. In this regard, inverse opal structures with hexagonally close-packed pores and macroscopic (˜microm) order are synthesized and evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively (via FFT) with respect to their degree of interconnectedness. An inverse opal TiO2 electrode possesses advantages that supplement those of current disordered electrodes: (a) high surface area for dye adhesion, (b) large area contact between the sensitizer and the electrolyte, which aids electron transfer reactions, and (c) scattering of incident radiation due to the inherent

  3. Influences of the geometry and acoustic parameter on acoustic radiation forces on three-layered nucleate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Yao, Jie; Wu, Xue-Wei; Wu, Da-Jian; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2017-09-01

    Acoustic radiation forces (ARFs) on three-layered micro-shells (TLSs) are investigated using Mie scattering theory. The TLS is proposed to simulate a nucleate cell with nucleus, cytoplasm, and membrane. It is found that the existence of the inner core or outer shell greatly influences ARFs on nucleate cells. We focus on the influences of the geometry, acoustic parameters, and the surrounding medium on ARFs on TLSs. With increasing inner core radius or outer shell thickness, the ARF on the TLS shows a distinct increase. We find that the impedance of each layer of the TLS plays a dominant role with regard to the ARF, while the density and the sound velocity separately provide distinct modulations. In addition, it is found that the higher impedance of the surrounding medium induces larger ARF on the TLS. Our work may be beneficial for the acoustic manipulation of nucleate cells.

  4. Increasing the efficiency of a portable PEM fuel cell by altering the cathode channel geometry: A numerical and experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques, T.; Cesar, B.; Branco, P.J. Costa [Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Center for Innovation in Electrical and Energy Engineering, CIE3, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-04-15

    Portable fuel cells are receiving great attention today mainly because their energy density is higher than any portable battery solution. Among other types, portable polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are an established technology where research on increasing their efficiency is leading product development and manufacturing. The objective of this work was to study and evaluate the redesign of a commercial portable fuel cell, improving its efficiency. A three-dimensional model of the original PEM fuel cell with parallel plus a transversal flow channel design was developed using Comsol Multiphysics, including the effects of liquid water formation and electric current production. Using this model, the effects of different channel geometries and respective cathode flow rates on the cell's performance, including the local transport characteristics, were studied. Laboratory tests with various fuel cell stacks using the new channels structure were effectuated for an evaluation of the fuel cell's performance, showing improvements in its efficiency of up to 26.4%. (author)

  5. The development and geometry of shape change in Arabidopsis thaliana cotyledon pavement cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halsey Leah E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The leaf epidermis is an important architectural control element that influences the growth properties of underlying tissues and the overall form of the organ. In dicots, interdigitated pavement cells are the building blocks of the tissue, and their morphogenesis includes the assembly of specialized cell walls that surround the apical, basal, and lateral (anticlinal cell surfaces. The microtubule and actin cytoskeletons are highly polarized along the cortex of the anticlinal wall; however, the relationships between these arrays and cell morphogenesis are unclear. Results We developed new quantitative tools to compare population-level growth statistics with time-lapse imaging of cotyledon pavement cells in an intact tissue. The analysis revealed alternating waves of lobe initiation and a phase of lateral isotropic expansion that persisted for days. During lateral isotropic diffuse growth, microtubule organization varied greatly between cell surfaces. Parallel microtubule bundles were distributed unevenly along the anticlinal surface, with subsets marking stable cortical domains at cell indentations and others clearly populating the cortex within convex cell protrusions. Conclusions Pavement cell morphogenesis is discontinuous, and includes punctuated phases of lobe initiation and lateral isotropic expansion. In the epidermis, lateral isotropic growth is independent of pavement cell size and shape. Cortical microtubules along the upper cell surface and stable cortical patches of anticlinal microtubules may coordinate the growth behaviors of orthogonal cell walls. This work illustrates the importance of directly linking protein localization data to the growth behavior of leaf epidermal cells.

  6. Fabrication and characteristics of unit cell for SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gwi-Yeol; Eom, Seung-Wook; Moon, Seong-In [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Kyongnam (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Research and development on solid oxide fuel cells in Korea have been mainly focused on unit cell and small stack. Fuel cell system is called clean generation system which not cause NOx or SOx. It is generation efficiency come to 50-60% in contrast to 40% of combustion generation system. Among the fuel cell system, solid oxide fuel cell is constructed of ceramics, so stack construction is simple, power density is very high, and there are no corrosion problems. The object of this study is to develop various composing material for SOFC generation system, and to test unit cell performance manufactured. So we try to present a guidance for developing mass power generation system. We concentrated on development of manufacturing process for cathode, anode and electrolyte.

  7. Mechanical properties of regular porous biomaterials made from truncated cube repeating unit cells: Analytical solutions and computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, R; Sadighi, M; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has enabled fabrication of open-cell porous biomaterials based on repeating unit cells. The micro-architecture of the porous biomaterials and, thus, their physical properties could then be precisely controlled. Due to their many favorable properties, porous biomaterials manufactured using AM are considered as promising candidates for bone substitution as well as for several other applications in orthopedic surgery. The mechanical properties of such porous structures including static and fatigue properties are shown to be strongly dependent on the type of the repeating unit cell based on which the porous biomaterial is built. In this paper, we study the mechanical properties of porous biomaterials made from a relatively new unit cell, namely truncated cube. We present analytical solutions that relate the dimensions of the repeating unit cell to the elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, yield stress, and buckling load of those porous structures. We also performed finite element modeling to predict the mechanical properties of the porous structures. The analytical solution and computational results were found to be in agreement with each other. The mechanical properties estimated using both the analytical and computational techniques were somewhat higher than the experimental data reported in one of our recent studies on selective laser melted Ti-6Al-4V porous biomaterials. In addition to porosity, the elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio of the porous structures were found to be strongly dependent on the ratio of the length of the inclined struts to that of the uninclined (i.e. vertical or horizontal) struts, α, in the truncated cube unit cell. The geometry of the truncated cube unit cell approaches the octahedral and cube unit cells when α respectively approaches zero and infinity. Consistent with those geometrical observations, the analytical solutions presented in this study approached those of the octahedral and cube unit cells when

  8. Architectural geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2014-11-26

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural geometry, meanwhile contains a great wealth of individual contributions which are relevant in various fields. For mathematicians, the relation to discrete differential geometry is significant, in particular the integrable system viewpoint. Besides, new application contexts have become available for quite some old-established concepts. Regarding graphics and geometry processing, architectural geometry yields interesting new questions but also new objects, e.g. replacing meshes by other combinatorial arrangements. Numerical optimization plays a major role but in itself would be powerless without geometric understanding. Summing up, architectural geometry has become a rewarding field of study. We here survey the main directions which have been pursued, we show real projects where geometric considerations have played a role, and we outline open problems which we think are significant for the future development of both theory and practice of architectural geometry.

  9. The statistical geometry of transcriptome divergence in cell-type evolution and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Cong; Forrest, Alistair R R; Wagner, Günter P; Clevers, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    In evolution, body plan complexity increases due to an increase in the number of individualized cell types. Yet, there is very little understanding of the mechanisms that produce this form of organismal complexity. One model for the origin of novel cell types is the sister cell-type model. According

  10. The statistical geometry of transcriptome divergence in cell-type evolution and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Cong; Forrest, Alistair R R; Wagner, Günter P; Clevers, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    In evolution, body plan complexity increases due to an increase in the number of individualized cell types. Yet, there is very little understanding of the mechanisms that produce this form of organismal complexity. One model for the origin of novel cell types is the sister cell-type model. According

  11. Effect of the geometry of the anodized titania nanotube array on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lidong; Zhang, Sam; Sun, Xiaowei; He, Xiaodong

    2010-07-01

    Highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays are superior photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) due to reduced intertube connections, vectorial electron transport, suppressed electron recombination, and enhanced light scattering. Performance of the cells is greatly affected by tube geometry, such as wall thickness, length, inner diameter and intertube spacing. In this paper, effect of geometry on the photovoltaic characteristics of DSSCs is reviewed. The nanotube wall has to be thick enough for a space charge layer to form for faster electron transportation and reduced recombination. When the tube wall is too thin to support the space charge layer, electron transport in the nanotubes will be hindered and reduced to that similar in a typical nanoparticle photoanode, and recombination will easily take place. Length of the nanotubes also plays a role: longer tube length is desired because of more dye loading, however, tube length longer than the electron diffusion length results in low collecting efficiency, which in turn, results in low short-circuit current density and thus low overall conversion efficiency. The tube inner diameter (pore size) affects the conversion efficiency through effective surface area, i.e., larger pore size gives rise to smaller surface area for dye adsorption, which results in low short-circuit current density under the same light soaking. Another issue that may seriously affect the conversion efficiency is whether each of the tube stands alone (free from connecting to the neighboring tubes) to facilitate infiltration of dye and fully use the outer surface area.

  12. Push–pull effect on the geometries, electronic and optical properties of thiophene based dye-sensitized solar cell materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Irfan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Geometries, electronic structure and electronic absorption spectra of thiophene based dye-sensitized solar cells were performed using Density Functional Theory (DFT and time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT. Different electron donating and electron withdrawing groups have been substituted. Geometries and electronic properties have been computed at B3LYP/6-31G∗∗ and absorption spectra at TD-B3LYP/6-31G∗∗ level of theory. Major change in bond lengths and bond angles occurs in the system where there is electron withdrawing or electron donating groups have been substituted. In SYSTEM-2 and SYSTEM-3 intra charge transfer has been observed. HOMO of SYSTEM-2 and SYSTEM-3 is delocalized on left side while LUMO on right side of the molecule. In SYSTEM-1, HOMO is on left side while LUMO is in the center. The designed systems show two absorption peaks for each of the system. In short, choice of appropriate electron withdrawing and donating groups is very important for improving the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells.

  13. The geometry of the light-cone cell decomposition of moduli space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, David, E-mail: d.p.r.garner@qmul.ac.uk; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye, E-mail: s.ramgoolam@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Research in String Theory, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    The moduli space of Riemann surfaces with at least two punctures can be decomposed into a cell complex by using a particular family of ribbon graphs called Nakamura graphs. We distinguish the moduli space with all punctures labelled from that with a single labelled puncture. In both cases, we describe a cell decomposition where the cells are parametrised by graphs or equivalence classes of finite sequences (tuples) of permutations. Each cell is a convex polytope defined by a system of linear equations and inequalities relating light-cone string parameters, quotiented by the automorphism group of the graph. We give explicit examples of the cell decomposition at low genus with few punctures.

  14. Beautiful geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Maor, Eli

    2014-01-01

    If you've ever thought that mathematics and art don't mix, this stunning visual history of geometry will change your mind. As much a work of art as a book about mathematics, Beautiful Geometry presents more than sixty exquisite color plates illustrating a wide range of geometric patterns and theorems, accompanied by brief accounts of the fascinating history and people behind each. With artwork by Swiss artist Eugen Jost and text by acclaimed math historian Eli Maor, this unique celebration of geometry covers numerous subjects, from straightedge-and-compass constructions to intriguing configur

  15. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Graustein, William C

    2006-01-01

    This first course in differential geometry presents the fundamentals of the metric differential geometry of curves and surfaces in a Euclidean space of three dimensions. Written by an outstanding teacher and mathematician, it explains the material in the most effective way, using vector notation and technique. It also provides an introduction to the study of Riemannian geometry.Suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students, the text presupposes a knowledge of calculus. The first nine chapters focus on the theory, treating the basic properties of curves and surfaces, the mapping of

  16. Small-Size Resonant Photoacoustic Cell of Inclined Geometry for Gas Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelik, A V; Nikonovich, F N; Zakharich, M P; Chebotar, A I; Firago, V A; Stetsik, V M; Kazak, N S; Starovoitov, V S

    2009-01-01

    A photoacoustic cell intended for laser detection of trace gases is represented. The cell is adapted so as to enhance the gas-detection performance and, simultaneously, to reduce the cell size. The cell design provides an efficient cancellation of the window background (a parasite response due to absorption of laser beam in the cell windows) and acoustic isolation from the environment for an acoustic resonance of the cell. The useful photoacoustic response from a detected gas, window background and noise are analyzed in demonstration experiments as functions of the modulation frequency for a prototype cell with the internal volume ~ 0.5 cm^3. The minimal detectable absorption for the prototype is estimated to be ~ 1.2 10^{-8} cm^{-1} W Hz^{-1/2}.

  17. Thermally Sprayed Large Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Its Stack: Geometry Optimization, Preparation, and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Shuai; Li, Chang-Jiu; Yang, Guan-Jun; He, Peng-Jiang; Yun, Liang-Liang; Song, Bo; Xie, Ying-Xin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we develop a large tubular solid oxide fuel cells design with several cells in series on a porous cermet support, which has many characteristics such as self-sealing, low Ohmic loss, high strength, and good thermal expansion coefficient matching. Here, we investigate aspects of the cell design, manufacture, performance, and application. Firstly, the cell length and number of cells in series are optimized by theoretical analysis. Then, thermal spraying is applied as a cost-effective method to prepare all the cell components. Finally, the performance of different types of cells and two types of stacks is characterized. The maximum output power of one tube, which had 20 cells in series, reaches 31 and 40.5 W at 800 and 900 °C, respectively. Moreover, the output power of a stack assembled with 56 tubes, each with ten cells in series, reaches 800 W at 830 °C. The excellent single tube and cell stack performance suggest that thermally sprayed tubular SOFCs have significant potential for commercialized application.

  18. Thermally Sprayed Large Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Its Stack: Geometry Optimization, Preparation, and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Shuai; Li, Chang-Jiu; Yang, Guan-Jun; He, Peng-Jiang; Yun, Liang-Liang; Song, Bo; Xie, Ying-Xin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we develop a large tubular solid oxide fuel cells design with several cells in series on a porous cermet support, which has many characteristics such as self-sealing, low Ohmic loss, high strength, and good thermal expansion coefficient matching. Here, we investigate aspects of the cell design, manufacture, performance, and application. Firstly, the cell length and number of cells in series are optimized by theoretical analysis. Then, thermal spraying is applied as a cost-effective method to prepare all the cell components. Finally, the performance of different types of cells and two types of stacks is characterized. The maximum output power of one tube, which had 20 cells in series, reaches 31 and 40.5 W at 800 and 900 °C, respectively. Moreover, the output power of a stack assembled with 56 tubes, each with ten cells in series, reaches 800 W at 830 °C. The excellent single tube and cell stack performance suggest that thermally sprayed tubular SOFCs have significant potential for commercialized application.

  19. Algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lefschetz, Solomon

    2005-01-01

    An introduction to algebraic geometry and a bridge between its analytical-topological and algebraical aspects, this text for advanced undergraduate students is particularly relevant to those more familiar with analysis than algebra. 1953 edition.

  20. Information geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ay, Nihat; Lê, Hông Vân; Schwachhöfer, Lorenz

    2017-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive introduction and a novel mathematical foundation of the field of information geometry with complete proofs and detailed background material on measure theory, Riemannian geometry and Banach space theory. Parametrised measure models are defined as fundamental geometric objects, which can be both finite or infinite dimensional. Based on these models, canonical tensor fields are introduced and further studied, including the Fisher metric and the Amari-Chentsov tensor, and embeddings of statistical manifolds are investigated. This novel foundation then leads to application highlights, such as generalizations and extensions of the classical uniqueness result of Chentsov or the Cramér-Rao inequality. Additionally, several new application fields of information geometry are highlighted, for instance hierarchical and graphical models, complexity theory, population genetics, or Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The book will be of interest to mathematicians who are interested in geometry, inf...

  1. Mitotic rounding alters cell geometry to ensure efficient bipolar spindle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Oscar M; Le Berre, Maël; Dimitracopoulos, Andrea; Bonazzi, Daria; Zlotek-Zlotkiewicz, Ewa; Picone, Remigio; Duke, Thomas; Piel, Matthieu; Baum, Buzz

    2013-05-13

    Accurate animal cell division requires precise coordination of changes in the structure of the microtubule-based spindle and the actin-based cell cortex. Here, we use a series of perturbation experiments to dissect the relative roles of actin, cortical mechanics, and cell shape in spindle formation. We find that, whereas the actin cortex is largely dispensable for rounding and timely mitotic progression in isolated cells, it is needed to drive rounding to enable unperturbed spindle morphogenesis under conditions of confinement. Using different methods to limit mitotic cell height, we show that a failure to round up causes defects in spindle assembly, pole splitting, and a delay in mitotic progression. These defects can be rescued by increasing microtubule lengths and therefore appear to be a direct consequence of the limited reach of mitotic centrosome-nucleated microtubules. These findings help to explain why most animal cells round up as they enter mitosis.

  2. Subtracted geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Zain Hamid

    In this thesis we study a special class of black hole geometries called subtracted geometries. Subtracted geometry black holes are obtained when one omits certain terms from the warp factor of the metric of general charged rotating black holes. The omission of these terms allows one to write the wave equation of the black hole in a completely separable way and one can explicitly see that the wave equation of a massless scalar field in this slightly altered background of a general multi-charged rotating black hole acquires an SL(2, R) x SL(2, R) x SO(3) symmetry. The "subtracted limit" is considered an appropriate limit for studying the internal structure of the non-subtracted black holes because new 'subtracted' black holes have the same horizon area and periodicity of the angular and time coordinates in the near horizon regions as the original black hole geometry it was constructed from. The new geometry is asymptotically conical and is physically similar to that of a black hole in an asymptotically confining box. We use the different nice properties of these geometries to understand various classically and quantum mechanically important features of general charged rotating black holes.

  3. The effect of cathode felt geometries on electrochemical characteristics of sodium sulfur (NaS) cells: Planar vs. tubular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Goun; Park, Yoon-Cheol; Lee, Younki; Cho, Namung; Kim, Chang-Soo; Jung, Keeyoung

    2016-09-01

    Two sodium sulfur (NaS) cells, one with a planar design and the other with a tubular design, were subject to discharge-charge cycles in order to investigate the effect of cathode felt geometries on electrochemical characteristics of NaS cells. Their discharge-charge behaviors over 200 cycles were evaluated at the operation temperature of 350 °C with the current densities of 100 mA cm-2 for discharge and 80 mA cm-2 for charge. The results showed that the deviation from theoretical open circuit voltage changes of a planar cell was smaller than those of a tubular cell resulting in potential specific power loss reduction during operation. In order to understand the effect, a three dimensional statistically representative matrix for a cathode felt has been generated using experimentally measured data. It turns out that the area specific fiber number density in the outer side area of a tubular cathode felt is smaller than that of a planar felt resulting in occurrence of larger voltage drops via retarded convection of cathode melts during cell operation.

  4. Comparison of Chip Inlet Geometry in Microfluidic Devices for Cell Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Shin Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Micro-fabricated devices integrated with fluidic components provide an in vitro platform for cell studies best mimicking the in vivo micro-environment. These devices are capable of creating precise and controllable surroundings of pH value, temperature, salt concentration, and other physical or chemical stimuli. Various cell studies such as chemotaxis and electrotaxis can be performed by using such devices. Moreover, microfluidic chips are designed and fabricated for applications in cell separations such as circulating tumor cell (CTC chips. Usually, there are two most commonly used inlets in connecting the microfluidic chip to sample/reagent loading tubes: the vertical (top-loading inlet and the parallel (in-line inlet. Designing this macro-to-micro interface is believed to play an important role in device performance. In this study, by using the commercial COMSOL Multiphysics software, we compared the cell capture behavior in microfluidic devices with different inlet types and sample flow velocities. Three different inlets were constructed: the vertical inlet, the parallel inlet, and the vertically parallel inlet. We investigated the velocity field, the flow streamline, the cell capture rate, and the laminar shear stress in these inlets. It was concluded that the inlet should be designed depending on the experimental purpose, i.e., one wants to maximize or minimize cell capture. Also, although increasing the flow velocity could reduce cell sedimentation, too high shear stresses are thought harmful to cells. Our findings indicate that the inlet design and flow velocity are crucial and should be well considered in fabricating microfluidic devices for cell studies.

  5. Efficiency of the unit cell in rectangular finned tube arrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzzoni, Luca; Dall' Olio, Roberto; Spiga, Marco [Bologna Univ., DIENCA, Bologna (Italy)

    1999-11-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting an investigation concerning the efficiency of the single unit in finned air-cooled heat exchangers with staggered and in-line bundles of rectangular ducts, where a hot process fluid flows inside extended-surface tubes and atmospheric air is circulated outside, over the extended surface. The differential energy equation is numerically solved by a finite difference technique, in order to determine the spatial temperature profiles, then the fin efficiency and the augmentation factor are calculated by a simple numerical integration. The results show that the temperature distribution and the fin performance depend on four dimensionless parameters (m,{beta},p{sub x},p{sub y}), the first accounting for the heat transfer condition, the other ones accounting for the geometry of the extended surface (tube aspect ratio and pitches). Several tables are presented, allowing the efficiency of the extended surface to be deduced as a function of the thermal and geometric parameters. (Author)

  6. A Method for Efficient Calculation of Diffusion and Reactions of Lipophilic Compounds in Complex Cell Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Kristian Dreij; Qasim Ali Chaudhry; Bengt Jernström; Ralf Morgenstern; Michael Hanke

    2011-01-01

    A general description of effects of toxic compounds in mammalian cells is facing several problems. Firstly, most toxic compounds are hydrophobic and partition phenomena strongly influence their behaviour. Secondly, cells display considerable heterogeneity regarding the presence, activity and distribution of enzymes participating in the metabolism of foreign compounds i.e. bioactivation/biotransformation. Thirdly, cellular architecture varies greatly. Taken together, complexity at several leve...

  7. Tmod1 and CP49 synergize to control the fiber cell geometry, transparency, and mechanical stiffness of the mouse lens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Gokhin

    Full Text Available The basis for mammalian lens fiber cell organization, transparency, and biomechanical properties has contributions from two specialized cytoskeletal systems: the spectrin-actin membrane skeleton and beaded filament cytoskeleton. The spectrin-actin membrane skeleton predominantly consists of α₂β₂-spectrin strands interconnecting short, tropomyosin-coated actin filaments, which are stabilized by pointed-end capping by tropomodulin 1 (Tmod1 and structurally disrupted in the absence of Tmod1. The beaded filament cytoskeleton consists of the intermediate filament proteins CP49 and filensin, which require CP49 for assembly and contribute to lens transparency and biomechanics. To assess the simultaneous physiological contributions of these cytoskeletal networks and uncover potential functional synergy between them, we subjected lenses from mice lacking Tmod1, CP49, or both to a battery of structural and physiological assays to analyze fiber cell disorder, light scattering, and compressive biomechanical properties. Findings show that deletion of Tmod1 and/or CP49 increases lens fiber cell disorder and light scattering while impairing compressive load-bearing, with the double mutant exhibiting a distinct phenotype compared to either single mutant. Moreover, Tmod1 is in a protein complex with CP49 and filensin, indicating that the spectrin-actin network and beaded filament cytoskeleton are biochemically linked. These experiments reveal that the spectrin-actin membrane skeleton and beaded filament cytoskeleton establish a novel functional synergy critical for regulating lens fiber cell geometry, transparency, and mechanical stiffness.

  8. Learning about the Unit Cell and Crystal Lattice with Computerized Simulations and Games: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luealamai, Sutha; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed a computer-based learning module on the unit cell of various types of crystal. The module has two components: the virtual unit cell (VUC) part and the subsequent unit cell hunter part. The VUC is a virtual reality simulation for students to actively arrive at the unit cell from exploring, from a broad view, the crystal…

  9. Learning about the Unit Cell and Crystal Lattice with Computerized Simulations and Games: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luealamai, Sutha; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed a computer-based learning module on the unit cell of various types of crystal. The module has two components: the virtual unit cell (VUC) part and the subsequent unit cell hunter part. The VUC is a virtual reality simulation for students to actively arrive at the unit cell from exploring, from a broad view, the crystal…

  10. Interfacing Sca-1pos Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Biocompatible Scaffolds with Different Chemical Composition and Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Forte

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An immortalized murine mesenchymal stem cell line (mTERT-MSC enriched for Linneg/Sca-1pos fraction has been obtained through the transfection of MSC with murine TERT and single-cell isolation. Such cell line maintained the typical MSC self-renewal capacity and continuously expressed MSC phenotype. Moreover, mTERT-MSC retained the functional features of freshly isolated MSC in culture without evidence of senescence or spontaneous differentiation events. Thus, mTERT-MSC have been cultured onto PLA films, 30 and 100 μm PLA microbeads, and onto unpressed and pressed HYAFF-11 scaffolds. While the cells adhered preserving their morphology on PLA films, clusters of mTERT-MSC were detected on PLA beads and unpressed fibrous scaffolds. Finally, mTERT-MSC were not able to colonize the inner layers of pressed HYAFF-11. Nevertheless, such cell line displayed the ability to preserve Sca-1 expression and to retain multilineage potential when appropriately stimulated on all the scaffolds tested.

  11. A method for efficient calculation of diffusion and reactions of lipophilic compounds in complex cell geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreij, Kristian; Chaudhry, Qasim Ali; Jernström, Bengt; Morgenstern, Ralf; Hanke, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A general description of effects of toxic compounds in mammalian cells is facing several problems. Firstly, most toxic compounds are hydrophobic and partition phenomena strongly influence their behaviour. Secondly, cells display considerable heterogeneity regarding the presence, activity and distribution of enzymes participating in the metabolism of foreign compounds i.e. bioactivation/biotransformation. Thirdly, cellular architecture varies greatly. Taken together, complexity at several levels has to be addressed to arrive at efficient in silico modelling based on physicochemical properties, metabolic preferences and cell characteristics. In order to understand the cellular behaviour of toxic foreign compounds we have developed a mathematical model that addresses these issues. In order to make the system numerically treatable, methods motivated by homogenization techniques have been applied. These tools reduce the complexity of mathematical models of cell dynamics considerably thus allowing to solve efficiently the partial differential equations in the model numerically on a personal computer. Compared to a compartment model with well-stirred compartments, our model affords a more realistic representation. Numerical results concerning metabolism and chemical solvolysis of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogen show good agreement with results from measurements in V79 cell culture. The model can easily be extended and refined to include more reactants, and/or more complex reaction chains, enzyme distribution etc, and is therefore suitable for modelling cellular metabolism involving membrane partitioning also at higher levels of complexity.

  12. A method for efficient calculation of diffusion and reactions of lipophilic compounds in complex cell geometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Dreij

    Full Text Available A general description of effects of toxic compounds in mammalian cells is facing several problems. Firstly, most toxic compounds are hydrophobic and partition phenomena strongly influence their behaviour. Secondly, cells display considerable heterogeneity regarding the presence, activity and distribution of enzymes participating in the metabolism of foreign compounds i.e. bioactivation/biotransformation. Thirdly, cellular architecture varies greatly. Taken together, complexity at several levels has to be addressed to arrive at efficient in silico modelling based on physicochemical properties, metabolic preferences and cell characteristics. In order to understand the cellular behaviour of toxic foreign compounds we have developed a mathematical model that addresses these issues. In order to make the system numerically treatable, methods motivated by homogenization techniques have been applied. These tools reduce the complexity of mathematical models of cell dynamics considerably thus allowing to solve efficiently the partial differential equations in the model numerically on a personal computer. Compared to a compartment model with well-stirred compartments, our model affords a more realistic representation. Numerical results concerning metabolism and chemical solvolysis of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogen show good agreement with results from measurements in V79 cell culture. The model can easily be extended and refined to include more reactants, and/or more complex reaction chains, enzyme distribution etc, and is therefore suitable for modelling cellular metabolism involving membrane partitioning also at higher levels of complexity.

  13. Biology 23. Unit One -- The Cell: Structure and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederland Independent School District, TX.

    GRADES OR AGES: Not given. SUBJECT MATTER: Biology, the structure and physiology of the cell. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: There are four sections: a) objectives for the unit, b) bibliography, c) activities, and d) evaluation. The guide is directed to the student rather than the teacher. The guide is mimeographed and stapled, with no…

  14. Manual suction versus femtosecond laser trephination for penetrating keratoplasty: intraocular pressure, endothelial cell damage, incision geometry, and wound healing responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angunawela, Romesh I; Riau, Andri; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Tan, Donald T; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2012-05-04

    To measure real-time intraocular pressure (IOP) during trephination with a manual suction trephine (MST) and the femtosecond laser (FSL), and to assess endothelial cell damage, incision geometry, and wound healing response with these procedures. IOP was monitored with an intracameral sensor. Eight rabbits underwent manual suction trephination. Eight rabbits had FSL trephination (FSL-T). Slit lamp photography, confocal microscopy, and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) were performed at baseline and postoperatively. Animals were sacrificed at 4 hours and 3 days. Tissue was examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunohistochemistry for an array of wound-healing markers. Separately, 6 human corneas had MST (3) and FSL-T (3). Incision geometry was imaged with high resolution Optovue AS-OCT. The average IOP during MST and FSL-T was similar (37 mm Hg). There was wider IOP fluctuation during the MST cutting phase (60 mm Hg maximum). There were 1-2 rows of endothelial loss on either side of the incision for FSL-T and 2-5 rows deep for MST. Immune cell responses at 4 hours (CD11b) were comparable, greater apoptosis with FSL-T (TUNEL) occurred at 4 hours, and there was increased keratocyte proliferation at 3 days (Ki67) with FSL-T. There was significantly greater undercutting of the cornea with MST (46.86 degrees versus 16.72 degrees). There is more IOP variation during MST. Average IOP is 37 mm Hg for both techniques. More endothelial damage and undercutting of the cornea occurs with MST. The wound healing response to FSL-T appears greater at 3 days.

  15. Geometry Revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Both classical geometry and modern differential geometry have been active subjects of research throughout the 20th century and lie at the heart of many recent advances in mathematics and physics. The underlying motivating concept for the present book is that it offers readers the elements of a modern geometric culture by means of a whole series of visually appealing unsolved (or recently solved) problems that require the creation of concepts and tools of varying abstraction. Starting with such natural, classical objects as lines, planes, circles, spheres, polygons, polyhedra, curves, surfaces,

  16. Analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Burdette, A C

    1971-01-01

    Analytic Geometry covers several fundamental aspects of analytic geometry needed for advanced subjects, including calculus.This book is composed of 12 chapters that review the principles, concepts, and analytic proofs of geometric theorems, families of lines, the normal equation of the line, and related matters. Other chapters highlight the application of graphing, foci, directrices, eccentricity, and conic-related topics. The remaining chapters deal with the concept polar and rectangular coordinates, surfaces and curves, and planes.This book will prove useful to undergraduate trigonometric st

  17. Vector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Gilbert de B

    2011-01-01

    This brief undergraduate-level text by a prominent Cambridge-educated mathematician explores the relationship between algebra and geometry. An elementary course in plane geometry is the sole requirement for Gilbert de B. Robinson's text, which is the result of several years of teaching and learning the most effective methods from discussions with students. Topics include lines and planes, determinants and linear equations, matrices, groups and linear transformations, and vectors and vector spaces. Additional subjects range from conics and quadrics to homogeneous coordinates and projective geom

  18. A Stochastic Geometry Framework for LOS/NLOS Propagation in Dense Small Cell Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galiotto, Carlo; Kiilerich Pratas, Nuno; Marchetti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The need to carry out analytical studies of wireless systems often motivates the usage of simplified models which, despite their tractability, can easily lead to an overestimation of the achievable performance. In the case of dense small cells networks, the standard single slope path-loss model h...

  19. Polymer electrolyte fuel cell mini power unit for portable application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, F.; Squadrito, G.; Barbera, O.; Giacoppo, G.; Passalacqua, E.; Zerbinati, O.

    This paper describes the design, realisation and test of a power unit based on a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, operating at room temperature, for portable application. The device is composed of an home made air breathing fuel cell stack, a metal hydride tank for H 2 supply, a dc-dc converter for power output control and a fan for stack cooling. The stack is composed by 10 cells with an active surface of 25 cm 2 and produces a rated power of 15 W at 6 V and 2 A. The stack successfully runs with end-off fed hydrogen without appreciable performance degradation during the time. The final assembled system is able to generate 12 W at 9.5 V, and power a portable DVD player for 3 h in continuous. The power unit has collected about 100 h of operation without maintenance.

  20. Polymer electrolyte fuel cell mini power unit for portable application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbani, F.; Squadrito, G.; Barbera, O.; Giacoppo, G.; Passalacqua, E. [CNR-ITAE, via Salita S. Lucia sopra Contesse n. 5, 98126 S. Lucia, Messina (Italy); Zerbinati, O. [Universita del Piemonte Orientale, Dip. di Scienze dell' Ambiente e della Vita, via Bellini 25/g, 15100 Alessandria (Italy)

    2007-06-20

    This paper describes the design, realisation and test of a power unit based on a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, operating at room temperature, for portable application. The device is composed of an home made air breathing fuel cell stack, a metal hydride tank for H{sub 2} supply, a dc-dc converter for power output control and a fan for stack cooling. The stack is composed by 10 cells with an active surface of 25 cm{sup 2} and produces a rated power of 15 W at 6 V and 2 A. The stack successfully runs with end-off fed hydrogen without appreciable performance degradation during the time. The final assembled system is able to generate 12 W at 9.5 V, and power a portable DVD player for 3 h in continuous. The power unit has collected about 100 h of operation without maintenance. (author)

  1. Architectural geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pottmann, Helmut; Eigensatz, Michael; Vaxman, A.; Wallner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural

  2. Architectural geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pottmann, Helmut; Eigensatz, Michael; Vaxman, A.; Wallner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural

  3. Design and simulation of novel flow field plate geometry for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Hanxia; Wu, Chaoqun; Liu, Shuliang; Chen, Tao

    2016-10-01

    Bipolar plate is one of the many important components of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stacks as it supplies fuel and oxidant to the membrane-electrode assembly (MEA), removes water, collects produced current and provides mechanical support for the single cells in the stack. The flow field design of a bipolar plate greatly affects the performance of a PEMFC. It must uniformly distribute the reactant gases over the MEA and prevent product water flooding. This paper aims at improving the fuel cell performance by optimizing flow field designs and flow channel configurations. To achieve this, a novel biomimetic flow channel for flow field designs is proposed based on Murray's Law. Computational fluid dynamics based simulations were performed to compare three different designs (parallel, serpentine and biomimetic channel, respectively) in terms of current density distribution, power density distribution, pressure distribution, temperature distribution, and hydrogen mass fraction distribution. It was found that flow field designs with biomimetic flow channel perform better than that with convectional flow channel under the same operating conditions.

  4. Calculations to compare different ways of modelling the plate geometry cells of the Zebra fast critical assembly, MZA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowlands, John, E-mail: rowlandsjl@aol.com

    2009-03-15

    The core region cells of the Zebra fast critical assembly MZA comprise 14 plates in a square steel tube, with 12 cells being stacked axially to form the core section of the assembly. The cells can be modelled in different levels of detail, ranging from a three-dimensional representation in which the core (The word core is used to describe both the region of a plate containing the main material, such as plutonium, UO{sub 2} or sodium, and the region of the assembly containing fissile material cells.) and canning regions of the plates and the void gaps between the edges of the plates and the steel tube, and between tubes, are represented. Simplified models include a three-dimensional representation in which the void regions are combined with the tube material. A further simplified three-dimensional model, called the MURAL model, represents the core regions of the plates but homogenises the canning, tube material and void regions. Two types of one-dimensional slab geometry model are found in the literature, one in which the materials are homogenised within each of the three axial slab regions of a canned plate (plate core and upper and lower canning regions) and a further simplified version in which the plate is modelled as a single region, the compositions being averaged over the whole thickness of the plate, comprising the plate core material, the canning and the tube material. MONK Monte Carlo calculations have been made for each of these models, and also for the fully homogenised cells, and the k-effective values, core sodium void reactivities and reaction rate ratios are compared.

  5. The effects of 3D channel geometry on CTC passing pressure--towards deformability-based cancer cell separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhifeng; Xu, Jie; Hong, Bin; Chen, Xiaolin

    2014-07-21

    Various lab on a chip devices have been developed recently to detect and separate circulating tumour cells (CTCs) for early stage cancer detection. Because CTCs are extremely rare in the blood, next generation CTC microfilters aim at significant improvement in both efficiency and throughput. CTC microfilters based on cell deformability seem to be a promising direction. In the present research, we study a CTC passing event through a micro-filtering channel with various 3D geometries. The pressure signatures for different types of cells passing through different channels are characterized numerically. Specifically, five kinds of cross-sections, circular, square, triangular and two kinds of rectangular channels with aspect ratios of 2 and 5, are studied in this work. The total pressures for cells passing through the channels are calculated and reveal different behaviour from what is predicted by the static surface tension model. Among all five cross-sections studied, the circular cross-section features the highest critical pressure and thus is most suitable for high efficiency CTC separation. The square filtering channel provides the second largest critical pressure, and the triangular cross-section provides the least critical pressure among these three cross-sections. All these three cross-sections are better than the rectangular channels with aspect ratios of 2 and 5. For the rectangular channel, a high aspect ratio channel may lead to cell splitting at high speed, which will result in a periodic pressure signature. Our findings will provide valuable information for the design of next generation CTC microfilters.

  6. Microbial fuel cells as pollutant treatment units: Research updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quanguo; Hu, Jianjun; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are a device that can convert chemical energy in influent substances to electricity via biological pathways. Based on the consent that MFC technology should be applied as a waste/wastewater treatment unit rather than a renewable energy source, this mini-review discussed recent R&D efforts on MFC technologies for pollutant treatments and highlighted the challenges and research and development needs. Owing to the low power density levels achievable by larger-scale MFC, the MFC should be used as a device other than energy source such as being a pollutant treatment unit.

  7. Biomimetic three-dimensional anisotropic geometries by uniaxial stretch of poly(ε-caprolactone) films for mesenchymal stem cell proliferation, alignment, and myogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zu-yong; Teo, Erin Yiling; Chong, Mark Seow Khoon; Zhang, Qin-yuan; Lim, Jing; Zhang, Zhi-yong; Hong, Ming-hui; Thian, Eng-san; Chan, Jerry Kok Yen; Teoh, Swee-hin

    2013-07-01

    Anisotropic geometries are critical for eliciting cell alignment to dictate tissue microarchitectures and biological functions. Current fabrication techniques are complex and utilize toxic solvents, hampering their applications for translational research. Here, we present a novel simple, solvent-free, and reproducible method via uniaxial stretching for incorporating anisotropic topographies on bioresorbable films with ambitions to realize stem cell alignment control. Uniaxial stretching of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) films resulted in a three-dimensional micro-ridge/groove topography (inter-ridge-distance: ~6 μm; ridge-length: ~90 μm; ridge-depth: 200-900 nm) with uniform distribution and controllable orientation by the direction of stretch on the whole film surface. When stretch temperature (Ts) and draw ratio (DR) were increased, the inter-ridge-distance was reduced and ridge-length increased. Through modification of hydrolysis, increased surface hydrophilicity was achieved, while maintaining the morphology of PCL ridge/grooves. Upon seeding human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on uniaxial-stretched PCL (UX-PCL) films, aligned hMSC organization was obtained. Compared to unstretched films, hMSCs on UX-PCL had larger increase in cellular alignment (>85%) and elongation, without indication of cytotoxicity or reduction in cellular proliferation. This aligned hMSC organization was homogenous and stably maintained with controlled orientation along the ridges on the whole UX-PCL surface for over 2 weeks. Moreover, the hMSCs on UX-PCL had a higher level of myogenic genes' expression than that on the unstretched films. We conclude that uniaxial stretching has potential in patterning film topography with anisotropic structures. The UX-PCL in conjunction with hMSCs could be used as "basic units" to create tissue constructs with microscale control of cellular alignment and elongation for tissue engineering applications.

  8. Riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Intended for a one year course, this text serves as a single source, introducing readers to the important techniques and theorems, while also containing enough background on advanced topics to appeal to those students wishing to specialize in Riemannian geometry. This is one of the few Works to combine both the geometric parts of Riemannian geometry and the analytic aspects of the theory. The book will appeal to a readership that have a basic knowledge of standard manifold theory, including tensors, forms, and Lie groups. Important revisions to the third edition include: a substantial addition of unique and enriching exercises scattered throughout the text; inclusion of an increased number of coordinate calculations of connection and curvature; addition of general formulas for curvature on Lie Groups and submersions; integration of variational calculus into the text allowing for an early treatment of the Sphere theorem using a proof by Berger; incorporation of several recent results about manifolds with posit...

  9. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kreyszig, Erwin

    1991-01-01

    An introductory textbook on the differential geometry of curves and surfaces in three-dimensional Euclidean space, presented in its simplest, most essential form, but with many explanatory details, figures and examples, and in a manner that conveys the theoretical and practical importance of the different concepts, methods and results involved. With problems at the end of each section, and solutions listed at the end of the book. Includes 99 illustrations.

  10. Imaging the impact on cuprate superconductivity of varying the interatomic distances within individual crystal unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, J A; Lee, Jinho; Wang, M; McElroy, K; Fujita, K; Andersen, B M; Hirschfeld, P J; Eisaki, H; Uchida, S; Davis, J C

    2008-03-04

    Many theoretical models of high-temperature superconductivity focus only on the doping dependence of the CuO(2)-plane electronic structure. However, such models are manifestly insufficient to explain the strong variations in superconducting critical temperature, T(c), among cuprates that have identical hole density but are crystallographically different outside of the CuO(2) plane. A key challenge, therefore, has been to identify a predominant out-of-plane influence controlling the superconductivity, with much attention focusing on the distance d(A) between the apical oxygen and the planar copper atom. Here we report direct determination of how variations in interatomic distances within individual crystalline unit cells affect the superconducting energy-gap maximum Delta of Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta). In this material, quasiperiodic variations of unit cell geometry occur in the form of a bulk crystalline "supermodulation." Within each supermodulation period, we find approximately 9 +/- 1% cosinusoidal variation in local Delta that is anticorrelated with the associated d(A) variations. Furthermore, we show that phenomenological consistency would exist between these effects and the random Delta variations found near dopant atoms if the primary effect of the interstitial dopant atom is to displace the apical oxygen so as to diminish d(A) or tilt the CuO(5) pyramid. Thus, we reveal a strong, nonrandom out-of-plane effect on cuprate superconductivity at atomic scale.

  11. Zero loss magnetic metamaterials using powered active unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yu; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2009-08-31

    We report the design and experimental measurement of a powered active magnetic metamaterial with tunable permeability. The unit cell is based on the combination of an embedded radiofrequency amplifier and a tunable phase shifter, which together control the response of the medium. The measurements show that a negative permeability metamaterial with zero loss or even gain can be achieved through an array of such metamaterial cells. This kind of active metamaterial can find use in applications that are performance limited due to material losses.

  12. A heated vapor cell unit for DAVLL in atomic rubidium

    OpenAIRE

    McCarron, Daniel J.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-01-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm-long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field...

  13. Composite Bipolar Plate for Unitized Fuel Cell/Electrolyzer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelsteadt, Cortney K.; Braff, William

    2009-01-01

    In a substantial improvement over present alkaline systems, an advanced hybrid bipolar plate for a unitized fuel cell/electrolyzer has been developed. This design, which operates on pure feed streams (H2/O2 and water, respectively) consists of a porous metallic foil filled with a polymer that has very high water transport properties. Combined with a second metallic plate, the pore-filled metallic plates form a bipolar plate with an empty cavity in the center.

  14. General Geometry and Geometry of Electromagnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Shahverdiyev, Shervgi S.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that Electromagnetism creates geometry different from Riemannian geometry. General geometry including Riemannian geometry as a special case is constructed. It is proven that the most simplest special case of General Geometry is geometry underlying Electromagnetism. Action for electromagnetic field and Maxwell equations are derived from curvature function of geometry underlying Electromagnetism. And it is shown that equation of motion for a particle interacting with electromagnetic...

  15. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells coupled with a biomass gasification unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrzypkiewicz Marek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A possibility of fuelling a solid oxide fuel cell stack (SOFC with biomass fuels can be realized by coupling a SOFC system with a self-standing gasification unit. Such a solution enables multi-fuel operation, elasticity of the system as well as the increase of the efficiency of small-scale biomass-to-electricity conversion units. A system of this type, consisting of biomass gasification unit, gas purification unit, SOFC stack, anode off-gas afterburner and peripherals was constructed and operated successfully. During the process, biomass fuel (wood chips was gasified with air as gasification agent. The gasifier was capable of converting up to 30 kW of fuel to syngas with efficiencies up to 75%. Syngas leaving the gasification unit is delivered to a medium temperature adsorber for sulphur compounds removal. Steam is added to the purified fuel to maintain steam to carbon ratio higher than 2. The syngas then is passed to a SOFC stack through a fuel preheater. In such a configuration it was possible to operate a commercial 1.3 kW stack within its working regime. Conducted tests confirmed successful operation of a SOFC stack fuelled by biomass-sourced syngas.

  16. Quantitative morphometry of electrophysiologically identified CA3b interneurons reveals robust local geometry and distinct cell classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, Giorgio A; Brown, Kerry M; Calixto, Eduardo; Card, J Patrick; Galván, E J; Perez-Rosello, T; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2009-08-20

    The morphological and electrophysiological diversity of inhibitory cells in hippocampal area CA3 may underlie specific computational roles and is not yet fully elucidated. In particular, interneurons with somata in strata radiatum (R) and lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) receive converging stimulation from the dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex as well as within CA3. Although these cells express different forms of synaptic plasticity, their axonal trees and connectivity are still largely unknown. We investigated the branching and spatial patterns, plus the membrane and synaptic properties, of rat CA3b R and L-M interneurons digitally reconstructed after intracellular labeling. We found considerable variability within but no difference between the two layers, and no correlation between morphological and biophysical properties. Nevertheless, two cell types were identified based on the number of dendritic bifurcations, with significantly different anatomical and electrophysiological features. Axons generally branched an order of magnitude more than dendrites. However, interneurons on both sides of the R/L-M boundary revealed surprisingly modular axodendritic arborizations with consistently uniform local branch geometry. Both axons and dendrites followed a lamellar organization, and axons displayed a spatial preference toward the fissure. Moreover, only a small fraction of the axonal arbor extended to the outer portion of the invaded volume, and tended to return toward the proximal region. In contrast, dendritic trees demonstrated more limited but isotropic volume occupancy. These results suggest a role of predominantly local feedforward and lateral inhibitory control for both R and L-M interneurons. Such a role may be essential to balance the extensive recurrent excitation of area CA3 underlying hippocampal autoassociative memory function.

  17. Three-dimensional model of a 50 cm{sup 2} high temperature PEM fuel cell. Study of the flow channel geometry influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, Justo; Canizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A.; Pinar, F. Javier; Mena, Esperanza; Ubeda, Diego [Chemical Enginnering Department, University of Castilla-La Mancha. Enrique Costa Novella Building, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela, n 12, 13071, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    In this work, a three-dimensional half-cell model for a 50 cm{sup 2} high temperature polyelectrolyte membrane fuel cell (HTPEMFC) has been implemented in a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) application. It was solved for three different flow channel geometries: 4-step serpentine, parallel and pin-type. Each geometry leads to a very well defined current density profile which indicates that current density distribution is directly linked to the way reactants are spread over the electrode surface. The model predicts that parallel flow channels present a significant lower performance probably due to the existence of preferential paths which makes the reactant gases not to be well distributed over the whole electrode surface. This results in lower output current densities when this geometry is used, especially at high oxygen demand conditions. This behavior was also detected by experimental measurement. Serpentine and pin-type flow channels were found to perform very similarly, although slightly higher limit current densities are predicted when using serpentine geometry. Inlet flow rate as well as temperature influence were also studied. The model predicts mass transfer problems and low limit current densities when the fuel cell is fed with small oxygen flow rates, whereas no differences regarding average flow rates are noticed if it is over increased. Better fuel cell performance is predicted while temperature grows as it could be expected. (author)

  18. A design method to assess the accessibility of light on PV cells in an arbitraty geometry by means of ambient occlusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.; Willeke, G.; Ossenbrink, H.

    2007-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which the accessibility of light on PV cells in an arbitrary geometry can be quickly visualized and quantified. Modelling of irradiance in this method is based on ambient occlusion, which indicates the likelihood of shading of object’s surfaces due to

  19. Towards a Nano Geometry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booss-Bavnbek, Bernhelm

    2011-01-01

    This paper applies I.M. Gelfand's distinction between adequate and non-adequate use of mathematical language in different contexts to the newly opened window of model-based measurements of intracellular dynamics. The specifics of geometry and dynamics on the mesoscale of cell physiology are elabo...

  20. Thermodynamics of Condensed Phases: Formula Unit Volume, "V[subscript m]", and the Determination of the Number of Formula Units, "Z", in a Crystallographic Unit Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Formula unit (or molecular) volume, "V[subscript m]", is related to many thermodynamic and physical properties of materials, so that knowledge of "V[subscript m]" is useful in prediction of such properties for known and even hypothetical materials. The symbol "Z" represents the number of formula units in a crystallographic unit cell; "Z" thus…

  1. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ciarlet, Philippe G

    2007-01-01

    This book gives the basic notions of differential geometry, such as the metric tensor, the Riemann curvature tensor, the fundamental forms of a surface, covariant derivatives, and the fundamental theorem of surface theory in a selfcontained and accessible manner. Although the field is often considered a classical one, it has recently been rejuvenated, thanks to the manifold applications where it plays an essential role. The book presents some important applications to shells, such as the theory of linearly and nonlinearly elastic shells, the implementation of numerical methods for shells, and

  2. Effect of lipid A on the deformability, membrane rigidity and geometry of human adult red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöschl, J M; Linderkamp, O

    1992-09-01

    Lipid A is responsible for the activities of endotoxin and may cause circulatory failure and haemolysis. This study evaluated the effects of different lipid A concentrations on red blood cell (RBC) deformation (rheoscope), the aspiration pressure required to aspirate RBC into 3.3 microns pipettes, the membrane shear elastic modulus (i.e. membrane rigidity) and cellular geometry (micropipette system) after 15 min of incubation. Lipid A concentrations of 10 and 100 micrograms ml-1 of RBCs decreased RBC deformability by 26% and 39%, respectively. The aspiration pressure for RBCs into a 3.3 microns micropipette increased by 235% at a lipid A concentration of 10 micrograms ml-1 and by 586% at a concentration of 100 micrograms ml-1. The elastic shear modulus almost doubled at a lipid A concentration of 10 micrograms ml-1 and tripled at 100 micrograms ml-1. At a lipid A concentration of 100 micrograms ml-1, 37% of RBCs showed spicules. These echinocytes were less deformable than discocytes. Mean corpuscular volume, RBC volume and surface area were not affected by lipid A. We conclude that lipid A causes marked reduction of RBC deformability due to increasing membrane rigidity.

  3. Zeroing in on red blood cell unit expiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyalil, Fathima; Irwin, Greg; Ross, Bryony; Manolis, Michael; Enjeti, Anoop K

    2017-09-20

    Expiry of red blood cell (RBC) units is a significant contributor to wastage of precious voluntary donations. Effective strategies aimed at optimal resource utilization are required to minimize wastage. This retrospective study analyzed the strategic measures implemented to reduce expiry of RBC units in an Australian tertiary regional hospital. The measures, which included inventory rearrangement, effective stock rotation, and the number of emergency courier services required during a 24-month period, were evaluated. There was no wastage of RBC units due to expiry over the 12 months after policy changes. Before these changes, approximately half of RBC wastage (261/511) was due to expiry. The total number of transfusions remained constant in this period and there was no increase in the use of emergency couriers. Policy changes implemented were decreasing the RBC inventory level by one-third and effective stock rotation and using a computerized system to link the transfusion services across the area. Effective stock rotation resulted in a reduction in older blood (>28 days) received in the main laboratory rotated from peripheral hospitals, down from 6%-41% to 0%-2.5%. Age-related expiry of blood products is preventable and can be significantly reduced by improving practices in the pathology service. This study provides proof of principle for "zero tolerance for RBC unit expiry" across a large networked blood banking service. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  4. Geometries, Electronic Structures, And Spectral Properties Of Some Metal Free Phthalonitrile Derivatives For Enhancement Of The Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbarasan, P. M.

    2010-08-01

    New technologies for direct solar energy conversion have gained more attention in the last few years. In particular, Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) are promising in terms of efficiency and low cost [1,2]. Benefited from systematic device engineering and continuous material innovation, a state of the art DSC with a ruthenium sensitizer has achieved a validated efficiency of 11.1%[3] measured under the air mass 1.5 global (AM1.5G) conditions. The optimized geometries of the 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile are shown in Fig. 1(a). The frontier molecular orbitals (MO) energies of the dyes 3, 4 Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Nitrophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile are shown in Fig. 1(b). The HOMO-LUMO gap of the dye 3, 4 Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile in vacuum is 5.96 eV, 5.54 eV, 5.57 eV, 5.76 eV respectively. The geometries, electronic structures, polarizabilities, and hyperpolarizabilities of dyes 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile were studied by using density functional theory with hybrid functional B3LYP, and the UV-Vis spectra were investigated by using TDDFT methods. The NBO results suggest that 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile are all (D-pi-A) systems. The calculated isotropic polarizability of 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile is. 85.76, 112.72, 26.63 and 115.13 a.u., respectively. The calculated polarizability anisotropy invariant of 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile is 74.451, 83.533, 62.653 and 88.526 a.u., respectively. The hyperpolarizabilities of 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile is 0

  5. Synthesis and photovoltaic properties from inverted geometry cells and roll-to-roll coated large area cells from dithienopyrrole-based donor-acceptor polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Wei; Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod; Hu, Xiaolian

    2013-01-01

    , for P2 and P4 possessing thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione as an acceptor, their film absorption covers the region of 500-800 nm and 500-750 nm respectively, which makes them attractive as low band gap polymer solar cell (PSC) materials. With the incorporation of thiophene bridges, P3 and P4 have 0.......24 and 0.21 eV higher HOMO energy levels than P1 and P2, respectively. A bandgap as low as 1.66 eV is obtained for P2. An up-scaling experiment is performed on bulk-heterojunction PSCs with an inverted device geometry fabricated on a small scale by spin coating and on a large scale using roll-to-roll (R2R...

  6. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  7. Mechanical behavior of regular open-cell porous biomaterials made of diamond lattice unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, S M; Campoli, G; Amin Yavari, S; Sajadi, B; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2014-06-01

    Cellular structures with highly controlled micro-architectures are promising materials for orthopedic applications that require bone-substituting biomaterials or implants. The availability of additive manufacturing techniques has enabled manufacturing of biomaterials made of one or multiple types of unit cells. The diamond lattice unit cell is one of the relatively new types of unit cells that are used in manufacturing of regular porous biomaterials. As opposed to many other types of unit cells, there is currently no analytical solution that could be used for prediction of the mechanical properties of cellular structures made of the diamond lattice unit cells. In this paper, we present new analytical solutions and closed-form relationships for predicting the elastic modulus, Poisson׳s ratio, critical buckling load, and yield (plateau) stress of cellular structures made of the diamond lattice unit cell. The mechanical properties predicted using the analytical solutions are compared with those obtained using finite element models. A number of solid and porous titanium (Ti6Al4V) specimens were manufactured using selective laser melting. A series of experiments were then performed to determine the mechanical properties of the matrix material and cellular structures. The experimentally measured mechanical properties were compared with those obtained using analytical solutions and finite element (FE) models. It has been shown that, for small apparent density values, the mechanical properties obtained using analytical and numerical solutions are in agreement with each other and with experimental observations. The properties estimated using an analytical solution based on the Euler-Bernoulli theory markedly deviated from experimental results for large apparent density values. The mechanical properties estimated using FE models and another analytical solution based on the Timoshenko beam theory better matched the experimental observations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd

  8. Theoretical characterization and design of small molecule donor material containing naphthodithiophene central unit for efficient organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yu-Ai; Geng, Yun; Li, Hai-Bin; Jin, Jun-Ling; Wu, Yong; Su, Zhong-Min

    2013-07-15

    To seek for high-performance small molecule donor materials used in heterojunction solar cell, six acceptor-donor-acceptor small molecules based on naphtho[2,3-b:6,7-b']dithiophene (NDT) units with different acceptor units were designed and characterized using density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory. Their geometries, electronic structures, photophysical, and charge transport properties have been scrutinized comparing with the reported donor material NDT(TDPP)2 (TDPP  =  thiophene-capped diketopyrrolopyrrole). The open circuit voltage (V(oc)), energetic driving force(ΔE(L-L)), and exciton binding energy (E(b)) were also provided to give an elementary understanding on their cell performance. The results reveal that the frontier molecular orbitals of 3-7 match well with the acceptor material PC61 BM, and compounds 3-5 were found to exhibit the comparable performances to 1 and show promising potential in organic solar cells. In particular, comparing with 1, system 7 with naphthobisthiadiazole acceptor unit displays broader absorption spectrum, higher V(oc), lower E(b), and similar carrier mobility. An in-depth insight into the nature of the involved excited states based on transition density matrix and charge density difference indicates that all S1 states are mainly intramolecular charge transfer states with the charge transfer from central NDT unit to bilateral acceptor units, and also imply that the exciton of 7 can be dissociated easily due to its large extent of the charge transfer. In a word, 7 maybe superior to 1 and may act as a promising donor candidate for organic solar cell. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Experience with a Fourier method for determining the extracellular potential fields of excitable cells with cylindrical geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J W; Greco, E C; Harman, T L

    1978-11-01

    In this chapter, well-known solutions that utilize a Fourier transform method for determining the extracellular, volume-conductor potential distribution surrounding elongated excitable cells of cylindrical geometry are reformulated as a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) problem, which subsequently permits the volume-conductor problem to be viewed as an equivalent linear-filtering problem. This DFT formulation is fast and computationally efficient. In addition, it lends itself to the application of some rather well-known techniques in linear systems theory (e.g., the DFT for convolution and least mean-square (Wiener) filtering for optimal prediction of a signal in random noise). Two specific examples are employed to demonstrate the utility of this discrete Fourier method: (1) the single, isolated, active nerve fiber in an essentially infinite volume conductor and (2) the isolated, active nerve trunk in a similar type of extracellular medium. In each of these, our DFT method is employed to obtain both the classical "forward" and "inverse" potential solutions for each volume conductor problem. In the case where the single, active nerve fiber is the bioelectric source in the volume conductor, simulated action-potential data from an invertebrate giant axon is utilized, and potentials at various points in the extracellular medium are calculated. The calculated potential distributions in axial distance z, at various radial distances r, are consistent with well-known experimental fact. When the active nerve trunk acts as the bioelectric source, the DFT method provides calculated potential distributions that are fairly consistent with experimental data under a variety of experimental conditions. For example, in these experiments, a special, isolated frog spinal cord preparation is used that permits separate or combined stimulation of the motor and sensory nerve fiber components of the attached sciatic nerve trunk. By manipulating the stimulus intensity applied to the motor

  10. Porous silicon for micro-sized fuel cell reformer units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presting, H.; Konle, J.; Starkov, V.; Vyatkin, A.; Koenig, U

    2004-04-25

    Randomly, self-organized and ordered anodically etched porous silicon with pore sizes down to hundred nanometers have been fabricated for a variety of automotive applications which range from carrier structures in fuel cell technology up to shower heads for fuel injection in combustion engines. The porous wafers are produced by deep anodic etching which is a very effective and cheap fabrication method compatible to standard Si CMOS fabrication technology. The density of nano- (and micro-) pores can be varied in a wide range by choice of substrate doping level and appropriate electrolyte solution. Surface enlargement up to a factor of 1000 can be achieved [J. Electrochem. Soc. 149 (1) (2002) G70]. After deposition of a catalyst on the inner surface of the pores these structures can be used as an effective catalytic reaction area for the injected hydrocarbons in a micro-steam reformer unit with a small reaction volume. In addition deep anodic etching (DAE) of a pinhole array with very high aspect ratios is demonstrated using a pre-patterned inverted pyramidal array which is produced by lithography and subsequent wet chemical potassium hydroxide (KOH) etch. The structures can also be used as carrier structures for the hydrogen separation membrane of the reforming gas in a reformer unit when a thin layer of palladium is evaporated prior to the anodic etching of the pores. The noble metal foil serves as anode contact during the etch as well as hydrogen separating membrane of the device.

  11. Roll coated large area ITO- and vacuum-free all organic solar cells from diketopyrrolopyrrole based non-fullerene acceptors with molecular geometry effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Rasmus Guldbaek; Zhang, Fei; Andersen, Thomas Rieks

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate three diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) based small molecular non-fullerene acceptors, namely Ph(DPP)3, Ph(DPP)2, and PhDMe(DPP)2, focusing on molecular geometry effects on the frontier orbital level, light absorption, molecular configuration, electron mobility, thin film...... morphology, and photovoltaic performance of both spin-coated ITO based and roll coated large area, ITO- and vacuum-free organic solar cells (OSCs). For spin-coated devices based on P3HT as the donor polymer the solar cells gave power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) in the following order for (P3HT:PhDMe(DPP)2...

  12. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic–inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria, E-mail: mchatzin@materials.uoc.gr [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen [Hematology Laboratory, School of Medicine, University of Crete (Greece); Farsari, Maria [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Vamvakaki, Maria [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece)

    2015-03-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50 mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2 h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21 days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell–material combination in bone tissue engineering. - Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy image depicting cell adhesion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into a pore of a hybrid Direct Laser Writing

  13. The effect of lance geometry and carbon coating of silicon lances on propidium iodide uptake in lance array nanoinjection of HeLa 229 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, John W.; Lindstrom, Dallin L.; Hanks, Brad W.; Hope, Sandra; Jensen, Brian D.

    2016-04-01

    Connecting technology to biologic discovery is a core focus of non-viral gene therapy biotechnologies. One approach that leverages both the physical and electrical function of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in cellular engineering is a technology previously described as lance array nanoinjection (LAN). In brief, LAN consists of a silicon chip measuring 2 cm by 2 cm that has been etched to contain an array of 10 μm tall, solid lances that are spaced every 10 μm in a grid pattern. This array of lances is used to physically penetrate hundreds of thousands of cells simultaneously and to then electrically deliver molecular loads into cells. In this present work, two variables related to the microfabrication of the silicon lances, namely lance geometry and coating, are investigated. The purpose of both experimental variables is to assess these parameters’ effect on propidium iodide (PI), a cell membrane impermeable dye, uptake to injected HeLa 229 cells. For the lance geometry experimentation, three different microfabricated lance geometries were used which include a flat/narrow (FN, 1 μm diameter), flat/wide (FW, 2-2.5 μm diameter), and pointed (P, 1 μm diameter) lance geometries. From these tests, it was shown that the FN lances had a slightly better cell viability rate of 91.73% and that the P lances had the best PI uptake rate of 75.08%. For the lance coating experimentation, two different lances were fabricated, both silicon etched lances with some being carbon coated (CC) in a  <100 nm layer of carbon and the other lances being non-coated (Si). Results from this experiment showed no significant difference between lance types at three different nanoinjection protocols (0V, +1.5V DC, and  +5V Pulsed) for both cell viability and PI uptake rates. One exception to this is the comparison of CC/5V Pul and Si/5V Pul samples, where the CC/5V Pul samples had a cell viability rate 5% higher. Both outcomes were unexpected and reveal how to better

  14. Effect of roughness geometry on heat transfer and friction characteristics of PCM storage unit for night coolness storage in summer season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Shailndra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical analysis of thermal storage unit using phase change material (PCM as storage medium. Storage unit consists of parallel rectangular channels for the air flow which are separated by phase change storage material. The purpose of storage unit is to absorb the night coolness and to provide cooled air at comfort temperature during day time in summer season. MATLsimulation tool has been used to compute the air temperature variation with location as well as time, charging and discharging time of storage unit. Phase change material used for analysis is selected in such a way that it’s Melting point lies between comfort temperature and minimum night ambient temperatures. The air flow rate needed for charging of PCM is approximately four times greater than the flow rate required during day time to achieve comfort temperature for approximately eight hours, due to limited summer night time (only eight hours. The length of storage unit for which NTU value is greater than or equal to five will give the exit air temperature equal to PCM temperature for the case of latent heat utilization. It is found that artificial roughness on the duct surface effectively reduces the length of storage unit in the cost of some extra pressure drop across the duct.

  15. Effect of Yttria Content on the Zirconia Unit Cell Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogstad, Jessica A.; Lepple, Maren; Gao, Yan; Lipkin, Don M.; Levi, Carlos G. (UCSB); (GE Global)

    2012-02-06

    The relationship between yttria concentration and the unit cell parameters in partially and fully stabilized zirconia has been reassessed, motivated by the need to improve the accuracy of phase analysis upon decomposition of t{prime}-based thermal barrier coatings. Compositions ranging from 6 to 18 mol% YO{sub 1.5} were synthesized and examined by means of high-resolution X-ray diffraction. Lattice parameters were determined using the Rietveld refinement method, a whole-pattern fitting procedure. The revised empirical relationships fall within the range of those published previously. However, efforts to achieve superior homogeneity of the materials, as well as accuracy of the composition and lattice parameters, provide increased confidence in the reliability of these correlations for use in future studies. Additional insight into the potential sources for scatter previously reported for the transition region ({approx}12-14 mol% YO{sub 1.5}), where tetragonal and cubic phases have been observed to coexist, is also provided. Implications on the current understanding of stabilization mechanisms in zirconia are discussed.

  16. Cell Churches and Stem Cell Marketing in South Korea and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipp, Douglas

    2016-05-23

    The commercial provision of putative stem cell-based medical interventions in the absence of conclusive evidence of safety and efficacy has formed the basis of an unregulated industry for more than a decade. Many clinics offering such supposed stem cell treatments include statements about the 'ethical' nature of somatic (often colloquially referred to as 'adult' stem cells) stem cells, in specific contrast to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which have been the subject of intensive political, legal, and religious controversy since their first derivation in 1998. Christian groups-both Roman Catholic and evangelical Protestant-in many countries have explicitly promoted the medical potential and current-day successes in the clinical application of somatic stem cells, lending indirect support to the activities of businesses marketing stem cells ahead of evidence. In this article, I make a preliminary examination of how the structures and belief systems of certain churches in South Korea and the United States, both of which are home to significant stem cell marketing industries, has complemented other factors, including national biomedical funding initiatives, international economic rivalries, permissive legal structures, which have lent impetus to a problematic and often exploitative sector of biomedical commerce.

  17. Biomimetic three-dimensional anisotropic geometries by uniaxial stretching of poly(ε-caprolactone) films: degradation and mesenchymal stem cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zu-Yong; Lim, Jing; Ho, Yeow Siong; Zhang, Qin-Yuan; Chong, Mark S K; Tang, Min; Hong, Ming-Hui; Chan, Jerry K Y; Teoh, Swee Hin; Thian, Eng San

    2014-07-01

    Geometric cues have been used for a variety of cell regulation and tissue regenerative applications. While the function of geometric cues is being recognized, their stability and degradation behaviors are not well known. Here, we studied the influence of degradation on uniaxial-stretch-induced poly(ε-caprolactone) (UX-PCL) ridge/groove arrays and further cellular responses. Results from accelerated hydrolysis in vitro showed that UX-PCL ridge/groove arrays followed a surface-controlled erosion, with an overall geometry remained even at ∼45% film weight loss. Compared to unstretched PCL flat surfaces and/or ridge/groove arrays, UX-PCL ridge/groove arrays achieved an enhanced morphological stability against degradation. Over the degradation period, UX-PCL ridge/groove arrays exhibited an "S-shape" behavior of film weight loss, and retained more stable surface hydrophilicity and higher film mechanical properties than those of unstretched PCL surfaces. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) aligned better toward UX-PCL ridge/groove arrays when the geometries were remained intact, and became sensitive with gradually declined nucleus alignment and elongation to the geometric degradation of ridges. We speculate that uniaxial stretching confers UX-PCL ridge/groove arrays with enhanced stability against degradation in erosive environment. This study provides insights of how degradation influences geometric cues and further cell responses, and has implications for the design of biomaterials with stability-enhanced geometric cues for long-term tissue regeneration.

  18. Single fibre and multifibre unit cell analysis of strength and cracking of unidirectional composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, H.W.; Zhou, H.W.; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulations of damage evolution in composites reinforced with single and multifibre are presented. Several types of unit cell models are considered: single fibre unit cell, multiple fibre unit cell with one and several damageable sections per fibres, unit cells with homogeneous...... damageable parts in composites (matrix cracks, fibre/matrix interface damage and fibre fracture) was observed in the simulations. The strength of interface begins to influence the deformation behaviour of the cell only after the fibre is broken. In this case, the higher interface layer strength leads...... and inhomogeneous interfaces, etc. Two numerical damage models, cohesive elements, and damageable layers are employed for the simulation of the damage evolution in single fibre and multifibre unit cells. The two modelling approaches were compared and lead to the very close results. Competition among the different...

  19. Automated assembling of single fuel cell units for use in a fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalba, C. K.; Muminovic, A.; Barz, C.; Nasui, V.

    2017-05-01

    The manufacturing of PEMFC stacks (POLYMER ELEKTROLYT MEMBRAN Fuel Cell) is nowadays still done by hand. Over hundreds of identical single components have to be placed accurate together for the construction of a fuel cell stack. Beside logistic problems, higher total costs and disadvantages in weight the high number of components produce a higher statistic interference because of faulty erection or material defects and summation of manufacturing tolerances. The saving of costs is about 20 - 25 %. Furthermore, the total weight of the fuel cells will be reduced because of a new sealing technology. Overall a one minute cycle time has to be aimed per cell at the manufacturing of these single components. The change of the existing sealing concept to a bonded sealing is one of the important requisites to get an automated manufacturing of single cell units. One of the important steps for an automated gluing process is the checking of the glue application by using of an image processing system. After bonding the single fuel cell the sealing and electrical function can be checked, so that only functional and high qualitative cells can get into further manufacturing processes.

  20. Global Differential Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bär, Christian; Schwarz, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    This volume contains a collection of well-written surveys provided by experts in Global Differential Geometry to give an overview over recent developments in Riemannian Geometry, Geometric Analysis and Symplectic Geometry. The papers are written for graduate students and researchers with a general interest in geometry, who want to get acquainted with the current trends in these central fields of modern mathematics.

  1. Geometry in Medias Res

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukier, Mimi; Asdourian, Tony; Thakker, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Geometry provides a natural window into what it is like to do mathematics. In the world of geometry, playful experimentation is often more fruitful than following a procedure, and logic plus a few axioms can open new worlds. Nonetheless, teaching a geometry course in a way that combines both rigor and play can be difficult. Many geometry courses…

  2. Unit Cell Analysis of the Superelastic Behavior of Open-Cell Tetrakaidecahedral Shape Memory Alloy Foam under Quasi-Static Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Maîtrejean

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular solid materials and, more specifically, foams are increasingly common in many industrial applications due to their attractive characteristics. The tetrakaidecahedral foam microstructure, which can be observed in many types of foams, is studied in the present work in association with shape memory alloys (SMA material. SMA foams are of particular interest as they associate both the shape memory effect and the superelasticity with the characteristics of foam. A Unit Cell Finite Element Method approach is used, an approach that allows accurate predicting of the macroscale response of the foam with a highly reduced numerical effort. The tetrakaidecahedral foam’s responses, both in the elastic and in the superelastic stages, are then extracted and compared with results from the literature. The tetrakaidecahedral geometry is found to be of particular interest when associated with SMA as it takes more advantage of the superelastic property of the material than foams with randomly distributed porosity.

  3. X-ray powder diffraction data and unit cells of ammonium paratungstate tetrahydrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Put, J.W. van; Verkroost, T.W.; Sonneveld, E.J.

    1990-01-01

    X-Ray powder diffraction data and unit cell parameters of industrially produced, as well as bench scale prepared, ammonium paratungstate tetrahydrate are reported and compared with current Powder Data file (PDF) (1989) patterns. A least-squares refinement resulted in two slightly different unit cell

  4. Covariant Macroscopic Quantum Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, Craig J

    2012-01-01

    A covariant noncommutative algebra of position operators is presented, and interpreted as the macroscopic limit of a geometry that describes a collective quantum behavior of the positions of massive bodies in a flat emergent space-time. The commutator defines a quantum-geometrical relationship between world lines that depends on their separation and relative velocity, but on no other property of the bodies, and leads to a transverse uncertainty of the geometrical wave function that increases with separation. The number of geometrical degrees of freedom in a space-time volume scales holographically, as the surface area in Planck units. Ongoing branching of the wave function causes fluctuations in transverse position, shared coherently among bodies with similar trajectories. The theory can be tested using appropriately configured Michelson interferometers.

  5. On the Relative Relevance of Subject-Specific Geometries and Degeneration-Specific Mechanical Properties for the Study of Cell Death in Human Intervertebral Disk Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandrino, Andrea; Pozo, José M.; Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Frangi, Alejandro F.; van Rijsbergen, Marc M.; Ito, Keita; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Dao, Tien Tuan; Ho Ba Tho, Marie-Christine; Noailly, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Capturing patient- or condition-specific intervertebral disk (IVD) properties in finite element models is outmost important in order to explore how biomechanical and biophysical processes may interact in spine diseases. However, disk degenerative changes are often modeled through equations similar to those employed for healthy organs, which might not be valid. As for the simulated effects of degenerative changes, they likely depend on specific disk geometries. Accordingly, we explored the ability of continuum tissue models to simulate disk degenerative changes. We further used the results in order to assess the interplay between these simulated changes and particular IVD morphologies, in relation to disk cell nutrition, a potentially important factor in disk tissue regulation. A protocol to derive patient-specific computational models from clinical images was applied to different spine specimens. In vitro, IVD creep tests were used to optimize poro-hyperelastic input material parameters in these models, in function of the IVD degeneration grade. The use of condition-specific tissue model parameters in the specimen-specific geometrical models was validated against independent kinematic measurements in vitro. Then, models were coupled to a transport-cell viability model in order to assess the respective effects of tissue degeneration and disk geometry on cell viability. While classic disk poro-mechanical models failed in representing known degenerative changes, additional simulation of tissue damage allowed model validation and gave degeneration-dependent material properties related to osmotic pressure and water loss, and to increased fibrosis. Surprisingly, nutrition-induced cell death was independent of the grade-dependent material properties, but was favored by increased diffusion distances in large IVDs. Our results suggest that in situ geometrical screening of IVD morphology might help to anticipate particular mechanisms of disk degeneration. PMID:25717471

  6. CMEIAS JFrad: a digital computing tool to discriminate the fractal geometry of landscape architectures and spatial patterns of individual cells in microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhou; Card, Kyle J; Dazzo, Frank B

    2015-04-01

    Image analysis of fractal geometry can be used to gain deeper insights into complex ecophysiological patterns and processes occurring within natural microbial biofilm landscapes, including the scale-dependent heterogeneities of their spatial architecture, biomass, and cell-cell interactions, all driven by the colonization behavior of optimal spatial positioning of organisms to maximize their efficiency in utilization of allocated nutrient resources. Here, we introduce CMEIAS JFrad, a new computing technology that analyzes the fractal geometry of complex biofilm architectures in digital landscape images. The software uniquely features a data-mining opportunity based on a comprehensive collection of 11 different mathematical methods to compute fractal dimension that are implemented into a wizard design to maximize ease-of-use for semi-automatic analysis of single images or fully automatic analysis of multiple images in a batch process. As examples of application, quantitative analyses of fractal dimension were used to optimize the important variable settings of brightness threshold and minimum object size in order to discriminate the complex architecture of freshwater microbial biofilms at multiple spatial scales, and also to differentiate the spatial patterns of individual bacterial cells that influence their cooperative interactions, resource use, and apportionment in situ. Version 1.0 of JFrad is implemented into a software package containing the program files, user manual, and tutorial images that will be freely available at http://cme.msu.edu/cmeias/. This improvement in computational image informatics will strengthen microscopy-based approaches to analyze the dynamic landscape ecology of microbial biofilm populations and communities in situ at spatial resolutions that range from single cells to microcolonies.

  7. On the relative relevance of subject-specific geometries and degeneration-specific mechanical properties for the study of cell death in human intervertebral disk models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandrino, Andrea; Pozo, José M; Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Frangi, Alejandro F; van Rijsbergen, Marc M; Ito, Keita; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Dao, Tien Tuan; Ho Ba Tho, Marie-Christine; Noailly, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Capturing patient- or condition-specific intervertebral disk (IVD) properties in finite element models is outmost important in order to explore how biomechanical and biophysical processes may interact in spine diseases. However, disk degenerative changes are often modeled through equations similar to those employed for healthy organs, which might not be valid. As for the simulated effects of degenerative changes, they likely depend on specific disk geometries. Accordingly, we explored the ability of continuum tissue models to simulate disk degenerative changes. We further used the results in order to assess the interplay between these simulated changes and particular IVD morphologies, in relation to disk cell nutrition, a potentially important factor in disk tissue regulation. A protocol to derive patient-specific computational models from clinical images was applied to different spine specimens. In vitro, IVD creep tests were used to optimize poro-hyperelastic input material parameters in these models, in function of the IVD degeneration grade. The use of condition-specific tissue model parameters in the specimen-specific geometrical models was validated against independent kinematic measurements in vitro. Then, models were coupled to a transport-cell viability model in order to assess the respective effects of tissue degeneration and disk geometry on cell viability. While classic disk poro-mechanical models failed in representing known degenerative changes, additional simulation of tissue damage allowed model validation and gave degeneration-dependent material properties related to osmotic pressure and water loss, and to increased fibrosis. Surprisingly, nutrition-induced cell death was independent of the grade-dependent material properties, but was favored by increased diffusion distances in large IVDs. Our results suggest that in situ geometrical screening of IVD morphology might help to anticipate particular mechanisms of disk degeneration.

  8. Map service: United States Decadal Production History Cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map service displays present and past oil and gas production in the United States, as well as the location and intensity of exploratory drilling outside...

  9. Real Algebraic Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mahé, Louis; Roy, Marie-Françoise

    1992-01-01

    Ten years after the first Rennes international meeting on real algebraic geometry, the second one looked at the developments in the subject during the intervening decade - see the 6 survey papers listed below. Further contributions from the participants on recent research covered real algebra and geometry, topology of real algebraic varieties and 16thHilbert problem, classical algebraic geometry, techniques in real algebraic geometry, algorithms in real algebraic geometry, semialgebraic geometry, real analytic geometry. CONTENTS: Survey papers: M. Knebusch: Semialgebraic topology in the last ten years.- R. Parimala: Algebraic and topological invariants of real algebraic varieties.- Polotovskii, G.M.: On the classification of decomposing plane algebraic curves.- Scheiderer, C.: Real algebra and its applications to geometry in the last ten years: some major developments and results.- Shustin, E.L.: Topology of real plane algebraic curves.- Silhol, R.: Moduli problems in real algebraic geometry. Further contribu...

  10. Digital Differential Geometry Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Guo Liu; Hu-Jun Bao; Qun-Sheng Peng

    2006-01-01

    The theory and methods of digital geometry processing has been a hot research area in computer graphics, as geometric models serves as the core data for 3D graphics applications. The purpose of this paper is to introduce some recent advances in digital geometry processing, particularly mesh fairing, surface parameterization and mesh editing, that heavily use differential geometry quantities. Some related concepts from differential geometry, such as normal, curvature, gradient,Laplacian and their counterparts on digital geometry are also reviewed for understanding the strength and weakness of various digital geometry processing methods.

  11. Quantitative Morphometry of Electrophysiologically Identified CA3b Interneurons Reveals Robust Local Geometry and Distinct Cell Classes

    OpenAIRE

    Ascoli, Giorgio A.; Brown, Kerry M.; Calixto, Eduardo; Card, J. Patrick; Galvan, E. J.; Perez-Rosello, T.; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2009-01-01

    The morphological and electrophysiological diversity of inhibitory cells in hippocampal area CA3 may underlie specific computational roles and is not yet fully elucidated. In particular, interneurons with somata in strata radiatum (R) and lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) receive converging stimulation from the dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex as well as within CA3. Although these cells express different forms of synaptic plasticity, their axonal trees and connectivity are still largely unknown. ...

  12. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Performance as Telecommunications Backup Power in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Working in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and industry project partners, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) acts as the central data repository for the data collected from real-world operation of fuel cell backup power systems. With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) co-funding awarded through DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office, more than 1,300 fuel cell units were deployed over a three-plus-year period in stationary, material handling equipment, auxiliary power, and backup power applications. This surpassed a Fuel Cell Technologies Office ARRA objective to spur commercialization of an early market technology by installing 1,000 fuel cell units across several different applications, including backup power. By December 2013, 852 backup power units out of 1,330 fuel cell units deployed were providing backup service, mainly for telecommunications towers. For 136 of the fuel cell backup units, project participants provided detailed operational data to the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center for analysis by NREL's technology validation team. NREL analyzed operational data collected from these government co-funded demonstration projects to characterize key fuel cell backup power performance metrics, including reliability and operation trends, and to highlight the business case for using fuel cells in these early market applications. NREL's analyses include these critical metrics, along with deployment, U.S. grid outage statistics, and infrastructure operation.

  13. Geometry and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Walter J

    2006-01-01

    Meyer''s Geometry and Its Applications, Second Edition, combines traditional geometry with current ideas to present a modern approach that is grounded in real-world applications. It balances the deductive approach with discovery learning, and introduces axiomatic, Euclidean geometry, non-Euclidean geometry, and transformational geometry. The text integrates applications and examples throughout and includes historical notes in many chapters. The Second Edition of Geometry and Its Applications is a significant text for any college or university that focuses on geometry''s usefulness in other disciplines. It is especially appropriate for engineering and science majors, as well as future mathematics teachers.* Realistic applications integrated throughout the text, including (but not limited to): - Symmetries of artistic patterns- Physics- Robotics- Computer vision- Computer graphics- Stability of architectural structures- Molecular biology- Medicine- Pattern recognition* Historical notes included in many chapters...

  14. Riemann-Finsler geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Enli; MO Xiaohuan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,a survey on Riemann-Finsler geometry is given.Non-trivial examples of Finsler metrics satisfying different curvature conditions are presented.Local and global results in Finsler geometry are analyzed.

  15. Geometry optimization of a fibrous scaffold based on mathematical modelling and CFD simulation of a dynamic cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tajsoleiman, Tannaz; J. Abdekhodaie, Mohammad; Gernaey, Krist

    2016-01-01

    simulation of cartilage cell culture under a perfusion flow, which allows not only to characterize the supply of nutrients and metabolic products inside a fibrous scaffold, but also to assess the overall culture condition and predict the cell growth rate. Afterwards, the simulation results supported finding...... an optimized design of the scaffold within a new mathematical optimization algorithm that is proposed. The main concept of this optimization routine isto maintain a large effective surface while simultaneously keeping the shear stress levelin an operating range that is expected to be supporting growth...

  16. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic-inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius; Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen; Farsari, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell-material combination in bone tissue engineering.

  17. Advanced Composite Bipolar Plate for Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell/Electrolyzer Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of an advanced composite bipolar plate is proposed for a unitized regenerative fuel cell and electrolyzer system that operates on pure feed streams...

  18. Geometry essentials for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Just the critical concepts you need to score high in geometry This practical, friendly guide focuses on critical concepts taught in a typical geometry course, from the properties of triangles, parallelograms, circles, and cylinders, to the skills and strategies you need to write geometry proofs. Geometry Essentials For Dummies is perfect for cramming or doing homework, or as a reference for parents helping kids study for exams. Get down to the basics - get a handle on the basics of geometry, from lines, segments, and angles, to vertices, altitudes, and diagonals Conque

  19. Introduction to projective geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wylie, C R

    2008-01-01

    This lucid introductory text offers both an analytic and an axiomatic approach to plane projective geometry. The analytic treatment builds and expands upon students' familiarity with elementary plane analytic geometry and provides a well-motivated approach to projective geometry. Subsequent chapters explore Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry as specializations of the projective plane, revealing the existence of an infinite number of geometries, each Euclidean in nature but characterized by a different set of distance- and angle-measurement formulas. Outstanding pedagogical features include w

  20. Affine and Projective Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, M K

    1995-01-01

    An important new perspective on AFFINE AND PROJECTIVE GEOMETRY. This innovative book treats math majors and math education students to a fresh look at affine and projective geometry from algebraic, synthetic, and lattice theoretic points of view. Affine and Projective Geometry comes complete with ninety illustrations, and numerous examples and exercises, covering material for two semesters of upper-level undergraduate mathematics. The first part of the book deals with the correlation between synthetic geometry and linear algebra. In the second part, geometry is used to introduce lattice theory

  1. Symplectic geometries on supermanifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, P M

    2007-01-01

    Extension of symplectic geometry on manifolds to the supersymmetric case is considered. In the even case it leads to the even symplectic geometry (or, equivalently, to the geometry on supermanifolds endowed with an non-degenerate Poisson bracket) or to the geometry on an even Fedosov supermanifolds. It is proven that in the odd case there are two different scalar symplectic structures (namely, an odd closed differential 2-form and the antibracket) which can be used for construction of different symplectic geometries on supermanifolds.

  2. Super Unit Cells in Aperture-Based Metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Dragan Tanasković; Zoran Jakšić; Marko Obradov; Olga Jakšić

    2015-01-01

    An important class of electromagnetic metamaterials are aperture-based metasurfaces. Examples include extraordinary optical transmission arrays and double fishnets with negative refractive index. We analyze a generalization of such metamaterials where a simple aperture is now replaced by a compound object formed by superposition of two or more primitive objects (e.g., rectangles, circles, and ellipses). Thus obtained “super unit cell” shows far richer behavior than the subobjects that compris...

  3. Overview of commercialization of stationary fuel cell power plants in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooie, D.T.; Williams, M.C.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper, DOE`s efforts to assist private sector organizations to develop and commercialize stationary fuel cell power plants in the United States are discussed. The paper also provides a snapshot of the status of stationary power fuel cell development occurring in the US, addressing all fuel cell types. This paper discusses general characteristics, system configurations, and status of test units and demonstration projects. The US DOE, Morgantown Energy Technology Center is the lead center for implementing DOE`s program for fuel cells for stationary power.

  4. Dielectric Behavior of Low Microwave Loss Unit Cell for All Dielectric Metamaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Tianhuan Luo; Bo Li; Qian Zhao; Ji Zhou

    2015-01-01

    With a deep study of the metamaterial, its unit cells have been widely extended from metals to dielectrics. The dielectric based unit cells attract much attention because of the advantage of easy preparation, tunability, and higher frequency response, and so forth. Using the conventional solid state method, we prepared a kind of incipient ferroelectrics (calcium titanate, CaTiO3) with higher microwave permittivity and lower loss, which can be successfully used to construct metamaterials. The ...

  5. Generalized Kahler geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtieri, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Generalized Kahler geometry is the natural analogue of Kahler geometry, in the context of generalized complex geometry. Just as we may require a complex structure to be compatible with a Riemannian metric in a way which gives rise to a symplectic form, we may require a generalized complex structure to be compatible with a metric so that it defines a second generalized complex structure. We explore the fundamental aspects of this geometry, including its equivalence with the bi-Hermitian geometry on the target of a 2-dimensional sigma model with (2,2) supersymmetry, as well as the relation to holomorphic Dirac geometry and the resulting derived deformation theory. We also explore the analogy between pre-quantum line bundles and gerbes in the context of generalized Kahler geometry.

  6. Methods for euclidean geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Byer, Owen; Smeltzer, Deirdre L

    2010-01-01

    Euclidean plane geometry is one of the oldest and most beautiful topics in mathematics. Instead of carefully building geometries from axiom sets, this book uses a wealth of methods to solve problems in Euclidean geometry. Many of these methods arose where existing techniques proved inadequate. In several cases, the new ideas used in solving specific problems later developed into independent areas of mathematics. This book is primarily a geometry textbook, but studying geometry in this way will also develop students' appreciation of the subject and of mathematics as a whole. For instance, despite the fact that the analytic method has been part of mathematics for four centuries, it is rarely a tool a student considers using when faced with a geometry problem. Methods for Euclidean Geometry explores the application of a broad range of mathematical topics to the solution of Euclidean problems.

  7. Recent insights into the cell biology of thyroid angiofollicular units.

    OpenAIRE

    Colin, Ides M.; Denef, Jean-François; Lengelé, Benoît; Many, Marie-Christine; Gérard, Anne-Catherine

    2013-01-01

    In thyrocytes, cell polarity is of crucial importance for proper thyroid function. Many intrinsic mechanisms of self-regulation control how the key players involved in thyroid hormone (TH) biosynthesis interact in apical microvilli, so that hazardous biochemical processes may occur without detriment to the cell. In some pathological conditions, this enzymatic complex is disrupted, with some components abnormally activated into the cytoplasm, which can lead to further morphological and functio...

  8. Dominant unit CD34+ cell dose predicts engraftment after double-unit cord blood transplantation and is influenced by bank practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtill, Duncan; Smith, Katherine; Devlin, Sean; Meagher, Richard; Tonon, Joann; Lubin, Marissa; Ponce, Doris M; Giralt, Sergio; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Stevens, Cladd E; Barker, Juliet N

    2014-11-06

    We investigated the unit characteristics associated with engraftment after double-unit cord blood (CB) transplantation (dCBT) and whether these could be reliably identified during unit selection. Cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraftment in 129 myeloablative dCBT recipients was 95% (95% confidence interval: 90-98%). When precryopreservation characteristics were analyzed, the dominant unit CD34(+) cell dose was the only characteristic independently associated with engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.43; P = .002). When postthaw characteristics were also included, only dominant unit infused viable CD34(+) cell dose independently predicted engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.95; P banks were more likely to have low recovery (P banks and units with cryovolumes other than 24.5 to 26.0 mL were more likely to have poor postthaw viability. Precryopreservation CD34(+) cell dose and banking practices should be incorporated into CB unit selection.

  9. Fuel cell repeater unit including frame and separator plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanis, Jean; Hawkes, Justin R; Chiapetta, Jr., Louis; Bird, Connie E; Sun, Ellen Y; Croteau, Paul F

    2013-11-05

    An example fuel cell repeater includes a separator plate and a frame establishing at least a portion of a flow path that is operative to communicate fuel to or from at least one fuel cell held by the frame relative to the separator plate. The flow path has a perimeter and any fuel within the perimeter flow across the at least one fuel cell in a first direction. The separator plate, the frame, or both establish at least one conduit positioned outside the flow path perimeter. The conduit is outside of the flow path perimeter and is configured to direct flow in a second, different direction. The conduit is fluidly coupled with the flow path.

  10. Evaluation of the pneumatic tube system for transportation of packed red cell units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Dhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pneumatic tube system (PTS is commonly used in hospital settings to transport blood samples to diagnostic laboratories. At our blood center, we receive blood requisitions via the PTS, but units are carried to the ward by human courier. Recently we considered using the PTS for transporting blood units. Since, there are reports of hemolysis in blood samples sent through the PTS, we evaluated this system for transporting red cell units. Aims: The aim was to assess the effect of PTS transport on the quality of packed red cell units. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 red blood cells units (RBC, (25 non-irradiated and 25 irradiated were subjected to transportation through the PTS. The control arm in the study was age-matched RBC units not subjected to PTS transport. Each RBC unit was evaluated for hemoglobin (Hb, lactate dehydrogenase, potassium and plasma hemoglobin (Hb. The paired t-test was used to compare these parameters, and the P value was calculated. Results and Conclusion: The percentage of hemolysis after transportation through PTS was below the recommended guidelines. Delivery of the blood unit to the wrong station, bags lying unattended at the destination were few of the problems that had to be addressed. To conclude, though the PTS is a safe means of transporting blood products with reduction in the turn-around-time, it must be validated before use.

  11. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  12. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  13. Control of an afterburner in a diesel fuel cell power unit under variable load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolanc, Gregor; Pregelj, Boštjan; Petrovčič, Janko; Samsun, Remzi Can

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the control system for a catalytic afterburner in a diesel fuel cell auxiliary power unit is presented. The catalytic afterburner is used to burn the non-utilised hydrogen and other possible combustible components of the fuel cell anode off-gas. To increase the energy efficiency of the auxiliary power unit, the thermal energy released in the catalytic afterburner is utilised to generate the steam for the fuel processor. For optimal operation of the power unit in all modes of operation including load change, stable steam generation is required and overall energy balance must be kept within design range. To achieve this, the reaction temperature of the catalytic afterburner must be stable in all modes of operation. Therefore, we propose the afterburner temperature control based on mass and thermal balances. Finally, we demonstrate the control system using the existing prototype of the diesel fuel cell auxiliary power unit.

  14. Use of Culture Geometry to Control Hypoxia-Induced Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Secretion from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: Optimizing a Cell-Based Approach to Drive Vascular Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, Matthew L.; Sahai, Suchit; Rucker, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) possess potent angiogenic properties and represent a source for cell-based approaches to delivery of bioactive factors to drive vascularization of tissues. Hypoxic signaling appears to be largely responsible for triggering release of these angiogenic cytokines, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Three-dimensional (3D) culture may promote activation of hypoxia-induced pathways, and has furthermore been shown to enhance cell survival by promoting cell–cell interactions while increasing angiogenic potential. However, the development of hypoxia within ADSC spheroids is difficult to characterize. In the present study, we investigated the impact of spheroid size on hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1 activity in spheroid cultures under atmospheric and physiological oxygen conditions using a fluorescent marker. Hypoxia could be induced and modulated by controlling the size of the spheroid; HIF-1 activity increased with spheroid size and with decreasing external oxygen concentration. Furthermore, VEGF secretion was impacted by the hypoxic status of the culture, increasing with elevated HIF-1 activity, up to the point at which viability was compromised. Together, these results suggest the ability to use 3D culture geometry as a means to control output of angiogenic factors from ADSCs, and imply that at a particular environmental oxygen concentration an optimal culture size for cytokine production exists. Consideration of culture geometry and microenvironmental conditions at the implantation site will be important for successful realization of ADSCs as a pro-angiogenic therapy. PMID:23668629

  15. The Geometry Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Bárány, Imre; Vilcu, Costin

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents easy-to-understand yet surprising properties obtained using topological, geometric and graph theoretic tools in the areas covered by the Geometry Conference that took place in Mulhouse, France from September 7–11, 2014 in honour of Tudor Zamfirescu on the occasion of his 70th anniversary. The contributions address subjects in convexity and discrete geometry, in distance geometry or with geometrical flavor in combinatorics, graph theory or non-linear analysis. Written by top experts, these papers highlight the close connections between these fields, as well as ties to other domains of geometry and their reciprocal influence. They offer an overview on recent developments in geometry and its border with discrete mathematics, and provide answers to several open questions. The volume addresses a large audience in mathematics, including researchers and graduate students interested in geometry and geometrical problems.

  16. Quantification of Cell-Free DNA in Red Blood Cell Units in Different Whole Blood Processing Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Shih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Whole blood donations in Canada are processed by either the red cell filtration (RCF or whole blood filtration (WBF methods, where leukoreduction is potentially delayed in WBF. Fresh WBF red blood cells (RBCs have been associated with increased in-hospital mortality after transfusion. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA is released by neutrophils prior to leukoreduction, degraded during RBC storage, and is associated with adverse patient outcomes. We explored cfDNA levels in RBCs prepared by RCF and WBF and different storage durations. Methods. Equal numbers of fresh (stored ≤14 days and older RBCs were sampled. cfDNA was quantified by spectrophotometry and PicoGreen. Separate regression models determined the association with processing method and storage duration and their interaction on cfDNA. Results. cfDNA in 120 RBC units (73 RCF, 47 WBF were measured. Using PicoGreen, WBF units overall had higher cfDNA than RCF units (p=0.0010; fresh WBF units had higher cfDNA than fresh RCF units (p=0.0093. Using spectrophotometry, fresh RBC units overall had higher cfDNA than older units (p=0.0031; fresh WBF RBCs had higher cfDNA than older RCF RBCs (p=0.024. Conclusion. Higher cfDNA in fresh WBF was observed compared to older RCF blood. Further study is required for association with patient outcomes.

  17. High performance internal reforming unit for high temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiwen; Venkataraman, Ramakrishnan; Novacco, Lawrence J.

    2008-10-07

    A fuel reformer having an enclosure with first and second opposing surfaces, a sidewall connecting the first and second opposing surfaces and an inlet port and an outlet port in the sidewall. A plate assembly supporting a catalyst and baffles are also disposed in the enclosure. A main baffle extends into the enclosure from a point of the sidewall between the inlet and outlet ports. The main baffle cooperates with the enclosure and the plate assembly to establish a path for the flow of fuel gas through the reformer from the inlet port to the outlet port. At least a first directing baffle extends in the enclosure from one of the sidewall and the main baffle and cooperates with the plate assembly and the enclosure to alter the gas flow path. Desired graded catalyst loading pattern has been defined for optimized thermal management for the internal reforming high temperature fuel cells so as to achieve high cell performance.

  18. Algorithms in Algebraic Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dickenstein, Alicia; Sommese, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    In the last decade, there has been a burgeoning of activity in the design and implementation of algorithms for algebraic geometric computation. Some of these algorithms were originally designed for abstract algebraic geometry, but now are of interest for use in applications and some of these algorithms were originally designed for applications, but now are of interest for use in abstract algebraic geometry. The workshop on Algorithms in Algebraic Geometry that was held in the framework of the IMA Annual Program Year in Applications of Algebraic Geometry by the Institute for Mathematics and Its

  19. Fundamental concepts of geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Meserve, Bruce E

    1983-01-01

    Demonstrates relationships between different types of geometry. Provides excellent overview of the foundations and historical evolution of geometrical concepts. Exercises (no solutions). Includes 98 illustrations.

  20. Revolutions of Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    O'Leary, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Guides readers through the development of geometry and basic proof writing using a historical approach to the topic. In an effort to fully appreciate the logic and structure of geometric proofs, Revolutions of Geometry places proofs into the context of geometry's history, helping readers to understand that proof writing is crucial to the job of a mathematician. Written for students and educators of mathematics alike, the book guides readers through the rich history and influential works, from ancient times to the present, behind the development of geometry. As a result, readers are successfull

  1. Euclidean geometry and transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Dodge, Clayton W

    1972-01-01

    This introduction to Euclidean geometry emphasizes transformations, particularly isometries and similarities. Suitable for undergraduate courses, it includes numerous examples, many with detailed answers. 1972 edition.

  2. Introduction to finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Kárteszi, F

    1976-01-01

    North-Holland Texts in Advanced Mathematics: Introduction to Finite Geometries focuses on the advancements in finite geometries, including mapping and combinatorics. The manuscript first offers information on the basic concepts on finite geometries and Galois geometries. Discussions focus on linear mapping of a given quadrangle onto another given quadrangle; point configurations of order 2 on a Galois plane of even order; canonical equation of curves of the second order on the Galois planes of even order; and set of collineations mapping a Galois plane onto itself. The text then ponders on geo

  3. The Daniell cell, Ohm's law, and the emergence of the International System of Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayson, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    Telegraphy originated in the 1830s and 40 s and flourished in the following decades but with a patchwork of electrical standards. Electromotive force was for the most part measured in units of the predominant Daniell cell, but each telegraphy company had their own resistance standard. In 1862, the British Association for the Advancement of Science formed a committee to address this situation. By 1873, they had given definition to the electromagnetic system of units (emu) and defined the practical units of the ohm as 109 emu units of resistance and the volt as 108 emu units of electromotive force. These recommendations were ratified and expanded upon in a series of international congresses held between 1881 and 1904. A proposal by Giovanni Giorgi in 1901 took advantage of a coincidence between the conversion of the units of energy in the emu system (the erg) and in the practical system (the Joule). As it was, the same conversion factor existed between the cgs based emu system and a theretofore undefined MKS system. By introducing another unit X (where X could be any of the practical electrical units), Giorgi demonstrated that a self-consistent MKSX system was tenable without the need for multiplying factors. Ultimately, the ampere was selected as the fourth unit. It took nearly 60 years, but in 1960, Giorgi's proposal was incorporated as the core of the newly inaugurated International System of Units (SI). This article surveys the physics, physicists, and events that contributed to those developments.

  4. [THE MODEL OF NEUROVASCULAR UNIT IN VITRO CONSISTING OF THREE CELLS TYPES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khilazheva, E D; Boytsova, E B; Pozhilenkova, E A; Solonchuk, Yu R; Salmina, A B

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to model blood brain barrier and neurovascular unit in vitro. All existing models have their disadvantages, advantages and some peculiarities of preparation and usage. We obtained the three-cells neurovascular unit model in vitro using progenitor cells isolated from the rat embryos brain (Wistar, 14-16 d). After withdrawal of the progenitor cells the neurospheres were cultured with subsequent differentiation into astrocytes and neurons. Endothelial cells were isolated from embryonic brain too. During the differentiation of progenitor cells the astrocytes monolayer formation occurs after 7-9 d, neurons monolayer--after 10-14 d, endothelial cells monolayer--after 7 d. Our protocol for simultaneous isolation and cultivation of neurons, astrocytes and endothelial cells reduces the time needed to obtain neurovascular unit model in vitro, consisting of three cells types and reduce the number of animals used. It is also important to note the cerebral origin of all cell types, which is also an advantage of our model in vitro.

  5. Importance of unit cells in accurate evaluation of the characteristics of graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabzyan, Hassan; Sadeghpour, Narges [Isfahan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-08-01

    Effects of the size of the unit cell on energy, atomic charges, and phonon frequencies of graphene at the Γ point of the Brillouin zone are studied in the absence and presence of an electric field using density functional theory (DFT) methods (LDA and DFT-PBE functionals with Goedecker-Teter-Hutter (GTH) and Troullier-Martins (TM) norm-conserving pseudopotentials). Two types of unit cells containing n{sub c}=4-28 carbon atoms are considered. Results show that stability of graphene increases with increasing size of the unit cell. Energy, atomic charges, and phonon frequencies all converge above n{sub c}=24 for all functional-pseudopotentials used. Except for the LDA-GTH calculations, application of an electric field of 0.4 and 0.9 V/nm strengths does not change the trends with the size of the unit cell but instead slightly decreases the binding energy of graphene. Results of this study show that the choice of unit cell size and type is critical for calculation of reliable characteristics of graphene.

  6. Euclidean Geometry via Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonov, Rossen; Kreith, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Plane Geometry System computer software developed at the Educational Computer Systems laboratory in Sofia, Bulgaria. The system enables students to use the concept of "algorithm" to correspond to the process of "deductive proof" in the development of plane geometry. Provides an example of the software's capability and compares it to…

  7. Supersymmetric Sigma Model Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Ulf Lindström

    2012-01-01

    This is a review of how sigma models formulated in Superspace have become important tools for understanding geometry. Topics included are: The (hyper)k\\"ahler reduction; projective superspace; the generalized Legendre construction; generalized K\\"ahler geometry and constructions of hyperk\\"ahler metrics on Hermitean symmetric spaces.

  8. Geometry of multihadron production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    This summary talk only reviews a small sample of topics featured at this symposium: Introduction; The Geometry and Geography of Phase space; Space-Time Geometry and HBT; Multiplicities, Intermittency, Correlations; Disoriented Chiral Condensate; Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA; and Other Contributions.

  9. Supersymmetric Sigma Model geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lindström, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    This is a review of how sigma models formulated in Superspace have become important tools for understanding geometry. Topics included are: The (hyper)k\\"ahler reduction; projective superspace; the generalized Legendre construction; generalized K\\"ahler geometry and constructions of hyperk\\"ahler metrics on Hermitean symmetric spaces.

  10. Designs and finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  11. Foundations of algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Weil, A

    1946-01-01

    This classic is one of the cornerstones of modern algebraic geometry. At the same time, it is entirely self-contained, assuming no knowledge whatsoever of algebraic geometry, and no knowledge of modern algebra beyond the simplest facts about abstract fields and their extensions, and the bare rudiments of the theory of ideals.

  12. Dual doubled geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Riccioni, Fabio; Alvarez-Gaumé, L.

    2011-01-01

    We probe doubled geometry with dual fundamental branes. i.e. solitons. Restricting ourselves first to solitonic branes with more than two transverse directions we find that the doubled geometry requires an effective wrapping rule for the solitonic branes which is dual to the wrapping rule for fundam

  13. New photosensitizer with phenylenebisthiophene central unit and cyanovinylene 4-nitrophenyl terminal units for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikroyannidis, J.A., E-mail: mikroyan@chemistry.upatras.gr [Chemical Technology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, GR-26500 Patras (Greece); Suresh, P. [Physics Department, Molecular Electronic and Optoelectronic Device Laboratory, JNV University, Jodhpur (Raj.) 342005 (India); Roy, M.S. [Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (Raj.) 342011 (India); Sharma, G.D., E-mail: sharmagd_in@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Molecular Electronic and Optoelectronic Device Laboratory, JNV University, Jodhpur (Raj.) 342005 (India); R and D Centre for Engineering and Science, Jaipur Engineering College, Kukas, Jaipur (Raj.) (India)

    2011-06-30

    Graphical abstract: A novel dye D was synthesized and used as photosensitizer for quasi solid state dye-sensitized solar cells. A power conversion efficiency of 4.4% was obtained which was improved to 5.52% when diphenylphosphinic acid (DPPA) was added as coadsorbent. Display Omitted Highlights: > A new low band gap photosensitizer with cyanovinylene 4-nitrophenyl terminal units was synthesized. > A power conversion efficiency of 4.4% was obtained for the dye-sensitized solar cell based on this photosensitizer. > The power conversion efficiency of the dye-sensitized solar cell was further improved to 5.52% when diphenylphosphinic acid was added as coadsorbent. - Abstract: A new low band gap photosensitizer, D, which contains 2,2'-(1,4-phenylene) bisthiophene central unit and cyanovinylene 4-nitrophenyl terminal units at both sides was synthesized. The two carboxyls attached to the 2,5-positions of the phenylene ring act as anchoring groups. Dye D was soluble in common organic solvents, showed long-wavelength absorption maximum at 620-636 nm and optical band gap of 1.72 eV. The electrochemical parameters, i.e. the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) (-5.1 eV) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) (-3.3 eV) energy levels of D show that this dye is suitable as molecular sensitizer. The quasi solid state dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) based on D shows a short circuit current (J{sub sc}) of 9.95 mA/cm{sup 2}, an open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 0.70 V, and a fill factor (FF) of 0.64 corresponding to an overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.40% under 100 mW/cm{sup 2} irradiation. The overall PCE has been further improved to 5.52% when diphenylphosphinic acid (DPPA) coadsorbent is incorporated into the D solution. This increased PCE has been attributed to the enhancement in the electron lifetime and reduced recombination of injected electrons with the iodide ions present in the electrolyte with the use of DPPA as coadsorbant. The

  14. A Lorentzian quantum geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotz, Andreas

    2011-10-07

    In this thesis, a formulation of a Lorentzian quantum geometry based on the framework of causal fermion systems is proposed. After giving the general definition of causal fermion systems, we deduce space-time as a topological space with an underlying causal structure. Restricting attention to systems of spin dimension two, we derive the objects of our quantum geometry: the spin space, the tangent space endowed with a Lorentzian metric, connection and curvature. In order to get the correspondence to classical differential geometry, we construct examples of causal fermion systems by regularizing Dirac sea configurations in Minkowski space and on a globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifold. When removing the regularization, the objects of our quantum geometry reduce to the common objects of spin geometry on Lorentzian manifolds, up to higher order curvature corrections.

  15. Towards a Nano Geometry? Geometry and Dynamics on Nano Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Booss-Bavnbek, Bernhelm

    2012-01-01

    This paper applies I.M. Gelfand's distinction between adequate and non-adequate use of mathematical language in different contexts to the newly opened window of model-based measurements of intracellular dynamics. The specifics of geometry and dynamics on the mesoscale of cell physiology are elaborated - in contrast to the familiar Newtonian mechanics and the more recent, but by now also rather well established quantum field theories. Examples are given originating from the systems biology of insulin secreting pancreatic beta-cells and the mathematical challenges of an envisioned non-invasive control of magnetic nanoparticles.

  16. Prediction of stress-strain behavior of ceramic matrix composites using unit cell model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the elastic modulus and the stress-strain curve of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs were predicted by using the unit cell model that consists of fiber bundles and matrix. The unit cell model was developed based on the observation of cross sections of CMCs. The elastic modulus of CMCs was calculated from the results of finite element analysis using the developed model. The non-linear behavior of stress-strain curve of CMCs was also predicted by taking the degradation of the elastic modulus into consideration, where the degradation was related to the experimentally measured crack density in CMCs. The approach using the unit cell model was applied to two kinds of CMCs, and good agreement was obtained between the experimental and the calculated results.

  17. Reduction in potassium concentration of stored red blood cell units using a resin filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Chisa; Heitmiller, Eugenie S; Ness, Paul M; King, Karen E

    2010-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a serious complication of rapid and massive blood transfusion due to high plasma potassium (K) in stored red blood cell (RBC) units. A potassium adsorption filter (PAF) was developed in Japan to remove K by exchanging with sodium (Na). We performed an in vitro evaluation of its efficacy and feasibility of use. Three AS-3 RBC units were filtered by each PAF using gravity; 10 PAFs were tested. Blood group, age, flow rate, and irradiation status were recorded. Total volume, K, Na, Cl, Mg, total Ca (tCa), RBC count, hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), and plasma Hb were measured before and after filtering each unit. Ionized Ca (iCa), pH, and glucose were measured for some units. After filtration, the mean decrease in K was 97.5% in the first RBC unit, 91.2% in the second unit, and 64.4% in the third unit. The mean increases in Na, Mg, and tCa were 33.0, 151.4, and 116.1%, respectively. iCa and pH remained low; glucose was unchanged. RBC count, Hb, and Hct decreased slightly after filtration of first units; plasma Hb was unchanged. After filtration, there was no visual evidence of increased hemolysis or clot formation. The PAF decreased K concentration in stored AS-3 RBC units to minimal levels in the first and second RBC units. Optimally, one filter could be used for 2 RBC units. Although Na increased, the level may not be clinically significant. PAF may be useful for at-risk patients receiving older units or blood that has been stored after gamma irradiation. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  18. Torque and atomic forces for Cartesian tensor atomic multipoles with an application to crystal unit cell optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elking, Dennis M

    2016-08-15

    New equations for torque and atomic force are derived for use in flexible molecule force fields with atomic multipoles. The expressions are based on Cartesian tensors with arbitrary multipole rank. The standard method for rotating Cartesian tensor multipoles and calculating torque is to first represent the tensor with n indexes and 3(n) redundant components. In this work, new expressions for directly rotating the unique (n + 1)(n + 2)/2 Cartesian tensor multipole components Θpqr are given by introducing Cartesian tensor rotation matrix elements X(R). A polynomial expression and a recursion relation for X(R) are derived. For comparison, the analogous rotation matrix for spherical tensor multipoles are the Wigner functions D(R). The expressions for X(R) are used to derive simple equations for torque and atomic force. The torque and atomic force equations are applied to the geometry optimization of small molecule crystal unit cells. In addition, a discussion of computational efficiency as a function of increasing multipole rank is given for Cartesian tensors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. 臺灣、美國與新加坡國中階段幾何教材內容之分析比較 Geometry Content of Middle School Textbooks in Taiwan, the United States, and Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    楊德清 Der-Ching Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available 本研究採內容分析法以比較臺灣「康軒數學」、美國「連結數學」與新加坡「新課程數學」在國中階段幾何教材總題數、佈題方式與表徵型態,以及幾何內容特色之差異。結果顯示:三套教科書在幾何教材總題數具顯著差異性,美國「連結數學」之幾何總題數顯著多於臺灣「康軒數學」與新加坡「新課程數學」。三套教科書在佈題方式亦有差異;美國「連結數學」有將近三分之一的問題屬開放型問題,但是「康軒數學」與「新課程數學」兩套教材之幾何題目安排高達九成五以上皆為封閉型問題。三套教材在表徵型態方面,以「聯合型態問題」與「文字型態問題」部分所占比例最高,約有七至八成以上。研究亦發現,三套教材在幾何主題內容有部分差異,且三套教材亦各有其特色。最後,期望本研究之發現,可提供未來數學教科書設計之參考。 This study applied the content analysis method to compare the differences in the geometry problems, problem-posing methods, representational types, and characteristics of geometry content of middle school mathematics textbooks among Kang Hsuan (KH in Taiwan, Connected Mathematics Program (CMP in the United States, and New Syllabus Mathematics (NSM in Singapore. The results reveal significant differences in the total geometry problems and problem-posing methods among the three textbooks. The CMP included approximately one-third open-ended problems; however, the KH and NSM textbooks included more than 95% closed-ended problems. Regarding representation types, all three textbooks presented combined problems and verbal problems. In addition, the results show that the three textbooks have different characteristics. The findings of this study can serve as a reference for designing mathematics textbooks in the future.

  20. High light-extraction-efficiency OLED based on photonic crystal slab structures with taper unit cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Rong-jin; WANG Qing-kang

    2006-01-01

    To improve the light-extraction-efficiency of OLED,we introduced PCS (Photonic Crystal Slab) structures into the interface of ITO layer and glass substrate.PCS structures with Taper unit cells are proved to be effective in reducing the energy of guided wave trapped in high refractive index material,and an increase of light-extraction-efficiency to 95.26% is gained.This enhancement is much greater than the traditional PCS with cylinder unit cells (60%-70%).Physical mechanisms of light-extraction-efficiency enhancement in these structures are further discussed.

  1. Riemann-Finsler Geometry with Applications to Information Geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Information geometry is a new branch in mathematics, originated from the applications of differential geometry to statistics. In this paper we briefly introduce RiemannFinsler geometry, by which we establish Information Geometry on a much broader base,so that the potential applications of Information Geometry will be beyond statistics.

  2. Statistical discrete geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ariwahjoedi, Seramika; Kosasih, Jusak Sali; Rovelli, Carlo; Zen, Freddy Permana

    2016-01-01

    Following our earlier work, we construct statistical discrete geometry by applying statistical mechanics to discrete (Regge) gravity. We propose a coarse-graining method for discrete geometry under the assumptions of atomism and background independence. To maintain these assumptions, restrictions are given to the theory by introducing cut-offs, both in ultraviolet and infrared regime. Having a well-defined statistical picture of discrete Regge geometry, we take the infinite degrees of freedom (large n) limit. We argue that the correct limit consistent with the restrictions and the background independence concept is not the continuum limit of statistical mechanics, but the thermodynamical limit.

  3. Non-Euclidean geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bonola, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    This is an excellent historical and mathematical view by a renowned Italian geometer of the geometries that have risen from a rejection of Euclid's parallel postulate. Students, teachers and mathematicians will find here a ready reference source and guide to a field that has now become overwhelmingly important.Non-Euclidean Geometry first examines the various attempts to prove Euclid's parallel postulate-by the Greeks, Arabs, and mathematicians of the Renaissance. Then, ranging through the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, it considers the forerunners and founders of non-Euclidean geometry, such

  4. ALICE Geometry Database

    CERN Document Server

    Santo, J

    1999-01-01

    The ALICE Geometry Database project consists of the development of a set of data structures to store the geometrical information of the ALICE Detector. This Database will be used in Simulation, Reconstruction and Visualisation and will interface with existing CAD systems and Geometrical Modellers.At the present time, we are able to read a complete GEANT3 geometry, to store it in our database and to visualise it. On disk, we store different geometry files in hierarchical fashion, and all the nodes, materials, shapes, configurations and transformations distributed in this tree structure. The present status of the prototype and its future evolution will be presented.

  5. Discrete and computational geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Devadoss, Satyan L

    2011-01-01

    Discrete geometry is a relatively new development in pure mathematics, while computational geometry is an emerging area in applications-driven computer science. Their intermingling has yielded exciting advances in recent years, yet what has been lacking until now is an undergraduate textbook that bridges the gap between the two. Discrete and Computational Geometry offers a comprehensive yet accessible introduction to this cutting-edge frontier of mathematics and computer science. This book covers traditional topics such as convex hulls, triangulations, and Voronoi diagrams, as well a

  6. Non-Euclidean geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kulczycki, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    This accessible approach features two varieties of proofs: stereometric and planimetric, as well as elementary proofs that employ only the simplest properties of the plane. A short history of geometry precedes a systematic exposition of the principles of non-Euclidean geometry.Starting with fundamental assumptions, the author examines the theorems of Hjelmslev, mapping a plane into a circle, the angle of parallelism and area of a polygon, regular polygons, straight lines and planes in space, and the horosphere. Further development of the theory covers hyperbolic functions, the geometry of suff

  7. Investigation of IrO2/Pt Electrocatalysts in Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Baglio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available IrO2/Pt catalysts (at different concentrations were synthesized by incipient wetness technique and characterized by XRD, XRF, and SEM. Water electrolysis/fuel cell performances were evaluated in a 5 cm2 single cell under Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell (URFC configuration. The IrO2/Pt composition of 14/86 showed the highest performance for water electrolysis and the lowest one as fuel cell. It is derived that for fuel cell operation an excess of Pt favours the oxygen reduction process whereas IrO2 promotes oxygen evolution. From the present results, it appears that the diffusion characteristics and the reaction rate in fuel cell mode are significantly lower than in the electrolyser mode. This requires the enhancement of the gas diffusion properties of the electrodes and the catalytic properties for cathode operation in fuel cells.

  8. Water proton configurations in structures I, II, and H clathrate hydrate unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Fumihito; Hiratsuka, Masaki; Ohmura, Ryo; Alavi, Saman; Sum, Amadeu K; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2013-03-28

    Position and orientation of water protons need to be specified when the molecular simulation studies are performed for clathrate hydrates. Positions of oxygen atoms in water are experimentally determined by X-ray diffraction analysis of clathrate hydrate structures, but positions of water hydrogen atoms in the lattice are disordered. This study reports a determination of the water proton coordinates in unit cell of structure I (sI), II (sII), and H (sH) clathrate hydrates that satisfy the ice rules, have the lowest potential energy configuration for the protons, and give a net zero dipole moment. Possible proton coordinates in the unit cell were chosen by analyzing the symmetry of protons on the hexagonal or pentagonal faces in the hydrate cages and generating all possible proton distributions which satisfy the ice rules. We found that in the sI and sII unit cells, proton distributions with small net dipole moments have fairly narrow potential energy spreads of about 1 kJ∕mol. The total Coulomb potential on a test unit charge placed in the cage center for the minimum energy∕minimum dipole unit cell configurations was calculated. In the sI small cages, the Coulomb potential energy spread in each class of cage is less than 0.1 kJ∕mol, while the potential energy spread increases to values up to 6 kJ∕mol in sH and 15 kJ∕mol in the sII cages. The guest environments inside the cages can therefore be substantially different in the sII case. Cartesian coordinates for oxygen and hydrogen atoms in the sI, sII, and sH unit cells are reported for reference.

  9. Culture of human cells in experimental units for spaceflight impacts on their behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Alessandra; Moscheni, Claudia; Maier, Jeanette Am; Castiglioni, Sara

    2017-05-01

    Because space missions produce pathophysiological alterations such as cardiovascular disorders and bone demineralization which are very common on Earth, biomedical research in space is a frontier that holds important promises not only to counterbalance space-associated disorders in astronauts but also to ameliorate the health of Earth-bound population. Experiments in space are complex to design. Cells must be cultured in closed cell culture systems (from now defined experimental units (EUs)), which are biocompatible, functional, safe to minimize any potential hazard to the crew, and with a high degree of automation. Therefore, to perform experiments in orbit, it is relevant to know how closely culture in the EUs reflects cellular behavior under normal growth conditions. We compared the performances in these units of three different human cell types, which were recently space flown, i.e. bone mesenchymal stem cells, micro- and macrovascular endothelial cells. Endothelial cells are only slightly and transiently affected by culture in the EUs, whereas these devices accelerate mesenchymal stem cell reprogramming toward osteogenic differentiation, in part by increasing the amounts of reactive oxygen species. We conclude that cell culture conditions in the EUs do not exactly mimic what happens in a culture dish and that more efforts are necessary to optimize these devices for biomedical experiments in space. Impact statement Cell cultures represent valuable preclinical models to decipher pathogenic circuitries. This is true also for biomedical research in space. A lot has been learnt about cell adaptation and reaction from the experiments performed on many different cell types flown to space. Obviously, cell culture in space has to meet specific requirements for the safety of the crew and to comply with the unique environmental challenges. For these reasons, specific devices for cell culture in space have been developed. It is important to clarify whether these

  10. Elementary differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Pressley, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Curves and surfaces are objects that everyone can see, and many of the questions that can be asked about them are natural and easily understood Differential geometry is concerned with the precise mathematical formulation of some of these questions, and with trying to answer them using calculus techniques It is a subject that contains some of the most beautiful and profound results in mathematics yet many of these are accessible to higher-level undergraduates Elementary Differential Geometry presents the main results in the differential geometry of curves and surfaces while keeping the prerequisites to an absolute minimum Nothing more than first courses in linear algebra and multivariate calculus are required, and the most direct and straightforward approach is used at all times Numerous diagrams illustrate both the ideas in the text and the examples of curves and surfaces discussed there The book will provide an invaluable resource to all those taking a first course in differential geometry, for their lecture...

  11. What Is Geometry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Shiing-Shen

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the major historical developments of geometry. Euclid, Descartes, Klein's Erlanger Program, Gaus and Riemann, globalization, topology, Elie Cartan, and an application to molecular biology are included as topics. (KR)

  12. An expedition to geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kumaresan, S

    2005-01-01

    Including Affine and projective classification of Conics, 2 point homogeneity's of the planes, essential isometrics, non euclidean plan geometrics, in this book, the treatment of Geometry goes beyond the Kleinian views.

  13. Lectures on Symplectic Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Ana Cannas

    2001-01-01

    The goal of these notes is to provide a fast introduction to symplectic geometry for graduate students with some knowledge of differential geometry, de Rham theory and classical Lie groups. This text addresses symplectomorphisms, local forms, contact manifolds, compatible almost complex structures, Kaehler manifolds, hamiltonian mechanics, moment maps, symplectic reduction and symplectic toric manifolds. It contains guided problems, called homework, designed to complement the exposition or extend the reader's understanding. There are by now excellent references on symplectic geometry, a subset of which is in the bibliography of this book. However, the most efficient introduction to a subject is often a short elementary treatment, and these notes attempt to serve that purpose. This text provides a taste of areas of current research and will prepare the reader to explore recent papers and extensive books on symplectic geometry where the pace is much faster. For this reprint numerous corrections and cl...

  14. Geometry of differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Khovanskiĭ, A; Vassiliev, V

    1998-01-01

    This volume contains articles written by V. I. Arnold's colleagues on the occasion of his 60th birthday. The articles are mostly devoted to various aspects of geometry of differential equations and relations to global analysis and Hamiltonian mechanics.

  15. Facilitating Understandings of Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Christine C.; Bush, Sara

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates some learning encounters for facilitating first graders' understanding of geometry. Describes some of children's approaches using Cuisenaire rods and teacher's intervening. Presents six problems involving various combinations of Cuisenaire rods and cubes. (YP)

  16. Introduction to tropical geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Maclagan, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Tropical geometry is a combinatorial shadow of algebraic geometry, offering new polyhedral tools to compute invariants of algebraic varieties. It is based on tropical algebra, where the sum of two numbers is their minimum and the product is their sum. This turns polynomials into piecewise-linear functions, and their zero sets into polyhedral complexes. These tropical varieties retain a surprising amount of information about their classical counterparts. Tropical geometry is a young subject that has undergone a rapid development since the beginning of the 21st century. While establishing itself as an area in its own right, deep connections have been made to many branches of pure and applied mathematics. This book offers a self-contained introduction to tropical geometry, suitable as a course text for beginning graduate students. Proofs are provided for the main results, such as the Fundamental Theorem and the Structure Theorem. Numerous examples and explicit computations illustrate the main concepts. Each of t...

  17. Invitation to geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Melzak, Z A

    2008-01-01

    Intended for students of many different backgrounds with only a modest knowledge of mathematics, this text features self-contained chapters that can be adapted to several types of geometry courses. 1983 edition.

  18. Complex algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kollár, János

    1997-01-01

    This volume contains the lectures presented at the third Regional Geometry Institute at Park City in 1993. The lectures provide an introduction to the subject, complex algebraic geometry, making the book suitable as a text for second- and third-year graduate students. The book deals with topics in algebraic geometry where one can reach the level of current research while starting with the basics. Topics covered include the theory of surfaces from the viewpoint of recent higher-dimensional developments, providing an excellent introduction to more advanced topics such as the minimal model program. Also included is an introduction to Hodge theory and intersection homology based on the simple topological ideas of Lefschetz and an overview of the recent interactions between algebraic geometry and theoretical physics, which involve mirror symmetry and string theory.

  19. Derived logarithmic geometry I

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Sagave; Timo, Schurg; Gabriele, Vezzosi

    2016-01-01

    In order to develop the foundations of logarithmic derived geometry, we introduce a model category of logarithmic simplicial rings and a notion of derived log \\'etale maps and use this to define derived log stacks.

  20. The geometry of geodesics

    CERN Document Server

    Busemann, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive approach to qualitative problems in intrinsic differential geometry, this text examines Desarguesian spaces, perpendiculars and parallels, covering spaces, the influence of the sign of the curvature on geodesics, more. 1955 edition. Includes 66 figures.

  1. Geometry and Combinatorics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokkendorff, Simon Lyngby

    2002-01-01

    The subject of this Ph.D.-thesis is somewhere in between continuous and discrete geometry. Chapter 2 treats the geometry of finite point sets in semi-Riemannian hyperquadrics,using a matrix whose entries are a trigonometric function of relative distances in a given point set. The distance...... to the geometry of a simplex in a semi-Riemannian hyperquadric. In chapter 3 we study which finite metric spaces that are realizable in a hyperbolic space in the limit where curvature goes to -∞. We show that such spaces are the so called leaf spaces, the set of degree 1 vertices of weighted trees. We also...... establish results on the limiting geometry of such an isometrically realized leaf space simplex in hyperbolic space, when curvature goes to -∞. Chapter 4 discusses negative type of metric spaces. We give a measure theoretic treatment of this concept and related invariants. The theory developed...

  2. Observer dependent geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Hohmann, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    From general relativity we have learned the principles of general covariance and local Lorentz invariance, which follow from the fact that we consider observables as tensors on a spacetime manifold whose geometry is modeled by a Lorentzian metric. Approaches to quantum gravity, however, hint towards a breaking of these symmetries and the possible existence of more general, non-tensorial geometric structures. Possible implications of these approaches are non-tensorial transformation laws between different observers and an observer-dependent notion of geometry. In this work we review two different frameworks for observer dependent geometries, which may provide hints towards a quantization of gravity and possible explanations for so far unexplained phenomena: Finsler spacetimes and Cartan geometry on observer space. We discuss their definitions, properties and applications to observers, field theories and gravity.

  3. Implosions and hypertoric geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dancer, A.; Kirwan, F.; Swann, A.

    2013-01-01

    The geometry of the universal hyperkahler implosion for SU (n) is explored. In particular, we show that the universal hyperkahler implosion naturally contains a hypertoric variety described in terms of quivers. Furthermore, we discuss a gauge theoretic approach to hyperkahler implosion.......The geometry of the universal hyperkahler implosion for SU (n) is explored. In particular, we show that the universal hyperkahler implosion naturally contains a hypertoric variety described in terms of quivers. Furthermore, we discuss a gauge theoretic approach to hyperkahler implosion....

  4. Intermediate algebra & analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gondin, William R

    1967-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra & Analytic Geometry Made Simple focuses on the principles, processes, calculations, and methodologies involved in intermediate algebra and analytic geometry. The publication first offers information on linear equations in two unknowns and variables, functions, and graphs. Discussions focus on graphic interpretations, explicit and implicit functions, first quadrant graphs, variables and functions, determinate and indeterminate systems, independent and dependent equations, and defective and redundant systems. The text then examines quadratic equations in one variable, system

  5. Higher prequantum geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiber, Urs

    2016-01-01

    This is a survey of motivations, constructions and applications of higher prequantum geometry. In section 1 we highlight the open problem of prequantizing local field theory in a local and gauge invariant way, and we survey how a solution to this problem exists in higher differential geometry. In section 2 we survey examples and problems of interest. In section 3 we survey the abstract cohesive homotopy theory that serves to make all this precise and tractable.

  6. Brans-Dicke geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Punzi, Raffaele; Wohlfarth, Mattias N R

    2008-01-01

    We reveal the non-metric geometry underlying omega-->0 Brans-Dicke theory by unifying the metric and scalar field into a single geometric structure. Taking this structure seriously as the geometry to which matter universally couples, we show that the theory is fully consistent with solar system tests. This is in striking constrast with the standard metric coupling, which grossly violates post-Newtonian experimental constraints.

  7. Brans-Dicke geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punzi, Raffaele [Zentrum fuer Mathematische Physik und II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: raffaele.punzi@desy.de; Schuller, Frederic P. [Max Planck Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert Einstein Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14467 Potsdam (Germany)], E-mail: fps@aei.mpg.de; Wohlfarth, Mattias N.R. [Zentrum fuer Mathematische Physik und II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: mattias.wohlfarth@desy.de

    2008-12-11

    We reveal the non-metric geometry underlying {omega}{yields}0 Brans-Dicke theory by unifying the metric and scalar field into a single geometric structure. Taking this structure seriously as the geometry to which matter universally couples, we show that the theory is fully consistent with solar system tests. This is in striking contrast with the standard metric coupling, which grossly violates post-Newtonian experimental constraints.

  8. SOC and Fractal Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAteer, R. T. J.

    2013-06-01

    When Mandelbrot, the father of modern fractal geometry, made this seemingly obvious statement he was trying to show that we should move out of our comfortable Euclidean space and adopt a fractal approach to geometry. The concepts and mathematical tools of fractal geometry provides insight into natural physical systems that Euclidean tools cannot do. The benet from applying fractal geometry to studies of Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) are even greater. SOC and fractal geometry share concepts of dynamic n-body interactions, apparent non-predictability, self-similarity, and an approach to global statistics in space and time that make these two areas into naturally paired research techniques. Further, the iterative generation techniques used in both SOC models and in fractals mean they share common features and common problems. This chapter explores the strong historical connections between fractal geometry and SOC from both a mathematical and conceptual understanding, explores modern day interactions between these two topics, and discusses how this is likely to evolve into an even stronger link in the near future.

  9. Teaching Basic Science Environmentally, The Concept: The cell is basic unit of structure of most organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Phyllis S.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests simple ways to introduce students to the concept that the cell is the basic unit of structure of most organisms. Mentions materials for microscope study that are readily available and easy to handle, e.g., membranes from between the scales of the onion bulb, thin-leaved plants, pond water, and pollen. (JHZ)

  10. 3D-Printing Crystallographic Unit Cells for Learning Materials Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Vanti, William B.; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Introductory materials science and engineering courses universally include the study of crystal structure and unit cells, which are by their nature highly visual 3D concepts. Traditionally, such topics are explored with 2D drawings or perhaps a limited set of difficult-to-construct 3D models. The rise of 3D printing, coupled with the wealth of…

  11. Predication of Plastic Flow Characteristics in Ferrite/Pearlite Steel Using a Fern Unit Cell Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Li; Jingtao Han; Jing Liu; Lv Zhang

    2004-01-01

    The flow stress of ferrite/pearlite steel under uni-axial tension was simulated with finite element method (FEM) by applying commercial software MARC/MENTAT. Flow stress curves of ferrite/pearlite steels were calculated based on unit cell model. The effects of volume fraction, distribution and the aspect ratio of pearlite on tensile properties have been investigated.

  12. 3D-Printing Crystallographic Unit Cells for Learning Materials Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Vanti, William B.; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Introductory materials science and engineering courses universally include the study of crystal structure and unit cells, which are by their nature highly visual 3D concepts. Traditionally, such topics are explored with 2D drawings or perhaps a limited set of difficult-to-construct 3D models. The rise of 3D printing, coupled with the wealth of…

  13. Mitigation of Unwanted Forward Narrow-band Radiation from PCBs with a Metamaterial Unit Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruaro, Andrea; Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    Mitigation of EMI from a PCB is obtained through the use of a metamaterial unit cell. The focus is on the reduction of narrow-band radiation in the forward hemisphere when the resonant element is etched on a layer located between the source of radiation and the ground plane. As opposed to previou...

  14. Recovery Act. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxilliary Power Unit Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Gail E. [Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC., Gillingham (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-30

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxilliary Power Unit Demonstration Project. Summarizing development of Delphi’s next generation SOFC system as the core power plant to prove the viability of the market opportunity for a 3-5 kW diesel SOFC system. Report includes test and demonstration results from testing the diesel APU in a high visibility fleet customer vehicle application.

  15. Experimental broadband absorption enhancement in silicon nanohole structures with optimized complex unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chenxi; Martínez, Luis Javier; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2013-09-09

    We design silicon membranes with nanohole structures with optimized complex unit cells that maximize broadband absorption. We fabricate the optimized design and measure the optical absorption. We demonstrate an experimental broadband absorption about 3.5 times higher than an equally-thick thin film.

  16. Geometry-induced protein pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-19

    Protein patterns are known to adapt to cell shape and serve as spatial templates that choreograph downstream processes like cell polarity or cell division. However, how can pattern-forming proteins sense and respond to the geometry of a cell, and what mechanistic principles underlie pattern formation? Current models invoke mechanisms based on dynamic instabilities arising from nonlinear interactions between proteins but neglect the influence of the spatial geometry itself. Here, we show that patterns can emerge as a direct result of adaptation to cell geometry, in the absence of dynamical instability. We present a generic reaction module that allows protein densities robustly to adapt to the symmetry of the spatial geometry. The key component is an NTPase protein that cycles between nucleotide-dependent membrane-bound and cytosolic states. For elongated cells, we find that the protein dynamics generically leads to a bipolar pattern, which vanishes as the geometry becomes spherically symmetrical. We show that such a reaction module facilitates universal adaptation to cell geometry by sensing the local ratio of membrane area to cytosolic volume. This sensing mechanism is controlled by the membrane affinities of the different states. We apply the theory to explain AtMinD bipolar patterns in [Formula: see text] EcMinDE Escherichia coli. Due to its generic nature, the mechanism could also serve as a hitherto-unrecognized spatial template in many other bacterial systems. Moreover, the robustness of the mechanism enables self-organized optimization of protein patterns by evolutionary processes. Finally, the proposed module can be used to establish geometry-sensitive protein gradients in synthetic biological systems.

  17. Inulin isoforms differ by repeated additions of one crystal unit cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Peter D; Barclay, Thomas G; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Gerson, Andrea R; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2014-03-15

    Inulin isoforms, especially delta inulin, are important biologically as immune activators and clinically as vaccine adjuvants. In exploring action mechanisms, we previously found regular increments in thermal properties of the seven-member inulin isoform series that suggested regular additions of some energetic structural unit. Because the previous isolates carried additional longer chains that masked defining ranges, these were contrasted with new isoform isolates comprising only inulin chain lengths defining that isoform. The new series began with 19 fructose units per chain (alpha-1 inulin), increasing regularly by 6 fructose units per isoform. Thus the 'energetic unit' equates to 6 fructose residues per chain. All isoforms showed indistinguishable X-ray diffraction patterns that were also identical with known inulin crystals. We conclude that an 'energetic unit' equates to one helix turn of 6 fructose units per chain as found in one unit cell of the inulin crystal. Each isoform chain comprised progressively more helix turns plus one additional fructose and glucose residues per chain.

  18. Question 7: the first units of life were not simple cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Vic; Hunding, Axel; Kepes, Francois; Lancet, Doron; Minsky, Abraham; Raine, Derek; Root-Bernstein, Robert; Sriram, K

    2007-10-01

    Five common assumptions about the first cells are challenged by the pre-biotic ecology model and are replaced by the following propositions: firstly, early cells were more complex, more varied and had a greater diversity of constituents than modern cells; secondly, the complexity of a cell is not related to the number of genes it contains, indeed, modern bacteria are as complex as eukaryotes; thirdly, the unit of early life was an 'ecosystem' rather than a 'cell'; fourthly, the early cell needed no genes at all; fifthly, early life depended on non-covalent associations and on catalysts that were not confined to specific reactions. We present here the outlines of a theory that connects findings about modern bacteria with speculations about their origins.

  19. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Daniel J; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D(2) transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude.

  20. Quantum Geometry of the ``Fuzzy-Lattice'' Hubbard Model and the Fractional Chern Insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Sagar; Haldane, F. D. M.

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies of interacting particles on tight-binding lattices with broken time-reversal symmetry reveal ``zero-field'' fractional quantum Hall (FQH) phases (fractional Chern insulators, FCI). In a partially-filled Landau level, the non-commutative guiding-centers are the residual degrees of freedom, requiring a ``quantum geometry'' Hilbert-space description (a real-space Schrödinger description can only apply in the ``classical geometry'' of unprojected coordinates). The continuum description does not apply on a lattice, where we describe emergence of the FCI from a non-commutative quantum lattice geometry. We define a ``fuzzy lattice'' by projecting a one-particle bandstructure (with more than one orbital per unit cell) into a single band, and then renormalize the orbital on each site to unit weight. The resulting overcomplete basis of local states is analogous to a basis of more than one coherent state per flux quantum in a Landau level. The overlap matrix characterizes ``quantum geometry'' on the ``fuzzy lattice'', defining a ``quantum distance'' measure and Berry fluxes through elementary lattice triangles. We study quantum geometry at transitions between topologically-distinct instances of a fuzzy lattice, as well as N-body states with local Hubbard interactions. supported by NSF MRSEC Grant DMR-0819860

  1. Sources of hyperbolic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Stillwell, John

    1996-01-01

    This book presents, for the first time in English, the papers of Beltrami, Klein, and Poincaré that brought hyperbolic geometry into the mainstream of mathematics. A recognition of Beltrami comparable to that given the pioneering works of Bolyai and Lobachevsky seems long overdue-not only because Beltrami rescued hyperbolic geometry from oblivion by proving it to be logically consistent, but because he gave it a concrete meaning (a model) that made hyperbolic geometry part of ordinary mathematics. The models subsequently discovered by Klein and Poincaré brought hyperbolic geometry even further down to earth and paved the way for the current explosion of activity in low-dimensional geometry and topology. By placing the works of these three mathematicians side by side and providing commentaries, this book gives the student, historian, or professional geometer a bird's-eye view of one of the great episodes in mathematics. The unified setting and historical context reveal the insights of Beltrami, Klein, and Po...

  2. A switchable pH-differential unitized regenerative fuel cell with high performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xu; Xuan, Jin; Leung, Dennis Y. C.; Zou, Haiyang; Li, Jiantao; Wang, Hailiang; Wang, Huizhi

    2016-05-01

    Regenerative fuel cells are a potential candidate for future energy storage, but their applications are limited by the high cost and poor round-trip efficiency. Here we present a switchable pH-differential unitized regenerative fuel cell capable of addressing both the obstacles. Relying on a membraneless laminar flow-based design, pH environments in the cell are optimized independently for different electrode reactions and are switchable together with the cell process to ensure always favorable thermodynamics for each electrode reaction. Benefiting from the thermodynamic advantages of the switchable pH-differential arrangement, the cell allows water electrolysis at a voltage of 0.57 V, and a fuel cell open circuit voltage of 1.89 V, rendering round-trip efficiencies up to 74%. Under room conditions, operating the cell in fuel cell mode yields a power density of 1.3 W cm-2, which is the highest performance to date for laminar flow-based cells and is comparable to state-of-the-art polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  3. A fuel cell energy storage system concept for the Space Station Freedom Extravehicular Mobility Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlhart, Otto J.; Rosso, Matthew J., Jr.; Marmolejo, Jose

    1989-01-01

    An update is given on work to design and build a Fuel Cell Energy Storage System (FCESS) bench-tested unit for the Space Station Freedom Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Fueled by oxygen and hydride-stored hydrogen, the FCESS is being considered as an alternative to the EMU zinc-silver oxide battery. Superior cycle life and quick recharge are the main attributes of FCESS. The design and performance of a nonventing, 28 V, 34 Ahr system with 7 amp rating are discussed.

  4. Single-unit transfusions and hemoglobin trigger: relative impact on red cell utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, William W; Thakkar, Rajiv N; Gehrie, Eric A; Chen, Weiyun; Frank, Steven M

    2017-05-01

    Patient blood management (PBM) programs can reduce unnecessary transfusions, but the optimal methods used to achieve this effect are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that encouraging single-unit red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in stable patients would have a greater impact on blood use than compliance with a specific hemoglobin (Hb) transfusion trigger alone. We analyzed blood utilization data at three community hospitals without previous PBM efforts before and after implementing a PBM program. Data were analyzed at monthly intervals to determine the relative impact of a "Why give 2 when 1 will do?" campaign promoting single-unit RBC transfusions and simultaneous efforts to promote evidence-based Hb triggers of 7 or 8 g/dL. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify independent effects of these two interventions on overall RBC utilization. Univariate analysis revealed that both the increase in single-unit transfusions (from 38.0% to 70.9%; p utilization. Multivariate analysis showed that the increase in single-unit transfusions was an independent predictor of decreased RBC utilization, but the Hb triggers of both 7 and 8 g/dL were not. Overall, our PBM efforts decreased RBC utilization from 0.254 to 0.185 units/patient (27.2%) across all three hospitals (p = 0.0009). A campaign promoting single-unit RBC transfusions had a greater impact on RBC utilization than did encouraging a restrictive transfusion trigger. © 2016 AABB.

  5. The Daniell Cell, Ohm's Law and the Emergence of the International System of Units

    CERN Document Server

    Jayson, Joel S

    2015-01-01

    Telegraphy originated in the 1830s and 40s and flourished in the following decades, but with a patchwork of electrical standards. Electromotive force was for the most part measured in units of the predominant Daniell cell. Each company had their own resistance standard. In 1862 the British Association for the Advancement of Science formed a committee to address this situation. By 1873 they had given definition to the electromagnetic system of units (emu) and defined the practical units of the ohm as ${10}^9$ emu units of resistance and the volt as ${10}^8$ emu units of electromotive force. These recommendations were ratified and expanded upon in a series of international congresses held between 1881 and 1904. A proposal by Giovanni Giorgi in 1901 took advantage of a coincidence between the conversion of the units of energy in the emu system (the erg) and in the practical system (the joule) in that the same conversion factor existed between the cgs based emu system and a theretofore undefined MKS system. By in...

  6. Students Discovering Spherical Geometry Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven, Bulent; Karatas, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as Cabri and Geometers' Sketchpad has been regularly used worldwide for teaching and learning Euclidean geometry for a long time. The DGS with its inductive nature allows students to learn Euclidean geometry via explorations. However, with respect to non-Euclidean geometries, do we need to introduce them to…

  7. Students Discovering Spherical Geometry Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven, Bulent; Karatas, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as Cabri and Geometers' Sketchpad has been regularly used worldwide for teaching and learning Euclidean geometry for a long time. The DGS with its inductive nature allows students to learn Euclidean geometry via explorations. However, with respect to non-Euclidean geometries, do we need to introduce them to…

  8. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhihao; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2014-01-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geo...

  9. Computational synthetic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bokowski, Jürgen

    1989-01-01

    Computational synthetic geometry deals with methods for realizing abstract geometric objects in concrete vector spaces. This research monograph considers a large class of problems from convexity and discrete geometry including constructing convex polytopes from simplicial complexes, vector geometries from incidence structures and hyperplane arrangements from oriented matroids. It turns out that algorithms for these constructions exist if and only if arbitrary polynomial equations are decidable with respect to the underlying field. Besides such complexity theorems a variety of symbolic algorithms are discussed, and the methods are applied to obtain new mathematical results on convex polytopes, projective configurations and the combinatorics of Grassmann varieties. Finally algebraic varieties characterizing matroids and oriented matroids are introduced providing a new basis for applying computer algebra methods in this field. The necessary background knowledge is reviewed briefly. The text is accessible to stud...

  10. Supersymmetry and noncommutative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Beenakker, Wim; Suijlekom, Walter D van

    2016-01-01

    In this work the question whether noncommutative geometry allows for supersymmetric theories is addressed. Noncommutative geometry has seen remarkable applications in high energy physics, viz. the geometrical interpretation of the Standard Model, however such a question has not been answered in a conclusive way so far. The book starts with a systematic analysis of the possibilities for so-called almost-commutative geometries on a 4-dimensional, flat background to exhibit not only a particle content that is eligible for supersymmetry, but also have a supersymmetric action. An approach is proposed in which the basic `building blocks' of potentially supersymmetric theories and the demands for their action to be supersymmetric are identified. It is then described how a novel kind of soft supersymmetry breaking Lagrangian arises naturally from the spectral action. Finally, the above formalism is applied to explore the existence of a noncommutative version of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. This book is ...

  11. Universality of geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wetterich, C

    2012-01-01

    In models of emergent gravity the metric arises as the expectation value of some collective field. Usually, many different collective fields with appropriate tensor properties are candidates for a metric. Which collective field describes the "physical geometry"? We resolve this "metric ambiguity" by an investigation of the most general form of the quantum effective action for several metrics. In the long-distance limit the physical metric is universal and accounts for a massless graviton. Other degrees of freedom contained in the various metric candidates describe very massive scalars and symmetric second rank tensors. They only play a role at microscopic distances, typically around the Planck length. The universality of geometry at long distances extends to the vierbein and the connection. On the other hand, for distances and time intervals of Planck size geometry looses its universal meaning. Time is born with the big bang.

  12. Geometry of hypersurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Cecil, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    This exposition provides the state-of-the art on the differential geometry of hypersurfaces in real, complex, and quaternionic space forms. Special emphasis is placed on isoparametric and Dupin hypersurfaces in real space forms as well as Hopf hypersurfaces in complex space forms. The book is accessible to a reader who has completed a one-year graduate course in differential geometry. The text, including open problems and an extensive list of references, is an excellent resource for researchers in this area. Geometry of Hypersurfaces begins with the basic theory of submanifolds in real space forms. Topics include shape operators, principal curvatures and foliations, tubes and parallel hypersurfaces, curvature spheres and focal submanifolds. The focus then turns to the theory of isoparametric hypersurfaces in spheres. Important examples and classification results are given, including the construction of isoparametric hypersurfaces based on representations of Clifford algebras. An in-depth treatment of Dupin hy...

  13. Complex differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Fangyang

    2002-01-01

    The theory of complex manifolds overlaps with several branches of mathematics, including differential geometry, algebraic geometry, several complex variables, global analysis, topology, algebraic number theory, and mathematical physics. Complex manifolds provide a rich class of geometric objects, for example the (common) zero locus of any generic set of complex polynomials is always a complex manifold. Yet complex manifolds behave differently than generic smooth manifolds; they are more coherent and fragile. The rich yet restrictive character of complex manifolds makes them a special and interesting object of study. This book is a self-contained graduate textbook that discusses the differential geometric aspects of complex manifolds. The first part contains standard materials from general topology, differentiable manifolds, and basic Riemannian geometry. The second part discusses complex manifolds and analytic varieties, sheaves and holomorphic vector bundles, and gives a brief account of the surface classifi...

  14. Integral Geometry and Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Czech, Bartlomiej; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-01-01

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS$_3$/CFT$_2$ correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we...

  15. Lectures on discrete geometry

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Discrete geometry investigates combinatorial properties of configurations of geometric objects. To a working mathematician or computer scientist, it offers sophisticated results and techniques of great diversity and it is a foundation for fields such as computational geometry or combinatorial optimization. This book is primarily a textbook introduction to various areas of discrete geometry. In each area, it explains several key results and methods, in an accessible and concrete manner. It also contains more advanced material in separate sections and thus it can serve as a collection of surveys in several narrower subfields. The main topics include: basics on convex sets, convex polytopes, and hyperplane arrangements; combinatorial complexity of geometric configurations; intersection patterns and transversals of convex sets; geometric Ramsey-type results; polyhedral combinatorics and high-dimensional convexity; and lastly, embeddings of finite metric spaces into normed spaces. Jiri Matousek is Professor of Com...

  16. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  17. Amoeboid motion in confined geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Hao; Hu, Wei-Fan; Farutin, Alexander; Rafaï, Salima; Lai, Ming-Chih; Peyla, Philippe; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system, as well as cancer cells, migrating in confined environment of tissues undergo frequent shape changes (described as amoeboid motion) that enable them to move forward through these porous media without the assistance of adhesion sites. In other words, they perform amoeboid swimming (AS) while using extracellular matrices and cells of tissues as support. We introduce a simple model of AS in a confined geometry solved by means of 2D numerical simulations. We find that confinement promotes AS, unless being so strong that it restricts shape change amplitude. A straight AS trajectory in the channel is found to be unstable, and ample lateral excursions of the swimmer prevail. For weak confinement, these excursions are symmetric, while they become asymmetric at stronger confinement, whereby the swimmer is located closer to one of the two walls. This is a spontaneous symmetry-breaking bifurcation. We find that there exists an optimal confinement for migration. We provide numerical results as...

  18. The Geometry of Conventionality

    CERN Document Server

    Weatherall, James Owen

    2013-01-01

    Hans Reichenbach famously argued that the geometry of spacetime is conventional in relativity theory, in the sense that one can freely choose the spacetime metric so long as one is willing to postulate a "universal force field". Here we make precise a sense in which the field Reichenbach defines fails to be a "force". We then argue that there is an interesting and perhaps tenable sense in which geometry is conventional in classical spacetimes. We conclude with a no-go result showing that the variety of conventionalism available in classical spacetimes does not extend to relativistic spacetimes.

  19. A programmer's geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bowyer, Adrian

    1983-01-01

    A Programmer's Geometry provides a guide in programming geometric shapes. The book presents formulas and examples of computer representation and coding of geometry. Each of the nine chapters of the text deals with the representation and solution of a specific geometrical problem, such as areas, vectors, and volumes. The last chapter provides a brief discussion on generating image through a computer. The codes presented in the book are written in FORTRAN 77. The text will be of great use to programmers who are working on projects that involve geometric calculations.

  20. Geometry and symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Yale, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the geometry of Euclidean, affine, and projective spaces with special emphasis on the important groups of symmetries of these spaces. The two major objectives of the text are to introduce the main ideas of affine and projective spaces and to develop facility in handling transformations and groups of transformations. Since there are many good texts on affine and projective planes, the author has concentrated on the n-dimensional cases.Designed to be used in advanced undergraduate mathematics or physics courses, the book focuses on ""practical geometry,"" emphasi

  1. Non-Riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenhart, L P

    1927-01-01

    The use of the differential geometry of a Riemannian space in the mathematical formulation of physical theories led to important developments in the geometry of such spaces. The concept of parallelism of vectors, as introduced by Levi-Civita, gave rise to a theory of the affine properties of a Riemannian space. Covariant differentiation, as developed by Christoffel and Ricci, is a fundamental process in this theory. Various writers, notably Eddington, Einstein and Weyl, in their efforts to formulate a combined theory of gravitation and electromagnetism, proposed a simultaneous generalization o

  2. Regulations in the United States for cell transplantation clinical trials in neurological diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Zhu; Yuanqing Tan; Qi Gu; Weifang Han; Zhongwen Li; Jason S Meyer; Baoyang Hu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to use a systematic approach to evaluate the current utilization, safety, and effectiveness of cell therapies for neurological diseases in human. And review the present regulations, considering United States (US) as a representative country, for cell transplantation in neurological disease and discuss the challenges facing the field of neurology in the coming decades. Methods:A detailed search was performed in systematic literature reviews of cellular‐based therapies in neurological diseases, using PubMed, web of science, and clinical trials. Regulations of cell therapy products used for clinical trials were searched from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Results: Seven most common types of cell therapies for neurological diseases have been reported to be relatively safe with varying degrees of neurological recovery. And a series of regulations in US for cellular therapy was summarized including preclinical evaluations, sourcing material, stem cell manufacturing and characterization, cell therapy product, and clinical trials. Conclusions:Stem cell‐based therapy holds great promise for a cure of such diseases and will value a growing population of patients. However, regulatory permitting activity of the US in the sphere of stem cells, technologies of regenerative medicine and substitutive cell therapy are selective, theoretical and does not fit the existing norm and rules. Compiled well‐defined regulations to guide the application of stem cell products for clinical trials should be formulated.

  3. Fuel cell collaboration in the United States. Follow up report to the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    Fuel cell technology continues to grow in the United States, with strong sales in stationary applications and early markets such as data centers, materials handling equipment, and telecommunications sites. New fuel cell customers include Fortune 500 companies Apple, eBay, Coca-Cola, and Walmart, who will use fuel cells to provide reliable power to data centers, stores, and facilities. Some are purchasing multi-megawatt (MW) systems, including three of the largest non-utility purchases of stationary fuel cells in the world by AT and T, Apple and eBay - 17 MW, 10 MW and 6 MW respectively. Others are replacing fleets of battery forklifts with fuel cells. Sysco, the food distributor, has more than 700 fuel cell-powered forklifts operating at seven facilities, with more on order. Mega-retailer Walmart now operates more than 500 fuel cell forklifts at three warehouses, including a freezer facility. Although federal government budget reduction efforts are impacting a wide range of departments and programs, fuel cell and hydrogen technology continues to be funded, albeit at a lower level than in past years. The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently funding fuel cell and hydrogen R and D and has nearly 300 ongoing projects at companies, national labs, and universities/institutes universities. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 and DOE's Market Transformation efforts have acted as a government ''catalyst'' for market success of emerging technologies. Early market deployments of about 1,400 fuel cells under the ARRA have led to more than 5,000 additional fuel cell purchases by industry with no DOE funding. In addition, interest in Congress remains high. Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Chris Coons (D-DE), Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and John Hoeven (R-ND) re-launched the bipartisan Senate Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Caucus in August 2012 to promote the continued development and commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies

  4. Study on Unit Cell Models and the Effective Thermal Conductivities of Silica Aerogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Li, Zeng-Yao; Zhao, Xin-Peng; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, two modified unit cell models, truncated octahedron and cubic array of intersecting square rods with 45-degree rotation, are developed in consideration of the tortuous path of heat conduction in solid skeleton of silica aerogel. The heat conduction is analyzed for each model and the expressions of effective thermal conductivity of the modified unit cell models are derived. Considering the random microstructure of silica aerogel, the probability model is presented. We also discuss the effect of the thermal conductivity of aerogel backbone. The effective thermal conductivities calculated by the proposed probability model are in good agreement with available experimental data when the density of the aerogel is 110 kg/m3.

  5. Universal correlators from geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkgraaf, Robbert [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Korteweg-de Vries Institute for Mathematics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Temuerhan, Mine; Sinkovics, Annamaria [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: sinkovic@science.uva.nl

    2004-11-01

    Matrix model correlators show universal behaviour at short distances. We provide a derivation for these universal correlators by inserting probe branes in the underlying effective geometry. We generalize these results to study correlators of branes and their universal behaviour in the Calabi-Yau crystals, where we find a role for a generalized brane insertion. (author)

  6. Universal Correlators from Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Sinkovics, Annamaria; Temurhan, Mine

    2004-11-01

    Matrix model correlators show universal behaviour at short distances. We provide a derivation for these universal correlators by inserting probe branes in the underlying effective geometry. We generalize these results to study correlators of branes and their universal behaviour in the Calabi-Yau crystals, where we find a role for a generalized brane insertion.

  7. Universal Correlators from Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkgraaf, R; Temurhan, M; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Sinkovics, Annamaria; Temurhan, Mine

    2004-01-01

    Matrix model correlators show universal behaviour at short distances. We provide a derivation for these universal correlators by inserting probe branes in the underlying effective geometry. We generalize these results to study correlators of branes and their universal behaviour in the Calabi-Yau crystals, where we find a role for a generalized brane insertion.

  8. Geometry and physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiyah, Michael; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hitchin, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    We review the remarkably fruitful interactions between mathematics and quantum physics in the past decades, pointing out some general trends and highlighting several examples, such as the counting of curves in algebraic geometry, invariants of knots and four-dimensional topology. PMID:20123740

  9. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  10. Diophantine geometry an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Hindry, Marc

    2000-01-01

    This is an introduction to diophantine geometry at the advanced graduate level. The book contains a proof of the Mordell conjecture which will make it quite attractive to graduate students and professional mathematicians. In each part of the book, the reader will find numerous exercises.

  11. Towards relativistic quantum geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridao, Luis Santiago [Instituto de Investigaciones Físicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Mar del Plata (Argentina); Bellini, Mauricio, E-mail: mbellini@mdp.edu.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350, C.P. 7600, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Investigaciones Físicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2015-12-17

    We obtain a gauge-invariant relativistic quantum geometry by using a Weylian-like manifold with a geometric scalar field which provides a gauge-invariant relativistic quantum theory in which the algebra of the Weylian-like field depends on observers. An example for a Reissner–Nordström black-hole is studied.

  12. Advanced geometries and regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanov, S. S. [Univeristy of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States); Bulanov, S. V. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Turchetti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Bologna and INFN Sezione di Bologna, Via Irnerio, 46-I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J. [Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines/HiLASE project, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague, Czech Republic and Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Brehova 7, 115 19 Prague (Czech Republic); Antici, P. [Dipartimento di Energetica ed INFM, Università di Roma, La Sapienza, 00165 Roma (Italy); Margarone, D.; Korn, G. [Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines/HiLASE project, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-26

    We review and discuss different schemes of laser ion acceleration as well as advanced target geometries in connection with the development of the laser-driven proton source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases, which is a part of the ELIMED project.

  13. Emergent Hyperbolic Network Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    A large variety of interacting complex systems are characterized by interactions occurring between more than two nodes. These systems are described by simplicial complexes. Simplicial complexes are formed by simplices (nodes, links, triangles, tetrahedra etc.) that have a natural geometric interpretation. As such simplicial complexes are widely used in quantum gravity approaches that involve a discretization of spacetime. Here, by extending our knowledge of growing complex networks to growing simplicial complexes we investigate the nature of the emergent geometry of complex networks and explore whether this geometry is hyperbolic. Specifically we show that an hyperbolic network geometry emerges spontaneously from models of growing simplicial complexes that are purely combinatorial. The statistical and geometrical properties of the growing simplicial complexes strongly depend on their dimensionality and display the major universal properties of real complex networks (scale-free degree distribution, small-world and communities) at the same time. Interestingly, when the network dynamics includes an heterogeneous fitness of the faces, the growing simplicial complex can undergo phase transitions that are reflected by relevant changes in the network geometry.

  14. Spacetime and Euclidean Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Brill, D R; Brill, Dieter; Jacobson, Ted

    2004-01-01

    Using only the principle of relativity and Euclidean geometry we show in this pedagogical article that the square of proper time or length in a two-dimensional spacetime diagram is proportional to the Euclidean area of the corresponding causal domain. We use this relation to derive the Minkowski line element by two geometric proofs of the "spacetime Pythagoras theorem".

  15. Spacetime and Euclidean geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Dieter; Jacobson, Ted

    2006-04-01

    Using only the principle of relativity and Euclidean geometry we show in this pedagogical article that the square of proper time or length in a two-dimensional spacetime diagram is proportional to the Euclidean area of the corresponding causal domain. We use this relation to derive the Minkowski line element by two geometric proofs of the spacetime Pythagoras theorem.

  16. Origami, Geometry and Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, Arsalan; Elstak, Iwan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the mathematics that emanates from the construction of an origami box. We first construct a simple origami box from a rectangular sheet and then discuss some of the mathematical questions that arise in the context of geometry and algebra. The activity can be used as a context for illustrating how algebra…

  17. Geometry Euclid and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Hartshorne, Robin

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, I have been teaching a junior-senior-level course on the classi­ cal geometries. This book has grown out of that teaching experience. I assume only high-school geometry and some abstract algebra. The course begins in Chapter 1 with a critical examination of Euclid's Elements. Students are expected to read concurrently Books I-IV of Euclid's text, which must be obtained sepa­ rately. The remainder of the book is an exploration of questions that arise natu­ rally from this reading, together with their modern answers. To shore up the foundations we use Hilbert's axioms. The Cartesian plane over a field provides an analytic model of the theory, and conversely, we see that one can introduce coordinates into an abstract geometry. The theory of area is analyzed by cutting figures into triangles. The algebra of field extensions provides a method for deciding which geometrical constructions are possible. The investigation of the parallel postulate leads to the various non-Euclidean geometries. And ...

  18. History of analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, Carl B

    2012-01-01

    Designed as an integrated survey of the development of analytic geometry, this study presents the concepts and contributions from before the Alexandrian Age through the eras of the great French mathematicians Fermat and Descartes, and on through Newton and Euler to the "Golden Age," from 1789 to 1850.

  19. Origami, Geometry and Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, Arsalan; Elstak, Iwan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the mathematics that emanates from the construction of an origami box. We first construct a simple origami box from a rectangular sheet and then discuss some of the mathematical questions that arise in the context of geometry and algebra. The activity can be used as a context for illustrating how algebra…

  20. On the Performance of Hybrid PV/Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell System in the Tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwan Dihrab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar hydrogen system is a unique power system that can meet the power requirements for future energy demands. Such a system uses the hydrogen as the energy carrier, which produces energy through the electrolyzer with assistance of the power from the PV during the sunny hours, and then uses stored hydrogen to produce energy through the fuel cell after sunset or on cloudy days. The current study has used premanufactured unitized regenerative fuel cells in which the electrolyzer and the fuel cell function within one cell at different modes. The system components were modeled and the one-day real operational and simulated data has been presented and compared. The measured results showed the ability of the system to meet the proposed load, and the total efficiency was about 4.5%.

  1. P{sub N} solutions for the slowing-down and the cell calculation problems in plane geometry; Solucoes P{sub N} para os problemas da moderacao e do calculo de celula em geometria plana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldeira, Alexandre David

    1999-07-01

    In this work P{sub N} solutions for the slowing-down and cell problems in slab geometry are developed. To highlight the main contributions of this development, one can mention: the new particular solution developed for the P{sub N} method applied to the slowing-down problem in the multigroup model, originating a new class of polynomials denominated Chandrasekhar generalized polynomials; the treatment of a specific situation, known as a degeneracy, arising from a particularity in the group constants and the first application of the P{sub N} method, for arbitrary N, in criticality calculations at the cell level reported in literature. (author)

  2. BioDiff - a neutron diffractometer optimized for crystals with large unit cell dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Schrader, Tobias Erich; Ostermann, Andreas; Monkenbusch, Michael; Laatsch, Bernhard; Jüttner, Philipp; Petry, Winfried; Richter, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    The research reactor Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) is a modern high flux neutron source which feeds some 30 state of the art neutron beam instruments. Currently 24 are operational, others in commissioning or under construction. The newly built neutron single crystal diffractometer BIODIFF is especially designed to collect data from crystals with large unit cells. The main field of application is the structural analysis of proteins, especially the determination of hydrogen atom positions. BIOD...

  3. Geometry and the Quantum: Basics

    CERN Document Server

    Chamseddine, Ali H; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the construction of spectral manifolds in noncommutative geometry, we introduce a higher degree Heisenberg commutation relation involving the Dirac operator and the Feynman slash of scalar fields. This commutation relation appears in two versions, one sided and two sided. It implies the quantization of the volume. In the one-sided case it implies that the manifold decomposes into a disconnected sum of spheres which will represent quanta of geometry. The two sided version in dimension 4 predicts the two algebras M_2(H) and M_4(C) which are the algebraic constituents of the Standard Model of particle physics. This taken together with the non-commutative algebra of functions allows one to reconstruct, using the spectral action, the Lagrangian of gravity coupled with the Standard Model. We show that any connected Riemannian Spin 4-manifold with quantized volume >4 (in suitable units) appears as an irreducible representation of the two-sided commutation relations in dimension 4 and that these represen...

  4. Dielectric Behavior of Low Microwave Loss Unit Cell for All Dielectric Metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhuan Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With a deep study of the metamaterial, its unit cells have been widely extended from metals to dielectrics. The dielectric based unit cells attract much attention because of the advantage of easy preparation, tunability, and higher frequency response, and so forth. Using the conventional solid state method, we prepared a kind of incipient ferroelectrics (calcium titanate, CaTiO3 with higher microwave permittivity and lower loss, which can be successfully used to construct metamaterials. The temperature and frequency dependence of dielectric constant are also measured under different sintering temperatures. The dielectric spectra showed a slight permittivity decrease with the increase of temperature and exhibited a loss of 0.0005, combined with a higher microwave dielectric constant of ~167 and quality factor Q of 2049. Therefore, CaTiO3 is a kind of versatile and potential metamaterial unit cell. The permittivity of CaTiO3 at higher microwave frequency was also examined in the rectangular waveguide and we got the permittivity of 165, creating a new method to test permittivity at higher microwave frequency.

  5. An introduction to Minkowski geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, David L.

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental ideas of Minkowski geometries are presented. Learning about Minkowski geometries can sharpen our students' understanding of concepts such as distance measurement. Many of its ideas are important and accessible to undergraduate students. Following a brief overview, distance and orthogonality in Minkowski geometries are thoroughly discussed and many illustrative examples and applications are supplied. Suggestions for further study of these geometries are given. Indeed, Minkowski geometries are an excellent source of topics for undergraduate research and independent study.

  6. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  7. Renyi Entropy and Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jeongseog; Safdi, Benjamin R

    2014-01-01

    Entanglement entropy in even dimensional conformal field theories (CFTs) contains well-known universal terms arising from the conformal anomaly. Renyi entropies are natural generalizations of the entanglement entropy that are much less understood. Above two spacetime dimensions, the universal terms in the Renyi entropies are unknown for general entangling geometries. We conjecture a new structure in the dependence of the four-dimensional Renyi entropies on the intrinsic and extrinsic geometry of the entangling surface. We provide evidence for this conjecture by direct numerical computations in the free scalar and fermion field theories. The computation involves relating the four-dimensional free massless Renyi entropies across cylindrical entangling surfaces to corresponding three-dimensional massive Renyi entropies across circular entangling surfaces. Our numerical technique also allows us to directly probe other interesting aspects of three-dimensional Renyi entropy, including the massless renormalized Reny...

  8. Spectral Geometry and Causality

    CERN Document Server

    Kopf, T

    1996-01-01

    For a physical interpretation of a theory of quantum gravity, it is necessary to recover classical spacetime, at least approximately. However, quantum gravity may eventually provide classical spacetimes by giving spectral data similar to those appearing in noncommutative geometry, rather than by giving directly a spacetime manifold. It is shown that a globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifold can be given by spectral data. A new phenomenon in the context of spectral geometry is observed: causal relationships. The employment of the causal relationships of spectral data is shown to lead to a highly efficient description of Lorentzian manifolds, indicating the possible usefulness of this approach. Connections to free quantum field theory are discussed for both motivation and physical interpretation. It is conjectured that the necessary spectral data can be generically obtained from an effective field theory having the fundamental structures of generalized quantum mechanics: a decoherence functional and a choice of...

  9. Multivariate calculus and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dineen, Seán

    2014-01-01

    Multivariate calculus can be understood best by combining geometric insight, intuitive arguments, detailed explanations and mathematical reasoning. This textbook has successfully followed this programme. It additionally provides a solid description of the basic concepts, via familiar examples, which are then tested in technically demanding situations. In this new edition the introductory chapter and two of the chapters on the geometry of surfaces have been revised. Some exercises have been replaced and others provided with expanded solutions. Familiarity with partial derivatives and a course in linear algebra are essential prerequisites for readers of this book. Multivariate Calculus and Geometry is aimed primarily at higher level undergraduates in the mathematical sciences. The inclusion of many practical examples involving problems of several variables will appeal to mathematics, science and engineering students.

  10. Algebra, Arithmetic, and Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Tschinkel, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    The two volumes of "Algebra, Arithmetic, and Geometry: In Honor of Y.I. Manin" are composed of invited expository articles and extensions detailing Manin's contributions to the subjects, and are in celebration of his 70th birthday. The well-respected and distinguished contributors include: Behrend, Berkovich, Bost, Bressler, Calaque, Carlson, Chambert-Loir, Colombo, Connes, Consani, Dabrowski, Deninger, Dolgachev, Donaldson, Ekedahl, Elsenhans, Enriques, Etingof, Fock, Friedlander, Geemen, Getzler, Goncharov, Harris, Iskovskikh, Jahnel, Kaledin, Kapranov, Katz, Kaufmann, Kollar, Kont

  11. Geometry of Quantum States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2007-12-01

    Preface; 1. Convexity, colours and statistics; 2. Geometry of probability distributions; 3. Much ado about spheres; 4. Complex projective spaces; 5. Outline of quantum mechanics; 6. Coherent states and group actions; 7. The stellar representation; 8. The space of density matrices; 9. Purification of mixed quantum states; 10. Quantum operations; 11. Duality: maps versus states; 12. Density matrices and entropies; 13. Distinguishability measures; 14. Monotone metrics and measures; 15. Quantum entanglement; Epilogue; Appendices; References; Index.

  12. Differential geometry and thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Quevedo, H

    2003-01-01

    In this work we present the first steps of a new approach to the study of thermodynamics in the context of differential geometry. We introduce a fundamental differential 1-form and a metric on a pseudo-Euclidean manifold coordinatized by means of the extensive thermodynamic variables. The study of the connection and the curvature of these objects is initialized in this work by using Cartan structure equations. (Author)

  13. Geometry and Destiny

    CERN Document Server

    Krauss, L M; Krauss, Lawrence M.; Turner, Michael S.

    1999-01-01

    The recognition that the cosmological constant may be non-zero forces us to re-evaluate standard notions about the connection between geometry and the fate of our Universe. An open Universe can recollapse, and a closed Universe can expand forever. As a corollary, we point out that there is no set of cosmological observations we can perform that will unambiguously allow us to determine what the ultimate destiny of the Universe will be.

  14. Inflation from quantum geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojowald, Martin

    2002-12-23

    Quantum geometry predicts that a universe evolves through an inflationary phase at small volume before exiting gracefully into a standard Friedmann phase. This does not require the introduction of additional matter fields with ad hoc potentials; rather, it occurs because of a quantum gravity modification of the kinetic part of ordinary matter Hamiltonians. An application of the same mechanism can explain why the present day cosmological acceleration is so tiny.

  15. Complex geometries in wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Riiber Nielsen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The versatility of wood constructions and traditional wood joints for the production of non standard elements was in focus of a design based research. Herein we established a seamless process from digital design to fabrication. A first research phase centered on the development of a robust parame...... parametric model and a generic design language a later explored the possibilities to construct complex shaped geometries with self registering joints on modern wood crafting machines. The research was carried out as collaboration with industrial partners....

  16. Major design issues of molten carbonate fuel cell power generation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    In addition to the stack, a fuel cell power generation unit requires fuel desulfurization and reforming, fuel and oxidant preheating, process heat removal, waste heat recovery, steam generation, oxidant supply, power conditioning, water supply and treatment, purge gas supply, instrument air supply, and system control. These support facilities add considerable cost and system complexity. Bechtel, as a system integrator of M-C Power`s molten carbonate fuel cell development team, has spent substantial effort to simplify and minimize these supporting facilities to meet cost and reliability goals for commercialization. Similiar to other fuels cells, MCFC faces design challenge of how to comply with codes and standards, achieve high efficiency and part load performance, and meanwhile minimize utility requirements, weight, plot area, and cost. However, MCFC has several unique design issues due to its high operating temperature, use of molten electrolyte, and the requirement of CO2 recycle.

  17. Integral geometry and holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Bartłomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-01

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts — points, distances and angles — are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  18. Hilbert, completeness and geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Venturi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to show how the mathematical content of Hilbert's Axiom of Completeness consists in an attempt to solve the more general problem of the relationship between intuition and formalization. Hilbert found the accordance between these two sides of mathematical knowledge at a logical level, clarifying the necessary and sufficient conditions for a good formalization of geometry. We will tackle the problem of what is, for Hilbert, the definition of geometry. The solution of this problem will bring out how Hilbert's conception of mathematics is not as innovative as his conception of the axiomatic method. The role that the demonstrative tools play in Hilbert's foundational reflections will also drive us to deal with the problem of the purity of methods, explicitly addressed by Hilbert. In this respect Hilbert's position is very innovative and deeply linked to his modern conception of the axiomatic method. In the end we will show that the role played by the Axiom of Completeness for geometry is the same as the Axiom of Induction for arithmetic and of Church-Turing thesis for computability theory. We end this paper arguing that set theory is the right context in which applying the axiomatic method to mathematics and we postpone to a sequel of this work the attempt to offer a solution similar to Hilbert's for the completeness of set theory.

  19. Integral geometry and valuations

    CERN Document Server

    Solanes, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Valuations are finitely additive functionals on the space of convex bodies. Their study has become a central subject in convexity theory, with fundamental applications to integral geometry. In the last years there has been significant progress in the theory of valuations, which in turn has led to important achievements in integral geometry. This book originated from two courses delivered by the authors at the CRM and provides a self-contained introduction to these topics, covering most of the recent advances. The first part, by Semyon Alesker, is devoted to the theory of convex valuations, with emphasis on the latest developments. A special focus is put on the new fundamental structures of the space of valuations discovered after Alesker's irreducibility theorem. Moreover, the author describes the newly developed theory of valuations on manifolds. In the second part, Joseph H. G. Fu gives a modern introduction to integral geometry in the sense of Blaschke and Santaló, based on the notions and tools presented...

  20. Cell phone recycling experiences in the United States and potential recycling options in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Geraldo T R; Chang, Shoou-Yuh

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of cell phone recycling programs currently available in the United States. At the same time, it also provides analyses of the current recycling situation and possible recycling alternatives for Brazil. Although there are several recycling options in the United States, collection rates are still only 10% of all potential devices because customers are not aware of these possibilities. The whole system is financially based on reselling refurbished cell phones and recycled materials to developing countries which represent an effective and strong market. Several recyclers offer funds to collection partners who are either charities or who work with charities while obtaining the materials that they need in order to run their operations. A mobile phone recycling system for Brazil considering the United States experience and the Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) principle is suggested. A deposit/refund/advance-recycling fee is proposed which might be implemented as a voluntary industrial initiative managed by PRO Brazil, a producer responsibility organization. One widespread public-private agreement will integrate all mobile phone stakeholders, and environmental education actions and promotional events will promote citizen's participation.

  1. Generalised Geometry and Flux Vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Larfors, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    This note discusses the connection between generalised geometry and flux compactifications of string theory. Firstly, we explain in a pedestrian manner how the supersymmetry constraints of type II ${\\mathcal{N}}=1$ flux compactifications can be restated as integrability constraints on certain generalised complex structures. This reformulation uses generalised complex geometry, a mathematical framework that geometrizes the B-field. Secondly, we discuss how exceptional generalised geometry may provide a similar geometrization of the RR fields. Thirdly, we examine the connection between generalised geometry and non-geometry, and finally we present recent developments where generalised geometry is used to construct explicit examples of flux compactifications to flat space.

  2. Geometry creation for MCNP by Sabrina and XSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Riper, K.A.

    1994-02-01

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code MCNP is based on a surface description of 3-dimensional geometry. Cells are defined in terms of boolean operations on signed quadratic surfaces. MCNP geometry is entered as a card image file containing coefficients of the surface equations and a list of surfaces and operators describing cells. Several programs are available to assist in creation of the geometry specification, among them Sabrina and the new ``Smart Editor`` code XSM. We briefly describe geometry creation in Sabrina and then discuss XSM in detail. XSM is under development; our discussion is based on the state of XSM as of January 1, 1994.

  3. Planar conjugated polymers containing 9,10-disubstituted phenanthrene units for efficient polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangwu; Kang, Chong; Li, Cuihong; Lu, Zhen; Zhang, Jicheng; Gong, Xue; Zhao, Guangyao; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping; Bo, Zhishan

    2014-06-01

    Four novel conjugated polymers (P1-4) with 9,10-disubstituted phenanthrene (PhA) as the donor unit and 5,6-bis(octyloxy)benzothiadiazole as the acceptor unit are synthesized and characterized. These polymers are of medium bandgaps (2.0 eV), low-lying HOMO energy levels (below -5.3 eV), and high hole mobilities (in the range of 3.6 × 10(-3) to 0.02 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) ). Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells (PSCs) with P1-4:PC71 BM blends as the active layer and an alcohol-soluble fullerene derivative (FN-C60) as the interfacial layer between the active layer and cathode give the best power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.24%, indicating that 9,10-disubstituted PhA are potential donor materials for high-efficiency BHJ PSCs.

  4. Theoretical Study of the π-Bridge Influence with Different Units of Thiophene and Thiazole in Coumarin Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rody Soto-Rojo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eight coumarin derivative dyes were studied by varying the π-bridge size with different thiophene and thiazole units for their potential use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC. Geometry optimization, the energy levels and electron density of the Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital and the Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital, and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra were calculated by Density Functional Theory (DFT and Time-Dependent-DFT. All molecular properties were analyzed to decide which dye was the most efficient. Furthermore, chemical reactivity parameters, such as chemical hardness, electrophilicity index, and electroaccepting power, were obtained and analyzed, whose values predicted the properties of the dyes in addition to the rest of the studied molecular properties. Our calculations allow us to qualitatively study dye molecules and choose the best for use in a DSSC. The effects of π-bridges based on thiophenes, thiazoles, and combinations of the two were reviewed; dyes with three units mainly of thiazole were chosen as the best photosensitizers for DSSC.

  5. The Application of Load-cell Technique in the Study of Armour Unit Responses to Impact Loads Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The slender, complex types of armour units, such as Tetrapods and Dolosse are widely used for rubble mound breakwaters. Many of the recent failures of such structures were caused by unforeseen early breakage of the units, thus revealing an in balance between the strength (structural integrity....... slender armour units can be studied. by load-cell technique. Moreover, the paper presents DoJos design diagrams for the prediction of both breakage and hydraulic stability...

  6. The Application of Load-cell Technique in the Study of Armour Unit Responses to Impact Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Zhou

    1994-01-01

    The slender, complex types of armour units, such as Tetrapods and Dolosse are widely used for rubble mound breakwaters. Many of the recent failures of such structures were caused by unforeseen early breakage of the units, thus revealing an inbalance between the strength (structural integrity...... on slender armour units can be studied by load-cell technique. Moreover, the paper presents Dolos design diagrams for the prediction of both breakage and hydraulic stability....

  7. Introductory non-Euclidean geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Henry Parker

    1963-01-01

    This fine and versatile introduction begins with the theorems common to Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, and then it addresses the specific differences that constitute elliptic and hyperbolic geometry. 1901 edition.

  8. Geometry for the Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moalem, D.

    1977-01-01

    A sequential but non-axiomatic high school geometry course which includes Euclidean, transformation, and analytic geometry and vectors and matrices, and emphasizes the invariance property of transformations, is outlined. Sample problems, solutions, and comments are included. (MN)

  9. Linear connections on matrix geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Madore, J; Mourad, J; Madore, John; Masson, Thierry; Mourad, Jihad

    1994-01-01

    A general definition of a linear connection in noncommutative geometry has been recently proposed. Two examples are given of linear connections in noncommutative geometries which are based on matrix algebras. They both possess a unique metric connection.

  10. Quasi-crystalline geometry for architectural structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wester, Ture; Weinzieri, Barbara

    The quasi-crystal (QC) type of material was discovered in 1983 by Dan Schechtman from Technion, Haifa. This new crystalline structure of material broke totally with the traditional conception of crystals and geometry introducing non-periodic close packing of cells with fivefold symmetry in 3D space...

  11. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Wind River Basin Province (035) Assessment Units Quarter-Mile Cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Cell maps for each oil and gas assessment unit were created by the USGS to illustrate the degree of exploration, type of production, and distribution of production...

  12. Failure mechanisms of additively manufactured porous biomaterials: Effects of porosity and type of unit cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadkhodapour, J; Montazerian, H; Darabi, A Ch; Anaraki, A P; Ahmadi, S M; Zadpoor, A A; Schmauder, S

    2015-10-01

    Since the advent of additive manufacturing techniques, regular porous biomaterials have emerged as promising candidates for tissue engineering scaffolds owing to their controllable pore architecture and feasibility in producing scaffolds from a variety of biomaterials. The architecture of scaffolds could be designed to achieve similar mechanical properties as in the host bone tissue, thereby avoiding issues such as stress shielding in bone replacement procedure. In this paper, the deformation and failure mechanisms of porous titanium (Ti6Al4V) biomaterials manufactured by selective laser melting from two different types of repeating unit cells, namely cubic and diamond lattice structures, with four different porosities are studied. The mechanical behavior of the above-mentioned porous biomaterials was studied using finite element models. The computational results were compared with the experimental findings from a previous study of ours. The Johnson-Cook plasticity and damage model was implemented in the finite element models to simulate the failure of the additively manufactured scaffolds under compression. The computationally predicted stress-strain curves were compared with the experimental ones. The computational models incorporating the Johnson-Cook damage model could predict the plateau stress and maximum stress at the first peak with less than 18% error. Moreover, the computationally predicted deformation modes were in good agreement with the results of scaling law analysis. A layer-by-layer failure mechanism was found for the stretch-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the cubic unit cell, while the failure of the bending-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the diamond unit cells, was accompanied by the shearing bands of 45°.

  13. Identified metabolic signature for assessing red blood cell unit quality is associated with endothelial damage markers and clinical outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordbar, Aarash; Johansson, Pär I.; Paglia, Giuseppe;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been interest in determining whether older red blood cell (RBC) units have negative clinical effects. Numerous observational studies have shown that older RBC units are an independent factor for patient mortality. However, recently published randomized clinical trials have...

  14. Geometry success in 20 mins

    CERN Document Server

    Editors, LearningExpress

    2010-01-01

    Whether you're new to geometry or just looking for a refresher, this completely revised and updated third edition of Geometry Success in 20 Minutes a Day offers a 20-step lesson plan that provides quick and thorough instruction in practical, critical skills. Stripped of unnecessary math jargon but bursting with geometry essentials, Geometry Success in 20 Minutes a Day is an invaluable resource for both students and adults.

  15. High quality-factor fano metasurface comprising a single resonator unit cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Warne, Larry K.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Langston, William L.; Campione, Salvatore; Brener, Igal; Liu, Sheng

    2017-06-20

    A new monolithic resonator metasurface design achieves ultra-high Q-factors while using only one resonator per unit cell. The metasurface relies on breaking the symmetry of otherwise highly symmetric resonators to induce intra-resonator mixing of bright and dark modes (rather than inter-resonator couplings), and is scalable from the near-infrared to radio frequencies and can be easily implemented in dielectric materials. The resulting high-quality-factor Fano metasurface can be used in many sensing, spectral filtering, and modulation applications.

  16. Unit Cell Structure of Crystal Polytypes in InAs and InSb Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegner, Dominik; Panse, Christian; Mandl, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    , wurtzite, and 4H polytypes for InAs and InSb nanowires, using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results are compared to density functional theory calculations. Experiment and theory show that the occurrence of hexagonal bilayers tends to stretch the distances of atomic layers...... parallel to the c axis and to reduce the in-plane distances compared to those in zinc blende. The change of the lattice parameters scales linearly with the hexagonality of the polytype, defined as the fraction of bilayers with hexagonal character within one unit cell....

  17. Unit cell modeling in support of interim performance assessment for low level tank waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, N.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    A unit cell model is used to simulate the base analysis case and related sensitivity cases for the interim performance assessment of low level tank waste disposal. Simulation case results are summarized in terms of fractional contaminant release rates to the vadose zone and to the water table at the unconfined aquifer. Results suggest that the crushed glass water conditioning layer at the top of the facility and the chemical retardation pad at the bottom of the facility can be important components of the facility. Results also suggest that the release rates to the water table are dominated by the release rate from the waste form.

  18. Teaching of Geometry in Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankov, Kiril

    2013-01-01

    Geometry plays an important role in the school mathematics curriculum all around the world. Teaching of geometry varies a lot (Hoyls, Foxman, & Kuchemann, 2001). Many countries revise the objectives, the content, and the approaches to the geometry in school. Studies of the processes show that there are not common trends of these changes…

  19. Elementary algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kendig, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Designed to make learning introductory algebraic geometry as easy as possible, this text is intended for advanced undergraduates and graduate students who have taken a one-year course in algebra and are familiar with complex analysis. This newly updated second edition enhances the original treatment's extensive use of concrete examples and exercises with numerous figures that have been specially redrawn in Adobe Illustrator. An introductory chapter that focuses on examples of curves is followed by a more rigorous and careful look at plane curves. Subsequent chapters explore commutative ring th

  20. Geometry and trigonometry

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This stimulating volume offers a broad collection of the principles of geometry and trigonometry and contains colorful diagrams to bring mathematical principles to life. Subjects are enriched by references to famous mathematicians and their ideas, and the stories are presented in a very comprehensible way. Readers investigate the relationships of points, lines, surfaces, and solids. They study construction methods for drawing figures, a wealth of facts about these figures, and above all, methods to prove the facts. They learn about triangle measure for circular motion, sine and cosine, tangent

  1. Local analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Abhyankar, Shreeram Shankar

    1964-01-01

    This book provides, for use in a graduate course or for self-study by graduate students, a well-motivated treatment of several topics, especially the following: (1) algebraic treatment of several complex variables; (2) geometric approach to algebraic geometry via analytic sets; (3) survey of local algebra; (4) survey of sheaf theory. The book has been written in the spirit of Weierstrass. Power series play the dominant role. The treatment, being algebraic, is not restricted to complex numbers, but remains valid over any complete-valued field. This makes it applicable to situations arising from

  2. Kinematic geometry of gearing

    CERN Document Server

    Dooner, David B

    2012-01-01

    Building on the first edition published in 1995 this new edition of Kinematic Geometry of Gearing has been extensively revised and updated with new and original material. This includes the methodology for general tooth forms, radius of torsure', cylinder of osculation, and cylindroid of torsure; the author has also completely reworked the '3 laws of gearing', the first law re-written to better parallel the existing 'Law of Gearing" as pioneered by Leonard Euler, expanded from Euler's original law to encompass non-circular gears and hypoid gears, the 2nd law of gearing describing a unique relat

  3. From geometry to topology

    CERN Document Server

    Flegg, H Graham

    2001-01-01

    This excellent introduction to topology eases first-year math students and general readers into the subject by surveying its concepts in a descriptive and intuitive way, attempting to build a bridge from the familiar concepts of geometry to the formalized study of topology. The first three chapters focus on congruence classes defined by transformations in real Euclidean space. As the number of permitted transformations increases, these classes become larger, and their common topological properties become intuitively clear. Chapters 4-12 give a largely intuitive presentation of selected topics.

  4. Geometry of conics

    CERN Document Server

    Akopyan, A V

    2007-01-01

    The book is devoted to the properties of conics (plane curves of second degree) that can be formulated and proved using only elementary geometry. Starting with the well-known optical properties of conics, the authors move to less trivial results, both classical and contemporary. In particular, the chapter on projective properties of conics contains a detailed analysis of the polar correspondence, pencils of conics, and the Poncelet theorem. In the chapter on metric properties of conics the authors discuss, in particular, inscribed conics, normals to conics, and the Poncelet theorem for confoca

  5. Geometry I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Geometry I includes methods of proof, points, lines, planes, angles, congruent angles and line segments, triangles, parallelism, quadrilaterals, geometric inequalities, and geometric

  6. Geometry of discrete quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Andrew J.; Ortiz, Gerardo; Sabry, Amr; Tai, Yu-Tsung

    2013-05-01

    Conventional quantum computing entails a geometry based on the description of an n-qubit state using 2n infinite precision complex numbers denoting a vector in a Hilbert space. Such numbers are in general uncomputable using any real-world resources, and, if we have the idea of physical law as some kind of computational algorithm of the universe, we would be compelled to alter our descriptions of physics to be consistent with computable numbers. Our purpose here is to examine the geometric implications of using finite fields Fp and finite complexified fields \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} (based on primes p congruent to 3 (mod4)) as the basis for computations in a theory of discrete quantum computing, which would therefore become a computable theory. Because the states of a discrete n-qubit system are in principle enumerable, we are able to determine the proportions of entangled and unentangled states. In particular, we extend the Hopf fibration that defines the irreducible state space of conventional continuous n-qubit theories (which is the complex projective space \\mathbf {CP}^{2^{n}-1}) to an analogous discrete geometry in which the Hopf circle for any n is found to be a discrete set of p + 1 points. The tally of unit-length n-qubit states is given, and reduced via the generalized Hopf fibration to \\mathbf {DCP}^{2^{n}-1}, the discrete analogue of the complex projective space, which has p^{2^{n}-1} (p-1)\\,\\prod _{k=1}^{n-1} ( p^{2^{k}}+1) irreducible states. Using a measure of entanglement, the purity, we explore the entanglement features of discrete quantum states and find that the n-qubit states based on the complexified field \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} have pn(p - 1)n unentangled states (the product of the tally for a single qubit) with purity 1, and they have pn + 1(p - 1)(p + 1)n - 1 maximally entangled states with purity zero.

  7. Auxiliary power unit based on a solid oxide fuel cell and fuelled with diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jeremy; Boltze, Matthias

    An auxiliary power unit (APU) is presented that is fuelled with diesel, thermally self-sustaining, and based on a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The APU is rated at 1 kW electrical, and can generate electrical power after a 3 h warm-up phase. System features include a "dry" catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) diesel reformer, a 30 cell SOFC stack with an open cathode, and a porous-media afterburner. The APU does not require a supply of external water. The SOFC stack is an outcome of a development partnership with H.C. Starck GmbH and Fraunhofer IKTS, and is discussed in detail in an accompanying paper.

  8. Root cause analysis of the degradation in a unitized regenerative fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Amit C.; Meenakshi, S.; Ghosh, Prakash C.

    2017-03-01

    The present study emphasizes the possible modes of failure of a unitized regenerative fuel cell (URFC) when operated in fuel cell as well as in electrolysis mode at different temperatures viz. 30 °C and 60 °C. The carbon based catalyst (Pt/C) and diffusion layers are used to characterize the degradation of the URFCs. The electrolysis mode of operation is found to dominate the root cause of failure with increase in temperature. Agglomeration and loss of catalyst along with delamination of electrode from membrane are observed. Membrane degradation owing to it's structural as well as chemical damage is seen to be prominent at higher temperature. Characterization techniques such as SEM, TEM and ICP-AES confirm the study showcasing the effect.

  9. Optimizing energy management of decentralized photovoltaic. Fuel cell - direct storage - power supply units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocklisch, Thilo; Schufft, Wolfgang; Bocklisch, Steffen [Chemnitz Univ. of Technology (TUC) (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a new optimizing energy management concept for decentralized power supply units. Main goal is the coordinated utilization of dynamically controllable combined-heat-and-power-plants (e.g. fuel cell cogeneration plants) and electrochemical direct storages (e.g. future electric car batteries) for the active balancing of fluctuating renewable energy generation (e.g. building integrated photovoltaics) and fluctuation electricity consumption. The self-utilization and partial storage of renewable energy helps to stabilize the grid in a ''bottom-up'' approach. The new energy mangement concept features a three-layer control structure, which aims for the optimization of the power flows, minimizing the fuel consumption and the dynamic stress imposed onto the fuel cell. (orig.)

  10. Quasi-crystalline geometry for architectural structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weizierl, Barbara; Wester, Ture

    2001-01-01

    Artikel på CD-Rom 8 sider. The quasi-crystal (QC) type of material was discovered in 1983 by Dan Schechtman from Technion, Haifa. This new crystalline structure of material broke totally with the traditional conception of crystals and geometry introducing non-periodic close packing of cells....... The purpose of the paper is to investigate some possibilities for the application of Quasi-Crystal geometry for structures in architecture. The basis for the investigations is A: to use the Golden Cubes (the two different hexahedra consisting of rhombic facets where the length of the diagonals has the Golden...

  11. Differential geometry based multiscale models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atomistic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations that are

  12. Spherical TiO2 aggregates with different building units for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaohui; Su, Xunjia; Hou, Genliang; Bi, Song; Xiao, Zhou; Jia, Haipeng

    2013-09-07

    Tailoring the architectures of spherical TiO2 aggregates is crucial to obtain superior photovoltaic properties and promote their application in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Herein, we synthesized spherical TiO2 aggregates using different building units, including nanocrystallites, nanorods, nanosheets, and nanotubes, via a hydrothermal method, and studied the effect of the building units on the performances of DSSCs. The aggregates assembled by uniform nanosheet and nanotube building units were synthesized with the use of spherical TiO2 nanorod aggregates as titanium sources in an alkaline hydrothermal reaction. Compared with TiO2 nanoparticles, the spherical TiO2 aggregates possess higher surface area, more efficient light scattering ability, and better electron transport properties. Among the four types of spherical TiO2 aggregates; the nanorod, nanotube, and nanosheet aggregates demonstrate better electron transport properties than the nanocrystallite aggregates; the nanotube and nanosheet aggregates exhibit more efficient light scattering than the nanocrystallite and nanorod aggregates; and the nanotube aggregates show the highest surface area. Thus the DSSC based on nanotube aggregates exhibited the highest energy conversion efficiency of 7.48%, which is 16.0%, 9.7%, and 19.5% higher than those of the DSSCs based on the nanosheet, nanorod, and nanocrystallite aggregates, respectively.

  13. Unit cell-based computer-aided manufacturing system for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Wook; Park, Jeong Hun; Kang, Tae-Yun; Seol, Young-Joon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2012-03-01

    Scaffolds play an important role in the regeneration of artificial tissues or organs. A scaffold is a porous structure with a micro-scale inner architecture in the range of several to several hundreds of micrometers. Therefore, computer-aided construction of scaffolds should provide sophisticated functionality for porous structure design and a tool path generation strategy that can achieve micro-scale architecture. In this study, a new unit cell-based computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) system was developed for the automated design and fabrication of a porous structure with micro-scale inner architecture that can be applied to composite tissue regeneration. The CAM system was developed by first defining a data structure for the computing process of a unit cell representing a single pore structure. Next, an algorithm and software were developed and applied to construct porous structures with a single or multiple pore design using solid freeform fabrication technology and a 3D tooth/spine computer-aided design model. We showed that this system is quite feasible for the design and fabrication of a scaffold for tissue engineering.

  14. Intra-unit-cell nematic charge order in the titanium-oxypnictide family of superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Benjamin A.; Bozin, Emil S.; Hu, Hefei; Zhu, Yimei; Nozaki, Yasumasa; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uemura, Yasutomo J.; Yin, Wei-Guo; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the role played by broken-symmetry states such as charge, spin and orbital orders in the mechanism of emergent properties, such as high-temperature superconductivity, is a major current topic in materials research. That the order may be within one unit cell, such as nematic, was only recently considered theoretically, but its observation in the iron-pnictide and doped cuprate superconductors places it at the forefront of current research. Here, we show that the recently discovered BaTi2Sb2O superconductor and its parent compound BaTi2As2O form a symmetry-breaking nematic ground state that can be naturally explained as an intra-unit-cell nematic charge order with d-wave symmetry, pointing to the ubiquity of the phenomenon. These findings, together with the key structural features in these materials being intermediate between the cuprate and iron-pnictide high-temperature superconducting materials, render the titanium oxypnictides an important new material system to understand the nature of nematic order and its relationship to superconductivity.

  15. Landscape as a model: the importance of geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, E Penelope; Aegerter, James N; Dytham, Calvin; Smith, Graham C

    2007-10-01

    In all models, but especially in those used to predict uncertain processes (e.g., climate change and nonnative species establishment), it is important to identify and remove any sources of bias that may confound results. This is critical in models designed to help support decisionmaking. The geometry used to represent virtual landscapes in spatially explicit models is a potential source of bias. The majority of spatial models use regular square geometry, although regular hexagonal landscapes have also been used. However, there are other ways in which space can be represented in spatially explicit models. For the first time, we explicitly compare the range of alternative geometries available to the modeller, and present a mechanism by which uncertainty in the representation of landscapes can be incorporated. We test how geometry can affect cell-to-cell movement across homogeneous virtual landscapes and compare regular geometries with a suite of irregular mosaics. We show that regular geometries have the potential to systematically bias the direction and distance of movement, whereas even individual instances of landscapes with irregular geometry do not. We also examine how geometry can affect the gross representation of real-world landscapes, and again show that individual instances of regular geometries will always create qualitative and quantitative errors. These can be reduced by the use of multiple randomized instances, though this still creates scale-dependent biases. In contrast, virtual landscapes formed using irregular geometries can represent complex real-world landscapes without error. We found that the potential for bias caused by regular geometries can be effectively eliminated by subdividing virtual landscapes using irregular geometry. The use of irregular geometry appears to offer spatial modellers other potential advantages, which are as yet underdeveloped. We recommend their use in all spatially explicit models, but especially for predictive models

  16. Triangle geometry processing for surface modeling and cartesian grid generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftosmis, Michael J [San Mateo, CA; Melton, John E [Hollister, CA; Berger, Marsha J [New York, NY

    2002-09-03

    Cartesian mesh generation is accomplished for component based geometries, by intersecting components subject to mesh generation to extract wetted surfaces with a geometry engine using adaptive precision arithmetic in a system which automatically breaks ties with respect to geometric degeneracies. During volume mesh generation, intersected surface triangulations are received to enable mesh generation with cell division of an initially coarse grid. The hexagonal cells are resolved, preserving the ability to directionally divide cells which are locally well aligned.

  17. Fuel cell collaboration in the United States. A report to the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-08-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide members of the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells with information regarding collaborative opportunities in the United States. The report is designed to provide an overview of key issues and activities and to provide guidance on strategies for finding U.S. research and commercial partners and gaining access to the U.S. market. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the key drivers of policy at the federal and state government levels regarding hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and provides a perspective of the U.S. industry and key players. It also suggests three general pathways for accessing U.S. opportunities: enhancing visibility; developing vendor relationships; and establishing a formal presence in the U.S. The next sections summarize focus areas for commercial and research activity that currently are of the greatest interest in the U.S. Section 2 describes major programs within the federal government and national laboratories, and discusses various methods for identifying R and D funding opportunities, with an overview of federal acquisition regulations. Section 3 reviews the efforts of several state governments engaging the fuel cell industry as an economic driver and presents an overview of acquisition at the state level. Section 4 discusses university research and development (R and D) and university-industry partnerships. There are 12 appendices attached to the report. These appendices provide more detailed information regarding the key federal government agencies involved in fuel cells and hydrogen, state-specific policies and activities, national laboratories and universities, and other information regarding the fuel cell and hydrogen industry in the U.S. (Author)

  18. Linear geometry thyratron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, S.

    1985-03-01

    The low pressure gas-filled thyratron is scalable in the long dimension. Internally the tube is formed as a tetrode, with an auxiliary grid placed between the cathode and the control grid. A dc or pulsed power source drives the auxiliary grid both to insure uniform cathode emission and to provide a grid-cathode plasma prior to commutation. The high voltage holdoff structure consists of the anode, the control grid and its electrostatic shielding baffles, and a main quartz insulator. A small gas flow supply and exhaust system is used that eliminates the need for a hydrogen reservoir and permits other gases, such as helium, to be used. The thyratron provides a low inductance, high current, long lifetime switch configuration: useful for switch-on applications involving large scale lasers and other similar loads that are distributed in a linear geometry.

  19. Critique of information geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skilling, John, E-mail: skilling@eircom.net [Maximum Entropy Data Consultants Ltd, Kenmare (Ireland)

    2014-12-05

    As applied to probability, information geometry fails because probability distributions do not form a metric space. Probability theory rests on a compelling foundation of elementary symmetries, which also support information (aka minus entropy, Kullback-Leibler) H(p;q) as the unique measure of divergence from source probability distribution q to destination p. Because the only compatible connective H is from≠to asymmetric, H(p;q)≠H(q;p), there can be no compatible geometrical distance (which would necessarily be from=to symmetric). Hence there is no distance relationship compatible with the structure of probability theory. Metrics g and densities sqrt(det(g)) interpreted as prior probabilities follow from the definition of distance, and must fail likewise. Various metrics and corresponding priors have been proposed, Fisher's being the most popular, but all must behave unacceptably. This is illustrated with simple counter-examples.

  20. Real algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bochnak, Jacek; Roy, Marie-Françoise

    1998-01-01

    This book is a systematic treatment of real algebraic geometry, a subject that has strong interrelation with other areas of mathematics: singularity theory, differential topology, quadratic forms, commutative algebra, model theory, complexity theory etc. The careful and clearly written account covers both basic concepts and up-to-date research topics. It may be used as text for a graduate course. The present edition is a substantially revised and expanded English version of the book "Géometrie algébrique réelle" originally published in French, in 1987, as Volume 12 of ERGEBNISSE. Since the publication of the French version the theory has made advances in several directions. Many of these are included in this English version. Thus the English book may be regarded as a completely new treatment of the subject.

  1. Advanced geometries and regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Bulanov, S. V.; Turchetti, G.; Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Stockem, A.; Fiuza, F.; Silva, L. O.; Antici, P.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.

    2013-08-01

    We review and discuss different schemes of laser ion acceleration as well as advanced target geometries in connection with the development of the laser-driven proton source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases, which is a part of the ELIMED project. At the request of the Proceedings Editors and Dr. Stepan Bulanov, University of California, Berkeley, the above article has been updated to include three additional authors: A. Stockem, F. Fiuza, and L. O. Silva. All additional authors have consented to their name being added to the paper. Furthermore, the updated article PDF contains amendments to a number of references as detailed within the pages attached to the end of the updated article PDF file. The updated article was re-published on 8 August 2013.

  2. STREAMLINED APPROACH FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 116: AREA 25 TEST CELL C FACILITYNEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada.

  3. Study on Pyroelectric Harvesters with Various Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Shen Siao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pyroelectric harvesters convert time-dependent temperature variations into electric current. The appropriate geometry of the pyroelectric cells, coupled with the optimal period of temperature fluctuations, is key to driving the optimal load resistance, which enhances the performance of pyroelectric harvesters. The induced charge increases when the thickness of the pyroelectric cells decreases. Moreover, the induced charge is extremely reduced for the thinner pyroelectric cell when not used for the optimal period. The maximum harvested power is achieved when a 100 μm-thick PZT (Lead zirconate titanate cell is used to drive the optimal load resistance of about 40 MΩ. Moreover, the harvested power is greatly reduced when the working resistance diverges even slightly from the optimal load resistance. The stored voltage generated from the 75 μm-thick PZT cell is less than that from the 400 μm-thick PZT cell for a period longer than 64 s. Although the thinner PZT cell is advantageous in that it enhances the efficiency of the pyroelectric harvester, the much thinner 75 μm-thick PZT cell and the divergence from the optimal period further diminish the performance of the pyroelectric cell. Therefore, the designers of pyroelectric harvesters need to consider the coupling effect between the geometry of the pyroelectric cells and the optimal period of temperature fluctuations to drive the optimal load resistance.

  4. Magnetism in curved geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-09-01

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. These recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  5. Impact of the irregular microgeometry of polyurethane foam on the macroscopic acoustic behavior predicted by a unit-cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutres, O; Ouisse, M; Atalla, N; Ichchou, M

    2014-10-01

    This paper deals with the prediction of the macroscopic sound absorption behavior of highly porous polyurethane foams using two unit-cell microstructure-based models recently developed by Doutres, Atalla, and Dong [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064901 (2011); J. Appl. Phys. 113, 054901 (2013)]. In these models, the porous material is idealized as a packing of a tetrakaidecahedra unit-cell representative of the disordered network that constitutes the porous frame. The non-acoustic parameters involved in the classical Johnson-Champoux-Allard model (i.e., porosity, airflow resistivity, tortuosity, etc.) are derived from characteristic properties of the unit-cell and semi-empirical relationships. A global sensitivity analysis is performed on these two models in order to investigate how the variability associated with the measured unit-cell characteristics affects the models outputs. This allows identification of the possible limitations of a unit-cell micro-macro approach due to microstructure irregularity. The sensitivity analysis mainly shows that for moderately and highly reticulated polyurethane foams, the strut length parameter is the key parameter since it greatly impacts three important non-acoustic parameters and causes large uncertainty on the sound absorption coefficient even if its measurement variability is moderate. For foams with a slight inhomogeneity and anisotropy, a micro-macro model associated to cell size measurements should be preferred.

  6. Klein geometries, parabolic geometries and differential equations of finite type

    CERN Document Server

    Abadoglu, Ender

    2009-01-01

    We define the infinitesimal and geometric orders of an effective Klein geometry G/H. Using these concepts, we prove i) For any integer m>1, there exists an effective Klein geometry G/H of infinitesimal order m such that G/H is a projective variety (Corollary 9). ii) An effective Klein geometry G/H of geometric order M defines a differential equation of order M+1 on G/H whose global solution space is G (Proposition 18).

  7. Techno-economic analysis of fuel cell auxiliary power units as alternative to idling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Semant; Chen, Hsieh-Yeh; Schwank, Johannes

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of fuel-cell-based auxiliary power units (APUs), with emphasis on applications in the trucking industry and the military. The APU system is intended to reduce the need for discretionary idling of diesel engines or gas turbines. The analysis considers the options for on-board fuel processing of diesel and compares the two leading fuel cell contenders for automotive APU applications: proton exchange membrane fuel cell and solid oxide fuel cell. As options for on-board diesel reforming, partial oxidation and auto-thermal reforming are considered. Finally, using estimated and projected efficiency data, fuel consumption patterns, capital investment, and operating costs of fuel-cell APUs, an economic evaluation of diesel-based APUs is presented, with emphasis on break-even periods as a function of fuel cost, investment cost, idling time, and idling efficiency. The analysis shows that within the range of parameters studied, there are many conditions where deployment of an SOFC-based APU is economically viable. Our analysis indicates that at an APU system cost of 100 kW -1, the economic break-even period is within 1 year for almost the entire range of conditions. At 500 kW -1 investment cost, a 2-year break-even period is possible except for the lowest end of the fuel consumption range considered. However, if the APU investment cost is 3000 kW -1, break-even would only be possible at the highest fuel consumption scenarios. For Abram tanks, even at typical land delivered fuel costs, a 2-year break-even period is possible for APU investment costs as high as 1100 kW -1.

  8. Higher geometry an introduction to advanced methods in analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Frederick S

    2005-01-01

    For students of mathematics with a sound background in analytic geometry and some knowledge of determinants, this volume has long been among the best available expositions of advanced work on projective and algebraic geometry. Developed from Professor Woods' lectures at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, it bridges the gap between intermediate studies in the field and highly specialized works.With exceptional thoroughness, it presents the most important general concepts and methods of advanced algebraic geometry (as distinguished from differential geometry). It offers a thorough study

  9. Hydrophobicity of silver surfaces with microparticle geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macko, Ján; Oriňaková, Renáta; Oriňak, Andrej; Kovaľ, Karol; Kupková, Miriam; Erdélyi, Branislav; Kostecká, Zuzana; Smith, Roger M.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the duration of the current deposition cycle and the number of current pulses on the geometry of silver microstructured surfaces and on the free surface energy, polarizability, hydrophobicity and thus adhesion force of the silver surfaces has been investigated. The changes in surface hydrophobicity were entirely dependent on the size and density of the microparticles on the surface. The results showed that formation of the silver microparticles was related to number of current pulses, while the duration of one current pulse played only a minor effect on the final surface microparticle geometry and thus on the surface tension and hydrophobicity. The conventional geometry of the silver particles has been transformed to the fractal dimension D. The surface hydrophobicity depended predominantly on the length of the dendrites not on their width. The highest silver surface hydrophobicity was observed on a surface prepared by 30 current pulses with a pulse duration of 1 s, the lowest one when deposition was performed by 10 current pulses with a duration of 0.1 s. The partial surface tension coefficients γDS and polarizability kS of the silver surfaces were calculated. Both parameters can be applied in future applications in living cells adhesion prediction and spectral method selection. Silver films with microparticle geometry showed a lower variability in final surface hydrophobicity when compared to nanostructured surfaces. The comparisons could be used to modify surfaces and to modulate human cells and bacterial adhesion on body implants, surgery instruments and clean surfaces.

  10. An introduction to incidence geometry

    CERN Document Server

    De Bruyn, Bart

    2016-01-01

    This book gives an introduction to the field of Incidence Geometry by discussing the basic families of point-line geometries and introducing some of the mathematical techniques that are essential for their study. The families of geometries covered in this book include among others the generalized polygons, near polygons, polar spaces, dual polar spaces and designs. Also the various relationships between these geometries are investigated. Ovals and ovoids of projective spaces are studied and some applications to particular geometries will be given. A separate chapter introduces the necessary mathematical tools and techniques from graph theory. This chapter itself can be regarded as a self-contained introduction to strongly regular and distance-regular graphs. This book is essentially self-contained, only assuming the knowledge of basic notions from (linear) algebra and projective and affine geometry. Almost all theorems are accompanied with proofs and a list of exercises with full solutions is given at the end...

  11. Algorithm and program for precise determination of unit-cell parameters of single crystal taking into account the sample eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudka, A. P.; Smirnova, E. S.; Verin, I. A.; Bolotina, N. B.

    2017-07-01

    A technique has been developed to refine the unit-cell parameters of single crystals with minimization of the influence of instrumental errors on the result. The corresponding computational procedure HuberUB is added to the software package of Huber-5042 diffractometer with a point detector and closedcycle helium cryostat Displex DE-202. The parameters of unit cell, its orientation, the goniometer zero angles, the sample eccentricity, the distances in the goniometer, and the radiation wavelength were refined by the nonlinear least-squares method, which allows imposition of constraints on the unit-cell parameters, depending on the crystal symmetry. The technique is approved on a LuB12 single crystal. The unit-cell parameters are determined in a temperature range of 20-295 K, with an absolute error not larger than 0.0004 Å (the relative error is of 5 × 10-5). The estimates of the unit-cell parameters obtained by the proposed method are evidenced to be unbiased. Some specific features of the behavior of parameters in the ranges of 120-140 and 20-50 K are revealed, which correlate with the anomalies of the physical properties of the crystal.

  12. Guide to Computational Geometry Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Gravesen, Jens; Anton, François;

    be processed before it is useful. This Guide to Computational Geometry Processing reviews the algorithms for processing geometric data, with a practical focus on important techniques not covered by traditional courses on computer vision and computer graphics. This is balanced with an introduction......, metric space, affine spaces, differential geometry, and finite difference methods for derivatives and differential equations Reviews geometry representations, including polygonal meshes, splines, and subdivision surfaces Examines techniques for computing curvature from polygonal meshes Describes...

  13. Linear algebra and projective geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, Reinhold

    2005-01-01

    Geared toward upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, this text establishes that projective geometry and linear algebra are essentially identical. The supporting evidence consists of theorems offering an algebraic demonstration of certain geometric concepts. These focus on the representation of projective geometries by linear manifolds, of projectivities by semilinear transformations, of collineations by linear transformations, and of dualities by semilinear forms. These theorems lead to a reconstruction of the geometry that constituted the discussion's starting point, within algebra

  14. Finding Proofs in Tarskian Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Beeson, Michael; Wos, Larry

    2016-01-01

    We report on a project to use a theorem prover to find proofs of the theorems in Tarskian geometry. These theorems start with fundamental properties of betweenness, proceed through the derivations of several famous theorems due to Gupta and end with the derivation from Tarski's axioms of Hilbert's 1899 axioms for geometry. They include the four challenge problems left unsolved by Quaife, who two decades ago found some \\Otter proofs in Tarskian geometry (solving challenges issued in Wos's 1998...

  15. Phase structures in fuzzy geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Govindarajan, T R; Gupta, K S; Martin, X

    2012-01-01

    We study phase structures of quantum field theories in fuzzy geometries. Several examples of fuzzy geometries as well as QFT's on such geometries are considered. They are fuzzy spheres and beyond as well as noncommutative deformations of BTZ blackholes. Analysis is done analytically and through simulations. Several features like novel stripe phases as well as spontaneous symmetry breaking avoiding Colemen, Mermin, Wagner theorem are brought out. Also we establish that these phases are stable due to topological obstructions.

  16. Thermodynamics of Asymptotically Conical Geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Gibbons, Gary W; Saleem, Zain H

    2015-06-12

    We study the thermodynamical properties of a class of asymptotically conical geometries known as "subtracted geometries." We derive the mass and angular momentum from the regulated Komar integral and the Hawking-Horowitz prescription and show that they are equivalent. By deriving the asymptotic charges, we show that the Smarr formula and the first law of thermodynamics hold. We also propose an analog of Christodulou-Ruffini inequality. The analysis can be generalized to other asymptotically conical geometries.

  17. Exfoliation of natural van der Waals heterostructures to a single unit cell thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velický, Matěj; Toth, Peter S.; Rakowski, Alexander M.; Rooney, Aidan P.; Kozikov, Aleksey; Woods, Colin R.; Mishchenko, Artem; Fumagalli, Laura; Yin, Jun; Zólyomi, Viktor; Georgiou, Thanasis; Haigh, Sarah J.; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Dryfe, Robert A. W.

    2017-02-01

    Weak interlayer interactions in van der Waals crystals facilitate their mechanical exfoliation to monolayer and few-layer two-dimensional materials, which often exhibit striking physical phenomena absent in their bulk form. Here we utilize mechanical exfoliation to produce a two-dimensional form of a mineral franckeite and show that the phase segregation of chemical species into discrete layers at the sub-nanometre scale facilitates franckeite's layered structure and basal cleavage down to a single unit cell thickness. This behaviour is likely to be common in a wider family of complex minerals and could be exploited for a single-step synthesis of van der Waals heterostructures, as an alternative to artificial stacking of individual two-dimensional crystals. We demonstrate p-type electrical conductivity and remarkable electrochemical properties of the exfoliated crystals, showing promise for a range of applications, and use the density functional theory calculations of franckeite's electronic band structure to rationalize the experimental results.

  18. Prognosis of Allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Recipients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgaard, Sidsel Christy; Nielsen, Jonas; Lindmark, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a procedure with inherent complications and intensive care may be necessary. We evaluated the short- and long-term outcomes of the HSCT recipients requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: We...... ventilation had a statistically significant effect on in-ICU (p = 0.02), 6-month (p = 0.049) and 1-year (p = 0.014) mortality. Renal replacement therapy also had a statistically significant effect on in-hospital (p = 0.038) and 6-month (p = 0.026) mortality. Short ICU admissions, i.e. ... to the ICU was confirmed in our study. Mechanical ventilation, renal replacement therapy and an ICU admission of ≥10 days were each risk factors for mortality in the first year after ICU admission....

  19. An explicit algorithm for fully flexible unit cell simulation with recursive thermostat chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwangsub; Cho, Maenghyo

    2008-10-28

    Through the combination of the recursive multiple thermostat (RMT) Nose-Poincare and Parrinello-Rahman methods, the recursive multiple thermostat chained fully flexible unit cell (RMT-NsigmaT) molecular dynamics method is proposed for isothermal-isobaric simulation. The RMT method is known to have the advantage of achieving the ergodicity that is required for canonical sampling of the harmonic oscillator. Thus, an explicit time integration algorithm is developed for RMT-NsigmaT. We examine the ergodicity for various parameters of RMT-NsigmaT using bulk and thin film structures with different numbers of copper atoms and thicknesses in various environments. Through the numerical simulations, we conclude that the RMT-NsigmaT method is advantageous in the cases of lower temperatures.

  20. Planetary Image Geometry Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Robert C.; Pariser, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    The Planetary Image Geometry (PIG) library is a multi-mission library used for projecting images (EDRs, or Experiment Data Records) and managing their geometry for in-situ missions. A collection of models describes cameras and their articulation, allowing application programs such as mosaickers, terrain generators, and pointing correction tools to be written in a multi-mission manner, without any knowledge of parameters specific to the supported missions. Camera model objects allow transformation of image coordinates to and from view vectors in XYZ space. Pointing models, specific to each mission, describe how to orient the camera models based on telemetry or other information. Surface models describe the surface in general terms. Coordinate system objects manage the various coordinate systems involved in most missions. File objects manage access to metadata (labels, including telemetry information) in the input EDRs and RDRs (Reduced Data Records). Label models manage metadata information in output files. Site objects keep track of different locations where the spacecraft might be at a given time. Radiometry models allow correction of radiometry for an image. Mission objects contain basic mission parameters. Pointing adjustment ("nav") files allow pointing to be corrected. The object-oriented structure (C++) makes it easy to subclass just the pieces of the library that are truly mission-specific. Typically, this involves just the pointing model and coordinate systems, and parts of the file model. Once the library was developed (initially for Mars Polar Lander, MPL), adding new missions ranged from two days to a few months, resulting in significant cost savings as compared to rewriting all the application programs for each mission. Currently supported missions include Mars Pathfinder (MPF), MPL, Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix, and Mars Science Lab (MSL). Applications based on this library create the majority of operational image RDRs for those missions. A

  1. A diesel fuel processor for fuel-cell-based auxiliary power unit applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsun, Remzi Can; Krekel, Daniel; Pasel, Joachim; Prawitz, Matthias; Peters, Ralf; Stolten, Detlef

    2017-07-01

    Producing a hydrogen-rich gas from diesel fuel enables the efficient generation of electricity in a fuel-cell-based auxiliary power unit. In recent years, significant progress has been achieved in diesel reforming. One issue encountered is the stable operation of water-gas shift reactors with real reformates. A new fuel processor is developed using a commercial shift catalyst. The system is operated using optimized start-up and shut-down strategies. Experiments with diesel and kerosene fuels show slight performance drops in the shift reactor during continuous operation for 100 h. CO concentrations much lower than the target value are achieved during system operation in auxiliary power unit mode at partial loads of up to 60%. The regeneration leads to full recovery of the shift activity. Finally, a new operation strategy is developed whereby the gas hourly space velocity of the shift stages is re-designed. This strategy is validated using different diesel and kerosene fuels, showing a maximum CO concentration of 1.5% at the fuel processor outlet under extreme conditions, which can be tolerated by a high-temperature PEFC. The proposed operation strategy solves the issue of strong performance drop in the shift reactor and makes this technology available for reducing emissions in the transportation sector.

  2. Digital geometry in image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    Exploring theories and applications developed during the last 30 years, Digital Geometry in Image Processing presents a mathematical treatment of the properties of digital metric spaces and their relevance in analyzing shapes in two and three dimensions. Unlike similar books, this one connects the two areas of image processing and digital geometry, highlighting important results of digital geometry that are currently used in image analysis and processing. The book discusses different digital geometries in multi-dimensional integral coordinate spaces. It also describes interesting properties of

  3. Initiation to global Finslerian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Akbar-Zadeh, Hassan

    2006-01-01

    After a brief description of the evolution of thinking on Finslerian geometry starting from Riemann, Finsler, Berwald and Elie Cartan, the book gives a clear and precise treatment of this geometry. The first three chapters develop the basic notions and methods, introduced by the author, to reach the global problems in Finslerian Geometry. The next five chapters are independent of each other, and deal with among others the geometry of generalized Einstein manifolds, the classification of Finslerian manifolds of constant sectional curvatures. They also give a treatment of isometric, affine, p

  4. DFT and TD-DFT study on geometries, electronic structures and electronic absorption of some metal free dye sensitizers for dye sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, T; Aroulmoji, V; Ravindran, R Samson; Müller, M; Ranjitha, S; Rajarajan, G; Anbarasan, P M

    2015-01-25

    The geometries, electronic structures, polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of 2-hydroxynaphthalene-1,4-dione (henna1), 3-(5-((1E)-2-(1,4-dihydro-1,4-dioxonaphthalen-3-yloxy) vinyl) thiophen-2-yl)-2-isocyanoacrylic acid (henna2) and anthocyanin dye sensitizers were studied based on density functional theory (DFT) using the hybrid functional B3LYP. The Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectrum was investigated by using a hybrid method which combines the properties and dynamics of many-body in the presence of time-dependent (TD) potentials, i.e. TDSCF-DFT (B3LYP). Features of the electronic absorption spectrum in the visible and near-UV regions were plotted and assigned based on TD-DFT calculations. Due to the absorption, bands of the metal-organic compound are n→π(*) present. The calculated results suggest that the three lowest energy excited states of the investigated dye sensitizers are due to photoinduced electron transfer processes. The interfacial electron transfer between semiconductor TiO2 electrode and dye sensitizer is owing to an electron injection process from excited dye to the semiconductor's conduction band. The role of linking the henna1 dye with a carboxylic acid via a thiophene bridge was analyzed. The results are that using a stronger π-conjugate bridge as well as a strong donator and acceptor group enhances the efficiency.

  5. Null twisted geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Speziale, Simone

    2013-01-01

    We define and investigate a quantisation of null hypersurfaces in the context of loop quantum gravity on a fixed graph. The main tool we use is the parametrisation of the theory in terms of twistors, which has already proved useful in discussing the interpretation of spin networks as the quantization of twisted geometries. The classical formalism can be extended in a natural way to null hypersurfaces, with the Euclidean polyhedra replaced by null polyhedra with space-like faces, and SU(2) by the little group ISO(2). The main difference is that the simplicity constraints present in the formalims are all first class, and the symplectic reduction selects only the helicity subgroup of the little group. As a consequence, information on the shapes of the polyhedra is lost, and the result is a much simpler, abelian geometric picture. It can be described by an Euclidean singular structure on the 2-dimensional space-like surface defined by a foliation of space-time by null hypersurfaces. This geometric structure is na...

  6. Matrix Information Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatia, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    This book is an outcome of the Indo-French Workshop on Matrix Information Geometries (MIG): Applications in Sensor and Cognitive Systems Engineering, which was held in Ecole Polytechnique and Thales Research and Technology Center, Palaiseau, France, in February 23-25, 2011. The workshop was generously funded by the Indo-French Centre for the Promotion of Advanced Research (IFCPAR).  During the event, 22 renowned invited french or indian speakers gave lectures on their areas of expertise within the field of matrix analysis or processing. From these talks, a total of 17 original contribution or state-of-the-art chapters have been assembled in this volume. All articles were thoroughly peer-reviewed and improved, according to the suggestions of the international referees. The 17 contributions presented  are organized in three parts: (1) State-of-the-art surveys & original matrix theory work, (2) Advanced matrix theory for radar processing, and (3) Matrix-based signal processing applications.  

  7. Functional integration over geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Mottola, E

    1995-01-01

    The geometric construction of the functional integral over coset spaces {\\cal M}/{\\cal G} is reviewed. The inner product on the cotangent space of infinitesimal deformations of \\cal M defines an invariant distance and volume form, or functional integration measure on the full configuration space. Then, by a simple change of coordinates parameterizing the gauge fiber \\cal G, the functional measure on the coset space {\\cal M}/{\\cal G} is deduced. This change of integration variables leads to a Jacobian which is entirely equivalent to the Faddeev-Popov determinant of the more traditional gauge fixed approach in non-abelian gauge theory. If the general construction is applied to the case where \\cal G is the group of coordinate reparametrizations of spacetime, the continuum functional integral over geometries, {\\it i.e.} metrics modulo coordinate reparameterizations may be defined. The invariant functional integration measure is used to derive the trace anomaly and effective action for the conformal part of the me...

  8. Coframe geometry and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Itin, Yakov

    2007-01-01

    The possible extensions of GR for description of fermions on a curved space, for supergravity and for loop quantum gravity require a richer set of 16 independent variables. These variables can be assembled in a coframe field, i.e., a local set of four linearly independent 1-forms. In the ordinary formulation, the coframe gravity does not have any connection to a specific geometry even being constructed from the geometrical meaningful objects. A geometrization of the coframe gravity is an aim of this paper. We construct a complete class of the coframe connections which are linear in the first order derivatives of the coframe field on an $n$ dimensional manifolds with and without a metric. The subclasses of the torsion-free, metric-compatible and flat connections are derived. We also study the behavior of the geometrical structures under local transformations of the coframe. The remarkable fact is an existence of a subclass of connections which are invariant when the infinitesimal transformations satisfy the Ma...

  9. Ostrich eggs geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šárka Nedomová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Precise quantification of the profile of egg can provide a powerful tool for the analysis of egg shape for various biological problems. A new approach to the geometry of a Ostrich’s egg profile is presented here using an analysing the egg’s digital photo by edge detection techniques. The obtained points on the eggshell counter are fitted by the Fourier series. The obtained equations describing an egg profile have been used to calculate radii of curvature. The radii of the curvature at the important point of the egg profile (sharp end, blunt end and maximum thickness are independent on the egg shape index. The exact values of the egg surface and the egg volume have been obtained. These quantities are also independent on the egg shape index. These quantities can be successively estimated on the basis of simplified equations which are expressed in terms of the egg length, L¸ and its width, B. The surface area of the eggshells also exhibits good correlation with the egg long circumference length. Some limitations of the most used procedures have been also shown.

  10. Geometries from field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Sinya; Kikuchi, Kengo; Onogi, Tetsuya

    2015-10-01

    We propose a method to define a d+1-dimensional geometry from a d-dimensional quantum field theory in the 1/N expansion. We first construct a d+1-dimensional field theory from the d-dimensional one via the gradient-flow equation, whose flow time t represents the energy scale of the system such that trArr 0 corresponds to the ultraviolet and trArr infty to the infrared. We then define the induced metric from d+1-dimensional field operators. We show that the metric defined in this way becomes classical in the large-N limit, in the sense that quantum fluctuations of the metric are suppressed as 1/N due to the large-N factorization property. As a concrete example, we apply our method to the O(N) nonlinear σ model in two dimensions. We calculate the 3D induced metric, which is shown to describe an anti-de Sitter space in the massless limit. Finally, we discuss several open issues for future studies.

  11. Optimum Stirling engine geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senft, J.R. [University of Wisconsin, River Walls, WI (United States). Mathematics Dept.

    2002-07-01

    This paper combines the author's work on mechanical efficiency of reciprocating engines with the classic Schmidt thermodynamic model for Stirling engines and revisits the problem of identifying optimal engine geometry. All previous optimizations using the Schmidt theory focused on obtaining a maximal specific indicated cyclic work. This does not necessarily produce the highest shaft output. Indeed, some optima based upon indicated work would yield engines that cannot run at all due to excessive intrinsic mechanical losses. The analysis presented in this paper shows how to optimize for shaft or brake work output. Specifically, it presents solutions to the problem of finding the piston-to-displacer swept volume ratio and phase angle which will give the maximum brake output for a given total swept volume, given temperature extremes, a given mean operating pressure, and a given engine mechanism effectiveness. The paper covers the split-cylinder or gamma-type Stirling in detail, serving as a model for similar analysis of the other Stirling engine configurations. (author)

  12. Fuel cell system including a unit for electrical isolation of a fuel cell stack from a manifold assembly and method therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley; Dana A. , Farooque; Mohammad , Davis; Keith

    2007-10-02

    A fuel cell system with improved electrical isolation having a fuel cell stack with a positive potential end and a negative potential, a manifold for use in coupling gases to and from a face of the fuel cell stack, an electrical isolating assembly for electrically isolating the manifold from the stack, and a unit for adjusting an electrical potential of the manifold such as to impede the flow of electrolyte from the stack across the isolating assembly.

  13. Bidirectional relationship of mast cells-neurovascular unit communication in neuroinflammation and its involvement in POCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nana; Zhang, Xiang; Dong, Hongquan; Hu, Youli; Qian, Yanning

    2017-03-30

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) has been hypothesized to be mediated by surgery-induced neuroinflammation, which is also a key element in the pathobiology of neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and neuropsychiatric disorders. There is extensive communication between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Inflammation resulting from activation of the innate immune system cells in the periphery can impact central nervous system behaviors, such as cognitive performance. Mast cells (MCs), as the"first responders" in the CNS, can initiate, amplify, and prolong other immune and nervous responses upon activation. In addition, MCs and their secreted mediators modulate inflammatory processes in multiple CNS pathologies and can thereby either contribute to neurological damage or confer neuroprotection. Neuroinflammation has been considered to be linked to neurovascular dysfunction in several neurological disorders. This review will provide a brief overview of the bidirectional relationship of MCs-neurovascular unit communication in neuroinflammation and its involvement in POCD, providing a new and unique therapeutic target for the adjuvant treatment of POCD.

  14. Two-Dimensional Simulation of Mass Transfer in Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cells under Operation Mode Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional, single-phase, isothermal, multicomponent, transient model is built to investigate the transport phenomena in unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs under the condition of switching from the fuel cell (FC mode to the water electrolysis (WE mode. The model is coupled with an electrochemical reaction. The proton exchange membrane (PEM is selected as the solid electrolyte of the URFC. The work is motivated by the need to elucidate the complex mass transfer and electrochemical process under operation mode switching in order to improve the performance of PEM URFC. A set of governing equations, including conservation of mass, momentum, species, and charge, are considered. These equations are solved by the finite element method. The simulation results indicate the distributions of hydrogen, oxygen, water mass fraction, and electrolyte potential response to the transient phenomena via saltation under operation mode switching. The hydrogen mass fraction gradients are smaller than the oxygen mass fraction gradients. The average mass fractions of the reactants (oxygen and hydrogen and product (water exhibit evident differences between each layer in the steady state of the FC mode. By contrast, the average mass fractions of the reactant (water and products (oxygen and hydrogen exhibit only slight differences between each layer in the steady state of the WE mode. Under either the FC mode or the WE mode, the duration of the transient state is only approximately 0.2 s.

  15. Additively Manufactured Open-Cell Porous Biomaterials Made from Six Different Space-Filling Unit Cells: The Mechanical and Morphological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Ahmadi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the mechanical properties of bone-mimicking porous biomaterials are a function of the morphological properties of the porous structure, including the configuration and size of the repeating unit cell from which they are made. However, the literature on this topic is limited, primarily because of the challenge in fabricating porous biomaterials with arbitrarily complex morphological designs. In the present work, we studied the relationship between relative density (RD of porous Ti6Al4V EFI alloy and five compressive properties of the material, namely elastic gradient or modulus (Es20–70, first maximum stress, plateau stress, yield stress, and energy absorption. Porous structures with different RD and six different unit cell configurations (cubic (C, diamond (D, truncated cube (TC, truncated cuboctahedron (TCO, rhombic dodecahedron (RD, and rhombicuboctahedron (RCO were fabricated using selective laser melting. Each of the compressive properties increased with increase in RD, the relationship being of a power law type. Clear trends were seen in the influence of unit cell configuration and porosity on each of the compressive properties. For example, in terms of Es20–70, the structures may be divided into two groups: those that are stiff (comprising those made using C, TC, TCO, and RCO unit cell and those that are compliant (comprising those made using D and RD unit cell.

  16. Surrogate Modeling for Geometry Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas Larrazabal, Marielba de la Caridad; Abraham, Yonas; Holzwarth, Natalie;

    2009-01-01

    A new approach for optimizing the nuclear geometry of an atomic system is described. Instead of the original expensive objective function (energy functional), a small number of simpler surrogates is used.......A new approach for optimizing the nuclear geometry of an atomic system is described. Instead of the original expensive objective function (energy functional), a small number of simpler surrogates is used....

  17. Analytic Geometry, A Tentative Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helwig, G. Alfred; And Others

    This teacher's guide for a semester course in analytic geometry is based on the text "Analytic Geometry" by W. K. Morrill. Included is a daily schedule of suggested topics and homework assignments. Specific teaching hints are also given. The content of the course includes point and plane vectors, straight lines, point and space vectors, planes,…

  18. An extended polarization model to study the influence of current collector geometry of large-format lithium-ion pouch cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosch, Stephan; Rheinfeld, Alexander; Erhard, Simon V.; Jossen, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    In this work, depth-of-discharge and temperature distribution of a large-format lithium-ion pouch cell are examined by means of a two-dimensional electro-thermal polarization model. A method of improving the dynamic behavior of the model while maintaining its accuracy under constant current loads by applying intermittent charge and discharge data is given. The model is validated with the aid of experimental data gained from dynamic and constant current discharge profiles applied to a commercial 40 Ah Li-ion pouch cell. Two major design studies are carried out focusing on a variation of geometrical parameters, namely the size and the positioning of the cell tabs. For each design, the influence of current collector thickness on the uniformity of the temperature and depth-of-discharge distribution is investigated during a 4C constant current discharge operation. Simulation results show that reducing the current collector thickness results in a moderate increase of 3 °C in maximum temperature and 1.5% in depth-of-discharge imbalance if the tab size is increased. In consequence, lowering the share of inactive components within a lithium-ion cell by optimizing the thickness of the current collector foils should be further considered to enhance the performance of typical lithium-ion cell designs.

  19. Basic algebraic geometry, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Shafarevich, Igor Rostislavovich

    1994-01-01

    Shafarevich Basic Algebraic Geometry 2 The second edition of Shafarevich's introduction to algebraic geometry is in two volumes. The second volume covers schemes and complex manifolds, generalisations in two different directions of the affine and projective varieties that form the material of the first volume. Two notable additions in this second edition are the section on moduli spaces and representable functors, motivated by a discussion of the Hilbert scheme, and the section on Kähler geometry. The book ends with a historical sketch discussing the origins of algebraic geometry. From the Zentralblatt review of this volume: "... one can only respectfully repeat what has been said about the first part of the book (...): a great textbook, written by one of the leading algebraic geometers and teachers himself, has been reworked and updated. As a result the author's standard textbook on algebraic geometry has become even more important and valuable. Students, teachers, and active researchers using methods of al...

  20. Index Theorems on Torsional Geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Tetsuji

    2007-01-01

    We study various topological invariants on a differential geometry in the presence of a totally anti-symmetric torsion H under the closed condition dH=0. By using the identification between the Clifford algebra on a geometry and the canonical quantization condition of fermion in the quantum mechanics, we construct the N=1 quantum mechanical sigma model in the Hamiltonian formalism and extend this model to N=2 system, equipped with the totally anti-symmetric tensor associated with the torsion on the target space geometry. Next we construct transition elements in the Lagrangian path integral formalism and apply them to the analyses of the Witten indices in supersymmetric systems. We improve the formulation of the Dirac index on the torsional geometry which has already been studied. We also formulate the Euler characteristic and the Hirzebruch signature on the torsional geometry.

  1. Inhibition of Autophagy Enhances Curcumin United light irradiation-induced Oxidative Stress and Tumor Growth Suppression in Human Melanoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Tianhui; Tian, Yan; Mei, Zhusong; Guo, Guangjin

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin carcinoma, which possesses fast propagating and highly invasive characteristics. Curcumin is a natural phenol compound that has various biological activities, such as anti-proliferative and apoptosis-accelerating impacts on tumor cells. Unfortunately, the therapeutical activities of Cur are severely hindered due to its extremely low bioavailability. In this study, a cooperative therapy of low concentration Cur combined with red united blue light irradiation was performed to inspect the synergistic effects on the apoptosis, proliferation and autophagy in human melanoma A375 cell. The results showed that red united blue light irradiation efficaciously synergized with Cur to trigger oxidative stress-mediated cell death, induce apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. Meanwhile, Western blotting revealed that combined disposure induced the formation of autophagosomes. Conversely, inhibition of the autophagy enhanced apoptosis, obstructed cell cycle arrest and induced reversible proliferation arrest to senescence. These findings suggest that Cur combined with red united blue light irradiation could generate photochemo-preventive effects via enhancing apoptosis and triggering autophagy, and pharmacological inhibition of autophagy convert reversible arrested cells to senescence, therefore reducing the possibility that damaged cells might escape programmed death. PMID:27502897

  2. Growth Factor Independence-1 (Gfi1) Is Required for Pancreatic Acinar Unit Formation and Centroacinar Cell Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Xiaoling; Nyeng, Pia; Xiao, Fan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The genetic specification of the compartmentalized pancreatic acinar/centroacinar unit is poorly understood. Growth factor independence-1 (Gfi1) is a zinc finger transcriptional repressor that regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, pre-T-cell differentiation, formation...... of pancreatic acinar cells as well as the centroacinar cells (CACs) in Gfi1(-/-) mice when compared with wild-type littermates. Pancreatic endocrine differentiation, islet architecture, and function were unaffected. Organ domain patterning and the formation of ductal cells occurred normally during the murine...... of granulocytes, inner ear hair cells, and the development of secretory cell types in the intestine. As GFI1/Gfi1 is expressed in human and rodent pancreas, we characterized the potential function of Gfi1 in mouse pancreatic development. METHODS: Gfi1 knockout mice were analyzed at histological and molecular...

  3. Latent geometry of bipartite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsak, Maksim; Papadopoulos, Fragkiskos; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2017-03-01

    Despite the abundance of bipartite networked systems, their organizing principles are less studied compared to unipartite networks. Bipartite networks are often analyzed after projecting them onto one of the two sets of nodes. As a result of the projection, nodes of the same set are linked together if they have at least one neighbor in common in the bipartite network. Even though these projections allow one to study bipartite networks using tools developed for unipartite networks, one-mode projections lead to significant loss of information and artificial inflation of the projected network with fully connected subgraphs. Here we pursue a different approach for analyzing bipartite systems that is based on the observation that such systems have a latent metric structure: network nodes are points in a latent metric space, while connections are more likely to form between nodes separated by shorter distances. This approach has been developed for unipartite networks, and relatively little is known about its applicability to bipartite systems. Here, we fully analyze a simple latent-geometric model of bipartite networks and show that this model explains the peculiar structural properties of many real bipartite systems, including the distributions of common neighbors and bipartite clustering. We also analyze the geometric information loss in one-mode projections in this model and propose an efficient method to infer the latent pairwise distances between nodes. Uncovering the latent geometry underlying real bipartite networks can find applications in diverse domains, ranging from constructing efficient recommender systems to understanding cell metabolism.

  4. The effects of realistic synaptic distribution and 3D geometry on signal integration and extracellular field generation of hippocampal pyramidal cells and inhibitory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila I Gulyas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In vivo and in vitro multichannel field and somatic intracellular recordings are frequently used to study mechanisms of network pattern generation. When interpreting these data, neurons are often implicitly considered as electrotonically compact cylinders with a homogeneous distribution of excitatory and inhibitory inputs. However, the actual distributions of dendritic length, diameter, and the densities of excitatory and inhibitory input are non-uniform and cell type-specific. We first review quantitative data on the dendritic structure and synaptic input and output distribution of pyramidal cells and interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 area. Second, using multicompartmental passive models of four different types of neurons, we quantitatively explore the effect of differences in dendritic structure and synaptic distribution on the errors and biases of voltage clamp measurements of inhibitory and excitatory postsynaptic currents. Finally, using the 3-dimensional distribution of dendrites and synaptic inputs we calculate how different inhibitory and excitatory inputs contribute to the generation of local field potential in the hippocampus. We analyze these effects at different realistic background activity levels as synaptic bombardment influences neuronal conductance and thus the propagation of signals in the dendritic tree.We conclude that, since dendrites are electrotonically long and entangled in 3D, somatic intracellular and field potential recordings miss the majority of dendritic events in some cell types, and thus overemphasize the importance of perisomatic inhibitory inputs and belittle the importance of complex dendritic processing. Modeling results also suggest that pyramidal cells and inhibitory neurons probably use different input integration strategies. In pyramidal cells, second- and higher-order thin dendrites are relatively well-isolated from each other, which may support branch-specific local processing as suggested by studies

  5. basement reservoir geometry and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, bastien; Geraud, yves; Diraison, marc

    2017-04-01

    Basement reservoirs are nowadays frequently investigated for deep-seated fluid resources (e.g. geothermal energy, groundwater, hydrocarbons). The term 'basement' generally refers to crystalline and metamorphic formations, where matrix porosity is negligible in fresh basement rocks. Geothermal production of such unconventional reservoirs is controlled by brittle structures and altered rock matrix, resulting of a combination of different tectonic, hydrothermal or weathering phenomena. This work aims to characterize the petro-structural and petrophysical properties of two basement surface analogue case studies in geological extensive setting (the Albert Lake rift in Uganda; the Ifni proximal margin of the South West Morocco Atlantic coast). Different datasets, using field structural study, geophysical acquisition and laboratory petrophysical measurements, were integrated to describe the multi-scale geometry of the porous network of such fractured and weathered basement formations. This study points out the multi-scale distribution of all the features constituting the reservoir, over ten orders of magnitude from the pluri-kilometric scale of the major tectonics structures to the infra-millimetric scale of the secondary micro-porosity of fractured and weathered basements units. Major fault zones, with relatively thick and impermeable fault core structures, control the 'compartmentalization' of the reservoir by dividing it into several structural blocks. The analysis of these fault zones highlights the necessity for the basement reservoirs to be characterized by a highly connected fault and fracture system, where structure intersections represent the main fluid drainage areas between and within the reservoir's structural blocks. The suitable fluid storage areas in these reservoirs correspond to the damage zone of all the fault structures developed during the tectonic evolution of the basement and the weathered units of the basement roof developed during pre

  6. The Geometry Description Markup Language

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RadovanChytracek

    2001-01-01

    Currently,a lot of effort is being put on designing complex detectors.A number of simulation and reconstruction frameworks and applications have been developed with the aim to make this job easier.A very important role in this activity is played by the geometry description of the detector apparatus layout and its working environment.However,no real common approach to represent geometry data is available and such data can be found in various forms starting from custom semi-structured text files,source code (C/C++/FORTRAN),to XML and database solutions.The XML(Extensible Markup Language)has proven to provide an interesting approach for describing detector geometries,with several different but incompatible XML-based solutions existing.Therefore,interoperability and geometry data exchange among different frameworks is not possible at present.This article introduces a markup language for geometry descriptions.Its aim is to define a common approach for sharing and exchanging of geometry description data.Its requirements and design have been driven by experience and user feedback from existing projects which have their geometry description in XML.

  7. Hamilton geometry: Phase space geometry from modified dispersion relations

    CERN Document Server

    Barcaroli, Leonardo; Gubitosi, Giulia; Loret, Niccoló; Pfeifer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We describe the Hamilton geometry of the phase space of particles whose motion is characterised by general dispersion relations. In this framework spacetime and momentum space are naturally curved and intertwined, allowing for a simultaneous description of both spacetime curvature and non-trivial momentum space geometry. We consider as explicit examples two models for Planck-scale modified dispersion relations, inspired from the $q$-de Sitter and $\\kappa$-Poincar\\'e quantum groups. In the first case we find the expressions for the momentum and position dependent curvature of spacetime and momentum space, while for the second case the manifold is flat and only the momentum space possesses a nonzero, momentum dependent curvature. In contrast, for a dispersion relation that is induced by a spacetime metric, as in General Relativity, the Hamilton geometry yields a flat momentum space and the usual curved spacetime geometry with only position dependent geometric objects.

  8. Effects of Dexamethasone on Satellite Cells and Tissue Engineered Skeletal Muscle Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syverud, Brian C; VanDusen, Keith W; Larkin, Lisa M

    2016-03-01

    Tissue engineered skeletal muscle has potential for application as a graft source for repairing soft tissue injuries, a model for testing pharmaceuticals, and a biomechanical actuator system for soft robots. However, engineered muscle to date has not produced forces comparable to native muscle, limiting its potential for repair and for use as an in vitro model for pharmaceutical testing. In this study, we examined the trophic effects of dexamethasone (DEX), a glucocorticoid that stimulates myoblast differentiation and fusion into myotubes, on our tissue engineered three-dimensional skeletal muscle units (SMUs). Using our established SMU fabrication protocol, muscle isolates were cultured with three experimental DEX concentrations (5, 10, and 25 nM) and compared to untreated controls. Following seeding onto a laminin-coated Sylgard substrate, the administration of DEX was initiated on day 0 or day 6 in growth medium or on day 9 after the switch to differentiation medium and was sustained until the completion of SMU fabrication. During this process, total cell proliferation was measured with a BrdU assay, and myogenesis and structural advancement of muscle cells were observed through immunostaining for MyoD, myogenin, desmin, and α-actinin. After SMU formation, isometric tetanic force production was measured to quantify function. The histological and functional assessment of the SMU showed that the administration of 10 nM DEX beginning on either day 0 or day 6 yielded optimal SMUs. These optimized SMUs exhibited formation of advanced sarcomeric structure and significant increases in myotube diameter and myotube fusion index, compared with untreated controls. Additionally, the optimized SMUs matured functionally, as indicated by a fivefold rise in force production. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the addition of DEX to our process of engineering skeletal muscle tissue improves myogenesis, advances muscle structure, and increases force production in the

  9. Progress in human embryonic stem cell research in the United States between 2001 and 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Vakili

    Full Text Available On August 9th, 2001, the federal government of the United States announced a policy restricting federal funds available for research on human embryonic stem cell (hESCs out of concern for the "vast ethical mine fields" associated with the creation of embryos for research purposes. Until the policy was repealed on March 9th, 2009, no U.S. federal funds were available for research on hESCs extracted after August 9, 2001, and only limited federal funds were available for research on a subset of hESC lines that had previously been extracted. This paper analyzes how the 2001 U.S. federal funding restrictions influenced the quantity and geography of peer-reviewed journal publications on hESC. The primary finding is that the 2001 policy did not have a significant aggregate effect on hESC research in the U.S. After a brief lag in early 2000s, U.S. hESC research maintained pace with other areas of stem cell and genetic research. The policy had several other consequences. First, it was tied to increased hESC research funding within the U.S. at the state level, leading to concentration of related activities in a relatively small number of states. Second, it stimulated increased collaborative research between US-based scientists and those in countries with flexible policies toward hESC research (including Canada, the U.K., Israel, China, Spain, and South Korea. Third, it encouraged independent hESC research in countries without restrictions.

  10. Geometry and W-Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Hull, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    The higher-spin geometries of $W_\\infty$-gravity and $W_N$-gravity are analysed and used to derive the complete non-linear structure of the coupling to matter and its symmetries. The symmetry group is a subgroup of the symplectic diffeomorphisms of the cotangent bundle of the world-sheet, and the $W_N$ geometry is obtained from a non-linear truncation of the $W_\\infty$ geometry. Quantum W-gravity is briefly discussed. (Talk given at {\\it Pathways to Fundamental Interactions}, the 16th John Ho...

  11. Linear algebra, geometry and transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Vectors, Mappings and Linearity Numeric Vectors Functions Mappings and Transformations Linearity The Matrix of a Linear Transformation Solving Linear Systems The Linear SystemThe Augmented Matrix and RRE Form Homogeneous Systems in RRE Form Inhomogeneous Systems in RRE Form The Gauss-Jordan Algorithm Two Mapping Answers Linear Geometry Geometric Vectors Geometric/Numeric Duality Dot-Product Geometry Lines, Planes, and Hyperplanes System Geometry and Row/Column Duality The Algebra of Matrices Matrix Operations Special Matrices Matrix Inversion A Logical Digression The Logic of the Inversion Alg

  12. A first course in geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Edward T

    2014-01-01

    This introductory text is designed to help undergraduate students develop a solid foundation in geometry. Early chapters progress slowly, cultivating the necessary understanding and self-confidence for the more rapid development that follows. The extensive treatment can be easily adapted to accommodate shorter courses. Starting with the language of mathematics as expressed in the algebra of logic and sets, the text covers geometric sets of points, separation and angles, triangles, parallel lines, similarity, polygons and area, circles, space geometry, and coordinate geometry. Each chapter incl

  13. Head First 2D Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Fallow), Stray

    2009-01-01

    Having trouble with geometry? Do Pi, The Pythagorean Theorem, and angle calculations just make your head spin? Relax. With Head First 2D Geometry, you'll master everything from triangles, quads and polygons to the time-saving secrets of similar and congruent angles -- and it'll be quick, painless, and fun. Through entertaining stories and practical examples from the world around you, this book takes you beyond boring problems. You'll actually use what you learn to make real-life decisions, like using angles and parallel lines to crack a mysterious CSI case. Put geometry to work for you, and

  14. A new look at geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Irving

    1967-01-01

    This richly detailed overview surveys the development and evolution of geometrical ideas and concepts from ancient times to the present. In addition to the relationship between physical and mathematical spaces, it examines the interactions of geometry, algebra, and calculus. The text proves many significant theorems and employs several important techniques. Chapters on non- Euclidean geometry and projective geometry form brief, self-contained treatments.More than 100 exercises with answers and 200 diagrams illuminate the text. Teachers, students (particularly those majoring in mathematics educa

  15. CATIA-GDML geometry builder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogurov, S.; Berchun, Yu; Chernogorov, A.; Malzacher, P.; Ovcharenko, E.; Semennikov, A.

    2011-12-01

    Due to conceptual difference between geometry descriptions in Computer-Aided Design (CAD) systems and particle transport Monte Carlo (MC) codes direct conversion of detector geometry in either direction is not feasible. An original set of tools has been developed for building a GEANT4/ROOT compatible geometry in the CATIA CAD system and exchanging it with mentioned MC packages using GDML file format. A Special structure of a CATIA product tree, a wide range of primitives, different types of multiple volume instantiation, and supporting macros have been implemented.

  16. Quantum Consequences of Parameterizing Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanas, M. I.

    2002-12-01

    The marriage between geometrization and quantization is not successful, so far. It is well known that quantization of gravity , using known quantization schemes, is not satisfactory. It may be of interest to look for another approach to this problem. Recently, it is shown that geometries with torsion admit quantum paths. Such geometries should be parameterizied in order to preserve the quantum properties appeared in the paths. The present work explores the consequences of parameterizing such geometry. It is shown that quantum properties, appeared in the path equations, are transferred to other geometric entities.

  17. Geometry and W-Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Hull, C M

    1993-01-01

    The higher-spin geometries of $W_\\infty$-gravity and $W_N$-gravity are analysed and used to derive the complete non-linear structure of the coupling to matter and its symmetries. The symmetry group is a subgroup of the symplectic diffeomorphisms of the cotangent bundle of the world-sheet, and the $W_N$ geometry is obtained from a non-linear truncation of the $W_\\infty$ geometry. Quantum W-gravity is briefly discussed. (Talk given at {\\it Pathways to Fundamental Interactions}, the 16th John Hopkins Workshop on Current Problems in Particle Theory, Gothenborg, 1992.)

  18. Thermal Phase in Bubbling Geometries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chang-Yong

    2008-01-01

    We use matrix model to study thermal phase in bubbling half-BPS type IIB geometries with SO(4)×SO(4) symmetry.Near the horizon limit,we find that thermal vacua of bubbling geometries have disjoint parts,and each part is one kind of phase of the thermal system.We connect the thermal dynamics of bubbling geometries with one-dimensional fermions thermal system.Finally,we try to give a new possible way to resolve information loss puzzle.

  19. Highly Efficient and Exceptionally Durable CO2 Photoreduction to Methanol over Freestanding Defective Single-Unit-Cell Bismuth Vanadate Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Gu, Bingchuan; Jiao, Xingchen; Sun, Yongfu; Zu, Xiaolong; Yang, Fan; Zhu, Wenguang; Wang, Chengming; Feng, Zimou; Ye, Bangjiao; Xie, Yi

    2017-03-08

    Unearthing an ideal model for disclosing the role of defect sites in solar CO2 reduction remains a great challenge. Here, freestanding gram-scale single-unit-cell o-BiVO4 layers are successfully synthesized for the first time. Positron annihilation spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence unveil their distinct vanadium vacancy concentrations. Density functional calculations reveal that the introduction of vanadium vacancies brings a new defect level and higher hole concentration near Fermi level, resulting in increased photoabsorption and superior electronic conductivity. The higher surface photovoltage intensity of single-unit-cell o-BiVO4 layers with rich vanadium vacancies ensures their higher carriers separation efficiency, further confirmed by the increased carriers lifetime from 74.5 to 143.6 ns revealed by time-resolved fluorescence emission decay spectra. As a result, single-unit-cell o-BiVO4 layers with rich vanadium vacancies exhibit a high methanol formation rate up to 398.3 μmol g(-1) h(-1) and an apparent quantum efficiency of 5.96% at 350 nm, much larger than that of single-unit-cell o-BiVO4 layers with poor vanadium vacancies, and also the former's catalytic activity proceeds without deactivation even after 96 h. This highly efficient and spectrally stable CO2 photoconversion performances hold great promise for practical implementation of solar fuel production.

  20. An improved combinatorial geometry model for arbitrary geometry in DSMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargaran, H.; Minuchehr, A.; Zolfaghari, A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper focuses on a new direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code based on combinatorial geometry (CG) for simulation of any rarefied gas flow. The developed code, called DgSMC-A, has been supplied with an improved CG modeling able to significantly optimize the particle-tracking process, resulting in a highly reduced runtime compared to the conventional codes. The improved algorithm inserts a grid over the geometry and saves those grid elements containing some part of the geometry border. Since only a small part of a grid is engaged with the geometry border, significant time can be saved using the proposed algorithm. Embedding the modified algorithm in the DgSMC-A resulted in a fast, robust and self-governing code needless to any mesh generator. The code completely handles complex geometries created with first-and second-order surfaces. In addition, we developed a new surface area calculator in the CG methodology for complex geometries based on the Monte Carlo method with acceptable accuracy. Several well-known test cases are examined to indicate the code ability to deal with a wide range of realistic problems. Results are also found to be in good agreement with references and experimental data.

  1. Investigation of potential fluctuating intra-unit cell magnetic order in cuprates by μ SR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, A.; Akintola, K.; Potma, M.; Ishikado, M.; Eisaki, H.; Hardy, W. N.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R.; Sonier, J. E.

    2016-10-01

    We report low temperature muon spin relaxation (μ SR ) measurements of the high-transition-temperature (Tc) cuprate superconductors Bi2 +xSr2 -xCaCu2O8 +δ and YBa2Cu3O6.57 , aimed at detecting the mysterious intra-unit cell (IUC) magnetic order that has been observed by spin-polarized neutron scattering in the pseudogap phase of four different cuprate families. A lack of confirmation by local magnetic probe methods has raised the possibility that the magnetic order fluctuates slowly enough to appear static on the time scale of neutron scattering, but too fast to affect μ SR or nuclear magnetic resonance signals. The IUC magnetic order has been linked to a theoretical model for the cuprates, which predicts a long-range ordered phase of electron-current loop order that terminates at a quantum crictical point (QCP). Our study suggests that lowering the temperature to T ˜25 mK and moving far below the purported QCP does not cause enough of a slowing down of fluctuations for the IUC magnetic order to become detectable on the time scale of μ SR . Our measurements place narrow limits on the fluctuation rate of this unidentified magnetic order.

  2. Results and analysis of saltstone cores taken from saltstone disposal unit cell 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hill, K. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    As part of an ongoing Performance Assessment (PA) Maintenance Plan, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has developed a sampling and analyses strategy to facilitate the comparison of field-emplaced samples (i.e., saltstone placed and cured in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU)) with samples prepared and cured in the laboratory. The primary objectives of the Sampling and Analyses Plan (SAP) are; (1) to demonstrate a correlation between the measured properties of laboratory-prepared, simulant samples (termed Sample Set 3), and the field-emplaced saltstone samples (termed Sample Set 9), and (2) to validate property values assumed for the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) PA modeling. The analysis and property data for Sample Set 9 (i.e. six core samples extracted from SDU Cell 2A (SDU2A)) are documented in this report, and where applicable, the results are compared to the results for Sample Set 3. Relevant properties to demonstrate the aforementioned objectives include bulk density, porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity (SHC), and radionuclide leaching behavior.

  3. The modeling of a standalone solid-oxide fuel cell auxiliary power unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, N.; Li, Q.; Sun, X.; Khaleel, M. A.

    In this research, a Simulink model of a standalone vehicular solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) auxiliary power unit (APU) is developed. The SOFC APU model consists of three major components: a controller model; a power electronics system model; and an SOFC plant model, including an SOFC stack module, two heat exchanger modules, and a combustor module. This paper discusses the development of the nonlinear dynamic models for the SOFC stacks, the heat exchangers and the combustors. When coupling with a controller model and a power electronic circuit model, the developed SOFC plant model is able to model the thermal dynamics and the electrochemical dynamics inside the SOFC APU components, as well as the transient responses to the electric loading changes. It has been shown that having such a model for the SOFC APU will help design engineers to adjust design parameters to optimize the performance. The modeling results of the SOFC APU heat-up stage and the output voltage response to a sudden load change are presented in this paper. The fuel flow regulation based on fuel utilization is also briefly discussed.

  4. Fungal spore concentrations in two haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) units containing distinct air control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, C P; Miron, D; Silla, L M R; Pasqualotto, A C

    2013-04-01

    Invasive fungal diseases have emerged as important causes of morbidity and mortality in haematological patients. In this study air samples were collected in two haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) units, in which distinct air-control systems were in place. In hospital 1 no high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter was available whereas in hospital 2 HSCT rooms were equipped with HEPA filters, with positive air pressure in relation to the corridor. A total of 117 samples from rooms, toilets and corridors were obtained during December 2009 to January 2011, using a six-stage Andersen sampler. In both hospitals, the concentration of potentially pathogenic fungi in the air was reduced in patients' rooms compared to corridors (P < 0·0001). Despite the presence of a HEPA filter in hospital 2, rooms in both hospitals showed similar concentrations of potentially pathogenic fungi (P = 0·714). These findings may be explained by the implementation of additional protective measures in hospital 1, emphasizing the importance of such measures in protected environments.

  5. High-temperature superconductivity in one-unit-cell FeSe films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziqiao; Liu, Chaofei; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jian

    2017-04-01

    Since the dramatic enhancement of the superconducting transition temperature (T c) was reported in a one-unit-cell FeSe film grown on a SrTiO3 substrate (1-UC FeSe/STO) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), related research on this system has become a new frontier in condensed matter physics. In this paper, we present a brief review on this rapidly developing field, mainly focusing on the superconducting properties of 1-UC FeSe/STO. Experimental evidence for high-temperature superconductivity in 1-UC FeSe/STO, including direct evidence revealed by transport and diamagnetic measurements, as well as other evidence from scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), are overviewed. The potential mechanisms of the enhanced superconductivity are also discussed. There are accumulating arguments to suggest that the strengthened Cooper pairing in 1-UC FeSe/STO originates from the interface effects, specifically the charge transfer and coupling to phonon modes in the TiO2 plane. The study of superconductivity in 1-UC FeSe/STO not only sheds new light on the mechanism of high-temperature superconductors with layered structures, but also provides an insight into the exploration of new superconductors by interface engineering.

  6. Giant repeater F-wave in patients with anterior horn cell disorders. Role of motor unit size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I K; el-Abd, M A

    1997-01-01

    Conventional F-wave responses as well as single motor unit F-wave responses together with the volitionally recruited motor unit action potentials (MUAP) were studied in hand and feet muscles of 10 healthy subjects and 32 patients with anterior horn cell disorders. The amplitude of the largest F-wave (Fl) was significantly greater in the affected patients compared with healthy subjects. Giant repeater F-wave responses "up to 4 mV" were recorded in muscles having volitionally recruited giant MUAPs. Although, the group mean percentage of motor unit F-wave responses per stimulation in all tested orthodromic MUAPs was significantly decreased in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients, the group mean percentage of motor unit F-wave responses per stimulation in all tested orthodromic MUAPs that gave motor unit F-wave response was significantly increased compared with healthy subjects. The responding orthodromic MUAP gave identical motor unit F-wave response, even for complex polyphasic units. Enhanced monosynaptic (H-) reflex, proximal axon reflex (A-wave), and repetitive muscle response as possible explanations for the giant F-wave responses could be discounted. The electrophysiologic behavior of the giant late responses described here fits well with the criteria of F-waves modulated by newly formed distal (and or proximal) axonal branching.

  7. Monte Carlo simulations of magnetic and thermodynamic properties for different nanostructure geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantinova, Elena, E-mail: elena.konst@ifsudestemg.edu.br; Sales, José Antonio de

    2014-10-01

    Creation of magnetic nanodevices leads, in particular, to a growing interest in theoretical investigation of different types of magnetic nanostructures. The purpose of our work is to consider how the properties of such nanomaterials depend on their geometry and on the crystal structure. We report on the Monte Carlo simulation of magnetic nanostructures of different geometric forms, which are based on simple cubic and body-centered cubic cells. The magnetization of spin, magnetic susceptibility and specific heat are investigated for nano-disks, nano-bars and nano-balls of different magnitudes. The combination of dipole and Heisenberg-model interaction are considered for the ferromagnetic case. It is shown that magnetic and thermodynamic properties of nanostructures strongly depend on their geometry. The structures with a body-centered cubic unit cell manifest stronger dependence on size and geometric form. In this case one can interpret the results as an effective reduction of dimension from 3D to 2D for decreasing size of the compound. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic properties of nano-balls are dependent on their size. • Magnetic properties of nano-bars depend on their thickness. • The hysteresis loop is dependent on the geometry of the nanostructure.

  8. Low axial drift stage and temperature controlled liquid cell for z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in an inverted confocal geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgeyer, Edward S; Sterling, Sarah M; Neivandt, David J; Mason, Michael D

    2011-05-01

    A recent iteration of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), z-scan FCS, has drawn attention for its elegant solution to the problem of quantitative sample positioning when investigating two-dimensional systems while simultaneously providing an excellent method for extracting calibration-free diffusion coefficients. Unfortunately, the measurement of planar systems using (FCS and) z-scan FCS still requires extremely mechanically stable sample positioning, relative to a microscope objective. As axial sample position serves as the inherent length calibration, instabilities in sample position will affect measured diffusion coefficients. Here, we detail the design and function of a highly stable and mechanically simple inverted microscope stage that includes a temperature controlled liquid cell. The stage and sample cell are ideally suited to planar membrane investigations, but generally amenable to any quantitative microscopy that requires low drift and excellent axial and lateral stability. In the present work we evaluate the performance of our custom stage system and compare it with the stock microscope stage and typical sample sealing and holding methods.

  9. Low axial drift stage and temperature controlled liquid cell for z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in an inverted confocal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allgeyer, Edward S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Maine, Orono, Maine 04469 (United States); Sterling, Sarah M. [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, Maine 04469 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Maine, Orono, Maine 04469 (United States); Neivandt, David J. [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, Maine 04469 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Maine, Orono, Maine 04469 (United States); Institute for Molecular Biophysics, Orono, Maine 04469 (United States); Mason, Michael D. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Maine, Orono, Maine 04469 (United States); Institute for Molecular Biophysics, Orono, Maine 04469 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    A recent iteration of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), z-scan FCS, has drawn attention for its elegant solution to the problem of quantitative sample positioning when investigating two-dimensional systems while simultaneously providing an excellent method for extracting calibration-free diffusion coefficients. Unfortunately, the measurement of planar systems using (FCS and) z-scan FCS still requires extremely mechanically stable sample positioning, relative to a microscope objective. As axial sample position serves as the inherent length calibration, instabilities in sample position will affect measured diffusion coefficients. Here, we detail the design and function of a highly stable and mechanically simple inverted microscope stage that includes a temperature controlled liquid cell. The stage and sample cell are ideally suited to planar membrane investigations, but generally amenable to any quantitative microscopy that requires low drift and excellent axial and lateral stability. In the present work we evaluate the performance of our custom stage system and compare it with the stock microscope stage and typical sample sealing and holding methods.

  10. Exciton-Dissociation and Charge-Recombination Processes in Pentacene/C 60 Solar Cells: Theoretical Insight into the Impact of Interface Geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Yuanping

    2009-11-04

    The exciton-dissociation and charge-recombination processes in organic solar cells based on pentacene/C60 heterojunctions are investigated by means of quantum-mechanical calculations. The electronic couplings and the rates of exciton dissociation and charge recombination have been evaluated for several geometrical configurations of the pentacene/C60 complex, which are relevant to bilayer and bulk heterojunctions. The results suggest that, irrespective of the actual pentacene-fullerene orientation, both pentacene-based and C60-based excitons are able to dissociate efficiently. Also, in the case of parallel configurations of the molecules at the pentacene/C60 interface, the decay of the lowest charge-transfer state to the ground state is calculated to be very fast; as a result, it can compete with the dissociation process into mobile charge carriers. Since parallel configurations are expected to be found more frequently in bulk heterojunctions than in bilayer heterojunctions, the performance of pentacene/C60 bulk-heterojunction solar cells is likely to be more affected by charge recombination than that of bilayer devices. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  11. Multiscale Talbot effects in Fibonacci geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, I-Lin

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the Talbot effects in Fibonacci geometry by introducing the cut-and-project construction, which allows for capturing the entire infinite Fibonacci structure into a single computational cell. Theoretical and numerical calculations demonstrate the Talbot foci of Fibonacci geometry at distances that are multiples $(\\tau+2)(F_{\\mu}+\\tau F_{\\mu+1} )^{-1}p/(2q)$ or $(\\tau+2)(L_{\\mu}+\\tau L_{\\mu+1} )^{-1}p/(2q)$ of the Talbot distance. Here, ($p$, $q$) are coprime integers, $\\mu$ is an integer, $\\tau$ is the golden mean, and $F_{\\mu}$ and $L_{\\mu}$ are Fibonacci and Lucas numbers, respectively. The image of a single Talbot focus exhibits a multiscale pattern due to the self-similarity of the scaling Fourier spectrum.

  12. Hyperbolic Metamaterials with Complex Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Andryieuski, Andrei; Zhukovsky, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    We investigate new geometries of hyperbolic metamaterialssuch as highly corrugated structures, nanoparticle monolayer assemblies, super-structured or vertically arranged multilayersand nanopillars. All structures retain basic propertiesof hyperbolic metamaterials, but have functionality improved...

  13. Instability of supersymmetric microstate geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Eperon, Felicity C; Santos, Jorge E

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the classical stability of supersymmetric, asymptotically flat, microstate geometries with five non-compact dimensions. Such geometries admit an "evanescent ergosurface": a timelike hypersurface of infinite redshift. On such a surface, there are null geodesics with zero energy relative to infinity. These geodesics are stably trapped in the potential well near the ergosurface. We present a heuristic argument indicating that this feature is likely to lead to a nonlinear instability of these solutions. We argue that the precursor of such an instability can be seen in the behaviour of linear perturbations: nonlinear stability would require that all linear perturbations decay sufficiently rapidly but the stable trapping implies that some linear perturbation decay very slowly. We study this in detail for the most symmetric microstate geometries. By constructing quasinormal modes of these geometries we show that generic linear perturbations decay slower than any inverse power of time.

  14. Molecular motion in restricted geometries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siddharth Gautam; S Mitra; R Mukhopadhyay

    2008-10-01

    Molecular dynamics in restricted geometries is known to exhibit anomalous behaviour. Diffusion, translational or rotational, of molecules is altered significantly on confinement in restricted geometries. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) offers a unique possibility of studying molecular motion in such systems. Both time scales involved in the motion and the geometry of motion can be studied using QENS. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation not only provides insight into the details of the different types of motion possible but also does not suffer limitations of the experimental set-up. Here we report the effect of confinement on molecular dynamics in various restricted geometries as studied by QENS and MD simulations: An example where the QENS technique provided direct evidence of phase transition associated with change in the dynamical behaviour of the molecules is also discussed.

  15. Moment methods in extremal geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Laat, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we develop techniques for solving problems in extremal geometry. We give an infinite dimensional generalization of moment techniques from polynomial optimization. We use this to construct semidefinite programming hierarchies for approximating optimal packing densities and ground state

  16. An introduction to differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Willmore, T J

    2012-01-01

    This text employs vector methods to explore the classical theory of curves and surfaces. Topics include basic theory of tensor algebra, tensor calculus, calculus of differential forms, and elements of Riemannian geometry. 1959 edition.

  17. Instability of supersymmetric microstate geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eperon, Felicity C.; Reall, Harvey S.; Santos, Jorge E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-07

    We investigate the classical stability of supersymmetric, asymptotically flat, microstate geometries with five non-compact dimensions. Such geometries admit an “evanescent ergosurface”: a timelike hypersurface of infinite redshift. On such a surface, there are null geodesics with zero energy relative to infinity. These geodesics are stably trapped in the potential well near the ergosurface. We present a heuristic argument indicating that this feature is likely to lead to a nonlinear instability of these solutions. We argue that the precursor of such an instability can be seen in the behaviour of linear perturbations: nonlinear stability would require that all linear perturbations decay sufficiently rapidly but the stable trapping implies that some linear perturbation decay very slowly. We study this in detail for the most symmetric microstate geometries. By constructing quasinormal modes of these geometries we show that generic linear perturbations decay slower than any inverse power of time.

  18. Moment methods in extremal geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Laat, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we develop techniques for solving problems in extremal geometry. We give an infinite dimensional generalization of moment techniques from polynomial optimization. We use this to construct semidefinite programming hierarchies for approximating optimal packing densities and ground state

  19. Guide to Computational Geometry Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Gravesen, Jens; Anton, François

    be processed before it is useful. This Guide to Computational Geometry Processing reviews the algorithms for processing geometric data, with a practical focus on important techniques not covered by traditional courses on computer vision and computer graphics. This is balanced with an introduction......Optical scanning is rapidly becoming ubiquitous. From industrial laser scanners to medical CT, MR and 3D ultrasound scanners, numerous organizations now have easy access to optical acquisition devices that provide huge volumes of image data. However, the raw geometry data acquired must first......, metric space, affine spaces, differential geometry, and finite difference methods for derivatives and differential equations Reviews geometry representations, including polygonal meshes, splines, and subdivision surfaces Examines techniques for computing curvature from polygonal meshes Describes...

  20. Advances in discrete differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This is one of the first books on a newly emerging field of discrete differential geometry and an excellent way to access this exciting area. It surveys the fascinating connections between discrete models in differential geometry and complex analysis, integrable systems and applications in computer graphics. The authors take a closer look at discrete models in differential geometry and dynamical systems. Their curves are polygonal, surfaces are made from triangles and quadrilaterals, and time is discrete. Nevertheless, the difference between the corresponding smooth curves, surfaces and classical dynamical systems with continuous time can hardly be seen. This is the paradigm of structure-preserving discretizations. Current advances in this field are stimulated to a large extent by its relevance for computer graphics and mathematical physics. This book is written by specialists working together on a common research project. It is about differential geometry and dynamical systems, smooth and discrete theories, ...

  1. Paper Interfaces for Learning Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnard, Quentin; Verma, Himanshu; Kaplan, Frédéric; Dillenbourg, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Paper interfaces offer tremendous possibilities for geometry education in primary schools. Existing computer interfaces designed to learn geometry do not consider the integration of conventional school tools, which form the part of the curriculum. Moreover, most of computer tools are designed specifically for individual learning, some propose group activities, but most disregard classroom-level learning, thus impeding their adoption. We present an augmented reality based tabletop system with ...

  2. Courant Algebroids in Parabolic Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Armstrong, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    To a smooth manifold $M$, a parabolic geometry associates a principal bundle, which has a parabolic subgroup of a semisimple Lie group as its structure group, and a Cartan connection. We show that the adjoint tractor bundle of a regular normal parabolic geometry can be endowed with the structure of a Courant algebroid. This gives a class of examples of transitive Courant algebroids that are not exact.

  3. Topology and geometry for physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Nash, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Differential geometry and topology are essential tools for many theoretical physicists, particularly in the study of condensed matter physics, gravity, and particle physics. Written by physicists for physics students, this text introduces geometrical and topological methods in theoretical physics and applied mathematics. It assumes no detailed background in topology or geometry, and it emphasizes physical motivations, enabling students to apply the techniques to their physics formulas and research. ""Thoroughly recommended"" by The Physics Bulletin, this volume's physics applications range fr

  4. Higgs mass in noncommutative geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devastato, A.; Martinetti, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Lizzi, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Departament de Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti y Franques, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2014-09-11

    In the noncommutative geometry approach to the standard model, an extra scalar field σ - initially suggested by particle physicist to stabilize the electroweak vacuum - makes the computation of the Higgs mass compatible with the 126 GeV experimental value. We give a brief account on how to generate this field from the Majorana mass of the neutrino, following the principles of noncommutative geometry. (Copyright copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. The Common Geometry Module (CGM).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tautges, Timothy James

    2004-12-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and on top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also includes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.

  6. Additively Manufactured Open-Cell Porous Biomaterials Made from Six Different Space-Filling Unit Cells: The Mechanical and Morphological Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadi, S.M.; Yavari, S.A.; Wauthle, R.; Pouran, B.; Schrooten, J.; Weinans, H.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    It is known that the mechanical properties of bone-mimicking porous biomaterials are a function of the morphological properties of the porous structure, including the configuration and size of the repeating unit cell from which they are made. However, the literature on this topic is limited, primari

  7. The effect of pore geometry on the in vitro biological behavior of human periosteum-derived cells seeded on selective laser-melted Ti6Al4V bone scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bael, S; Chai, Y C; Truscello, S; Moesen, M; Kerckhofs, G; Van Oosterwyck, H; Kruth, J-P; Schrooten, J

    2012-07-01

    The specific aim of this study was to gain insight into the influence of scaffold pore size, pore shape and permeability on the in vitro proliferation and differentiation of three-dimensional (3-D) human periosteum-derived cell (hPDC) cultures. Selective laser melting (SLM) was used to produce six distinct designed geometries of Ti6Al4V scaffolds in three different pore shapes (triangular, hexagonal and rectangular) and two different pore sizes (500 μm and 1000 μm). All scaffolds were characterized by means of two-dimensional optical microscopy, 3-D microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) image analysis, mechanical compression testing and computational fluid dynamical analysis. The results showed that SLM was capable of producing Ti6Al4V scaffolds with a broad range of morphological and mechanical properties. The in vitro study showed that scaffolds with a lower permeability gave rise to a significantly higher number of cells attached to the scaffolds after seeding. Qualitative analysis by means of live/dead staining and scanning electron micrography showed a circular cell growth pattern which was independent of the pore size and shape. This resulted in pore occlusion which was found to be the highest on scaffolds with 500 μm hexagonal pores. Interestingly, pore size but not pore shape was found to significantly influence the growth of hPDC on the scaffolds, whereas the differentiation of hPDC was dependent on both pore shape and pore size. The results showed that, for SLM-produced Ti6Al4V scaffolds with specific morphological and mechanical properties, a functional graded scaffold will contribute to enhanced cell seeding and at the same time can maintain nutrient transport throughout the whole scaffold during in vitro culturing by avoiding pore occlusion.

  8. Evolutionary algorithm for optimization of nonimaging Fresnel lens geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, N; Nishikawa, T

    2010-06-21

    In this study, an evolutionary algorithm (EA), which consists of genetic and immune algorithms, is introduced to design the optical geometry of a nonimaging Fresnel lens; this lens generates the uniform flux concentration required for a photovoltaic cell. Herein, a design procedure that incorporates a ray-tracing technique in the EA is described, and the validity of the design is demonstrated. The results show that the EA automatically generated a unique geometry of the Fresnel lens; the use of this geometry resulted in better uniform flux concentration with high optical efficiency.

  9. Holomorphic Cartan geometries and rational curves

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Indranil

    2010-01-01

    We prove that any compact K\\"ahler manifold bearing a holomorphic Cartan geometry contains a rational curve just when the Cartan geometry is inherited from a holomorphic Cartan geometry on a lower dimensional compact K\\"ahler manifold.

  10. Fermi surface properties of paramagnetic NpCd{sub 11} with a large unit cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Yoshiya; Aoki, Dai; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Haga, Yoshinori; Sakai, Hironori; Ikeda, Shugo; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Nakamura, Akio; Onuki, Yoshichika [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Settai, Rikio [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Takeuchi, Tetsuya [Cryogenic Center, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yamagami, Hiroshi, E-mail: yhomma@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    We succeeded in growing a high-quality single crystal of NpCd{sub 11} with the cubic BaHg{sub 11}-type structure by the Cd-self flux method. The lattice parameter of a = 9.2968(2) A and crystallographic positions of the atoms were determined by x-ray single-crystal structure analysis. From the results of the magnetic susceptibility and specific heat experiments, this compound is found to be a 5f-localized paramagnet with the singlet ground state in the crystalline electric field (CEF) scheme. Fermi surface properties were measured using the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) technique. Long-period oscillations were observed in the dHvA frequency range of 9.1 x 10{sup 5} to 1.9 x 10{sup 7} Oe, indicating small cross-sectional areas of Fermi surfaces, which is consistent with a small Brillouin zone based on a large unit cell. From the results of dHvA and magnetoresistance experiments, the Fermi surface of NpCd{sub 11} is found to consist of many kinds of closed Fermi surfaces and a multiply-connected-like Fermi surface, although the result of energy band calculations based on the 5f-localized Np{sup 3+}(5f{sup 4}) configuration reveals the existence of only closed Fermi surfaces. The corresponding cyclotron effective mass is small, ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 m{sub 0}, which is consistent with a small electronic specific heat coefficient {gamma} {approx_equal} 10mJ/K{sup 2{center_dot}}mol, revealing no hybridization between the 5f electrons and conduction electrons.

  11. Primes, Geometry and Condensed Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Rabeh R. H.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Fascination with primes dates back to the Greeks and before. Primes are named by some "the elementary particles of arithmetic" as every nonprime integer is made of a unique set of primes. In this article we point to new connections between primes, geometry and physics which show that primes could be called "the elementary particles of physics" too. This study considers the problem of closely packing similar circles/spheres in 2D/3D space. This is in effect a discretization process of space and the allowable number in a pack is found to lead to some unexpected cases of prime configurations which is independent of the size of the constituents. We next suggest that a non-prime can be considered geometrically as a symmetric collection that is separable (factorable into similar parts- six is two threes or three twos for example. A collection that has no such symmetry is a prime. As a result, a physical prime aggregate is more difficult to split symmetrically resulting in an inherent stability. This "number/physical" stability idea applies to bigger collections made from smaller (prime units leading to larger stable prime structures in a limitless scaling up process. The distribution of primes among numbers can be understood better using the packing ideas described here and we further suggest that differing numbers (and values of distinct prime factors making a nonprime collection is an important factor in determining the probability and method of possible and subsequent disintegration. Disintegration is bound by energy conservation and is closely related to symmetry by Noether theorems. Thinking of condensed matter as the packing of identical elements, we examine plots of the masses of chemical elements of the periodic table, and also those of the elementary particles of physics, and show that prime packing rules seem to play a role in the make up of matter. The plots show convincingly that the growth of prime numbers and that of the masses of

  12. Primes, Geometry and Condensed Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Rabeh R. H.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Fascination with primes dates back to the Greeks and before. Primes are named by some “the elementary particles of arithmetic” as every nonprime integer is made of a unique set of primes. In this article we point to new connections between primes, geometry and physics which show that primes could be called “the elementary particles of physics” too. This study considers the problem of closely packing similar circles / spheres in 2D / 3D space. This is in effect a discretization process of space and the allowable num- ber in a pack is found to lead to some unexpected cases of prime configurations which is independent of the size of the constituents. We next suggest that a non-prime can be considered geometrically as a symmetric collection that is separable (factorable into similar parts- six is two threes or three twos for example. A collection that has no such symmetry is a prime. As a result, a physical prime aggregate is more difficult to split symmetrically resulting in an inherent stability. This “number / physical” stability idea applies to bigger collections made from smaller (prime units leading to larger sta- ble prime structures in a limitless scaling up process. The distribution of primes among numbers can be understood better using the packing ideas described here and we further suggest that differing numbers (and values of distinct prime factors making a nonprime collection is an important factor in determining the probability and method of possible and subsequent disintegration. Disintegration is bound by energy conservation and is closely related to symmetry by Noether theorems. Thinking of condensed matter as the packing of identical elements, we examine plots of the masses of chemical elements of the periodic table, and also those of the elementary particles of physics, and show that prime packing rules seem to play a role in the make up of matter. The plots show con- vincingly that the growth of prime numbers and that

  13. In vitro fertilization and stem cell harvesting from human embryos: the law and practice in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, C Christopher

    2010-07-01

    The challenges before science and medicine are these: science must explore the natural world as thoroughly as possible, while still honoring, protecting, serving and preserving the subject of its investigations, and the human beings for whom it is a tool; medicine must confront disease and disability as effectively as possible, while also honoring, protecting, and preserving those beings for whom it serves - all of those beings, not just some, or even most, at the potential expense of others. These goals are challenged by embryo-destructive human embryonic stem cell research. The human embryo is a human being as clearly defined by embryology, and as such should be protected by the codes governing human subject research. However, because of the "potential" benefits offered by pluripotent stem cells, coupled with abortion politics and a very poorly regulated infertility industry, United States governmental advisory commissions and the scientific, medical, and political communities have attempted to define away the humanity of the human embryo, with a few notable exceptions. Because infertility treatments in the United States are poorly regulated, there are large numbers of supernumerary embryos in cryopreservation. However, only a tiny portion of these will ever be potentially available for research, and thus are not a realistic source of the cells necessary to provide treatments to the millions who might benefit from proposed stem cell based therapies. Cloning will not be the answer either, given the millions of women who must be exploited to provide sufficient numbers of eggs to generate the cloned cell lines. Moreover, the disposition decisions parents must make for their extra embryos are often agonizing, and not uncommonly change. The use of supernumerary embryos as a source for human embryonic stem cells is unethical, will never be a sufficient source for the medical treatments expected from stem cell research, and is often a source of great distress for the

  14. In vitro fertilization and stem cell harvesting from human embryos: the law and practice in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Christopher Hook

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The challenges before science and medicine are these: science must explore the natural world as thoroughly as possible, while still honoring, protecting, serving and preserving the subject of its investigations, and the human beings for whom it is a tool; medicine must confront disease and disability as effectively as possible, while also honoring, protecting, and preserving those beings for whom it serves – all of those beings, not just some, or even most, at the potential expense of others. These goals are challenged by embryo-destructive human embryonic stem cell research. The human embryo is a human being as clearly defined by embryology, and as such should be protected by the codes governing human subject research. However, because of the “potential” benefits offered by pluripotent stem cells, coupled with abortion politics and a very poorly regulated infertility industry, United States governmental advisory commissions and the scientific, medical, and political communities have attempted to define away the humanity of the human embryo, witha few notable exceptions. Because infertility treatments in the United States are poorly regulated, there are large numbersof supernumerary embryos in cryopreservation. However, only a tiny portion of these will ever be potentially available for research, and thus are not a realistic source of the cells necessary to provide treatments to the millions who might benefit from proposed stem cell based therapies. Cloning willnot be the answer either, given the millions of women who must be exploited to provide sufficient numbers of eggs to generate the cloned cell lines. Moreover, the disposition decisions parents must make for their extra embryos are often agonizing, and not uncommonly change.The use of supernumerary embryos as a source for human embryonic stem cells is unethical, will never be a sufficient source for the medical treatments expected from stem cell research, and is often a source of

  15. Frequency and Risk Factors Associated with Cord Graft Failure after Transplant with Single-Unit Umbilical Cord Cells Supplemented by Haploidentical Cells with Reduced-Intensity Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Stephanie B; Liu, Hongtao; Shore, Tsiporah; Fan, Yun; Bishop, Michael; Cushing, Melissa M; Gergis, Usama; Godley, Lucy; Kline, Justin; Larson, Richard A; Martinez, Guadalupe; Mayer, Sebastian; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Stock, Wendy; Wickrema, Amittha; van Besien, Koen; Artz, Andrew S

    2016-06-01

    Delayed engraftment and cord graft failure (CGF) are serious complications after unrelated cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), particularly when using low-cell-dose UCB units. The haplo-cord HSCT approach allows the use of a lower dose single UCB unit by co-infusion of a CD34(+) selected haploidentical graft, which provides early transient engraftment while awaiting durable UCB engraftment. We describe the frequency, complications, and risk factors of CGF after reduced-intensity conditioning haplo-cord HSCT. Among 107 patients who underwent haplo-cord HSCT, 94 were assessable for CGF, defined as risk of CGF. We conclude that assessing chimerism at day 30 may foretell impending CGF, and avoidance of high haploidentical cell doses may reduce risk of CGF after haplo-cord HSCT. However, long-term survival is possible after CGF because of predominant haploidentical or mixed chimerism and hematopoietic function.

  16. Development of integrated DMFC and PEM fuel cell units. Final report; Udvikling af integrerede DMFC og PEM braendselscelle enheder. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odgaard, M. (IRD Fuel Cell Technology, Svendborg (DK))

    2007-06-15

    The 36-month long project 'Development of integrated DMFC and PEM fuel cell units' has been completed. The project goal was to develop a completely new MEA concept for integrated PEM and DMFC unit cells with enhanced power density and in this way obtain a price reduction. The integrated unit cell consists of a MEA, a gas diffusion layer with flow fields completed with bipolar plates and seals. The main focus of the present project was to: 1) Develop new catalyst materials fabricated by the use of FSD (flame spray deposition method). 2) Optimisation of the state-of-the-art MEA materials and electrode structure. 3) Implementation of a model to account for the CO poisoning of PEM fuel cells. Results and progress obtained in the project established that the individual unit cell components were able to meet and follow the road map of LT-PEM FC regarding electrode catalyst loading and fulfilled the targets for Year 2006. The project has resulted in some important successes. The highlights are as follows: The project has resulted in some important successes. The highlights are as follows: 1) MEA structure knowledge acquired in the project provide a sound basis for further progress. 2) A novel method for the synthesis of electrode by using flame spray synthesis was explored. 3) Electrochemical and catalytic behaviours of catalysts activity for CH{sub 3}OH explored. 4) Implementation of a sub model to account for the CO poisoning of PEM FC has been developed. 5) Numerical study of the flow distribution in FC manifolds was developed and completed with experimental data. 6) The electrode catalyst loading targets for year 2006 achieved. 7) The DMFC MEA performance has been improved by 35%. 8) Optimisation of the MEAs fabrication process has been successfully developed. 9) A new simple flow field design has been designed. 10) A procedure for integrated seals has been developed (au)

  17. Pre-Calculus Instructional Guide for Elementary Functions, Analytic Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    This is a guide for use in semester-long courses in Elementary Functions and Analytic Geometry. A list of entry-level skills and a list of approved textbooks is provided. Each of the 18 units consists of: (1) overview, suggestions for teachers, and suggested time; (2) list of objectives; (3) cross-references guide to approved textbooks; (4) sample…

  18. 3D stochastic geophysical inversion for contact surface geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelièvre, Peter; Farquharson, Colin; Bijani, Rodrigo

    2015-04-01

    Geologists' interpretations about the Earth typically involve distinct rock units with contacts (interfaces) between them. As such, 3D geological Earth models typically comprise wireframe contact surfaces of tessellated triangles or other polygonal planar facets. In contrast, standard minimum-structure geophysical inversions are performed on meshes of space-filling cells (typically prisms or tetrahedra) and recover smoothly varying physical property distributions that are inconsistent with typical geological interpretations. There are several approaches through which mesh-based geophysical inversion can help recover models with some of the desired characteristics. However, a more effective strategy is to consider a fundamentally different type of inversion that works directly with models that comprise surfaces representing contacts between rock units. We are researching such an approach, our goal being to perform geophysical forward and inverse modelling directly with 3D geological models of any complexity. Geological and geophysical models should be specified using the same parameterization such that they are, in essence, the same Earth model. We parameterize the wireframe contact surfaces in a 3D model as the coordinates of the nodes (facet vertices). The physical properties of each rock unit in a model remain fixed while the geophysical inversion controls the position of the contact surfaces via the control nodes, perturbing the surfaces as required to fit the geophysical data responses. This is essentially a "geometry inversion", which can be used to recover the unknown geometry of a target body or to investigate the viability of a proposed Earth model. We apply global optimization strategies to solve the inverse problem, including stochastic sampling to obtain statistical information regarding the likelihood of particular features in the model, helping to assess the viability of a proposed model. Jointly inverting multiple types of geophysical data is simple

  19. THE FEATURES OF CONNEXINS EXPRESSION IN THE CELLS OF NEUROVASCLAR UNIT IN NORMAL CONDITIONS AND HYPOXIA IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Morgun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to assess a role of connexin 43 (Cx43 and associated molecule CD38 in the regulation of cell-cell interactions in the neurovascular unit (NVU in vitro in physiological conditions and in hypoxia.Materials and methods. The study was done using the original neurovascular unit model in vitro. The NVU consisted of three cell types: neurons, astrocytes, and cerebral endothelial cells derived from rats. Hypoxia was induced by incubating cells with sodium iodoacetate for 30 min at37 °C in standard culture conditions.Results. We investigated the role of connexin 43 in the regulation of cell interactions within the NVU in normal and hypoxic injury in vitro. We found that astrocytes were characterized by high levels of expression of Cx43 and low level of CD38 expression, neurons demonstrated high levels of CD38 and low levels of Cx43. In hypoxic conditions, the expression of Cx43 and CD38 in astrocytes markedly increased while CD38 expression in neurons decreased, however no changes were found in endothelial cells. Suppression of Cx43 activity resulted in down-regulation of CD38 in NVU cells, both in physiological conditions and at chemical hypoxia.Conclusion. Thus, the Cx-regulated intercellular NAD+-dependent communication and secretory phenotype of astroglial cells that are the part of the blood-brain barrier is markedly changed in hypoxia.

  20. Tool for Generation of MAC/GMC Representative Unit Cell for CMC/PMC Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Pineda, Evan J.

    2016-01-01

    This document describes a recently developed analysis tool that enhances the resident capabilities of the Micromechanics Analysis Code with the Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) 4.0. This tool is especially useful in analyzing ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), where higher fidelity with improved accuracy of local response is needed. The tool, however, can be used for analyzing polymer matrix composites (PMCs) as well. MAC/GMC 4.0 is a composite material and laminate analysis software developed at NASA Glenn Research Center. The software package has been built around the concept of the generalized method of cells (GMC). The computer code is developed with a user friendly framework, along with a library of local inelastic, damage, and failure models. Further, application of simulated thermomechanical loading, generation of output results, and selection of architectures to represent the composite material have been automated to increase the user friendliness, as well as to make it more robust in terms of input preparation and code execution. Finally, classical lamination theory has been implemented within the software, wherein GMC is used to model the composite material response of each ply. Thus, the full range of GMC composite material capabilities is available for analysis of arbitrary laminate configurations as well. The primary focus of the current effort is to provide a graphical user interface (GUI) capability that generates a number of different user-defined repeating unit cells (RUCs). In addition, the code has provisions for generation of a MAC/GMC-compatible input text file that can be merged with any MAC/GMC input file tailored to analyze composite materials. Although the primary intention was to address the three different constituents and phases that are usually present in CMCs-namely, fibers, matrix, and interphase-it can be easily modified to address two-phase polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials where an interphase is absent. Currently, the

  1. Indium phosphide solar cell research in the United States: Comparison with non-photovoltaic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Highlights of the InP solar cell research program are presented. Homojunction cells with efficiencies approaching 19 percent are demonstrated, while 17 percent is achieved for ITO/InP cells. The superior radiation resistance of the two latter cell configurations over both Si and GaAs cells has been shown. InP cells aboard the LIPS3 satellite show no degradation after more than a year in orbit. Computed array specific powers are used to compare the performance of an InP solar cell array to solar dynamic and nuclear systems.

  2. Tunable Multifunctional Thermal Metamaterials: Manipulation of Local Heat Flux via Assembly of Unit-Cell Thermal Shifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwanwoo; Kang, Sunggu; Lee, Howon; Choi, Wonjoon

    2017-01-20

    Thermal metamaterials, designed by transformation thermodynamics are artificial structures that can actively control heat flux at a continuum scale. However, fabrication of them is very challenging because it requires a continuous change of thermal properties in materials, for one specific function. Herein, we introduce tunable thermal metamaterials that use the assembly of unit-cell thermal shifters for a remarkable enhancement in multifunctionality as well as manufacturability. Similar to the digitization of a two-dimensional image, designed thermal metamaterials by transformation thermodynamics are disassembled as unit-cells thermal shifters in tiny areas, representing discretized heat flux lines in local spots. The programmed-reassembly of thermal shifters inspired by LEGO enable the four significant functions of thermal metamaterials-shield, concentrator, diffuser, and rotator-in both simulation and experimental verification using finite element method and fabricated structures made from copper and PDMS. This work paves the way for overcoming the structural and functional limitations of thermal metamaterials.

  3. Surface and Interface Properties of 10–12 Unit Cells Thick Sputter Deposited Epitaxial CeO2 Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Saraf

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrathin and continuous epitaxial films with relaxed lattice strain can potentially maintain more of its bulk physical and chemical properties and are useful as buffer layers. We study surface, interface, and microstructural properties of ultrathin (∼10–12 unit cells thick epitaxial ceria films grown on single crystal YSZ substrates. The out-of -plane and in-plane lattice parameters indicate relaxation in the continuous film due to misfit dislocations seen by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and substrate roughness of ∼1-2 unit cells, confirmed by atomic force microscopy and HRTEM. A combination of secondary sputtering, lattice mismatch, substrate roughness, and surface reduction creating secondary phase was likely the cause of surface roughness which should be reduced to a minimum level for effective use of it as buffer layers.

  4. Tunable Multifunctional Thermal Metamaterials: Manipulation of Local Heat Flux via Assembly of Unit-Cell Thermal Shifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwanwoo; Kang, Sunggu; Lee, Howon; Choi, Wonjoon

    2017-01-01

    Thermal metamaterials, designed by transformation thermodynamics are artificial structures that can actively control heat flux at a continuum scale. However, fabrication of them is very challenging because it requires a continuous change of thermal properties in materials, for one specific function. Herein, we introduce tunable thermal metamaterials that use the assembly of unit-cell thermal shifters for a remarkable enhancement in multifunctionality as well as manufacturability. Similar to the digitization of a two-dimensional image, designed thermal metamaterials by transformation thermodynamics are disassembled as unit-cells thermal shifters in tiny areas, representing discretized heat flux lines in local spots. The programmed-reassembly of thermal shifters inspired by LEGO enable the four significant functions of thermal metamaterials—shield, concentrator, diffuser, and rotator—in both simulation and experimental verification using finite element method and fabricated structures made from copper and PDMS. This work paves the way for overcoming the structural and functional limitations of thermal metamaterials. PMID:28106156

  5. Compact Circularly Polarized Patch Antenna Using a Composite Right/Left-Handed Transmission Line Unit-Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Geng

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A compact circularly polarized (CP patch antenna using a composite right/left-handed (CRLH transmission line (TL unit-cell is proposed. The CRLH TL unit-cell includes a complementary split ring resonator (CSRR for shunt inductance and a gap loaded with a circular-shaped slot for series capacitance. The CSRR can decrease the TM10 mode resonance frequency, thus reducing the electrical size of the proposed antenna. In addition, the asymmetry of the CSRR brings about the TM01 mode, which can be combined with the TM10 mode by changing the slot radius. The combination of these two orthogonal modes with 90° phase shift makes the proposed antenna provide a CP property. The experimental results show that the proposed antenna has a wider axial ratio bandwidth and a smaller electrical size than the reported CP antennas. Moreover, the proposed antenna is designed without impedance transformer, 90° phase shift, dual feed and ground via.

  6. General Construction of Tubular Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of locally describing tubular geometry around a submanifold embedded in a (pseudo)Riemannian manifold in its general form. Given the geometry of ambient space in an arbitrary coordinate system and equations determining the submanifold in the same system, we compute the tubular expansion coefficients in terms of this {\\it a priori data}. This is done by using an indirect method that crucially applies the tubular expansion theorem for vielbein previously derived. With an explicit construction involving the relevant coordinate and non-coordinate frames we verify consistency of the whole method up to quadratic order in vielbein expansion. Furthermore, we perform certain (long and tedious) higher order computation which verifies the first non-trivial spin connection term in the expansion for the first time. Earlier a similar method was used to compute tubular geometry in loop space. We explain this work in the light of our general construction.

  7. Quantum geometry and gravitational entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Joan; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Czech, Bart Iomiej; Larjo, Klaus; Marolf, Donald; Simon, Joan

    2007-05-29

    Most quantum states have wavefunctions that are widely spread over the accessible Hilbert space and hence do not have a good description in terms of a single classical geometry. In order to understand when geometric descriptions are possible, we exploit the AdS/CFT correspondence in the half-BPS sector of asymptotically AdS_5 x S5 universes. In this sector we devise a"coarse-grained metric operator" whose eigenstates are well described by a single spacetime topology and geometry. We show that such half-BPS universes have a non-vanishing entropy if and only if the metric is singular, and that the entropy arises from coarse-graining the geometry. Finally, we use our entropy formula to find the most entropic spacetimes with fixed asymptotic moments beyond the global charges.

  8. Conventionalism and integrable Weyl geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucheu, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    Since the appearance of Einstein's general relativity, gravitation has been associated to the space-time curvature. This theory introduced a geometrodynamic language which became a convenient tool to predict matter behaviour. However, the properties of space-time itself cannot be measurable by experiments. Taking Poincaré idea that the geometry of space-time is merely a convention, we show that the general theory of relativity can be completely reformulated in a more general setting, a generalization of Riemannian geometry, namely, the Weyl integrable geometry. The choice of this new mathematical language implies, among other things, that the path of particles and light rays should now correspond to Weylian geodesies. Such modification in the dynamic of bodies brings a new perception of physical phenomena that we will explore.

  9. Wave propagation on microstate geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Keir, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Supersymmetric microstate geometries were recently conjectured to be nonlinearly unstable due to numerical and heuristic evidence, based on the existence of very slowly decaying solutions to the linear wave equation on these backgrounds. In this paper, we give a thorough mathematical treatment of the linear wave equation on both two and three charge supersymmetric microstate geometries, finding a number of surprising results. In both cases we prove that solutions to the wave equation have uniformly bounded local energy, despite the fact that three charge microstates possess an ergoregion; these geometries therefore avoid Friedman's "ergosphere instability". In fact, in the three charge case we are able to construct solutions to the wave equation with local energy that neither grows nor decays, although this data must have nontrivial dependence on the Kaluza-Klein coordinate. In the two charge case we construct quasimodes and use these to bound the uniform decay rate, showing that the only possible uniform dec...

  10. Euclidean geometry and its subgeometries

    CERN Document Server

    Specht, Edward John; Calkins, Keith G; Rhoads, Donald H

    2015-01-01

    In this monograph, the authors present a modern development of Euclidean geometry from independent axioms, using up-to-date language and providing detailed proofs. The axioms for incidence, betweenness, and plane separation are close to those of Hilbert. This is the only axiomatic treatment of Euclidean geometry that uses axioms not involving metric notions and that explores congruence and isometries by means of reflection mappings. The authors present thirteen axioms in sequence, proving as many theorems as possible at each stage and, in the process, building up subgeometries, most notably the Pasch and neutral geometries. Standard topics such as the congruence theorems for triangles, embedding the real numbers in a line, and coordinatization of the plane are included, as well as theorems of Pythagoras, Desargues, Pappas, Menelaus, and Ceva. The final chapter covers consistency and independence of axioms, as well as independence of definition properties. There are over 300 exercises; solutions to many of the...

  11. Geometry of black hole spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, Lars; Blue, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    These notes, based on lectures given at the summer school on Asymptotic Analysis in General Relativity, collect material on the Einstein equations, the geometry of black hole spacetimes, and the analysis of fields on black hole backgrounds. The Kerr model of a rotating black hole in vacuum is expected to be unique and stable. The problem of proving these fundamental facts provides the background for the material presented in these notes. Among the many topics which are relevant for the uniqueness and stability problems are the theory of fields on black hole spacetimes, in particular for gravitational perturbations of the Kerr black hole, and more generally, the study of nonlinear field equations in the presence of trapping. The study of these questions requires tools from several different fields, including Lorentzian geometry, hyperbolic differential equations and spin geometry, which are all relevant to the black hole stability problem.

  12. Swimming Vorticella convallaria in various confined geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Luz; Lee, Donghee; Jung, Sunghwan; Ryu, Sangjin

    2014-11-01

    Vorticella convallaria is a stalked ciliate observed in the sessile form (trophont) or swimming form (telotroch). Trophonts are mainly composed of an inverted bell-shaped cell body generating vortical feeding currents, and a slender stalk attaching the cell body to a substrate. If the surrounding environment is no longer suitable, the trophont transforms into a telotroch by elongating its cell body into a cylindrical shape, resorbing its oral cilia and producing an aboral cilia wreath. After a series of contractions, the telotroch will completely detach from the stalk and swim away to find a better location. While sessile Vorticella has been widely studied because of its stalk contraction and usefulness in waste treatment, Vorticella's swimming has not yet been characterized. The purpose of this study is to describe V. convallaria's swimming modes, both in its trophont and telotroch forms, in different confined geometries. Using video microscopy, we observed Vorticellae swimming in semi-infinite field, in Hele-Shaw configurations, and in capillary tubes. Based on measured swimming displacement and velocity, we investigated how V. convallaria's mobility was affected by the geometry constrictions. We acknolwedge support from the First Award grant of Nebraska EPSCoR.

  13. Interfacing of science, medicine and law: The stem cell patent controversy in the United States and the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya eDavey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The patent eligibility of stem cells – particularly those derived from human embryos – has long been under debate in both the scientific and legal communities. On the basis of moral grounds, the European Patent Office (EPO has refrained from granting patents for stem cells obtained through the destruction of human embryos. On the contrary, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO has historically granted patents regarding the isolation and use of human embryonic and other stem cells. To date, these US patents remain valid despite an increasing onslaught of challenges in court. However, recent precedents established in US courts significantly narrow the scope of patent eligibility within biotechnology. This article compares the implications of recent legal changes on stem cell patent eligibility between the EU and US.

  14. Geometric Transformations in Engineering Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. F. Borovikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, for business purposes, in view of current trends and world experience in training engineers, research and faculty staff there has been a need to transform traditional courses of descriptive geometry into the course of engineering geometry in which the geometrical transformations have to become its main section. On the basis of critical analysis the paper gives suggestions to improve a presentation technique of this section both in the classroom and in academic literature, extend an application scope of geometrical transformations to solve the position and metric tasks and simulation of surfaces, as well as to design complex engineering configurations, which meet a number of pre-specified conditions.The article offers to make a number of considerable amendments to the terms and definitions used in the existing courses of descriptive geometry. It draws some conclusions and makes the appropriate proposals on feasibility of coordination in teaching the movement transformation in the courses of analytical and descriptive geometry. This will provide interdisciplinary team teaching and allow students to be convinced that a combination of analytical and graphic ways to solve geometric tasks is useful and reasonable.The traditional sections of learning courses need to be added with a theory of projective and bi-rational transformations. In terms of application simplicity and convenience it is enough to consider the central transformations when solving the applied tasks. These transformations contain a beam of sub-invariant (low-invariant straight lines on which the invariant curve induces non-involution and involution projectivities. The expediency of nonlinear transformations application is shown in the article by a specific example of geometric modeling of the interfacing surface "spar-blade".Implementation of these suggestions will contribute to a real transformation of a traditional course of descriptive geometry to the engineering geometry

  15. Red cell storage age policy for patients with sickle cell disease: A survey of transfusion service directors in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karafin, Matthew S; Singavi, Arun K; Irani, Mehraboon S; Puca, Kathleen E; Baumann Kreuziger, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Field, Joshua J

    2016-02-01

    In patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), the effects of the red cell storage lesion are not well defined. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of transfusion services that limit red cell units by storage age for patients with SCD. We developed a 22 question survey of transfusion service director opinions and their corresponding blood bank policies. Target subjects were systematically identified on the AABB website. Responses were recorded in SurveyMonkey and summarized using standard statistical techniques. Ninety transfusion service directors responded to the survey. Response rate was 22%. Only 23% of respondents had storage age policies in place for patients with SCD, even though 36% of respondents consider older units to be potentially harmful in this patient population. Of those with a policy, a less-than 15 day storage age requirement was most often used (75%), but practices varied, and most respondents (65%) agreed that evidence-based guidelines regarding storage age are needed for patients with SCD. Policies, practices and opinions about the risks of older units for patients with SCD vary. As patients with SCD may have unique susceptibilities to features of the red cell storage lesion, prospective studies in this population are needed to determine best practice.

  16. KEMAJUAN BELAJAR SISWA PADA GEOMETRI TRANSFORMASI MENGGUNAKAN AKTIVITAS REFLEKSI GEOMETRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irkham Ulil Albab

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendeskripsikan kemajuan belajar siswa pada materi geometri transformasi yang didukung dengan serangkaian aktivitas belajar berdasarkan Pendidikan Matematika Realistik Indonesia. Penelitian didesain melalui tiga tahap, yaitu tahapan perancangan desain awal, pengujian desain melalui pembelajaran awal dan pembelajaran eksperimental, dan tahap analisis retrospektif. Dalam penelitian ini, Hypothetical Learning Trajectory, HLT (HLT berperan penting sebagai desain pembelajaran sekaligus instrumen penelitian. HLT diujikan terhadap 26 siswa kelas VII. Data dikumpulkan dengan teknik wawancara, pengamatan, dan catatan lapangan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa desain pembelajaran ini mampu menstimulasi siswa untuk memberikan karakteristik refleksi dan transformasi geometri lainnya secara informal, mengklasifikasikannya dalam transformasi isometri pada level kedua, dan menemukan garis bantuan refleksi pada level yang lebih formal. Selain itu, garis bantuan refleksi digunakan oleh siswa untuk menggambar bayangan refleksi dan pola pencerminan serta memahami bentuk rotasi dan translasi sebagai kombinasi refleksi adalah level tertinggi. Keyword: transformasi geometri, kombinasi refleksi, rotasi, translasi, design research, HLT STUDENTS’ LEARNING PROGRESS ON TRANSFORMATION GEOMETRY USING THE GEOMETRY REFLECTION ACTIVITIES Abstract: This study was aimed at describing the students’ learning progress on transformation geometry supported by a set of learning activities based on Indonesian Realistic Mathematics Education. The study was designed into three stages, that is, the preliminary design stage, the design testing through initial instruction and experiment, and the restrospective analysis stage. In this study, Hypothetical Learning Trajectory (HLT played an important role as an instructional design and a research instrument. HLT was tested to 26 seventh grade students. The data were collected through interviews

  17. Stochastic geometry and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chiu, Sung Nok; Kendall, Wilfrid S; Mecke, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    An extensive update to a classic text Stochastic geometry and spatial statistics play a fundamental role in many modern branches of physics, materials sciences, engineering, biology and environmental sciences. They offer successful models for the description of random two- and three-dimensional micro and macro structures and statistical methods for their analysis. The previous edition of this book has served as the key reference in its field for over 18 years and is regarded as the best treatment of the subject of stochastic geometry, both as a subject with vital a

  18. Geometry Design of Wooden Barrels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan CISMARU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present a design methodology of the wooden barrel geometry, as an algorithm of successive calculations. Thus, starting from the required elements (volume, length, shape, maximum height of storage space the user will be able to define the geometry which must be obtained by processing. Based on these calculations, one can define the structure, size and shape of the staves in order to establish the processing technology of both components and subassemblies (jacket and bottoms which are to form the final product by their assembling using metal circles.

  19. Geometry, topology, and string theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varadarajan, Uday

    2003-07-10

    A variety of scenarios are considered which shed light upon the uses and limitations of classical geometric and topological notions in string theory. The primary focus is on situations in which D-brane or string probes of a given classical space-time see the geometry quite differently than one might naively expect. In particular, situations in which extra dimensions, non-commutative geometries as well as other non-local structures emerge are explored in detail. Further, a preliminary exploration of such issues in Lorentzian space-times with non-trivial causal structures within string theory is initiated.

  20. Spatial geometry and special relativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneubil, Fabiana Botelho

    2016-01-01

    In this work, it is shown the interplay of relative and absolute entities, which are present in both spatial geometry and special relativity. In order to strengthen the understanding of special relativity, we discuss firstly an instance of geometry and the existence of both frame......-dependent and frame-independent entities. We depart from a subject well known by students, which is the three-dimensional geometric space in order to compare, afterwards, with the treatment of four-dimensional space in the special relativity. The differences and similarities between these two subjects are also...