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Sample records for unirradiated clay samples

  1. 178 175 Analysis of Some Clay Samples from

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-02

    Dec 2, 2008 ... 2Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Sokoto, Nigeria. ... ABSTRACT: Analysis of some clay samples presumed to be kaolin obtained from different ... mostly unpublished (Nashuni, 1982).

  2. Suction effects in deep Boom clay block samples

    CERN Document Server

    Delage, Pierre; Tang, Anh-Minh; Cui, Yu-Jun; Li, Xiang-Ling

    2008-01-01

    Extensive investigations have been and are being carried out on a stiff clay from an underground research laboratory located at Mol (Belgium) called Boom clay, in the context of research into deep nuclear waste disposal. Suction effects in deep Boom clay block samples were investigated through the characterisation of the water retention and of the swelling properties of the clay. The data obtained allowed an estimation of the sample initial suction that was reasonably compatible with the in-situ state of stress at a depth of 223 m. The relationship between suction and stress changes during loading and unloading sequences were also examined by running oedometer tests with suction measurements. A rather wide range of the ratio s/sigma 'v (being s the suction and sigma 'v the effective vertical stress) was obtained (0.61 - 1), different from that proposed by Bishop et al; (1974). Finally, the effect of suction release under an isotropic stress close to the estimated sample suction was investigated. A slight swel...

  3. Evaluation of correlation between physical properties and ultrasonic pulse velocity of fired clay samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, İlker; Yayla, Zeliha

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to establish a correlation between physical properties and ultrasonic pulse velocity of clay samples fired at elevated temperatures. Brick-making clay and pottery clay were studied for this purpose. The physical properties of clay samples were assessed after firing pressed clay samples separately at temperatures of 850, 900, 950, 1000, 1050 and 1100 °C. A commercial ultrasonic testing instrument (Proceq Pundit Lab) was used to evaluate the ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements for each fired clay sample as a function of temperature. It was observed that there became a relationship between physical properties and ultrasonic pulse velocities of the samples. The results showed that in consequence of increasing densification of the samples, the differences between the ultrasonic pulse velocities were higher with increasing temperature. These findings may facilitate the use of ultrasonic pulse velocity for the estimation of physical properties of fired clay samples.

  4. Thermal neutron absorption cross section and clay mineral content for Miocene Carpathian samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woznicka

    2000-12-01

    A correlation between the thermal neutron absorption cross section and the clay volume for samples from the chosen geological region is discussed. A comparison of the calculated and measured absorption cross sections as a function of clay volume allows an estimate to be made on the presence of highly absorbing impurities in clays. From the example presented, it was deduced that 105 ppm of B or 25 ppm of Gd in the clay minerals in the samples tested would be sufficient to explain the difference between the experimental and calculated cross sections.

  5. Development of a sample preparation procedure for the simultaneous determination of Np and Pu in clay samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renz, Tobias; Quinto, Francesca; Lagos, Markus; Plaschke, Markus; Bauer, Andreas; Geckeis, Horst [INE, KIT, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Taubald, Heinrich [Eberhard Karls Universitaet, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Neptunium (Np) and plutonium (Pu) are two key radionuclides for the long-term disposal of nuclear waste. Within this context Opalinus Clay formations are considered as a potential location for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In the framework of experiments studying the diffusion behavior and retention of actinides under repository conditions, the present work focuses on the development of an analytical-chemical procedure for the determination of Np and Pu in clay (or clay-rich soil) samples. The procedure aims at the simultaneous determination of Np and Pu at femto- to attogram levels with AMS. Fields of application are the investigation of global fallout actinides in environmental clay-rich samples or the diffusion behavior of actinides in compacted clay liners used as technical barriers in nuclear waste repositories. Clay samples are spiked with certified standards of Pu-242 and Np-237. The analytical method, including a) leaching of the spiked clay samples, b) redox adjustments of Np and Pu, c) chromatographic separation of Np and Pu from the sample matrix and d) measurement of the actinides with Sector Field (SF)-ICP-MS will be presented. The suitability of a Pu isotope as non-isotopic tracer for determination of Np-237 is evaluated by determining the chemical yield using SF-ICP-MS.

  6. Colloid and Phosphorus Leaching From Undisturbed Soil Cores Sampled Along a Natural Clay Gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann;

    2011-01-01

    The presence of strongly sorbing compounds in groundwater and tile drains can be a result of colloid-facilitated transport. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from macropores in undisturbed soil cores sampled across a natural clay gradient at Aarup, Denmark, were studied. The aim of the study...... was to correlate easily measurable soil properties, such as clay content and water-dispersible colloids, to colloid and phosphorus leaching. The clay contents across the gradient ranged from 0.11 to 0.23 kg kgj1. Irrigating with artificial rainwater, all samples showed a high first flush of colloids and phosphorus...

  7. Sampling Outdoor, Resting Anopheles gambiae and Other Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in Western Kenya with Clay Pots

    OpenAIRE

    Odiere, M.; Bayoh, M. N.; Gimnig, J; Vulule, J; Irungu, L.; Walker, E.

    2007-01-01

    Clay pots were analyzed as devices for sampling the outdoor resting fraction of Anopheles gambiae Giles (Diptera: Culicidae) and other mosquito species in a rural, western Kenya. Clay pots (Anopheles gambiae resting pots, herein AgREPOTs), outdoor pit shelters, indoor pyrethrum spray collections (PSC), and Colombian curtain exit traps were compared in collections done biweekly for nine intervals from April to June 2005 in 20 housing compounds. Of 10,517 mosquitoes sampled, 4,668 An. gambiae s...

  8. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from undisturbed soil cores sampled along a natural clay gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2011-01-01

    was to correlate easily measurable soil properties, such as clay content and water-dispersible colloids, to colloid and phosphorus leaching. The clay contents across the gradient ranged from 0.11 to 0.23 kg kgj1. Irrigating with artificial rainwater, all samples showed a high first flush of colloids and phosphorus...... and the so-called degree of P saturation (oxalate-extractable P on iron and aluminum minerals). Because higher colloidal P concentration was countered by a lower colloidal leaching, the total amount of leached P stayed remarkably constant along the natural clay gradient....

  9. Shear Strength of Remoulding Clay Samples Using Different Methods of Moulding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhaliza, W.; Ismail, B.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Nurul, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    Shear strength for clay soil was required to determine the soil stability. Clay was known as a soil with complex natural formations and very difficult to obtain undisturbed samples at the site. The aim of this paper was to determine the unconfined shear strength of remoulded clay on different methods in moulding samples which were proctor compaction, hand operated soil compacter and miniature mould methods. All the samples were remoulded with the same optimum moisture content (OMC) and density that were 18% and 1880 kg/m3 respectively. The unconfined shear strength results of remoulding clay soils for proctor compaction method was 289.56kPa with the strain 4.8%, hand operated method was 261.66kPa with the strain 4.4% and miniature mould method was 247.52kPa with the strain 3.9%. Based on the proctor compaction method, the reduction percentage of unconfined shear strength of remoulded clay soil of hand operated method was 9.66%, and for miniature mould method was 14.52%. Thus, because there was no significant difference of reduction percentage of unconfined shear strength between three different methods, so it can be concluded that remoulding clay by hand operated method and miniature mould method were accepted and suggested to perform remoulding clay samples by other future researcher. However for comparison, the hand operated method was more suitable to form remoulded clay sample in term of easiness, saving time and less energy for unconfined shear strength determination purposes.

  10. Sampling outdoor, resting Anopheles gambiae and other mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in western Kenya with clay pots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odiere, M; Bayoh, M N; Gimnig, J; Vulule, J; Irungu, L; Walker, E

    2007-01-01

    Clay pots were analyzed as devices for sampling the outdoor resting fraction of Anopheles gambiae Giles (Diptera: Culicidae) and other mosquito species in a rural, western Kenya. Clay pots (Anopheles gambiae resting pots, herein AgREPOTs), outdoor pit shelters, indoor pyrethrum spray collections (PSC), and Colombian curtain exit traps were compared in collections done biweekly for nine intervals from April to June 2005 in 20 housing compounds. Of 10,517 mosquitoes sampled, 4,668 An. gambiae s.l. were sampled in total of which 63% were An. gambiae s.s. (46% female) and 37% were An. arabiensis (66% female). The clay pots were useful and practical for sampling both sexes of An. gambiae s.l. Additionally, 617 An. funestus (58% female) and 5,232 Culex spp. (males and females together) were collected. Temporal changes in abundance of An. gambiae s.l. were similarly revealed by all four sampling methods, indicating that the clay pots could be used as devices to quantify variation in mosquito population density. Dispersion patterns of the different species and sexes fit well the negative binomial distribution, indicating that the mosquitoes were aggregated in distribution. Aside from providing a useful sampling tool, the AgREPOT also may be useful as a delivery vehicle for insecticides or pathogens to males and females that enter and rest in them.

  11. Laboratory Investigation of Rivers State Clay Samples for Drilling Mud Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nmegbu, Chukwuma Godwin Jacob

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Drilling fluids are an integral part of any oil and gas industry, providing the ease to which wells are drilled to access subsurface reservoir fluids. Certain rheology and mineralogical properties of the clay material used for drilling mud preparation must be critically investigated since clay deposits in different location exhibits different characteristics. Clay samples were collected from three different geographical locations namely; Egbamini (Emolga, Afam Street (Port Harcourt and Oboboru (onelga local government areas in Rivers state. Their rheological and wall building properties were measured in the laboratory to determine their suitability for drilling mud formulation. Results showed that in their respective native states, they proved unsuitable for drilling mud preparation when compared to standard Bentonite because they were observed to show responses far below the required API standards for mud formulation.

  12. The suitability of clay pots for indoor sampling of mosquitoes in an arid area in northern Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijllaardt, van den W.; Braak, ter R.; Shekalaghe, S.; Otieno, S.; Mahande, A.; Sauerwein, R.; Takken, W.; Bousema, T.

    2009-01-01

    Water storage clay pots have been recently explored as method for outdoor mosquito sampling and as novel device for administrating insect-pathogenic fungi to mosquitoes. Their suitability for indoor mosquito sampling in natural conditions is unknown. We tested clay pots as indoor resting sites along

  13. The suitability of clay pots for indoor sampling of mosquitoes in an arid area in northern Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijllaardt, van den W.; Braak, ter R.; Shekalaghe, S.; Otieno, S.; Mahande, A.; Sauerwein, R.; Takken, W.; Bousema, T.

    2009-01-01

    Water storage clay pots have been recently explored as method for outdoor mosquito sampling and as novel device for administrating insect-pathogenic fungi to mosquitoes. Their suitability for indoor mosquito sampling in natural conditions is unknown. We tested clay pots as indoor resting sites

  14. The suitability of clay pots for indoor sampling of mosquitoes in an arid area in northern Tanzania.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijllaardt, W. van den; Braak, R. ter; Shekalaghe, S.; Otieno, S.; Mahande, A.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Takken, W.; Bousema, T.

    2009-01-01

    Water storage clay pots have been recently explored as method for outdoor mosquito sampling and as novel device for administrating insect-pathogenic fungi to mosquitoes. Their suitability for indoor mosquito sampling in natural conditions is unknown. We tested clay pots as indoor resting sites

  15. The suitability of clay pots for indoor sampling of mosquitoes in an arid area in northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bijllaardt, Wouter; ter Braak, Roel; Shekalaghe, Seif; Otieno, Silas; Mahande, Aneth; Sauerwein, Robert; Takken, Willem; Bousema, Teun

    2009-08-01

    Water storage clay pots have been recently explored as method for outdoor mosquito sampling and as novel device for administrating insect-pathogenic fungi to mosquitoes. Their suitability for indoor mosquito sampling in natural conditions is unknown. We tested clay pots as indoor resting sites alongside catches by CDC light trap in an area of low malaria endemicity in northern Tanzania. Mosquitoes were caught by clay pots although the rate of female Anopheles mosquito catches was 22.64 (95% CI 11.26-45.52) times greater for CDC light traps. The proportion of fed female Anophelines was significantly higher for clay pots compared to CDC light trap (pclay pots. We conclude that clay pots are not a reliable tool to sample mosquitoes in the dry season in an area of low transmission intensity with Anopheles arabiensis as principle vector.

  16. Loss tangent measurements on unirradiated alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Goulding, R.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Unirradiated room temperature loss tangent for sapphire and several commercial grades of polycrystalline alumina are complied for frequencies between 10{sup 5} and 4x10{sup 11} Hz. Sapphire exhibits significantly lower values for the loss tangent at frequencies up to 10{sup 11} Hz. The loss tangents of 3 different grades of Wesgo alumina (AL300, AL995, AL998) and 2 different grades of Coors alumina (AD94, AD995) have typical values near {approx}10{sup -4} at a frequency of 10{sup 8} Hz. On the other hand, the loss tangent of Vitox alumina exhibits a large loss peak tan d{approx} 5x10{sup -3} at this frequency.

  17. Comparison of the thermal properties of clay samples as potential walling material for naturally cooled building design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The thermal properties of different clay samples obtainedfrom locations in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria were investigated andcomppared, and in order to establish their suitability as buildingmaterial from energy conservation point of view. The results showedthat sstoneware clay has the highest solar radiation absorptivityof 22.32 m-1 while kaolin clay has the lowest radiation absoptivityof 14.46 m-1. A model for the prediction of temperature variationwith thickness of the samples was developed. Results showed thatkaolin would make the best choice for the design of a naturallycooled building.

  18. Effect of Sample Disturbance on Unconfined Compression Strength of Natural Marine Clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘汉龙; 洪振舜

    2003-01-01

    Quantitatively correcting the unconfined compressive strength for sample disturbance is an important research project in the practice of ocean engineering and geotechnical engineering. In this study, the specimens of undisturbed natural marine clay obtained from the same depth at the same site were deliberately disturbed to different levels. Then, the specimens with different extents of sample disturbance were trimmed for both oedometer tests and unconfined compression tests. The degree of sample disturbance SD is obtained from the oedometer test data. The relationship between the unconfined compressive strength qu and SD is studied for investigating the effect of sample disturbance on qu. It is found that the value of qu decreases linearly with the increase in SD. Then, a simple method of correcting qu for sample disturbance is proposed. Its validity is also verified through analysis of the existing published data.

  19. Mineralogy and instrumental neutron activation analysis of seven National Bureau of Standards and three Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas clay reference samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosterman, John W.; Flanagan, F.J.; Bragg, Anne; Doughten, M.W.; Filby, R.H.; Grimm, Catherine; Mee, J.S.; Potts, P.J.; Rogers, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    The concentrations of 3 oxides and 29 elements in 7 National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and 3 Instituto de Pesquisas Techno16gicas (IPT) reference clay samples were etermined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The analytical work was designed to test the homogeneity of constituents in three new NBS reference clays, NBS-97b, NBS-98b, and NBS-679. The analyses of variance of 276 sets of data for these three standards show that the constituents are distributed homogeneously among bottles of samples for 94 percent of the sets of data. Three of the reference samples (NBS-97, NBS-97a, and NBS-97b) are flint clays; four of the samples (NBS-98, NBS-98a, NBS-98b, and IPT-32) are plastic clays, and three of the samples (NBS-679, IPT-28, and IPT-42) are miscellaneous clays (both sedimentary and residual). Seven clays are predominantly kaolinite; the other three clays contain illite and kaolinite in the approximate ratio 3:2. Seven clays contain quartz as the major nonclay mineral. The mineralogy of the flint and plastic clays from Missouri (NBS-97a and NBS-98a) differs markedly from that of the flint and plastic clays from Pennsylvania (NBS-97, NBS-97b, NBS-98, and NBS-98b). The flint clay NBS-97 has higher average chromium, hafnium, lithium, and zirconium contents than its replacement, reference sample NBS-97b. The differences between the plastic clay NBS-98 and its replacement, NBS-98b, are not as pronounced. The trace element contents of the flint and plastic clays from Missouri, NBS-97a and NBS-98a, differ significantly from those of the clays from Pennsylvania, especially the average rare earth element (REE) contents. The trace element contents of clay sample IPT-32 differ from those of the other plastic clays. IPT-28 and IPT-42 have some average trace element contents that differ not only between these two samples but also from all the other clays. IPT-28 has the highest summation of the average REE contents of the 10 samples. The uranium content of NBS-98a, 46

  20. Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2013-09-30

    The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

  1. The Effects of Groundnut Shell Addition on The Insulating Properties of Clay Samples From Kogi State Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manukaji John U

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clay samples from three towns in Kogi state were examined with the aim of determining their chemical composition as well as testing for their suitability as refractory insulating materials for local furnaces. Refractories are required for many other industries in Nigeria like in chemical, ceramic, petrochemical, oil,foundry and iron and steel industries. The presence of air in these pores reduces the conductive capacity of the refractories and therefore increasing their insulating characteristics. Apart from the natural occurring fire clays which has been adjudged an insulating refractories, other clays can have their insulating characteristics improved by the addition of materials like saw dust, rice husks and other farm wastes. Experiments were carried out to determine how the addition of groundnut shell could improve the refractory properties of clay samples from Kogi State. The experiments were carried out on the four mechanical properties that enhance the insulating properties of clay which are linear shrinkage, thermal conductivity, apparent porosity and solid density .The results showed significant improvement in these properties

  2. Gas equilibration and pore water sampling experiment in the opalinus clay at the Mont Terri rock laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinsot, A. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), Lab. de recherche souterrain 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France); Fierz, T. [Solexperts, Schwerzenbach (Switzerland); Cailteau, C.; Donato, P. de [Institut National Polytechnique, LEM, UMR 7569 CNRS, ENSG/INPL, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Cailteau, C.; Pironon, J. [G2R-CREGU (UMR 7566 CNRS), 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Pepa, S. [Metro Mesures, 91 - Mennecy (France); Wersin, P. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Canniere, P. de [SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Gubler, H.E. [Bundesanstalt fur Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Badertscher, N. [Geotechnical Institute, St-Ursanne (Switzerland); Eichinger, L. [Hydroisotop, Schweitenkirchen (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The study of the mechanisms governing the composition of the interstitial fluids in clay formations with very low permeability constitutes a part of the scientific programmes associated with the feasibility analyses of deep repositories for the geological disposal of long-lived radioactive waste. Several in-situ geochemical experiments have been performed since 1996 in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory to develop methods for studying these mechanisms in the Opalinus Clay formation. These experiments enabled to build a conceptual model of the interstitial water in the Opalinus Clay. The main uncertainties of this model deal with the carbonate system and the redox state of the water. Consecutively, the PC-C experiment was initiated in 2003 to reduce these uncertainties using: i) a gas equilibration, and, ii) isobar water sampling. (authors)

  3. Three-dimensional FDEM numerical simulation of failure processes observed in Opalinus Clay laboratory samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Mahabadi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the first step of a research project that aims at using a three-dimensional (3D hybrid finite-discrete element method (FDEM to investigate the development of an excavation damaged zone (EDZ around tunnels in a clay shale formation known as Opalinus Clay. The 3D FDEM was first calibrated against standard laboratory experiments, including Brazilian disc test and uniaxial compression test. The effect of increasing confining pressure on the mechanical response and fracture propagation of the rock was quantified under triaxial compression tests. Polyaxial (or true triaxial simulations highlighted the effect of the intermediate principal stress (σ2 on fracture directions in the model: as the intermediate principal stress increased, fractures tended to align in the direction parallel to the plane defined by the major and intermediate principal stresses. The peak strength was also shown to vary with changing σ2.

  4. Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, L M

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables.

  5. Three-dimensional FDEM numerical simulation of failure processes observed in Opalinus Clay laboratory samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Omid Mahabadi; Patrick Kaifosh; Paul Marschall; Tim Vietor

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the first step of a research project that aims at using a three-dimensional (3D) hybrid finite-discrete element method (FDEM) to investigate the development of an excavation damaged zone (EDZ) around tunnels in a clay shale formation known as Opalinus Clay. The 3D FDEM was first calibrated against standard laboratory experiments, including Brazilian disc test and uniaxial compression test. The effect of increasing confining pressure on the mechanical response and fracture propagation of the rock was quantified under triaxial compression tests. Polyaxial (or true triaxial) simulations highlighted the effect of the intermediate principal stress (s2) on fracture directions in the model: as the intermediate principal stress increased, fractures tended to align in the direction parallel to the plane defined by the major and intermediate principal stresses. The peak strength was also shown to vary with changing s2. ? 2014 Institute of Rock and Soil Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of ball clay in 2009 and presents an outlook for its 2010 performance. Several companies mined ball call in the country including Old Hickey Clay Co., Kentucky-Tennessee Clay Co., and H.C. Spinks Clay Co. Information on the decline in ball clay imports and exports is also presented.

  7. Oedometric Small Angle Neutron Scattering: In-Situ Observation of Deformation Partitioning in Clay-rich Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, C. R.; Heath, J. E.; Hjelm, R.; Taylor, M.; Olds, D.; Dewers, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    We present novel oedometric small angle neutron scattering (SANS) on deforming clay-rich materials. Oedometric SANS involves a non-hydrostatic pressure vessel (i.e., the oedometer) that places a porous sample under uniaxial strain with control of applied pore pressure. The oedometer is optimized for neutron optics of SANS on the Low-Q Diffractometer of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The device enables normal oedometric measurements of time-dependent compaction, but with SANS for in situ observation of pore structure evolution under uniaxial strain as a function of effective stress and pore fluid compositions. We present preliminary examination of clay compaction and testing of the device. Funding from the DOE Basic Energy Sciences Geosciences Program is gratefully acknowledged. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Rescue Effects: Irradiated Cells Helped by Unirradiated Bystander Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, R. K. K.; Fung, Y. K.; Han, W.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-01-01

    The rescue effect describes the phenomenon where irradiated cells or organisms derive benefits from the feedback signals sent from the bystander unirradiated cells or organisms. An example of the benefit is the mitigation of radiation-induced DNA damages in the irradiated cells. The rescue effect can compromise the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) (and actually all radiotherapy). In this paper, the discovery and subsequent confirmation studies on the rescue effect were reviewed. The mechanisms and the chemical messengers responsible for the rescue effect studied to date were summarized. The rescue effect between irradiated and bystander unirradiated zebrafish embryos in vivo sharing the same medium was also described. In the discussion section, the mechanism proposed for the rescue effect involving activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway was scrutinized. This mechanism could explain the promotion of cellular survival and correct repair of DNA damage, dependence on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and modulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in irradiated cells. Exploitation of the NF-κB pathway to improve the effectiveness of RIT was proposed. Finally, the possibility of using zebrafish embryos as the model to study the efficacy of RIT in treating solid tumors was also discussed. PMID:25625514

  9. A method for disaggregating clay concretions and eliminating formalin smell in the processing of sediment samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cedhagen, Tomas

    1989-01-01

    A complete handling procedure for processing sediment samples is described. It includes some improvements of conventional methods. The fixed sediment sample is mixed with a solution of the alkaline detergent AJAX® (Colgate-Palmolive). It is kept at 80-900 C for 20-40 min. This treatment facilitates...

  10. Clay Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  11. Fatigue behavior of unirradiated V-5Cr-5Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieseke, B.G.; Stevens, C.O.; Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the low cycle fatigue behavior of V-5Cr-5Ti alloys for a range of temperatures and the extent of environmental effects at ambient temperatures. The results of in-vacuum low cycle fatigue tests are presented for unirradiated V-5Cr-5Ti tested at room temperature, 240, and 400{degree}C. A comparison of the fatigue data generated in rough and high vacuums shows that a pronounced environmental degradation of the fatiuge properties exists in this alloy at room temperature. Fatigue life was reduced by as much as 84%. Cyclic stress range data and SEM observations suggest that this reduction is due to a combination of increases in rates of crack initiation and subsequent growth. The relative contribution of each difference is dependent upon the strain range.

  12. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global ball clay mining industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It cites several firms that are involved in ball clay mining in the U.S., including HC Spins Clay Co. Inc., the Imerys Group and Old Hickory Clay Co. Among the products made from ball clay are ceramic tiles, sanitaryware, as well as fillers, extenders and binders.

  13. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  14. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  15. Physical Properties of Latvian Clays

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of clays mostly depends on its mineral and chemical composition, particle size and pH value. The mutual influence of these parameters is complex. Illite is the most abundant clay mineral in Latvia and usually used in building materials and pottery. The viscosity and plasticity of Latvian clays from several deposits were investigated and correlated with mineral composition, particle size and pH value. Fractionated and crude clay samples were used. The p...

  16. Revised ANL-reported tensile data for unirradiated and irradiated (FFTF, HFIR) V-Ti and V-Cr-Ti alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The tensile data for all unirradiated and irradiated vanadium alloys samples tested at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been critically reviewed and, when necessary, revised. The review and revision are based on reanalyzing the original load-displacement strip chart recordings by a methodology consistent with current ASTM standards. For unirradiated alloys (162 samples), the revised values differ from the previous values as follows: {minus}11{+-}19 MPa ({minus}4{+-}6%) for yield strength (YS), {minus}3{+-}15 MPa ({minus}1{+-}3%) for ultimate tensile strength (UTS), {minus}5{+-}2% strain for uniform elongation (UE), and {minus}4{+-}2% strain for total elongation (TE). Of these changes, the decrease in {minus}1{+-}6 MPa (0{+-}1%) for UTS, {minus}5{+-}2% for UE, and {minus}4{+-}2% for TE. Of these changes, the decrease in UE values for alloys irradiated and tested at 400--435 C is the most significant. This decrease results from the proper subtraction of nongauge-length deformation from measured crosshead deformation. In previous analysis of the tensile curves, the nongauge-length deformation was not correctly determined and subtracted from the crosshead displacement. The previously reported and revised tensile values for unirradiated alloys (20--700 C) are tabulated in Appendix A. The revised tensile values for the FFTF-irradiated (400--600 C) and HFIR-irradiated (400 C) alloys are tabulated in Appendix B, along with the neutron damage and helium levels. Appendix C compares the revised values to the previously reported values for irradiated alloys. Appendix D contains previous and revised values for the tensile properties of unirradiated V-5Cr-5Ti (BL-63) alloy exposed to oxygen.

  17. Mineralogy and geotechnical characteristics of some pottery clay

    OpenAIRE

    Mujib Olamide ADEAGBO; Samuel Akinlabi OLA; Olumide Oluwapelumi OJURI

    2016-01-01

    The physical properties of soils, which are tremendously influenced by the active clay minerals in soil, are of great importance in geotechnical engineering. This paper investigates the clay-sized particles of the Igbara-Odo pottery clay, and compares results obtained with available data on the bulk sample, to determine their correlation and underline the dependence of the geotechnical properties of the bulk clay material on the clay-sized particles. The bulk clay sample consists of 52% sand-...

  18. a Study of Stress Relaxation Rate in Un-Irradiated and Neutron-Irradiated Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghauri, I. M.; Afzal, Naveed; Zyrek, N. A.

    Stress relaxation rate in un-irradiated and neutron-irradiated 303 stainless steel was investigated at room temperature. The specimens were exposed to 100 mC, Ra-Be neutron source of continuous energy 2-12 MeV for a period ranging from 4 to 16 days. The tensile deformation of the specimens was carried out using a Universal Testing Machine at 300 K. During the deformation, straining was frequently interrupted by arresting the cross head to observe stress relaxation at fixed load. Stress relaxation rate, s, was found to be stress dependent i.e. it increased with increasing stress levels σ0 both in un-irradiated and irradiated specimens, however the rate was lower in irradiated specimens than those of un-irradiated ones. A further decrease in s was observed with increase in exposure time. The experiential decrease in the relaxation rate in irradiated specimens is ascribed to strong interaction of glide dislocations with radiation induced defects. The activation energy for the movement of dislocations was found to be higher in irradiated specimens as compared with the un-irradiated ones.

  19. Comparison of ring compression testing to three point bend testing for unirradiated ZIRLO cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-04-01

    Safe shipment and storage of nuclear reactor discharged fuel requires an understanding of how the fuel may perform under the various conditions that can be encountered. One specific focus of concern is performance during a shipment drop accident. Tests at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are being performed to characterize the properties of fuel clad relative to a mechanical accident condition such as a container drop. Unirradiated ZIRLO tubing samples have been charged with a range of hydride levels to simulate actual fuel rod levels. Samples of the hydrogen charged tubes were exposed to a radial hydride growth treatment (RHGT) consisting of heating to 400°C, applying initial hoop stresses of 90 to 170 MPa with controlled cooling and producing hydride precipitates. Initial samples have been tested using both a) ring compression test (RCT) which is shown to be sensitive to radial hydride and b) three-point bend tests which are less sensitive to radial hydride effects. Hydrides are generated in Zirconium based fuel cladding as a result of coolant (water) oxidation of the clad, hydrogen release, and a portion of the released (nascent) hydrogen absorbed into the clad and eventually exceeding the hydrogen solubility limit. The orientation of the hydrides relative to the subsequent normal and accident strains has a significant impact on the failure susceptability. In this study the impacts of stress, temperature and hydrogen levels are evaluated in reference to the propensity for hydride reorientation from the circumferential to the radial orientation. In addition the effects of radial hydrides on the Quasi Ductile Brittle Transition Temperature (DBTT) were measured. The results suggest that a) the severity of the radial hydride impact is related to the hydrogen level-peak temperature combination (for example at a peak drying temperature of 400°C; 800 PPM hydrogen has less of an impact/ less radial hydride fraction than 200 PPM hydrogen for the same thermal

  20. High Temperature Tensile Properties of Unirradiated and Neutron Irradiated 20 Cr-35 Ni Austenitic Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, R.B.; Solly, B.

    1966-12-15

    The tensile properties of an unirradiated and neutron irradiated (at 40 deg C) 20 % Cr, 35 % Ni austenitic steel have been studied at 650 deg C, 750 deg C and 820 deg C. The tensile elongation and mode of fracture (transgranular) of unirradiated specimens tested at room temperature and 650 deg C are almost identical. At 750 deg C and 820 deg C the elongation decreases considerably and a large part of the total elongation is non-uniform. Furthermore, the mode of fracture at these temperatures is intergranular and microscopic evidence suggests that fracture is caused by formation and linkup of grain boundary cavities. YS and UTS decrease monotonically with temperature. Irradiated specimens show a further decrease in ductility and an increase in the tendency to grain boundary cracking. Irradiation has no significant effect on the YS, but the UTS are reduced. The embrittlement of the irradiated specimens is attributed to the presence of He and Li atoms produced during irradiation and the possible mechanisms are discussed. Prolonged annealing of irradiated and unirradiated specimens at 650 deg C appears to have no significant effect on tensile properties.

  1. Kinetic analysis for non-isothermal decomposition of unirradiated and γ-irradiated indium acetyl acetonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refaat Mohammed Mahfouz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic studies for the non-isothermal decomposition of un-irradiated and γ-irradiated indium acetyl acetonate In(acac3 with 10² kGy total γ-ray dose were carried out in static air. The results showed that the decomposition proceeds in one major step in the temperature range of 150-250 °C with the formation of In2O3 as solid residue. The non-isothermal data for un-irradiated and γ-irradiated In(acac3 were analysed using linear Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO and nonlinear Vyazovkin (VYZ iso-conversional methods. The results of application of these free models on the investigated data showed a systematic dependence of Ea on α indicating a simple decomposition process. No significant changes were observed in both decomposition behaviour and (Eα-α dependency between unirradiated and γ-irradiated In(acac3. Calcination of In(acac3 at 400 °C for 5 hours led to the formation of In2O3 monodispersed nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction, FTIR and SEM techniques were employed for characterization of the synthesised nanoparticles. This is the first attempt to prepare In2O3 nanoparticles by solid state thermal decomposition of In(acac3.

  2. Diffusion of HTO, {sup 36}Cl{sup -}, {sup 125}I{sup -} and {sup 22}Na{sup +} in Opalinus Clay: Effect of Confining Pressure, Sample Orientation, Sample Depth and Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Loon, L.R.; Soler, J.M

    2004-02-01

    Effective diffusion coefficients (D{sub e}), rock capacity factors ({alpha}) and diffusion-accessible porosities ({epsilon}) were measured using the through-diffusion technique. Transport (diffusion) was measured both perpendicular and parallel to the bedding. Special cells that allowed the application of an axial confining pressure were designed. The pressures applied ranged from 1 to 5 MPa for Mont Terri samples and between 4 and 15 MPa for Benken samples, the upper values representing the in-situ confining pressure at both locations. The test solutions used in the experiments were synthetic Opalinus Clay pore water, which has Na and Cl as main components (Mont Terri: I = 0.39 M; Benken: I = 0.20 M). Pressure only had a small effect on the value of the effective diffusion coefficients. In the case of Mont Terri samples, increasing the pressure from 1 to 5 MPa resulted in a decrease of the effective diffusion coefficient of 20% for HTO, 27% for {sup 36}Cl{sup -}, 29% for {sup 125}I{sup -} and 17 % for {sup 22}Na{sup +}. In the case of Benken samples, increasing the pressure from 4 to 15 MPa resulted in a decrease of D{sub e} of 17% for HTO, 22% for {sup 36}Cl{sup -}, 32% for {sup 125}I{sup -} and 17 % for {sup 22}Na{sup +}. Moreover, the effective diffusion coefficients for for {sup 36}Cl{sup -}are smaller than for HTO, which is consistent with an effect arising from anion exclusion. This ion exclusion effect is smaller in samples from Mont Terri than in samples from Benken, which can be explained by the higher ionic strength of the Mont Terri water used in the experiments. The diffusion of {sup 22}Na{sup +} is similar to that of HTO in the case of Mont Terri OPA. For Benken OPA, the D{sub e} value of {sup 22}Na{sup +} is a factor of 2 higher than that of HTO. This last observation cannot be explained so far but is comparable to experimental data from ANDRA (1999) on Callovo-Oxfordian claystones from the Meuse/Haute Same site. {sup 125}I{sup -} is retarded with

  3. Porosity Investigation of Kosova's Clay

    OpenAIRE

    Makfire Sadiku; Naim Hasani; Altin Mele

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: Acid activated clay minerals are used as catalysts in the desulphurization of crude oil or as catalyst carrier, as drilling mud, as bleaching earth. Approach: The efficiency of the acid activation can be described in two ways. As increase of the surface and as increase of the cumulative pore volume after the activation. Results: In different samples of the clay mineral the activation was done with different sulfuric acid concentrations for two and 3h. Afterwards the specifi...

  4. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ita, Stacey Leigh [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  5. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for space exploration applications: Influence of the ambient pressure on the calibration curves prepared from soil and clay samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallé, Béatrice; Cremers, David A.; Maurice, Sylvestre; Wiens, Roger C.

    2005-04-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing interest in the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique for stand-off detection of geological samples for use on landers and rovers to Mars, and for other space applications. For space missions, LIBS analysis capabilities must be investigated and instrumental development is required to take into account constraints such as size, weight, power and the effect of environmental atmosphere (pressure and ambient gas) on flight instrument performance. In this paper, we study the in-situ LIBS method at reduced pressure (7 Torr CO2 to simulate the Martian atmosphere) and near vacuum (50 mTorr in air to begin to simulate the Moon or asteroids' pressure) as well as at atmospheric pressure in air (for Earth conditions and comparison). Here in-situ corresponds to distances on the order of 150 mm in contrast to stand-off analysis at distance of many meters. We show the influence of the ambient pressure on the calibration curves prepared from certified soil and clay pellets. In order to detect simultaneously all the elements commonly observed in terrestrial soils, we used an Echelle spectrograph. The results are discussed in terms of calibration curves, measurement precision, plasma light collection system efficiency and matrix effects.

  6. Diffusion of HTO, {sup 36}Cl{sup -}, {sup 125}I{sup -} and {sup 22}Na{sup +} in Opalinus Clay: Effect of Confining Pressure, Sample Orientation, Sample Depth and Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Loon, L.R.; Soler, J.M

    2004-02-01

    Effective diffusion coefficients (D{sub e}), rock capacity factors ({alpha}) and diffusion-accessible porosities ({epsilon}) were measured using the through-diffusion technique. Transport (diffusion) was measured both perpendicular and parallel to the bedding. Special cells that allowed the application of an axial confining pressure were designed. The pressures applied ranged from 1 to 5 MPa for Mont Terri samples and between 4 and 15 MPa for Benken samples, the upper values representing the in-situ confining pressure at both locations. The test solutions used in the experiments were synthetic Opalinus Clay pore water, which has Na and Cl as main components (Mont Terri: I = 0.39 M; Benken: I = 0.20 M). Pressure only had a small effect on the value of the effective diffusion coefficients. In the case of Mont Terri samples, increasing the pressure from 1 to 5 MPa resulted in a decrease of the effective diffusion coefficient of 20% for HTO, 27% for {sup 36}Cl{sup -}, 29% for {sup 125}I{sup -} and 17 % for {sup 22}Na{sup +}. In the case of Benken samples, increasing the pressure from 4 to 15 MPa resulted in a decrease of D{sub e} of 17% for HTO, 22% for {sup 36}Cl{sup -}, 32% for {sup 125}I{sup -} and 17 % for {sup 22}Na{sup +}. Moreover, the effective diffusion coefficients for for {sup 36}Cl{sup -}are smaller than for HTO, which is consistent with an effect arising from anion exclusion. This ion exclusion effect is smaller in samples from Mont Terri than in samples from Benken, which can be explained by the higher ionic strength of the Mont Terri water used in the experiments. The diffusion of {sup 22}Na{sup +} is similar to that of HTO in the case of Mont Terri OPA. For Benken OPA, the D{sub e} value of {sup 22}Na{sup +} is a factor of 2 higher than that of HTO. This last observation cannot be explained so far but is comparable to experimental data from ANDRA (1999) on Callovo-Oxfordian claystones from the Meuse/Haute Same site. {sup 125}I{sup -} is retarded with

  7. Safety Analysis Report for Packaging: The unirradiated fuel shipping container USA/9853/AF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-18

    The HFBR Unirradiated Fuel Shipping Container was designed and fabricated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1978 for the transport of fuel for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) for Brookhaven National Laboratory. The package has been evaluated analytically, as well as the comparison to tests on similar packages, to demonstrate compliance with the applicable regulations governing packages in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported. The contents of this Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) are based on Regulatory Guide 7.9 (proposed Revision 2 - May 1986), 10 CFR Part 71, DOE Order 1540.2, DOE Order 5480.3, and 49 CFR Part 173.

  8. Safety Analysis Report for Packaging: The unirradiated fuel shipping container USA/9853/AF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-18

    The HFBR Unirradiated Fuel Shipping Container was designed and fabricated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1978 for the transport of fuel for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) for Brookhaven National Laboratory. The package has been evaluated analytically, as well as the comparison to tests on similar packages, to demonstrate compliance with the applicable regulations governing packages in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported. The contents of this Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) are based on Regulatory Guide 7.9 (proposed Revision 2 - May 1986), 10 CFR Part 71, DOE Order 1540.2, DOE Order 5480.3, and 49 CFR Part 173.

  9. CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESES

    Science.gov (United States)

    CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS HAVE BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS. THIS OVERVIEW DESCRIBES THE SALIENT STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS CLAY MATERIALS AND EXTENDS THE DISCUSSION TO PILLARED CLAYS AND REAGENTS SUPPORTED ON CLAY MATERIALS. A VARIET...

  10. Rescue effects in radiobiology: Unirradiated bystander cells assist irradiated cells through intercellular signal feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhao, Y. [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Han, W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Chiu, S.K. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Zhu, L. [Office of Admission and Careers Advisory Service, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Wu, L. [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2011-01-10

    Mammalian cells respond to ionization radiation by sending out extracellular signals to affect non-irradiated neighboring cells, which is referred to as radiation induced bystander effect. In the present paper, we described a phenomenon entitled the 'rescue effects', where the bystander cells rescued the irradiated cells through intercellular signal feedback. The effect was observed in both human primary fibroblast (NHLF) and cancer cells (HeLa) using two-cell co-culture systems. After co-culturing irradiated cells with unirradiated bystander cells for 24 h, the numbers of 53BP1 foci, corresponding to the number of DNA double-strand breaks in the irradiated cells were less than those in the irradiated cells that were not co-cultured with the bystander cells (0.78 {+-} 0.04 foci/cell vs. 0.90 {+-} 0.04 foci/cell) at a statistically significant level. Similarly, both micronucleus formation and extent of apoptosis in the irradiated cells were different at statistically significant levels if they were co-cultured with the bystander cells. Furthermore, it was found that unirradiated normal cells would also reduce the micronucleus formation in irradiated cancer cells. These results suggested that the rescue effects could participate in repairing the radiation-induced DNA damages through a media-mediated signaling feedback, thereby mitigating the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of ionizing radiation.

  11. New method to calculate the mechanical properties of unirradiated fuel cladding from ring tensile tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Rengel, M.A. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), Justo Dorado 11, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Gomez, F.J.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Caballero, L.; Valiente, A. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Nuclear fuel cladding is the first barrier used to confine the fuel and the fission products produced during irradiation. Zirconium alloys are used for this purpose due to their remarkable neutron transparency, together with their good mechanical properties at operational temperatures. Consequently, it is very important to be able to characterize the mechanical response of the irradiated cladding. The mechanical behaviour of the material can be modelled as elastoplastic with different stress-strain curves depending on the direction: radial, hoop or longitudinal direction. The ring tensile test has been proposed to determine the mechanical properties of the cladding along the hoop direction. The initial test consisted of applying a force inside the tube, by means of two half cylinders. Later Arsene and Bai [1,2] modified the experimental device to avoid tube bending at the beginning of the test. The same authors proposed a numerical method to obtain the stress-strain curve in the hoop direction from the experimental load versus displacement results and a given friction coefficient between the loading pieces and the sample [3]. This method has been used by different authors [4] with slight modifications. It is based on the existence of two universal curves under small strain hypothesis: the first correlating the hoop strain and the displacement of the loading piece and the second one correlating the hoop stress and the applied load. In this work, a new method to determine the mechanical properties of the cladding from the ring tensile test results is proposed. Non-linear geometry is considered and an iterative procedure is proposed so universal curves are not needed. A stress-strain curve is determined by combining numerical calculations with experimental results in a convergent loop. The two universal curves proposed by Arsene and Bai [3] are substituted by two relationships, one between the equivalent plastic strain in the centre of the specimen ligament and the

  12. Common clay and shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global common clay and shale industry, particularly in the U.S. It claims that common clay and shale is mainly used in the manufacture of heavy clay products like brick, flue tile and sewer pipe. The main producing states in the U.S. include North Carolina, New York and Oklahoma. Among the firms that manufacture clay and shale-based products are Mid America Brick & Structural Clay Products LLC and Boral USA.

  13. Overview and Critical Assessment of the Tensile Properties of unirradiated and irradiated EUROFER97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, E.; Vandermeulen, W.

    2007-10-15

    Material research represents a crucial issue for the assessment of fusion as a future viable source of energy. Structural materials, in particular, need to show a superior mechanical and chemical behaviour to guarantee the safe operation of the reactor during its whole lifetime, while retaining low activation characteristics to minimise the environmental impact of the produced waste. In this context, specific efforts have been focused for the last twenty years in Europe, Japan and the US, on developing suitable Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steels as candidate structural materials. EUROFER97 has recently emerged in Europe as the reference material for the DEMO design. In the framework of the Long-Term Programme of EFDA (European Fusion Development Agreement), a coordinated effort has been launched aimed at providing a critical assessment of the mechanical and microstructural properties of EUROFER97 in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions, based on the results accumulated since the late 90ies within numerous EFDA tasks.

  14. Reactor Materials Program electrochemical potential measurements by ORNL with unirradiated and irradiated stainless steel specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, E.W.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    Effect of irradiation of stainless steel on electrochemical potential (ECP) was investigated by measurements in dilute HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solutions, conditions simulating reactor moderator. The electrodes were made from unirradiated/irradiated, unsensitized/sensitized specimens from R-reactor piping. Results were inconclusive because of budgetary restrictions. The dose rate may have been too small to produce a significant radiolytic effect. Neither the earlier CERT corrosion susceptibility tests nor the present ECP measurements showed a pronounced effect of irradiation on susceptibility of the stainless steel to IGSCC; this is confirmed by the absence in the stainless steel of the SRS reactor tanks (except for the C Reactor tank knuckle area).

  15. Modified clay sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogler, H.S.; Srinivasan, K.R.

    1990-04-10

    This patent describes a clay-based sorbent. It comprises a clay having an external surface and lamellar layers; and cationic surfactant ions having a hydrocarbon portion and a cationic head portion, the cationic surfactant ions being irreversibly bound to the external surface by the hydrocarbon portion. This patent also describes cetylpyridinium-aluminum hydroxy-montmorillonite; the clay-based sorbent wherein the clay is a non-expandable clay; and the clay-based sorbent wherein the cationic surfactant ions are selected from the group consisting of ionized cetylpyridinium chloride and cetylakonium chloride.

  16. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability-Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl;

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC...... as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled 3 yr in a field varying in clay content (∼100 to ∼220 g kg−1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay dispersibility was measured after end-over-end shaking of field-moist soil and 1- to 2-mm sized aggregates either air......-dried or rewetted to −100 hPa matric potential. Tensile strength of 1- to 2-, 2- to 4-, 4- to 8-, and 8- to 16-mm air-dried aggregates was calculated from their compressive strength, and soil friability estimated from the strength–volume relation. Crop rotation characteristics gave only minor effects on clay...

  17. Mineralogy and geotechnical characteristics of some pottery clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujib Olamide ADEAGBO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The physical properties of soils, which are tremendously influenced by the active clay minerals in soil, are of great importance in geotechnical engineering. This paper investigates the clay-sized particles of the Igbara-Odo pottery clay, and compares results obtained with available data on the bulk sample, to determine their correlation and underline the dependence of the geotechnical properties of the bulk clay material on the clay-sized particles. The bulk clay sample consists of 52% sand-size particles, 21% silt and 27% clay. Analysis of the clay-sized particles and the bulk materials shows: specific gravity of 2.07 and 2.66, liquid limit of 91.0% and 33.0%, plastic limit of 27.5% and 14.3%, plasticity index of 63.5% and 18.7% and a linear shrinkage of 7.9% and 5.4%, for both clay-sized particles and bulk clay respectively. The activity value of the clay material (0.64 suggests the presence of Kaolinite and Ilite; and these were confirmed with X-Ray diffraction on the bulk sample and clay-sized particles. X-Ray diffraction patterns shows distinctive peaks which highlight the dominance of Kaolinite (with 8 peaks in the pottery clay sample for both clay-sized particles and bulk material; while traces of other clay minerals like Illite and Halloysite and rock minerals like Mica, Feldspar and Chrysotile were also found. These results suggest that the clay possesses high viability in the manufacturing of ceramics, refractory bricks, paper, fertilizer and paint. The clay material can be used as a subgrade in road construction, since it possesses low swelling characteristics.

  18. Sperm quantity and size variation in un-irradiated and irradiated males of the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis Patton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helinski, M.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Anopheles mosquitoes are important candidates for genetic control strategies. However, little is known about sperm quality and quantity as determinants of male reproductive success. In this study, sperm quantity and length variation were assessed in testes of un-irradiated and irradiated Anopheles

  19. Sperm quantity and size variation in un-irradiated and irradiated males of the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis Patton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helinski, M.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Anopheles mosquitoes are important candidates for genetic control strategies. However, little is known about sperm quality and quantity as determinants of male reproductive success. In this study, sperm quantity and length variation were assessed in testes of un-irradiated and irradiated Anopheles a

  20. Obtention of fracture properties of unirradiated fuel cladding from ring compression tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Rengel, M.A. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos Profesor Aranguren s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), Justo Dorado 11, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Gomez, F.J.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Caballero, L.; Valiente, A. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos Profesor Aranguren s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Zirconium alloy cladding is used as the first structural barrier to contain the nuclear fuel and the fission products. In addition to its neutron transparency, this material has a good corrosion resistance and remarkable mechanical properties at operational temperatures. Consequently, it is or paramount importance to precisely characterize the mechanical behaviour and fracture properties of irradiated cladding to ensure a safe operation. It is known that the mechanical behaviour of unirradiated zirconium alloy cladding is anisotropic. The elastoplastic response depends on the direction, namely radial, hoop or longitudinal. For this reason, different fracture properties should be expected in each direction. From the various tests employed to characterize the mechanical behaviour along the hoop direction in nuclear fuel cladding, the ring compression test is particularly useful to study material fracture. With this test it is possible to determine the moment when a real crack is formed, due to a sudden decrease in the applied load at a given displacement value. The aim of this research is to determine as precisely as possible the value of the fracture energy from the ring compression test load vs. displacement curves. To this end, a finite element calculation incorporating the cohesive zone model was performed. In this case, the cohesive zone theory is applied in its simplest form. It is considered that the cohesive crack transfers a constant stress until the displacement of this cohesive crack reaches a critical value. At this precise moment a real crack is generated. The properties of the softening curve of the cohesive zone model can be obtained by directly comparing the experimental load vs. displacement records with the finite element calculations. The area under the softening curve is the fracture energy, which is directly related with the material fracture toughness. The experimental data used in this work have been obtained on unirradiated Zirlo cladding

  1. THE EFFECT OF CLAY DISPERSION ON THE CRYSTALLIZATION AND MORPHOLOGY OF POLYPROPYLENE/CLAY COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Zhang; Xiao-lin Gao; Ke Wang; Qiang Fu

    2004-01-01

    PP/clay composites with different dispersions, namely, exfoliated dispersion, intercalated dispersion and agglomerates and panicle-like dispersion, were prepared by direct melt intercalation or compounding. The effect of clay dispersion on the crystallization and morphology of PP was investigated via PLM, SAXS and DSC. Experimental results show that exfoliated clay layers are much more efficient than intercalated clay and agglomerates of clay in serving as nucleation agent due to the nano-scale dispersion of clay, resulting in a dramatic decrease in crystal size (lamellar thickness and spherulites) and an increase of crystallization temperature and crystallization rate. On the other hand, a decrease of melting temperature and crystallinity was also observed in PP/clay composites with exfoliated dispersion, due to the strong interaction between PP and clay. Compared with exfoliated clay layers, the intercalated clay layers have a less important effect on the crystallization and crystal morphology. No effect is seen for samples with agglomerates and panicle-like dispersion, in regard to melting temperature, crystallization temperature, crystal thickness and crystallinity.

  2. High resolution X-ray diffraction studies on unirradiated and irradiated strontium hexaferrite crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Balwinder Kaur; Monita Bhat; F Licci; Ravi Kumar; K K Bamzai; P N Kotru

    2012-04-01

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction technique, employing a three-crystal monochromator–collimator combination is used to study the irradiation induced defects in flux grown Sr-hexaferrite crystals irradiated with 50 MeV Li3+ ion beams at room temperature with a fluence value of 1 × 1014 ions/cm2. The diffraction curves of the irradiated crystals suggest the possibility of creation of low angle grain boundaries and other point/clusters of defects causing amorphization in the irradiated crystals. The perfection of the irradiated and unirradiated (0001) cleaved surfaces of the crystals is studied using the bulk method of X-ray topography. The topographs supplement the findings suggestive of modifications in the crystalline quality of SrFe12O19 on irradiation with SHI of Li3+. Etching of the (0001) cleaved surfaces in H3PO4 at 120°C suggests that the dissolution characteristics of the surfaces get affected on irradiation with SHI of Li3+, besides supporting the findings of HRXRD and X-ray topography regarding modifications in the perfection of SrFe12O19 on irradiation.

  3. Properties of unirradiated and irradiated Ti-6Al-4V alloy for ITER flexible connectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodchenkov, B.S., E-mail: rodchen@nikiet.ru [Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE), P.O. Box 788, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Evseev, M.V. [Institute of Reactor Materials, Zarechnyi, Sverdlovsk Region 624051 (Russian Federation); Strebkov, Yu.S. [Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE), P.O. Box 788, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Sinelnikov, L.P.; Shushlebin, V.V. [Institute of Reactor Materials, Zarechnyi, Sverdlovsk Region 624051 (Russian Federation)

    2011-10-01

    The high strength ({alpha} + {beta}) Ti-6Al-4V alloy was selected as the material for flexible attachments of the shield blanket modules in the ITER reactor. The different technologies used for manufacturing this alloy are: forging, stamping or pressing. The microstructures resulting from these processing methods can vary significantly and as a consequence the properties, including irradiation behavior, also vary. There are limited data available on the irradiation behavior of these materials. Specimens cut in the longitudinal and transversal directions of forged and stamped material were studied, with some of the specimens hydrogen charged to {approx}400 ppm H{sub 2}. In the unirradiated condition the forged alloy had slightly more ductility than the stamped alloy. The strength properties of both were practically the same. Neutron irradiation of these materials in the IVV-2M reactor reached doses of {approx}0.2 and 0.3 dpa at temperatures 240-260 deg. C. Irradiation resulted in substantial hardening and significant decrease of the fracture toughness of specimens from both materials.

  4. Permeation properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalendova, A.; Merinska, D.; Gerard, J. F.

    2012-07-01

    The important characteristics of polymer/clay nanocomposites are stability, barrier properties and in the case of polyvinyl chloride also plasticizer migration into other materials. Therefore, the permeation properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites are discussed in this paper. The attention was focused to the polyethylene (PE) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Natural type of montmorillonite MMTNa+ and modified types of montmorillonite from Southern Clay Products were used as the inorganic phase. As the compounding machine, one screw Buss KO-kneader was employed. The principal aim is to fully exfoliate the clay into polymer matrix and enhanced the permeation properties. Prepared samples were tested for O2 and CO2 permeability. Polymer/clay nanocomposite structure was determined on the base of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy (TEM).

  5. Cobalt sorption in silica-pillared clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, A; Fetter, G; Bosch, P; Bulbulian, S

    2006-01-03

    Silicon pillared samples were prepared following conventional and microwave irradiation methods. The samples were characterized and tested in cobalt sorption. Ethylenediammine was added before cobalt addition to improve the amount of cobalt retained. The amount of cobalt introduced in the original clay in the presence of ethylenediammine was the highest. In calcined pillared clays the cobalt retention with ethylenediammine was lower (ca. 40%). In all cases the presence of ethylenediammine increased twice the amount of cobalt sorption measured for aqueous solutions.

  6. Crystallite size distribution of clay minerals from selected Serbian clay deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The BWA (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach technique for the measurement of the mean crystallite thickness and thickness distributions of phyllosilicates was applied to a set of kaolin and bentonite minerals. Six samples of kaolinitic clays, one sample of halloysite, and five bentonite samples from selected Serbian deposits were analyzed. These clays are of sedimentary volcano-sedimentary (diagenetic, and hydrothermal origin. Two different types of shape of thickness distribution were found - lognormal, typical for bentonite and halloysite, and polymodal, typical for kaolinite. The mean crystallite thickness (T BWA seams to be influenced by the genetic type of the clay sample.

  7. Thermostability of montmorillonitic clays

    OpenAIRE

    Petr Jelínek; Dobosz, Stanisław M.; Jaroslav Beňo

    2014-01-01

    Bentonite is one of the most widespread used clays connected with various applications. In the case of foundry technology, bentonite is primarily used as a binder for mold manufacture. Thermal stability of bentonites is a natural property of clay minerals and it depends on the genesis, source and chemical composition of the clay. This property is also closely connected to bentonite structure. According to DTA analysis if only one peak of dehydroxylation is observed (about 600 ºC), the cis- is...

  8. Geotechnical characterization of mined clay from Appalachian Ohio: challenges and implications for the clay mining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anthony R; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-07-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling.

  9. Removal of boron from aqueous solution by clays and modified clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Senem; Yurdakoç, Mürüvvet; Seki, Yoldaş; Yurdakoç, Kadir

    2006-01-01

    In order to increase the adsorption capacities of bentonite, sepiolite, and illite for the removal of boron form aqueous solution, the clay samples were modified by nonylammonium chloride. Specific surface areas of the samples were determined as a result of N2 adsorption-desorption at 77 K using the BET method. X-ray powder diffraction analysis of the clays and modified clays was used to determine the effects of modifying agents on the layer structure of the clays. The surface characterization of clays and modified clay samples was conducted using the FTIR technique before and after the boron adsorption. For the optimization of the adsorption of boron on clays and modified clays, the effect of pH and ionic strength was examined. The results indicate that adsorption of boron can be achieved by regulating pH values in the range of 8-10 and high ionic strength. In order to find the adsorption characteristics, Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherms were applied to the adsorption data. The data were well described by Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherms while the fit of Langmuir equation to adsorption data was poor. It was reached that modification of bentonite and illite with nonylammonium chloride increased the adsorption capacity for boron sorption from aqueous solution.

  10. Some Tests on Heather Field Moraine Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mogens B.; Jacobsen, Moust

    This report deals with oedometer tests on three samples of moraine clay from the Heather Field in the English part of the North Sea. The tests have been carried out in the very unelastic apparatus used in Denmark and with special test procedures differing from the ones used elsewhere. In Denmark...... the English North Sea moraine clays with the corresponding Danish Moraine Clays. The Danish test procedures are explained in details and some comments are given in the hope that they may not be banalities all of them....

  11. Clay Portrait Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  12. Columns in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  13. Siderophore sorption to clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Patricia A; Haack, Elizabeth A; Mishra, Bhoopesh

    2009-08-01

    Siderophores are low molecular weight organic ligands exuded by some aerobic organisms and plants to acquire Fe under Fe-limited conditions. The hydroxamate siderophores may sorb to aluminosilicate clays through a variety of mechanisms depending upon the nature of the clay and of the siderophore along with solution conditions such as pH, ionic strength, and presence of metal cations. They may also affect metal binding to clays. Here, we review previous studies of siderophore sorption to aluminosilicate clays; briefly discuss how the techniques of X-ray diffractometry, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy may be applied to such studies; review effects of siderophores on metal sorption to clays; and highlight some areas for future research.

  14. CLAY SOIL STABILISATION USING POWDERED GLASS

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This paper assesses the stabilizing effect of powdered glass on clay soil. Broken waste glass was collected and ground into powder form suitable for addition to the clay soil in varying proportions namely 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% along with 15% cement (base) by weight of the soil sample throughout. Consequently, the moisture content, specific gravity, particle size distribution and Atterberg limits tests were carried out to classify the soil using the ASSHTO classification system. Based on the...

  15. Subtask 12D6: Fatigue behavior of unirradiated V-5Cr-5Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieseke, B.G.; Stevens, C.O.; Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the low cycle fatigue behavior of V-5Cr-5Ti alloys for a range of temperatures and the extent of environmental effects at ambient temperatures. The results of in-vacuum low cycle fatigue tests are presented for unirradiated V-5Cr-5Ti tested at room temperature (25, 250, and 400{degrees}C). A comparison of the fatigue data generated in rough and high vacuums shows that a pronounced environmental degradation of the fatigue properties exists in the alloy at room temperature. Fatigue life was reduced by as much as 84%. Cyclic stress range data and SEM observations suggest that this reduction is due to a combination of increases in rates of crack initiation and subsequent growth. The relative contribution of each difference is dependent upon the strain range. In high vacuum, the fatigue results also show a trend of increasing cyclic life with increasing temperature between 25 and 400{degrees}C. From the limited data available, life at 25{degrees}C averages 1.7 times that at 25{degrees}C, and at 400{degrees}C, life averages 3.2 times that at room temperature. Like the environmental effects at 25{degrees}C, the effect of temperature seems to be a function of strain range at each temperature. The total strain range and cycles to failure were correlated using a power law relationship and compared to 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel and several vanadium-base alloys. The results suggest that V-SCr-5Ti has better resistance to fatigue than 316-SS in the temperature range of 25 to 400{degrees}C. At 400{degrees}C, the data also show that V-5Cr-5Ti out performs Vanstar alloys 7 and 8 over the entire range of strains investigated. Furthermore, the fatigue properties of the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy compare favorably to V-15Cr-57i (at 25{degrees}C) and Vanstar 9 (at 400{degrees}C) at strains greater than 1%. At lower strains, the lower fatigue resistance of V-5Cr-5Ti is attributed to the higher strengths of the V-15Cr-5Ti and Vanstar 9 alloys.

  16. Porosity Investigation of Kosova's Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makfire Sadiku

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Acid activated clay minerals are used as catalysts in the desulphurization of crude oil or as catalyst carrier, as drilling mud, as bleaching earth. Approach: The efficiency of the acid activation can be described in two ways. As increase of the surface and as increase of the cumulative pore volume after the activation. Results: In different samples of the clay mineral the activation was done with different sulfuric acid concentrations for two and 3h. Afterwards the specific surface was measured by means of nitrogen adsorption. All the measured isotherms belong to the pseudo-two kind. After the activation the surface enhanced from around 100-180 m2 g-1. The mesopore distribution is calculated out of the hysteresis between adsorption-desorption isotherms of the nitrogen. Conclusion: It is shown that the activation increases significantly the amount of mesopores which is reflected in the cumulative volume. The macrospore volume of the clay samples were measured by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry for pore sizes up to 320 nm. The volume of the macrospores results to an increase up to two times after the activation. The cumulative volume of all the pores is shown like a good parameter of the efficiency of the acid activation. The measurements were fulfilled in the newly equipped laboratory of the surface characterizations of the Tirana University. These analyses are of big interest for the industry in Albania and Kosove.

  17. Polyamide 66/Brazilian Clay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Araújo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyamide 66 (PA66/Brazilian clay nanocomposites were produced via direct melt intercalation. A montmorillonite sample from the Brazilian state of Paraíba was organically modified with esthearildimethylammonium chloride (Praepagen, quaternary ammonium salt and has been tested to be used in polymer nanocomposites. The dispersion analysis and the interlayer spacing of the clay particles in matrix were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Thermal behavior of the obtained systems was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetry (TG, and heat deflection temperature (HDT was reported too. The nanocomposites exhibited a partially exfoliated structure, very interesting HDT values which are higher than those of pure PA66, and good thermal stability.

  18. Sample size clay kaolin of primary in pegmatites regions Junco Serido - PB and Equador - RN; Granulometria de argila caulim primario dos pegmatitos nas regioes do Junco do Serido - PB e Equador - RN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M.F.; Sousa, J.B.M.; Sales, L.R.; Silva, P.A.S.; Lima, A.D.D., E-mail: mauro.meyer@ifrn.edu.br [Instituto Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (IFRN), RN (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Kaolin is a clay formed mainly of kaolinite resulting from feldspar weathering or hydrothermal. This study aims to investigate the way of occurrence, kaolin particle size of the pegmatites of the Borborema Province Pegmatitic in the regions of Junco do Serido-PB and Ecuador-RN. These variables were analyzed considering granulometric intervals obtained from wet sieving of samples of pegmatite mines in the region. Kaolin was received using sieves of 200, 325, 400 and 500 mesh and the sieve fractions retained by generating statistical parameters histograms. kaolin particles are extremely fine and pass in its entirety through 500 mesh sieve. The characterization of minerals in fine fractions by diffraction of X-rays showed that the relative amount of sericite in fractions retained in sieves 400 and 500 mesh impairing the whiteness and mineralogical texture kaolin production. (author)

  19. Clay and concrete brick

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlamini, MN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available are manufactured from raw clay as their primary ingredient. However concrete brick has also become a favoured material in recent times. This review will adumbrate the impact of these building materials on energy use and the environment....

  20. Clay goes patchy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kegel, W.K.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.

    2011-01-01

    Empty liquids and equilibrium gels have so far been only theoretical possibilities, predicted for colloids with patchy interactions. But evidence of both has now been found in Laponite, a widely studied clay.

  1. Mechanical properties of type 316L stainless steel welded joint for ITER vacuum vessel (1). Experiment of unirradiated welded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Shigeru; Fukaya, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ishiyama, Shintaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Kouichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-01-01

    In design activity of ITER, the vacuum vessel (VV) is ranked as one of the most important components in core reactor from the view point of first barrier to tritium release from the reactor. The VV of ITER is designed as double walled structure so that some parts of them are not qualified in the conventional design standards. So it is necessary to prepare the new design standards to be applied them. JAERI has executed the preparation activity of the new design standards and the technical data to support them. In this study, the results of metallographic observation and mechanical properties of unirradiated type 316L stainless steel welded joint were reported. (author)

  2. Properties of unirradiated fuel element graphites H-451 and SO818. [Bulk density, tensile properties, thermal expansion, thermal conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engle, G.B.; Johnson, W.R.

    1976-10-08

    Nuclear graphites H-451, lot 440 (Great Lakes Carbon Corporation (GLCC)), and SO818 (Airco Speer Division, Air Reduction Corporation (AS)) are described, and physical, mechanical, and chemical property data are presented for the graphites in the unirradiated state. A summary of the mean values of the property data and of data on TS-1240 and H-451, lot 426, is tabulated. A direct comparison of H-451, lot 426, chosen for Fort St. Vrain (FSV) fuel reload production, TS-1240, and SO818 may be made from the table. (auth)

  3. Dissolution of unirradiated UO{sub 2} fuel in synthetic groundwater. Final report (1996-1998)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollila, K. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-05-01

    This study was a part of the EU R and D programme 1994-1998: Nuclear Fission Safety, entitled `Source term for performance assessment of spent fuel as a waste form`. The research carried out at VTT Chemical Technology was focused on the effects of granitic groundwater composition and redox conditions on UO{sub 2} solubility and dissolution mechanisms. The synthetic groundwater compositions simulated deep granitic fresh and saline groundwaters, and the effects of the near-field material, bentonite, on very saline groundwater. Additionally, the Spanish granite/bentonite water was used. The redox conditions (Eh), which are obviously the most important factors that influence on UO{sub 2} solubility under the disposal conditions of spent fuel, varied from strongly oxidising (air-saturated), anaerobic (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} < l ppm) to reducing (N{sub 2}, low Eh). The objective of the air-saturated dissolution experiments was to yield the maximum solution concentrations of U, and information on the formation of secondary phases that control the concentrations, with different groundwater compositions. The static batch solubility experiments of long duration (up to 1-2 years) were performed using unirradiated UO{sub 2} pellets and powder. Under anaerobic and reducing conditions, the solubilities were also approached from oversaturation. The results of the oxic, air-saturated dissolution experiments with UO{sub 2} powder showed that the increase in the salinity (< 1.7 M) had a minor effect on the measured steady-state concentrations of U. The concentrations, (1.2 ...2.5) x 10{sup -5} M, were at the level of the theoretical solubility of schoepite or another uranyl oxide hydrate, e.g. becquerelite (possibly Na-polyuranate). The higher alkalinity of the fresh (Allard) composition increased the aqueous U concentration. Only some kind of oxidised U-phase (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-UO{sub 3}) was identified with XRD when studying possible secondary phases after the contact time of one year

  4. The effect of clay minerals on diasterane/sterane ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kaam-Peters, Heidy M. E.; Köster, Jürgen; van der Gaast, Sjierk J.; Dekker, Marlèn; de Leeuw, Jan W.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    1998-09-01

    To examine the effect of clay minerals on diasterane/sterane ratios, the mineral compositions of three sample sets of sedimentary rocks displaying a wide range of diasterane/sterane ratios were analysed quantitatively. Diasterane/sterane ratios do not to correlate with clay content but depend on the amount of clay relative to the amount of organic matter (clay/TOC ratios). This correlation may explain the high diasterane/sterane ratios in crude oils and extracts derived from certain carbonate source rocks. Based on the concentrations of regular and rearranged steroids in the sample sets, it is proposed that diasterenes are partly reduced to diasteranes and partly degraded during diagenesis in a ratio largely determined by the availability of clay minerals. It is suggested that the hydrogen atoms required for reduction of the diasterenes originate from the water in the interlayers of clay minerals.

  5. Geotechnical studies of Jaitapur marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.

    A gravity corer was designed and fabricated for near shore sediment sampling. The corer was operated off Jaitapur, West Coast of India, and 70 cores were obtained. The performance of the corer was quite satisfactory. The core samples were soft clays...

  6. NMR imaging and cryoporometry of swelling clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Szutkowski, Kosma; Petrov, Oleg V.; Furó, István.

    2010-05-01

    Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising "self-sealing" buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. In environmental sciences, evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted clay are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. Major goal of present study was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored [1]. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were obtained. Expansion rates for bulk swelling and swelling in narrow slits were compared. For sodium-exchanged montmorillonite in contact with de-ionised water, we observed a remarkable acceleration of expansion as compared to that obtained in the bulk. To characterize the porosity of the clay a cryoporometric study [2] has been performed. Our results have important implications to waste repository designs and for the assessment of its long-term performance. Further research exploring clay-water interaction over a wide variety of clay composition and water ionic

  7. Optimization method for quantitative calculation of clay minerals in soil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Libo Hao; Qiaoqiao Wei; Yuyan Zhao; Zilong Lu; Xinyun Zhao

    2015-04-01

    Determination of types and amounts for clay minerals in soil are important in environmental, agricultural, and geological investigations. Many reliable methods have been established to identify clay mineral types. However, no reliable method for quantitative analysis of clay minerals has been established so far. In this study, an attempt was made to propose an optimization method for the quantitative determination of clay minerals in soil based on bulk chemical composition data. The fundamental principles and processes of the calculation are elucidated. Some samples were used for reliability verification of the method and the results prove the simplicity and efficacy of the approach.

  8. Tensile mechanical response of polyethylene – clay nanocomposites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report on the microstructural and the mechanical characteristics of high density polyethylene (HDPE-clay nanocomposites, with particular attention to the creep behaviour. The samples were prepared through melt compounding, using two high-density polyethylenes with different melt flow rate (MFR, two different organo-modified clays, and changing the relative amount of a polyethylene grafted with maleic anhydride (PEgMA compatibilizer. The intercalation process is more effective as the matrix melt viscosity decreases (higher MFR, while the clay interlamellar spacing increases as the compatibilizer amount increases. The relative stiffness of the nanocomposites increases with the addition of clay, with a limited enhancement of the relative yield stress. The better intercalation obtained by the addition of the compatibilizer is not accompanied by a concurrent improvement of the tensile mechanical properties. The creep resistance is enhanced by the introduction of clay, with an appreciable dependence on both the polyethylene and the clay type.

  9. Effects of shock metamorphism on clay mineralogy: Implications for remote sensing of martian clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, J. R.; Glotch, T. D.; Friedlander, L.; Bish, D. L.; Sharp, T. G.; Dyar, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    One of the most important discoveries in recent exploration of Mars has been the detection of clay minerals within materials exhumed by meteor impact, which point to ancient subsurface alteration and possible habitable conditions at depth. These "crustal clays" occur within central peaks, ejecta, and uplifted rims of many large craters (Ehlmann et al., Nature 2011). The geologic context of phyllosilicates in these settings suggests that most of these deposits represent clays that formed in the subsurface and were later exhumed by impact, rather than clays that formed as a consequence of impact. Therefore, crustal clays exposed at the surface are likely to have experienced some effects of shock metamorphism and/or thermal alteration related to meteor impact. We are investigating the effects of shock metamorphism on the mineralogy of phyllosilicates in the laboratory. Purified, size-separated clay mineral samples were pressed into pellets to decrease internal porosity and were subsequently shocked using the Flat Plate Accelerator at NASA Johnson Space Center. Five minerals (nontronite, saponite, serpentine, chlorite, and kaolinite) were shocked to six pressure steps (10, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 GPa). The recovered, shocked samples are being analyzed by thermal infrared emission, visible/near-infrared reflectance, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mossbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results thus far suggest that shock metamorphism has little effect on the structure or infrared signature of the clay minerals at pressures clay is greatly decreased upon initial shock. At 40 GPa, this feature has lost all internal spectral structure, though a broad absorption in the same region is retained. Lastly, Mossbauer spectroscopy indicates that clays containing ferrous iron are progressively oxidized as a function of shock pressure. In the case of a meteor impact, intense shock pressures are highly localized phenomena although low shock pressures might affect

  10. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the INL Waste Associated with the Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shott, Gregory [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2017-03-21

    This special analysis (SA) evaluates whether the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Waste Associated with the Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) waste stream (INEL167203QR1, Revision 0) is suitable for shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Disposal of the INL Waste Associated with the Unirradiated LWBR waste meets all U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual,” Chapter IV, Section P performance objectives (DOE 1999). The INL Waste Associated with the Unirradiated LWBR waste stream is recommended for acceptance with the condition that the total uranium-233 (233U) inventory be limited to 2.7E13 Bq (7.2E2 Ci).

  11. Behavior of compacted clay-concrete interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.R. SHAKIR; Jungao ZHU

    2009-01-01

    Tests of interface between compacted clay and concrete were conducted systematically using interface simple shear test apparatus. The samples, having same dry density with different water content ratio, were prepared.Two types of concrete with different surface roughness, i.e., relatively smooth and relatively rough surface rough-ness, were also prepared. The main objectives of this paper are to show the effect of water content, normal stress and rough surface on the shear stress-shear displacement relationship of clay-concrete interface. The following were concluded in this study: 1) the interface shear sliding dominates the interface shear displacement behavior for both cases of relatively rough and smooth concrete surface except when the clay water content is greater than 16% for the case of rough concrete surface where the shear failure occurs in the body of the clay sample; 2) the results of interface shear strength obtained by direct shear test were different from that of simple shear test for the case of rough concrete surface; 3) two types of interface failure mechanism may change each other with different water content ratio; 4) the interface shear strength increases with increasing water content ratio especially for the case of clay-rough concrete surface interface.

  12. Boom clay borehole water, home of a diverse bacterial community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouters, Katinka; Moors, Hugo; Leys, Natalie [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    For over two decades, Boom Clay has been studied in the framework of geological disposal of nuclear waste thereby mainly addressing its geochemical properties. Today, also the microbiological properties and the possibility of microbes interacting with radionuclides or repository components including the waste form, in a host formation like Boom Clay are considered [2,3]. In the past, a reference composition for synthetic Boom Clay pore water (BCPW) was derived, based on interstitial water sampled from different layers within the Boom clay [1]. Similarly, the primary aim of this microbiological study was to determine the core BCPW bacterial community and identify representative water samples for future microbial directed lab experiments. In this respect, BCPW was sampled from different Boom Clay layers using the Morpheus piezometer and subsequently analysed by microscopy and molecular techniques, in search for overall shared and abundant micro-organisms. (authors)

  13. Centrifuge modelling of rigid piles in soft clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkvort, R.T.; Poder, M.; Truong, P.

    2016-01-01

    of this study is to employ centrifuge modelling in order to derive experimental p-y curves for rigid piles embedded in over-consolidated soft clay. A kaolin clay sample was prepared and pre-consolidated by applying a constant pressure at the soil surface, while different over-consolidation ratios were achieved...

  14. Clay mineral distribution on the Kerala continental shelf and slope

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Nair, R.R.; Hashimi, N.H.

    Seventy-five sediment samples collected from the Kerala continental shelf and slope during the 17th and 71st Cruises of @iRV gaveshani@@ were analysed by X-ray diffraction for clay mineral cntent. The distribution of total clay (< 4~k fraction...

  15. The effect of clay minerals on diasterane/sterane ratios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kaam-Peters, H.M.E. van; Koster, J.; Gaast, S. J. van der; Dekker, M.H.A.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1998-01-01

    To examine the effect of clay minerals on diasterane/sterane ratios, the mineral compositions of three sample sets of sedimentary rocks displaying a wide range of diasterane/sterane ratios were analysed quantitatively. Diasterane/sterane ratios do not to correlate with clay content but depend on the

  16. Magnificent Clay Murals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirker, Sara Schmickle

    2007-01-01

    Each August, third grade artists at Apple Glen Elementary in Bentonville, Arkansas, start the school year planning, creating, and exhibiting a clay relief mural. These mural projects have helped students to acquire not only art knowledge and techniques, but an even more important kind of knowledge: what it means to plan and successfully complete a…

  17. Rattles of Clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banning, Donna

    1983-01-01

    Using the rattles of Native American cultures as inspiration, students used pinching, coiling, and slab and molding techniques to form the bodies of rattles and clay pellets for sound. Surface decoration included glazed and unglazed areas as well as added handles, feathers, and leather. (IS)

  18. Lift-based up-ender and methods using same to manipulate a shipping container containing unirradiated nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilles, Michael J.

    2017-08-01

    A shipping container containing an unirradiated nuclear fuel assembly is lifted off the ground by operating a crane to raise a lifting tool comprising a winch. The lifting tool is connected with the shipping container by a rigging line connecting with the shipping container at a lifting point located on the shipping container between the top and bottom of the shipping container, and by winch cabling connecting with the shipping container at the top of the shipping container. The shipping container is reoriented by operating the winch to adjust the length of the winch cabling so as to rotate the shipping container about the lifting point. Shortening the winch cabling rotates the shipping container about the lifting point from a horizontal orientation to a vertical orientation, while lengthening the winch cabling rotates the shipping container about the lifting point from the vertical orientation to the horizontal orientation.

  19. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  20. Clay Improvement with Burned Olive Waste Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utkan Mutman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Olive oil is concentrated in the Mediterranean basin countries. Since the olive oil industries are incriminated for a high quantity of pollution, it has become imperative to solve this problem by developing optimized systems for the treatment of olive oil wastes. This study proposes a solution to the problem. Burned olive waste ash is evaluated for using it as clay stabilizer. In a laboratory, bentonite clay is used to improve olive waste ash. Before the laboratory, the olive waste is burned at 550°C in the high temperature oven. The burned olive waste ash was added to bentonite clay with increasing 1% by weight from 1% to 10%. The study consisted of the following tests on samples treated with burned olive waste ash: Atterberg Limits, Standard Proctor Density, and Unconfined Compressive Strength Tests. The test results show promise for this material to be used as stabilizer and to solve many of the problems associated with its accumulation.

  1. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has throughout the years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R4669. It states that natural clay deposits may be used as membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system contains at least 95% of all leachate created...... into account advective ion transport as well as diffusion. Clay prospecting for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island of Lolland. The natural clay contains 60-75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium......-type. The clay material has been evaluated using the standardized methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15-0.3 m thick clay membrane...

  2. Adsorption of cobalt ions from waste water on activated Saudi clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jlil, Saad A.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was to remove the Cobalt ions from wastewater by three types of Saudi clay. These were collected from Tabbuk city (Tabbuk clay), Khiber city (Khiber clay), and Bahhah city (Bahhah clay). The paper also examined the effect of different activators on the enhancement of adsorption capacity of clays for cobalt ions. The results showed minor enhancement in the adsorption capacities of cobalt ions on three types of clays activated by acid treatment. The adsorption capacity of clays improved particularly for Tabbuk clay when treated with hydrogen peroxide as an activator. The adsorption capacity increased from 3.94 to 12.9 mg/g for the untreated and treated Tabbuk clay, respectively. Also, the adsorption capacity of Bahhah clay increased by activating with sodium chloride from 3.44 to 12.55 mg/g for untreated and treated sample, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption data were correlated using five equilibrium equations, namely, Langmuir, Freundlich, Langmuir-Freundlich, BET, and Toth isotherm equations. Langmuir isotherm agreed well with the experimental data of Khiber and Bahhah clay, while Freundlich model and Langmuir-Freundlich model fitted well with the experimental data of Tabbuk and Bahhah clay activated by NaCl. The results showed that Freundlich model fitted well with the experimental data of Tabbuk clay when activated by H2O2 and H2SO4. Finally, the BET model did not describe the experimental data well for the three types of clay after activation.

  3. Characterization of clay from northern of Morocco for their industrial application

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ouahabi, Meriam; Fagel, Nathalie

    2010-05-01

    Clays are a natural resource used for millennia. Currently applications such as industrial minerals are diversified. In this context, our goal is to estimate the potential of the many clay deposits in northern of Morocco. The choice of this region is justified by the particular abundance of clay deposits used to manufacture building materials (brick, ceramic and refractories) and pottery. This study focuses on the mineralogical, chemical and geotechnical characterization tests carried out on Tangier-Tetouan and Meknes clays from northern of Morocco. The suitability of raw clay material from those regions in order to produce ceramic and brick has not been tested yet. The results revealed that the studied samples are diversified, kaolinite and illite (Tetouan clay) and kaolinite and illite and smectite and vermiculite (Tangier and Meknes clay) based materials. There were no major differences in grain-size distribution, whereas Meknes clay was more plastic than Tetouan-Tangier clay. The cation exchange capacity show that Meknes and Tangier clay were more important than Tetouan clay. Specific surface area and thermal analaysis complete this caracterization. It was found that almost all technological properties of the Meknes clay deposit are led to the manufacture of ceramic floor tile, and Tetouan-Tangier clay provide opportunities to making brick and ceramic floor. The Tetouan-Tangier and Meknes clay are a potential ceramic raw material for growing Morrocan ceramic tile and brick industries.

  4. Radiation quality-dependence of bystander effect in unirradiated fibroblasts is associated with TGF-β1-Smad2 pathway and miR-21 in irradiated keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaoming; Tian, Wenqian; Wang, Longxiao; Wang, Jingdong; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping; Yang, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    Traditional radiation biology states that radiation causes damage only in cells traversed by ionizing radiation. But radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), which refers to the biological responses in unirradiated cells when the neighboring cells are exposed to radiation, challenged this old dogma and has become a new paradigm of this field. By nature, RIBEs are the consequences of intercellular communication between irradiated and unirradiated cells. However, there are still some important questions remain unanswered such as whether RIBE is dependent on radiation quality, what are the determining factors if so, etc. Using a transwell co-culture system, we found that HaCaT keratinocytes irradiated with α-particles but not X-rays could induce bystander micronucleus formation in unirradiated WS1 fibroblasts after co-culture. More importantly, the activation of TGF-β1-Smad2 pathway and the consistent decrease of miR-21 level in α-irradiated HaCaT cells were essential to the micronucleus induction in bystander WS1 cells. On the other hand, X-irradiation did not induce bystander effect in unirradiated WS1 cells, accompanied by lack of Smad2 activation and consistent decrease of miR-21 in X-irradiated HaCaT cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the radiation quality-dependence of bystander effect may be associated with the TGF-β1-Smad2 pathway and miR-21 in irradiated cells. PMID:26080011

  5. Radiation quality-dependence of bystander effect in unirradiated fibroblasts is associated with TGF-β1-Smad2 pathway and miR-21 in irradiated keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaoming; Tian, Wenqian; Wang, Longxiao; Wang, Jingdong; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping; Yang, Hongying

    2015-06-16

    Traditional radiation biology states that radiation causes damage only in cells traversed by ionizing radiation. But radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), which refers to the biological responses in unirradiated cells when the neighboring cells are exposed to radiation, challenged this old dogma and has become a new paradigm of this field. By nature, RIBEs are the consequences of intercellular communication between irradiated and unirradiated cells. However, there are still some important questions remain unanswered such as whether RIBE is dependent on radiation quality, what are the determining factors if so, etc. Using a transwell co-culture system, we found that HaCaT keratinocytes irradiated with α-particles but not X-rays could induce bystander micronucleus formation in unirradiated WS1 fibroblasts after co-culture. More importantly, the activation of TGF-β1-Smad2 pathway and the consistent decrease of miR-21 level in α-irradiated HaCaT cells were essential to the micronucleus induction in bystander WS1 cells. On the other hand, X-irradiation did not induce bystander effect in unirradiated WS1 cells, accompanied by lack of Smad2 activation and consistent decrease of miR-21 in X-irradiated HaCaT cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the radiation quality-dependence of bystander effect may be associated with the TGF-β1-Smad2 pathway and miR-21 in irradiated cells.

  6. Clay at Nili Fossae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This image of the Nili Fossae region of Mars was compiled from separate images taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) and the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), two instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The images were taken at 0730 UTC (2:30 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 4, 2006, near 20.4 degrees north latitude, 78.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36 to 3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. HiRISE's image was taken in three colors, but its much higher resolution shows features as small as 30 centimeters (1 foot) across. CRISM's sister instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft, OMEGA, discovered that some of the most ancient regions of Mars are rich in clay minerals, formed when water altered the planet's volcanic rocks. From the OMEGA data it was unclear whether the clays formed at the surface during Mars' earliest history of if they formed at depth and were later exposed by impact craters or erosion of the overlying rocks. Clays are an indicator of wet, benign environments possibly suitable for biological processes, making Nili Fossae and comparable regions important targets for both CRISM and HiRISE. In this visualization of the combined data from the two instruments, the CRISM data were used to calculate the strengths of spectral absorption bands due to minerals present in the scene. The two major minerals detected by the instrument are olivine, a mineral characteristic of primitive igneous rocks, and clay. Areas rich in olivine are shown in red, and minerals rich in clay are shown in green. The derived colors were then overlayed on the HiRISE image. The area where the CRISM and HiRISE data overlap is shown at the upper left, and is about 5 kilometers (3 miles) across. The three boxes outlined in blue are enlarged to show how the different minerals in the scene match up with different landforms. In the image at the upper right

  7. Thermostability of montmorillonitic clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Jelínek

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is one of the most widespread used clays connected with various applications. In the case of foundry technology, bentonite is primarily used as a binder for mold manufacture. Thermal stability of bentonites is a natural property of clay minerals and it depends on the genesis, source and chemical composition of the clay. This property is also closely connected to bentonite structure. According to DTA analysis if only one peak of dehydroxylation is observed (about 600 ºC, the cis- isomerism of bentonite is expected, while two peaks of de-hydroxylation (about 550 and 850 ºC are expected in the trans- one. In this overview, the bentonite structure, the water – bentonite interaction and the swelling behavior of bentonite in connection with the general technological properties of bentonite molding mixture are summarized. Further, various types of methods for determination of bentonite thermostability are discussed, including instrumental analytical methods as well as methods that employ evaluation of various technological properties of bentonite binders and/or bentonite molding mixtures.

  8. Thermostability of montmorillonitic clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petr Jelnek; Stanisaw M.Dobosz; Jaroslav Beo; Katarzyna Major-Gabry

    2014-01-01

    Bentonite is one of the most widespread used clays connected with various applications. In the case of foundry technology, bentonite is primarily used as a binder for mold manufacture. Thermal stability of bentonites is a natural property of clay minerals and it depends on the genesis, source and chemical composition of the clay. This property is also closely connected to bentonite structure. According to DTA analysis if only one peak of dehydroxylation is observed (about 600 ºC), thecis- isomerism of bentonite is expected, while two peaks of de-hydroxylation (about 550 and 850 ºC) are expected in thetrans- one. In this overview, the bentonite structure, the water - bentonite interaction and the sweling behavior of bentonite in connection with the general technological properties of bentonite molding mixture are summarized. Further, various types of methods for determination of bentonite thermostability are discussed, including instrumental analytical methods as wel as methods that employ evaluation of various technological properties of bentonite binders and/or bentonite molding mixtures.

  9. A Study of Clay-Epoxy Nanocomposites Consisting of Unmodified Clay and Organo Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Edward

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Clay-epoxy nanocomposites were synthesized from DGEBA resin and montmorillonite clay with an in-situ polymerization. One type of untreated clay and two types of organo clay were used to produce the nanocompsoites. The aims of this study were to examine the nanocomposite structure using different tools and to compare the results between the unmodified clay and modified clays as nanofillers. Although diffractogram in reflection mode did not show any apparent peak of both types of materials, the transmitted XRD (X-Ray Difraction graphs, DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter analysis and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope images revealed that the modified clay-epoxy and unmodified clay-epoxy provides different results. Interestingly, the micrographs showed that some of the modified clay layers possessed non-exfoliated layers in the modified clay-epoxy nanocomposites. Clay aggregates and a hackle pattern were found from E-SEM images for both types of nanocomposite materials. It is shown that different tools should be used to determine the nanocomposite structure.

  10. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  11. Particle size distribution and physico-chemical composition of clay.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP USER

    obtained after acid digestion of clay samples were used in determining the elements by Atomic. Absorption ... ignition (LOI) reveal a general reduction in composition as particles sizes reduces. However, Mg .... Murray, H.H. Diagnostic Tests for.

  12. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The meeting covers all topics concerning natural argillaceous geological barriers and the clay material based engineered barrier systems, investigated by means of: laboratory experiments on clay samples (new analytical developments), in situ experiments in underground research laboratories, mock-up demonstrations, natural analogues, as well as numerical modelling and global integration approaches (including up-scaling processes and treatment of uncertainties). The works presented deal with: examples of broad research programs (national or international) on the role of natural and artificial clay barriers for radionuclide confinement; clay-based repository concepts: repository designs, including technological and safety issues related to the use of clay for nuclear waste confinement; geology and clay characterisation: mineralogy, sedimentology, paleo-environment, diagenesis, dating techniques, discontinuities in rock clay, fracturing, self sealing processes, role of organic matter and microbiological processes; geochemistry: pore water geochemistry, clay thermodynamics, chemical retention, geochemical modelling, advanced isotopic geochemistry; mass transfer: water status and hydraulic properties in low permeability media, pore space geometry, water, solute and gas transfer processes, colloid mediated transport, large scale movements, long-term diffusion; alteration processes: oxidation effects, hydration-dehydration processes, response to thermal stress, iron-clay interactions, alkaline perturbation; geomechanics: thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of clay, rheological models, EDZ characterisation and evolution, coupled behaviour and models (HM, THM, THMC). A particular interest is given to potential contributions coming from fields of activities other than radioactive waste management, which take advantage of the confinement properties of the clay barrier (oil and gas industries, gas geological storage, CO{sub 2} geological sequestration, chemical waste isolation

  13. Simulation aided testing of hydro-mechanical processes on clay

    OpenAIRE

    Vaunat J.; Romero E.; Merchán V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a study focused on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of a plastic clay under partially saturated conditions. Clay remoulded samples were dried using vapour transfer under one-dimensional conditions. Samples underwent an important vertical shrinkage on drying, which progressed along more than one week. To study the time evolution of this phenomenon, simulation aided techniques were used to analyse the progression of suction at local scale and to determine the time requir...

  14. Tensile and electrical properties of unirradiated and irradiated Hycon 3HP{trademark} CuNiBe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of two different heats of Hycon 3HP{trademark} CuNiBe (HT Temper) have been measured over the temperature range of 20-500{degrees}C for longitudinal and long transverse orientations. The room temperature electrical conductivity has also been measured for both heats. Both heats exhibited a very good combination of strength and conductivity at room temperature. The strength remained relatively high at all test temperatures, with a yield strength of 420-520 MPa at 500{degrees}C. However, low levels of ductility (<5% uniform elongation) were observed at test temperatures above 200-250{degrees}C, due to flow localization adjacent to grain boundaries. Fission neutron irradiation to a dose of {approximately}0.7 dpa at temperatures between 100 and 240{degrees}C produced a slight increase in strength and a significant decrease in ductility. The measured tensile elongation increased with increasing irradiation temperature, with a uniform elongation of {approximately}3.3% observed at 240{degrees}C. The electrical conductivity decreased slightly following irradiation, due to the presence of defect clusters and Ni, Zn, Co transmutation products. The data indicate that CuNiBe alloys have irradiated tensile and electrical properties comparable or superior to CuCrZr and oxide dispersion strengthened copper at temperatures <250{degrees}C, and may be suitable for certain fusion energy structural applications.

  15. The Analysis of the General Performance and Mechanical Behavior of Unirradiated FeCrAl Alloys Before and After Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-03

    The present report summarizes and discusses the preliminary results for the in-depth characterization of the modern, nuclear-grade FeCrAl alloys currently under development. The alloys were designed for enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability, and the research is currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program. Last year, seven candidate FeCrAl alloys with well-controlled chemistry and microstructures were designed and produced; welding was performed under well-controlled conditions. The structure and general performance of unirradiated alloys were assessed using standardized and advanced microstructural characterization techniques and mechanical testing. The primary objective is to identify the best candidate alloy, or at a minimum to identify the contributing factors that increase the weldability and radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys, therefore enabling future generations of FeCrAl alloys to deliver better performance parameters. This report is structured so as to describe these critical assessments of the weldability; radiation tolerance will be reported on in later reports from this program.

  16. Disposition of Unirradiated Sodium Bonded EBR-II Driver Fuel Elements and HEU Scrap: Work Performed for FY 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen A Moore

    2007-04-01

    Specific surplus high enriched uranium (HEU) materials at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) will be transferred to a designated off-site receiving facility. The DOE High Enriched Uranium Disposition Program Office (HDPO) will determine which materials, if any, will be prepared and transferred to an off-site facility for processing and eventual fabrication of fuel for nuclear reactors. These surplus HEU materials include approximately 7200 kg unirradiated sodium-bonded EBR-II driver fuel elements, and nearly 800 kg of HEU casting scrap from the process which formed various sodium-bonded fuels (including the EBR-II driver elements). Before the driver fuel can be packaged for shipment, the fuel elements will require removal of the sodium bond. The HEU scrap will also require repackaging in preparation for off-site transport. Preliminary work on this task was authorized by BWXT Y-12 on Nov 6, 2006 and performed in three areas: • Facility Modifications • Safety Documentation • Project Management

  17. Compaction of microfossil and clay-rich chalk sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of microfossils and clay in the compaction of chalk facies sediments. To meet this aim, chalk sediments with varying micro texture were studied. The sediments have been tested uniaxially confined in a stainless-steel compaction cell. The sediments are......: 1) Pure carbonate chalk with mudstone texture from Stevns Klint (Denmark), 2) Relatively pure chalk sediments with varying content of microfossils from the Ontong Java Plateau (Western Pacific), 3) Clay-rich chalk and mixed sediments from the Caribbean. The tested samples were characterised...... of microfossils and fine-grained silica and clay. Samples with relatively pure chalk mud supported texture compact along a common stress - matrix porosity trend. Microfossils thus have a passive role, apparently because they are supported by the chalk mud. Samples with fine-grained silica and clay can be modelled...

  18. Clay particle retention in small constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braskerud, B C

    2003-09-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) can be used to mitigate non-point source pollution from arable fields. Previous investigations have shown that the relative soil particle retention in small CWs increases when hydraulic load increases. This paper investigates why this phenomenon occurs, even though common retention models predict the opposite, by studying clay and silt particle retention in two Norwegian CWs. Retention was measured with water flow proportional sampling systems in the inlet and outlet of the wetlands, and the texture of the suspended solids was analyzed. The surface area of the CWs was small compared to the watershed area (approximately 0.07%), giving high average hydraulic loads (1.1 and 2.0 md(-1)). One of the watersheds included only old arable land, whereas the other included areas with disturbed topsoil after artificial land leveling. Clay particle retention was 57% for the CW in the first watershed, and 22% for the CW in the disturbed watershed. The different behavior of the wetlands could be due to differences in aggregate size and stability of the particles entering the wetlands. Results showed that increased hydraulic loads did affect CW retention negatively. However, as runoff increased, soil particles/aggregates with higher sedimentation velocities entered the CWs (e.g., the clay particles behaved as silt particles). Hence, clay particle settling velocity is not constant as assumed in many prediction models. The net result was increased retention.

  19. 80 FR 65469 - NESHAP for Brick and Structural Clay Products Manufacturing; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    ... Clay Products Manufacturing; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal...; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... NESHAP for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing. All major sources in these categories must meet...

  20. Adsorption of natural dyes on clay fixed on polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Toni Jefferson Lopes; Odinei Hess Gonçalves; Ricardo Barbosa Barros; Francine Carla Rodrigues Capelli; Ricardo Antonio Francisco Machado; Mara Gabriela Novy Quadri; Marintho Bastos Quadri

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of this work was to produce a pellet to minimize undesirable effects in fixed beds, such as colmatation, through clay fixation on the surface of polymeric particles. Preliminary experiments were carried out by heating the clay, namely Tonsil Terrana 580FF, in order to observe variations on its capacity to adsorb anthocyanins derived from red cabbage. Clays was fixed on five samples of high density polyethylene (HDPE) at 180°C -210°C for two hours. The morphological an...

  1. Obtaining and Organophilisation of Smectite Clays with Reduced Iron Oxide Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karasa Jūlija

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Raw clays from the Baltic region are characterized as smectite containing clays with significant amount of naturally occurring impurities that limiting the potential applications of crude Baltic clay resources. Purification of clay samples from Šaltiškių deposit (Venta basin was carried out by varied concentration hydrochloric acid solutions and resulted in fine removal of carbonates and iron oxide. The main idea of this work is to widen the possible applications of local clay resources providing a new type of raw material for further organoclay production.

  2. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  3. The influence of late-stage pupal irradiation and increased irradiated: un-irradiated male ratio on mating competitiveness of the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis Patton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helinski, M E H; Knols, B G J

    2009-06-01

    Competitiveness of released males in genetic control programmes is of critical importance. In this paper, we explored two scenarios to compensate for the loss of mating competitiveness after pupal stage irradiation in males of the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis. First, competition experiments with a higher ratio of irradiated versus un-irradiated males were performed. Second, pupae were irradiated just prior to emergence and male mating competitiveness was determined. Males were irradiated in the pupal stage with a partially or fully-sterilizing dose of 70 or 120 Gy, respectively. Pupae were irradiated aged 20-26 h (young) as routinely performed, or the pupal stage was artificially prolonged by cooling and pupae were irradiated aged 42-48 h (old). Irradiated males competed at a ratio of 3:1:1 to un-irradiated males for mates in a large cage design. At the 3:1 ratio, the number of females inseminated by males irradiated with 70 Gy as young pupae was similar to the number inseminated by un-irradiated males for the majority of the replicates. At 120 Gy, significantly fewer females were inseminated by irradiated than by un-irradiated males. The irradiation of older pupae did not result in a significantly improved male mating competitiveness compared to the irradiation of young pupae. Our findings indicate that the loss of competitiveness after pupal stage irradiation can be compensated for by a threefold increase of irradiated males, but only for the partially-sterilizing dose. In addition, cooling might be a useful tool to facilitate handling processes of large numbers of mosquitoes in genetic control programmes.

  4. Cell cycle tracking for irradiated and unirradiated bystander cells in a single colony with exposure to a soft X-ray microbeam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminaga, Kiichi; Noguchi, Miho; Narita, Ayumi; Hattori, Yuya; Usami, Noriko; Yokoya, Akinari

    2016-11-01

    To establish a new experimental technique to explore the photoelectric and subsequent Auger effects on the cell cycles of soft X-ray microbeam-irradiated cells and unirradiated bystander cells in a single colony. Several cells located in the center of a microcolony of HeLa-Fucci cells consisting of 20-80 cells were irradiated with soft X-ray (5.35 keV) microbeam using synchrotron radiation as a light source. All cells in the colony were tracked for 72 h by time-lapse microscopy imaging. Cell cycle progression, division, and death of each cell in the movies obtained were analyzed by pedigree assay. The number of cell divisions in the microcolony was also determined. The fates of these cells were clarified by tracking both irradiated and unirradiated bystander cells. Irradiated cells showed significant cell cycle retardation, explosive cell death, or cell fusion after a few divisions. These serious effects were also observed in 15 and 26% of the bystander cells for 10 and 20 Gy irradiation, respectively, and frequently appeared in at least two daughter or granddaughter cells from a single-parent cell. We successfully tracked the fates of microbeam-irradiated cells and unirradiated bystander cells with live cell recordings, which have revealed the dynamics of soft X-ray irradiated and unirradiated bystander cells for the first time. Notably, cell deaths or cell cycle arrests frequently arose in closely related cells. These details would not have been revealed by a conventional immunostaining imaging method. Our approach promises to reveal the dynamic cellular effects of soft X-ray microbeam irradiation and subsequent Auger processes from various endpoints in future studies.

  5. New polyelectrolyte complex from pectin/chitosan and montmorillonite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Marcia Parente Melo; de Mello Ferreira, Ivana Lourenço; de Macedo Cruz, Mauricio Tavares

    2016-08-01

    A new nanocomposite hydrogel was prepared by forming a crosslinked hybrid polymer network based on chitosan and pectin in the presence of montmorillonite clay. The influence of clay concentration (0.5 and 2% wt) as well as polymer ratios (1:1, 1:2 and 2:1) was investigated carefully. The samples were characterized by different techniques: transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, infrared spectroscopy, swelling degree and compression test. Most samples presented swelling degree above 1000%, which permits characterizing them as superabsorbent material. Images obtained by transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of clay nanoparticles into hydrogel. The hydrogels' morphological properties were evaluated by scanning electron microscope in high and low-vacuum. The micrographs showed that the samples presented porous. The incorporation of clay produced hydrogels with differentiated morphology. Thermogravimetric analysis results revealed that the incorporation of clay in the samples provided greater thermal stability to the hydrogels. The compression resistance also increased with addition of clay.

  6. Characterization of Abaji clay deposits for refractory applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Olufunke MATHEW

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research work, Abaji clay deposit in Abuja, Nigeria was investigated to determine its suitability for refractory applications. The clay was sourced froom three different locations having Red clay, Pink clay, and White clay; and was labeled samples A, B, and C respectively. The chemical analysis was carried out by X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry complemented with thermogravimetry while the mineralogical analysis was conducted using X-ray Diffractometer and property test such as sieve analysis, loss on ignition, shrinkage, porosity, bulk density plastic index, thermal shock resistance, permanent linear change on re-heating, and refractoriness were carried out using standard techniques. The chemical analysis shows that samples A, B, and C were composed of Silica: 49.98%, 36.89%, and 44.38% respectively; Alumina (Al2O3: 16.39%, 20.12%, and 18.33% respectively. The mineralogical analysis shows the clays are mainly kaolinite and free quartz. The result of the physical tests show that samples A, B, and C have: an apparent porosity of 25.90%, 20.78%, 13.82% respectively; shrinkage of 1.90%, 2.04%, 0.95%; bulk density of 1.58g/cm3, 1.63g/cm3, 1.78g/cm3; thermal shock resistance of 11 cycles, 15cycles, 17cycles respectively; while the three samples A, B, and C have the same refractoriness of 1100 °C.

  7. Characterization of some clay deposits in South West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatai Olufemi ARAMIDE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Clay minerals are the most important industrial minerals whose application is dependent on its structure and chemical composition. Mineralogical, chemical compositions, phase constitutions, and microstructural morphology of certain clay minerals from three different deposits in south western Nigeria were investigated using state-of-the-art equipment. These were done with the intention of determining the appropriate application for the clay minerals. It was observed that the major phases in the clay samples from the three different deposits are kaolinite, microcline, muscovite/illite, plagioclase/albite and quartz. These phases were observed in varied percentages. It was concluded that sample A (Ifon clay which contains very low kaolinite (5.63%; could not use for making high temperature caliber refractories. But due to its high content of feldspar, it could be processed for the production of feldspar for glass and iron making industries. Sample B is considered to be appropriate for the production the refractory composite due to its most appropriate content of both kaolinite (23.74% kaolinite and feldspars (26.12% microcline and 11.28% plagioclase/albite which is necessary for producing mullite fibers in ceramic matrix at a temperature of around 1400oC. Sample C (Iseyin clay, which contains very low feldspars (3.00% microcline and 3.08% plagioclase/albite and high content of kaolinite was considered suitable for further processing for making high temperature caliber refractories.

  8. Clay resources in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, M.J. van der; Maljers, D.; Gessel, S.F. van; Gruijters, S.H.L.L.

    2007-01-01

    Clay is a common lithology in the Dutch shallow subsurface. It is used in earth constructions such as dikes, and as raw material for the fabricationof bricks, roof tiles etc. We present a new national assessment of Dutch clay resources, as part of a project that provides mineral-occurrenceinformatio

  9. Clay resources in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, M.J. van der; Maljers, D.; Gessel, S.F. van; Gruijters, S.H.L.L.

    2007-01-01

    Clay is a common lithology in the Dutch shallow subsurface. It is used in earth constructions such as dikes, and as raw material for the fabrication of bricks, roof tiles etc. We present a new national assessment of Dutch clay resources, as part of a project that provides mineral-occurrence informat

  10. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p...

  11. Viscous property of dried clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Li-sheng; LI Jian-zhong

    2006-01-01

    One dimensional and triaxial compression tests of air-dried and oven-dried Fujinomori clay and Pisa clay were carried out. Water content is less than 4.5 % and 1.0% for air-dried and oven-dried clay specimens, respectively. In all tests, axial strain rate was changed stepwise many times and drained creep tests were performed several times during monotonic loading at a constant strain rate. Global unloading (and also reloading in some tests) was applied during which creep loading tests were performed several times. Cyclic loading with small stress amplitude and several cycles was also performed to calculate the modulus of elasticity of the clay in tests. Local displacement transducer was used in triaxial compression test to increase measuring accuracy of axial strain. The results show that air-dried and oven-dried clay have noticeable viscous properties; during global unloading, creep deformation changes from positive to negative, i.e. there exist neutral points (zero creep deformation or no creep deformation point) in global unloading part of strain-stress curve; viscous property of Fujinomori clay decreases when water content decreases, i.e. viscous property of air-dried Fujinomori clay is more significant than that of oven-dried Fujinomori clay.

  12. RESEARCH OF SWELLING OF SUZAKH CLAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubetskiy Valeriy Leonidovich

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the course of construction of Sangtudinsky hydropower plant-1 on the River Vakhsh, it was deemed necessary to identify clay swelling properties in the event of alterations of the humidity mode of fructured half-rock soils, or the Suzakh clay, that accommodated tunnel-shaped water outlets within a section that was 75 meters long. The depth of tunnels was about 100 m. Any interaction with swelling soils could lead to destruction of the tunnel lining. Suzakh clays demonstrated the following physical and mechanical properties: density of particles of soil ρ= 2,69 g/cm; soil density ρ = 2.40-2.47 g/cm; porosity of 8.2-10.8 %; ultimate resistance to uniaxial compression = 13.1-31.0 MPa. Water saturated clay samples disintegrated into cloddy fragments; the rate of a longitudinal ultrasonic wave in the area of unaltered soils was equal to = 2500 m/c; repulse coefficient k was equal to 15 MPa/m; solidity coefficient (according to Protodyakonov was equal to 1,5; modulus of deformation in the massif was equal to 0.23 х10 MPa. The author proposed a methodology and designed a pilot set of equipment units designated for the identification of the swelling properties of fractured half-rock soils. Results of the pilot unit operation are presented in the article. Swelling properties are based on the monolith testing results. The programme contemplated a set of experiments held in various limit states on the surface of monoliths. Dependence between the swelling pressure and the swelling deformation in the course of water saturation was identified. The experiment demonstrates that alterations of the humidity mode of free surface Suzakh clays cause the relative deformation of swelling up to 1.1 %, and if the lining is rigid, the swelling pressure can exceed 4 MPa.

  13. Clay minerals in pollution control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateo, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Ricerca sulle Argille, Tito Scalo, PZ (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Clay minerals are fundamental constituents of life, not only as possible actors in the development of life on the Earth (Cairns-Smith and Hartman, 1986), but mainly because they are essential constituents of soils, the interface between the solid planet and the continental biosphere. Many, many authors have devoted themselves to the study of clays and clay minerals since the publication of the early modern studies by Grim (1953, 1962) and Millot (1964). In those years two very important associations were established in Europe (Association Internationale pour l'Etude des Argiles, AIPEA) and in the USA (Clay Mineral Society, CMS). The importance of these societies is to put together people that work in very different fields (agronomy, geology, geochemistry, industry, etc.), but with a common language (clays), very useful in scientific work. Currently excellent texts are being published, but introductory notes are also available on the web (Schroeder, 1998).

  14. Oxidative dissolution of unirradiated Mimas MOX fuel (U/Pu oxides) in carbonated water under oxic and anoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odorowski, Mélina; Jégou, Christophe; De Windt, Laurent; Broudic, Véronique; Peuget, Sylvain; Magnin, Magali; Tribet, Magaly; Martin, Christelle

    2016-01-01

    Few studies exist concerning the alteration of Mimas Mixed-OXide (MOX) fuel, a mixed plutonium and uranium oxide, and data is needed to better understand its behavior under leaching, especially for radioactive waste disposal. In this study, two leaching experiments were conducted on unirradiated MOX fuel with a strong alpha activity (1.3 × 109 Bq.gMOX-1 reproducing the alpha activity of spent MOX fuel with a burnup of 47 GWd·tHM-1 after 60 years of decay), one under air (oxic conditions) for 5 months and the other under argon (anoxic conditions with [O2] MOX pellets under both oxic and anoxic conditions were similar, demonstrating the predominant effect of alpha radiolysis on the oxidative dissolution of the pellets. The uranium released was found to be mostly in solution as carbonate species according to modeling, whereas the Am and Pu released were significantly sorbed or precipitated onto the TiO2 reactor. An intermediate fraction of Am (12%) was also present as colloids. SEM and EPMA results indicated a preferential dissolution of the UO2 matrix compared to the Pu-enriched agglomerates, and Raman spectroscopy showed the Pu-enriched agglomerates were slightly oxidized during leaching. Unlike Pu-enriched zones, the UO2 grains were much more sensitive to oxidative dissolution, but the presence of carbonates did not enable observation of an oxidized layer by Raman spectroscopy with the exception of a few areas revealing the presence of U4O9. This data shows the heterogeneous nature of the alteration and the need to combine information from different techniques to determine the origin of releases.

  15. Mineral resource of the Month: Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Clays were one of the first mineral commodities used by people. Clay pottery has been found in archeological sites that are 12,000 years old, and clay figurines have been found in sites that are even older.

  16. Experimental study of Human Adenoviruses interactions with clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellou, Maria; Syngouna, Vasiliki; Paparrodopoulos, Spyros; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos

    2014-05-01

    Clays are used to establish low permeability liners in landfills, sewage lagoons, water retention ponds, golf course ponds, and hazardous waste sites. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are waterborne viruses which have been used as viral indicators of fecal pollution. The objective of this study was to investigate the survival of HAdV in static and dynamic clay systems. The clays used as a model were crystalline aluminosilicates: kaolinite and bentonite. The adsorption and survival of HAdVs onto these clays were characterized at two different controlled temperatures (4 and 25o C) under static and dynamic batch conditions. Control tubes, in the absence of clay, were used to monitor virus inactivation due to factors other than adsorption to clays (e.g. inactivation or sorption onto the tubes walls). For both static and dynamic batch experiments, samples were collected for a maximum period of seven days. This seven day time - period was determined to be sufficient for the virus-clay systems to reach equilibrium. To infer the presence of infectious HAdV particles, all samples were treated with Dnase and the extraction of viral nucleid acid was performed using a commercial viral RNA kit. All samples were analyzed by Real - Time PCR which was used to quantify viral particles in clays. Samples were also tested for virus infectivity by A549 cell cultures. Exposure time intervals in the range of seven days (0.50-144 hours) resulted in a load reduction of 0.74 to 2.96 logs for kaolinite and a reduction of 0.89 to 2.92 for bentonite. Furthermore, virus survival was higher onto bentonite than kaolinite (p

  17. Viscosity and Plasticity of Latvian Illite Clays

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Due to viscosity and plasticity, clays and clay minerals are used in civil engineering, pottery and also in cosmetics and medicine as thickening agents and emulsion and suspension stabilizers. The rheological properties of clay suspensions are complex. Mostly it is an interaction between mineral composition, clay particle size and pH value and also depends on clay minerals. Clay-water suspension is non-Newtonian fluid showing thixotropic and pseudoplastic properties. Results showed that plast...

  18. Lead removal from aqueous solutions by a Tunisian smectitic clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaari, Islem; Fakhfakh, Emna; Chakroun, Salima; Bouzid, Jalel; Boujelben, Nesrine; Feki, Mongi; Rocha, Fernando; Jamoussi, Fakher

    2008-08-15

    The adsorption of Pb(2+) ions onto Tunisian smectite-rich clay in aqueous solution was studied in a batch system. Four samples of clay (AYD, AYDh, AYDs, AYDc) were used. The raw AYD clay was sampled in the Coniacian-Early Campanian of Jebel Aïdoudi in El Hamma area (South of Tunisia). AYDh and AYDs corresponds to AYD activated by 2.5 mol/l hydrochloric acid and 2.5 mol/l sulphuric acid, respectively. AYDc corresponds to AYD calcined at different temperatures (100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 degrees C). The raw AYD clay was characterized by X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis, infrared spectroscopy and coupled DTA-TGA. Specific surface area of all the clay samples was determined from nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Preliminary adsorption tests showed that sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid activation of raw AYD clay enhanced its adsorption capacity for Pb(2+) ions. However, the uptake of Pb(2+) by AYDs was very high compared to that by AYDh. This fact was attributed to the greater solubility of clay minerals in sulphuric acid compared to hydrochloric acid. Thermic activation of AYD clay reduced the Pb(2+) uptake as soon as calcination temperature reaches 200 degrees C. All these preliminary results were well correlated to the variation of the specific surface area of the clay samples. The ability of AYDs sample to remove Pb(2+) from aqueous solutions has been studied at different operating conditions: contact time, adsorbent amount, metal ion concentration and pH. Kinetic experiments showed that the sorption of lead ions on AYDs was very fast and the equilibrium was practically reached after only 20 min. The results revealed also that the adsorption of lead increases with an increase in the solution pH from 1 to 4.5 and then decreases, slightly between pH 4.5 and 6, and rapidly at pH 6.5 due to the precipitation of some Pb(2+) ions. The equilibrium data were analysed using Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity (Q(0)) increased from 25 to 25

  19. Development and Characterisation of Nanoclays from Indian Clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manocha

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Indian clays are known for their smecticity. One such clay sample collected from Bhuj (Gujaratwas characterised and modified by successive sedimentation processes for different time intervals.The non-plastic components of clay, viz., quartz, illite, iron oxide, CaO, MgO, and organic matterwere removed in different steps, as the heavy impurities in the clay-water suspensions, settledown during sedimentation. The free iron oxide present in clay suspension was reduced bygiving sodium citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite treatment and iron content was further reducedfrom 12Œ15 per cent to 5Œ7 per cent respectively. The organic matter was removed by sodiumacetate-H2O2 treatment. The modified clay so obtained was characterised by thermal analysis,FTIR, and XRD,  SEM and TEM. The cation exchange capacities of original and modified clayswere determined both by methylene blue method and ammonium acetate method. The cationex change capacity is found to enhance from 120Œ130 meq/100 g to 135Œ145 meq/100 g. Usingthe above procedure, 92 per cent smecticity was obtained. Organo philisation of purified clay(smectite was carried out by intercalation with alkyl ammonium salt. The  XRD  analysis show edenhancement of interlamellar spacing from 1.294 nm to 2.855 nm.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(4, pp.517-524, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1672

  20. Adsorption of zinc and lead on clay minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Jablonovská

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Clays (especially bentonite, zeolite and quartz sand are widely used as landfill barriers to prevent contamination of subsoil and groundwater by leachates containing heavy metals. The sorption of zinc and lead on these clays was studied as a function of time and it was found that the initial 1 h our was sufficient to exchange most of the metal ions. The retention efficiency of clay samples of Zn2+ and Pb2+ follows the order of bentonite > zeolite> quartz sand. Whatever the clay sample, lead is retained more than zinc. The concentration of elements in the solution was followed by atomic adsorption spectrofotometry. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus, previously isolated from the kaoline deposit Horna Prievrana was added into the clay samples to comparise the accumulation of Zn2+ and Pb2+ from the model solution. The study of heavy metal adsorption capacity of bacteria- enriched clay adsorbent showed a high retention efficiency for lead ions as comparised with zinc ions. Biosorption is considered a potential instrument for the removal of metals from waste solutions and for the precious metals recovery as an alternative to the conventional processes.

  1. EFFECT OF CALCINATION TEMPERATURE OF TUNISIAN CLAYS ON THE PROPERTIES OF GEOPOLYMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essaidi N.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymers are amorphous three dimensional aluminosilicate materials that may be synthesized at room or slightly higher temperature by alkaline activation of aluminosilicates obtained from industrial wastes, calcined clays and natural minerals. Among the different family of geopolymers, two Tunisian clays (a kaolinite clay from Tabarka and illito/kaolinitic clay from Medenine are tested for their feasibility of geopolymers at low temperature. The unfired and calcined clays were dissolved in strongly alkaline solution in order to produce consolidated materials whose pastes were characterized by their compressive strength. Hardened geopolymer samples were also submitted to X-Ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses. The geopolymer strength is related to the structure and reactivity of the clay generated by thermal treatment and to the role of associated minerals in clays. The amorphous character of obtained geopolymers and the displacement of the IR wavenumber are signature of geopolymerisation reaction.

  2. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Idaho National Laboratory Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor Rods and Pellets Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shott, Gregory [NSTec

    2014-08-31

    The purpose of this special analysis (SA) is to determine if the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Rods and Pellets waste stream (INEL103597TR2, Revision 2) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream consists of 24 containers with unirradiated fabricated rods and pellets composed of uranium oxide (UO2) and thorium oxide (ThO2) fuel in zirconium cladding. The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream requires an SA because the 229Th, 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U activity concentrations exceed the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels.

  3. Induced polarization of clay-sand mixtures. Experiments and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okay, G.; Leroy, P.

    2012-04-01

    The complex conductivity of saturated unconsolidated sand-clay mixtures was experimentally investigated using two types of clay minerals, kaolinite and smectite (mainly Na-Montmorillonite) in the frequency range 1.4 mHz - 12 kHz. The experiments were performed with various clay contents (1, 5, 20, and 100 % in volume of the sand-clay mixture) and salinities (distilled water, 0.1 g/L, 1 g/L, and 10 g/L NaCl solution). Induced polarization measurements were performed with a cylindrical four-electrode sample-holder associated with a SIP-Fuchs II impedance meter and non-polarizing Cu/CuSO4 electrodes. The results illustrate the strong impact of the CEC of the clay minerals upon the complex conductivity. The quadrature conductivity increases steadily with the clay content. We observe that the dependence on frequency of the quadrature conductivity of sand-kaolinite mixtures is more important than for sand-bentonite mixtures. For both types of clay, the quadrature conductivity seems to be fairly independent on the pore fluid salinity except at very low clay contents. The experimental data show good agreement with predicted values given by our SIP model. This complex conductivity model considers the electrochemical polarization of the Stern layer coating the clay particles and the Maxwell-Wagner polarization. We use the differential effective medium theory to calculate the complex conductivity of the porous medium constituted of the grains and the electrolyte. The SIP model includes also the effect of the grain size distribution upon the complex conductivity spectra.

  4. Macro-and Micro- Properties of Two Natural Marine Clays in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ming-jing; PENG Li-cai; ZHU He-hua; LIN Yi-xi; HUANG Liang-ji

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,macro- and micro- properties of natural marine clay in two different and representative regions of China are investigated in detail.In addition to in-situ tests,soil samples are collected by use of Shelby tubes for laboratory examination in Shanghai and Zhuhai respectively,two coastal cities in China.In the laboratory tests,macro-properties such as consolidation characteristics and undrained shear strength are measured.Moreover,X-ray diffraction test,scanning electron microscope test,and mercury intrusion test are carried out for the investigation of their micro-properties including clay minerals and microstructure.The study shows that:(1) both clays are Holocene series formations,classified as either normal or underconsolidated soils.The initial gradient of the stress-strain curves shows their increase with increasing consolidation pressure;however,the Shanghai and the Zhuhai clays are both structural soils with the latter shown to be more structured than the former.As a result,the Zhuhai clay shows strain softening behavior at low confining pressures,but strain hardening at high pressures.In contrast,the Shanghai clay mainly manifests strain-hardening.(2) An activity ranges from 0.75 to 1.30 for the Shanghai marine clay and from 0.5 to 0.85 for the Zhuhai marine clay.The main clay mineral is illite in the Shanghai clay and kaolinite in the Zhuhai clay.The Zhuhai clay is mainly characterized by a flocculated structure,while the typical Shanghai clay shows a dispersed structure.The porous structure of the Shanghai clay is characterized mainly by large and medium-sized pores,while the Zhuhai clay porous structure is mainly featreed by small and medium-sized pores.The differences in their macro- and micro- properties can he attributed to different sedimentation environments.

  5. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    -type. The clay material has been evaluated using the standardized methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15-0.3 m thick clay membrane...... have been tested successfully. At a natural water content of w=40-45% it is possible to establish a homogeneous membrane with hydraulic conductivity k...

  6. CO2 adsorption isotherm on clay minerals and the CO2 accessibility into the clay interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Bertier, Pieter; Busch, Andreas; Rother, Gernot; Krooß, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale CO2 storage in porous rock formations at 1-3 km depth is seen as a global warming mitigation strategy. In this process, CO2 is separated from the flue gas of coal or gas power plants, compressed, and pumped into porous subsurface reservoirs with overlying caprocks (seals). Good seals are mechanically and chemically stable caprocks with low porosity and permeability. They prevent leakage of buoyant CO2 from the reservoir. Caprocks are generally comprised of thick layers of shale, and thus mainly consist of clay minerals. These clays can be affected by CO2-induced processes, such as swelling or dissolution. The interactions of CO2 with clay minerals in shales are at present poorly understood. Sorption measurements in combination scattering techniques could provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms governing CO2-clay interaction. Volumetric sorption techniques have assessed the sorption of supercritical CO2 onto coal (Gensterblum et al., 2010; Gensterblum et al., 2009), porous silica (Rother et al., 2012a) and clays as a means of exploring the potential of large-scale storage of anthropogenic CO2 in geological reservoirs (Busch et al., 2008). On different clay minerals and shales, positive values of excess sorption were measured at gas pressures up to 6 MPa, where the interfacial fluid is assumed to be denser than the bulk fluid. However, zero and negative values were obtained at higher densities, which suggests the adsorbed fluid becomes equal to and eventually less dense than the corresponding bulk fluid, or that the clay minerals expand on CO2 charging. Using a combination of neutron diffraction and excess sorption measurements, we recently deduced the interlayer density of scCO2 in Na-montmorillonite clay in its single-layer hydration state (Rother et al., 2012b), and confirmed its low density, as well as the expansion of the basal spacings. We performed neutron diffraction experiments at the FRMII diffractometer on smectite, kaolinite and illite

  7. Characterization of low-purity clays for geopolymer binder formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Nasser Y.; Mohsen, Q.; El-maghraby, A.

    2014-06-01

    The production of geopolymer binders from low-purity clays was investigated. Three low-purity clays were calcined at 750°C for 4 h. The calcined clays were chemically activated by the alkaline solutions of NaOH and Na2SiO3. The compressive strength was measured as a function of curing time at room temperature and 85°C. The results were compared with those of a pure kaolin sample. An amorphous aluminosilicate polymer was formed in all binders at both processing temperatures. The results show that, the mechanical properties depend on the type and amount of active aluminum silicates in the starting clay material, the impurities, and the processing temperature.

  8. Characterization of low-purity clays for geopolymer binder formulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasser Y.Mostafa; Q.Mohsen; A.El-maghraby

    2014-01-01

    The production of geopolymer binders from low-purity clays was investigated. Three low-purity clays were calcined at 750°C for 4 h. The calcined clays were chemically activated by the alkaline solutions of NaOH and Na2SiO3. The compressive strength was measured as a function of curing time at room temperature and 85°C. The results were compared with those of a pure kaolin sample. An amorphous aluminosilicate polymer was formed in all binders at both processing temperatures. The results show that, the mechanical properties depend on the type and amount of active aluminum silicates in the starting clay material, the impurities, and the processing temperature.

  9. About the mechanisms governing the hydrogen effect on visco plasticity of unirradiated fully annealed zircaloy-4 sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupa, N [Electricite de France (EDF), Nuclear Power Div., Lab. Group, 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Clavel, M. [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Centre de Recherches de Royalliu, 60 (France); Bouffioux, P.; Domain, C. [Electricite de France, Research engineer, RD Div., Material Study Branch, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France); Legris, A. [Lille-1 Univ., UMR 8517, 59 - Villeneuve-d' Ascq (France)

    2002-07-01

    It has been observed that hydrogen either in solid solution or precipitated under the form of hydrides has an impact on the visco-plasticity of CWSR Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes, increasing significantly the creep resistance. The use of TEM on the structurally complex CWSR material being unlikely to identify the deformation mechanisms, it has been decided to complete this R and D program on recrystallized material. A study has been carried out on fully annealed unirradiated Zircaloy-4 sheet used for the manufacturing of the fuel subassembly grids. Mechanical tests were performed for large ranges of temperatures (300 to 400 deg C), stresses (120 to 250 MPa), and strain rates (2 x 10{sup -7} to 2 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}) on as-received and hydrided specimen. The results emphasize: - Hydrogen in solid solution induces a softening of the material. The TEM observations have revealed identical structure of dislocations for both as-received and hydrided specimens. The softening has been particularly observed when dynamic strain aging is activated. It is assumed that atomic hydrogen decreases the dislocation pinning caused by interstitial and/or enhances the intrinsic mobility of the dislocations. With respect to ab initio calculation, atomic hydrogen might be trapped easily by the core of the dislocation, this phenomenon contributing to decrease the lattice friction and to enhance planar glide. - Precipitated hydrides induce a hardening of the material as observed for CWSR Zircaloy 4. The magnitude of the phenomenon depends upon temperature and stress. An analysis of the unload sequences for tension tests and of the secondary strain rates for creep tests leads to the conclusion that hydrides change the kinematics hardening by increasing the internal stress with respect to the as-received material. TEM observation combined with this visco-plasticity approach has revealed that: first, as long as the internal stress is increasing versus plastic strain, hydride are obstacles to

  10. Adsorption of hydrogen gas and redox processes in clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Mathilde; Leone, Laura; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Giffaut, Eric; Charlet, Laurent

    2012-03-20

    In order to assess the adsorption properties of hydrogen gas and reactivity of adsorbed hydrogen, we measured H(2)(g) adsorption on Na synthetic montmorillonite-type clays and Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clayrock using gas chromatography. Synthetic montmorillonites with increasing structural Fe(III) substitution (0 wt %, 3.2 wt %, and 6.4 wt % Fe) were used. Fe in the synthetic montmorillonites is principally present as structural Fe(III) ions. We studied the concomitant reduction of structural Fe(III) in the clays using (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry. The COx, which mainly contains smectite/illite and calcite minerals, is also studied together with the pure clay fraction of this clayrock. Experiments were performed with dry clay samples which were reacted with hydrogen gas at 90 and 120 °C for 30 to 45 days at a hydrogen partial pressure close to 0.45 bar. Results indicate that up to 0.11 wt % of hydrogen is adsorbed on the clays at 90 °C under 0.45 bar of relative pressure. (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry shows that up to 6% of the total structural Fe(III) initially present in these synthetic clays is reduced upon adsorption of hydrogen gas. No reduction is observed with the COx sample in the present experimental conditions.

  11. Constitutive model for overconsolidated clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the relationships between the Hvorslev envelope,the current yield sur-face and the reference yield surface,a new constitutive model for overconsolidated clays is proposed. It adopts the unified hardening parameter,to which the potential failure stress ratio and the characteristic state stress ratio are introduced. The model can describe many characteristics of overconsolidated clays,including stress-strain relationships,strain hardening and softening,stress dilatancy,and stress path dependency. Compared with the Cam-clay model,the model only re-quires one additional soil parameter which is the slope of the Hvorslev envelope. Comparisons with data from triaxial drained compression tests for Fujinomori clay show that the proposed model can rationally describe overconsolidated properties. In addition,the model is also used to predict the stress-strain relationship in the isotropic consolidation condition and the stress paths in the undrained triaxial compression tests.

  12. Colloidal gels: Clay goes patchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Willem K.; Lekkerkerker, Henk N. W.

    2011-01-01

    Empty liquids and equilibrium gels have so far been only theoretical possibilities, predicted for colloids with patchy interactions. But evidence of both has now been found in Laponite, a widely studied clay.

  13. Clay mineral distribution in surface sediments between Indonesia and NW Australia - source and transport by ocean currents

    OpenAIRE

    F. X. Gingele; P. De Deckker; Hillenbrand, C. -D.

    2001-01-01

    The clay mineral distribution in sediments between Indonesia and NW Australia has been assessed on the basis of 166 core-top samples. Clay mineral assemblages are closely related to the geology and weathering regime of the adjacent hinterland and allow the distinction of four clay mineral provinces. Three provinces, Western, Central and Eastern Province are situated along the Indonesian Islands Arc, from Sumatra in the west to Timor in the east. Illite is the major clay mineral of the Western...

  14. Clays in radioactive waste disposal

    OpenAIRE

    Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu-Jun; Tang, Anh-Minh

    2010-01-01

    Clays and argillites are considered in some countries as possible host rocks for nuclear waste disposal at great depth. The use of compacted swelling clays as engineered barriers is also considered within the framework of the multi-barrier concept. In relation to these concepts, various research programs have been conducted to assess the thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of radioactive waste disposal at great depth. After introducing the concepts of waste isolation developed in Belgium, Fran...

  15. What makes a natural clay antibacterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Port-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (2+ solubility.

  16. Cyclic Shearing Deformation Behavior of Saturated Clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The apparatus for static and dynamic universal triaxial and torsional shear soil testing is employed to perform stress-controlled cyclic single-direction torsional shear tests and two-direction coupled shear tests under unconsolidated-undrained conditions. Through a series of tests on saturated clay, the effects of initial shear stress and stress reversal on the clay's strain-stress behavior are examined, and the behavior of pore water pressure is studied. The experimental results indicate that the patterns of stress-strain relations are distinctly influenced by the initial shear stress in the cyclic single-direction shear tests. When the initial shear stress is large and no stress reversal occurs, the predominant deformation behavior is characterized by an accumulative effect. When the initial shear stress is zero and symmetrical cyclic stress occurs, the predominant deformation behavior is characterized by a cyclic effect. The pore water pressure fluctuates around the confining pressure with the increase of cycle number. It seems that the fluctuating amplitude increases with the increase of the cyclic stress. But a buildup of pore water pressure does not occur. The deformations of clay samples under the complex initial and the cyclic coupled stress conditions include the normal deviatoric deformation and horizontal shear deformation, the average deformation and cyclic deformation. A general strain failure criterion taking into account these deformations is recommended and is proved more stable and suitable compared to the strain failure criteria currently used.

  17. Wave liquefaction in soils with clay content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, Özgür; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of clay content (in silt-clay and sand-clay mixtures) on liquefaction beneath progressive waves. The experiments showed that the influence of clay content is very significant. Susceptibility of silt to liquefaction...... is increased with increasing clay content, up to 30%, beyond which the mixture of silt and clay is not liquefied. Sand may become prone to liquefaction with the introduction of clay, contrary to the general perception that this type of sediment is normally liquefaction resistant under waves....

  18. 81 FR 31234 - NESHAP for Brick and Structural Clay Products Manufacturing; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-18

    ... AGENCY NESHAP for Brick and Structural Clay Products Manufacturing; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics... Brick and Structural Clay Products (BSCP) Manufacturing and the final NESHAP for Clay Ceramics... No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2013-0290 for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing. All documents in the dockets are listed...

  19. How mobile are sorbed cations in clays and clay rocks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmi, T; Kosakowski, G

    2011-02-15

    Diffusion of cations and other contaminants through clays is of central interest, because clays and clay rocks are widely considered as barrier materials for waste disposal sites. An intriguing experimental observation has been made in this context: Often, the diffusive flux of cations at trace concentrations is much larger and the retardation smaller than expected based on their sorption coefficients. So-called surface diffusion of sorbed cations has been invoked to explain the observations but remains a controversial issue. Moreover, the corresponding surface diffusion coefficients are largely unknown. Here we show that, by an appropriate scaling, published diffusion data covering a broad range of cations, clays, and chemical conditions can all be modeled satisfactorily by a surface diffusion model. The average mobility of sorbed cations seems to be primarily an intrinsic property of each cation that follows inversely its sorption affinity. With these surface mobilities, cation diffusion coefficients can now be estimated from those of water tracers. In pure clays at low salinities, surface diffusion can reduce the cation retardation by a factor of more than 1000.

  20. Effects of Using Pozzolan and Portland Cement in the Treatment of Dispersive Clay

    OpenAIRE

    Vakili, A. H.; Selamat, M. R.; H. Moayedi

    2013-01-01

    Use of dispersive clay as construction material requires treatment such as by chemical addition. Treatments to dispersive clay using pozzolan and Portland cement, singly and simultaneously, were carried out in this study. When used alone, the optimum amount of pozzolan required to treat a fully dispersive clay sample was 5%, but the curing time to reduce dispersion potential, from 100% to 30% or less, was 3 month long. On the other hand, also when used alone, a 3% cement content was capable o...

  1. The composition and origin of Ghana medicine clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Bart E; Fraser, Sharon E; Insoll, Timothy

    2011-08-01

    The mineral, organic and elemental composition of medicine clays from three shrines in the Tong Hills in northern Ghana (Gbankil, Kusanaab, and Yaane) are assessed to ascertain what additives they might contain and the implications for their recognition, for example in archaeological contexts. These are clays that are widely used for healing purposes being perceived efficacious in curing multiple ailments and which are given a divine provenance, but their collection is ascribed human agency. The Yaane clay is also supplied as part of the process of obtaining the right to operate the shrine elsewhere making it widely dispersed. Organic geochemical analyses revealed a predominance of plant-derived material with a substantial contribution of microbial origin. Based on these (supported by elemental and mineral analyses), no unnatural organic material could be detected, making an exogenous contribution to these clays unlikely. The implications are that these are wholly natural medicinal substances with no anthropogenic input into their preparation, as the traditions suggest. The very similar mineralogy of all the clays, including a non-medicine clay sampled, suggests that, unless the geology radically differed, differentiating between them analytically in an archaeological contexts would be doubtful.

  2. Biodegradation of crude oil saturated fraction supported on clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Jones, Martin D; Head, Ian M; Manning, David A C; Fialips, Claire I

    2014-02-01

    The role of clay minerals in crude oil saturated hydrocarbon removal during biodegradation was investigated in aqueous clay/saturated hydrocarbon microcosm experiments with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community. The clay minerals used for this study were montmorillonite, palygorskite, saponite and kaolinite. The clay mineral samples were treated with hydrochloric acid and didecyldimethylammonium bromide to produce acid activated- and organoclays respectively which were used in this study. The production of organoclay was restricted to only montmorillonite and saponite because of their relative high CEC. The study indicated that acid activated clays, organoclays and unmodified kaolinite, were inhibitory to biodegradation of the hydrocarbon saturates. Unmodified saponite was neutral to biodegradation of the hydrocarbon saturates. However, unmodified palygorskite and montmorillonite were stimulatory to biodegradation of the hydrocarbon saturated fraction and appears to do so as a result of the clays' ability to provide high surface area for the accumulation of microbes and nutrients such that the nutrients were within the 'vicinity' of the microbes. Adsorption of the saturated hydrocarbons was not significant during biodegradation.

  3. Evaluation of the medicinal use of clay minerals as antibacterial agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Haydel, Shelley E.

    2010-01-01

    Natural clays have been used to heal skin infections since the earliest recorded history. Recently our attention was drawn to a clinical use of French green clay (rich in Fe-smectite) for healing Buruli ulcer, a necrotizing fasciitis (‘flesh-eating’ infection) caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. These clays and others like them are interesting as they may reveal an antibacterial mechanism that could provide an inexpensive treatment for this and other skin infections, especially in global areas with limited hospitals and medical resources. Microbiological testing of two French green clays, and other clays used traditionally for healing, identified three samples that were effective at killing a broad-spectrum of human pathogens. A clear distinction must be made between ‘healing clays’ and those we have identified as antibacterial clays. The highly adsorptive properties of many clays may contribute to healing a variety of ailments, although they are not antibacterial. The antibacterial process displayed by the three identified clays is unknown. Therefore, we have investigated the mineralogical and chemical compositions of the antibacterial clays for comparison with non-antibacterial clays in an attempt to elucidate differences that may lead to identification of the antibacterial mechanism(s). The two French green clays used to treat Buruli ulcer, while similar in mineralogy, crystal size, and major element chemistry, have opposite effects on the bacterial populations tested. One clay deposit promoted bacterial growth whereas another killed the bacteria. The reasons for the difference in antibacterial properties thus far show that the bactericidal mechanism is not physical (e.g., an attraction between clay and bacteria), but by a chemical transfer or reaction. The chemical variables are still under investigation. Cation exchange experiments showed that the antibacterial component of the clay can be removed, implicating exchangeable cations in the antibacterial

  4. Charm of Purple Clay A private museum in Wuxi is devoted to purple-clay art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Purple-clay art pieces will be on display in a museum opening soon in Wuxi, Jiangsu Province. The museum, named Shuaiyuan Purple Clay Museum, is part of the Shuaiyuan Purple Clay Art Exhibition Center

  5. Constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock: Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-04-15

    Geological repositories have been considered a feasible option worldwide for storing high-level nuclear waste. Clay rock is one of the rock types under consideration for such purposes, because of its favorable features to prevent radionuclide transport from the repository. Coupled hydromechanical processes have an important impact on the performance of a clay repository, and establishing constitutive relationships for modeling such processes are essential. In this study, we propose several constitutive relationships for elastic deformation in indurated clay rocks based on three recently developed concepts. First, when applying Hooke's law in clay rocks, true strain (rock volume change divided by the current rock volume), rather than engineering strain (rock volume change divided by unstressed rock volume), should be used, except when the degree of deformation is very small. In the latter case, the two strains will be practically identical. Second, because of its inherent heterogeneity, clay rock can be divided into two parts, a hard part and a soft part, with the hard part subject to a relatively small degree of deformation compared with the soft part. Third, for swelling rock like clay, effective stress needs to be generalized to include an additional term resulting from the swelling process. To evaluate our theoretical development, we analyze uniaxial test data for core samples of Opalinus clay and laboratory measurements of single fractures within macro-cracked Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples subject to both confinement and water reduced swelling. The results from this evaluation indicate that our constitutive relationships can adequately represent the data and explain the related observations.

  6. 80 FR 75817 - NESHAP for Brick and Structural Clay Products Manufacturing; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-04

    ... NESHAP for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing: Correction AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION...; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing. These amendments make two technical corrections to...

  7. Impact of Oriented Clay Particles on X-Ray Spectroscopy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, A. J. M. S.; Syazwani, R. N.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the engineering properties of the mineralogy and microfabic of clayey soils is very complex and thus very difficult for soil characterization. Micromechanics of soils recognize that the micro structure and mineralogy of clay have a significant influence on its engineering behaviour. To achieve a more reliable quantitative evaluation of clay mineralogy, a proper sample preparation technique for quantitative clay mineral analysis is necessary. This paper presents the quantitative evaluation of elemental analysis and chemical characterization of oriented and random oriented clay particles using X-ray spectroscopy. Three different types of clays namely marine clay, bentonite and kaolin clay were studied. The oriented samples were prepared by placing the dispersed clay in water and left to settle on porous ceramic tiles by applying a relatively weak suction through a vacuum pump. Images form a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was also used to show the comparison between the orientation patterns of both the sample preparation techniques. From the quantitative analysis of the X-ray spectroscopy, oriented sampling method showed more accuracy in identifying mineral deposits, because it produced better peak intensity on the spectrum and more mineral content can be identified compared to randomly oriented samples.

  8. Irradiation programme MANITU: Results of pre-examinations and Charpy tests with unirradiated materials; Bestrahlungsprogramm MANITU. Ergebnisse der Voruntersuchungen und der Kerbschlagbiegeversuche mit den unbestrahlten Werkstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieth, M.; Dafferner, B.; Ries, H.; Romer, O.

    1995-04-01

    The irradiation project MANITU was planned in the frame of the European Long-term Fusion Materials Development Programme. The results of MANITU will have a lasting influence on the future actions within the materials development programme. The problem of the irradiation induced embrittlement of possible martensitic alloy candidates is still unsolved. But after the evaluation of sub-size Charpy tests with the unirradiated refrence specimens of MANITU a first tendency is recognizable. The Charpy properties of the newly developed low activation 7-10% Cr-WVTa alloys are clearly better compared with the modified commerical 10-11% Cr-NiMoVNb steels. In the present report the pre-examinations are documented and the Charpy test results with unirradiated reference specimens are analysed and assessed. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Bestrahlungsprojekt MANITU wurde im Rahmen des europaeischen Langzeitprogramms fuer Materialentwicklung fuer die Kernfusion geplant. Die daraus gewonnenen Ergebnisse werden das weitere Vorgehen bei der Materialentwicklung entscheidend beeinflussen. Das Problem der bestrahlungsinduzierten Versproedung bei den in Frage kommenden martensitischen Werkstoffen ist nach wie vor ungeloest. Eine erste Tendenz zeichnet sich nach der Auswertung der Kerbschlagbiegeversuche an den unbestrahlten miniaturisierten Referenzproben des MANITU-Programms ab. Die neu entwickelten niedrig aktivierbaren 7-10% Cr-WVTa-Legierungen weisen gegenueber den modifizierten kommerziellen 10-11% Cr-NiMoVNb-Staehlen deutlich bessere Kerbschlageigenschaften auf. Im vorliegenden Bericht werden die Voruntersuchungen dokumentiert und die Ergebnisse aus den Kerbschlagbiegeversuchen der unbestrahlten Referenzproben analysiert und bewertet. (orig.)

  9. CLAY SOIL STABILISATION USING POWDERED GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. OLUFOWOBI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the stabilizing effect of powdered glass on clay soil. Broken waste glass was collected and ground into powder form suitable for addition to the clay soil in varying proportions namely 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% along with 15% cement (base by weight of the soil sample throughout. Consequently, the moisture content, specific gravity, particle size distribution and Atterberg limits tests were carried out to classify the soil using the ASSHTO classification system. Based on the results, the soil sample obtained corresponded to Group A-6 soils identified as ‘fair to poor’ soil type in terms of use as drainage and subgrade material. This justified stabilisation of the soil. Thereafter, compaction, California bearing ratio (CBR and direct shear tests were carried out on the soil with and without the addition of the powdered glass. The results showed improvement in the maximum dry density values on addition of the powdered glass and with corresponding gradual increase up to 5% glass powder content after which it started to decrease at 10% and 15% powdered glass content. The highest CBR values of 14.90% and 112.91% were obtained at 5% glass powder content and 5mm penetration for both the unsoaked and soaked treated samples respectively. The maximum cohesion and angle of internal friction values of 17.0 and 15.0 respectively were obtained at 10% glass powder content.

  10. An assessment of dioxin levels in processed ball clay from the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrario, J.; Byrne, C. [USEPA, Stennis Space Ctr. Mississippi (United States); Schaum, J. [USEPA, Washington, DC (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Introduction The presence of dioxin-like compounds in ball clay was discovered in 1996 as a result of an investigation to determine the sources of elevated levels of dioxin found in two chicken fat samples from a national survey of poultry. The investigation indicated that soybean meal added to chicken feed was the source of dioxin contamination. Further investigation showed that the dioxin contamination came from the mixing of a natural clay known as ''ball clay'' with the soybean meal as an anti-caking agent. The FDA subsequently discontinued the use of contaminated ball clay as an anti-caking agent in animal feeds. The source of the dioxins found in ball clay has yet to be established. A comparison of the characteristic dioxin profile found in ball clay to those of known anthropogenic sources from the U.S.EPA Source Inventory has been undertaken, and none of those examined match the features found in the clays. These characteristic features together with the fact that the geologic formations in which the clays are found are ancient suggest a natural origin for the dioxins. The plasticity of ball clays makes them an important commercial resource for a variety of commercial uses. The percentage of commercial uses of ball clay in 2000 included: 29% for floor and wall tile, 24% for sanitary ware, 10% pottery, and 37% for other industrial and commercial uses. The total mining of ball clay in the U.S. for 2003 was 1.12 million metric tons. EPA is examining the potential for the environmental release of dioxins from the processing/use of ball clays and evaluating potential exposure pathways. Part of this overall effort and the subject of this study includes the analysis of dioxin levels found in commercially available ball clays commonly used in ceramic art studios.

  11. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Stephenson

    Full Text Available We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration.

  12. Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  13. Strength Properties of Aalborg Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kirsten Malte; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    resulted in many damaged buildings in Aalborg. To provide sufficient bearing capacity it is therefore necessary either to remove the fill or to construct the building on piles. Both methods imply that the strength of Aalborg Clay is important for the construction. This paper evaluates the strength...... of Aalborg Clay by use of triaxial tests from four different locations. Both the drained strength (c and ϕ) and the undrained strength (cu) are assessed through two different methods: one where the strength is assumed to vary with the effective stress and another where the strength is found to be constant....

  14. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has through years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R 466). It states natural clay deposits may be used for membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system may contain at least 95% of all leachate created throughout...

  15. Morphological Evaluation of Variously Intercalated Pre-baked Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullah Hameed

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of porous materials is enjoying tremendous popularity and attention of the advance scientific communities due to their excellent adsorptive and catalytic activities. Clays are one of the most important candidates in the porous community which shows the above mentioned activities after modifing with a different intercalating agent. The paper is focused on the infiuence of some inorganic intercalating agents (NaOH on the morphology of the variously intercalated clay samples. The alkali metal was used as the inorganic intercalating agent. The effect of intercalation temperature, intercalation agent concentration and intercalation time on the pre-baked clay morphology were also part of the study. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM study was performed to evaluate the morphological changes of the resultant intercalates. Different morphological properties were improved significantly in the case of the inorganically modified clay samples. Thus, such intercalations are suggested to be effective if the clays under study are to be used for different industrial process at elevated conditions.

  16. Direct visualization of clay microfabric signatures driving organic matter preservation in fine-grained sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Kenneth J.; Bennett, Richard H.; Mayer, Lawrence M.; Curry, Ann; Abril, Maritza; Biesiot, Patricia M.; Hulbert, Matthew H.

    2007-04-01

    We employed direct visualization of organic matter (OM) sequestered by microfabric signatures in organo-clay systems to study mechanisms of OM protection. We studied polysaccharides, an abundant class of OM in marine sediments, associated with the nano- and microfabric of clay sediment using a novel application of transmission electron microscopy, histochemical staining (periodic acid-thiosemicarbazide-silver proteinate), and enzymatic digestion techniques. We used two experimental organo-clay sediment environments. First, laboratory-consolidated sediment with 10% chitin (w/w) added was probed for chitin before and after digestion with chitinase. Second, fecal pellets from the polychaete Heteromastus filiformis were used as a natural environment rich in clay and polysaccharides. Sections of this material were probed with silver proteinate for polysaccharides before and after digestion with a mixture of enzymes (amylase, cellulase, chitinase, dextranase, and pectinase). In both environments, chitin or other polysaccharides were found within pores, bridging clay domains, and attached to clay surfaces in undigested samples. Digested samples showed chitin or polysaccharides more closely associated with clay surfaces and in small pores. Our results imply protective roles for both sorption to clay surfaces and encapsulation within clay microfabric signatures.

  17. Comparison between isothermal cold and melt crystallization of polylactide/clay nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Defeng; Wu, Liang; Wu, Lanfeng; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Yisheng; Zhang, Ming

    2008-04-01

    The isothermal cold and melt crystallization behavior of intercalated polylactide (PLA)/clay nanocomposites (PLACNs) were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarized optical microscope (POM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectrometer (FT-IR). The results show that the degree of crystallinity of PLA matrix decreases monotonously with increasing clay loadings for both the cold and melt crystallization. The cold crystallized sample shows a double melting behavior and lower melting temperature compared to that of melt-crystallized sample, especially in the presence of clay. The crystallization kinetics was then analyzed by the Avrami and Lauritzen-Hoffman methods for further comparison between these two crystallization behaviors. The results reveal that PLA and its nanocomposites present higher activation energy in melt crystallization than that in cold crystallization due to the reptation of entire polymer chains. The addition of clay facilitates the overall kinetics of melt crystallization, which is attributed to both the nucleation effect of clay and enhanced diffusion of PLA chains. However, for cold crystallization, only very small amounts of clay can slightly increase the kinetics, while larger amounts impede the process. The presence of clay leads to a diffusion-controlled growth of nucleation of PLA matrix in the cold crystallization process and, the hindrance effect of clay hence becomes the dominant factor gradually with increasing clay loadings in the case of high-rate nucleation.

  18. Characterization of Clay Minerals and Kerogen in Alberta Oil Sands Geological End Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Limin

    The high degree of variability of oil sands ores can be attributed to a mixture of different geological end members, i.e., estuarine sand, estuarine clay, marine sand and marine clay. This study focused on the mineralogy, especially of clay minerals, and toluene insoluble organic matter, referred to as kerogen, in different oil sands end members. Clays and kerogens will likely have a significant impact on solvent recovery from the gangue following non-aqueous bitumen extraction. The bitumen-free solids were subjected to mineralogical and geochemical analysis. Kerogens were isolated and analyzed by various characterization methods. The types of clays were identified in oriented samples by X-ray diffraction analysis. The nitrogen to carbon ratio in the isolated kerogens is found to be higher than in bitumen. There are more type III kerogens in estuarine samples and more type II kerogens in marine samples.

  19. Clay mineral distribution on tropical shelf: an example from the western shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hashimi, N.H.; Nair, R.R.

    Seventy-five sediment samples collected from the Kerala continental shelf and slope during the 17th and 71st Cruises of RV Gaveshani were analysed by X-ray diffraction for clay mineral content. The distribution of total clay ( 4 mu fraction...

  20. Mechanical properties of attapulgite clay reinforced polyurethane shape-memory nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Bin; Huang, W.M.; Pei, Y.T.; Chen, Zhenguo; Kraft, A.; Reuben, R.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Fu, Y.Q.

    Nanocomposites based on attapulgite clay and shape-memory polyurethane were fabricated by mechanical mixing. The mechanical properties of samples were evaluated using a micro-indentation tester. The untreated commercial attapulgite clay resulted in a significant decrease in glass transition

  1. Aggregation with clay causes sedimentation of the buoyant cyanobacteria Microcystis spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verspagen, J.M.H.; Visser, P.M.; Huisman, J.

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT: We investigated whether the attachment of clay particles can result in sedimentation of the buoyant cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. For this purpose, we measured aggregation of clay to Microcystis spp. in field samples as well as in laboratory cultures of isolated strains. We focused on how

  2. Aggregation with clay causes sedimentation of the buoyant cyanobacteria Microcystis spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verspagen, J.M.H.; Visser, P.M.; Huisman, J.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether the attachment of clay particles can result in sedimentation of the buoyant cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. For this purpose, we measured aggregation of clay to Microcystis spp. in field samples as well as in laboratory cultures of isolated strains. We focused on how the

  3. Mechanical properties of attapulgite clay reinforced polyurethane shape-memory nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Bin; Huang, W.M.; Pei, Y.T.; Chen, Zhenguo; Kraft, A.; Reuben, R.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Fu, Y.Q.

    2009-01-01

    Nanocomposites based on attapulgite clay and shape-memory polyurethane were fabricated by mechanical mixing. The mechanical properties of samples were evaluated using a micro-indentation tester. The untreated commercial attapulgite clay resulted in a significant decrease in glass transition temperat

  4. Picasso Masks: Cubism in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daddino, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art project developed by the author which provides a way to further the children's understanding of Picasso's Cubism style in 3-D. Through this project, upper-elementary students learn a bit about the life and art of Picasso as they gain a firm understanding of the style of art known as Cubism, and apply clay techniques…

  5. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  6. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  7. Geotechnical properties of Karwar marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.; Naik, R.L.

    Karwar marine clay possesses high plasticity characteristics with natural water content higher than the liquid limit. Liquidity index was as high as 1.7. Predominant clay mineral was kaolinite. Undrained shear strength showed an increasing trend...

  8. In situ interaction between different concretes and Opalinus Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenni, A.; Mäder, U.; Lerouge, C.; Gaboreau, S.; Schwyn, B.

    Interactions between cementitious materials and claystone are driven by chemical gradients in pore water and might lead to mineralogical modifications in both materials. In the context of a radioactive waste repository, this alteration might influence safety-relevant clay properties like swelling pressure, permeability, or specific retention. In this study, interfaces of Opalinus Clay, a potential host-rock in Switzerland, and three concrete formulations emplaced in the Cement-Clay Interaction (CI) Experiment at the Mont Terri Underground Laboratory (St. Ursanne, Switzerland) were analysed after 2.2 years of interaction. Sampling techniques with interface stabilisation followed by inclined intersection drilling were developed. Element distribution maps of the concrete-clay interfaces show complex zonations like sulphur enrichment, zones depleted in Ca but enriched in Mg, strong Mg enrichment adjacent to the interface, or carbonation. Consistently, the carbonated zone shows a reduced porosity. Properties of the complex zonation strongly depend on cement properties like water content and pH (ordinary Portland cement vs. low-pH cement). An increased Ca or Mg content in the first 100 μm next to the interface is observed in Opalinus Clay. The cation occupancy of clay exchanger phases next to the ordinary Portland cement interface is depleted in Mg, but enriched in Na, whereas porosity shows no changes at all. The current data suggests migration of CO2/HCO3-, SO42-, and Mg species from clay into cement. pH decrease in the cement next to the interface leads to instability of ettringite, and the sulphate liberated diffuses towards higher pH regions (away from the interface), where additional ettringite can form.

  9. Embedding of laboratory wastes in clay or concrete blocks, with special reference to baking osmic acid and cacodylic acid wastes with clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, T; Murakami, T; Yamana, S

    1998-12-01

    Liquid laboratory waste containing osmic acid and cacodylic acid was mixed with potter's clay or hydraulic cement. The clay-waste product was kneaded into blocks and baked in a klin (1,200-1,400 degrees C). The cement-waste product was allowed to harden into concrete blocks. Some of the baked clay blocks and concrete blocks were ground, and immersed in 1 N NaOH or 10% HCI solutions for 3-6 months. X-ray microanalysis of the dried samples of these solutions showed that no leakage of osmium and arsenic occurred in the baked clay embedding, and that some leakage of these agents occurred in the concrete embedding. The present study indicates that the baked clay embedding method is useful for safe storage of dangerous laboratory wastes. Additional experiments suggested that glass embedding is also useful for safe storage of laboratory wastes or harmful metals.

  10. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin) contain...

  11. Gas breakthrough and emission through unsaturated compacted clay in landfill final cover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.W.W.; Chen, Z.K.; Coo, J.L. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Chen, R., E-mail: chenrui1005@hotmail.com [Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Urban and Civil Engineering for Disaster Prevention and Mitigation, Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zhou, C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Explore feasibility of unsaturated clay as a gas barrier in landfill cover. • Gas breakthrough pressure increases with clay thickness and degree of saturation. • Gas emission rate decreases with clay thickness and degree of saturation. • A 0.6 m-thick clay layer may be sufficient to meet gas emission rate limit. - Abstract: Determination of gas transport parameters in compacted clay plays a vital role for evaluating the effectiveness of soil barriers. The gas breakthrough pressure has been widely studied for saturated swelling clay buffer commonly used in high-level radioactive waste disposal facility where the generated gas pressure is very high (in the order of MPa). However, compacted clay in landfill cover is usually unsaturated and the generated landfill gas pressure is normally low (typically less than 10 kPa). Furthermore, effects of clay thickness and degree of saturation on gas breakthrough and emission rate in the context of unsaturated landfill cover has not been quantitatively investigated in previous studies. The feasibility of using unsaturated compacted clay as gas barrier in landfill covers is thus worthwhile to be explored over a wide range of landfill gas pressures under various degrees of saturation and clay thicknesses. In this study, to evaluate the effectiveness of unsaturated compacted clay to minimize gas emission, one-dimensional soil column tests were carried out on unsaturated compacted clay to determine gas breakthrough pressures at ultimate limit state (high pressure range) and gas emission rates at serviceability limit state (low pressure range). Various degrees of saturation and thicknesses of unsaturated clay sample were considered. Moreover, numerical simulations were carried out using a coupled gas–water flow finite element program (CODE-BRIGHT) to better understand the experimental results by extending the clay thickness and varying the degree of saturation to a broader range that is typical at different

  12. Determination of geomagnetic archaeomagnitudes from clay pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Games, K. P.; Baker, M. E.

    1981-02-01

    Archaeomagnitude determinations of a selection of clay pipes dateable to AD 1645+/-10 as well as studies of pottery samples from the same site and of the same age have been made. Values of the magnitude of the ancient magnetic field (Banc), were obtained from two pottery sherds, two pipe bowls and three pipe stems. The values from the sherds and bowls agree within 2% and compare well with the average value of the magnitude of the magnetic field for the seventeenth century as determined by other archaeomagnetic studies. However, the pipe stems give values of Banc which are significantly less than those from the bowls and pottery. We have not yet been able to explain this and thus we suggest that reliable archaeomagnitude determinations can be made from the bowls of clay pipes but not from the stems. Nevertheless, this result provides a new source of material for investigating variations in the geomagnetic field strength over the past 400 yr. Clay pipes have been manufactured in England since the end of the sixteenth century. In the firing process some pipes were broken and disposed of without ever having been smoked. One such collection, discovered at Rainford, Lancashire, in 1978, consisted of a series of discrete dumps including pipes, kiln debris and a small collection of contemporary used earthenware sherds. The internal consideration of the dumps suggested a very short period of activity and archaeologists (P. Davey, personal communication) ascribe all the material to the period 1645+/-10 yr. With such well-dated material, we set out to check whether or not reliable archaeomagnitudes could be obtained from the pipes.

  13. Evaluation of kaolin clay as natural material for

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ashraf I. Hafez; Naser S. Gerges; Heba N. Ibrahim; Wael S.I. Abou El-magd; Ahmed I. Hashem

    2017-01-01

    ... °C for 3 h indicated that copper sulfide was formed on the copper strip surface. The reclaimed oil by using kaolin clay reduced the sulfur content of all tested aged oils reducing the corrosion on copper strips in all samples investigated...

  14. Fine Structure of Starch-Clay Composites as Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midsol 50 wheat starch and 5% Cloisite clay with or without the addition of glycerin were used to prepare biopolymers in a twin-screw extruder. Early trials of sectioning the unembedded biopolymer resulted in the immediate absorption of water and subsequent dissolution of the sample due to the the ...

  15. Clay mineralogy of the mud banks of Cochin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, R.R.; Murty, P.S.N.

    The mineralogy of the sediments constituting the mud banks formed off Cochin, Kerala, India was studied. The clay mineral composition was used as a means of understanding the nature and source of origin of the muds. Fine fraction of the mud samples...

  16. Clay Cuffman: A Cool, Calm, Relaxed Guy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Gina

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Clay Cuffman, a simple clay-sculpture project that requires two or three sessions, and works for students from the upper-elementary level through high school. It takes about 1.5 pounds of clay per student--about the size of a small grapefruit. The Cuffman project is a great way for upper-elementary through high-school…

  17. Hydrodynamic erosion process of undisturbed clay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, G.; Visser, P.J.; Vrijling, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the hydrodynamic erosion process of undisturbed clay due to the turbulent flow, based on theoretical analysis and experimental results. The undisturbed clay has the unique and complicated characteristics of cohesive force among clay particles, which are highly different from dis

  18. Clay & Children: More than Making Pots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbe, Ursula

    1997-01-01

    Working with clay enables young children to express, explore, and communicate their feelings and ideas. This resource booklet for early childhood practitioners and it promotes the clay table as a special place for shared discoveries, social interaction, and discussion. The booklet provides a glossary of terms used in clay work, as well as reasons…

  19. MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SANDSTONE AND CLAY, NORTH-EAST CONSTANTINE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M BENYAMINA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The north-east area of Constantine has a very complex geological setting. The variety of sedimentary rocks such as sandstone and clay in abundance, represent a big importance in the industry and road infrastructure. The X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy SEM/EDS, FTIR spectroscopy of sandstone and clay are required for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the existing phases. In addition, chemical analysis of the same samples is required to confirm the XRD, EDS (Energy Dispersive X ray Spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy results. The results of this multidisciplinary study, obtained by various analytical techniques, show a good agreement on the existing phases.

  20. Mineralogy and thermal properties of clay from Slatina (Ub, Serbia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Maja; Logar, Mihovil; Kaludjerovic, Lazar; Jelic, Ivana

    2017-04-01

    The "Slatina" deposit, Ub, Serbia was opened in 1965 and represents one of few deposits exploited by "Kopovi" a.d., Ub, company. Deposit is composed of clay layers belonging to Neogene sediments that are widespread transgressive over granitoid rocks of Cer mountain and Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments. Clay is mostly of illite-montmorillonite-kaolinite type and they are generally used as ceramic materials while some of the layers are used as fire-resistant materials. In this study we present mineralogical and thermal characterization of two samples to determine their application as industrial materials. Chemical and mineral composition was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), X-ray diffraction (XRD) on powder and oriented samples, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and granulometry. Cationic exchange capacity (CEC) and specific surface area (SSA) was determined using spectrophotometry and methylene blue (MB). Thermal properties where determined by gravimetry (120, 350, 600 and 1000 oC) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Quantitative mineral composition obtained by Rietveld refinement of combined chemical and XRD data shows that the sample 1(SC) is mainly smectite-illite (45%) and kaolinite (14%) clay with 19% of quartz, 10% feldspars and 7% of limonite, while sample 2(SV) is smectite-illite (43%) and kaolinite (11%) clay with 10% of quartz, 15% feldspars and 7% of limonite. Both samples have low content of impurities (carbonate minerals). Medium grain size (μm) goes from 1.02 (SSA = 104 m2/g) for sample 1(SC) to 0.71 (SSA = 117 m2/g) for sample 2(SV) while their CEC is 12.7 and 14.9 mmol/100g for 1(SC) and 2(SV) respectively. IR spectra of the samples shows larger amount of smectite clays with quartz and carbonate minerals for both samples which is in accordance with XRD data. DTA data shows couple of events that are endothermic. First one (100-200 oC) is associated with loss of moisture and constitutive water, second

  1. Breakdown of Clays by Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Through Changes in Oxidation State of Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arocena, J. M.; Velde, B.

    2012-04-01

    Organisms are known to play a significant role in the transformation of clay minerals in soils. In our earlier work on canola, barley and alfalfa, we reported that Glomus, an arbuscular mycorrhizae, selectively transformed biotite into 2:1 expanding clays through the oxidation of Fe (II) in biotite to Fe(III). In this presentation, we will share similar results on clay transformations mediated by ectomycorrhizal fungi colonizing the roots of coniferous trees. Clay samples were isolated from rhizosphere soils of sub-alpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) in northern British Columbia (Canada). Chemical and mineralogical properties of these soils had been reported in our earlier paper. In this study, we subjected the clay samples to iron X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (Fe-XANES) at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron facility in Saskatoon (Canada). Our initial results showed relatively higher amounts of Fe (III) than Fe(II) in clays collected from rhizosphere of Piloderma (an ectomycorrhizal fungus) compared to soils influenced by non-Piloderma species and Control (non-rhizosphere soil). Coupled with the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, there seems to be a positive relationship between the relative amounts of Fe(III) and the 2:1 expanding clays. This relationship is consistent with our results on agricultural plants in laboratory experiments on biotites where we suggested that oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) results in the formation of 2:1 expanding clays. In a related data set on chlorite alteration we observed that after dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) treatment, the d-spacing of a slight portion of chloritic expanding clays shifted to higher angles indicating decreased d-spacing towards micaceous clays. The reductive process initiated through the action of the DCB treatment seems to indicate the collapsed of expandable clays upon the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II). Initial results from the Fe-XANES and XRD analysis of DCB

  2. Water Retention Curves of Opalinus Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Romero, F. J.

    2012-11-01

    The water retention curve of Opalinus clay samples was determined under different conditions: total and matric suction, stress or no-stress conditions, wetting and drying paths. Through the fitting of these results to the van Genuchten expression the P parameter, related to the air entry value (AEV), was obtained. The AEV is the suction value above which air is able to enter the pores of the sample, and consequently, above which 2-phase flow can take place in the soil pore structure. The samples used in this research came from two different boreholes, BHT-1 and BHG-D1, but the behaviour of them did not depend on their location, what was probably due to the fact that both were drilled in the shay facies of the Opalinus clay. There was not a distinct difference between the results obtained under total or matric suctions. In the drying paths, both the water contents and the degrees of saturation tended to be higher when total suction was applied, however the reverse trend was observed for the water contents reached in wetting paths. As well, no clear difference was observed in the water retention curves obtained in odometers under matric and total suctions, what points to the osmotic component of suction in Opalinus clay not being significant. Overall, the water contents were lower and the degrees of saturation higher when suction was applied under vertical stress, what would indicate that the water retention capacity was lower under 8 MPa vertical stress than under free volume conditions. This vertical stress value is slightly higher than the maximum in situ stress. Also, the samples showed hysteresis according to the expected behaviour, i.e. the water contents for a given suction were higher during a drying path than during a wetting path. The P values obtained were between 6 and 34 MPa, and tended to be higher for the samples tested under stress, in drying paths and when total suction was used. The air entry value calculated from the mercury intrusion porosimetry

  3. Clay platelet partition within polymer blend nanocomposite films by EFTEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Elisângela M; Rippel, Márcia M; Galembeck, Fernando

    2010-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is the main technique used to investigate the spatial distribution of clay platelets in polymer nanocomposites, but it has not often been successfully used in polymer blend nanocomposites because the high contrast between polymer phases impairs the observation of clay platelets. This work shows that electron spectral imaging in energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) in the low-energy-loss spectral crossover region allows the observation of platelets on a clear background. Separate polymer domains are discerned by imaging at different energy losses, above and below the crossover energy, revealing the material morphology. Three blends (natural rubber [NR]/poly(styrene-butyl acrylate) [P(S-BA)], P(S-BA)/poly(vinyl chloride) [PVC], and NR/starch) were studied in this work, showing low contrast between the polymer phases in the 40-60 eV range. In the NR/P(S-BA) and P(S-BA)/PVC blend nanocomposites, the clay platelets accumulate in the P(S-BA) phase, while in the P(S-BA)/PVC nanocomposites, clay is also found at the interfaces. In the NR/starch blend, clay concentrates at the interface, but it also penetrates the two polymer phases. These observations reveal that nanostructured soft materials can display complex morphochemical patterns that are discerned thanks to the ability of EFTEM to produce many contrast patterns for the same sample.

  4. {alpha}-Pinene conversion by modified-kaolinitic clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volzone, C. [CETMIC-Centro de Tecnologia de Recursos Minerales y Ceramica-(CONICET-CIC), C.C. 49, Cno. Centenario y 506 (1897) M.B. Gonnet, Prov., Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: volzcris@netverk.com.ar; Masini, O. [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, Prov., San Luis (Argentina); Comelli, N.A. [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, Prov., San Luis (Argentina); Grzona, L.M. [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, Prov., San Luis (Argentina); Ponzi, E.N. [CINDECA (CONICET-UNLP) calle 47 No. 257 (1900) La Plata, Prov., Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ponzi, M.I. [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, Prov., San Luis (Argentina)

    2005-10-15

    The isomerization of {alpha}-pinene using natural kaolinitic clay before and after different treatments was studied in this work. The kaolinite is a clay material constituted by phyllosilicate 1:1 layer (one sheet of tetrahedral silicon and one sheet of octahedral alumina). The clay was treated at different times using 6.0 N solution of sulfuric acid previous heating to 500 or 700 K. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, by chemical analyses and acidity measurements. The catalytic reactions were carried out at 373 K in a reactor batch with condenser and stirrer. Samples were taken at regular intervals, and reactants and products were quantitatively analyzed with a gas chromatograph after separation of the individual compounds. Conversions of alpha pinene between 67 and 94%, and selectivities in camphene and in limonene of 65 and 23%, respectively, were obtained with the clay treated at different conditions. The structural and textural changes of the clay by the treatments influenced on catalytic reactions.

  5. Clay fraction mineralogy of a Cambisol in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastacio, A. S.; Fabris, J. D., E-mail: jdfabris@ufmg.br [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Campus - Pampulha, Department of Chemistry (Brazil); Stucki, J. W. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences (United States); Coelho, F. S.; Pinto, I. V. [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Campus - Pampulha, Department of Chemistry (Brazil); Viana, J. H. M. [Embrapa Milho e Sorgo (Brazil)

    2005-11-15

    Clay minerals having a 2:1 (tetrahedral:octahedral sheet) structure may be found in strongly weathering soils only if the local pedo-climatic environment prevents them from further weathering to other minerals such as iron oxides. The clay minerals impart important chemical properties to soils, in part by virtue of changes in the redox state of iron in their crystal structures. Knowing the chemical nature of soil clays is a first step in evaluating their potential reactivity with other soil constituents and processes, such as the chemical decomposition of organic substrates to be potentially used in environmental remediation. The purpose of this work was to characterize the iron oxides and iron-bearing clay minerals from a B horizon of a Cambisol developed on tuffite in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, using chemical analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and thermal analysis. The iron oxides of this NaOH-treated clay-fraction were found to contain mainly maghemite ({gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and superparamagnetic goethite ({alpha}FeOOH). Kaolinite (Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}), smectite, and minor portions of anatase (TiO{sub 2}) were identified in the CBD-treated sample.

  6. The systems containing clays and clay minerals from modified drug release: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Luís Alberto de Sousa; Figueiras, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; da Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti; da Silva Leite, Cleide Maria

    2013-03-01

    Clays are materials commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, either as ingredients or as active ingredients. It was observed that when they are administered concurrently, they may interact with drugs reducing their absorption. Therefore, such interactions can be used to achieve technological and biopharmaceutical advantages, regarding the control of release. This review summarizes bibliographic (articles) and technological (patents) information on the use of systems containing clays and clay minerals in modified drug delivery. In this area, formulations such natural clay, commercial clay, synthetic clay, composites clay-polymers, nanocomposites clay-polymers, films and hidrogels composites clay-polymers are used to slow/extend or vectorize the release of drugs and consequently they increase their bioavailability. Finally, this review summarizes the fields of technology and biopharmaceutical applications, where clays are applied.

  7. Novel Organically Modified Core-Shell Clay for Epoxy Composites-"SOBM Filler 1".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iheaturu, Nnamdi Chibuike; Madufor, Innocent Chimezie

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of a novel organically modified clay from spent oil base drilling mud (SOBM) that could serve as core-shell clay filler for polymers is herein reported. Due to the hydrophilic nature of clay, its compatibility with polymer matrix was made possible through modification of the surface of the core clay sample with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTES) compound prior to its use. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to characterize clay surface modification. Electron dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to expose filler chemical composition and morphology, while electrophoresis measurement was used to examine level of filler dispersion. Results show an agglomerated core clay powder after high temperature treatment, while EDX analysis shows that the organically modified clay is composed of chemical inhomogeneities, wherein elemental compositions in weight percent vary from one point to the other in a probe of two points. Micrographs of the 3-APTES coupled SOBM core-shell clay filler clearly show cloudy appearance, while FT-IR indicates 25% and 5% increases in fundamental vibrations band at 1014 cm(-1) and 1435 cm(-1), respectively. Furthermore, 3-APTES coupled core-shell clay was used to prepare epoxy composites and tested for mechanical properties.

  8. A review of WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) repository clays and their relationship to clays of adjacent strata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumhansl, J.L.; Kimball, K.M.; Stein, C.L.

    1990-12-01

    The Salado Formation is a thick evaporite sequence located in the Permian Delaware Basin of southeastern New Mexico. This study focuses on the intense diagenetic alteration that has affected the small amounts of clay, feldspar, and quartz washed into the basin during salt deposition. These changes are of more than academic interest since this formation also houses the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant). Site characterization concerns warrant compiling a detailed data base describing the clays in and around the facility horizon. An extensive sampling effort was undertaken to address these programmatic issues as well as to provide additional insight regarding diagenetic mechanisms in the Salado. Seventy-five samples were collected from argillaceous partings in halite at the stratigraphic level of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These were compared with twenty-eight samples from cores of the Vaca Triste member of the Salado, a thin clastic unit at the top of the McNutt potash zone, and with a clay-rich sample from the lower contact of the Culebra Dolomite (in the overlying Rustler Formation). These settings were compared to assess the influence of differences in brine chemistry (i.e., halite and potash facies, normal to hypersaline marine conditions) and sediment composition (clays, sandy silt, dolomitized limestone) on diagenetic processes. 44 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. A study on alluvial clays of Darrang and Kamrup district of Assam by x-ray and other physical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharia, Ganeswar

    The first Chapter gives a general introduction about the clays and alluvial clays. In this chapter a broad discussion on the general features of the clays and clay minerals have been explained. A short description on seven different types of clay, the areas of application in the past and present are incorporated. It gives an insight into the important industrial and commercial utility of the alluvial clays or clay. This chapter also deals with the review of previous and present work on clay minerals including home state. The objectives of the present study have been mentioned in the last part of this chapter. The Second chapter deals with the occurrence and formation of the clays. The structural features of the clays have been described with due emphasis on two layered Kaolinite group, three layered Illite and Montmorillonite group, Chlorite group and Vermiculite groups. Profiles of the clays have been described briefly in this chapter. Some causes are mentioned for which the plasticity of the clays developed. A general classification of the clays in relation to the clay mineral study and recommendations of AIPEA is shown in the Table No. 2.5(1) Here, the behaviour of clay minerals in relation to water and foreign Ions in acquons solution are briefly enumerated. A sketch diagram for behaviour of clays in relation to water is shown in Fig. 2.6(1). The third chapter deals with the experimental methodology and the areas of investigation or places from where the samples were collected are shown in Map (Fig. 3.1.) and in Chart 3.1.1. In this chapter the specimen collection process and procedures of preparatory washed and chemically treated samples are described elaborately. Here, the preparation of H+, K + and Mg++ clay, powder clay, pellet slide are mentioned. A general interpretation about the XRD, XRF and FTIR instrument and the procedure of treatments are synthesised. The different perimeters for this study are also mentioned here with their respective units and the

  10. Cyclic deformations in the Opalinus clay: a laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Emanuel; Huggenberger, Peter; Möri, Andreas; Meier, Edi

    2015-04-01

    The influence of tunnel climate on deformation cycles of joint openings and closings is often observed immediately after excavation. At the EZ-B niche in the Mt. Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland), a cyclic deformation of the shaly Opalinus clay has been monitored for several years. The deformation cycles of the joints parallel to the clay bedding planes correlate with seasonal variations in relative humidity of the air in the niche. In winter, when the relative humidity is the lowest (down to 65%), the joints open as the clay volume decreases, whereas they tend to close in the summer when the relative humidity reaches up to 100%. Furthermore, in situ measurements have shown the trend of an increasingly smaller aperture of joints with time. A laboratory experiment was carried out to reproduce the observed cyclic deformation in a climate chamber using a core sample of Opalinus clay. The main goal of the experiment was to investigate the influence of the relative humidity on the deformation of the Opalinus clay while excluding the in situ effects (e.g. confining stress). The core sample of Opalinus clay was put into a closed ended PVC tube and the space between the sample and the tube was filled with resin. Then, the sample (size: 28 cm × 14 cm × 6.5 cm) was cut in half lengthways and the open end was cut, so that the half-core sample could move in one direction. The mounted sample was exposed to wetting and drying cycles in a climate chamber. Air temperature, air humidity and sample weight were continuously recorded. Photographs taken at regular time intervals by a webcam allowed the formation/deformation of cracks on the surface of the sample to be monitored. A crackmeter consisting of a double-plate capacitor attached to the core sample was developed to measure the dynamics of the crack opening and closing. Preliminary results show that: - Deformation movements during different climate cycles can be visualized with the webcam - The crackmeter signal gives a

  11. The influence of clay minerals on acoustic properties of sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Olav

    1997-12-31

    This thesis aims to provide better understanding of the relationship between the acoustic properties and the petrophysical/mineralogical properties in sand-prone rock. It emphasizes the influence of clay minerals. The author develops a method to deposit clay minerals/mineral aggregates in pore space of a rigid rock framework. Kaolinite aggregates were flushed into porous permeable Bentheimer sandstone to evaluate the effect of pore filling minerals on porosity, permeability and acoustic properties. The compressional velocity was hardly affected by the clay content and it was found that the effect of minor quantities of pore filling minerals may be acoustically modelled as an ideal suspension, where the pore fluid bulk modulus is modified by the bulk modulus of the clay minerals. The influence of clays on acoustic velocities in petroleum reservoir rocks was investigated through ultrasonic measurements of compressional- and shear-waves on core material from reservoir and non-reservoir units on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The measured velocities decrease as the porosity increases, but are not strongly dependent on the clay content. The measured velocities are less dependent on the petrophysical and lithological properties than indicated by previous authors and published mathematical models, and stiffness reduction factors are introduced in two of the models to better match the data. Velocities are estimated along the wellbores based on non-sonic well logs and reflect well the actual sonic log well measurements. In some wells the compressional velocity cannot be modelled correctly by the models suggested. Very high compressional wave anisotropy was measured in the dry samples at atmospheric conditions. As the samples were saturated, the anisotropy was reduced to a maximum of about 30% and decreases further upon pressurization. Reservoir rocks retrieved from 2500 m are more stress dependent than those retrieved from less than 200 m depth. 168 refs., 117 figs., 24

  12. Interaction of oil components and clay minerals in reservoir sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changchun Pan; Linping Yu; Guoying Sheng; Jiamo Fu [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Lab. of Organic Geochemistry, Wushan, Guangzhou (China); Jianhui Feng; Yuming Tian [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Lab. of Organic Geochemistry, Wushan, Guangzhou (China); Zhongyuan Oil Field Co., Puyang, Henan (China); Xiaoping Luo [Zhongyuan Oil Field Co., Puyang, Henan (China)

    2005-04-15

    The free oil (first Soxhlet extract) and adsorbed oil (Soxhlet extract after the removal of minerals) obtained from the clay minerals in the <2 {mu}m size fraction as separated from eight hydrocarbon reservoir sandstone samples, and oil inclusions obtained from the grains of seven of these eight samples were studied via GC, GC-MS and elemental analyses. The free oil is dominated by saturated hydrocarbons (61.4-87.5%) with a low content of resins and asphaltenes (6.0-22.0% in total) while the adsorbed oil is dominated by resins and asphaltenes (84.8-98.5% in total) with a low content of saturated hydrocarbons (0.6-9.5%). The inclusion oil is similar to the adsorbed oil in gross composition, but contains relatively more saturated hydrocarbons (16.87-31.88%) and less resins and asphaltenes (62.30-78.01% in total) as compared to the latter. Although the amounts of both free and adsorbed oils per gram of clay minerals varies substantially, the residual organic carbon content in the clay minerals of the eight samples, after the free oil extraction, is in a narrow range between 0.537% and 1.614%. From the decrease of the percentage of the extractable to the total of this residual organic matter of the clay minerals with burial depth it can be inferred that polymerization of the adsorbed polar components occurs with the increase of the reservoir temperature. The terpane and sterane compositions indicate that the oil adsorbed onto the clay surfaces appears to be more representative of the initial oil charging the reservoir than do the oil inclusions. This phenomenon could possibly demonstrate that the first oil charge preferentially interacts with the clay minerals occurring in the pores and as coatings around the grains. Although the variation of biomarker parameters between the free and adsorbed oils could be ascribed to the compositional changes of oil charges during the filling process and/or the differential maturation behaviors of these two types of oils after oil

  13. Mineral acquisition from clay by budongo forest chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consum

  14. Distribution, characteristics, and worldwide inventory of dioxins in kaolin ball clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Yuichi; Ohtsuka, Nobutoshi; Minomo, Kotaro; Nojiri, Kiyoshi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Lam, Paul K S; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi

    2011-09-01

    Distribution, characteristics, and global inventory of dioxins (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins [PCDDs] and dibenzofurans [PCDFs] and dioxin like polychlorinated biphenyls) in kaolin clays collected from 10 countries were investigated. Dioxins were found in all kaolin clay samples analyzed, at total concentrations ranging from 1.2 pg/g (Brazil) to 520,000 pg/g (USA). Dioxin concentrations in kaolin clays from a few countries (e.g., Brazil and UK) were lower than those reported for background soils in Japan. Dioxin profiles in kaolin clays were characterized by the domination of the congener octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD), and the concentrations of other congeners decreased in the order of reduction in the levels of chlorination. Furthermore, specific distribution of congeners, with predominant proportions of 1,4,6,9-substituted PCDDs within each homologue group, was found in most clay samples. The ratios of concentrations of PCDD to PCDF and 1,2,3,7,8,9-HxCDD to 1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDD indicated differences in the profiles found for anthropogenic sources (including pentachlorophenol) and kaolin clays. Concentrations of PCDD/Fs in kaolin clays, except for American ball clays, did not exceed the environmental criteria set by the Law Concerning Special Measures against Dioxins in Japan. Based on the average concentrations measured in our study, inventories of PCDD/Fs from the production/usage of ball clays on a global scale were estimated to be 650 kg/yr; the corresponding value on a TEQ basis is 2400 g-TEQ/yr. More than 480 kg of OCDD is estimated to be released annually from the production of kaolin clays worldwide, suggesting that kaolin clays can be a major contributor for additional source of dioxins, especially OCDD, in the environment.

  15. Effect of Grain Size on Selected Physico-Chemical Properties of Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osumanu H. Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Mixture of the right proportion of expanding and non-expanding clays to improve plasticity (moldability of clays used in the pot industry of Malaysia is yet to be well investigated. In addition, little is known about the choice of the right clay size to eliminate or reduce the content of undesirable compounds such as Fe2O3, Al2O3 to improve the strength of pots and roofing tiles in the country. The objective of this study was to investigate how selected physico-chemical properties of pottery clay relate to grain size of Nyalau series ((Typic Paleudults. Approach: Soil samples were refined into 25, 20 and 63 µm using size grading method. The mineralogical composition of the samples was determined using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD. The chemical composition of the samples was also determined using standard procedures. Firing was done at 800°C in a muffle furnace and the cracks of the samples recorded. Results: The clay particles with sizes 20 and 25 µm were higher in LOI and total C than that those of 63 µm regardless of grain size, the clay investigated had quartz (SiO2, illite-montmorillonite, Anatase ((TiO2 and kaolinite. Grading affected the concentrations of Fe, Al and Si as clays with particle sizes 20 and 25 µm had higher contents of the aforementioned elements compared with those of 63 µm. The clay with particles 63 µm had the best strength and this was so because the clay particles had the lowest amount of Fe, Al and Si. Conclusion: The strength of Malaysian pots could be improved upon proper grading of the clay particles.

  16. Thermal conductivity of unsaturated clay-rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jougnot

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parameters used to describe the electrical conductivity of a porous material can be used to describe also its thermal conductivity. A new relationship is developed to connect the thermal conductivity of an unsaturated porous material to the thermal conductivity of the different phases of the composite, and two electrical parameters called the first and second Archie's exponents. A good agreement is obtained between the new model and thermal conductivity measurements performed using packs of glass beads and core samples of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rocks at different saturations of the water phase. We showed that the three model parameters optimised to fit the new model against experimental data (namely the thermal conductivity of the solid phase and the two Archie's exponents are consistent with independent estimates. We also observed that the anisotropy of the effective thermal conductivity of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock was mainly due to the anisotropy of the thermal conductivity of the solid phase.

  17. Investigation of activated Al-pillared clay efficiency in vegetable oil purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomić Gizela A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents a contribution to the applicability of natural clays and their derivates as adsorbents in the process of purification of vegetable oil. Investigation of textural properties of raw and purified clay samples reveals that during acid activation and Al-pillaring, BET and micropore surface area increases significantly. However, bleaching capacity of clay and its derivates is not determined by using sample surface area, but rather sample total pore volume. Surface area, especially micropore surface area contributes to removal of smaller molecules. This was confirmed by successful elimination of moisture and volatile materials by samples with an appropriate micropore structure. Used samples of clay and its derivates do not significantly influence acid and peroxide values of raw sunflower oil during its treatment.

  18. Hands-on Virtual Clay

    OpenAIRE

    Pihuit, Adeline; Kry, Paul; Cani, Marie-Paule

    2008-01-01

    poster; International audience; This paper presents a new interaction system designed for hands-on 3D shape modeling and deformation through natural hand gestures. Our system is made of a Phantom haptic device coupled with a deformable foam ball that supports pressure sensors. These sensors detect forces exerted by the user's fingertips, and are used to control the configuration of a compliant virtual hand that is modeling soft virtual clay. During interaction, the user is provided both passi...

  19. Performance Evaluation of Insulating Firebricks Produced from Hydrometallurgically Purified Termite Hill Clay Reinforced with Alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.O. Folorunso

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The performance of insulating firebricks produced from hydrometallurgically purified termite hill clay admixed with varying percentages of alumina cement has been qualitatively evaluated. A large quantity of termite hill clay was mined from a location on the campus of The Federal University of Technology, Akure (FUTA, Nigeria. The bulk of clay was washed in water, the deleterious shafts decanted, the slurry dried in sun for three days and later in the oven at 90 °C for eight hours. The dried clay was then crushed and ground to a fine size of 100 µm, being the average particle size upon the sieve size analysis. Sieved clay was purified hydrometallurgically at a predetermined condition; 1.6 mol/dm3 of oxalic acid at 90 °C for 150 min. and 200 rev/min agitation. Raw and purified clays were characterized using X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Purified clay samples containing 5 – 20 % alumina were again fired at varying temperatures of 900 °C, 1100 °C, 1300 °C and 1500 °C and tested for some important refractory properties such as permanent linear change, modulus of rupture and permeability. Sample (purified clay + 10 % alumina fired at 1500 °C that exhibited the best combination of these properties was examined under scanning electron microscope to see the effect of heat and analyzed chemically using the X-ray fluorescence machine to know the precise compositions.

  20. Characterization of karak clay from pakistan for pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, L.A. [University of Peshawar (Pakistan); Silva-Valenzuela, M.G.; Valenzuela-Diaz, F.R.; Sayeg, I.J.; Carvalho, F.M.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Clay, the most important, plentiful, and low cost naturally occurring mineral, is widely used in variety of industrial application including Pharmaceutical and cosmetic. Clay is the fine grained aluminosilicate mineral which shows the property of plasticity at appropriate water content, and becomes hard upon drying. In Pakistan there are different types of clay but till now neither of them properly identified nor characterize for specific industrial application. The objective of this work is to characterize Karak clay for pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications collected from deposit located at Shagai region, District Karak, Pakistan. The clay was characterized through Xray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), trace elemental Analysis, Microbiological analysis, Cation exchange capacity (CEC), pH and swelling assays according to European, United States of America and Brazilian Pharmacopeias. Bulk Chemical analysis shows that the Aluminum oxide and silica oxide are present in large quantity which was confirmed by XRD that this sample has montmorillonite as a major while illite and kaolinite as minor clay minerals. Quartz of small quantity was also found as a non-clay mineral. After analyzing the results for sample it was concluded that the clay is a strong candidate for cosmetic purposes. (author)

  1. Micromechanical Properties of Nanostructured Clay-Oxide Multilayers Synthesized by Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Dongwei; Zhang, Guoping; Pant, Rohit Raj; Wei, Zhongxin; Shen, Shuilong

    2016-11-08

    Clay-based nanostructured multilayers, such as clay-polymer multilayers and clay-oxide multilayers, have attracted growing attention owing to their remarkable mechanical properties and promising application in various fields. In this paper, synthesis of a new kind of nanostructured clay-oxide multilayers by layer-by-layer self-assembly was explored. Nano-mechanical characterization of 18 clay-based multilayer samples, prepared under as-deposited (i.e., air-dried) and annealing conditions at 400 °C/600 °C with different precursor cations and multilayer structure, were carried out using nanoindentation testing, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The influencing factors, including as-deposited and annealing conditions and clay concentrations on the mechanical properties were analyzed. Results show that all of the multilayers exhibit high bonding strength between interlayers. Higher modulus and hardness of clay-based multilayers were obtained with lower clay concentrations than that with higher clay concentrations. Different relationships between the modulus and hardness and the annealing temperature exist for a specific type of clay-oxide multilayer. This work offers the basic and essential knowledge on design of clay-based nanostructured multilayers by layer-by-layer self-assembly.

  2. Clay mineralogy, organic carbon burial, and redox evolution in Proterozoic oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosca, Nicholas J.; Johnston, David T.; Mushegian, Alexandra; Rothman, Daniel H.; Summons, Roger E.; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2010-03-01

    Clay minerals formed through chemical weathering have long been implicated in the burial of organic matter (OM), but because diagenesis and metamorphism commonly obscure the signature of weathering-derived clays in Precambrian rocks, clay mineralogy and its role in OM burial through much of geologic time remains incompletely understood. Here we have analyzed the mineralogy, geochemistry and total organic carbon (TOC) of organic rich shales deposited in late Archean to early Cambrian sedimentary basins. Across all samples we have quantified the contribution of 1 M and 1 Md illite polytypes, clay minerals formed by diagenetic transformation of smectite and/or kaolinite-rich weathering products. This mineralogical signal, together with corrected paleo-weathering indices, indicates that late Archean and Mesoproterozoic samples were moderately to intensely weathered. However, in late Neoproterozoic basins, 2 M1 illite/mica dominates clay mineralogy and paleo-weathering indices sharply decrease, consistent with an influx of chemically immature and relatively unweathered sediment. A late Neoproterozoic switch to micaceous clays is inconsistent with hypotheses for oxygen history that require an increased flux of weathering-derived clays (i.e., smectite or kaolinite) across the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary. Compared to previous studies, our XRD data display the same variation in Schultz Ratio across the late Neoproterozoic, but we show the cause to be micaceous clay and not pedogenic clay; paleo-weathering signals cannot be recovered from bulk mineralogy without this distinction. We find little evidence to support a link between these mineralogical variations and organic carbon in our samples and conclude that modal clay mineralogy cannot by itself explain an Ediacaran increase in atmospheric oxygen driven by enhanced OM burial.

  3. Modernity and putty-clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Trichur Kailas

    This dissertation addresses issues arising out of the problems of capital accumulation, productivity growth and 'putty-clay' technology. The concept of economic modernity occupies a central place in the subject-matter studied here in that it expresses both the incessant drive for newness that characterizes economic reality and the persistence of dated techniques that successfully resist replacement. This study examines the way in which an expansive development-theoretic 'putty-clay' framework may be employed to explain the historical processes behind both the avalanche of newness (innovations) and the conservatism of technology in the U.S. economy. The guiding link is the fixity of investments in physical capital equipment over time and space. The dilemma of fixed capital is studied in the context of the constant entrepreneurial search for flexibility and liquidity. The thesis advanced is that a development (Entwicklung)-theoretic 'putty-clay' conceptualization of the economic system adequately addresses the recurring problems of fixity, flexibility, and liquidity, and thereby permits important insights into the enigma surrounding the persistent productivity growth slowdown and 'stagflation' of the late sixties and seventies and the related phenomena of physical 'capital obsolescence' and the financial or 'speculative explosions' of our times. The notion of 'putty-clay' used here is an innovative one in that it departs from the growth-theoretic literature to re-appear as a Schumpeterian theory of modernity modified by a Veblenite view of an economic system directed by the exigencies of the 'machine-process'. The empirical aptitude of a macroeconomic 'putty-clay' model to explain capital obsolescence mediated by the energy 'crises' (supply shocks) of the seventies and eighties is examined in a separate chapter with results that differ markedly from the standard (Berndt and Wood) conclusions for the U.S. economy. The final chapter in the dissertation reverts to the

  4. Clay mineral distribution from Bhimunipatnam to Pudimadaka along cental eastern continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, N.P.C.; Rao, K.M.

    Forty eight sediment samples, collected from 50-100m depth, have been analysed for their clay mineral composition and distribution. Kaolinite with chlorite (K + C) is the predominant mineral followed by illite and montmorillonite. K + C and illite...

  5. Synthesis and characterization of polymer/clay nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Cynthia M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais; Leal, Elvia [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Processos; Cambium, Karina B.; Sobrinho, Ariosvaldo A.B.; Baracho, Marcos A.R. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Pontes, Luiz R.A. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Sea atmosphere present salt rates in order of 3.5%, being sodium chloride (NaCl) found in bigger amounts. The high electrolytic character of NaCl contributes to form corrosion products more energetic. The presence of chloride ions (Cl-) promotes the appearance of ferrous chloride molecules (FeCl{sub 2}), which hydrolysis occurs quickly, leading to the metal deterioration. So, the protection of these surfaces by the use of organic coatings, applied in one or multiple layers, has been a technique strongly spread out to promote the metal mechanical properties conservation. The aim of this work is to study the use of organophilic clay as component in anti corrosive polymeric coatings used in metallic structures of petroliferous industry. It had been formulated acrylic coatings, with and without organophilic clay addition. The samples had been submitted a salt spray fog tests, according to ASTM B-117. The results had showed that the samples addicted with organophilic clay presented anti corrosive properties six times more efficient than the other ones without clay addiction. (author)

  6. In situ synthesis, characterization, and catalytic performance of tungstophosphoric acid encapsulated into the framework of mesoporous silica pillared clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoshan; Liu, Zhenxing; Han, Chunying; Ma, Wei; Zhao, Songjie

    2012-07-01

    Mesoporous silica pillared clay (SPC) incorporated with tungstophosphoric acid (HPW) has been synthesized via in situ introducing P and W source in the acidic suspension of the clay interlayer template during the formation of the silica pillared clay. The samples were characterized by XRD, XRF, FT-IR, TG-DTA, N(2) adsorption-desorption, and SEM techniques. The results showed that the HPW formed by in situ method has been effectively introduced into the framework of mesoporous silica pillared clay and its Keggin structure remained perfectly after formation of the materials. In addition, samples with similar HPW loadings were also prepared by impregnation method using SPC as the support. HPW in the incorporated samples was better dispersed into the silica pillared clay than in the impregnated samples. The results of catalytic tests indicated that the encapsulated materials demonstrated better catalytic performance than the impregnated samples in oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT).

  7. SO2 gas adsorption by modified kaolin clays: influence of previous heating and time acid treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volzone, Cristina; Ortiga, Jose

    2011-10-01

    Modified kaolin clays were used as adsorbents for SO(2) gas adsorptions. The clays were heated up to 900 °C previous to acid treatments with 0.5 N sulfuric acid solutions at boiling temperature during different times up to 1440 min. Equilibrium adsorption at 25 °C and 0.1 MPa was carried out by using a volumetric apparatus. The samples were characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and infrared analysis. The heating of the clays followed by acid treatment improved the adsorption capacity of the kaolin clays. The presence of amorphous silica and hydroxyl in the final products improved SO(2) adsorption capacity. Better properties for SO(2) adsorption were found in kaolin rich in not well ordered kaolinite clay mineral. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A remediation performance model for enhanced metabolic reductive dechlorination of chloroethenes in fractured clay till

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Chambon, Julie C.; Bjerg, Poul L.;

    2012-01-01

    ). The model is tested on lab batch experiments and applied to describe sediment core samples from a TCE-contaminated site. Model simulations compare favorably to field observations and demonstrate that dechlorination may be limited to narrow bioactive zones in the clay matrix around fractures and sand......A numerical model of metabolic reductive dechlorination is used to describe the performance of enhanced bioremediation in fractured clay till. The model is developed to simulate field observations of a full scale bioremediation scheme in a fractured clay till and thereby to assess remediation...... efficiency and timeframe. A relatively simple approach is used to link the fermentation of the electron donor soybean oil to the sequential dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) while considering redox conditions and the heterogeneous clay till system (clay till matrix, fractures and sand stringers...

  9. Photocatalytic degradation of pesticides by titanium dioxide and titanium pillared purified clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdennouri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide was synthesized by the sol–gel method and titanium pillared purified clay was prepared with two titanium contents: 1.15 and 10.5 mmol of Ti per gram of clay. The composites were synthesized by immobilizing TiO2 onto surfactant-pillared clay via ion exchange reaction between clay with cation surfactant, cetyl-trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTMABr. The composition and texture of the prepared photocatalysts were characterized with X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, FT-IR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDX. The adsorption performance and photocatalytic activities of the prepared samples were investigated using 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D and 2,4-dichlorophenoxypropionic acid (2,4-DP as models of organic pollutants. The results were obtained that these photocatalysts can effectively degrade selected pesticides. The removal efficiency increases with the Ti content in the pillared clay.

  10. Sm-Nd dating of Fig Tree clay minerals of the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulkeridis, T.; Goldstein, S. L.; Clauer, N.; Kroner, A.; Lowe, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Sm-Nd isotopic data from carbonate-derived clay minerals of the 3.22-3.25 Ga Fig Tree Group, Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa, form a linear array corresponding to an age of 3102 +/- 64 Ma, making these minerals the oldest dated clays on Earth. The obtained age is 120-160 m.y. younger than the depositional age determined by zircon geochronology. Nd model ages for the clays range from approximately 3.39 to 3.44 Ga and almost cover the age variation of the Barberton greenstone belt rocks, consistent with independent evidence that the clay minerals are derived from material of the belt. The combined isotopic and mineralogical data provide evidence for a cryptic thermal overprint in the sediments of the belt. However, the highest temperature reached by the samples since the time of clay-mineral formation was <300 degrees C, lower than virtually any known early Archean supracrustal sequence.

  11. Lability of soil organic carbon in tropical soils with different clay minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Thilde Bech; Elberling, Bo; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup

    2010-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and turnover is influenced by interactions between organic matter and the mineral soil fraction. However, the influence of clay content and type on SOC turnover rates remains unclear, particularly in tropical soils under natural vegetation. We examined the lability...... of SOC in tropical soils with contrasting clay mineralogy (kaolinite, smectite, allophane and Al-rich chlorite). Soil was sampled from A horizons at six sites in humid tropical areas of Ghana, Malaysian Borneo and the Solomon Islands and separated into fractions above and below 250 µm by wet sieving....... Basal soil respiration rates were determined from bulk soils and soil fractions. Substrate induced respiration rates were determined from soil fractions. SOC lability was significantly influenced by clay mineralogy, but not by clay content when compared across contrasting clay minerals. The lability...

  12. Reactivity of clay minerals with acids and alkalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, D.; Starkey, H.C.

    1971-01-01

    One-g samples of a montmorillonite, a metabentonite, an illite, two kaolinites, and three halloysites were treated with 50 ml of hydrochloric acid (6??45 N, 1:1), acetic acid (4??5 N, 1:3), sodium hydroxide (2??8 N), sodium chloride solution (pH 6??10; Na = 35???; Cl = 21??5???), and natural sea water (pH 7??85; Na = 35??5???; Cl = 21??5???) for a 10-day period in stoppered plastic vials. The supernatant solutions were removed from the clay minerals and analyzed for SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, Na2O, and K2O. All the solutions removed some SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3 from the samples, but the quantities were small. Sodium hydroxide attacked the kaolin group minerals more strongly than it did montmorillonite, metabentonite, or illite. Halloysite was more strongly attacked by hydrochloric acid than was any of the other experimental minerals. Hydrochloric acid removed iron oxide coatings from soil clay minerals, but acetic acid did not remove them completely. The samples most strongly attacked by HCl and NaOH were examined by X-ray diffraction. Acid treatment did not destroy the structure of the clays, but the halloysite structure was partially destroyed. Sodium hydroxide attacked the halloysite structure, as shown by chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction. These experiments show that treatment in dilute acids has no harmful effect in the preparation of clays for X-ray diffraction. Acetic acid is preferred to hydrochloric acid for this purpose. Hydrochloric acid cleans clay minerals by removing free iron oxide from the surface; acetic acid is less effective. ?? 1971.

  13. Cations extraction of sandy-clay soils from cavado valley, portugal, using sodium salts solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Silva João Eudes da; Castro Fernando

    2002-01-01

    Cases of contamination by metals in the water wells of the Cavado Valley in north-west Portugal can be attributed to the heavy leaching of clay soils due to an excess of nitrogen resulting from the intensive use of fertilisers in agricultural areas. This work focuses on the natural weathering characteristics of soils, particularly the clay material, through the study of samples collected near the River Cavado. Samples taken from various sites, after physico-chemical characterisation, were sub...

  14. Nanoindentation measurements of the mechanical properties of zirconium matrix and hydrides in unirradiated pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, A.; Martin-Rengel, M. A.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Gomez-Sanchez, F. J.

    2014-09-01

    It is well known that the mechanical properties of the nuclear fuel cladding may be affected by the presence of hydrides. The average mechanical properties of hydrided cladding have been extensively investigated from a macroscopic point of view. In addition, the mechanical and fracture properties of bulk hydride samples fabricated from zirconium plates have also been reported. In this paper, Young's modulus, hardness and yield stress are measured for each phase, namely zirconium hydrides and matrix, of pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding. To this end, nanoindentation tests were performed on ZIRLO samples in as-received state, on a hydride blister and in samples with 150 and 1200 ppm of hydrogen homogeneously distributed along the hoop direction of the cladding. The results show that the measured mechanical properties of the zirconium hydrides and ZIRLO matrix (Young's modulus, hardness and yield stress) are rather similar. From the experimental data, the hydride volume fraction in the cladding samples with 150 and 1200 ppm was estimated and the average mechanical properties were calculated by means of the rule of mixtures. These values were compared with those obtained from ring compression tests. Good agreement between the results obtained by both methods was found.

  15. Nanoindentation measurements of the mechanical properties of zirconium matrix and hydrides in unirradiated pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rico, A., E-mail: alvaro.rico@urjc.es [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Martin-Rengel, M.A., E-mail: mamartin@mater.upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ruiz-Hervias, J., E-mail: jesus.ruiz@upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, J. [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Sanchez, F.J., E-mail: javier.gomez@amsimulation.com [Advanced Material Simulation, S.L, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    It is well known that the mechanical properties of the nuclear fuel cladding may be affected by the presence of hydrides. The average mechanical properties of hydrided cladding have been extensively investigated from a macroscopic point of view. In addition, the mechanical and fracture properties of bulk hydride samples fabricated from zirconium plates have also been reported. In this paper, Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress are measured for each phase, namely zirconium hydrides and matrix, of pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding. To this end, nanoindentation tests were performed on ZIRLO samples in as-received state, on a hydride blister and in samples with 150 and 1200 ppm of hydrogen homogeneously distributed along the hoop direction of the cladding. The results show that the measured mechanical properties of the zirconium hydrides and ZIRLO matrix (Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress) are rather similar. From the experimental data, the hydride volume fraction in the cladding samples with 150 and 1200 ppm was estimated and the average mechanical properties were calculated by means of the rule of mixtures. These values were compared with those obtained from ring compression tests. Good agreement between the results obtained by both methods was found.

  16. Efficient removal of cadmium and 2-chlorophenol in aqueous systems by natural clay: Adsorption and photo-Fenton degradation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Bel Hadjltaief, Haithem; Sdiri, Ali; Ltaief, Wahida; Da Costa, Patrick; Galvez, María Elena; Ben Zina, Mourad

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Adsorption and photo-Fenton processes were used as handy tools to ascertain the capability of natural clays to remove cadmium (Cd) and 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) from aqueous solution. Natural Fe-rich clay collected from Tejera-Esghira in Medenine area, south Tunisia, was used as a catalyst in the heterogeneous photo-Fenton oxidation of 2-CP in aqueous solution. Clay samples were acid activated to improve their adsorptive capacity for the removal of Cd. Experimental results...

  17. Tailoring the mechanical properties of SU-8/clay nanocomposites: polymer microcantilever fabrication perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Ojijo, Vincent; Cele, Hastings; Joubert, Trudi; Suprakas, Sinha Ray; Land, Kevin

    2014-06-01

    SU-8/Clay nanocomposite is considered as a candidate material for microcantilever sensor fabrication. Organically modified montmorillonite clay nanoparticles are dispersed in the universally used negative photoresist polymer SU-8, for a low cost material, which is also biocompatible. If varying the clay loading of the composite material yields a variation of the Young's modulus, the tailored material stiffness presents an opportunity for fabrication of microcantilevers with tunable sensor sensitivity. With this microcantilever application perspective, mechanical and thermal properties of the material were investigated. SU-8/Clay nanocomposite samples were prepared with clay loadings from 1wt% - 10wt%. Tensile test results show a general trend of increase in composite modulus with an increase in the clay loading up to 7wt%, followed by a small drop at 10wt%. The composite material indeed yields moderate variation of the Young's modulus. It was also found that the thermal degradation peak of the material occurred at 300°C, which is beyond the operating temperature of typical microcantilever sensor applications. The fabrication of a custom designed microcantilever array chip with the SU-8/Clay nanocomposite material was achieved in a class 100 cleanroom, using spin-coating and photolithography microfabrication techniques. The optimization of the process for fabricating microcantilever with the SU-8/Clay nanocomposite material is discussed in this paper. The results of this research are promising for cheaper mass production of low cost disposable, yet sensitive, microcantilever sensor elements, including biosensor applications.

  18. Numerical verification of similar Cam-clay model based on generalized potential theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟志辉; 杨光华; 傅旭东; 温勇; 张玉成

    2014-01-01

    From the mathematical principles, the generalized potential theory can be employed to create constitutive model of geomaterial directly. The similar Cam-clay model, which is created based on the generalized potential theory, has less assumptions, clearer mathematical basis, and better computational accuracy. Theoretically, it is more scientific than the traditional Cam-clay models. The particle flow code PFC3D was used to make numerical tests to verify the rationality and practicality of the similar Cam-clay model. The verification process was as follows: 1) creating the soil sample for numerical test in PFC3D, and then simulating the conventional triaxial compression test, isotropic compression test, and isotropic unloading test by PFC3D; 2) determining the parameters of the similar Cam-clay model from the results of above tests; 3) predicting the sample’s behavior in triaxial tests under different stress paths by the similar Cam-clay model, and comparing the predicting results with predictions by the Cam-clay model and the modified Cam-clay model. The analysis results show that the similar Cam-clay model has relatively high prediction accuracy, as well as good practical value.

  19. Thermal stability of PMMA–clay hybrids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tanushree Choudhury; Nirendra M Misra

    2010-04-01

    Materials with small particle size are being extensively used in composites and hybrid materials. Exfoliated clay–polymer hybrids show enhanced properties. Exfoliation of clay platelets can be affected by selecting dispersing agents. In the present work, clay dispersed by natural dispersant (soap stone powder), cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) dispersed clay and acid clay (amorphous clay) are taken. They are then polymerized with poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) by solution intercalation method. The thermal stability of these different clay–PMMA hybrids have been studied and compared with that of pure PMMA by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The bonding of clay with PMMA has been studied by IR. Morphology of clay–PMMA hybrids has been shown by SEM and XRD which indicate partially exfoliated structure in T606-4 and intercalated structures in T606-6 and T606-2.

  20. [Species Determination and Spectral Characteristics of Swelling Clay Minerals in the Pliocene Sandstones in Xinghai, Qinghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-wen; Chen, Jiang-jun; Fang, Qian; Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-lie

    2015-10-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) were conducted to deepen our research on specific species and spectral characteristics of swelling clay minerals in the Pliocene sandstones in Xinghai, Qinghai province. XRD results show that swelling clay minerals are dominant clay minerals in the sandstones, which can be up to 97% in percentage. XRD patterns show 060 reflections of the samples occur both remarkably at 1.534 Å and 1.498 Å, indicating the samples contain physical mixtures of trioctahedral and dioctahedral swelling clay minerals, respectively. Further treatment of Li-300 degrees C heat and glycerol saturation shows the swelling clay minerals collapse to 9.3-9.9 Å with a partial expansion to -18 Å. This indicates the swelling clay minerals dominate montmorillonite and contain minor saponite. The montmorillonite shows no swelling after Li-300 degrees C heat and glycerol saturation because of Li+ inserting into the octahedral layers, which balances the layer charge caused by the substitution of Mg to Al. FTIR results show the samples are composed of a kind of phyllosilicate with absorbed and structural water, which is in agreement with the results of XRD. Absorbed peaks at 913, 842, 880 cm(-1), corresponding to OH associated with Al-Al, Al-Mg, and Al-Fe pairs, further indicates the minerals are dominant dioctahedron in structure. Meanwhile, absorbed peaks at 625 and 519 cm(-1), corresponding to coupled Si-O and Al-O-Si deformation, indicates parts of Si is replaced by Al in tetrahedron. The spectral characteristics of the samples are against the presence of beidellite and nontronite based on the results of XRD and FTIR, while demonstrating an,existence of montmorillonite. This study, to distinguish the specific species of swelling clay species in clay minerals, would be of great importance when using clay mineralogy to interpret provenance and climatic information.

  1. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  2. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  3. Ceramic clays from the western part of the Tamnava Tertiary Basin, Serbia: Deposits and clay types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on geological, mineralogical, physical, chemical and technological investigations in the Tamnava Tertiary Basin near Šabac town (western Serbia, deposits of ceramic clays were studied. These ceramic clays are composed of kaolin-illite with a variable content of quartz, feldspars, mica, iron oxides and hydroxides, and organic matter. Four main types of commercial clays were identified: i red-yellow sandy-gravely (brick clays; ii grey-white poor sandy (ceramic clays; iii dark-carbonaceous (ceramic clays; and iv lamellar (“interspersed” fatty, poor sandy (highly aluminous and ferrous clays. Ceramic clays are defined as medium to high plastic with different ranges of sintering temperatures, which makes them suitable for the production of various kinds of materials in the ceramic industry. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI-176016

  4. Membrane behavior of clay liner materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jong Beom

    Membrane behavior represents the ability of porous media to restrict the migration of solutes, leading to the existence of chemico-osmosis, or the flow of liquid in response to a chemical concentration gradient. Membrane behavior is an important consideration with respect to clay soils with small pores and interactive electric diffuse double layers associated with individual particles, such as bentonite. The results of recent studies indicate the existence of membrane behavior in bentonite-based hydraulic barriers used in waste containment applications. Thus, measurement of the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior in such clay soils is becoming increasingly important. Accordingly, this research focused on evaluating the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior for three clay-based materials that typically are considered for use as liners for waste containment applications, such as landfills. The three clay-based liner materials included a commercially available geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) consisting of sodium bentonite sandwiched between two geotextiles, a compacted natural clay known locally as Nelson Farm Clay, and compacted NFC amended with 5% (dry wt.) of a sodium bentonite. The study also included the development and evaluation of a new flexible-wall cell for clay membrane testing that was used subsequently to measure the membrane behaviors of the three clay liner materials. The consolidation behavior of the GCL under isotropic states of stress also was evaluated as a preliminary step in the determination of the membrane behavior of the GCL under different effective consolidation stresses.

  5. The many ways of making anionic clays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michael Rajamathi; Grace S Thomas; P Vishnu Kamath

    2001-10-01

    Together with hydrotalcite-like layered double hydroxides, bivalent and trivalent metal hydroxides and their hydroxy salts are actually anionic clays consisting of positively charged hydroxide layers with anions intercalated in the interlayer region. The anionic clays exhibit anion sorption, anion diffusion and exchange properties together with surface basicity making them materials of importance for many modern applications. In this article, we discuss many different ways of making anionic clays and compare and contrast the rich diversity of this class of materials with the better-known cationic clays.

  6. Probing the water interactions in clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, D.H. [Lausanne Univ., Lausanne (Switzerland); Fischer, H.E. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Skipper, N.T. [Univ. College, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-11-01

    Clays, the microscopic mineral fraction of soils, are probably the most important substrate for interactions between water, the mineral world and the biosphere. A knowledge of the structuring of water and hydrated metal ions near clays surfaces is of importance in environmental science, including toxic and radioactive waste disposal, and in the industrial application of clays. The smectite clays, with their large hydrated internal surface areas represent excellent model systems for the interactions of aqueous phases with solid surface. We present the results of neutron diffraction experiments using isotopic substitutions to probe the structure in the aqueous interlayer region of Li-montmorillonite. (authors) 6 refs., 3 figs.

  7. PREFERENTIAL INTERCALATION BEHAVIOR OF CLAY AND ITS EFFECT ON THE THERMAL DEGRADATION IN IMMISCIBLE PP/PS BLENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhu; Hai-yun Ma; Li-fang Tong; Zheng-ping Fang

    2008-01-01

    The typical immiscible PP/PS blend based clay nanocomposites were prepared via melt blending.The dispersion of clay was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).Thermal stability and dynamic mechanical properties were measured by thermogravimetrical analysis (TGA) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA),respectively.Preferential intercalation behavior of clay in PP/PS blends was found.The dispersion of clay is significantly influenced by the polarity of PP and PS,meanwhile the location of clay can be controlled by the alternation of the polarity of PP and PS through chemical modification.The clay migrates from PS phase to PP phase with the improvement of the polarity of PP.However,when the PS is sulfonated,clay migrates back to the dispersed PS phase again.The dispersion and location of clay have profound influence on the thermal and dynamic mechanical behavior of PP/PS blends.The better the dispersion of clay in either continuous phase or disperse phase,the higher the thermal stability of the blends.Besides,samples with clay located in the continuous phase can display the best strengthening effect.

  8. Factors affecting clay dispersion in oxisols treated with vinasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thadeu Rodrigues de Melo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vinasse is a potassium-rich waste generated in large amounts by the ethanol production that, applied in the soil, can promote changes in water dispersible clay and in its physical quality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clay dispersion of Oxisols after vinasse application and correlate it with some chemical attributes. Samples were collected in two Oxisols (155 and 471 g of clay kg-1, put in pots, received dosages of vinasse (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 m3 ha-1 and remained incubated during 120 days. Phosphorous, organic carbon, pH H2O, pH KCl, pH CaCl2, Al3+, H+Al3+, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+, Delta pH and the proportion between monovalent and bivalent cations have been evaluated and correlated with the clay flocculation degree. Vinasse changed almost all chemical variables in both soils and increased the flocculation in the sandy soil, but did not change the clayey one. Delta pH, Mg2+ and K+ significantly correlated with the flocculation degree in the sandy soil. It is possible to conclude that the dispersive effect of K+ added by vinasse are irrelevant, considering the flocculant effect caused by the increment in Mg2+ and Delta pH after vinasse application.

  9. Fluorescence and structure of methyl red-clay nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynková, Grazyna Simha; Kulhánková, Lenka; Malý, Petr; Capková, Pavla

    2008-04-01

    Two types of clay minerals-montmorillonite and vermiculite have been chosen as a host matrix for the intercalation of methyl red (MR) in order to investigate a possible fluorescence tuning via dye-clay interactions. The effect of silicate layer charge on the structure and fluorescence of dye-clay intercalated hybrid nanostructures was investigated using combination of molecular modeling with experiment. Structure of both intercalates MR-vermiculite (MR-VER) and MR-montmorillonite (MR-MMT) exhibits high degree of structural disorder resulting in broaden emission band. The fluorescence wavelength range of MR intercalated in clays is shifted to lower wavelengths compared with the pristine MR polycrystalline sample (800 nm). Results showed the strong dependence of fluorescence band maximum on the silicate layer charge, lambda(max) = 565 nm for MR-MMT, 645 nm for MR-VER and 800 nm for the methyl red fine crystalline powder, whereas the structural disorder in the arrangement of dye molecules affects the emission band broadening.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of clays: swelling, sedimentation, dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey; Furo, Istvan

    2010-05-01

    While most magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications concern medical research, there is a rapidly increasing number of MRI studies in the field of environmental science and technology. In this presentation, MRI will be introduced from the latter perspective. While many processes in these areas are similar to those addressed in medical applications of MRI, parameters and experimental implementations are often quite different and, in many respects, far more demanding. This hinders direct transfer of existing methods developed for biomedical research, especially when facing the challenging task of obtaining spatially resolved quantitative information. In MRI investigation of soils, clays, and rocks, mainly water signal is detected, similarly to MRI of biological and medical samples. However, a strong variation of water mobility and a wide spread of water spin relaxation properties in these materials make it difficult to use standard MRI approaches. Other significant limitations can be identified as following: T2 relaxation and probe dead time effects; molecular diffusion artifacts; varying dielectric losses and induced currents in conductive samples; limited dynamic range; blurring artifacts accompanying drive for increasing sensitivity and/or imaging speed. Despite these limitations, by combining MRI techniques developed for solid and liquid states and using independent information on relaxation properties of water, interacting with the material of interest, true images of distributions of both water, material and molecular properties in a wide range of concentrations can be obtained. Examples of MRI application will be given in the areas of soil and mineral research where understanding water transport and erosion processes is one of the key challenges. Efforts in developing and adapting MRI approaches to study these kinds of systems will be outlined as well. Extensive studies of clay/water interaction have been carried out in order to provide a quantitative

  11. Clay mineral distribution in the shelf sediments off the northern part of the east coast of india

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Reddy, N.P.C.; Rao, Ch.M.

    Forty-eight sediment samples from the continental shelf between Visakhapatnam and the Ganges were analysed by X-ray diffraction for the composition and distribution of clay minerals. Estuarine samples of the Hooghly are dominated by illite...

  12. Cations extraction of sandy-clay soils from cavado valley, portugal, using sodium salts solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva João Eudes da

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of contamination by metals in the water wells of the Cavado Valley in north-west Portugal can be attributed to the heavy leaching of clay soils due to an excess of nitrogen resulting from the intensive use of fertilisers in agricultural areas. This work focuses on the natural weathering characteristics of soils, particularly the clay material, through the study of samples collected near the River Cavado. Samples taken from various sites, after physico-chemical characterisation, were subjected to clay dissolution tests, using sodium salts of different ionic forces, to detect the relationship between certain physico-chemical parameters of water, such as pH, nitrate, chloride and sulphate content, in the dissolution of clay and the subsequent extraction of such cations as Al, Fe and K. In acidic sandy clay soils, the mineralogical composition of which was characterised by a predominance of quartz, micas, kaolinite and K-feldspars, decreases of the clay material/water pH ratio increases dissolution of the micaceous and K-feldspars phases. The presence of nitrates in the aqueous solution apparently advanced the extraction of all three cations Al, Fe and K. The specific surface area of the clay material showed a significant correlation with the main kinetic parameters of cation extraction.

  13. Thermal magnetic behaviour of Al-substituted haematite mixed with clay minerals and its geological significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Zhao, Xiangyu; Jin, Chunsheng; Liu, Caicai; Li, Shihu

    2015-01-01

    Clay minerals and Al-substituted haematite (Al-hm) usually coexist in soils and sediments. However, effects of clay minerals on Al-hm during thermal magnetic measurements in argon environment have not been well studied. In order to quantify such effects, a series of Al-hm samples were synthesized, and were then mixed with clay minerals (illite, chlorite, kaolinite and Ca-montmorillonite). The temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility curves in an argon environment showed that Al-substituted magnetite was produced during the thermal treatment via the reduction of Al-hm by the clay mineral, which leads to a significant magnetic enhancement of the thermal products. In addition, the reductive capacity varies among different types of clay minerals, that is, illite > chlorite > kaolinite > Ca-montmorillonite. Furthermore, the iron content in the clay minerals and Al content of Al-hm are two predominant factors controlling the reduced haematite content. The iron is released from the clay minerals and provides the reducing agent, while Al decreases the crystallinity of haematite and thus facilitates the chemical reaction. Therefore, the thermal magnetic measurements can be used to quantify the Al content of Al-hm in natural samples. Our study provides significant information for palaeomagnetism and environmental magnetism studies, such as thermal magnetic analysis and palaeomagnetic intensity reconstruction using ancient pottery and kilns.

  14. Surveying Clay Mineral Diversity in the Murray Formation, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, T. F.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Chipera, S. J.; Rampe, E. B.; Grotzinger, J. P.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morrison, S. M.; Yen, A. S.; Morris, R. V.; Des Marais, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    One of the primary science goals of Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is to investigate layered clay mineral-bearing deposits outcropping in the lower NW slopes of Aeolis Mons (Mt. Sharp) detected from orbit. Martian clay mineral-bearing layered rocks are of particular interest because they are potential markers of sedimentary deposits formed in habitable aqueous environments. The CheMin X-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument aboard MSL has documented clay minerals in various drill samples during its traverse of Gale Crater's floor and ascent of Mt. Sharp. Previously, the high concentrations of clay minerals (approximately 20 wt.%) detected in drill powders of mudstone (Sheepbed member) at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) allowed their detailed characterization. Drill powders recovered from lacustrine mudstones of the Sheepbed member at YKB contain smectite clay minerals. Based on the position of 02l reflections in XRD patterns, which serve as an indicator of octahedral occupancy, the smectites are Fe-bearing, trioctahedral species analogous to ferrian saponites from terrestrial deposits. The smectites are thought to have been formed through a process of isochemical aqueous alteration of detrital olivine close to the time of sediment deposition under anoxic to poorly oxidizing conditions. The clay minerals are key indicators that the lake waters were benign and habitable at the time. Clay minerals were detected at other locations during MSL's traverse, including samples from the Pahrump Hills, but lower abundances and overlapping peaks from crystalline phases in XRD patterns hamper in-depth analysis.

  15. Kinetic analysis for non-isothermal decomposition of un-irradiated and gamma-irradiated anhydrous cadmium nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culas, S.; Samuel, J. [Mar Ivanios College, Kerala (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2014-04-01

    The thermal decomposition of untreated and γ-irradiated samples of anhydrous cadmium nitrate was performed under non-isothermal conditions at different heating rates (5, 10, 15 and 20 C min{sup -1}). The results showed that the decomposition proceeds in one major step with the formation of cadmium oxide as solid residue. The data were analysed by using both isoconversional and non-isoconversional methods. The activation energy was calculated by various model-free isoconversional methods: Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO), Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) and Friedman (FR) methods. Irradiation enhances the decomposition and the effect increases with the irradiation dose. The activation energy decreases on irradiation. The appropriate conversion model for the thermal decomposition process selected by means of the master-plot method agrees with phase boundary reaction with spherical symmetry (R3 mechanism) for both untreated and irradiated salts at all heating rates. (orig.)

  16. Utilization of sludge waste from natural rubber manufacturing process as a raw material for clay-ceramic production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichaphund, S; Intiya, W; Kongkaew, A; Loykulnant, S; Thavorniti, P

    2012-12-01

    The possibility of utilization of the sludge waste obtained from the natural rubber manufacturing process as a raw material for producing clay ceramics was investigated. To prepared clay-based ceramic, the mixtures of traditional clay and sludge waste (10-30 wt%) were milled, uniaxilly pressed and sintered at a temperature between 1000 and 1200 degrees C. The effect of sludge waste on the properties of clay-based ceramic products was examined. The results showed that the amount of sludge waste addition had an effect on both sinterability and properties of the clay ceramics. Up to 30 wt% of sludge waste can be added into the clay ceramics, and the sintered samples showed good properties.

  17. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    has been evaluated using standardised methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15 to 0.3m thick clay membrane have been tested...... successfully. At natural watercontent w = 40 to 45% it is possible to establish a homogeneous membrane with hydraulic conductivity k tests used for establishing swell and deformation properties showed...... to be very dependent on the stress level. It varies from k = E-11 to 2 E-13 m/s at vertical stresses from 5 to 4800 kPa and is clearly related to a reduced effective porosity diminishing with stress. Preliminary diffusion tests indicate a similar influence on the effective diffusion coefficient being much...

  18. Color measurement of methylene blue dye/clay mixtures and its application using economical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Maja; Kaludjerovic, Lazar; Logar, Mihovil

    2016-04-01

    Identifying the clay mineral components of clay materials by staining tests is rapid and simple, but their applicability is restricted because of the mutual interference of the common components of clay materials and difficulties in color determination. The change of color with concentration of the dye is related to the use of colorants as a field test for identifying clay minerals and has been improved over the years to assure the accuracy of the tests (Faust G. T., 1940). The problem of measurement and standardization of color may be solved by combination of colors observed in staining tests with prepared charts of color chips available in the Munsell Book of Color, published by Munsell Color Co. Under a particular set of illumination conditions, a human eye can achieve an approximate match between the color of the dyed clay sample and that of a standard color chip, even though they do have different spectral reflectance characteristics. Experiments were carried out with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy on selected clay samples (three montmorillonite, three kaolinite and one mix-layer clay samples) saturated with different concentration of methylene blue dye solution. Dominant wavelength and purity of the color was obtained on oriented dry samples and calculated by use of the I. C. I. (x, y) - diagram in the region of 400-700 nm (reflectance spectra) without MB and after saturation with different concentrations of MB solutions. Samples were carefully photographed in the natural light environment and processed with user friendly and easily accessible applications (Adobe color CC and ColorHexa encyclopedia) available for android phones or tablets. Obtained colors were compared with Munsell standard color chips, RGB and Hexa color standards. Changes in the color of clay samples in their interaction with different concentration of the applied dye together with application of economical methods can still be used as a rapid fieldwork test. Different types of clay

  19. Model Free Approach for Non-Isothermal Decomposition of Un-Irradiated and g-Irradiated Silver Acetate: New Route for Synthesis of Ag2O Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser M. Abd El-Salam

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic studies for the non-isothermal decomposition of unirradiated and γ‑irradiated silver acetate with 103 kGy total γ-ray doses were carried out in air. The results showed that the decomposition proceeds in one major step in the temperature range of (180–270 °C with the formation of Ag2O as solid residue. The non-isothermal data for un‑irradiated and γ-irradiated silver acetate were analyzed using Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO and nonlinear Vyazovkin (VYZ iso-conversional methods. These free models on the investigated data showed a systematic dependence of Ea on a indicating a simple decomposition process. No significant changes in the thermal decomposition behavior of silver acetate were recorded as a result of γ-irradiation. Calcinations of γ-irradiated silver acetate (CH3COOAg at 200 °C for 2 hours only led to the formation of pure Ag2O mono-dispersed nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction, FTIR and SEM techniques were employed for characterization of the synthesized nanoparticles.

  20. Mineralogy of subducted clay and clay restite in the lower mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, L.; Skora, S. E.; Walter, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Light Source in Didcot, England. Preliminary analysis of diffraction data collected at ambient pressure indicates the following phase assemblages. At transition zone conditions the clay produces an assemblage of St+K-Holl+Gt+Cpx+CAS-phase, consistent with multi-anvil results [6]. CAS-phase is absent by 30 GPa, and K-Holl disappears from the assemblage between 40 and 50 GPa. At >30 GPa the assemblage consists of St+NAL+CF-structured phase±K-Holl. In the restite composition the assemblage at 19-24 GPa is St+Cor+Gt, and at higher pressures is mainly St+Mg-perovskite with minor unknown peaks. Further analysis of diffraction patterns and FEG-EPMA analysis of ion-milled samples are in progress to elucidate phase relations to 80 GPa. [1] van der Hilst et al., Nature 1997. 386:578-584 . [2] Fukao et al., Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 2009. 37:19-46. [3] Skora & Blundy, J. Petrol., 2010. 51:2211-2243. [4] Bulanova et al., Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 2010. DOI: 10.1007/s00410-010-0490-6. [5] Domanik & Holloway, GCA 1996. 60: 4133-1450. [6] Irifune et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 1994. 126:351-368.

  1. Enhanced coal and mineral flotation by selective clay agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, D.; Chen, G.L.; Fan, M.M.; Zhou, X.H.; Zhao, C.; Aron, M.; Wright, J. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose is to evaluate the performance of clay binding agents for enhancing coal and mineral flotation. Mechanical and column flotation tests were conducted on coal and potash samples. Several process parameters were examined, e.g. impeller rotation speed, binder dosage, slurry solids content, and collector dosage. The results show that the Georgia-Pacific reagents improved flotation efficiency under some process conditions, especially at higher solids percentage and higher impeller rotation speed. 26 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Clay: An important raw material for prehistoric man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, U. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department E15 (Germany); Gebhard, R. [Praehistorische Staatssammlung (Germany); Grosse, G.; Hutzelmann, T. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department E15 (Germany); Murad, E. [Bayerisches Geologisches Landesamt (Germany); Riederer, J. [Rathgen-Forschungslabor (Germany); Shimada, I. [Southern Illinois University (United States); Wagner, F.E. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department E15 (Germany)

    1998-12-15

    Early techniques of making pottery can be investigated by {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. Iron is generally present in unpurified clays in concentrations of several percent. During firing, the iron undergoes characteristic changes of its chemical and physical state, depending on the kiln atmosphere and on the maximum firing temperature reached. These changes can be followed by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Firing techniques can often be reconstructed when spectra of laboratory and field fired samples are compared with those observed in ancient sherds.

  3. Structural characterization of bentonite clays for utilization as nanofillers in nanocomposites; Caracterizacao estrutural de argilas bentoniticas para utilizacao como nanocargas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Carlos Ivan Ribeiro de; Rocha, Marisa Cristina Guimares; Vogas, Arthur Considera, E-mail: carlosivanr@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Politecnico; Silva, Ana Lucia Nazareth da [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Macromoleculas Professora Eloisa Mano; Bertolino, Luiz Carlos [Centro de Tecnologia Mineral (CETEM/MCTI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Clays of different composition have been used in the development of polymer nanocomposites. However, the utilization of bentonite clays has been emphasized in Brazil, mainly due to their availability.The best known and studied deposits of bentonite clays are located in the state of Paraiba. However, these deposits are becoming exhausted after decades of exploitation. In this context, the aim of this work is to proceed the physical-mineralogical characterization of bentonite clays recently discovered in Cubati, PB. In order to achieve this objective, the samples underwent a particle size classification step and were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Results of X-ray diffraction showed that the samples are composed of smectite, and kaolinite and quartz. The characterization of the samples by FTIR confirmed these results. Results of chemical analysis showed that the clays have predominantly different exchangeable cations. (author)

  4. Investigation of the physical properties of tiles produced with Otukpo clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O. PATRICK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on the production of floor tiles using local clay from Otukpo, Nigeria by plastic forming and properties of the tiles such as absorption, acid resistance, bulk density, compressive strength, and colour change, modulus of rupture, plasticity, shrinkage and thermal shock resistance were investigated. Different samples of tiles were formulated by blending the clay with feldspar, quartz, grog and filler. The compressive strength and modulus of rupture were found to be highest, 482 kg/cm2 and 487.5 kg/cm2 respectively for the clay tile sample. It bulk density was 2.31kg/cm3 and water absorption was 3%. The shrinkage of the clay sample was 16%, however with clay body of 40% clay, 20% feldspar and 40% quartz, it dropped to 6%. All the samples show good resistance to acid attack, thermal shock and have good plasticity. The tile properties showed that they could be used as floor or wall tiles. They could also be used for quarry tiles.

  5. Painting with Clay Van Gogh Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skophammer, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Discusses Vincent Van Gogh's painting "Starry Night" and describes a lesson where fifth- and sixth-grade students created their own version of the artwork. Explains that the students utilized four colors of Permoplast clay, using their hands and fingers as brushes and blending tools and the clay as paint. (CMK)

  6. Sectioning Clay Models Makes Anatomy & Development Tangible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Carina Endres; Howell, James Endres

    2010-01-01

    Clay models have proved to be useful teaching aids for many topics in biology that depend on three-dimensional reasoning. Students studying embryonic development struggle to mentally reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of embryos and larvae by observing prepared slides of cross-sectional slices. Students who build clay models of embryos…

  7. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaldoun, A.; Moller, P.; Fall, A.; Wegdam, G.; de Leeuw, B.; Méheust, Y.; Fossum, J.O.; Bonn, D.

    2009-01-01

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay s

  8. Moessbauer Spectra of Clays and Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, F. E.; Wagner, U. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2004-06-15

    The physical, chemical and mineralogical aspects of the use of Moessbauer spectroscopy in studies of clay-based ceramics are described. Moessbauer spectra of pottery clays fired under oxidising, reducing and changing conditions are explained, and the possibilities of using Moessbauer spectra to derive information on the firing temperatures and the kiln atmosphere during firing in antiquity are discussed and illustrated by examples.

  9. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  10. Predicting soil particle density from clay and soil organic matter contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; McBride, R.A.; Keller, T.

    2017-01-01

    Soil particle density (Dp) is an important soil property for calculating soil porosity expressions. However, many studies assume a constant value, typically 2.65Mgm−3 for arable, mineral soils. Fewmodels exist for the prediction of Dp from soil organic matter (SOM) content. We hypothesized...... of clay particles was approximately 2.86 Mg m−3, while that of sand+silt particles could be estimated to ~2.65 Mgm−3. Multiple linear regression showed that a combination of clay and SOMcontents could explain nearly 92% of the variation in measured Dp. The clay and SOMprediction equation was validated...... against a combined data set with 227 soil samples representing A, B, and C horizons from temperate North America and Europe. The new prediction equation performed better than two SOM-based models from the literature. Validation of the new clay and SOM model using the 227 soil samples gave a root mean...

  11. Serbian heavy clays behavior: Application in rough ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsenović Milica V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on the behavior of five new deposits of heavy clays from Serbia, with the aim to evaluate their potential suitability as raw materials in rough ceramic applications. The Pfefferkorn plasticity coefficient (PC and drying susceptibility using Bigot’s curve were measured for each raw sample. Thermodilatometric analysis (TDA showed the behaviour of dry products during firing. Samples groups were fired in the range of 850°C - 1000°C. Water absorption capacity (WAC and compressive strength (CS were done in order to characterize clays after firing. Linear regression models were used to fit the results. Mathematical tools were used to determine statistical difference of major oxides content, shaping moist and compressive strength of dry laboratory products, using post-hoc Tukey`s HSD test. The chemical and mineralogical compositions of samples do not differ considerably, but their possible application does. All studied clays seem to be easily adaptable to a correct brick making process.

  12. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundie, P. [Envirotech (Scotland) Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)]|[Environmental Resource Industries Disposal Pty Ltd., Perth (Australia); McLeod, N. [Envirotreat Ltd., Kingswinford (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  13. 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Favier, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    This volume focuses on research and practical issues linked to Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete. The main subjects are geology of clays, hydration and performance of blended systems with calcined clays, alkali activated binders, economic and environmental impacts of the use of calcined clays in cement based materials. Topics addressed in this book include the influence of processing on reactivity of calcined clays, influence of clay mineralogy on reactivity, geology of clay deposits, Portland-calcined clay systems, hydration, durability, performance, Portland-calcined clay-limestone systems, hydration, durability, performance, calcined clay-alkali systems, life cycle analysis, economics and environmental impact of use of calcined clays in cement and concrete, and field applications. This book compiles the different contributions of the 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete, which took place in Lausanne, Switzerland, June, 23-25, 2015.The papers present the latest  res...

  14. Petrographic correlations and mathematical analysis of log signatures for clay identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, B.

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of correlation of log signature with information on distribution of the types and volumes of clays in the sandstone pore spaces determined from detailed CT-scan, XRD, SEM and thin section analyses of core samples from three sandstone reservoirs. The log signatures are then analyzed to determine if suitable mathematical/statistical parameter(s) could be calculated from the logs for identification of types and volumes of clays in sandstone reservoirs.

  15. Production and Characterisation of Zeolite from Ahako Clay in Kogi State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. KOVO

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Zeolite, a multi-purpose material normally sourced from clay is usually for many Engineering applications. However, it is only those Zeolite that are technically well prepared that can give optimum performance during application. Obtaining a constant route for development of Zeolite in Nigeria will be a welcome development. In this study, therefore, emphasis was placed on the development of various type of Zeolite. In attempt to synthesize the Zeolite samples, 1kg of Ahako clay was beneficiated by soaking it in deionised water for four days during which the mixture was vigorously agitated. Subsequently, the mixture was sieved with a minus 60 mesh (Tyler fraction or Micro sphere of which the screened mixture was treated with 1 litre of sodium bicarbonate solution and sodium hexameta-phosphate in the ratio of 1:4 primarily for deflocculation or dispersion. The washed clay was dried in an oven set at 45oc for two days after which it was ground to fine powder.The beneficiated clay was calcined at 600°C in furnace (model 6H-85IR for two hours. Subsequently, the calcined clay was formulated into various samples by properly incorporation sodium hydroxide (Noah, Silica gel and deionised water or weight basis.The results of the XRF showed that the crude and treated clay (calcined clay contained 73.18% by weight of Sio2 and 14.5% by weight of Al2O3 and 73.20% by weight of SiO2, 7.48 by weight of Al2O3.The developed Zeolite sample should feature in their spectra (IR that are consistent with Zeolite D as obtained in sample 1 (freshly prepared, Zeolite N-A as obtained in sample II cum sample IV after aging time of 48hours and Zeolite A as obtained in sample III.

  16. MRI profiles over very wide concentration ranges: Application to swelling of a bentonite clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvinskikh, S. V.; Szutkowski, K.; Furó, I.

    2009-06-01

    In MRI investigation of soils, clays, and rocks, mainly mobile water is detected, similarly to that in biological and medical samples. However, the spin relaxation properties of water in these materials and/or low water concentration may make it difficult to use standard MRI approaches. Despite these limitations, one can combine MRI techniques developed for solid and liquid states and use independent information on relaxation properties of water, interacting with the material of interest, to obtain true images of both water and material content. We present procedures for obtaining such true density maps and demonstrate their use for studying the swelling of bentonite clay by water. A constant time imaging protocol provides 1D mapping of the clay distribution in regions with clay concentration above 10 vol%. T1 relaxation time imaging is employed to monitor the clay content down to 10 -3 vol%. Data provided by those two approaches are in good agreement in the overlapping range of concentrations. Covering five orders of magnitude of clay concentration, swelling of sodium-exchanged bentonite clays from pre-compacted pellets into a gel phase is followed in detail.

  17. MRI profiles over very wide concentration ranges: application to swelling of a bentonite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvinskikh, S V; Szutkowski, K; Furó, I

    2009-06-01

    In MRI investigation of soils, clays, and rocks, mainly mobile water is detected, similarly to that in biological and medical samples. However, the spin relaxation properties of water in these materials and/or low water concentration may make it difficult to use standard MRI approaches. Despite these limitations, one can combine MRI techniques developed for solid and liquid states and use independent information on relaxation properties of water, interacting with the material of interest, to obtain true images of both water and material content. We present procedures for obtaining such true density maps and demonstrate their use for studying the swelling of bentonite clay by water. A constant time imaging protocol provides 1D mapping of the clay distribution in regions with clay concentration above 10 vol%. T(1) relaxation time imaging is employed to monitor the clay content down to 10(-3) vol%. Data provided by those two approaches are in good agreement in the overlapping range of concentrations. Covering five orders of magnitude of clay concentration, swelling of sodium-exchanged bentonite clays from pre-compacted pellets into a gel phase is followed in detail.

  18. Ultrasound assisted synthesis of PMMA/clay nanocomposites: Study of oxygen permeation and flame retardant properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subrata K Patra; Gyanaranjan Prusty; Sarat K Swain

    2012-02-01

    PMMA/clay nanocomposites were synthesized by ultrasound assisted emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization technique. Ultrasound waves of different power and frequencies were applied to enhance the dispersion of the clay layers with polymer matrix. The structural information of the synthesized materials was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and it was revealed that the interlayer spacing increased with clay loading. The magnitude of dispersion of the clay in the polymer matrix was detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Young’s modulus, breaking stress, elongation at break, toughness, yield stress and yield strain of the nanocomposites as a function of different clay concentrations and ultrasonic power were measured. Particle diameter of the nanocomposites was measured by laser diffraction technique. Oxygen permeability of the samples was studied and it was found that the oxygen flow rate was reduced by the combined effect of clay loading and ultrasound. The flame retardant property of the nanocomposites due to clay dispersion was investigated by measurement of limiting oxygen index (LOI).

  19. The effect of clay incorporation on the mechanical properties of fluoroelastomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zen, Heloisa Augusto; Oliveira, Jonathan Pereira de; Lugao, Ademar Benevolo, E-mail: helozen@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In this work was studied the effect of clay incorporation in the mechanical properties of fluoroelastomer (FKM). The polymer matrix that was used is a compound of the commercial terpolymer of hexafluoropropylene, vinylidene fluoride and tetrafluoroethylene, with 70% of fluor content. This type of polymer is known for its resistance to high temperature and chemical products; it has low fuel permeation which allowing be used as sealant and especially as o-ring product. The incorporation of clay was carried to avoid excessive swelling and to observe the effect in the mechanical properties, for this application was used commercial clay, Cloisite® at 1 and 2% in weigh. The incorporation of clay into the FKM was carried out in a two roll cylinder. After that, the samples with and without clay loading were submitted to gamma radiation at 20 kGy in order to observe the changes in the polymer matrix. The characterization techniques used were: mechanical testes (stress - strain), rheometric properties and degree of swelling. After radiation process, was observed an increase in the swelling degree for the irradiated samples in relation to the pristine one. The incorporated samples with 1 and 2% of clay showed an increase in the elongation which can indicate a decrease in hardness of the polymer matrix. (author)

  20. Assessment of stream quality using biological indices at selected sites in the Red Clay and White Clay Creek basins, Chester County, Pennsylvania, 1981-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Andrew G.

    2002-01-01

    In 1970, the Chester County Water Resources Authority (Pennsylvania) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) established a longterm water-quality network with the goal of assessing the quality of streams in the county and understanding stream changes in response to urbanization using benthic-macroinvertebrate data (Lium, 1977). This database represents one of the longest continuous water-quality data sets in the country. Benthic macroinvertebrates are aquatic insects, such as mayflies, caddisflies, riffle beetles, and midges, and other invertebrates that live on the stream bottom. Benthic macroinvertebrates are useful in evaluating stream quality because their habitat preference and low motility cause them to be affected directly by substances that enter the aquatic system. By evaluating the diversity and community structure of benthic-macroinvertebrate populations, a determination of stream quality can be made. Between 1981 and 1997, the water-quality network consisted of 43 sites in 5 major basins in Chester County—Delaware, Schuylkill, Brandywine, Big Elk and Octoraro, and Red and White Clay. Benthicmacroinvertebrate, water-chemistry, and habitat data were collected each year in October or November during base-flow conditions (Reif, 1999; 2000). Using these data, Reif (2002) evaluates the overall water-quality condition of Chester County streams. This Fact Sheet summarizes the key findings from Reif (2002) for streams in the Red Clay and White Clay Creek Basins. These streams include East Branch Red Clay Creek (site 26), West Branch Red Clay Creek (site 27), East Branch White Clay Creek (site 28), the Middle Branch White Clay Creek (site 29), and West Branch White Clay Creek (site 30) (fig. 1). This summary includes an analysis of stream conditions on the basis of benthic-macroinvertebrate samples and an analysis of trends in stream conditions for the 17-year study period.

  1. Experimental investigation of the influence on static and cyclic deformation of structural soft clay of stress level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yunmin; CHEN Yingping; HUANG Bo

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental results performed to study the static and cyclic deformation behavior of undisturbed and remolded soft clays sampling from Xiaoshan.The consolidation tests indicated that the vertical strains of undisturbed soft clay could be divided into three stages with load increasing,however,the remolded clays were almost independent of stress level.The two cut-off points of these three stages are the preconsolidation stress and the structural yielding stress of the original clay,which could be determined by shear wave velocity measurement.The strains developed during cyclic tests of undisturbed and remolded soft clay,both having one turning point under different amplitude of cyclic stress.The strain developed slowly and stayed at a low level at the early stage,but developed quickly in a different way when the turning points were achieved and finally became great.The turning strains changed with different cyclic stress amplitudes,but they almost fell on a linear line whether undisturbed or remolded.Furthermore,the turning points of the remolded clay all fell on the same line of different confining stresses,including which of the undisturbed soft clay under confining pressure was larger than structural yielding stress.It was also found that the deformation characteristic of undisturbed and remolded Xiaoshan clay tend to be consistent when the structure of undisturbed soft clay is damaged.

  2. Accumulation of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) at different depths clay and loamy sand textural soils due to tobacco waste application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülser, Coşkun; Yilmaz, Nazli Kutluk; Candemir, Feride

    2008-11-01

    The effects of tobacco waste (TW) application to the soil surface on the accumulation of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in clay and loamy sand textural soils at various depths were investigated in two different fields. The tobacco waste had been found to be infected with TMV. Eighteen months after TW application to the soil surface, soils were sampled at 20 cm intervals through to 80 cm depth. The DAS-ELISA method was performed to determine infection of soil with TMV. The viruses persisted in clay soil for a long period compared with loamy sand soil. There was no accumulation of TMV at any depth of loamy sand soil in Experimental Field 2. TMV adsorption to soil particles in 0-60 cm depth of clay soil was determined in all TW treatments in Experimental Field 1. The highest ELISA Absorbance (A405) values in all treatments were determined in the 20-40 cm soil depth that had the highest clay content. ELISA A405 values of TMV at different depths of clay soil gave significant correlations with clay content (r = 0.793**), EC values (r = 0.421**) and soil pH (r = -0.405**). Adsorption of TMV to net negatively charged clay particle surfaces increased with increasing EC values of soil solution. Decreasing soil pH and infiltration rate increased adsorption of TMV to clay particles. Higher infiltration rate and lower clay content in loamy sand soil caused leaching of TMV from the soil profile.

  3. Characterisation of vumba and ubumba clays used for cosmetic purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refilwe Morekhure-Mphahlele

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Two traditional cosmetic clays bear similar names in different local South African languages: vumba (Tshivenda and ubumba (isiZulu. The wet clays are applied topically for cosmetic purposes by the respective indigenous peoples. Six samples from two South African provinces were characterised using X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the samples differed widely with respect to mineralogy and chemical composition. This finding raises the possibility that texture characteristics during application on the skin override composition effects. Of concern is the high levels of quartz found in all the samples as it might pose a health hazard; the lowest value for quartz was 11 wt% for vumba, while values for ubumba ranged from 26 wt% to 85 wt%. All samples contained varying amounts of silicates in the form of smectite, kaolin, chlorite and plagioclase. Minor amounts of anatase and rutile were present in some samples. Three samples also contained goethite. All samples were essentially free from the toxic elements As, Pb, Hg, Cd, Se and Sb. However, they did contain low levels of chromium and heavy metals such as Cu, Zn and Ni. The pH values of ubumba slurries were slightly basic, while those of a vumba slurry were slightly acidic.

  4. Evidence for Smectite Clays from MSL SAM Analyses of Mudstone at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, Amy; Franz, Heather; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Brunner, Anna; Archer, Paul Douglas; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Atreya, Sushil K.

    2013-01-01

    Drilled samples of mudstone from the Sheepbed unit at Yellowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL instruments including the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments in MSL's Analytical Laboratory. CheMin analyses revealed the first in situ X-ray diffraction based evidence of clay minerals on Mars, which are likely trioctahedral smectites (e.g., saponite) and comprise approx 20% of the mudstone sample (e.g., Bristow et al., this meeting). SAM analyses, which heated the mudstone samples to 1000 C and monitored volatiles evolved to perform in situ evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS), resulted in a H2O trace exhibiting a wide evolution at temperatures clay mineral. Comparison to EGA-MS data collected under SAM-like conditions on a variety of clay mineral reference materials indicate that a trioctahedral smectite, such as saponite, is most consistent with the high temperature H2O evolution observed. There may also be SAM EGA-MS evidence for a small high temperature H2O evolution from scoop samples from the Yellowknife Bay Rocknest sand shadow bedform. As in the mudstone samples, this evolution may indicate the detection of smectite clays, and the idea that minor clays may be present in Rocknest materials that could be expected to be at least partially derived from local sources is reasonable. But, because smectite clays were not definitively observed in CheMin analyses of Rocknest materials, they must be present at much lower abundances than the approx 20% observed in the mudstone samples. This potential detection underscores the complementary nature of the MSL CheMin and SAM instruments for investigations of martian sample mineralogy. Information on the nature of Yellowknife Bay clay minerals may also be available from the detection of H2 evolved during SAM EGA-MS at high temperature. A likely source of at least some of this H2 is H2O evolved from the smectite clays at high temperature, and it is possible these evolutions can

  5. Ni clay neoformation on montmorillonite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dähn, R; Scheidegger, A; Manceau, A; Schlegel, M; Baeyens, B; Bradbury, M H

    2001-03-01

    Polarized extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (P-EXAFS) was used to study the sorption mechanism of Ni on the aluminous hydrous silicate montmorillonite at high ionic strength (0.3 M NaClO4), pH 8 and a Ni concentration of 0.66 mM. Highly textured self-supporting clay films were obtained by slowly filtrating a clay suspension after a reaction time of 14 days. P-EXAFS results indicate that sorbed Ni has a Ni clay-like structural environment with the same crystallographic orientation as montmorillonite layers.

  6. Surface modification of synthetic clay aimed at biomolecule adsorption: synthesis and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela de Mello Ferreira Guimarães

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the process for functionalization of laponite through the grafting of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS. Laponite is synthetic smectite clay with surface area of 350 m²/g. The samples, prior to and after functionalization, were characterized by chemical analyses, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, x ray diffraction (XRD, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry (MEV/EDS. Infrared spectroscopy and elemental analyses confirmed the presence of organic chains and thiol groups in the modified clay. The immobilized and available thiol group, measured according to the Volhard method, totaled 1.4 meq/g of clay, with approximately 90% accessible for Ag+ trapping. These results represent an improvement as compared to other works concerning the functionalization of smectite-type clays in which the effect produced by functional group blockage limits the access of species to less than 10% of the complexing sites.

  7. Test of Ferroelectricity in Non-stretched Poly(vinylidene fluoride)/Clay Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Eiji; Nishioka, Akihiro; Suzuki, Hideshige; Koda, Tomonori; Ikeda, Susumu

    2007-11-01

    We measured of the electric displacement D versus electric field E (D-E) hysteresis loop for non-stretched film samples of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)/clay nanocomposites. The film was fabricated by compressing melted pellets followed by rapid cooling. The pellets were prepared by melt-compounding method. For the non-stretched film, we obtained clear D-E hysteresis loops that are clear evidence of ferroelectricity at room temperature. Results of X-ray diffraction pattern analysis indicate that the crystal structure of PVDF in PVDF/clay nanocomposites is similar to the β-form of pure PVDF. We conclude that the crystallization of β-form PVDF in PVDF/clay nanocomposites is induced by the epitaxial growth of the β-form on the surface of clay platelets.

  8. Curing Study of Epoxy/clay Nanocomposite by a New Aromatic Diamine Functional Curing Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mahdi Saadati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The curing behavior of an epoxy/clay nanocomposite system composed of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA epoxy resin with a new aromatic diamine curing agent and organically modified clay was investigated. Epoxy/clay nanocomposite samples were prepared by mixing DGEBA, different percentages of nanoclay (1, 3, 5, 7, and 9% and 4-(4-(2,6-diphenylpyridin-4-ylphenoxybenzene-1,3-diamine (DAP. The optimum ratio of the epoxy/clay nanocomposite system (3% was investigated by total enthalpy of the curing reaction from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC thermograms. The kinetic parameters such as activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and rate constant were obtained from DSC data.

  9. Clay mineral distributions in the southern Yellow Sea and their significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    To better understand the characteristics of the clay minerals in the southern Yellow Sea, the X-ray quantitative determinations have been carried out for the surface samples obtained from the Yellow Sea. With newly compiled clay mineral synoptic maps, the depositional processes were described for four main clay minerals (illite, chlorite, kaolinite and smectite). The analysis shows that most clay minerals are of terrigenous source with the Huanghe River acting as the major sediment supplier. Besides, the source of muddy sediments in the Yellow Sea was also discussed. As for the central Yellow Sea mud (CYSM), the sediments in its northern part mainly come from the Huanghe River, and those in the rest are of multi-origin. Very similarly, a large amount of sediments in the northern part of the southeastern Yellow Sea Mud (SEYSM) derive from the Keum River and Yeongsan River, while those in the southern part are of multi-origin.

  10. Removal of Cr(VI from Aqueous Environments Using Micelle-Clay Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohannad Qurie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solutions under different conditions was investigated using either clay (montmorillonite or micelle-clay complex, the last obtained by adsorbing critical micelle concentration of octadecyltrimethylammonium ions onto montmorillonite. Batch experiments showed the effects of contact time, adsorbent dosage, and pH on the removal efficiency of Cr(VI from aqueous solutions. Langmuir adsorption isotherm fitted the experimental data giving significant results. Filtration experiments using columns filled with micelle-clay complex mixed with sand were performed to assess Cr(VI removal efficiency under continuous flow at different pH values. The micelle-clay complex used in this study was capable of removing Cr(VI from aqueous solutions without any prior acidification of the sample. Results demonstrated that the removal effectiveness reached nearly 100% when using optimal conditions for both batch and continuous flow techniques.

  11. Recycling of sugarcane bagasse ash waste in the production of clay bricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, K C P; Gurgel, R F; Holanda, J N F

    2012-06-30

    This work investigates the recycling of sugarcane bagasse ash waste as a method to provide raw material for clay brick bodies, through replacement of natural clay by up 20 wt.%. Initially, the waste sample was characterized by its chemical composition, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, particle size, morphology and pollution potential. Clay bricks pieces were prepared, and then tested, so as to determine their technological properties (e.g., linear shrinkage, water absorption, apparent density, and tensile strength). The sintered microstructure was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the sugarcane bagasse ash waste is mainly composed by crystalline silica particles. The test results indicate that the sugarcane bagasse ash waste could be used as a filler in clay bricks, thus enhancing the possibility of its reuse in a safe and sustainable way.

  12. Ice nucleation efficiency of clay minerals in the immersion mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Pinti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Emulsion and bulk freezing experiments were performed to investigate immersion ice nucleation on clay minerals in pure water, using various kaolinites, montmorillonites, illites as well as natural dust from the Hoggar Mountains in the Saharan region. DSC (differential scanning calorimeter measurements were performed on the kaolinites KGa-1b and KGa-2 from the Clay Mineral Society and kaolinite from Sigma-Aldrich; the montmorillonites SWy-2 and STx-1b from the Clay Mineral Society and the acid treated montmorillonites KSF and K-10 from Sigma Aldrich; the illites NX and SE from Arginotec. The emulsion experiments provide information on the average freezing behaviour characterized by the average nucleation sites. These experiments revealed one to two distinct heterogeneous freezing peaks, which suggest the presence of a low number of qualitatively distinct average nucleation site classes. We refer to the peak at the lowest temperature as "standard peak" and to the one at higher temperatures as "special peak". Conversely, freezing in bulk samples is not initiated by the average nucleation sites, but by a very low number of "best sites". The kaolinites showed quite narrow standard peaks with onset temperatures 239 K < Tonstd < 242 K and best sites with averaged median freezing temperature Tmedbest = 257 K. Only the kaolinite from Sigma Aldrich featured a special peak with freezing onset at 248 K. The illites showed broad standard peaks with freezing onsets at 244 K < Tonstd < 246 K and best sites with averaged median freezing temperature Tmedbest = 262 K. Montmorillonites had standard peaks with onsets 238 K < Tonstd < 240 K and best sites with Tmedbest=257 K. SWy-2, M K10, and KSF featured special peaks with onsets at Tonspcl=247, 240, and 242 K

  13. Nondestructive Measurement of Water Content and Moisture Migration of Unsaturated Red Clays in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To reveal the moisture migration mechanism of the unsaturated red clays, which are sensitive to water content change and widely distributed in South China, and then rationally use them as a filling material for highway embankments, a method to measure the water content of red clay cylinders using X-ray computed tomography (CT was proposed and verified. Then, studies on the moisture migrations in the red clays under the rainfall and ground water level were performed at different degrees of compaction. The results show that the relationship between dry density, water content, and CT value determined from X-ray CT tests can be used to nondestructively measure the water content of red clay cylinders at different migration time, which avoids the error reduced by the sample-to-sample variation. The rainfall, ground water level, and degree of compaction are factors that can significantly affect the moisture migration distance and migration rate. Some techniques, such as lowering groundwater table and increasing degree of compaction of the red clays, can be used to prevent or delay the moisture migration in highway embankments filled with red clays.

  14. Magnetic properties of Jiaxian red clay sequences from northern Chinese Loess Plateau and its paleoclimatic significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANG; Xiaoke; AN; Zhisheng; LI; Huamei; CHANG; Hong

    2005-01-01

    Detailed rock magnetism investigation of the Jiaxian red clay sequences indicated that there are common magnetic mineralogy properties in red clay and loess-paleosol sequences from the Chinese Loess Plateau as well as the marked properties of themselves, magnetic minerals mainly with magnetite, maghemite, hematite, and possibly limonite/goethite contributing to the magnetic behavior. Meanwhile, it is found that the strong paleosol in red clay sequences has a lower coercivity and higher content of ultra-fine ferrimagnetic grains than that of the weak paleosol, which is similar to loess and paleosol in upper Wucheng Loess sequences, and indicates that humid conditions and relatively strong pedogenesis play a significant role in the increase of ultra-fine magnetic minerals and transformation of the magnetic minerals. This suggests that, like Quaternary loess-paleosols, the change of characteristics of paleoclimatic conditions of the late Tertiary red clay deposits is fluctuant. In addition, the results of magnetic hysteresis properties show that the applied saturated field for samples from the Jiaxian red clay sequences is higher than that of the samples from eastern and southern Chinese Loess Plateau. It is obviously shown that there exist more hard magnetic minerals and relatively weak biochemical processes in the Jiaxian red clay sequences on northern Chinese Loess Plateau. We conclude that the paleoclimatic environment is different between northern and eastern/southern Chinese Loess Plateau, and it should be more arid in northern Chinese Loess Plateau.

  15. Characterization of bentonite clay from “Greda” deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadežda Stanković

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on mineralogical and technological investigations of the deposit “Greda” important characteristics of bentonite clay were determined. Representative samples of the deposit were characterized with X-ray diffraction, low-temperature nitrogen adsorption, chemical analysis, differential thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. It was determined that the main mineral is montmorillonite and in subordinate quantities kaolinite, quartz and pyrite. The chemical composition generally shows high silica and alumina contents in all samples and small quantities of Fe3+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations. Based on technological and mineralogical research, bentonite from this deposit is a high-quality raw material for use in the ceramic industry.

  16. Effect of Firing Temperature on Mechanical Properties of Fired Masonry Bricks Produced from Ipetumodu Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatai Olufemi ARAMIDE

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of varied firing temperature on the mechanical properties of fired masonry bricks samples produced from Ipetumodu clay was investigated. The clay sample was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM for the evaluation of the morphology of the sample using secondary electron imaging; and the phases/compositions of the samples using energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis, X-ray diffractometer (XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS. The brick samples of standard dimensions were prepared from the clay slurry. The prepared samples were sun dried for 72 hours and then fired at varied temperature (held for an hour and then allowed to cool to room temperature in the furnace. The mechanical properties (compression strength, shear strength, modulus of rupture, density and hardness of the samples were then investigated. It was observed that the mechanical properties of the fired brick samples varied with varying firing temperature due to phase changes/chemical reaction between the phases in the clay sample. It was concluded that the optimum mechanical property for brick samples within the temperature range considered is obtained at 950oC.

  17. Adsorption of natural dyes on clay fixed on polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Jefferson Lopes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work was to produce a pellet to minimize undesirable effects in fixed beds, such as colmatation, through clay fixation on the surface of polymeric particles. Preliminary experiments were carried out by heating the clay, namely Tonsil Terrana 580FF, in order to observe variations on its capacity to adsorb anthocyanins derived from red cabbage. Clays was fixed on five samples of high density polyethylene (HDPE at 180°C -210°C for two hours. The morphological analyses of the resulting particles were accomplished through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The experiments demonstrated an increase on clay's adsorptive capacity of 15.65% at 120°C for 30 hours and 16.80% at 170°C for two hours. The SEM analysis showed that the clay particles adhered on the external surface of the pellets .These results show that it is possible to obtain polymeric pellets using HDPE coated with clay.O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar formas de minimizar efeitos indesejáveis como a colmatação em leitos constituídos de argila através de sua fixação sobre a superfície de partículas poliméricas. Foram realizados ensaios preliminares aquecendo a argila Tonsil Terrana 580FF em estufas para se observar a variação da sua capacidade de adsorção de antocianinas de repolho roxo. Posteriormente, foram utilizadas 5 amostras de polietileno de alta densidade para a fixação da argila a temperaturas de 180°C-210°C durante 2 horas. As análises morfológicas das partículas obtidas foram realizadas através de microscopia eletrônica de varredura. Os experimentos preliminares demonstraram um incremento máximo de 15,65% na capacidade adsortiva da argila (120°C, 30 horas e 16,80% (170ºC, 2 horas. Estes resultados mostram que é possível obter pellets com depósito de adsorventes de fina granulometria fixados superficialmente.

  18. Mullins' effect in polymer/clay nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drozdov, Aleksey; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville; Klitkou, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Experimental data are reported on polypropylene/clay nanocomposites in uniaxial cyclic tensile tests at room temperature (oscillations between maximum strains and the zero minimum stress with maximum strains increasing monotonically with number of cycles). Observations reveal fading...

  19. Toward Accurate Adsorption Energetics on Clay Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Zen, Andrea; Cox, Stephen J; Hu, Xiao L; Sorella, Sandro; Alfè, Dario; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in nature, and the manner in which they interact with their surroundings has important industrial and environmental implications. Consequently, a molecular-level understanding of the adsorption of molecules on clay surfaces is crucial. In this regard computer simulations play an important role, yet the accuracy of widely used empirical force fields (FF) and density functional theory (DFT) exchange-correlation functionals is often unclear in adsorption systems dominated by weak interactions. Herein we present results from quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) for water and methanol adsorption on the prototypical clay kaolinite. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time QMC has been used to investigate adsorption at a complex, natural surface such as a clay. As well as being valuable in their own right, the QMC benchmarks obtained provide reference data against which the performance of cheaper DFT methods can be tested. Indeed using various DFT exchange-correlation functionals yields...

  20. Mullins' effect in polymer/clay nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drozdov, Aleksey; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville; Klitkou, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Experimental data are reported on polypropylene/clay nanocomposites in uniaxial cyclic tensile tests at room temperature (oscillations between maximum strains and the zero minimum stress with maximum strains increasing monotonically with number of cycles). Observations reveal fading of ...

  1. The Basics in Pottery: Clay and Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Joan

    1985-01-01

    Art teachers at the middle school or junior high school level usually find themselves in a program teaching ceramics. The most essential tools needed for a ceramics class are discussed. Different kinds of clay are also discussed. (RM)

  2. Stabilization Of Marine Clay Using Biomass Silica-Rubber Chips Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marto, Aminaton; Ridzuan Jahidin, Mohammed; Aziz, Norazirah Abdul; Kasim, Fauziah; Zurairahetty Mohd. Yunus, Nor

    2016-11-01

    Marine clay is found widely along the coastal area and had caused expensive solutions in the construction of coastal highways. Hence, soil stabilization was suggested by some consultant to increase the strength of this soil in order to meet the highway construction requirement and also to achieve the specification for the development. Biomass Silica (BS), particularly the SH85 as a non-traditional stabilisation method, has been gaining more interest from the engineers recently. Rubber chips (RC), derived from waste rubber tyres, are considered ‘green’ element and had been used previously in some geotechnical engineering works. This paper presents the effect of using BS and RC as a mixture (BS-RC mixture), to increase the strength of marine clay for highway construction. Samples of marine clay, obtained from the West Coast Expressway project at Teluk Intan, Perak, were oven dried and grind to fine-grained sized. The marine clay was mixed with 9 % by weight proportion of BS- RC; that were 8%-l% and 7%-2%, respectively. For comparison purposes the result of BS-RC was compared to the result of stabilization by using 9% BS only. Laboratory tests were then carried out to determine the Atterberg limits and compaction characteristics of the untreated and treated marine clay. The Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) of the untreated and treated marine clays, compacted at the optimum moisture content was later obtained. The treated marine clay was tested at 0, 3 and 7 days curing periods. The results show that the Plasticity Index of BS-RC treated marine clay was lower than the untreated marine clay. From the UCS test results, it is shown that BS-RC mixtures had significantly improved the strength of marine clay. With the same percentage of 9% BS-RC, the increased of BS from 7% to 8% increased the UCS further to about six times more than untreated marine clay soils in 7 days curing period. The strength gained by using BS-RC at 8%-1% is slightly below the strength by

  3. Interaction of Auramine O with montmorillonite clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Avelardo U.C.; Poli, Alessandra L.; Gessner, Fergus; Neumann, Miguel G. [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 780, 13560-970 São Carlos SP (Brazil); Schmitt Cavalheiro, Carla C., E-mail: carla@iqsc.usp.br [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 780, 13560-970 São Carlos SP (Brazil)

    2013-04-15

    The spectroscopic behaviour of Auramine O (AuO) in aqueous suspensions of montmorillonite clays was studied using absorption and static and dynamic fluorescence techniques. The fluorescence of Auramine O increases immediately after mixing the dye solution with the suspension of clay due to its adsorption on the external surface of the clays, which restricts the torsional molecular motion of Auramine. At longer times, the dye molecules migrate into the interlamellar region of the clay particles. Aggregation of the dye molecules can occur in the interlayer region, leading to the decrease of the fluorescence emission. The fluorescence quantum yields (Φ{sub F}) of AuO on the natural montmorillonites SAz-1, SWy-1, Syn-1 and Laponite clays were 0.015, 0.007, 0.016 and 0.017, respectively. These values are higher than the Φ{sub F} of AuO in aqueous solution and are of the same order of magnitude of the Φ{sub F} found for viscous solvents such as n-hexanol and n-heptanol (0.014 and 0.015). Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy studies of adsorbed Auramine on clays revealed multi-exponential decays with components in the 25–36, 219–362 and 1300–1858 ps ranges. The short-lived components can be attributed to species bound to external surface and the longer lifetime is assigned to dye molecules in interlayer spaces interacting strongly with the clay. It seems clear that the binding of Auramine to clays causes a significant reduction of the rate of internal conversion that does involve rotational diffusion, so that the clay will be locked in a conformational geometry unfavourable for internal conversion. -- Highlights: ► Auramine O was dissolved in dispersions of different clays. ► The fluorescence quantum yields were higher than in aqueous solution. ► Decrease of the emission and triexponential decays were observed on SAz-1, LapRDS and SYn-1. ► On Swy-1 the decrease was slower and the decay monoexponential. ► The dye produces aggregates on the internal

  4. 2 nd Mid-European Clay Conference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The 2nd Mid-European Clay Conference (MECC'04) was held between 20-24th September 2004, in Miskolc, Hungary. The idea to hold common conferences was accepted by the national clay groups of four neighbouring countries, Poland, Slovakia, Hungary and Croatia, during the EUROCLAY Meeting in Cracow, Poland, in 1999. The first conference was held in 2001 at Stará Lesná, in the High Tatra Mts. in Slovakia.

  5. Dynamic properties of composite cemented clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡袁强; 梁旭

    2004-01-01

    In this work,the dynamic properties of composite cemented clay under a wide range of strains were studied considering the effect of different mixing ratio and the change of confining pressures through dynamic triaxial test. A simple and practical method to estimate the dynamic elastic modulus and damping ratio is proposed in this paper and a related empirical normalized formula is also presented. The results provide useful guidelines for preliminary estimation of cement requirements to improve the dynamic properties of clays.

  6. Quantifying the effect of squirt flow dispersion from compliant clay porosity in clay bearing sandstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    Compliant porosity in the form of cracks is known to cause significant attenuation and velocity dispersion through pore pressure gradients and consequent relaxation, dubbed squirt flow. Squirt flow from cracks vanish at high confining stress due to crack closing. Studies on clay bearing sandstones......-squirt flow on the bulk modulus of a clay bearing sandstone. The predicted magnitude of the clay-squirt effect on the bulk modulus is compared with experimental data. The clay-squirt effect is found to possibly account for a significant portion of the deviances from Gassmann fluid substitution in claybearing...

  7. DIBENZO-P-DIOXINS IN THE ENVIRONMENT FROM CERAMICS AND POTTERY PRODUCED FROM BALL CLAY MINED IN THE U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Processed ball clay samples used in the production of ceramics and samples of the ceramic products were collected and analyzed for the presence and concentration of the 2,3,7,8-Cl substituted polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDDs/PCDFs). The processed ball clay had...

  8. On The Thermal Consolidation Of Boom Clay

    CERN Document Server

    Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2012-01-01

    When a mass of saturated clay is heated, as in the case of host soils surrounding nuclear waste disposals at great depth, the thermal expansion of the constituents generates excess pore pressures. The mass of clay is submitted to gradients of pore pressure and temperature, to hydraulic and thermal flows, and to changes in its mechanical properties. In this work, some of these aspects were experimentally studied in the case of Boom clay, so as to help predicting the response of the soil, in relation with investigations made in the Belgian underground laboratory at Mol. Results of slow heating tests with careful volume change measurements showed that a reasonable prediction of the thermal expansion of the clay-water system was obtained by using the thermal properties of free water. In spite of the density of Boom clay, no significant effect of water adsorption was observed. The thermal consolidation of Boom clay was studied through fast heating tests. A simple analysis shows that the hydraulic and thermal trans...

  9. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Walter W.; Walsh, D.P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, D.L.; Miller, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. Hydrogel membranes of PVAl/ clay by gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, M. J. A.; Parra, D. F.; Amato, V. S.; Lugão, A. B.

    2013-03-01

    In the last decades several studies concerning the new methods for drug delivery system have been investigated. A new field known as "smart therapy" involves devices and drug delivery systems to detect, identify and treat the site affected by the disease, not interfering with the biological system. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis is an endemic disease that is characterized by the development of single or multiple localized lesions on exposed areas of skin and one coetaneous treatment could be a potential solution. The aim of this study was to obtain polymeric hydrogel matrices of poly(vinylalcohol)(PVAl) and chitosan with inorganic nanoparticles, which can release a drug according to the need of the treatment of injury caused by leishmania on the skin. The hydrogels matrices were obtained with PVAl/ chitosan and PVAl/ chitosan 0.5; 1.0 and 1.5% laponite RD clay, crosslinked by ionizing gamma radiation with dose of 25 kGy. The techniques used for characterization were swelling, gel fraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetry (TGA). After synthesis, the samples were immersed in distilled water and weighed in periods of time until 60 h for the swelling determination. The obtained results have indicated that the swelling of the membranes increases with clay concentration, in consequence of ionic groups present in the clay.

  11. Geopolymers Based on Phosphoric Acid and Illito-Kaolinitic Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Louati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New three-dimensional geopolymer materials based on illito-kaolinitic clay and phosphoric acid were synthesized. The effect of Si/P molar ratio on the geopolymers properties was studied. Raw, calcined clay, and geopolymers structures were investigated using XRD, IR spectroscopy, and SEM. The phosphoric acid-based geopolymers mechanical properties were evaluated by measuring the compressive strength. The Si/P molar ratio was found to increase with the increase of the compressive strength of the obtained geopolymers, which attained a maximum value at Si/P equal to 2.75. Beyond this ratio, the mechanical strength decreases. The XRD patterns of these geopolymers samples have proven that when the Si/P molar ratio decreases, the amorphous phase content increases. Besides, the structural analyses have revealed the presence of aluminum phosphate and Si-O-Al-O-P polymeric structure, whatever the Si/P molar ratio is (between 2.25 and 3.5. The obtained results have confirmed that the presence of the associated minerals such as hematite and quartz in the clay does not prevent the geopolymerization reaction, but the presence of illite mineral seems to have a modest contribution in the geopolymerization.

  12. Effects of Clay on Properties of Polycarboxylate Superplasticizer and Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin; WANG Dongmin

    2015-01-01

    The inlfuence law of clay on mortar lfuidity mixed with polycarboxylate superplasticizer was studied. Several methods of inhibiting clay adsorption of polycarboxylate superplasticizer were discussed. The experimental results show that clay has signiifcant effect on the dispersion of polycarboxylate superplasticizer and montmorillonite clay has more signiifcant impact on mortar lfuidity than other clays. The pH value and the salts of the solution can affect the adsorption of clay to polycarboxylate superplasticizer. The incorporation of a small amount of sodium hydroxide solution, sodium silicate or cationic surfactants can improve the effect of the clay on the dispersion of polycarboxylate superplasticizer.

  13. The composition and activation aspects of El-Fayoum clays for using as a drilling fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhat S. El-Mahllawy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The local consumption and the high importation cost of imported bentonite to Egypt led to find local substitute solutions for economical aspects. Hence, this paper presents the composition and activation capability of clays collected from the claystone quarries in Kom Oshim area at El-Fayoum province, Egypt for their application as a drilling fluid (water-based mud. It is an attempt to minimize the importation cost of the imported bentonites to Egypt by a local solution and maximize the usage of the studied clay sediments. The physical, chemical, thermal and mineralogical characteristics of five Egyptian clay samples were studied. The rheological properties of the prepared slurries from these samples and their activation characterization during studying the influence of NaOH and POLYPAC-R polymer as activators were investigated. It was found that the non-activated samples cannot be used as a drilling mud but it could be after the activation process where some significant changes in the rheological properties were observed. The experimental results revealed that the activated fitted samples may express as medium grade bentonitic clay and this type of clay can be used as a drilling fluid for shallow depth wells.

  14. Evaluation of used fuel disposition in clay-bearing rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hammond, Glenn Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kim, Kunhwi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Xu, Hao. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Norskog, Katherine E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maner, James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Palaich, Sarah [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cheshire, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wolery, Thomas J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Atkins-Duffin, Cindy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jerden, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Copple, Jacqueline M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cruse, Terry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ebert, William L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The R&D program from the DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) has documented key advances in coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) modeling of clay to simulate its complex dynamic behavior in response to thermal and hydrochemical feedbacks. These efforts have been harnessed to assess the isolation performance of heat-generating nuclear waste in a deep geological repository in clay/shale/argillaceous rock formations. This report describes the ongoing disposal R&D efforts on the advancement and refinement of coupled THMC process models, hydrothermal experiments on barrier clay interactions, used fuel and canister material degradation, thermodynamic database development, and reactive transport modeling of the near-field under non-isothermal conditions. These play an important role to the evaluation of sacrificial zones as part of the EBS exposure to thermally-driven chemical and transport processes. Thermal inducement of chemical interactions at EBS domains enhances mineral dissolution/precipitation but also generates mineralogical changes that result in mineral H2O uptake/removal (hydration/dehydration reactions). These processes can result in volume changes that can affect the interface / bulk phase porosities and the mechanical (stress) state of the bentonite barrier. Characterization studies on bentonite barrier samples from the FEBEX-DP international activity have provided important insight on clay barrier microstructures (e.g., microcracks) and interactions at EBS interfaces. Enhancements to the used fuel degradation model outlines the need to include the effects of canister corrosion due the strong influence of H2 generation on the source term.

  15. Main Clay Minerals in Soils of Fujian Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGGUO; ZHANGWEIMING; 等

    1996-01-01

    The clay minerals of more than 200 soil samples collected from various sites of Fujian Province were studied by the X-ray diffraction method and transmission electron microscopy to study their distribution and evolution.Montmorillonite was found in coastal solonchak,paddy soils derived from marine deposit,lacustrine deposit and river deposit,and some lateritic red soil,red soil and yellow soil with a low weathering degree.Chlorite existed mainly in coastal solonchak and paddy soil developed from marine deposit.1.4nm intergradient mineral appeared frequently in yellow soil,red soil and lateritic red soil.The content of 1.4nm intergradient mineral increased with the decrease of weathering degree from lateritic red soil to red soil to yellow soil.Hydrous micas were more in coastal solonchak,paddy soils derived from marine deposit,lacustrine deposit and river deposit.and puple soil from purple shale than in other soils.Kaolinte was the most important clay mineral in the soils iun this province.The higher the soil weathering degree,the more the kaolinite existed.From yellow soil to red soil to lateritic red soil,kaolinite increased gradually,Kaolinite was the predominant clay mineral accompanied by few other minerals in typical lateritic red soil. Tubular halloysite was a widespread clay mineral in soils of Fujian Province with varying quantities.The soil derived from the paent rocks rich in feldspar contained more tubular halloysite.Spheroidal halloysite was found in a red soil and a paddy soil developed from olivine basalt gibbsite in the soils in this district was largely“primary gibbsite” which formed in the early weathering stage.Gibbsite decreased with the increase of weathering degree from yellow soil to red soil to lateritic red soil.Goethite also decreased in the same sequence while hematite increased.

  16. Clay mineralogy and magnetic susceptibility of Oxisols in geomorphic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies analyzing the variability of clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility provide data for the delineation of site-specific management areas since many of their attributes are important to agronomy and the environment. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial variability of clay minerals, magnetic susceptibility, adsorbed phosphorus and physical attributes in Oxisols of sandstones in different geomorphic surfaces. For that purpose, soil samples were collected every 25 m along a transect located within the area where the geomorphic surfaces were identified and mapped. The transect occupied the central portion of 500 ha, where it was also sampled for density purposes with one sample per six hectares. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0.0-0.2 m. The results of the physical, chemical, mineralogical and magnetic susceptibility analyses were subjected to statistical and geostatistical analyses. The nature of the clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility was dependent on the variation of the soil parent material. High values of magnetic susceptibility were associated with the presence of maghemite and magnetite of coarse size. The spatial variability of crystallinity and the content of Fe oxides, as well as magnetic susceptibility, were dependent on the age of the geomorphic surfaces. The youngest surface had greater spatial variability of these attributes. The iron (goethite and hematite and aluminum (gibbsite oxides in the youngest geomorphic surface influenced the low values of soil density and high values of total pore volume, micropores and P adsorption. The characterization of the spatial variability of Fe oxides and susceptibility allowed for the delineation of homogeneous areas.

  17. Premiminary tests on modified clays for electrolyte contaminated drilling fluids

    OpenAIRE

    den Hamer, Davina; Di Emidio, Gemmina; Bezuijen, Adam; Verastegui Flores, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The quality of a bentonite suspension declines in aggressive systems like brackish or saline pore water. An engineered clay (HYPER clay) was developed for sealing materials with enhanced resistance to aggressive conditions. The modified clay is produced by treating a sodium activated bentonite with a cellulose polymer following the HYPER clay process method. This study investigates the suitability of the modified clay for electrolyte contaminated drilling fluids. Drilling fluids become contam...

  18. Use of organophilic clays in purification of oily wastewater; Uso de argilas organofilicas na purificacao de efluentes oleosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, A.A. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Engenharia de Processos], email: adriana_anp@yahoo.com.br; Pereira, K.R de O.; Wiebeck, H.; Valenzuela-Diaz, F.R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EPUSP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais; Rodrigues, M. G.F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). CCT. Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2006-07-01

    Water mixed with oil is produced in great volume in industrial processes and in petroleum refineries. This mixture must be treated to return to environment or can be reused in the same process. The refine of this water is expensive and presents a difficult execution. The process of separation of oil in water used organophilic clays can be a new option. In this work, the process of preparation of organophilic clays using smectitic clay polycationic and a industrial sodium bentonite both from Paraiba State, Brazil is described. The samples were characterized by two techniques: X-ray Diffraction and Thermal Analysis. After preparation of the organophilic clays it was determined theirs swelling in organic solvents and oil adsorption capacity. The organophilic clays presented higher capacity of oil adsorption when compared to activated carbon. (author)

  19. Levels of lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium in clays for oral use on the Dutch market and estimation of associated risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeuwijk, N M; Klerx, W N M; Kooijman, M; Hoogenboom, L A P; Rietjens, I M C M; Martena, M J

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women in Africa, Asia and Suriname, and some immigrants in Western societies, traditionally consume clay products known by a variety of names such as mabele, calabash chalk, sikor and pimba. Furthermore, clay is used for health purposes in Western societies. Because certain clays can contain high levels of metals and metalloids, the aim of this study was to determine lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium in clay products for oral use available on the Dutch market. Traditional clays originating from Africa (n = 10) and Suriname (n = 26), and health clays (n = 27) were sampled from 2004 up to and including 2012. Total metal and metalloid contents were measured by ICP-MS and showed maximum levels of lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium of 99.7, 45.1, 2.2 and 0.75 mg kg⁻¹, respectively. In the absence of maximum limits for these type of clays, the potential exposure was estimated from the determined concentration, the estimated daily use level of the clays, and the estimated bioaccessibility of the different metals and arsenic. The intake estimates were compared with existing health-based guidance values. For lead, the use of 34 of the 36 traditional clays and two of the 27 health clays would result in intake levels exceeding the toxicological limit by up to 20-fold. Use of 15 of the 35 traditional clays and 11 of the 27 health clays would result in intake levels exceeding the toxicological limit for inorganic arsenic by up to 19-fold. Although limited bioaccessibility from the clay may limit the exposure and exceedance of the health-based guidance values, it was concluded that lead and arsenic intakes from some clay products could be of concern also because of their use by pregnant women and the potential developmental toxicity. As a result the use of these products, especially by pregnant women, should be discouraged.

  20. Study on Fired Clay Bricks by Replacing Clay with Palm Oil Waste: Effects on Physical and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, A. A.; Sarani, N. A.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Perju, M. C.; Sandu, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    Palm oil is one of the major agricultural industries in Malaysia. Due to the poor management system, the discarded palm oil waste has always been linked to the environment issues. During processing of palm oil, a considerable amount of solid waste by-products in the form of fibres, shells, empty fruit bunches and fly ashes are produce rapidly. Therefore, this study was conducted to incorporate 1%, 5% and 10% of palm oil waste into fired clay brick. Samples of brick were fired at 1050°C temperature with heating rates of 1°C/min. Manufactured bricks were tested with physical and mechanical properties including firing shrinkage, dry density, water absorption and compressive strength. The results demonstrated that the replacement of 1% up to 5% of palm oil waste had improved several properties, although, a decrease of performance in certain aspects has also been observed. As a result, palm oil waste can be utilized in an environmentally safe way into fired clay brick thus providing adequate properties of fired clay brick.

  1. Photocatalytic degradation of methyl green dye in aqueous solution over natural clay-supported ZnO–TiO2 catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Bel Hadjltaief, Haithem; Ben Zina, Mourad; Galvez, Maria Elena; Da Costa, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    International audience; A ZnO–TiO2/clay photcatalyst was prepared using a natural Tunisian clay as support. Its activity was assayed in the photocatalytic degradation of methyl green in aqueous solutions, in the presence of UVA irradiation. The photocatalyst was synthesized using a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with Ti (OPri)4 deposed on the natural Na+–clay, followed by a modified sol–gel synthesis method for introduction. The sample was then characterized by scanning elect...

  2. Effect of organic residues addition on the technological properties of clay bricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ismail

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the utilization potential of several organic residues in clay bricks. Sawdust, tobacco residues, and grass are widespread by-products of industrial and agricultural processes in Turkey. These residue materials have long cellulose fibres. Sawdust and tobacco residues generally are used as fuel, and the grass is utilized for agricultural purposes. The insulation capacity of brick increases with the increasing porosity of the clay body. Combustible, organic types of pore-forming additives are most frequently used for this purpose. For this reason, increasing amounts of organic residues (0%, 2.5%, 5% and 10% in wt.) were mixed with raw brick-clay. All samples were fired at 900 degrees C. Effects on shaping, plasticity, density, and mechanical properties were investigated. The organic residue additions were found to be effective for pore-forming in the clay body with the clay maintaining acceptable mechanical properties. It was observed that the fibrous nature of the residues did not create extrusion problems. However, higher residue addition required a higher water content to ensure the right plasticity. As a result, sawdust, tobacco residues, and grass can be utilized in an environmentally safe way as organic pore-forming agents in brick-clay.

  3. Bioremediating oil spills in nutrient poor ocean waters using fertilized clay mineral flakes: some experimental constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Laurence N; Friese, André; Schwarz, Florian; Schauer, Frieder; Portier, Ralph J; Basirico, Laura M; Olson, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98%) of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity.

  4. A minimalistic microbial food web in an excavated deep subsurface clay rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F; Diomidis, Nikitas; Leupin, Olivier X; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-01-01

    Clay rocks are being considered for radioactive waste disposal, but relatively little is known about the impact of microbes on the long-term safety of geological repositories. Thus, a more complete understanding of microbial community structure and function in these environments would provide further detail for the evaluation of the safety of geological disposal of radioactive waste in clay rocks. It would also provide a unique glimpse into a poorly studied deep subsurface microbial ecosystem. Previous studies concluded that microorganisms were present in pristine Opalinus Clay, but inactive. In this work, we describe the microbial community and assess the metabolic activities taking place within borehole water. Metagenomic sequencing and genome-binning of a porewater sample containing suspended clay particles revealed a remarkably simple heterotrophic microbial community, fueled by sedimentary organic carbon, mainly composed of two organisms: a Pseudomonas sp. fermenting bacterium growing on organic macromolecules and releasing organic acids and H2, and a sulfate-reducing Peptococcaceae able to oxidize organic molecules to CO(2). In Opalinus Clay, this microbial system likely thrives where pore space allows it. In a repository, this may occur where the clay rock has been locally damaged by excavation or in engineered backfills. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Influence of clay swelling on the mechanical behaviour of Egyptian Helwan limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Nevin

    2016-04-01

    Clay minerals exist naturally in the majority of different Egyptian limestones types. Changes in the dimensions of clays during swelling / shrinking process induced by changes in the environmental conditions can result in acceleration the deterioration of the hosting stone. Petrographic investigation by scanning - electron microscope (SEM) of Helwan limestone (biomicritic limestone) revealed distribution of a typical smectite morphology (curled - leaf shape) beside abundance of glauconite pellets within the stone material. The clay frication extracted from Helwan reached 10% and oriented aggregates samples were analyzed by X- ray diffraction (XRD) and confirmed the identification of smectite as the main mineral in the clay frication. To study the effect of the clay content on the mechanical behavior of Helwan limestone, hygric swelling test was performed at first by using displacement sensor and then the effect of multiple wetting/ drying cycles on the stone strength was determined using unconfined compressive strength (UCS). Results revealed that there was a significant correlation between degree of swelling of the clay and strength of the limestone.

  6. Characteristics and genesis of clay minerals in the northern margin of the Qaidam Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Linlin; Jiang Bo; Peng Dehua; Yin Chengming; Zeng Chunlin

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop appropriate reservoir protection measures in the northern margin of the Qaidam Basin and improve its oil and gas recovery efficiency, characteristics of clay minerals from eleven clay rock samples from the northern margin of the Qaidam Basin were investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis, the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and energy spectrum analysis. Clay mineral composition and distribution characteristics of the main hydrocarbon reservoirs, I.e., from the Jurassic and Paleogene-Neogene, were explored. We analyzed the main factors which affected these attributes. The results show that the major clay minerals in the northern margin are chlorite, kaolinite, illite, smectite and illite/smectite inter-stratified minerals, Illite is the most widely spread clay mineral in this area.Chlorite is mainly found in the entire Neogene and in shallow horizons of the Paleogene. Smectite is enriched in the shallow Paleogene-Neogene. There are large amounts of kaolinite and illite/smectite inter-stratified minerals in the Jurassic. The major factors affecting the different development of clay minerals in the region are properties of parent rocks, paleoclimate and paleowater media conditions,diagenesis transformation, tectonic and terrain conditions.

  7. Characteristic of paramagnetic centres in burnt clay and pottery by the EPR method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobosz, B. [Medical Physics Division, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)]. E-mail: benia@hoth.amu.edu.pl; Krzyminiewski, R. [Medical Physics Division, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)

    2007-02-15

    The samples of natural clay and pottery have been investigated by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) method. Because of young age (100-5000 years old) of these materials and the presence of iron compounds the big doses (1-200kGy) of irradiation have been used. The authors investigated whole material without quartz extracting from acid washing. In natural clay the EPR lines were observed which disappear after clay burning and they were also not present in EPR spectrum of pottery. After clay burning at temperatures similar to these at which pottery was burnt the spectra of clay became similar to pottery spectra. These EPR spectra have also similar hyperfine structure for which the g factors are equal g{sub 1}=2.0595, g{sub 2}=2.0079, and g{sub 3}=2.0018 for clay and g{sub 1}=2.0602, g{sub 2}=2.0079 and g{sub 3}=2.0019 for pottery. For these lines the [AlO{sub 4}]{sup 0} centre in quartz was ascribed.

  8. Bioremediating Oil Spills in Nutrient Poor Ocean Waters Using Fertilized Clay Mineral Flakes: Some Experimental Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence N. Warr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98% of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity.

  9. High Concentration of Red Clay as an Alternative for Antibiotics in Aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaejoon; Jee, Seung Cheol; Sung, Jung-Suk; Park, Woojun

    2016-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in aquaculture raises environmental and food safety concerns because chronic exposure of an aquatic ecosystem to antibiotics can result in the spread of antibiotic resistance, bioaccumulation of antibiotics in the organisms, and transfer of antibiotics to humans. In an attempt to overcome these problems, high-concentration red clay was applied as an alternative antibiotic against the following common fish pathogens: Aeromonas salmonicida, Vibrio alginolyticus, and Streptococcus equinus. The growth of A. salmonicida and V. alginolyticus was retarded by red clay, whereas that of S. equinus was promoted. Phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy analyses confirmed the attachment of red clay on cell surfaces, resulting in rapid gravitational removal and cell surface damage in both A. salmonicida and V. alginolyticus, but not in S. equinus. Different cell wall properties of grampositive species may explain the unharmed cell surface of S. equinus. Significant levels of oxidative stress were generated in only the former two species, whereas significant changes in membrane permeability were found only in S. equinus, probably because of its physiological adaptation. The bacterial communities in water samples from Oncorhynchus mykiss aquacultures supplemented with red clay showed similar structure and diversity as those from oxytetracycline-treated water. Taken together, the antibiotic effects of high concentrations of red clay in aquaculture can be attributed to gravitational removal, cell surface damage, and oxidative stress production, and suggest that red clay may be used as an alternative for antibiotics in aquaculture.

  10. Effect of topical clay application on the synthesis of collagen in skin: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, D M Z; Silva, J; Teodoro, W R; Velosa, A P; Mello, S B V

    2012-03-01

    Clay is often used in cosmetic treatments, although little is known about its action. To evaluate the effect of topical clay application on the histoarchitecture of collagen fibres in rat skin. Animals received a daily application of clay and retinoic acid (RA) 0.025% to the dorsal skin over 7 and 14 days, under vaporization at 37 °C for 40 min. Control skin was not vaporized. Samples from each region were excised, and stained with picrosirius red for collagen evaluation. Seven days after clay treatment, an increase in the number of collagen fibres was observed in treated skin compared with control skin (51.74 ± 1.28 vs. 43.39 ± 1.79%, respectively, P Clay application over 14 days did not induce a further increase in skin collagen, whereas treatment with RA did (58.07 ± 1.59%; P = 0.001 vs. control). Clay application promotes an increase in the number of collagen fibres, which may account for its beneficial effects. © The Author(s). CED © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. The magnetic properties of baked clays and their implications for past geomagnetic field intensity determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinova-Avramova, M.; Kovacheva, M.

    2013-12-01

    Burnt clays provide a vital source of information about the archaeomagnetic field but their magnetic properties, and the dependency of these on thermal history, are diverse, complex and poorly understood. Here, we attempt to shed light on this problem through the investigation of artificial clay samples prepared from three different clay types repeatedly heated in known magnetic field to two different temperatures (400 and 700 °C). Combined rock-magnetic and X-ray analyses were carried out to obtain information about the mineralogical content and magnetic properties of the diverse raw and heated clays, and also their evolution during the course of multiple heating/cooling treatments. The magnetic behaviour of the three clay types evolved significantly during the course of being repeatedly heated to both 400 and 700 °C. Phyllosilicates containing iron-substitutions in their matrix apparently played an important role in supplying iron- oxides during the heatings and the iron oxides themselves underwent progressive oxidation. The samples heated to the higher temperature exhibited more ideal magnetic behaviour but even those heated only to 400 °C achieved magnetic stabilization after multiple heatings. After 10 reheating treatments, samples heated to both peak temperatures yielded reliable palaeointensity results and a grand mean intensity value Fa = 48.57 ± 1.19 μT which differs by less than 2 μT (or about 3 per cent) from the known intensity of the inducing field. The results confirm that the thermoremanent magnetization produced as a result of multiple heatings even to moderate temperature in the antiquity can give reliable palaeointensity determination. They also highlight that materials from repeatedly used baked clay structures (kilns, hearths, etc.) may be far more appropriate for archaeointensity study than singly baked clay structures (destruction layers, floor plasters, etc.).

  12. Studies of electrochemical properties of compacted clays by concentration potential method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroshchuk, Andriy; Glaus, Martin A; Van Loon, Luc R

    2007-05-15

    The development of concentration (membrane) potential upon step-wise change in salt concentration has been studied for diaphragms made of various strongly compacted clays (montmorillonite, illite, kaolinite) equilibrated with 0.1 M NaCl solution. Porous ceramic filters were used to confine the clays mechanically to be able to achieve high extent of compaction (dry density approximately 2000 kg/m3). A theoretical analysis has revealed that the relaxation pattern is primarily controlled by the properties of porous filters and only slightly depends on the clay properties. At the same time, quasi-stationary values of concentration potential are directly related to the electrochemical perm-selectivity of clay. This property has revealed considerable differences in the electrochemical behaviour of various clays used in this study. This has been attributed to the differences in the micro-structure of clays, in particular to the existence or nonexistence of the so-called interlayer water where cations may retain some mobility. It has also been shown that in clays with high electrochemical perm-selectivity, one can expect a strong increase in the diffusivity of cationic radio-tracers with decreasing ionic strength of equilibrium electrolyte solution. At the same time, low electrochemical perm-selectivity means no noticeable dependence of this kind. The correctness of this observation has been corroborated by the comparison of our findings with the literature data on the diffusion of cationic radio-tracers through compacted montmorillonite (high perm-selectivity) and kaolinite (low perm-selectivity). To check the self-consistency of our approach, we have also carried out sample measurements of diffusion of cationic and anionic radio-tracers through compacted illite. It has been found that the measured effective diffusion coefficients were in excellent agreement with the electrochemical perm-selectivity estimated for this clay from the measurements of concentration potential.

  13. Carbon saturation in the silt and clay particles in soils with contrasting mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Matus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The silt and clay particles play a key role as stabilizing agents of soil organic carbon (SOC. Several lines of evidence indicate a theoretical maximum or C saturation in individual particles. In the present study, we hypothesized that a C fraction displaying linear accumulation relative to the SOC is not influenced by C saturation, while a fraction displaying an asymptotic relationship is regarded as saturated (Stewart et al., 2008. The aim of the present study was to compare the amount of C in the silt and clay sized fractions in temperate and subtropical cropping soils across a range of textures with different mineralogy. Twenty-one and 18 soil samples containing 1:1 and 2:1 clay of temperate soil from Chile under monoculture of maize (Zea maiz L. for at least 30 years and 9 subtropical soils from Mexico under maize and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cropping for 9 years having mixed clay were collected at 0-0.1 m. The SOC of 2:1 soils was significantly higher (14±0.5 g kg-1 dry soil than 1:1 soils (10±0.7 g kg-1. However, subtropical soils showed the highest values (59±0.5 g kg-1. A positive (P < 0.01 relationship was observed between the SOC and the C in the silt fraction (R2 0.80-0.97, P < 0.01. In contrast, the clay fraction remained constant or showed asymptotic behavior. We conclude that the silt fraction, unlike clay, showed no evidence of C saturation, while clay accumulates C to a maximum. On average, the 2:1 clay was saturated at 1-2 g C kg-1 and 1:1 at 1 g C kg-1, and subtropical soils at 14 g C kg-1.

  14. Determining Upper Bounds for the Clay-squirt Effect in Clay Bearing Sandstone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    Sonic measurements of saturated bulk moduli of clay bearing sandstones show larger values than expected by Gassmann modelling from dry rock properties. This causes difficulties in extrapolation of laboratory data to different saturants or frequencies. Squirt flow from the clay phase of the rock...

  15. VIS/NIR Spectroscopy to determine the spatial variation of the weathering degree in Paleogene clay soil - London Clay Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Mohammed; Gibson, Andy, ,, Dr; Koor, Nick, ,, Dr; Gale, Professor Andy; Huggett, Jenny, ,, Dr; Branch, Steve

    2017-04-01

    The London Clay Formation (LCF) which underlies much of South-East England is hugely important as a construction medium. However, its geotechnical performance (shear strength, compressive strength, shrink-swell behaviour, etc. ) is greatly affected by its degree of weathering. Despite this importance, little attention has been focussed on a robust method to define and measure its degree of weathering. This is perhaps a result of a well-known colour change from bluish-grey to brown that accompanies 'weathering' and considered to be the result of oxidisation (Chandler and Apted 1988). Through wide experience, this definition is normally effective, but it is perhaps subjective and reliant on the experience of the investigator and the ability to observe samples or exposures. More objective investigation, typically using SEM is not normally economically feasible or expedient for construction works. We propose a simple, robust method to characterise the degree of weathering in the LCF using reflective or Visible-Near-InfraRed-Spectroscopy (VNIRS). 24 samples were extracted from 2 boreholes drilled in the Hampstead area of London to depths of 12 m within the uppermost Claygate Member of the LCF. VNIRS spectra (350-2500 nm) were measured from all samples and compared with XRD, XRF, SEM and PSD results on the same samples. Results show increased magnitude of absorption features related to clay mineralogy around 1400, 1900 and 2200 nm to a depth of 5 m beneath ground level. Beneath this depth, the absorption features show little variation. SEM analyses show corresponding changes in the degradation of pyrite crystals and individual clay (illite/smectite). These preliminary results show that there is a good potential for VNIRS spectroscopy to determine the variation of weathering in the LCF.

  16. Mineralogical characterization of Greda clays and monitoring of their phase transformations on thermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez Panduro, E., E-mail: 04130127@unmsm.edu.pe; Bravo Cabrejos, J., E-mail: jbravoc@unmsm.edu.pe [Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas (Peru)

    2010-01-15

    The mineralogical characterization of two clay samples from the Central Andean Region of Peru, denominated White Greda and Red Greda, is reported. These clays contain the clay minerals mica and illite respectively. Both clays were treated thermally in an oxidising atmosphere under controlled conditions up to 1,100 deg. C with the purpose of obtaining information about structural changes that may be useful for pottery manufacture. X-ray fluorescence was used for the elemental characterization of the samples and X-ray diffractometry was used to determine the collapse and formation of the mineral phases present in the samples caused by thermal treatment. At temperatures above 1,000 deg. C it is observed the formation of spinel in the case of White Greda and of hematite, corundum and cristobalite in the case of Red Greda. Room temperature transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy allowed the monitoring of the variation of the hyperfine parameters with the thermal treatment temperature; In the case of the evolution of the quadruple splitting of the paramagnetic Fe{sup 3+} sites with temperature, in both clays, the analyses reproduced results such as the 'camel back' curve shape, found by other workers (Wagner and Wagner, Hyperfine Interact 154:35-82, 2004; Wagner and Kyek, Hyperfine Interact 154:5-33, 2004).

  17. Mineralogical characterization of Greda clays and monitoring of their phase transformations on thermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panduro, E. Chavez; Cabrejos, J. Bravo

    2010-01-01

    The mineralogical characterization of two clay samples from the Central Andean Region of Peru, denominated White Greda and Red Greda, is reported. These clays contain the clay minerals mica and illite respectively. Both clays were treated thermally in an oxidising atmosphere under controlled conditions up to 1,100°C with the purpose of obtaining information about structural changes that may be useful for pottery manufacture. X-ray fluorescence was used for the elemental characterization of the samples and X-ray diffractometry was used to determine the collapse and formation of the mineral phases present in the samples caused by thermal treatment. At temperatures above 1,000°C it is observed the formation of spinel in the case of White Greda and of hematite, corundum and cristobalite in the case of Red Greda. Room temperature transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy allowed the monitoring of the variation of the hyperfine parameters with the thermal treatment temperature; In the case of the evolution of the quadruple splitting of the paramagnetic Fe3 + sites with temperature, in both clays, the analyses reproduced results such as the “camel back” curve shape, found by other workers (Wagner and Wagner, Hyperfine Interact 154:35-82, 2004; Wagner and Kyek, Hyperfine Interact 154:5-33, 2004).

  18. Physical-chemical characterization of Tunisian clays for the synthesis of geopolymers materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmani, S.; Essaidi, N.; Gouny, F.; Bouaziz, S.; Joussein, E.; Driss, A.; Sdiri, A.; Rossignol, S.

    2015-03-01

    Natural clay materials from Tunisia were examined as an aluminosilicate source for the synthesis of consolidated materials at low temperatures. Three clay samples were collected from the El Kef, Douiret and Gafsa basins and calcined at different temperatures. All of the samples were characterized using chemical and mineralogical analyses, thermogravimetry, dilatometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. The chemical (XRF) and mineralogical analyses (XRD and FTIR) indicated that all of the samples contained various amounts of kaolinite and quartz, followed by calcite, mica, palygorskite and gypsum. Curing produced a binder which did not significantly affect the physic-chemical properties of these clays. The obtained materials heterogeneous did not reach the geopolymerization stage, most likely because of their low kaolinite content. The addition of a suitable aluminosilicate to these clays is therefore recommended to produce homogeneous consolidated geopolymers. The synthesized materials obtained after the addition of metakaolin to the formulation to improve reactivity have interesting properties, thereby providing good potential for Tunisian clays in the synthesis of geopolymers.

  19. Investigation of Some Moulding Properties of a Nigerian Clay-Bonded Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oke A.O.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Moulding properties of Isasa River Sand bonded with Ipetumodu clay (Ife-North Local Government Area, Osun State, Nigeria were investigated. American Foundry men Society (AFS standard cylindrical specimens 50mm diameter and 50mm in height were prepared from various sand and clay ratios (between 18% and 32% with 15% water content. The stress-strain curves were generated from a universal strength testing machine. A flow factor was calculated from the inclination of the falling slope beyond the maximum compressive strength. The result shows that the flowability of the samples increases from 18% to 26% clay content, its maximum value was attained at 26% and then it decreases from 30% to 32% clay content. The green compressive strength, dry compressive strength and air permeability values obtained from the mould samples were in accordance with standard values used in foundry practice. The x-ray diffraction test shows that the sand contains silicon oxide (SiO2, Aluminium oxide (Al2O3, and Aluminium silicate (Al6Si2O13. The mould samples were heated to a temperature of 1200 °C to determine the sintering temperature; fussion did not take place at this temperature. The results showed that the sand and clay mixture can be used to cast ferrous and non-ferrous alloys.

  20. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  1. Clay nanocomposites for use in Li batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Gregory John

    1999-11-01

    Nanocomposites, materials made of more than one component and combined in an ordered manner on the nanometer scale, were synthesized using clay mineral hosts with various types of guests. The guests include polymers such as polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polyaniline (PANI), large molecules such as ethylmethyl sulfone, tetramethylene sulfone, and various length alkylamines. Vanadyl groups (VO 2+) were also incorporated with the clays. The otherwise non-swellable mica clay, synthetic Na-fluorophlogopite, was expanded by intercalation of acidic ions such as Cu2+ and Fe3+. As aqueous solutions, these ions caused the stable fluoromica to go from its dehydrated interlayer spacing of 9.8 A to over 14 A. This clay became a host for many other reactions including swelling with alkylamines to over 25 A. However, despite hydrated Cu2+ ions swelling fluorophlogopite, polymeric species such as PEO or PANI could not be inserted. Another clay that was used for formation of nanocomposites came from a procedure for the synthesis of Li-taeniolite, Li(Mg2Li)Si 4O10F2. The clay was synthesized following a high temperature method that led to a non-reactive product. Instead, a novel precursor route was employed that gave a clay product with a single hydration layer. Various chemical analyses gave a formula of Li0.8(Mg 2.2Li0.8)Si4O10(F1.6O 0.4)·H2O. For the purpose of forming nanocomposite electrolytes, ethylmethyl sulfone was synthesized and incorporated into the clay. For comparison of different shaped sulfones, tetramethylene sulfone also was inserted into the layers for electrolytic studies. To make a polymer-clay electrolyte, polyethylene oxide was intercalated into the Li-taeniolite. All of these new electrolyte materials were characterized using impedance spectroscopy for measurement of their conductivity. Syntheses and analyses are thoroughly discussed for all of these materials. Special attention is placed on powder x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric techniques to

  2. Variable Temperature Infrared Spectroscopy Investigations of Benzoic Acid Desorption from Sodium and Calcium Montmorillonite Clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Tara M; Ingram, Audrey L; Maraoulaite, Dalia K; White, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    Processes involved in thermal desorption of benzoic acid from sodium and calcium montmorillonite clays are investigated by using variable temperature diffuse reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS). By monitoring the temperature dependence of infrared absorbance bands while heating samples, subtle changes in molecular vibrations are detected and employed to characterize specific benzoic acid adsorption sites. Abrupt changes in benzoic acid adsorption site properties occur for both clay samples at about 125 °C. Difference spectra absorbance band frequency variations indicate that adsorbed benzoic acid interacts with interlayer cations through water bridges and that these interactions can be disrupted by the presence of organic anions, in particular, benzoate.

  3. Effect of wet grinding on structural properties of ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, A.; Hameed, A.; Chander, S.; Nehra, S. P.; Singh, P.; Dhaka, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the effect of wet grinding on structural properties of ball clay is undertaken. The wet grinding treatment was performed employing ball and vibro mills for different time spells of 2, 4, 8 and 16 hours. The structural properties were carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The structure of ground samples is found to be simple cubic. The crystallographic parameters are calculated and slight change in lattice constant, inter planner spacing and particle size is observed with grinding treatment. The results are in agreement with the available literature.

  4. Effects of Consolidation Stress State on Normally Consolidated Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lade, Poul V.

    2000-01-01

    and on isotropically consolidated, cubical specimens, both tested in triaxial compression and extension, clearly showed the influence of the undisturbed fabric as well as the effect of the initial consolidation stress states. While the K0-consolidated specimens appeared to retain their original fabric and exhibit......The effect of consolidation stress state on the stress-strain and strength characteristics has been studied from experiments on undisturbed block samples of a natural, normally consolidated clay known as San Francisco Bay Mud. The results of experiments on K0-consolidated, hollow cylinder specimens...

  5. Clay: An important raw material for prehistoric man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, U.; Gebhard, R.; Grosse, G.; Hutzelmann, T.; Murad, E.; Riederer, J.; Shimada, I.; Wagner, F. E.

    1998-12-01

    Early techniques of making pottery can be investigated by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Iron is generally present in unpurified clays in concentrations of several percent. During firing, the iron undergoes characteristic changes of its chemical and physical state, depending on the kiln atmosphere and on the maximum firing temperature reached. These changes can be followed by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Firing techniques can often be reconstructed when spectra of laboratory and field fired samples are compared with those observed in ancient sherds.

  6. EVALUATION OF THE REFRACTORY CHARACTERISTICS OF DUKKU CLAY DEPOSIT

    OpenAIRE

    A.M. Yami; M. A. B. Hassan; Umaru, S.

    2007-01-01

    Dukku clay was investigated to determine its refractory characteristics. The result shows that it has a bulk modulus of 9.27g/cm2, porosity of 27.84%, linear shrinkage of 1.27% and cold crushing strength of 80.20kg/cm3.A thermal shock resistance of 25 cycles was obtained with specific gravity of 2.69g and refractoriness of 1300oC.The sample was also analyzed to determine its chemical composition by atomic absorption spectra photometry method (AAS969). The result of the chemical analysis shows...

  7. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W; English, Christopher J; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  8. Catsius Clay Project. Calculation and Testing of Behaviour of Unsaturated Clay as Barrier in Radioactive Waste Repositories. Stage 2: Validation Exercises at Laboratory scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, E. E.; Alcoverro, J.

    1999-07-01

    Stage 2 of CATSIUS CLAY Project: Validation Exercises at Laboratory Scale includes two Benchmarks, Benchmark 2.1: Oedometer Suction Controlled Tests on Samples of compacted Boom Clay and Benchmark 2.2: Small Scale Weltting-Heating Test on Compacted Bentonite. BM 2.1 had two parts: BM 2.1A (volumetric deformation upon wetting-drying cycles) and BM 2.1 B (swelling pressure test). In BM 2.1A, participants were asked to model the results of a series of five tests on samples of compacted Boom clay. In BM 2.1B, a swelling pressure test in which suction, vertical and horizontal stresses were monitored, was proposed as a blind exercise. Participants were asked to use, without further changes, the models calibrated in BM 2.1A. This exercise provides an evaluation of the capabilities of current mechanical constitutive models for unsaturated clay behaviour. It was found that, even if a calibration exercise on the basis of known experimental data is satisfactory, blind predictions of tests involving different paths may prove difficult. The test set up for BM 2.2 consisted of a stainless stell cell filled with highly expansive compacted bentonite (S2 clay from Almeria, Spain). The clay was subjected to a simultaneous central heating and a progressive water inflow through the botton plate. Temperature at various locations within the sample and the boundary radial stress were monitored throughout the test. Water content distribution was also measured at the end of the experiment. Predictions for this benchmark required the solution of field equations for flow, temperature distribution and mechanical analysis. Model parameters were derived from the extensive set of available experiments on this clay. Comparison between model predictions and measurements revealed the significance of water transport in vapour phase, the difficulties to predict boundary stresses and the general good agreement between measured and calculated temperatures. The report provides a detailed accojnt of the

  9. Heavy metal content and potential health risk of geophagic white clay from the Kumasi Metropolis in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Asantewah Nkansah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Geophagia is the craving for non-food substances and commonly practiced among pregnant women and children. Consumption of geophagic clay samples can have serious implications on the health of the consumers as a result of the presence of toxic metals such as Pb, As, Hg and Cd. This study sought to determine the levels of heavy metals in the studied geophagic clay samples and to determine the potential risks of heavy metals as cumulative carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks to the health of the consumers via oral (ingestion and dermal exposure routes. A total of thirty (30 white clay samples were analysed using Niton Thermo scientific XRF Analyser (Mobile Test S, NDTr-XL3t-86956, com 24. The clay samples were found to contain essential elements such as Ca, Fe, K and Zn as well as toxic metals such as As and Pb. There were isolated cases of the presence of Hg and all samples had Cd levels below detection. Health risk indices such as hazard quotient and cancer risk were calculated and the results indicated that consumers are likely to suffer from cancer through ingestion of geophagic clay. Bioaccessibility studies were done on zinc and it did not indicate any potential toxicity due to zincs essential nature. The levels of heavy metals in some of the geophagic clay consumed by some residents in the Kumasi were high compared to the Permitted Maximum Tolerable Daily Intake (PMTDI by (WHO/FAO and may pose potential health threat over time.

  10. Modified clay sorbents for wastewater treatment and immobilization of heavy metals in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlakovs, Juris; Klavins, Maris; Vincevica-Gaile, Zane; Stapkevica, Mara

    2014-05-01

    Soil and groundwater pollution with heavy metals is the result of both, anthropogenic and natural processes in the environment. Anthropogenic influence in great extent appears from industry, mining, treatment of metal ores and waste incineration. Contamination of soil and water can be induced by diffuse sources such as applications of agrochemicals and fertilizers in agriculture, air pollution from industry and transport, and by point sources, e.g., wastewater streams, runoff from dump sites and factories. Treatment processes used for metal removal from polluted soil and water include methodologies based on chemical precipitation, ion exchange, carbon adsorption, membrane filtration, adsorption and co-precipitation. Optimal removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous medium can be achieved by adsorption process which is considered as one of the most effective methods due to its cost-effectiveness and high efficiency. Immobilization of metals in contaminated soil also can be done with different adsorbents as the in situ technology. Use of natural and modified clay can be developed as one of the solutions in immobilization of lead, zinc, copper and other elements in polluted sites. Within the present study clay samples of different geological genesis were modified with sodium and calcium chlorides, iron oxyhydroxides and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate in variable proportions of Ca/P equimolar ratio to test and compare immobilization efficiency of metals by sorption and batch leaching tests. Sorption capacity for raw clay samples was considered as relatively lower referring to the modified species of the same clay type. In addition, clay samples were tested for powder X-ray difractometry, cation exchange, surface area properties, elemental composition, as well as scanning electron microscopy pictures of clay sample surface structures were obtained. Modified clay sorbents were tested for sorption of lead as monocontaminant and for complex contamination of heavy metals. The

  11. Aggregation and stability of anisotropic charged clay colloids in aqueous medium in the presence of salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Samim; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2016-01-01

    Na-montmorillonite nanoclay is a colloid of layered mineral silicate. When dispersed in water, this mineral swells on absorption of water and exfoliates into platelets with electric double layers on their surfaces. Even at low particle concentration, the aqueous dispersion can exhibit a spontaneous ergodicity breaking phase transition from a free flowing liquid to nonequilibrium, kinetically arrested and disordered states such as gels and glasses. In an earlier publication [Applied Clay Science, 2015, 114, 8592], we showed that the stability of clay gels can be enhanced by adding a salt later to the clay dispersion prepared in deionized water, rather than by adding the clay mineral to a previously mixed salt solution. Here, we directly track the collapsing interface of sedimenting clay gels using an optical method and show that adding salt after dispersing the clay mineral does indeed result in more stable gels even in very dilute dispersions. These weak gels are seen to exhibit a transient collapse after a finite delay time, a phenomenon observed previously in depletion gels. The velocity of the collapse oscillates with the age of the sample. However, the average velocity of collapse increases with sample age up to a peak value before decreasing at higher ages. With increasing salt concentration, the delay time for transient collapse decreases, while the peak value of the collapsing velocity increases. Using ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy, rheometry and cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, we confirm that morphological changes of the gel network assembly, facilitated by thermal fluctuations, lead to the observed collapse phenomenon. Since clay minerals are used extensively in polymer nanocomposites, as rheological modifiers, stabilizers and gas absorbents, we believe that the results reported in this work are extremely useful for several practical applications and also for understanding geophysical phenomena such as the formation and stability of quicksand

  12. One-Dimensional Simulation of Clay Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siljan Siljan

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Drying of clay is simulated by a one-dimensional model. The background of the work is to form a better basis for investigation of the drying process in production of clay-based building materials. A model of one-dimensional heat and mass transfer in porous material is used and modified to simulate drying of clay particles. The convective terms are discretized by first-order upwinding, and the diffusive terms are discretized by central differencing. DASSL was used to solve the set of algebraic and differential equations. The different simulations show the effect of permeability, initial moisture content and different boundary conditions. Both drying of a flat plate and a spherical particle are modelled.

  13. Intensified Pozzolanic Reaction on Kaolinite Clay-Based Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Hee Kwon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to develop and characterize kaolinite clay-based structural mortar. The pozzolanic reaction induced from two mineral additives, i.e., calcium hydroxide and silica fume (SF, and the physical filling effect from SF, were found to be effective on the enhancement of structural properties. Based on several preliminary experiments, 7:3 ratio of kaolinite clay/calcium hydroxide was selected as a basic binder. Then, the amount of SF was chosen as 0%, 7.5%, and 15% of the total binder to consider both the chemical and physical effects. The results showed that compressive strengths of samples with 7.5% and 15% SF are significantly increased by approximately 200% and 350%, respectively, at 28 days compared to the sample without SF. However, based on the results of the sample with 15% SF, it is found that excessive addition of SF causes long-term strength loss, possibly owing to micro cracks. With the careful consideration on this long-term behavior, this suggested new mix design can be further extended to develop sustainable structural materials using natural minerals or waste materials with nonbinding properties.

  14. Application of chemical trated illite clay for development of ceramics products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedmale, G.; Korovkins, A.; Seglins, V.; Lindina, L.

    2013-12-01

    The chemically treatment by alkali solutions of illite clay, so-called geopolymer method, were studied to show the impact on changes of structure and crystalline phases composition of treated not dehydroxylated illite Quarternary clay, as well as ceramic properties and compressive strength of sintered respective ceramic samples. The degree of activating process were followed by FTIR-spectra, X-ray diffraction and differencial thermal analysis. The low temperature ceramic product was achieved by sintering of alkali solution (KOH or NaOH 1M, 3M, 4M and 6M) activated clay samples in temperature range from 100°C to 700°C . Sintered ceramic samples were characterized by compressive strength, total porosity, bulk density and shrinkage. It is shown that treatment of the illite Quarternary clay by KOH changes illite structure, but not destroyed. Main changes could be connected with changes of O-Al-OH grouping where O is associated with neighbour Si- layer That results into lowering of sintering temperature and development of amorphous (glassy) phase of sintered at 600-700 °C ceramic samples together with growing of total porosity. Consolidated at 600°C ceramic samples have the compressive strength ranged from 16-23 N.mm2. These values increases with growing of concentration of used alkali solution as well as with temperature for NaOH treated samples and is comparable with compressive strength for the respective ceramic products sintered at 900 °C.

  15. Study of structural changes in pillared clays; Estudo das alteracoes estruturais em argilas pilarizadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis Junior, Aluisio Sousa; Ardisson, Jose Domingos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2002-07-01

    X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy were used to study the structural changes due the Al-poli-hydroxide interactions with the montmorillonite surface. Pillared Intercalated Clays obtained from Fe and Cu-rich montmorillonites were studied. The results show that the basal spacing for samples obtained from Cu-rich montmorillonite (13.6 A) is lower than that observed for samples obtained from Fe-rich montmorillonite (16.2 Angstrom). This difference is supposed be due the occupation by Cu{sup 2+} ions of the hexagonal cavity on the clay surface. These copper ions induce reactions between the oligomers and clay surface causing changes on the layer structure. (author)

  16. Characterization of clay of Vitoria da Conquista - BA - Brazil; Caracterizacao de uma argila caulinitica por Rietveld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, O.M.; Zandonadi, A.R.; Martins, M.V. Surmani; Carrio, J.A.G.; Munhoz Junior, A.H., E-mail: orley10@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Kaolinitic clays are vastly used in ceramic industry. Kaolinitic clay that are not coloured after firing are very useful in the production of ceramics because of their aesthetic aspect after firing. In this work clay material from Vitoria da Conquista (South- West Bahia, Brazil) was characterized by several techniques. The differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) shows a kaolinite characteristic curve with an endothermic peak at 492 deg C, which corresponds to the kaolinite - metakaolinite transformation. The transformation of alpha to beta quartz characterized by a 573 deg C peak was also observed in DSC. The samples were also characterized by water absorption and x rays powder diffraction. The 1100 deg C burned samples were tested by flexural strength. (author)

  17. Effect of purity on adsorption capacities of a Mars-like clay mineral at different pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Traci; Mcdoniel, Bridgett; Bustin, Roberta; Allton, Judith H.

    1992-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in adsorption of carbon dioxide on Marslike clay minerals. Some estimates of the carbon dioxide reservoir capacity of the martian regolith were calculated from the amount of carbon dioxide adsorbed on the ironrich smectite nontronite under martian conditions. The adsorption capacity of pure nontronite could place upper limits on the regolith carbon dioxide reservoir, both at present martian atmospheric pressure and at the postulated higher pressures required to permit liquid water on the surface. Adsorption of carbon dioxide on a Clay Mineral Society standard containing nontronite was studied over a wide range of pressures in the absence of water. Similar experiments were conducted on the pure nontronite extracted from the natural sample. Heating curves were obtained to help characterize and determine the purity of the clay sample.

  18. NEXAFS microscopy studies of the association of hydrocarbon thin films with fine clay particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covelli, Danielle [Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9 (Canada); Hernandez-Cruz, Daniel [Brockhouse Institute for Material Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Haines, Brian M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9 (Canada); Munoz, Vincente; Omotoso, Oladipo; Mikula, Randy [CANMET Energy Technology Centre Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB, T9G 1A8 (Canada); Urquhart, Stephen [Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9 (Canada)], E-mail: stephen.urquhart@usask.ca

    2009-06-15

    The nature of organic species associated with clay minerals plays a significant role in several processes, from hydrocarbon recovery in oil sands to contaminated soil remediation and water treatment. In this work, we address the use of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) in conjunction with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to study the microstructure and chemistry of organic-clay associations in situ. A model system based on methylene blue and illite is used to explore the sensitivity of NEXAFS microscopy to these interactions, and to identify and resolve experimental challenges in these measurements. We find that sample contamination from X-ray induced photodeposition is a significant problem in STXM microscopy, but also that this problem can be substantially reduced with a liquid nitrogen cooled anticontaminator. With appropriate sample preparation and experimental procedures, we find that STXM microscopy is sensitive to thin carbon adsorbates on clay surfaces.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of waterborne polyurethane/organic clay nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zai-feng LI; Sheng-jun WANG; Jin-yan LI

    2008-01-01

    Stable waterborne polyurethane/organic clay latex was synthesized by ultrasonically-assisted mixing with different clay content. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra showed that the interaction between NH and C=O was enhanced with low content organic clay loaded. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results implied that the layered organic clay was exfoliated and the crystallization of the hard domain in the waterborne polyurethane (WPU) matrix was enhanced. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show that the layered clay was exfoliated by WPU molecule. The tensile test shows that the mechanical prop-erties were improved by loading organic clay and the desired addition was 1 wt.%.

  20. Iridium, sulfur isotopes and rare earth elements in the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary clay at Stevns Klint, Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, B.; Andersson, P.; Dahl, J.

    1988-01-01

    Microbial activity and redox-controlled precipitation have been of major importance in the process of metal accumulation in the strongly Ir-enriched Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary clay, the Fish Clay, at Stevns Klint in Denmark. Two important findings support this view: (1) Kerogen, recovered by leaching the Fish Clay in HCl and HF, shows an Ir concentration of 1100 ppb; this represents about 50% of the Ir present in the bulk sample Fish clay. Strong organometallic complexes is the most probable carrier phase for this fraction of Ir. Kerogen separated from the K-T boundary clay at Caravaca, Spain, similarly exhibits enhanced Ir concentrations. (2) Sulfur isotope analyses of metal-rich pyrite spherules, which occur in extreme abundance (about 10% by weight) in the basal Fish Clay, give a delta/sup 34/S value of -32 per thousand. This very low value shows that sulfide formation by anaerobic bacteria was intensive in the Fish Clay during early diagenesis. Since the pyrite spherules are major carriers of elements such as Ni, Co, As, Sb and Zn, microbial activity may have played an important role for concentrating these elements. In the Fish Clay large amounts of rare earth elements have precipitated from sea water on fish scales. Analyses reveal that, compared with sea water, the Fish Clay is only about four times less enriched in sea-water derived lanthanides than in Ir. This shows that a sea-water origin is plausible for elements that are strongly enriched in the clay, but whose origin cannot be accounted for by a lithogenic precursor.

  1. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaldoun, Asmae; Moller, Peder; Fall, Abdoulaye; Wegdam, Gerard; De Leeuw, Bert; Méheust, Yves; Otto Fossum, Jon; Bonn, Daniel

    2009-10-30

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay soils. Reproducing landslides on a small scale in the laboratory shows that an additional factor that determines the violence of the slides is the inhomogeneity of the flow. We propose a simple yield stress model capable of reproducing the laboratory landslide data, allowing us to relate landslides to the measured rheology.

  2. Rheological properties of different minerals and clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgor Khaydapova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rheological properties of kaolinite, montmorillonite, ferralitic soil of the humid subtropics (Norfolk island, southwest of Oceania, alluvial clay soil of arid subtropics (Konyaprovince, Turkey and carbonate loess loam of Russian forest-steppe zone were determined. A parallel plate rheometer MCR-302 (Anton Paar, Austria was used in order to conduct amplitude sweep test. Rheological properties allow to assess quantitatively structural bonds and estimate structural resistance to a mechanical impact. Measurements were carried out on samples previously pounded and capillary humidified during 24 hours. In the amplitude sweep method an analyzed sample was placed between two plates. The upper plate makes oscillating motions with gradually extending amplitude. Software of the device allows to receive several rheological parameters such as elastic modulus (G’, Pa, viscosity modulus (G", Pa, linear viscoelasticity range (G’>>G”, and point of destruction of structure at which the elastic modulus becomes equal to the viscosity modulus (G’=G”- crossover. It was found out that in the elastic behavior at G '>> G " strength of structural links of kaolinite, alluvial clay soil and loess loam constituted one order of 105 Pa. Montmorillonit had a minimum strength - 104 Pa and ferrallitic soil of Norfolk island [has] - a maximum one -106 Pa. At the same time montmorillonite and ferralitic soil were characterized by the greatest plasticity. Destruction of their structure (G '= G" took place only in the cases when strain was reaching 11-12%. Destraction of the kaolinite structure happened at 5% of deformation and of the alluvial clay soil and loess loam - at 4.5%.

  3. Comparison and analysis of reservoir rocks and related clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, M.E.; Donaldson, E.C.; Marchin, L.M.

    1983-10-01

    A series of instrumental and chemical analyses was made on sedimentary rocks to determine the surface chemical properties of sedimentry rocks and the physical characteristic of the pores. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray analytic capability was used to study the morphology of the samples, surface mineral composition and type and location of clays, and to obtain a qualitative estimate of the pore sizes. A centrifuge was used to determine the pore size distributions which are correlated with SEM observations. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with an inductively coupled plasma for complete spectral analysis was used to obtain analyses of the rocks, clays, and effluents from ion exchange tests. Two of the results are as follows: (1) Sweetwater gas sands have a bimodal pore size distribution composed of pores with a mean diameter of 0.2 microns which is attributed to intergranular spaces and cracks in the expanded laborboratory sample but which will be close under the pressure of the overburden formations, and these Sweetwater sands have a distribution of pores at 2 microns which are solution vugs rather than intergranular porosity since the sand grains are completely packed together with the cementing material due to the high overburden pressures; and (2) Ion-exchange capacities of two rocks were 5.3 meq/kg and 18.0 meq/kg, and the surface areas were 0.9 m/sup 2//g and 2.30 m/sup 2//g, respectively, even though each had almost identical mineral composition, clay type and quantity, and permeability. 7 references, 12 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Calcined clay lightweight ceramics made with wood sawdust and sodium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santis, Bruno Carlos de; Rossignolo, Joao Adriano, E-mail: desantis.bruno@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Pirassununga, SP (Brazil); Morelli, Marcio Raymundo [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2016-11-15

    This paper aims to study the influence of including wood sawdust and sodium silicate in the production process of calcined clay lightweight ceramics. In the production process first, a sample used by a company that produces ceramic products in Brazil was collected. The sample was analysed by techniques of liquidity (LL) and plasticity (LP) limits, particle size analysis, specific mass, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). From the clay, specimens of pure clay and mixtures with wood sawdust (10%, 20% and 30% by mass) and sodium silicate were produced and fired at a temperature of 900 deg C. These specimens were submitted to tests of water absorption, porosity, specific mass and compressive strength. Results of this research indicate that the incorporation of wood sawdust and sodium silicate in the ceramic paste specimens can be useful to make calcined clay lightweight ceramics with special characteristics (low values of water absorption and specific mass and high values of compressive strength), which could be used to produce calcined clay lightweight aggregates to be used in structural concrete. (author)

  5. CASTOR OIL-BASED BUILDING MATERIALS REINFORCED WITH FLY ASH, CLAY, EXPANDED PERLITE AND PUMICE POWDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen Balo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a study conducted to evaluate the influence of class C fly ash (FA, clay (C, expanded perlite (EP, pumice powder (PP and epoxidized castor oil (ECO on the density, thermal conductivity, compressive strength, tensile strength, abrasion loss and water absorption of building material. Density, thermal conductivity, compressive strength and tensile strength decreased with the increase of ECO and FA as replacement for building material. These properties also decreased with increasing process temperature. The addition of clay in the building material had an increasing effect on these properties. The addition of clay decreased abrasion loss and water absorption as a function of replacement percent. The minimum thermal conductivity and maximum water absorption observed for the sample made with minimum clay and maximum FA-ECO ratios processed at the highest process temperature. The maximum compression-tensile strengths and minimum abrasion loss observed for the sample with maximum clay and minimum FA-ECO ratios processed at the lowest process temperature.

  6. Poly(ethylene oxide)/clay nanaocomposites: Thermal and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejder-Korucu, Mehtap, E-mail: mehtapejderk@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Literature, Kafkas University, 36000 Kars (Turkey); Gürses, Ahmet [Department of Chemistry Education, K.K. Education Faculty, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Karaca, Semra [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • PEO/clay nanocomposites were prepared via solution intercalation. Complete exfoliation occurs in samples of 0.5 and 2.0 CEC. • The impaired helical structure of PEO in nanocomposite structures had been verified based on the results of FTIR studies. • The crystallization temperature of PEO/OMMT nanocomposites is low compared to raw polymer. • The increase of melting temperatures indicates the increase of the stability of PEO in case of availability of clay. • The tensile strength, yield strength, % stretching of nanocomposite samples increase compared to raw polymer at all CEC rates. - Abstract: Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)/clay nanocomposites were prepared by a solution intercalation method using chloroform as a solvent. The nanocomposites were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and also investigation of some mechanical properties of the composites. Formation of nanocomposite was confirmed by XRD analysis. The increasing tendency of exfoliation degree with an increase in clay content may be attributed to easier diffusion of PEO chains to interlayer regions. An increase in PEO crystallinity in case of nanocomposite, was confirmed by an increase in the heat of melting as indicated by DSC. Improvement in tensile properties in all respect was observed for nanocomposites with clay content.

  7. Water diffusion through compacted clays analyzed by neutron scattering and tracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Sanchez, F

    2007-11-15

    Clay minerals are aluminium phyllosilicates, mostly products of the chemical alteration and mechanical breakdown of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Their physical and chemical properties can be directly related to their layered, fine-grained (large surface area) structure. These properties such as large water retention, low hydraulic conductivity, heat resistance and ionic exchange capacities, make clays ideal for many different applications, e.g. as sealing material for the underground disposal of radioactive waste. The long-term disposal of radioactive waste in an underground geological repository is based on a multibarrier concept. In the barrier of highly compacted clay, water is intercalated and confined between the clay layers. The narrow pores are responsible that under natural hydraulic gradients, molecular diffusion through water is the dominant transport mechanism for released radionuclides. The properties of water at the water-clay interface differ from that of bulk water. Therefore, a good and deep understanding of the water structure and dynamics in compacted clay systems is fundamental. This knowledge is the base for the progressing research about transport of pollutants through the compacted clays and argillaceous rock of radioactive waste barriers. This study focusses on four different types of pure clays, two of them charged, namely montmorillonite and illite (both in a Na and Ca form), and two uncharged, namely kaolinite and pyrophyllite. Their structural differences result in a significantly different behaviour in contact with water. In case of montmorillonite, water is located in between particles and in the interlayer space. In illite, water is found only in between particles, because the interlayer surfaces are tightly linked by potassium cations. The layers of kaolinite and pyrophyllite are uncharged and, consequently, water is located only in between particles. The clay powders were compacted to reach a high bulk dry density of about 1.9 g

  8. Strain development in smectite clays upon exposure to CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, S. M.; Spiers, C. J.; Busch, A.

    2012-04-01

    Smectites (or swelling clays) are common constituents of claystones, mudstones and shales and are often present in the caprocks and faults sealing potential CO2 storage reservoirs. Their crystal structure is comprised of alternating silicate layers separated by an interlayer region, containing cations and water molecules. As the water molecules are easily exchanged between this region and the intergranular pore space, the structure can expand or shrink depending on factors such as temperature, water activity and clay composition. Whereas the water uptake and swelling properties of smectite clays have been studied extensively, fewer studies have been directed at possible interactions with CO2. However, several scenarios including shrinkage (dehydration) and swelling (surface adsorption or uptake of CO2 into the interlayer region) of the crystals are conceivable, which could have significant implications for caprock and fault integrity. To investigate possible effects of CO2 on the swelling properties of smectite clays, we performed unconfined volumetric strain measurements on compacted pellets of montmorillonite (SWy-1), which is a common type of smectite, and on smectite-bearing shale. This was done using an optical cell. We probed the macroscopic response of the pressed samples to assess the overall strain response to exposure to CO2 at typical P-T conditions expected in carbon dioxide storage sites, i.e. at a temperature of 45°C and CO2 pressures up to 15MPa. Samples were heat-treated prior to exposure to CO2 to obtain a defined hydration state (d001-spacing). This was determined independently using X-ray diffraction methods. Our results show that montmorillonite SWy-1 swells almost instantaneously (in a few seconds) to an equilibrium state, when placed in contact with (supercritical) CO2 for the conditions PCO2 ≤ 8 MPa, T = 45°C. Maximum swelling is observed for an initial d001 spacing of 11Å, reaching 2.4 ± 0.45% at a CO2 pressure of 15MPa. Only minor

  9. Ice nucleation efficiency of clay minerals in the immersion mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Pinti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Emulsion and bulk freezing experiments were performed to investigate immersion ice nucleation on clay minerals in pure water, using various kaolinites, montmorillonites, illites as well as natural dust from the Hoggar Mountains in the Saharan region. Differential scanning calorimeter measurements were performed on three different kaolinites (KGa-1b, KGa-2 and K-SA, two illites (Illite NX and Illite SE and four natural and acid-treated montmorillonites (SWy-2, STx-1b, KSF and K-10. The emulsion experiments provide information on the average freezing behaviour characterized by the average nucleation sites. These experiments revealed one to sometimes two distinct heterogeneous freezing peaks, which suggest the presence of a low number of qualitatively distinct average nucleation site classes. We refer to the peak at the lowest temperature as "standard peak" and to the one occurring in only some clay mineral types at higher temperatures as "special peak". Conversely, freezing in bulk samples is not initiated by the average nucleation sites, but by a very low number of "best sites". The kaolinites and montmorillonites showed quite narrow standard peaks with onset temperatures 238 K<Tonstd<242 K and best sites with averaged median freezing temperature Tmedbest=257 K, but only some featuring a special peak (i.e. KSF, K-10, K-SA and SWy-2 with freezing onsets in the range 240–248 K. The illites showed broad standard peaks with freezing onsets at 244 K Tonstd<246 K and best sites with averaged median freezing temperature Tmedbest=262 K. The large difference between freezing temperatures of standard and best sites shows that characterizing ice nucleation efficiencies of dust particles on the basis of freezing onset temperatures from bulk experiments, as has been done in some atmospheric studies, is not appropriate. Our investigations

  10. Evaporation induced orientational order in soft solid phases of clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbo Hansen, Elisabeth; Hemmen, Henrik; Dommersnes, Paul; Fossum, Jon Otto

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the possibility for promoting uniaxial orientational order in initially isotropic, soft solid dispersions of the synthetic clays Na-fluorohectorite and Laponite RD. We observe that strong orientational order can emerge from initially isotropic states when the samples are subjected to a slow concentration increase through evaporation of the dispersion water. During evaporation, there is a gradient in the order which, if evaporation is halted, slowly relaxes towards a uniform order throughout the samples. It is evident that the development of orientational order is not counterindicated by the viscoelastic nature of the samples, and that although the translational and likely also rotational diffusion of the particles is restricted in the soft solid state, the orientational degree of freedom can undergo a transition from a collectively random to an ordered state.

  11. Mineralogical and chemical study of Spanish common clays with regard to their use in pelotherapy; Estudio mineralogico y quomico de arcillas comunes espanolas para su empleo en peloterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozo Martin, E.; Martin Rubi, J. A.; Pozo Rodriguez, M.

    2011-07-01

    The mineralogical (whole sample and clay fraction) and chemical compositions of 5 representative samples of Spanish common clays have been studied to evaluate their use in pelotherapy. The mineralogy of the samples revealed clays with phyllosilicate contents of between 53% and 74% and minor quantities of quartz, calcite, dolomite, feldspars, gypsum, pyrite and hematite. Smectite was the predominant clay mineral, with the exception of one sample containing only illite. The results of analyses of the major chemical elements were consistent with the mineralogical composition. The samples contained low quantities (<130 ppm, with the exception of Ba) of potentially harmful elements; the CAR sample contained the highest quantities of Ba, V, Cr, Co, As, Sb, and Ni. Nevertheless, the concentrations of trace elements in the samples analysed showed lower levels of phytotoxicity than those permitted and were also lower than those found in peloids currently used in Spanish spas. (Author)

  12. Clay Mineralogy of Shallow Core Sediments of Lake Acigöl, Denizli, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budakoglu, Murat; Karaman, Muhittin; Geredeli, Serpil; Unal, Hatice; Abdelnasser, Amr; Kiran Yildirim, Demet

    2014-05-01

    Lake Acıgöl is a hypersaline and active industrial salt production lake located in Denizli, Turkey. Lake Acıgöl has been investigated to elucidate the distribution clay minerals under the saline conditions of the lake and carbonate and ophiolitic rocks controlled lake basin. The lake is very shallow and generally characterized by an un-stratified and whole oxygenated water table. Determination clay minerals in the bulk samples via XRD method was not possible due to the their small amount. Therefore, the sequential clay enrichment procedure applied to the bulk samples such as sample dispersion, removal of soluble salts and ions, and particle-size fractionation. The XRD analyses of normal, glycolated and heat-treated shallow core samples show that the dominant clay minerals in the samples to be illite, including the swelling montmorillonite and kaolinite minerals are encountered less frequently. Glauberite, Blodite, Dansite and Nickelblodite have been also identified as soda minerals by XRD studies.

  13. Features of Clay Minerals in the YSDP102 Core on the Continental Shelf of the Southeast Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xuejun; QU Gaosheng; LI Shaoquan

    2004-01-01

    Ninety-eight clay mineral samples from the YSDP102 core were analyzed by x-ray diffractometer to study the four clay minerals: illite, chlorite, kaolinite and smectite. Twenty-eight samples had been analyzed on the laser particle-size analyzer to reveal the particle features of the sediments. Distribution of the clay minerals and the particle characteristics in the YSDP102 core show that the core experienced three different depositional periods and formed three different sedimentary intervals due to different sediment sources and different depositional environments. Features of the clay minerals and the heavy minerals in the YSDP102 core indicate that coarse-grained sediments and fine-grained sediments result from different sources. The Yellow Sea Warm Current has greatly influenced the sedimentary framework of this region since the current's formation.

  14. Distribution of Clay Minerals in Light Coal Fractions and the Thermal Reaction Products of These Clay Minerals during Combustion in a Drop Tube Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sida Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the contribution of clay minerals in light coal fractions to ash deposition in furnaces, we investigated their distribution and thermal reaction products. The light fractions of two Chinese coals were prepared using a 1.5 g·cm−3 ZnCl2 solution as a density separation medium and were burned in a drop-tube furnace (DTF. The mineral matter in each of the light coal fractions was compared to that of the relevant raw coal. The DTF ash from light coal fractions was analysed using hydrochloric acid separation. The acid-soluble aluminium fractions of DTF ash samples were used to determine changes in the amorphous aluminosilicate products with increasing combustion temperature. The results show that the clay mineral contents in the mineral matter of both light coal fractions were higher than those in the respective raw coals. For the coal with a high ash melting point, clay minerals in the light coal fraction thermally transformed more dehydroxylation products compared with those in the raw coal, possibly contributing to solid-state reactions of ash particles. For the coal with a low ash melting point, clay minerals in the light coal fraction produced more easily-slagging material compared with those in the raw coal, playing an important role in the occurrence of slagging. Additionally, ferrous oxide often produces low-melting substances in coal ash. Due to the similarities of zinc oxide and ferrous oxide in silicate reactions, we also investigated the interactions of clay minerals in light coal fractions with zinc oxide introduced by a zinc chloride solution. The extraneous zinc oxide could react, to a small extent, with clay minerals in the coal during DTF combustion.

  15. Radiation induced synthesis of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles - Part II: Synthesis of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of un-irradiated and γ-irradiated indium acetylacetonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Resheedi, Ajayb Saud; Alhokbany, Norah Saad [Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, KSU, (Saudi Arabia); Mahfouz, Refaat Mohammed, E-mail: rmhfouz@science.au.edu.eg [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, AUN, (Egypt)

    2015-09-15

    Pure cubic phase, In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles with porous structure were synthesized by solid state thermal oxidation of un-irradiated and γ-irradiated indium acetyl acetonate in presence and absence of sodium dodecyl sulphate as surfactant. The as- synthesized In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transition electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetry (TG). The shapes and morphologies of as- synthesized In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were highly affected by γ-irradiation of indium acetyl acetonate precursor and by addition of sodium dodecyl sulphate as surfactant. Calcination of un-irradiated indium acetyl acetonate precursor to 4 hours of 600 °C leads to the formation of spherical- shaped accumulative and merged In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles with porous structure, whereas irregular porous architectures composed of pure In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were obtained by using γ-irradiated indium acetylacetonate precursor. The as- prepared In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano products exhibit photoluminescence emission (PL) property and display thermal stability in a wide range of temperature (25-800 °C) which suggest possible applications in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. (author)

  16. Evaluation of geochemical characteristics and health effects of some geophagic clays southern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, A S; Olajide-Kayode, J O; Abimbola, A F

    2014-12-01

    The geochemical characteristics of geophagic clays from Calabar and Okon-Eket, southern Nigeria were evaluated to determine their quality and the possible health effects of their consumption. The study involved the measurement of the pH, electrical conductivity (EC) and total dissolved solids (TDS) of the slurried clay samples soaked in distilled water for 48 h using digital multi-parameters probe as well as the elemental and mineralogical analyses of twenty geophagic clay samples for elemental and mineralogical constituents using both the ICP-MS and XRD, respectively. Medical data were also mined from medical facilities within the area in addition to the administering of questionnaire to adults involved in the geophagic practices in order to determine their justification for the practice as well as their and clay preferences. Results of physicochemical measurement revealed that the pH range of the samples ranges from 3.9 to 6.9 and 6.5 to 7.0; EC 0.3-377.7 and 0.12-82.38 µS/cm; TDS 1.98-2,432.65 and 0.08-52.95 mg/L for consumed and non-consumed clay, respectively. The elemental analyses revealed that the concentration of some potential harmful elements, PHEs, exceeded the recommended dietary intake by humans. This is especially true for Cu (9.1-23 ppm), Pb (16.7-55.6 ppm), Zn (13-148 ppm), Ni (11.1-46.4 ppm), Co (1.8-21.7 ppm), Mn (16-338 ppm), As (BDL-15 ppm) and Cd (BDL-0.2 ppm). The predominant phases established in the clay samples are quartz and kaolinite, while the minor minerals were montmorillonite and muscovite in all the clay samples. Respondents revealed that capacity for relief from gastrointestinal problems believes in the curative power to cure skin infections and cultural reasons as main justification for the geophagic practices. This is, however, not in conformity with information gleaned from the medical records which still indicated that the prevalent diseases in the area still include gastrointestinal problems in addition to malaria

  17. Water repellency of clay, sand and organic soils in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. RASA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Water repellency (WR delays soil wetting process, increases preferential flow and may give rise to surface runoff and consequent erosion. WR is commonly recognized in the soils of warm and temperate climates. To explore the occurrence of WR in soils in Finland, soil R index was studied on 12 sites of different soil types. The effects of soil management practice, vegetation age, soil moisture and drying temperature on WR were studied by a mini-infiltrometer with samples from depths of 0-5 and 5-10 cm. All studied sites exhibited WR (R index >1.95 at the time of sampling. WR increased as follows: sand (R = 1.8-5.0 < clay (R = 2.4-10.3 < organic (R = 7.9-undefined. At clay and sand, WR was generally higher at the soil surface and at the older sites (14 yr., where organic matter is accumulated. Below 41 vol. % water content these mineral soils were water repellent whereas organic soil exhibited WR even at saturation. These results show that soil WR also reduces water infiltration at the prevalent field moisture regime in the soils of boreal climate. The ageing of vegetation increases WR and on the other hand, cultivation reduces or hinders the development of WR.;

  18. Calm, Cool, and Comfortable in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, Xanthippi Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    The author's fourth-grade students had just finished a drawing unit that focused on the human figure. Projects included charcoal gesture drawings and chalk manikin drawings in chiaroscuro. She wanted to integrate a new medium for students to continue their study of the human figure. Since students are always excited to work with clay, making clay…

  19. Classroom Instruction: The Influences of Marie Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Marie Clay's body of work has influenced classroom instruction in direct and indirect ways, through large overarching themes in our pedagogical content knowledge as well as specific smart practices. This paper focuses on her the contributions to our thinking about instruction which come from two broad theoretical concepts; emergent literacy…

  20. Radionuclide transport in clay during climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenborg, A.F.B.; Orlic, B.; Thimus, J.F.; Lange, G.de; Cock, S. de; Leeuw, C.S. de; Veling, E.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Dutch national research programme into the feasibility of retrievable storage of radioactive waste (CORA Programme Phase I; CORA: Comité Opslag Radioactief Afval = Committee on Radioactive Waste Disposal) examined the suitability of Tertiary clay deposts for such storage. Long-term isolation -

  1. Clay Shirky, Internet e il collegio invisibile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Pievatolo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Come Internet sta cambiando il nostro modo di pensare? Fra le 172 risposte presentate da Edge, Clay Shirky ne propone una particolarmente interessante per i ricercatori di professione. Internet, scrive Shirky, ha aumentato straordinariamente la capacità espressiva dell’umanità. Ma che una risorsa divenga abbondante, da scarsa che era, è una sfortuna, almeno per chi su [...

  2. geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of lithomargic clay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    GHANA: IMPLICATIONS FOR POSSIBLE INDUSTRIAL UTILIZATION. F.W.Y. Momade1 ... evaluative analyses, the lithomargic clay types could be exploited in the production of aluminium sulphate ... Two major processes have been reported to be ..... powder diffraction unit. .... for fats and oils used for soap, grease produc-.

  3. Bauxite washing for the removal of clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ishaq Ahmad; Ernst-Ulrich Hartge; Joachim Werther; and Reiner Wischnewski

    2014-01-01

    Clay impurities associated with bauxite negatively affect the Bayer process for alumina production. These impurities should be removed as far as possible by a beneficiation technique before the ore is used as feed for the Bayer process. In this current investigation, bauxite washing was conducted in the laboratory. Bauxite washing is a physical process that causes the disintegration and deagglomeration of the clay matrix, and bauxite is liberated from the clay (mainly rich in silica). Subsequently, separation occurs with the assistance of wet screening at a predetermined cut size. Three techniques were investigated in the laboratory: drum washing, water-jet washing, and ultrasonic washing. Various operating parameters were investigated for drum washing and water-jet washing, including materials retention time, drum rotation speed, solid concentration, water-jet spray duration, pressure, and height. We concluded that the retention time of bauxite inside the drum at a solid concentration of 55wt% and a drum rotation speed of 31 r/min is the dominant parameter for the removal of clay from the bauxite surface.

  4. Black Carbon, The Pyrogenic Clay Mineral?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most soils contain significant amounts of black carbon, much of which is present as discrete particles admixed with the coarse clay fraction (0.2–2.0 µm e.s.d.) and can be physically separated from the more abundant diffuse biogenic humic materials. Recent evidence has shown that naturally occurring...

  5. Clay Aerogel Supported Palladium Nanoparticles as Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared J. Griebel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Highly porous, low density palladium nanoparticle/clay aerogel materials have been produced and demonstrated to possess significant catalytic activity for olefin hydrogenation and isomerization reactions at low/ambient pressures. This technology opens up a new route for the production of catalytic materials.

  6. Clay Corner: Recreating Chinese Bronze Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Harriet

    1998-01-01

    Presents a lesson where students make faux Chinese bronze vessels through slab or coil clay construction after they learn about the history, function, and design of these vessels. Utilizes a variety of glaze finishes in order to give the vessels an aged look. Gives detailed guidelines for creating the vessels. (CMK)

  7. Bauxite washing for the removal of clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ishaq; Hartge, Ernst-Ulrich; Werther, Joachim; Wischnewski, Reiner

    2014-11-01

    Clay impurities associated with bauxite negatively affect the Bayer process for alumina production. These impurities should be removed as far as possible by a beneficiation technique before the ore is used as feed for the Bayer process. In this current investigation, bauxite washing was conducted in the laboratory. Bauxite washing is a physical process that causes the disintegration and deagglomeration of the clay matrix, and bauxite is liberated from the clay (mainly rich in silica). Subsequently, separation occurs with the assistance of wet screening at a predetermined cut size. Three techniques were investigated in the laboratory: drum washing, water-jet washing, and ultrasonic washing. Various operating parameters were investigated for drum washing and water-jet washing, including materials retention time, drum rotation speed, solid concentration, water-jet spray duration, pressure, and height. We concluded that the retention time of bauxite inside the drum at a solid concentration of 55wt% and a drum rotation speed of 31 r/min is the dominant parameter for the removal of clay from the bauxite surface.

  8. Examination of effective stress in clay rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Liang Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effective stress in indurated clay rock theoretically and experimentally. A stress concept is derived from the analysis of the microstructure and of the pore water in the highly-indurated Callovo-Oxfordian and Opalinus clay rocks, and subsequently validated by various experiments performed on these claystones. The concept suggests that the interparticle or effective stress in a dense clay–water system is transferred through both the adsorbed interparticle pore water in narrow pores and the solid–solid contact between non-clay mineral grains. The experiments show that the adsorbed pore water in the claystones is capable of bearing deviatoric effective stresses up to the failure strength. The applied stresses are for the most part or even totally transferred by the bound pore water, i.e. the swelling pressure in the interparticle bound pore water is almost equivalent to the effective stress. This stress concept provides a reasonable view to the nature of the effective stress in argillaceous rock and forms the fundamental basis for studies of the hydro-mechanical properties and processes in clay formations.

  9. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF THREE GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hydraulic conductivity of three 2.9 m2 (32 sq ft) geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) was measured. Tests were performed on individual sheets of the GCLs, on overlapped pieces of GCLs, and on composite liners consisting of a punctured geomembrane overlying a GCL. Hyd...

  10. Solute transport in cracking clay soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.; Ritsema, C.J.; Oostindie, K.; Hamminga, P.

    1996-01-01

    A bromide tracer applied to a cracked clay soil was adsorbed in the soil matrix close to the soil surface. Upon subsequent precipitation, a small part of the bromide dissolved and flowed rapidly through cracks to the subsoil and the groundwater. As a result, the groundwater and the drain discharge

  11. geotechnical characteristics of some southwestern nigeria clays as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    their suitability for use as barrier soils in waste disposal sites. ... Permeability, Barrier Soils, Clays, Leachate, Containment, Attenuation. 17 ... disposal facilities involving burial in natural clay ... them the probability of groundwater pollution by.

  12. Quantitative approach on SEM images of microstructure of clay soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施斌; 李生林; M.Tolkachev

    1995-01-01

    The working principles of Videolab Image Processing System (VIPS), the examining methods of orientation of microstructural units of clay soils and analysing results on SEM images of some typical microstructures of clay soils using the VIPS are introduced.

  13. Heterogeneous uptake of the C1 to C4 organic acids on a swelling clay mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Tolbert

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Mineral aerosol is of interest due to its physiochemical impacts on the Earth's atmosphere. However, adsorbed organics could influence the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric mineral particles and alter their impact on the biosphere and climate. In this work, the heterogeneous uptake of a series of small organic acids on the swelling clay, Na-montmorillonite, was studied at 212 K as a function of relative humidity (RH, organic acid pressure and clay mass. A high vacuum chamber equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer and a transmission Fourier transform infrared spectrometer was used to detect the gas and condensed phases, respectively. Our results show that while the initial uptake efficiency was found to be independent of organic acid pressure, it increased linearly with increasing clay mass. Thus, the small masses studied allow access to the entire surface area of the clay sample with minimal effects due to surface saturation. Additionally, results from this study show that the initial uptake efficiency for butanoic (butyric acid on the clay increases by an order of magnitude as the RH is raised from 0% to 45% RH at 212 K while the initial uptake efficiency of formic, acetic and propanoic (propionic acids increases only slightly at higher humidities. However, the initial uptake efficiency decreases significantly in a short amount of time due to surface saturation effects. Thus, although the initial uptake efficiencies are appropriate for initial times, the fact that the uptake efficiency will decrease over time as the surface saturates should be considered in atmospheric models. Surface saturation results in sub-monolayer coverage of organic acid on montmorillonite under dry conditions and relevant organic acid pressures that increases with increasing humidity for all organic acids studied. Additionally, the presence of large organic acids may slightly enhance the water content of the clay above 45% RH. Our results indicate

  14. Characterization of Heat-treated Clay Minerals in the Context of Nuclear Waste Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteo, E. N.; Wang, Y.; Kruichak, J. N.; Mills, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals are likely candidates to aid in nuclear waste isolation due to their low permeability, favorable swelling properties, and high cation sorption capacities. Establishing the thermal limit for clay minerals in a nuclear waste repository is a potentially important component of repository design, as flexibility of the heat load within the repository can have a major impact on the selection of repository design. For example, the thermal limit plays a critical role in the time that waste packages would need to cool before being transferred to the repository. Understanding the chemical and physical changes, if any, that occur in clay minerals at various temperatures above the current thermal limit (of 100 °C) can enable decision-makers with information critical to evaluating the potential trade-offs of increasing the thermal limit within the repository. Most critical is gaining understanding of how varying thermal conditions in the repository will impact radionuclide sorption and transport in clay materials either as engineered barriers or as disposal media. A variety of repository-relevant clay minerals (illite, mixed layer illite/smectite, and montmorillonite), were heated for a range of temperatures between 100-1000 °C. These samples were characterized to determine surface area, mineralogical alteration, and cation exchange capacity (CEC). Our results show that for conditions up to 500 °C, no significant change occurs, so long as the clay mineral remains mineralogically intact. At temperatures above 500 °C, transformation of the layered silicates into silica phases leads to alteration that impacts important clay characteristics. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's Nation Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND Number: SAND2015-6524 A

  15. Identification of radiation treatment of wheat (Triticum aestivum. L) and rice (Oryza sativa. L) samples using thermoluminescence of contaminating minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Food irradiation is gaining popularity worldwide and this technology is important to improve quality and reduce the post harvest losses of food. Because of the rapid commercialization of irradiated foods throughout the world, compliance of different regulations relating to use of technology in different countries and demand of consumers for clear labelling of irradiated foods, there is need for the development of analytical methods to detect radiation treatment of food. Among several methods studied so far, thermoluminescence (TL) is an important method that can be used to find out the irradiation history of food that contain even a very minute amount of dust particles. In this study, the irradiated and unirradiated wheat and rice samples were analyzed using the TL method. The samples were purchased from the local market of Peshawar and irradiated to radiation doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy using Co-60 gamma irradiator at the Nuclear Institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA), Peshawar. The mineral contaminants were isolated by jet water, ultrasonic treatment, and density gradient. TL glow curves of the isolated minerals from irradiated and unirradiated samples were recorded between the temperature ranges of 50-500℃ using a TL reader. Generally, the glow curves for irradiated samples showed much higher TL intensities (TL1) than the unirradiated samples. The results were normalized by re-irradiation of mineral samples to gamma-ray dose of 1.0 kGy followed by determination of the second glow curves (TL2). The ratio of the area of first glow curve to that of second glow curve (TLl/TL2) was calculated for selected temperature intervals and compared with the recommended values for unirradiated and irradiated samples. Finally, the shapes of the glow curves for irradiated and unirradiated samples were also analyzed. On the basis of these results (comparison of TL-intensities, TL1/TL2 ratios and shapes of the glow curves), all the irradiated and unirradiated samples of wheat

  16. Synthesis of templated carbons starting from clay and clay-derived zeolites for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Musyoka, Nicholas M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Clay and its recrystallized zeolitic derivatives were used in this study as templating agents for carbon nanostructured materials. The conventional nanocasting process that involves impregnation with furfural alcohol and subsequent chemical vapour...

  17. Glowing clay: Real time tracing using a suite of novel clay based fluorescent tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Robert; Quinton, John; Pates, Jackie; Coogan, Mike

    2015-04-01

    Clay is one of the most mobile fractions of soil due to its small particle size. It is also known to sorb many chemicals, such as nutrients (notably phosphorus), agrochemicals and heavy metals. The movement of clay is therefore linked with the transport and fate of these substances. A novel fluorescent clay tracing suite has been produced, together with an imaging technique. This suite consists of qualitative clay tracers, using rhodamine based fluorophores, and quantitative clay tracers, using metal based fluorophores. Efforts have also been made to allow integration of commercially available tracers, which are silt and sand sized. The clay tracers exploit the high affinity that montmorillonite has for Rhodamine B and Ru(bpy)3. This allows for an extremely thin layer of the fluorophore to be sorbed onto the clay's surface, in much that same way as materials in the natural environment will bind to clay. The tracer that is produced retains key chemical and physical properties of clay, such as size, shape and density. The retention of these micro-properties results in the retention of macro-properties, such as tendency to aggregate and cracking on drying. Imaging techniques have been developed to analyse these tracers. The imaging system uses diffused laser light to excite the tracer and a modified DSLR camera to image the soil surface. The images have been compiled into a time lapse video showing the movement of clay over the course of a rainfall event. This is the first time that the quantitative movement of clay has been recorded over a soil surface in real time. 4D data can be extracted from the images allowing the spatial location and intensity of tracer to be monitored over time, with mm precision and on the timescale of seconds. As the system can also work with a commercial tracer it is possible to investigate the movement of particles of almost any size and over a range of scales from soil box to hillside. This allows users to access this technique without

  18. Transport of inorganic compounds through compacted clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, W.P.

    1989-01-01

    Compacted clay liners are widely utilized as leachate barrier in landfills for waste. The main purpose of this research was to study the transport of inorganic compounds through compacted clay. The subjects of interest included the diffusional migration of chemicals at low flow rates, the effective porosity of fine-grained soils, the transport of solutes in unsaturated clays, and the effect of adsorption processes on the transport of reactive solutes. Two clay soils, kaolinite and Lufkin clay, were used in the laboratory column tests and subjected to constant hydraulic gradients of 1 to 50. Inorganic tracers (Cl{sup {minus}} Br{sup {minus}}, K{sup +}, and Zn{sup 2+}) were added to the permeating water as a step input. Conclusions are: (a) the experimental data from soil specimens subjected to various gradients showed that diffusional transport did affect the migration of the tracers in fine-grained media. At low gradients, hydrodynamic dispersion was almost solely related to molecular diffusion rather than mechanical mixing; (b) the breakthrough curves for kaolinite specimens showed that the ratios of effective porosity to total porosity were 0.25 to 1.0. The effect of low effective porosity on transport of the tracers was much greater than that of diffusion; (c) the soils that were not presoaked before tracers were introduced had lower effective porosity and greater dispersion of solutes that did the presoaked soils; (d) no evidence of the existence of a threshold gradient was observed; and (e) the retardation factors predicted from batch equilibrium tests matched the results from column tests poorly, probably due to hydrodynamic effects or geochemical differences between the two soil/solution systems.

  19. Micro-fabric damages in Boom Clay inferred from cryo-BIB-SEM experiment: recent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schmatz, Joyce; Klaver, Jop; Urai, Janos L.

    2017-04-01

    The Boom Clay is considered as a potential host rock in Belgium for nuclear waste disposal in a deep geological formation. One of the keys to understand the long-term performance of such a host rock is the fundamental understanding of coupling between microstructural evolution, poromechanical behaviour and the state of hydration of the system. At in situ conditions, Boom Clay is a nearly water-saturated (>94%) clay-rich geomaterial. Subsequently, for measurement of mechanical and transport properties in laboratory, cores of Boom Clay are vacuum-packed in Al-coated-poly-ethylene barrier foil to be best preserved at original hydric state. Because clay microstructures are very sensitive to dehydration, the validity of investigations done on such preserved or/and dried samples is often questionable. Desbois et al. (2009, 2013, 2014) showed the possibility to image fluid-filled porosity in Boom Clay, by using the FIB-cryo-SEM (FIB: Focussed Ion Beam) and FIB-cryo-SEM (BIB: Broad Ion Beam) techniques. However, surprisingly in Desbois et al. (2014), BIB-cryo-SEM experiments on Boom Clay, shown that the majority of the pores were fluid-free, contrasting with result in Desbois et al. (2009). In Desbois et al. (2014), several reasons were discussed to explain such discrepancies. The likely ones are the sealing efficiency of the Al-barrier foil at long term and the volume expansion due to the release of in-situ stress after core extraction, contributing both to dehydration and microfabric damage. This contribution presents the newest results based on cryo-BIB-SEM. Small pieces (30 mm3) of Boom Clay were preserved in liquid nitrogen after the core extraction at the MOL/Dessel Underground Research Laboratory in Belgium. A maximum of ten minutes time span was achieved between opening the core, the sub-sample extraction and the quenching of sub-samples in liquid nitrogen. First results show that all pores visible at cryo-SEM resolution are water saturated. However, water

  20. Exploring biotic vs. abiotic controls on syngenetic carbonate and clay mineral precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Gabriela S.; McKenzie, Judith A.; Martinez Ruiz, Francisca; Bontognali, Tomaso R. R.; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2016-04-01

    A possible syngenetic relationship between carbonate and clay mineral precipitation has been reported for sedimentary rocks deposited in both lacustrine and marine sedimentary environments throughout the geological record. In particular, the mineral dolomite is often found associated with Mg-rich clays, such as stevensite. It is notable that this carbonate/clay association has been recorded in numerous samples taken from modern dolomite precipitating environments; for example, the Coorong lakes, South Australia, coastal sabkhas, Abu Dhabi, UAE and coastal hypersaline lagoons (Lagoa Vermelha and Brejo do Espinho) east of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. An HRTEM study of samples from these three locations indicates a possible physical/chemical association between the Ca-dolomite and Mg-rich clays, demonstrating a probable co-precipitation. To test this hypothesis, we have conducted a series of biotic and abiotic laboratory experiments. If this syngenesis actually occurs in nature, what, if any, are the biogeochemical processes controlling these precipitation reactions? Our experiments were designed to determine the extent of the biotic versus abiotic component influencing the mineral precipitation and, in the case of a biotic influence, to understand the mechanism through which microorganisms might mediate the formation of clay minerals. The experiments were carried out in the Geomicrobiology Laboratory of ETH Zürich using cultures of living microbes and artificial organic compounds that simulate functional groups present in natural biofilms formed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In addition, pure inorganic experiments were designed to understand possible physico-chemical conditions for diagenetic processes that could induce dissolution of Mg-carbonates and precipitation of Mg-rich clays. Our results show a remarkable biotic influence during the formation of clay minerals. Specifically, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), released by microbes in their

  1. Clays and clay minerals in Bikaner: Sources, environment pollution and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayatri, Sharma; Anu, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Environmental pollution can also be caused by minerals which include natural as well as human activities. Rapid urbanization, consumerist life style, anthropogenic deeds are increasing environmental pollution day by day. Fluctuation in our ecosystem or polluted environment leads to many diseases and shows adverse effects on living organisms. The main aim of this paper is to highlight the environmental pollution from clays and clay minerals and their mitigation..

  2. Fate and Tranport of MTBE in Clay-Rich Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    lenczewski, m e

    2001-12-01

    A recent report by the U.S. Geological Survey identified methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a constituent of reformulated gasoline, as the most common contaminant of urban aquifers in the United States. MTBE has been released into groundwater supplies by leaking underground fuel tanks. In Illinois, it has been found in 26 of the 1,800 public water supplies and although detection was intermittent, levels were high enough to be offensive to users in some Illinois communities. MTBE is also being used in Mexico to solve the problem of air quality; however, it has the potential to harm the drinking water quality in the process. Early research on MTBE considered it resistant to biodegradation and unable to adsorb to soils and sediments. However, recent evidence indicates that biodegradation does occur under certain conditions and that sorption can occur to organic materials. This research project will investigate the biodegradation of MTBE and its sorption to the clay-rich glacial till found in northern Illinois and lacustrine clays found in the Chalco Basin, Mexico City, Mexico whose interaction with MTBE has not previously been studied. The principal hypothesis of this research is that the microorganisms and environmental factors in clay-rich materials will increase the biodegradation and sorption of MTBE as compared to sandy materials. The experiments will simulate a spill of MTBE or downgradient from a gasoline spill. Microcosms and batch isotherm experiments will be used to demonstrate the potential for biodegradation and sorption in these materials; however, laboratory results are not considered reliable estimates of actual field sorption and biodegradation rates. Therefore long-term column experiments will also be conducted in which large sample volumes of material that simulate the heterogeneities naturally observed in the environment. This research will increase understanding of the biodegradation and sorption of MTBE and lay the necessary groundwork to implement

  3. Clay Mineral Distribution Patterns of Tertiary Continental Oil-bearing Basins in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Xingyuan

    1996-01-01

    @@ Induction This paper studies the clay mineral distribution patterns of Tertiary continental oil-bearing basins in China. More than 9 000 shale samples from Paleogene (E) to Neogene (N) Series distributed in Bohai Gulf, Subei, Jianghan,Nanxiang, Zhoukou, Sanshui, Beibu Bay, East China Sea,Hetao, Juiquan, Qaidam and Tarim basins, and so on.

  4. Fire performance of fiber board coated with nano kaolin-clay film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijia Liu; John F. Hunt; Zhiyong Cai

    2013-01-01

    Fiberboard is a common interior material used both in China and the United States of America. The increase in demand for interior materials has raised concerns regarding combustibility of the materials. The pyrolysis characteristics of fiber, phenolic resin (PF), and nano kaolin-clay (NK) were investigated using thermogravimetry. The fire performances of samples coated...

  5. Determining the clay/organic carbon ratio by visible near infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knadel, Maria; Peng, Yi; Hermansen, Cecilie

    /OC ratio directly would be valuable. Visible near infrared spectroscopy (vis-NIRS) is a cost-effective method for soil analysis and was tested here for the prediction of clay/OC ratio. Soil samples from two agricultural fields in Denmark (N=115) were analyzed. Partial Least Squares regression (full cross...

  6. Clay mineral stratigraphy of Miocene to recent marine sediments in the central Mediterranean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.P. de

    1992-01-01

    X-ray diffraction analyses were made of the smaller than 2 J..Lm fraction from about 1250 samples of the central Mediterranean Miocene to Recent and the southeastern North-Atlantic Miocene in order to reconstruct climatic changes. Relative quantities of the clay minerals chlorite, illite, pyrophylli

  7. Modeling selenite adsorption envelopes on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenite adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum and iron oxides, clay minerals: kaolinite, montmorillonite, and illite, and 45 surface and subsurface soil samples from the Southwestern and Midwestern regions of the USA as a function of solution pH. Selenite adsorption decreased ...

  8. Modeling selenate adsorption behavior on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenate adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum oxide, amorphous iron oxide, goethite, clay minerals: kaolinites, montmorillonites, illite, and 18 soil samples from Hawaii, and the Southwestern and the Midwestern regions of the US as a function of solution pH. Selenate adsorpti...

  9. Palaeomagnetic results from some panchet clay beds, Karanpura coalfield. Northeastern India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klootwijk, C.T.

    1974-01-01

    Reversely magnetized Panchet clay samples of Early Triassic or possibly Late Permian age, from the North Karanpura coalfield (Damodar Valley, NE. India) revealed, after thermal cleaning, the mean direction: D = llO.S”, I = +69” (k = 49, tugs = 6” , N = 13). The corresponding pole position is: 59.5”W

  10. AN ASSESSMENT OF DIOXIN LEVELS IN PROCESSED BALL CLAY FROM THE U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of dioxin-like compounds in ball clay was discovered in 1996 as a result of an investigation to determine the sources of elevated levels of dioxin found in two chicken fat samples from a national survey of poultry. The investigation indicated that soybean meal added...

  11. Radon exhalation study of manganese clay residue and usability in brick production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Tibor; Shahrokhi, Amin; Sas, Zoltán; Vigh, Tamás; Somlai, János

    2017-03-01

    The reuse of by-products and residue streams is an important topic due to environmental and financial aspects. Manganese clay is a residue of manganese ore processing and is generated in huge amounts. This residue may contain some radionuclides with elevated concentrations. In this study, the radon emanation features and the massic exhalation rate of the heat-treated manganese clay were determined with regard to brick production. From the manganese mud depository, 20 samples were collected and after homogenization radon exhalation characteristics were determined as a function of firing temperatures from 100 to 750 °C. The major naturally occurring radionuclides (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th concentrations were 607 ± 34, 52 ± 6 and 40 ± 5 Bq kg(-1), respectively, comparable with normal clay samples. Similar to our previous studies a strong correlation was found between the internal structure and the radon emanation. The radon emanation coefficient decreased by ∼96% from 0.23 at 100 °C to 0.01 at 750 °C. The massic radon exhalation rate of samples fired at 750 °C reduced by 3% compared to samples fired at 100 °C. In light of the results, reusing of manganese clay as a brick additive is possible without any constraints.

  12. Use of clay from kangerlussuaq in the Greenlandic construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmonte, Louise Josefine; Villumsen, Arne; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Clay material from Kangerlussuaq in West Greenland was characterised and its possible use for the production of bricks, expanded clay products and inert filler material was investigated. It was generally found that it was possible to use the clay in all of the above mentioned materials, although,...

  13. Organically modified clays as binders of fumonisins in feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglieri, Andrea; Reyneri, Amedeo; Gennari, Mara; Nègre, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    This study reports an investigation on the ability of organically modified clays to bind mycotoxins, fumonisins B1 (FB1) and B2 (FB2). Organically modified clays are commercia materials prepared from natural clays, generally montmorillonite, by exchanging the inorganic cation with an ammonium organic cation. A screening experiment conducted on 13 organically modified clays and 3 nonmodified clays, used as controls, has confirmed that the presence of an organic cation in the clay interlayer promoted the adsorption of both fumonisins. On the basis of the results of the screening test, four modified clays and a Na-montmorillonite were selected for the determination of the adsorption kinetics and isotherms. On all the tested materials adsorption took place within one hour of contact with fumonisins solutions. Adsorption isotherms have pointed out that the modified clays exhibited a higher adsorptive capacity than the unmodified clay. It was also demonstrated that, notwithstanding the reduced structural difference between FB1 and FB2, they were differently adsorbed on the modified clays. Addition of 2% modified clays to contaminated maize allowed a reduction of more than 70% and 60% of the amount of FB1and FB2 released in solution. Although in vivo experiments are required to confirm the effectiveness of the organically modified clays, these preliminary results suggest that these materials are promising as fumonisins binders.

  14. Strength and Deformation Properties of Tertiary Clay at Moesgaard Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufmann, Kristine Lee; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    The tertiary clay at Moesgaard Museum near Aarhus in the eastern part of Jutland in Denmark is a highly plastic, glacially disturbed nappe of Viborg Clay. The clay is characterised as a swelling soil, which could lead to damaging of the building due to additional heave of the soil. To take...

  15. Instrumental characterization of clay by XRF, XRD and FTIR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Preeti Sagar Nayak; B K Singh

    2007-06-01

    Instrumental characterizations of the clay were performed by different techniques such as XRF, XRD and FTIR. XRF shows the chemical compositions of the clay where Al-oxide and silica oxide are present in major quantity whereas XRD confirms the presence of these minerals in clay. FTIR studies show the presence of quartz, alumina, haematite and different mineral matters.

  16. Recovery of Porosity and Permeability for High Plasticity Clays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette; Foged, Niels Nielsen

    Clays, which have been loaded to a high stress level, will under certain conditions keep low porosity and permeability due to the high degree of compression. In some situations it seems that porosity and permeability will recover to a very high extent when the clay is unloaded. This seems...... the clay will expand to an even higher porosity....

  17. Comparative evaluation of clays from Abakaliki Formation with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okeey Aghamelu

    varied from 5.9 to 8.0 centipoises for 10 g clay per 350 ml water. Some of these natural .... lignite to clay mud to improve its rheological and filtration properties. ... naturally active bentonitic clays from Wyoming and Texas which are used in the ...

  18. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trièves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  19. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trieves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  20. Geological Investigations on Boulder-Clay of E. Groningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijzel, van P.; Overweel, C.J.; Veenstra, H.J.

    1959-01-01

    In this article the results of a study on boulder-clay in the neighbourhood of Winschoten (N.E. Netherlands) are communicated (Chapter I). The underlying sediments of the boulder-clay in this area consist of fine preglacial sands and black clay. In the nuclei of the many drumlins a strongly ice-push

  1. Geological Investigations on Boulder-Clay of E. Groningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijzel, van P.; Overweel, C.J.; Veenstra, H.J.

    1959-01-01

    In this article the results of a study on boulder-clay in the neighbourhood of Winschoten (N.E. Netherlands) are communicated (Chapter I). The underlying sediments of the boulder-clay in this area consist of fine preglacial sands and black clay. In the nuclei of the many drumlins a strongly ice-push

  2. Earth Pressure at rest of Søvind Marl – a highly overconsolidated Eocene clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech, Gitte Lyng; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated earth pressure at rest, K0, in highly overconsolidated Eocene clay called Søvind Marl, which exhibits extremely high plasticity indices of up to 300%, a highly fissured structure, and preconsolidation stresses up to 6,800 kPa. Continuous Loading Oedometer (CLO) tests...... in situ stresses to various stress levels to estimate continuous K0 development in this highly overconsolidated clay. The normally consolidated earth pressure at rest was found for two different sample ages of Søvind Marl to be between 0.42 and 0.68. Results indicated the overconsolidated K0 reached...

  3. Chemical characterization of clay SRM by X-ray fluorescence – results comparison from different laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Appoloni

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Two Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence equipments have been compared in order to verify its performance for clay characterization and potential application to the study in archaeometric field and industry. Two clay standard reference materials (SRM, IPT-42 and IPT-51 and one IAEA intercomparison sample were analyzed by two different methodologies and equipments. Asentamiento Universitario Zapala laboratory has a Shimadzu EDX-800HS bench top equipment and 13 elements from S to Zr were quantified in the standards. Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory has a portable EDXRF system. It was possible to quantify K, Ti and Fe and qualitatively to identify Mn, Rb, Zn and Zr.

  4. Advanced 2D and 3D Electron Microscopy Analysis of Clay/PP Nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosca, Alessandra; Roberts, Ashley; Daviðsdóttir, Svava

    2011-01-01

    consisting of 3 wt% modified clay in a PP matrix was studied. Prior to microscopy analyses, SEM or TEM samples were cryo-microtomed to a flat surface or thin sections (70 nm), respectively. An FEI Titan T20 TEM microscope operating at 200 kV was used for 2D imaging. An FEI Helios focussed ion beam (FIB...... and high resolution) as compared to TEM in the study of polymer nanocomposites. Both microscopy techniques are powerful tools to study these materials and provide a clear, quantitative measurement of the morphology, size distributions, and dispersion of the clay nanoparticles....

  5. Polymer-clay nanocomposites obtained by solution polymerization of vinyl benzyl triammonium chloride in the presence of advanced functionalized clay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raluca Ianchis; Dan Donescu; Ludmila Otilia Cinteza; Violeta Purcar; Cristina Lavinia Nistor; Critian Petcu; Cristian Andi Nicolae; Raluca Gabor; Silviu Preda

    2014-05-01

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites were synthesized by solution polymerization method using advanced functionalized clay and vinyl benzyl trimethyl ammonium chloride as monomer. First stage consisted in the silylation of a commercial organo-modified clay-Cl 20A using alkoxysilanes with different chain lengths. In the second step, the synthesis and characterization of polymer-nanocomposites were followed. To evaluate the clay functionalization process as well as the final polymer-clay products, thermogravimetric,X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and three test liquid contact angles analyses were used. The loss of ammonium ions from commercial clay, the grafting degree, the lengths and the nature of alkyl chain influence the dispersion of the advanced modified clay into the polymer solution and, furthermore, the properties of the final polymer-clay nanocomposite film.

  6. Preparation, characterization and application in deep catalytic ODS of the mesoporous silica pillared clay incorporated with phosphotungstic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoshan; Liu, Zhenxing; Liu, Jianjun; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Gao, Xiaohui; Pang, Xinmei; Sheng, Huiting

    2011-10-15

    Mesoporous silica pillared clay (SPC) materials with different contents of H(3)PW(12)O(40) (HPW) heteropoly acid were synthesized by introducing HPW into clay interlayer template in an acidic suspension using sol-gel method. Samples with similar HPW loadings were also prepared by impregnation method using SPC as the support. The results of the characterizations showed that HPW was dispersed more homogeneously in the encapsulated samples than in the impregnated samples. The encapsulated materials exhibited better catalytic performance than the impregnated samples in oxidative desulfurization of dibenzothiophene-containing model oil. The sulfur removal reached up to 98.6% for the model oil under the experiential conditions.

  7. Surveying Clay Mineral Diversity in the Murray Formation, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, T.F.; Blake, D. F..; Vaniman, D. T.; Chipera, S. J.; Rampe, E. B.; Grotzinger, J. P.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W..; Morrison, S. M.; Yen, A. S.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The CheMin XRD instrument aboard Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) has documented clay minerals in various drill samples during its traverse of Gale Crater's floor and ascent of Mt. Sharp. The most recent samples, named Marimba, Quela and Sebina were acquired from the Murray Formation in the Murray Buttes region of lower Mt. Sharp. Marimba and Quela come from a approx. 30 m package of finely laminated lacustrine mudstones. Sebina comes from an overlying package of heterolithic mudstone-sandstones. Clay minerals make up approx.15-25 wt.% of the bulk rock with similar contributions to XRD patterns in all three samples. Broad basal reflections at approx. 10deg 2(theta) CoK(alpha) indicate the presence of 2:1 group clay minerals. The 02(lambda) clay mineral band lies at approx. 22.9deg 2(theta), a region typically occupied by Fe-bearing dioctahedral 2:1 clay minerals like nontronite or Fe-illite. The low humidity within the CheMin instrument, which is open to the martian atmosphere, promotes loss of interlayer H2O and collapse of smectite interlayers making them difficult to distinguish from illites. However, based on the low K content of the bulk samples, it appears that smectitic clay minerals are dominant. Peak dehydroxylation of the Marimba sample measured by the SAM instrument on MSL occurred at 610C and 780C. Fe-bearing smectites are not consistent with these dehydroxylation temperatures. Thus, we suggest that a mixture of dioctahedral and trioctahedral smectite phases are present giving the appearance of intermediate octahedral occupancy in XRD. Dioctahedral smectites have not previously been reported in Gale Crater by MSL. Earlier in the mission, relatively clay mineral rich samples (approx. 20 wt.%) from lacustrine mudstones in Yellowknife Bay (YKB) were found to contain ferrian saponites. It is proposed that YKB saponites formed via isochemical aqueous alteration of detrital olivine close to the time of sediment deposition, under anoxic to poorly oxidizing

  8. Permeability, Strength and Filtration Performance for Uncoated and Titania-Coated Clay Wastewater Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masturi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Wastewater problems continue to be a relevant issue, particularly in urban areas. One promising low-cost material for manufacturing porous ceramics as water filter is clay. Clays can be blended with other materials such as polymers to obtain functional ceramic materials. Approach: Ceramic wastewater filters were fabricated from clay using both sol-gel and simple mixing methods followed by hot-pressing and calcination. Polyethylene Glycol (PEG was used as a pore-forming agent. Results: Varying the clay:PEG ratio modified the membrane permeability between 1.65×10-16 m2 and 3.16×10-15 m2 for the sol-gel membranes and between 1.38×10-16 and 8.72×10-13 m2 for membranes prepared by simple mixing. The strength ranged from 0.28 MPa-1.71 MPa for the sol-gel membranes and from 0.05-0.90 MPa for samples prepared by simple mixing. The filtration performance was tested using aqueous solutions of Methylene Blue (MB. The concentrations of MB remaining in the solution varied from 0.98-1.44% for sol-gel filters and from 1.50-38.05% for filters prepared by simple mixing. Conclusion: We succeeded in making ceramic as filter from clay. The porous ceramic can be used to reducing concentration of pollutant simulated. The model introduced has succeeded to explain the experimental observations with percolation approximation.

  9. Physicochemical Properties of Handere Clays and Their Use as a Building Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasin Erdoğan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Handere clay deposits were discovered at Adana in Turkey. These clay units primarily consist of uncoloured claystone, pebbly sandstone, sandstone, siltstone, and mudstone marl and include gypsum lenses and clay levels of various thicknesses in places. The physicochemical properties of these clays have been investigated by different techniques including Scanning Electron and Elemental Analysis (SEM and EDS, mineralogical analyses, chemical and physical analyses, X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermogravimetric differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA, and Atterberg (Consistency Limits Test. The mineralogical composition deduced from XRD is wide (smectite + palygorskite + illite ± feldspar ± chlorite ± quartz ± calcite ± serpentine due to the high smectite contents (≈85%. SEM studies reveal that smectite minerals are composed of irregular platy leaves and show honeycomb pattern in the form of wavy leaves in places. The leaves presenting an array with surface edge contact are usually concentrated in the dissolution voids and fractures of volcanic glass. Organic matter content and loss on ignition analysis of raw materials are good for all the studied samples. In summary, Handere clays can be used as building materials in bricks, roof tiles, and cement and as a binder.

  10. Removal of nickel on Bofe bentonite calcined clay in porous bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, M G A; Almeida Neto, A F; Gimenes, M L; da Silva, M G C

    2010-04-15

    Bentonite clays have been showing good adsorbing characteristics and are used as an alternative material in the removal of heavy metals. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the removal of nickel on Bofe bentonite calcined clay in porous bed. Firstly, a study was conducted to define the operation outflow, based on the minimum mass transfer zone (MTZ) obtained, useful (q(U)) and total adsorbed (q(T)) removal amounts and total nickel removal percentage (Rem (%)). Assays of nickel adsorption on clay were conducted according to a 2(2) factorial design with three central points to evaluate the effect of the particle diameter and initial adsorbate concentration on variables q(U), q(T) and Rem (%). Tests to obtain the adsorbent physical and chemical characteristics were performed on samples of Bofe clay in natura, calcined, and calcined submitted to nickel adsorption. This clay was characterized according to the following techniques: Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), Thermogravimetry (TG), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Physisorption of N(2) (BET), Helium Picnometry and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with metal mapping. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Networking and rheology of concentrated clay suspensions "matured" in mineral medicinal water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguzzi, Carola; Sánchez-Espejo, Rita; Cerezo, Pilar; Machado, José; Bonferoni, Cristina; Rossi, Silvia; Salcedo, Inmaculada; Viseras, César

    2013-09-10

    This work studied the influence of "maturation" conditions (time and agitation) on aggregation states, gel structure and rheological behaviour of a special kind of pharmaceutical semisolid products made of concentrated clay suspensions in mineral medicinal water. Maturation of the samples was carried out in distilled and sulphated mineral medicinal water, both in static conditions (without agitation) and with manual stirring once a week, during a maximum period of three months. At the measured pH interval (7.5-8.0), three-dimensional band-type networks resulting from face/face contacts were predominant in the laminar (disc-like) clay suspensions, whereas the fibrous (rod-like) particles formed micro-aggregates by van der Waals attractions. The high concentration of solids in the studied systems greatly determined their behaviour. Rod-like sepiolite particles tend to align the major axis in aggregates promoted by low shearing maturation, whereas aggregates of disc-like smectite particles did not have a preferential orientation and their complete swelling required long maturation time, being independent of stirring. Maturation of both kinds of suspensions resulted in improved rheological properties. Laminar clay suspensions became more structured with time, independently from static or dynamic maturation conditions, whereas for fibrous clay periodic agitation was also required. Rheological properties of the studied systems have been related to aggregation states and networking mechanisms, depending on the type of clay minerals constituents. Physical stability of the suspensions was not impaired by the specific composition of the Graena medicinal water.

  12. Laminar Mesoporous Structure of Modified Montmorillonite Clays and Its Formation Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying; CHEN Aiping; LI Chunzhong; LUO Meifang; XU Zhenliang

    2012-01-01

    Zr-pillared clays were prepared by heating and ultrasonic methods in intercalation process.The resultants were characterized by XRD,N2 adsorption-desorption,SEM,and TG/DTA analysis.Ultrasonic technology accelerated the pillaring process effectively and obtained better ordered structure than by heating method.The specific surface area and pore volume of the Zr-pillared clays increased by about 13 and 3 times respectively.Rare earth metal (Ce) was introduced into Zr-pillared clays by co-intercalation and dipping method.The specific surface area was increased by co-intercalation approach,but it was decreased dramatically by dipping method.Thermal stability of Ce modified samples prepared by co-intercalation method was enhanced in comparison with Zr-pillared clays.Modification mechanism and "corrugation-like" structural mode of intercalation process was proposed basing on the double XRD peaks in small-angle range of pillared clays,which was related to the deformation of silicate layer.

  13. Treatment of Scumming Effects of Pottery Clay by Sodium Carbonate Addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasanapiarnpong, T; Thueploy, A; Arayaphong, D [Research Unit of Advanced Ceramic, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Nilpairach, S, E-mail: thanakorn.w@chula.ac.t [National Center of Excellence for Petroleum, Petrochemicals, and Advanced Materials, Chulalongkorn University (Thailand)

    2011-10-29

    Earthenware pottery products made by using red plastic clay in Ratchaburi province of Thailand and fired at 850-1000 deg. C, always shows some blemishes, caused by scumming on the surface. This scumming contains calcium sulfate, contaminated in the raw clay as gypsum form. The addition of barium carbonate is a suggested solution to prevent this white stain. However, it is difficult for barium carbonate to spread throughout the clay so that it takes a long time to complete the reaction. This research aims to find the solution by using sodium carbonate as an alternative chemical. Sodium carbonate was mixed in the clay at 1wt% dissolved in distilled water controlled the moisture at 22 % by wet weight. The mixture was kneaded and aged for 24 h, then formed, dried and fired at 850-950 deg. C. The types and quantities of ion in mixed clay and deposited on the surface product were determined after drying. It was found that the white stain areas were diminished, as same as the result from the addition of barium carbonate. Moreover, the sample after firing at 950 deg. C had lower water absorption as 12.22%, higher three point bending strength as 32.53 MPa when compared to the addition of barium carbonate, which had higher water absorption as 15.58 % and lower three point bending strength as 25.25 MPa.

  14. Treatment of Scumming Effects of Pottery Clay by Sodium Carbonate Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasanapiarnpong, T.; Thueploy, A.; Nilpairach, S.; Arayaphong, D.

    2011-10-01

    Earthenware pottery products made by using red plastic clay in Ratchaburi province of Thailand and fired at 850-1000 °C, always shows some blemishes, caused by scumming on the surface. This scumming contains calcium sulfate, contaminated in the raw clay as gypsum form. The addition of barium carbonate is a suggested solution to prevent this white stain. However, it is difficult for barium carbonate to spread throughout the clay so that it takes a long time to complete the reaction. This research aims to find the solution by using sodium carbonate as an alternative chemical. Sodium carbonate was mixed in the clay at 1wt% dissolved in distilled water controlled the moisture at 22 % by wet weight. The mixture was kneaded and aged for 24 h, then formed, dried and fired at 850-950 °C. The types and quantities of ion in mixed clay and deposited on the surface product were determined after drying. It was found that the white stain areas were diminished, as same as the result from the addition of barium carbonate. Moreover, the sample after firing at 950 °C had lower water absorption as 12.22 %, higher three point bending strength as 32.53 MPa when compared to the addition of barium carbonate, which had higher water absorption as 15.58 % and lower three point bending strength as 25.25 MPa.

  15. Study of the Effect of Clay Particles on Low Salinity Water Injection in Sandstone Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Rezaei Gomari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The need for optimal recovery of crude oil from sandstone and carbonate reservoirs around the world has never been greater for the petroleum industry. Water-flooding has been applied to the supplement primary depletion process or as a separate secondary recovery method. Low salinity water injection is a relatively new method that involves injecting low salinity brines at high pressure similar to conventional water-flooding techniques, in order to recover crude oil. The effectiveness of low salinity water injection in sandstone reservoirs depends on a number of parameters such as reservoir temperature, pressure, type of clay particle and salinity of injected brine. Clay particles present on reservoir rock surfaces adsorb polar components of oil and modify wettability of sandstone rocks to the oil-wet state, which is accountable for the reduced recovery rates by conventional water-flooding. The extent of wettability alteration caused by three low salinity brines on oil-wet sandstone samples containing varying clay content (15% or 30% and type of clay (kaolinite/montmorillonite were analyzed in the laboratory experiment. Contact angles of mica powder and clay mixture (kaolinite/montmorillonite modified with crude oil were measured before and after injection with three low salinity sodium chloride brines. The effect of temperature was also analyzed for each sample. The results of the experiment indicate that samples with kaolinite clay tend to produce higher contact angles than samples with montmorillonite clay when modified with crude oil. The highest degree or extent of wettability alteration from oil-wet to intermediate-wet state upon injection with low salinity brines was observed for samples injected with brine having salinity concentration of 2000 ppm. The increase in temperature tends to produce contact angles values lying in the higher end of the intermediate-wet range (75°–115° for samples treated at 50 °C, while their corresponding

  16. Fast single firing applied to clay ceramics; Monoqueima rapida aplicada a ceramica vermelha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanelatto, F.C.; Uggioni, E. [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (UNESC), Criciuma, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais; Botega, J. [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (UNESC), Criciuma, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Tecnologia em Ceramica; Luckmann, G.; Bernardin, A.M., E-mail: amb@unesc.ne [Servico Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Tijucas, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Tecnologia em Ceramica

    2009-07-01

    This work aimed to obtain clay ceramics using fast single firing by dry processing. Four clay samples were characterized by chemical (FRX) and mineralogical (XRD) analyses and mixture design was used for the formulation of eight compositions. The compositions were dried and homogenized to 15% moisture and processed in a laboratory extruder. After drying (110 deg C, 24h), the formulations were fired in a laboratory roller kiln (900 deg C, 2h) and then characterized (water absorption and resistance to compression). The temperature of maximum sintering rate of each formulation was determined by optical dilatometry (10 deg C/min). The results show the effect of chemical and mineralogical composition of clays on the properties of the final compositions. (author)

  17. Micromechanics of non-active clays in saturated state and DEM modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagano Arianna Gea

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a conceptual micromechanical model for 1-D compression behaviour of non-active clays in saturated state. An experimental investigation was carried out on kaolin clay samples saturated with fluids of different pH and dielectric permittivity. The effect of pore fluid characteristics on one-dimensional compressibility behaviour of kaolin was investigated. A three dimensional Discrete Element Method (DEM was implemented in order to simulate the response of saturated kaolin observed during the experiments. A complex contact model was introduced, considering both the mechanical and physico-chemical microscopic interactions between clay particles. A simple analysis with spherical particles only was performed as a preliminary step in the DEM study in the elastic regime.

  18. Observation of empty liquids and equilibrium gels in a colloidal clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, R.; Ruzicka, B.; Zaccarelli, E.; Zulian, L.; Sztucki, M.; Moussaïd, A.; Narayanan, T.; Sciortino, F.

    2013-02-01

    The observation of empty liquids and equilibrium gels in a complex colloidal clay has been obtained through dilution experiments, small angle x ray scattering measurements and extensive numerical simulations. We investigate the behaviour of dilute suspensions of a synthetic clay, Laponite, for low concentrations, Cw ≤ 1%, to waiting times significantly longer than those previously studied. A significant evolution takes place on the year timescale and samples undergo a clear phase separation process which terminates at a finite clay concentration Cw = 1%, above which they remain in a homogeneous arrested state. Moreover, the slow aging dynamics peculiar of Laponite suspensions drive an arrest transition through a very slow rearrangement, so that equilibrium gels are formed. The observed features are similar to those predicted in simple models of patchy particles, suggesting that Laponite forms an (arrested) empty liquid at very low concentrations.

  19. Characterization and analysis of epoxy/clay nanotubes composites; Cacaterizacao e analise de compositos de epoxi, argila e nanotubos de carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    An DGEBA epoxy matrix was used aiming to achieve a nanocomposite material, through the dispersion of (CNT) via mechanical stirring followed by sonication. In this work the following characterization were performed: mechanical characterization, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WXRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of CNT and modified clays promoted the increase of modulus of the epoxy matrix, and a synergistic effect between CNT and both clays could be presumed. SEM images of the fracture surface show the difference between the fracture surface area and the presence of clusters among the samples, allowing a correlation with the modulus of elasticity. X-ray diffractograms from 2{Theta} = 5 deg showed no peaks for modified clay samples, however it is possible to affirm that modified clay platelets are forming a less organized structure compared to the structure of the clay as natural in epoxy. (author)

  20. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landrou Gnanli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  1. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrou, Gnanli; Brumaud, Coralie; Habert, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  2. Diffusion of inorganic chemical wastes in compacted clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shackelford, C.D.

    1988-01-01

    The factors that were investigated included the water content/dry unit weight, the method of compaction, the mineralogy of the soil, and the concentration of the ions. The effective diffusion coefficients (D{asterisk}) of three anions (Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, and I{sup {minus}}) and three cations (K{sup +}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+}) in a simulated waste leachate were measured. Two clay soils (kaolinite and Lufkin clay) and a sand were used in the study. The clay samples were compacted and pre-soaked to minimize hydraulic gradients due to negative pore pressures. Mass balance calculations were performed to indicate possible sinks/sources in the diffusion system. The results of the diffusion tests were analyzed using two analytical solutions to Fick's second law and a commercially available semi-analytical solution. The D{asterisk} values for tests using high-concentration (0.04 N) leachate generally fell in the narrow range of about 4.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2}/s, and were relatively insensitive to compaction water content/dry unit weight and to compaction method. The variability in the results from the tests with low-concentration (0.013 N) leachate precluded any definite conclusions from these tests. The values of D{asterisk} measured in this study were compared to values from previous studies, and the D{asterisk} values from this study were found to be slightly conservative (i.e., high). However, the results of the tests may be affected by several chemical and physical factors, and care should be taken to ensure that the soils used in the tests are representative of those used in the application of the test results. Recommendations are made for estimating D{asterisk} values for use in the design of compacted clay barriers for the containment of inorganic chemical wastes.

  3. In situ synthesis of polymer-clay nanocomposites from silicate gels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrado, K. A.; Xu, L.; Chemistry

    1998-01-01

    Polymer-containing silicate gels were hydrothermally crystallized to form layered magnesium silicate hectorite clays containing polymers that are incorporated in situ. Gels consist of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol, lithium fluoride, and the polymer of choice. Dilute solutions of gel in water are refluxed for various lengths of time and then isolated via centrifugation, washed, and air-dried. Polymer loadings up to 86% were attained by adding more polymer to the solutions after 2-day reaction times, reacting for another 24 h, and continuing this process prior to isolation. Polyaniline (PANI)- and polyacrylonitrile (PACN)-clay samples contain up to 57% and 76% polymer, respectively, after just one sequential addition at high polymer loading. Series of PANI-, PACN-, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP)-, and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC)-clays also were prepared by several sequential additions of lower polymer loading to the silicate gel during crystallization. Final polymer loadings were determined by thermal analysis. Basal spacings between clay interlayers were measured by X-ray powder diffraction for all samples. Increases in polymer loadings and basal spacings were observed for all the neutral polymers studied, until or unless delamination occurred. Delamination was evident for PACN- and PANI-clay nanocomposites. The highest loadings were observed for the PACN-clays, up to 86%. For the cationic polymer polydimethyldiallylammonium chloride, however, the loading could not be increased beyond about 20%. This is due to electrostatic interactions that balance the negatively charged sites on the silicate lattice with those on the cationic polymer chain. Beyond charge compensation, there is no driving force for further incorporation. Charge compensation in the case of the neutral polymers is attained by interlayer lithium(I) cations.

  4. Enhancement of insulating properties of brick clay by renewable agricultural wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Bánhidi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of agricultural wastes (byproducts in various segments of brick and tile industry is increasing continuously. These additives, which are previously mixed into the raw or compound clay, start to ignite during the firing process, providing extra thermal energy inside the product and decreasing the required external energy need. Besides this effect, the combustion of additives increases the porosity of the final product resulting in enhanced thermal insulation properties. In this paper the effect of some common agricultural wastes (sawdust, rice-peel and seed-shell on the thermal properties of brick clay products was investigated. The brick samples were prepared from the mixture of the yellow and gray clay in the ratio of 4:1, water content was between 15.57-16.67 wt.% and the pore-forming additives in concentrations 0, 4 and 7 wt.%. To measure the steady state thermal conductivity of the clay mixtures, samples with dimensions of 300×300×50 mm were prepared. Drying and firing were performed using the industrial partner’s standard procedures. Precise thermal conductivity data was measured, using a RAPID‑K type static thermal conductivity instrument. The results showed that increasing the quantity of agricultural byproducts in the clay mixture significantly decreases the thermal conductivity of the final products, while only a minor reduction in the mechanical strength was observed. It was found that the most efficient byproduct additive was the sunflower seed‑shell. With the addition of only 7 wt.% seed‑shell to the basic clay the thermal conductivity decreased from 0,27 W/m·K to 0,17 W/m·K (i.e. ~36%.

  5. Discontinuity networks in mud stones: an apparent contradiction for boom clay at Mol, opalinus clay at Mont Terri, Callovo-Oxfordian silty clay at Bure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M. [Centre de Geologie de l' Ingenieur, 75 - Paris (France); Mazurek, M. [Bern Univ., Rock-Water Interaction, Institute of Geological Sciences (Switzerland); Vandenberghe, N. [Katholieke Universiteit (KU), Lab. voor stratigrafie Leuven (Belgium)

    2005-07-01

    The Rupelian Boom Clay at Mol, Belgium, the lower Aalenian Opalinus Clay at Mont Terri Switzerland and the Callovo-Oxfordian silty clay at Bure, France, are currently studied in the framework of deep geological radioactive waste confinement. These three mud-stones are calcareous to variable degrees. They vary from plastic clay at Mol to hard rock at Bure. All three have similar mineralogical constituents, especially with regards to the clay minerals and include mixed layers of illite and montmorillonite. Remarkably, in outcrop sections of massive clay formations and mud-stone in general, it is very common to observe a network of discontinuities resembling the jointing in hard rock. As such jointing clearly would influence underground works it is imperative to examine whether or not the three mud-rock formations under discussion have such a discontinuity network in all their mass. (authors)

  6. Clay vein and its implication for uranium exploration activity in the northern part of the Alligator Rivers Uranium Field, northern Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasao, Eiji [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Toki, Gifu (Japan). Tono Geoscience Center

    2003-07-01

    Clay veins have been found by uranium exploration drilling around the Black Rock uranium prospect in the northern part of the alligator Rivers Uranium Field (ARUF), northern Australia. The mineralogical and chemical features are described to clarify relations with uranium mineralization, because it is not accompanied by uranium mineralization. X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis for major elements indicate that the clay vein consists mainly of chlorite (clinochlore to ferroan clinochlore) and lesser mica clay mineral (t-1M dominant). The clay vein is compared with the clay alteration zone around the uranium deposits in ARUF in terms of mode of occurrence, mineral and chemical compositions. Mineral composition of the clay vein is only in accordance with that of the inner alteration halo of the clay alteration zone. It is, however, different from mineral composition of the outer alteration halo in terms of lack of Fe chlorite in the clay vein. Chemical composition of the clay vein is similar to that of the clay alteration zone, except for lack in the vein of high iron content which is observed in some samples of the alteration zone. As a whole, the feature of the clay vein corresponds to the inner alteration zone around the uranium deposit in ARUF. The mode of occurrence of the clay vein is very different from that of the clay alteration zone. Mode of occurrence, and mineral and chemical compositions of the clay vein resemble a chlorite vein in the Lower to Middle Proterozoic sandstone above the Jabiluka deposit, one of major uranium deposit in the ARUF. Because of the similarity between the clay and the chlorite veins, the clay vein is regarded as marginal facies of an alteration zone. The fluid that formed the clay vein is estimated to have been oxidized, because of the existence of hematite and ubiquitous Mg chlorite. This nature is in accordance with the mineralizing fluid that formed the inner alteration zone in the Nabarlek deposit. In conclusion, the vein

  7. Coatings and films derived from clay/wax nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiko, David J.; Leyva, Argentina A.

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for making clay/wax nanocomposites and coatings and films of same with improved chemical resistance and gas barrier properties. The invention further provides methods for making and using emulsions of such clay/wax nanocomposites. Typically, an organophillic clay is combined with a wax or wax/polymer blend such that the cohesion energy of the clay matches that of the wax or wax/polymer blend. Suitable organophilic clays include mica and phyllosilicates that have been surface-treated with edge or edge and surface modifying agents. The resulting nanocomposites have applications as industrial coatings and in protective packaging.

  8. Clay mineral association in the salt formation of the Transylvanian Basin and its paleoenvironmental significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Bican-Bris̡an

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The investigated clay fraction was separated from salt samples recovered from three boreholes located in the Praid salt deposit area. For comparison, samples collected from Turda deposit (Franz Josef adit, the Rudolf and Ghizele chambers and from the salt massif from Sărăţel were also analyzed. The qualitative investigations evidenced a clay minerals association dominated by illite and chlorite accompanied by subordinate amounts of kaolinite, smectite, fibrous clays (sepiolite, palygorskite, and in minor amounts, by 14/14 chlorite/vermiculite and chlorite/smectite interstratifications. A quantitative evaluation (% including a standard graphical representation was performed only for the borehole samples (Praid, according to the vertical distribution. The genetical interpretation of the identified clay minerals association took into account the influence of the sedimentation mechanisms and the climate control on the mineral phases. The environment of formation for the salt in the Transylvanian Basin was defined by the presence of specific climatic factors, also suggested by the palynological investigations.

  9. Experimental investigations of the wettability of clays and shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysenko, Artem; Clennell, Ben; Sedev, Rossen; Burgar, Iko; Ralston, John; Raven, Mark; Dewhurst, David; Liu, Keyu

    2009-07-01

    Wettability in argillaceous materials is poorly understood, yet it is critical to hydrocarbon recovery in clay-rich reservoirs and capillary seal capacity in both caprocks and fault gouges. The hydrophobic or hydrophilic nature of clay-bearing soils and sediments also controls to a large degree the movement of spilled nonaqueous phase liquids in the subsurface and the options available for remediation of these pollutants. In this paper the wettability of hydrocarbons contacting shales in their natural state and the tendencies for wettability alteration were examined. Water-wet, oil-wet, and mixed-wet shales from wells in Australia were investigated and were compared with simplified model shales (single and mixed minerals) artificially treated in crude oil. The intact natural shale samples (preserved with their original water content) were characterized petrophysically by dielectric spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance, plus scanning electron, optical and fluorescence microscopy. Wettability alteration was studied using spontaneous imbibition, pigment extraction, and the sessile drop method for contact angle measurement. The mineralogy and chemical compositions of the shales were determined by standard methods. By studying pure minerals and natural shales in parallel, a correlation between the petrophysical properties, and wetting behavior was observed. These correlations may potentially be used to assess wettability in downhole measurements.

  10. Experimental and modeling study of flash calcination of kaolinite rich clay particles in a gas suspension calciner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse;

    2015-01-01

    Calcination of kaolinite particles under appropriate conditions to produce materials that can replace part of the CO2 intensive clinker is gaining an increasing interest in cement industry worldwide. This paper presents a study of flash calcination of kaolinite rich clay particles in a pilot scale...... gas suspension calciner, with the aim to derive useful guidelines on smart calcination for obtaining products of the best pozzolanic properties. Calcination tests are performed in the calciner under six different operation conditions. The raw feed and the calcined clay samples are all characterized...... experimentally and a mathematical model is also developed to predict the conversion of the clay particles. The model properly accounts for the particle–ambient flow interaction and numerically solves all the processes occurring within the clay particles. The model predictions are compared against...

  11. Dioxins in primary kaolin and secondary kaolinitic clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Martin; Scheeder, Georg; Bernau, Sarah; Dohrmann, Reiner; Germann, Klaus

    2011-01-15

    Since 1996 dioxins have been repeatedly detected worldwide in Tertiary ball clays used as anticaking agent in the production of animal feed and a variety of other applications. The dioxins of these natural clays are very unlikely of anthropogenic source, but no model of dioxin enrichment has been established. A hypothetical model is presented which explains the highly variable dioxin loadings of the Tertiary kaolinitic clays by natural addition during clay-sedimentation. To prove this hypothesis, Tertiary primary nonsedimentary kaolin and sedimentary kaolinitic clays were collected at three profiles in Europe and analyzed for mineralogy, chemistry, organic carbon, and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/-furans (PCDD/F). Primary kaolin, kaolinitic, and lignitic clays contained almost no PCDFs. PCDD concentration differed markedly between primary kaolin (3-91 pg/g) and secondary kaolinitic clay (711-45935 pg/g), respectively, lignitic clays (13513-1191120 pg/g). The dioxin loading of secondary kaolinitic and lignitic clays is approximately 10 to a few thousand times higher than in the primary kaolin or recent environmental settings. The dioxin concentrations decrease from octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin to the tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxins and exhibit the "natural formation pattern". No correlation between PCDD/F concentration and bulk composition of clays was found. These findings support the hypothesis of the enrichment of dioxin in clays during sedimentation.

  12. [Mechanisms of removing red tide organisms by organo-clays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xi-Hua; Song, Xiu-Xian; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Kui

    2006-08-01

    We tested the influence of the preparation conditions of the quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) modified clays on their capacities to remove red tide organisms, then discussed the mechanisms of the organo-clays removing red tide organisms. Hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) improved the capacity of clays to flocculate red tide algae, and the HDTMA in metastable state enhanced the toxicity of the clay complexes to algae. The capacities of the organo-clays correlated with the toxicity and the adsorbed amount of the QACs used in clays modification, but as the incubation time was prolonged the stability of the organo-clays was improved and the algal removal efficiencies of the clay complexes decreased. When the adsorbed HDTMA was arranged in different clays in which the spatial resistance was different, there was more HDTMA in metastable state in the three-layer montmorillonite. Because of the homo-ion effect the bivalent or trivalent metal ions induced more HDTMA in metastable state and the corresponding organo-clays had high capacities to remove red tide organisms. When the reaction temperature was 60 degrees C the adsorbed HDTMA was easily arranged on cation exchange sites, if the temperature rose or fell the metastable HDTMA would increase so that the capacity of the clays was improved.

  13. Resin injection in clays with high plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowamooz, Hossein

    2016-11-01

    Regarding the injection process of polyurethane resins in clays with high plasticity, this paper presents the experimental results of the pressuremeter and cone penetration tests before and after injection. A very important increase in pressure limit or in soil resistance can be observed for all the studied depths close to the injection points. An analytical analysis for cylindrical pore cavity expansion in cohesive frictional soils obeying the Mohr-Coulomb criterion was then used to reproduce the pressuremeter tests before and after injection. The model parameters were calibrated by maintaining constant the elasticity parameters as well as the friction angel before and after injection. A significant increase in cohesion was observed because of soil densification after resin expansion. The estimated undrained cohesions, derived from the parameters of the Mohr-Coulomb criterion, were also compared with the cone penetration tests. Globally, the model predictions show the efficiency of resin injection in clay soils with high plasticity.

  14. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific.

  15. Clay mineralogy in agrochernozems of western Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papish, I. Ya.; Chizhikova, N. P.; Poznyak, S. P.; Varlamov, E. B.

    2016-10-01

    The mineralogy of clay fractions separated from deep low-humus deep-gleyic loamy typical agrochernozems on loess-like loams of the Upper Bug and Dniester uplands in the Central Russian loess province of Ukraine consists of complex disordered interstratifications with the segregation of mica- and smectite-type layers (hereafter, smectite phase), tri- and dioctahedral hydromicas, kaolinite, and chlorite. The distribution of the clay fraction is uniform. The proportions of the layered silicates vary significantly within the profile: a decrease in the content of the smectite phase and a relative increase in the content of hydromicas up the soil profile are recorded. In the upper horizons, the contents of kaolinite and chlorite increase, and some amounts of fine quartz, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases are observed. This tendency is observed in agrochernozems developed on the both Upper Bug and Dniester uplands. The differences include the larger amounts of quartz, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases in the clay material of the Upper Bug Upland, while the contents of the smectite phase in the soil profiles of the areas considered are similar. An analogous mineral association is noted in podzolized agrochernozems on loess-like deposits in the Cis-Carpathian region of the Southern Russian loess province developed on the Prut-Dniester and Syan-Dniester uplands. The distribution of particle-size fractions and the mineralogy of the clay fraction indicate the lithogenic heterogeneity of the soil-forming substrate. When the drifts change, the mineral association of the soils developed within the loess-like deposits gives place to minerals dominated by individual smectite with some mica-smectite inter stratifications, hydromicas, and chlorite.

  16. Clay/polymer composites: the story

    OpenAIRE

    Fengge Gao

    2004-01-01

    Clay/polymer nanocomposites offer tremendous improvement in a wide range of physical and engineering properties for polymers with low filler loading. This technology can now be applied commercially and has received great attention in recent years. The major development in this field has been carried out over the last one and half decades. The progress, advantages, limitations, and current problems will be discussed in this review. So far, significant progress has been made in the development ...

  17. Interaction of clay and concrete plugs - Plugging of 5 m deep hole KA1621G01 at Aespoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland [Drawrite AB, Lund (Sweden); Luleaa Technical Univ., Luleaa (Sweden); Ramqvist, Gunnar [Eltekno AB, Figeholm (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    Sealing of deep boreholes in repository rock is planned to be made by installing dense smectite clay plugs where the rock is low-permeable and casting concrete where the holes intersect water-bearing fracture zones. Such zones have to be stabilized before sealing starts because fragments of rock can otherwise fall off and make it difficult to bring equipment for concrete casting and clay plug units down. These parts of the holes are filled with concrete and clay plugs are then inserted up to the nearest fracture zone where concrete is filled to the required level etc. The role of the concrete in the hole and in the closest part of the surrounding fracture zone is to provide stable parts that are sufficiently fine-porous to prevent clay particles from contacting clay plugs to migrate into the fractures and be lost by erosion. While the larger parts of long clay plugs are believed to stay largely intact chemically for hundreds of thousands of years, the parts adjacent to concrete plugs may undergo changes and so can the concrete plugs themselves. The objective of the presently reported project was to identify the detailed processes and quantify associated changes in physical properties by investigating samples of clay and concrete from a 2.5 m long plug of clay over which an equally long concrete plug had been cast and left to rest for 3 years. The outcome of the investigations was that significant chemically induced changes in mineralogy and physical performance had occurred within a few centimetres distance from the clay/concrete contact but that virtually no changes had taken place at larger distance. A comprehensive laboratory study including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) on the sample material was performed including also dual beam (combined ion and electron) microscopy. It was found that the clay had infiltrated the contacting concrete plug after filling of the borehole since clay was detected both

  18. Photochemical Deposition of Silver Nanoparticles on Clays and Exploring Their Antibacterial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Patrícia C; Poli, Alessandra L; Castro, Lucas F; Perussi, Janice R; Schmitt, Carla C

    2016-08-24

    Photochemical method was used to synthesize silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the presence of citrate or clay (SWy-1, SYn-1, and Laponite B) as stabilizers and Lucirin TPO as photoinitiator. During the photochemical synthesis, an appearance of the plasmon absorption band was seen around 400 nm, indicating the formation of AgNPs. X-ray diffraction results suggested that AgNPs prepared in SWy-1 were adsorbed into interlamellar space, and moreover, showed some clay exfoliation. In the case of SYn-1, AgNPs was not intercalated. For the AgNP/Lap B sample, the formation of an exfoliated structure occurred. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the spherical shape of AgNPs for all samples. The particle sizes obtained for AgNP/SWy-1, AgNP/SYn-1, and AgNP/Lap B were 2.6, 5.1, and 3.8 nm, respectively. AgNPs adsorbed on SYn-1 reveal nonuniform size and aggregation of some particles. However, AgNP/SWy-1 and AgNP/Lap B samples are more uniform and have diameters smaller than those prepared with SYn-1. This behavior is due to the ability to exfoliate these clays. The antibacterial activities of pure clays, AgNP/citrate, and AgNP/clays were investigated against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). AgNPs in the presence of clays (AgNPs/SYn-1 and AgNPs/SWy-1) showed a lower survival index percentage compared to those obtained for pure clays and AgNPs. The AgNP/SWy-1 sample showed good antibacterial activity against both tested species and the lowest survival index of 3.9 and 4.3 against E. coli and S. aureus, respectively. AgNPs are located in the interlayer region of the SWy-1, which has acid sites. These acidic sites may contribute to the release of Ag(+) ions from the surface of AgNPs. On the other hand, Laponite B and AgNP/Lap B samples did not demonstrate any bactericidal activity.

  19. Role of bentonite clays on cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Kaufhold, Stephan; Ufer, Kristian; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención

    2016-04-01

    Bentonites, naturally occurring clays, are produced industrially because of their adsorbent capacity but little is known about their effects on human health. This manuscript reports on the effect of bentonites on cell growth behaviour. Bentonites collected from India (Bent-India), Hungary (Bent-Hungary), Argentina (Bent-Argentina), and Indonesia (Bent-Indonesia) were studied. All four bentonites were screened in-vitro against two human cancer cell lines [U251 (central nervous system, glioblastoma) and SKLU-1 (lung adenocarcinoma)] supplied by the National Cancer Institute (USA). Bentonites induced growth inhibition in the presence of U251 cells, and growth increment in the presence of SKLU-1 cells, showing that interactions between bentonite and cell surfaces were highly specific. The proliferation response for U251 cells was explained because clay surfaces controlled the levels of metabolic growth components, thereby inhibiting the development of high-grade gliomas, particularly primary glioblastomas. On the other hand, the proliferation response for SKLU-1 was explained by an exacerbated growth favoured by swelling, and concomitant accumulation of solutes, and their hydration and transformation via clay-surface mediated reactions.

  20. Spectromicroscopy of Fe distributions in clay microcrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundl, T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Cerasari, S.; Garcia, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Clays are ubiquitous crystalline particles found in nature that are responsible for contributing to a wide range of chemical reactions in soils. The structure of these mineral particles changes when the particle is hydrated ({open_quotes}wet{close_quotes}), from that when it is dry. This makes a study of the microscopic distribution of chemical content of these nanocrystals difficult using standard techniques that require vacuum. In addition to large structural changes, it is likely that chemical changes accompany the drying process. As a result, spectroscopic measurements on dried clay particles may not accurately reflect the actual composition of the material as found in the environment. In this work, the authors extend the use of the ALS Spectromicroscopy Facility STXM to high spectral and spatial resolution studies of transition metal L-edges in environmental materials. The authors are studying mineral particles of montmorillonite, which is an Fe bearing clay which can be prepared with a wide distribution of Fe concentrations, and with Fe occupying different substitutional sites.

  1. Calculation of the debris flow concentration based on clay content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ningsheng; CUI Peng; LIU Zhonggang; WEI Fangqiang

    2003-01-01

    The debris flow clay content has very tremendous influence on its concentration (γC). It is reported that the concentration can be calculated by applying the relative polynomial based on the clay content. Here one polynomial model and one logarithm model to calculate the concentration based on the clay content for both the ordinary debris flow and viscous debris flow are obtained. The result derives from the statistics and analysis of the relationship between the debris flow concentrations and clay content in 45 debris flow sites located in the southwest of China. The models can be applied for the concentration calculation to those debris flows that are impossible to observe. The models are available to calculate the debris flow concentration, the principles of which are in the clay content affecting on the debris flow formation, movement and suspending particle diameter. The mechanism of the relationship of the clay content and concentration is clear and reliable. The debris flow is usually of micro-viscous when the clay content is low (<3%), by analyzing the developing tendency on the basics of the relationship between the clay content and debris flow concentration. Indeed, the less the clay content, the less the concentration for most debris flows. The debris flow tends to become the water rock flow or the hyperconcentrated flow with the clay content decrease. Through statistics it is apt to transform the soil into the viscous debris flow when the clay content of ranges is in 3%-18%. Its concentration increases with the increasing of the clay content when the clay content is between 5% and 10%. But the value decreases with the increasing of the clay content when the clay content is between 10% and 18%. It is apt to transform the soil into the mudflow, when the clay content exceeds 18%. The concentration of the mudflow usually decreases with the increase of the clay content, and this developing tendency reverses to that of the micro-viscous debris flow. There is

  2. Solidification and stabilization of cadmium ions in sand-cement-clay mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawabkeh, Reyad A

    2005-10-17

    This study was carried out to test the ability of a mixture of sand, cement and clay for immobilizing cadmium ions from leaching out into water resources. Various samples with different mass ratios for this mixture were tested to determine their efficiency for adsorbing cadmium. The compressive test, cation exchange capacity (CEC), adsorption equilibrium and leaching test were applied to each sample. The sample that showed the highest cation exchange capacity with 53.1 meq/100 g and compressive strength with 11.05 N/mm2 consists of 25% sand, 50% cement and 25% clay. The equilibrium data for Cd2+ removal using this sample showed a multilayer adsorption, which could be fitted using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption isotherm model with a regression coefficient of 0.999. The maximum cadmium uptake obtained from this model was 82.618 mg/g solid. The mobility of Cd2+ in acidic solution drawn-off after 18 h of initial mixing was 66.06 mg when the solid sample initially contains 6.0 g Cd2+. This value decreased to 14.33 mg when only 1.0 g Cd2+ was initially spiked in the sample. Introducing clay into this sample enhanced its sorption capacity while the presence of sand and cement enhanced its compressive strength.

  3. Surface Properties and Permeability of Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride)-Clays (PVDF/Clays) Composite Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramono, E.; Ahdiat, M.; Simamora, A.; Pratiwi, W.; Radiman, C. L.; Wahyuningrum, D.

    2017-07-01

    Surface properties are important factors that determine the performance of ultrafiltration membranes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of clay addition on the surface properties and membrane permeability of PVDF (poly-vinylidene fluoride) membranes. Three types of clay with different particle size were used in this study, namely montmorillonite-MMT, bentonite-BNT and cloisite 15A-CLS. The PVDF-clay composite membranes were prepared by phase inversion method using PEG as additive. The hydrophobicity of membrane surface was characterized by contact angle. The membrane permeability was determined by dead- end ultrafiltration with a trans-membrane pressure of 2 bars. In contact angle measurement, water contact angle of composite membranes is higher than PVDF membrane. The addition of clays decreased water flux but increased of Dextran rejection. The PVDF-BNT composite membranes reach highest Dextran rejection value of about 93%. The type and particle size of clay affected the hydrophobicity of membrane surface and determined the resulting membrane structure as well as the membrane performance.

  4. Iodide Sorption to Clays and the Relationship to Surface Charge and Clay Texture - 12356

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichiak, Jessica; Tellez, Hernesto; Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Iodine is assumed to behave conservatively in clay barriers around nuclear waste repositories and in natural sediments. Batch experiments tend to show little to no sorption, while in column experiments iodine is often retarded relative to tritiated water. Current surface complexation theory cannot account for negatively charged ion sorption to a negatively charged clay particle. Surface protonation and iodide sorption to clay minerals were examined using surface titrations and batch sorption experiments with a suite of clay minerals. Surface titrations were completed spanning a range of both pH values and ionic strengths. For reference, similar titrations were performed on pure forms of an Al-O powder. The titration curves were deconvoluted to attain the pKa distribution for each material at each ionic strength. The pKa distribution for the Al-O shows two distinct peaks at 4.8 and 7.5, which are invariant with ionic strength. The pKa distribution of clays was highly variable between the different minerals and as a function of ionic strength. Iodide sorption experiments were completed at high solid:solution ratios to exacerbate sorption properties. Palygorskite and kaolinite had the highest amount of iodide sorption and montmorillonite had the least. (authors)

  5. Raman spectroscopic study of ancient South African domestic clay pottery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legodi, M. A.; de Waal, D.

    2007-01-01

    The technique of Raman spectroscopy was used to examine the composition of ancient African domestic clay pottery of South African origin. One sample from each of four archaeological sites including Rooiwal, Lydenburg, Makahane and Graskop was studied. Normal dispersive Raman spectroscopy was found to be the most effective analytical technique in this study. XRF, XRD and FT-IR spectroscopy were used as complementary techniques. All representative samples contained common features, which were characterised by kaolin (Al 2Si 2O 5(OH) 5), illite (KAl 4(Si 7AlO 20)(OH) 4), feldspar (K- and NaAlSi 3O 8), quartz (α-SiO 2), hematite (α-Fe 2O 3), montmorillonite (Mg 3(Si,Al) 4(OH) 2·4.5H 2O[Mg] 0.35), and calcium silicate (CaSiO 3). Gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O) and calcium carbonates (most likely calcite, CaCO 3) were detected by Raman spectroscopy in Lydenburg, Makahane and Graskop shards. Amorphous carbon (with accompanying phosphates) was observed in the Raman spectra of Lydenburg, Rooiwal and Makahane shards, while rutile (TiO 2) appeared only in Makahane shard. The Raman spectra of Lydenburg and Rooiwal shards further showed the presence of anhydrite (CaSO 4). The results showed that South African potters used a mixture of clays as raw materials. The firing temperature for most samples did not exceed 800 °C, which suggests the use of open fire. The reddish brown and grayish black colours were likely due to hematite and amorphous carbon, respectively.

  6. HDPE/clay hybrids: the effect of clay modified with poly(diphenyl siloxanes) on thermal and rheological properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monasterio, Fernanda E.; Carrera, Maria C.; Erdmann, Eleonora; Destefanis, Hugo A., E-mail: ferelenakq@gmail.co [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Inst. de Investigaciones para la Industria Quimica; Pita, Victor J.R.R.; Dias, Marcos L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Profa. Eloisa Mano

    2009-07-01

    Poly(diphenyl siloxanes) (PDPhS) were synthesized in presence of organophilic clay in order to modify its nano structure. Two silane monomers were used: dimethoxydiphenylsilane and dichlorodiphenylsilane. The following characterizations were performed for all clays: XRD, FTIR and TGA/DTG. These siloxane-modified clays were more hydrophobic and had enhanced thermal stability. Solvent extraction was carried out in the siloxane-modified clays and the PDPhS soluble fraction analyzed according the molecular weight via GPC. The presence of free and grafted oligomers on clay surface was identified. The modified clays were added to HDPE by melt processing to obtain HDPE/clay hybrids which exhibited marked differences in the rheological behavior when compared with neat HDPE. (author)

  7. Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleber, S.-C.; Thieme, J.; Chao, W.; Fischer, P.

    2008-09-01

    The spatial arrangements of hematite particles within aqueous soil and clay samples are investigated with soft X-ray microscopy, taking advantage of the elemental contrast at the Fe-L edge around E = 707 eV. In combination with stereo microscopy, information about spatial arrangements are revealed and correlated to electrostatic interactions of the different mixtures. Manipulation of a sample mounted to the microscope is possible and particles added while imaging can be detected.

  8. Clay mineralogy in different geomorphic surfaces in sugarcane areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, L.; Marques, J., Jr.

    2012-04-01

    The crystallization of the oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite of clay fraction is the result of pedogenetic processes controlled by the relief. These minerals have influence on the physical and chemical attributes of soil and exhibit spatial dependence. The pattern of spatial distribution is influenced by forms of relief as the geomorphic surfaces. In this sense, the studies aimed at understanding the relationship between relief and the distribution pattern of the clay fraction attributes contribute to the delineation of specific areas of management in the field. The objective of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite of clay fraction and its relationship with the physical and chemical attributes in different geomorphic surfaces. Soil samples were collected in a transect each 25 m (100 samples) and in the sides of the same (200 samples) as well as an area of 500 ha (1 sample each six hectare). Geomorphic surfaces (GS) in the transect were mapped in detail to support mapping the entire area. The soil samples were taken to the laboratory for chemical, physical, and mineralogical analysis, and the pattern of spatial distribution of soil attributes was obtained by statistics and geostatistics. The GS I is considered the oldest surface of the study area, with depositional character, and a slope ranging from 0 to 4%. GS II and III are considered to be eroded, and the surface II plan a gentle slope that extends from the edge of the surface until the beginning of I and III. The crystallographic characteristics of the oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite showed spatial dependence and the distribution pattern corresponding to the limits present of the GS in the field. Surfaces I and II showed the best environments to the degree of crystallinity of hematite and the surface III to the greatest degree of crystallinity of goethite agreeing to the pedoenvironment

  9. Efficiency of natural and acid-activated clays in the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloussaief, Mabrouk; Benzina, Mourad

    2010-06-15

    The adsorption of Pb(2+) ions onto Tunisian clay in aqueous solution was studied in a batch system. Four samples of clay (RGC, RRC, AGC, and ARC) were used. The raw RGC and RRC clays were sampled in jebel Tejera-Esghira in Medenine area (Southeast of Tunisia). AGC and ARC corresponds respectively to RGC and RRC activated by 6M sulphuric acid. The adsorbents employed were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction, chemical analysis, and the specific surface area was also estimated. The ability of clay samples to remove Pb(2+) ions from aqueous solutions has been studied at different operating conditions: temperature and pH. The optimum pH for lead ions retention was found 7.0 for the four clay samples. The effect of temperature on adsorption phenomenon was also investigated. The results indicated that adsorption is an exothermic process for lead ions removal. The equilibrium adsorption data were analysed using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The adsorption capacities (X(m)) for RRC, RGC, ARC and AGC were found 17.84, 25.44, 27.15 and 40.75 mg g(-1), respectively. The performance of the red clay after activation was compared to that of silica gel, which has maximum adsorption of 20 mg g(-1). On the other hand, although the performance of activated carbon (88.3 mg g(-1)) is by far higher than that of the green clay after activation, the latter seems to have better performance than that of the silica gel.

  10. Effect of Clay Content and Soil-water Potential On Mobilization and Leaching of Colloids In Unsaturated Macroporous Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaergaard, C.; de Jonge, L. W.; Moldrup, P.

    The transport of strongly sorbed environmental contaminants may be enhanced due to sorption to mobile soil colloids. The most common source of mobile colloids in soil is the in-situ release of water-dispersible colloids (WDC), however experimental investigations of colloid mobilization in unsaturated macroporous soil are scarce. An understanding of the arrangement of colloids in aggregates, and the influence of clay on the development of the soil fabric and pore-size distributions is essential for the in- terpretation of colloid mobilization in soils. This emphasizes the important role of clay content, when evaluating the susceptibility of soils to release colloids and associated contaminants. This study was conducted to determine the effect of clay content and initial soil- water potential on colloid mobilization and leaching. Intact soil cores were sampled from an arable field at six locations along a naturally occurring texture gradient. Soil dispersibility was investigated using capillary saturation and drainage of field-moist packed aggregates. The amount of WDC in the soil was measured for each com- bination of clay content and initial soil-water potential (-2.5, -98 and -15530 hPa). Mobilization and leaching of colloids was investigated from unsaturated intact soil cores. The soils were irrigated at low intensity (1 mm/h), and effluent sampling was conducted at 5 cm tension. The results showed that colloid dispersion was significantly affected by both clay con- tent and initial soil-water potential. With a soil-water potential of -15530 hPa the col- loid release was generally low and no variation occurred between the soils. With in- creasing soil-water potential there was an increase in the amount of WDC for all soils. The increase in WDC was negatively correlated with clay content. The leaching of colloids from intact soil cores also decreased with increasing clay content at an ini- tial soil-water potential of -98 and -2.5 hPa, and no difference between

  11. REE and (э)Nd of clay fractions in sediments from the eastern Pacific Ocean: Evidence for clay sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jihua; SHI Xuefa; CHEN Lirong; HUANG Yongyang; WANG Yinxi; CUI Yingchun; BU Wenrui

    2005-01-01

    Clay fractions in the non-calcareous surface sediments from the eastern Pacific were analyzed for clay minerals, REE and 143Nd/144Nd. Montmorillonite/illite ratio (M/I ratio), total REE contents ((REE), LREE/HREE ratio and cerium anomaly (бCe) may effectively indicate the genesis of clay minerals. Clay fractions with M/I ratio >1, бCe (0.85, (REE (400 μg/g, LREE/HREE ratio (4, and REE patterns similar to those of pelagic sediments are terrigenous and autogenetic mixed clay fractions and contain more autogenetic montmorillonite. Clay fractions with M/I ratio <1, бCe=0.86 to 1.5, ΣREE=200 to 350 μg/g, LREE/HREE ratio (6 and REE distribution patterns similar to that of China loess are identified as terrigenous clay fraction. The 143Nd/144Nd ratios or (э)Nd values of clay fractions inherit the features of terrigenous sources of clay minerals. Clay fractions are divided into 4 types according to (э)Nd values. Terrigenous clay minerals of type I with the (э)Nd values of -8 to -6 originate mainly from North American fluvial deposits. Those of type II with the (э)Nd values of -9 to -7 are mainly from the East Asia and North American fluvial deposits. Those of type III with (э)Nd values of -6 to -3 could come from the central and eastern Pacific volcanic islands. Those of type IV with (э)Nd values of -13 to -12 may be from East Asia eolian. The terrigenous and autogenetic mixed clay fractions show patchy distributions, indicating that there are volcanic or hot-spot activities in the eastern Pacific plate, while the terrigenous clay fractions cover a large part of the study area, proving that the terrigenous clay minerals are dominant in the eastern Pacific.

  12. Neoformation of clay in lateral root catchments of mallee eucalypts: a chemical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboom, William H; Pate, John S; Aspandiar, Mehrooz

    2010-01-01

    A previous paper (Annals of Botany 103: 673-685) described formation of clayey pavements in lateral root catchments of eucalypts colonizing a recently formed sand dune in south-west Western Australia. Here chemical and morphological aspects of their formation at the site are studied. Chemical and physical examinations of soil cores through pavements and sand under adjacent heath assessed build-up of salts, clay and pH changes in or below pavements. Relationships of root morphology to clay deposition were examined and deposits subjected to scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Xylem transport of mineral elements in eucalypt and non-eucalypt species was studied by analysis of xylem (tracheal) sap from lateral roots. The columns of which pavements are composed develop exclusively on lower-tier lateral roots. Such sites show intimate associations of fine roots, fungal filaments, microbiota and clay deposits rich in Si, Al and Fe. Time scales for construction of pavements by eucalypts were assessed. Cores through columns of pavemented profiles showed gross elevations of bulk density, Al, Fe and Si in columns and related increases in pH, Mg and Ca status in lower profiles. A cutting through the dune exhibited pronounced alkalinity (pH 7-10) under mallee woodland versus acidity (pH 5-6.5) under proteaceous heath. Xylem sap analyses showed unusually high concentrations of Al, Fe, Mg and Si in dry-season samples from column-bearing roots. Deposition of Al-Fe-Si-rich clay is pivotal to pavement construction by eucalypts and leads to profound chemical and physical changes in relevant soil profiles. Microbial associates of roots are likely to be involved in clay genesis, with parent eucalypts supplying the required key mineral elements and carbon sources. Acquisition of the Al and Fe incorporated into clay derives principally from hydraulic uplift from ground water via deeply penetrating tap roots.

  13. Experimental method for characterizing CVOC removal from fractured clays during boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoling; Tan, Tianwu; Falta, Ronald W; Murdoch, Lawrence C

    2013-09-01

    Conventional remediation methods that rely on contact with contaminants can be ineffective in fractured media, but thermal methods of remediation involving CVOC stripping at boiling temperature show promise. However, limited experimental data are available to characterize thermal remediation because of challenges associated with high temperature. This research reports an experimental method using uniformly contaminated clay packed into two types of experimental cells, a rigid-wall stainless steel tube and a flexible-wall Teflon tube in a pressurized chamber. Both tubes are 5 cm in diameter and approximately 25 cm long. This laboratory apparatus was developed as a 1D physical model for contaminant transport in a cylindrical matrix towards a fracture, which is represented by one end of the cylinder and serves as the outlet of vapor and contaminant. The clay was contaminated with dissolved 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) and bromide, and the columns were heated to more than 100 °C and then the top end was depressurized to atmospheric pressure to induce boiling. The outflow was condensed and analyzed for contaminant mass. The flexible-wall cell was confined to 100 kPa (gage), allowing equilibrium boiling temperatures of approximately 120 °C to be maintained. The clay was sampled before and after heating and extracted to determine the DCA distribution along the length of the column. During a typical test in the rigid-wall cell, internal temperatures and pressures along the column during heating reached the saturated vapor pressure curve. DCA concentrations in the recovered condensate were up to 12 times of the initial pore concentration in the clay. Less than 5% of non-volatile bromide was recovered. Significant removal of DCA and water occurred along the entire length of the clay column. This suggests that boiling was occurring in the clay matrix.

  14. Change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiyouri N.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The compressibility of engineered barrier clays is, to a large extent, controlled by microstructure change due to the presence of chemical ions in clay-water system. This paper aims to investigate the change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water. We use two pure clays (kaolinite and bentonite in the study. One-dimensional consolidation tests were performed on reconstituted samples, which are prepared with distilled water and three types of heavy metal solutions (Pb(NO32, Cu(NO32, Zn(NO32,. In order to better understand the impact of chemical pore fluid on microstructure of the two clays, following the consolidation test, scanning electron microscope (SEM observations and mercury intrusion pore size distribution measurements (MIP were conducted. Due to the measurement range of MIP, which is only allowed to measure the minimal pore size 20 Å, BET method by gas sorption, whose measurement pore size range is from 3.5 Å to 500 Å, is used to measure the micropore size distribution. By this method, specific surface area of the soils can be also determined. It can be employed to demonstrate the difference of creep performance between the soils. Furthermore, a series of batch equilibrium tests were conducted to better understand the physical-chemical interactions between the particles of soils and the heavy metal ions. With the further consideration of the interparticle electrical attractive and repulsive force, an attempt has been made to predict the creep behaviour by using the modified Gouy-Chapman double layer theory. The results of calculation were compared with that of tests. The comparison shows that the prediction of compressibility of the clays according to the modified double diffuse layer theory can be reasonably agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Dielectric relaxation behavior of Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock: A hydraulic-mechanical-electromagnetic coupling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Norman; Bore, Thierry; Robinet, Jean-Charles; Coelho, Daniel; Taillade, Frederic; Delepine-Lesoille, Sylvie

    2013-09-01

    Water content is a key parameter to monitor in nuclear waste repositories such as the planed underground repository in Bure, France, in the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay formation. High-frequency electromagnetic (HF-EM) measurement techniques, i.e., time or frequency domain reflectometry, offer useful tools for quantitative estimation of water content in porous media. However, despite the efficiency of HF-EM methods, the relationship between water content and dielectric material properties needs to be characterized. Moreover, the high amount of swelling clay in the COx clay leads to dielectric relaxation effects which induce strong dispersion coupled with high absorption of EM waves. Against this background, the dielectric relaxation behavior of the clay rock was studied at frequencies from 1 MHz to 10 GHz with network analyzer technique in combination with coaxial transmission line cells. For this purpose, undisturbed and disturbed clay rock samples were conditioned to achieve a water saturation range from 0.16 to nearly saturation. The relaxation behavior was quantified based on a generalized fractional relaxation model under consideration of an apparent direct current conductivity assuming three relaxation processes: a high-frequency water process and two interface processes which are related to interactions between the aqueous pore solution and mineral particles (adsorbed/hydrated water relaxation, counter ion relaxation and Maxwell-Wagner effects). The frequency-dependent HF-EM properties were further modeled based on a novel hydraulic-mechanical-electromagnetic coupling approach developed for soils. The results show the potential of HF-EM techniques for quantitative monitoring of the hydraulic state in underground repositories in clay formations.

  16. Investigating the Thermal Limit of Clay Minerals for Applications in Nuclear Waste Repository Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteo, E. N.; Miller, A. W.; Kruichak, J.; Mills, M.; Tellez, H.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Clay minerals are likely candidates to aid in nuclear waste isolation due to their low permeability, favorable swelling properties, and high cation sorption capacities. Establishing the thermal limit for clay minerals in a nuclear waste repository is a potentially important component of repository design, as flexibility of the heat load within the repository can have a major impact on the selection of repository design. For example, the thermal limit plays a critical role in the time that waste packages would need to cool before being transferred to the repository. Understanding the chemical and physical changes that occur in clay minerals at various temperatures above the current thermal limit (of 100 °C) can enable decision-makers with information critical to evaluating the potential trade-offs of increasing the thermal limit within the repository. Most critical is gaining understanding of how varying thermal conditions in the repository will impact radionuclide sorption and transport in clay materials either as engineered barriers or as disposal media. A variety of clays (illite, mixed layer illite/smectite, montmorillonite, and palygorskite) were heated for a range of temperatures between 100-500 °C. These samples were characterized by a variety of methods, including nitrogen adsorption, x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, barium chloride exchange for cation exchange capacity (CEC), and iodide sorption. The nitrogen porosimetry shows that for all the clays, thermally-induced changes in BET surface area are dominated by collapse/creation of the microporosity, i.e. pore diameters Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND Number: 2013-6352A.

  17. Characterization of a clay from Vitoria da Conquista, Bahia, Brazil, by thermal analysis; Caracterizacao de uma argila de Vitoria da Conquista, BA, por analise termica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, O.M.; Zandonadi, A.R.; Martins, M.V. Surmani; Carrio, J.A.G.; Munhoz Junior, A.H. [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Kaolinitic clays are vastly used in ceramic industry. Light coloration burned clays are very useful in the coatings production because of their aesthetic. In this work clay material from Vitoria da Conquista (south-west Bahia, Brazil) was characterized by various techniques. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) shows a kaolinite characteristic curve with an endothermic peak at 492 deg C, which corresponds to the kaolinite - metakaolinite transformation. Transformation alpha to beta quartz is characterized by a 573 deg C peak. The samples were also characterized by water absorption and x rays powder diffraction. The 1100 deg C burned samples were tested by rupture tension with acceptable results. (author)

  18. Improving the performance of clay from Gabal Um Qumar as drilling mud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Abdou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main component of water base drilling fluids to perform common properties that facilitate safe and satisfactory drilling is bentonite operations. This paper represents composition and treatment capability of clays collected from clayston quarries in Gabal um Qumar north Cairo-Ismailia Desert Road, Egypt for its application as water base drilling mud. Chemical analysis, XRD and particle size distribution showed that these clays consist of montmorillonite. The rheological properties of the prepared suspension from these clay samples and its activation products by using chemicals and polymers were investigated. Results of untreated samples indicate that they cannot be used as a drilling mud but after activation processes by soda ash, Carboxi Methyl Cellulose (CMC and Drispac Polymer significant changes were observed in yield and rheological properties. Accordingly this type of clay after activation by polymer can be classified as sub-bentonite and classified between bentonite grade and medium bentonite grade that can be used as drilling mud for medium depth wells.

  19. Experimental Evidence for Hyperfiltration of Saline Water through Compacted Clay Aquitard in the Hebei Plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wang; Zongyu Chen; Baoqian Duan; Jingli Shao

    2014-01-01

    It becomes an increasing concern that groundwater quality in exploited deep confined aquifer may deteriorate due to brackish water leakage from its overlying saline aquifer in Hebei Plain. However, the monitoring data show that the TDS does not significantly change in the exploited aquifer. Some physics or chemistry processes must have taken place in aquitards during brackish leakage. The semi-permeable membrane function of clay aquitard during the process of hyperfiltration (reverse os-mosis) should be one of the most important processes. To confirm and test this hyperfiltration mecha-nism, a series of experiments were performed in which NaCl solutions were hydraulically forced through different clay sampled from aquitard. The solution 7 g/L in NaCl was forced through at 20 °C by a fluid pressure of 0.5 kN. The results show that hyperfiltration indeed happens in caly aquitard. Semi-permeability is quantified by the reflection coefficientσ. The mean rejection coefficients (σ) for clay samples #1, #2 and #3 were estimated to be 0.063, 0.164 and 0.040, respectively. This behavior of clay was well explained with the theory of the diffuse double layer. The hyperfiltration effect is to the great extent responsible for the chemical process in the aquitard.

  20. Polypropylene–clay composite prepared from Indian bentonite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhuchhanda Sarkar; Kausik Dana; Sankar Ghatak; Amarnath Banerjee

    2008-02-01

    In the present work, a set of experimental polypropylene (PP) clay composites containing pristine bentonite clay of Indian origin has been prepared and then characterized. The polymer clay composites are processed by solution mixing of polypropylene with bentonite clay using a solvent xylene and high speed electric stirrer at a temperature around 130°C and then by compression molding at 170°C. The mechanical properties of PP–clay composites like tensile strength, hardness and impact resistance have been investigated. Microstructural studies were carried out using scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope and the thermal properties were studied using differential scanning calorimeter. Mechanical properties of the prepared composites showed highest reinforcing and toughening effects of the clay filler at a loading of only 5 mass % in PP matrix. Tensile strength was observed to be highest in case of 5 mass % of clay loading and it was more than 14% of that of the neat PP, while toughness increased by more than 80%. Bentonite clay–PP composite (5 mass %) also showed 60% increase in impact energy value. However, no significant change was observed in case of hardness and tensile modulus. Higher percentages of bentonite clay did not further improve the properties with respect to pristine polypropylene. The study of the microstructure of the prepared polymer layered silicate clay composites showed a mixed morphology with multiple stacks of clay layers and tactoids of different thicknesses.

  1. Role of clay as catalyst in Friedel–Craft alkylation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tanushree Choudhury; Nirendra M Misra

    2011-10-01

    Solid acids have become increasingly important for many liquid-phase industrial reactions these days. Montmorillonite clays (2:1 clay mineral) have been used as efficient solid acid catalysts for a number of organic and liquid phase reactions and offer several advantages over classic acids. Tailor made catalysts can be prepared from clays by suitably adjusting their acidity and surface area by acid activation. In the present work, preparation, characterization and performance of Pt (II) clays, Cu (II) clays, acid clay, and sol–gel hybrids of Cu (II) clays as solid catalysts in a test Friedel–Craft alkylation reaction of benzyl chloride with toluene using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) are reported. Product formation has been analysed by FTIR spectroscopy. The main objective of this work is to show how clay as a solid catalyst affects reaction rates and activation energies. Acidity and dispersion of solid catalysts are twomain factors which govern a catalysis reaction. Kinetic parameter analysis and XRD studies confirm that acid Pt (II) clay and Pt (II) clay dispersed by natural dispersants aremore effective catalysts. In contrast to the reactions using AlCl3, the experimental conditions are non-polluting and the final work up does not require any aqueous treatment.

  2. Effective Removal of Heavy Metals from Wastewater Using Modified Clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mun-Seon; Vijayarangamuthu, K; Han, EunJi; Jeon, Ki-Joon

    2016-05-01

    We report an economical and eco-friendly way to remove the heavy metal pollutant using modified clay. The modification of clay was done by calcining the natural clay from Kyushu region in Japan. Further, the removal efficiency for various pH and contact time was evaluated. The morphology of the clays was studied using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The structural and chemical analyses of modified clay were done by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and Energy dispersion analysis (EDAX) to understand the properties related to the removal of heavy metal pollutant. Further, we studied the absorption efficiency of clay for various pH and contacting time using Ni polluted water. The modified clays show better removal efficiency for all pH with different saturation time. The adsorption follows pseudo-second order kinetics and the adsorption capacity of modified clay is 1.5 times larger than that of natural clay. The increase in the adsorption efficiency of modified clay was correlated to the increase in hematite phase along with increase in surface area due to surface morphological changes.

  3. Adsorption of dyes using different types of clay: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemo, Aderonke Ajibola; Adeoye, Idowu Olatunbosun; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2015-09-01

    Increasing amount of dyes in the ecosystem particularly in wastewater has propelled the search for more efficient low-cost adsorbents. The effective use of the sorption properties (high surface area and surface chemistry, lack of toxicity and potential for ion exchange) of different clays as adsorbents for the removal of different type of dyes (basic, acidic, reactive) from water and wastewater as potential alternatives to activated carbons has recently received widespread attention because of the environmental-friendly nature of clay materials. Insights into the efficiencies of raw and modified/activated clay adsorbents and ways of improving their efficiencies to obtain better results are discussed. Acid-modified clay resulted in higher rate of dye adsorption and an increased surface area and porosity (49.05 mm2 and 53.4 %). Base-modified clay has lower adsorption capacities, while ZnCl2-modified clay had the least rate of adsorption with a surface area of 44.3 mm2 and porosity of 43.4 %. This review also explores the grey areas of the adsorption properties of the raw clays and the improved performance of activated/modified clay materials with particular reference to the effects of pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capacities of the clays. Various challenges encountered in using clay materials are highlighted and a number of future prospects for the adsorbents are proposed.

  4. Adsorption of dyes using different types of clay: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemo, Aderonke Ajibola; Adeoye, Idowu Olatunbosun; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2017-05-01

    Increasing amount of dyes in the ecosystem particularly in wastewater has propelled the search for more efficient low-cost adsorbents. The effective use of the sorption properties (high surface area and surface chemistry, lack of toxicity and potential for ion exchange) of different clays as adsorbents for the removal of different type of dyes (basic, acidic, reactive) from water and wastewater as potential alternatives to activated carbons has recently received widespread attention because of the environmental-friendly nature of clay materials. Insights into the efficiencies of raw and modified/activated clay adsorbents and ways of improving their efficiencies to obtain better results are discussed. Acid-modified clay resulted in higher rate of dye adsorption and an increased surface area and porosity (49.05 mm2 and 53.4 %). Base-modified clay has lower adsorption capacities, while ZnCl2-modified clay had the least rate of adsorption with a surface area of 44.3 mm2 and porosity of 43.4 %. This review also explores the grey areas of the adsorption properties of the raw clays and the improved performance of activated/modified clay materials with particular reference to the effects of pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capacities of the clays. Various challenges encountered in using clay materials are highlighted and a number of future prospects for the adsorbents are proposed.

  5. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-06-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner.

  6. Clay mineralogy of the Boda Claystone Formation (Mecsek Mts., SW Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Németh Tibor

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Boda Claystone Formation (BCF is the host rock of the planned site for high level nuclear waste repository inHungary. Samples representing the dominant rock types of BCF were studied: albitic claystone, claystone with high illite content, and analcime bearing claystone. Clay minerals in these three rock types were characterized by Xray powder diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and thermal analysis (DTA-TG, and the results were discussed from the point of view of the radionuclide sorption properties being studied in the future. Mineral compositions of bulk BCF samples vary in wide ranges. In the albitic sample, besides the dominant illite, few percent of chlorite represents the layer silicates in the clay fraction. Illite is the dominating phase in the illitic sample, with a few percent of chlorite. HRTEM study revealed that the thickness of illite particles rarely reaches 10 layers, usually are of 5-6 TOT layer thick. Illite crystals are generally thicker in the albitic sample than in the illitic one. The significant difference between the clay mineral characterisitics of the analcimous and the other two samples is that the former contains regularly interstratified chlorite/smectite beside the dominant illite.

  7. Brazilian clay organophilization aiming its use in oil / water removal; Organofilizacao de argila brasileira visando seu uso na remocao oleo/agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, M.F.; Lima, W.S.; Oliveira, G.C.; Silva, M.M.; Rodrigues, M.G.F., E-mail: mariaugusta.f@gmail.com, E-mail: meiry@deq.ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (LABNOV/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Desenvolvimento de Novos Materiais

    2012-07-01

    Clays when subjected to modification with the addition of organic surfactant are called organoclays acquire hydrophobic character, they have an affinity for organic compounds. The organoclays can be used as adsorbents are considered promising agents in environmental control. The objective is to prepare organoclays clays from commercial use in order to remove organic contaminants. The clay used was gray, as polycationic, supplied by Süd-Chemie company and the quaternary ammonium salt was cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (Cetremide). The fresh samples and organoclay were characterized by the technique of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Cation Exchange Capacity, testing expansion and affinity with organic compounds: Swelling of Foster and adsorption capacity. The results showed appropriate conditions organophilic process. Through XRD confirmed the increase in basal spacing for the modified clay in relation to the clay in nature. (author)

  8. Characterization of two clays - attapulgite and sepiolite - before and after acid activation; Caracterizacao de duas argilas - atapulgita e sepiolita - antes e apos ativacao acida com HCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, R.N.; Soares, G.A., E-mail: renataoliveira@poli.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia; Barreto, L.S. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Among the special clays, two of them are distinguished by their large surface area: attapulgite and sepiolite. Although, being natural clays, when they are removed from the formation sites, their structural channels may be filled of impurities. The process done to clean these channels is called acid activation. The present work aim to treated samples from both clays by using 3M and 5M HCl solution under ultrasonic waves for 1 hour. The characterization of the clays before and after activation was carried out by SEM/EDS, XRD and surface area measure by method BET. The acid treatments employed were too aggressive, in special that with 5M HCl solution, which results in partial lixiviation of these clays. (author)

  9. Computer controlled chamber measurements for clay adherence relevant for potential dioxin exposure through skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Alesia; Bursac, Zoran; Johnson, Wayne; Davis, Jasmine

    2012-01-01

    A computer-controlled mechanical chamber was used to control the contact between aluminum sheet samples laden with clay, and cotton sheet samples for the measurement of mass transfer. The contact parameters of pressure (20 to 60 kPa) and time (10 to 70 sec) were varied for 160 multiple experiments of mass soil transfer. Before log transformation the average transfer for 'First Transfer' of clay particles was 34.4 ± 6.3 mg/8.97 cm(2) while that for 'Total Transfer' was 36.1 ± 6.8 mg/8.97 cm(2). Second contact, therefore, resulted in an average transfer of 1.70 ± 0.76 mg/8.97 cm(2). These values are well above adherence values measured for potting soil and sand as reported for previous experiments using the same methodologies. Based on the univariate analysis and the multiple regression analysis we were able to see some effect of parameters on the clay adherence values. The effect of pressure increases was significant for the higher levels of 50 and 60 kPa. In addition, we observed that increases in temperature were significant for 'First Transfer,' and less so for 'Total Transfer'. Past experiments using potting soil and play sand show high adherence values to human cadaver skin over cotton sample; the same scenario would be expected for clay. This data set can be used to improve estimates of dermal exposure to dioxins found in ball clays often used by artisans in the making of pottery.

  10. Laboratory chemical remanent magnetization in clay and the filtering of magnetic reversals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, J. P.; Cairanne, G.; Aubourg, C.; Moreau, M. G.

    2003-04-01

    In order to study the mechanisms of remagnetization in sediments we heated clay samples at temperature from 220°C to 250°C in a magnetic field controlled in direction and in intensity and in different physico-chemical conditions. 1- heating in argon atmosphere or in open atmosphere. 2- heating in closed titanium cells or in confined atmosphere. The magnetic mineral present in clay before heating is magnetite. In addition to clay minerals, pyrite is also present in noticeable proportion. The results are summarized as follows: In the samples heated in argon atmosphere, the final magnetic phase is a mixture of magnetite and hematite. In the samples heated in closed cells only magnetite is produced. In both cases, the CRM is in the direction of the field and it is proportional to its intensity. When the sense of the field is reversed during heating, the results are different: two opposite components of magnetization are acquired in both cases : they are separable by AF demagnetization when the clay was heated in argon atmosphere, but they remain impossible to separate when the clay was heated in closed cells. We propose that in the first case, two distinct processes of different time constants cooperate: production of magnetite from pyrite and partial oxidation of magnetite in hematite leading to a final product showing an evolution with time. In the second case, magnetite is produced continuously with a similar coercivity spectrum for the beginning to the end of the reaction. As a consequence, the two opposite components of CRM are not separable. This type of remagnetization constitutes a perfect filter against reversals.

  11. Experimental study of subaqueous, clay-rich, gravity flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, J.; Pratson, L.

    2003-04-01

    Recent laboratory experiments suggest a broad spectrum of flow and depositional behavior for compositionally varied subaqueous gravity flows. Dilute turbidity currents and cohesive debris flows are the end members of the spectrum. In this study we used geometrically scaled laboratory experiments to examine the flow dynamics and deposits associated with slurries of varying sediment composition. Slurries were composed of a mixture of tap water, kaolinite clay, 45 micron silt and 120 micron sand and were introduced into a 0.2m wide submerged channel. Slurry sediment concentrations ranged from 1-30% by volume. In all slurries, sediment was added in a ratio of 8:1:1 by volume of clay, silt, sand. A total volume of one cubic meter of slurry was used for each experiment and was introduced through a constant head tank allowing examination of sustained and steady gravity flow events lasting up to 5 minutes in duration. The dynamics of the flows (turbulence, hydroplaning, laminar shearing, etc.) were examined through the use of digital video cameras, dye injection tracking, high frequency sonar and visual observation. Vertical suspended sediment concentration and vertical grain size distributions were measured for each run from samples collected from siphon rakes. Deposit thicknesses and grain size distributions were measured from sediment samples taken from flow deposits. Rheological measurements and Atterberg limits of the slurries were made in an effort to link flow and depositional characteristics to bulk properties of the slurry mixture. The experiments show a clear linkage between the initial compositions of the slurries, their rheological properties, flow dynamics and deposits. Slurries with clay concentrations below 10% by volume appeared to be very turbulent. The silt and sand deposited during these events were transported along the bed as ripples. Flows between 10-20% sediment by volume appeared to be hybrid flows having both turbulent and non-turbulent elements

  12. In situ testing of waste glass in clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Iseghem, P.Ph. [SCK/CEN, Mol (Belgium)

    1994-12-31

    The actual status of an in-situ test programme exposing different waste glass samples directly to Boom clay is reviewed. Corrosion test tubes have been retrieved after residence for 5 years at 16{degrees}C, 2 years at 90{degrees}, and 5 years at 170{degrees}C. The corrosion is interpreted in terms of mass loss, surface analysis by SEM and profiling by EPMA and SIMS. At 16{degrees}C, glasses dissolve about 0.02-0.08 {mu}m per year. At higher temperature dissolution is more than two orders of magnitude larger. A good agreement is obtained between the mass losses and the surface analyses. The advantages and limitations of the Belgian in-situ tests are compared with the conclusions of an international expert group.

  13. Thermal stability of segmented polyurethane elastomers reinforced by clay particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavličević Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the influence of clay nanoparticles on thermal properties of segmented polyurethanes based on hexamethylene- diisocyanate, aliphatic polycarbonate diol and 1,4-butanediol as chain extender. The organically modified particles of montmorillonite and bentonite were used as reinforcing fillers. The structure of elastomeric materials was varied either by diol type or chain extender content. The ratio of OH groups from diol and chain extender (R was either 1 or 10. Thermal properties of prepared materials were determined using modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC. Thermal stability of obtained elastomers has been studied by simultaneously thermogravimetry coupled with DSC. The glass transition temperature, Tg, of soft segments for all investigated samples was about -33°C. On the basis of DTG results, it was concluded that obtained materials were very stable up to 300°C.

  14. Enhanced reductive dechlorination in clay till contaminated with chlorinated solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ida

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most frequently found contaminants in groundwater. In fractured media, chlorinated ethenes and ethanes are transported downwards through preferential pathways with subsequent diffusion into the sediment matrix. Due to slow back diffusion it can serve as a long...... term secondary source that can leach to the underlying aquifer. As some of the chlorinated solvents and their degradation products are toxic and carcinogenic, remediation technologies applicable in low permeability settings are needed. Enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD) has been proven efficient...... and ethanes in clay till (Vadsbyvej) revealed a very complex system where diffusion, biotic and abiotic degradation processes occurred simultaneously. High resolution sub sampling with combined use of chemical analysis, molecular microbial tools and CSIA was necessary to identify both biotic and abiotic...

  15. Speciation of neptunium after diffusion in Opalinus Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, Tobias; Amayri, Samer; Drebert, Jakob; Froehlich, Daniel R.; Grolimund, Daniel; Rosemann, Jonathan [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry; Kaplan, Ugras [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland). Swiss Light Source

    2015-07-01

    Argillaceous rock formations are under consideration as a potential host rock for the construction of high-level nuclear waste repositories. Under environmental conditions the most stable oxidation states of {sup 237}Np (t{sub 1/2}=2.1 x 10{sup 6} a) are Np(IV) and Np(V). We have investigated the sorption and diffusion of the more mobile Np(V) in Opalinus Clay (OPA, Mont Terri, Switzerland) (Wu et al. 2009, Froehlich et al. 2011 and 2012 a). OPA, which is present in Switzerland and southern Germany, possesses a micro-scale heterogeneity and is composed of several types of clay minerals, but also of calcite, quartz and iron(II)-bearing minerals. In our previous diffusion (Wu et al. 2009) and anaerobic sorption experiments (Froehlich et al. 2011), we observed higher distribution coefficients, K{sub d}, than expected from batch experiments performed in air, indicating that a partial reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) had occurred. To test this hypothesis, different sorption and diffusion samples with Np(V) were prepared at pH 7.6 for spatially resolved molecular-level investigations at the microXAS beamline at the Swiss Light Source (PSI, Villigen, Switzerland) (Froehlich et al. 2012 b). Elemental distributions of Ca, Fe and Np have been determined by μ-XRF mapping. Regions of high Np concentration were subsequently investigated by Np L{sub III}-edge μ-XANES. In most samples Np spots with considerable amounts of tetravalent Np could be found, even when the experiments were performed under ambient-air conditions. In some cases, almost pure Np(IV) L{sub III}-edge XANES spectra were recorded. In case of the anaerobic sorption sample, a clear correlation between Np and Fe was observed by μ-XRF, indicating that iron(II)-bearing minerals could be responsible for the reduction of Np(V). μ-XRD measurements of this sample showed that pyrite is at least one of the redox-active phases determining the speciation of Np in OPA. In this case, Np was accumulated on pyrite, indicating

  16. Geomechanical and water vapor absorption characteristics of clay-bearing soft rocks at great depth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Na; Liu Longbiao; Hou Dongwen; He Manchao; Liu Yilei

    2014-01-01

    The geological and physico-mechanical properties characterization of deep soft rocks is one of the critical scientific issues for deep soft rock engineering. In the present study, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and mercury intrusion porosimetry experiments were carried out to investigate the mineral compositions, microstructure and porosity characteristics of the 13 clay-bearing soft rock samples collected from a deep coal mine in China. Water vapor absorption and uniaxial compressive experiments were also performed to examine water absorption characteristics and water-induced strength degradation effect of the investigated deep soft rock samples. The results show that the dominant mineral components in mudstone, coarse sandstone and fine sandstone samples were calcite, quartz and clay respectively. The contents of clay minerals in all samples were relatively high and ranged from 12.3% (N-4) to 56.5% (XS-1). Water vapor absorption processes of all the soft rock samples follow an exponential law which is very similar to the water vapor absorption behavior of conglomerate samples reported in our earlier study. Correlation analyses also suggested that there were good positive correlation relationships between water absorptivity and clay minerals for both mudstone and sandstone samples. Furthermore, it was found that vapor absorption was not correlated with the porosity for mudstone, however, positive correlation relationship was found between them for sand-stone. Correlation analysis between UCS, modulus of elasticity and water content demonstrated that both of them tend to decrease with the increase of their water content due to water absorption.

  17. ZVI-Clay remediation of a chlorinated solvent source zone, Skuldelev, Denmark: 1. Site description and contaminant source mass reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Riis, Charlotte; Christensen, Anders G.;

    2012-01-01

    Field investigations on the effects of ZVI-Clay soil mixing were conducted at a small DNAPL source zone with PCE as the parent compound. In a one-year monitoring program, soil samples were collected at three horizontal sampling planes (2.5, 5.0 and 7.5m bgs.). PCE was found to have a pseudo first...

  18. Identification of chlorinated solvents degradation zones in clay till by high resolution chemical, microbial and compound specific isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ida; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Bælum, Jacob;

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in clay till was investigated at a contaminated site (Vadsby, Denmark) by high resolution sampling of intact cores combined with groundwater sampling. Over decades of contamination, bioactive zones with degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,...

  19. Ball clay and bentonite deposits of the central and western Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosterman, John W.

    1984-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain produces approximately 85 percent of the ball clay used in the United States. The best commercial-grade clay deposits are composed of poorly crystalline kaolinite and small amounts of Md illite and (or) smectite. Sand and silt and iron oxide minerals are virtually absent, but quartz is present in the clay-size fraction. The best grade ball clays are found as lenses limited to the Wilcox Group (Paleocene and lower Eocene) and Claiborne Group (middle Eocene). Reserves of ball clay are sufficient for the present, but because of the lenticular nature of the clay bodies, close-spaced drilling, detailed sampling, mineralogic analyses, and ceramic testing are needed to prove future reserves.Approximately 11 percent of the total bentonite produced in the United States comes from the Gulf Coast region. The commercial-grade bentonites are composed primarily of smectite with little or no Md illite and kaolinite. The nonclay impurities are quartz, feldspar, muscovite, biotite, calcite, dolomite, gypsum, and heulandite. Commercial bentonites occur in the Upper Cretaceous formations in Alabama and Mississippi, in Paleocene formations in Mississippi and Tennessee, and in Eocene and Miocene formations in Texas. The demand for low-swelling bentonite of the Gulf Coastal Plain has not increased along with the demand for swelling bentonite; therefore the reserves are adequate.

  20. Hydration and hydrolysis of samarium (III) in montmorillonite clay: a neutron diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, O; Charlet, L; Gehin, A; Geoffroy, N [LGIT-OSUG, University of Grenoble I and CNRS, BP 53, F-38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Cuello, G J [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Brendle, J [LMPC, UMR CNRS 7016, ENSCMu, UHA, 3 rue A Werner, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France)

    2008-03-12

    Neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution was carried out at room temperature on hydrated samples of Sm montmorillonite, prepared at pH = 4 and 8, in order to find out whether Sm is present as aqueous Sm(OH){sub 3}{sup o}, Sm{sup 3+}, or intermediate hydrolyzed species, and how it is linked to the clay surface. It was found that the number of hydrogen atoms (5.5 {+-} 2.0) nearest to Sm{sup 3+} at pH = 4 is equal to or even slightly smaller than that of oxygen atoms (7.5 {+-} 1.0). This means that Sm{sup 3+} is bound to the clay surface and it is probably partially hydrolyzed. This result is very close to those obtained earlier for Yb{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+}, despite the different methods of sample preparation and the different mineralogy of the samples.