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Sample records for unique transcribed sequence

  1. Identification of Transcribed Enhancers by Genome-Wide Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinka, Steven; Reimer, Michael H; Pulakanti, Kirthi; Pinello, Luca; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Rao, Sridhar

    2017-01-01

    Recent work has shown that RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription at distal cis-regulatory elements serves as a mark of highly active enhancers. Production of noncoding RNAs at enhancers, termed eRNAs, correlates with higher expression of genes that the enhancer interacts with; hence, eRNAs provide a new tool to model gene activity in normal and disease tissues. Moreover, this unique class of noncoding RNA has diverse roles in transcriptional regulation. Transcribed enhancers can be identified by a common signature of epigenetic marks by overlaying a series of genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA sequencing datasets. A computational approach to filter non-enhancer elements and other classes of noncoding RNAs is essential to not cloud downstream analysis. Here we present a protocol that combines wet and dry bench methods to accurately identify transcribed enhancers genome-wide as well as an experimental procedure to validate these datasets.

  2. PCR-Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) genes sequencing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2. Department of Pure and Applied Zoology, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria. 3. ... Keywords: Internal transcribed spacer genes, phylogenetic, genetic ... ization of fungi by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) am- .... Basic Local Alignment search Tool (BLAST) to establish ..... Population structure and.

  3. Identification of human chromosome 22 transcribed sequences with ORF expressed sequence tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza, S J; Camargo, A A; Briones, M R;

    2000-01-01

    by EST or full length cDNA sequences available in GenBank but not utilized in the initial annotation of the first human chromosome sequence. Thus despite representing less than 15% of all expressed human sequences in the public databases at the time of the present analysis, ORESTES sequences defined 48......Transcribed sequences in the human genome can be identified with confidence only by alignment with sequences derived from cDNAs synthesized from naturally occurring mRNAs. We constructed a set of 250,000 cDNAs that represent partial expressed gene sequences and that are biased toward the central...... coding regions of the resulting transcripts. They are termed ORF expressed sequence tags (ORESTES). The 250,000 ORESTES were assembled into 81,429 contigs. Of these, 1, 181 (1.45%) were found to match sequences in chromosome 22 with at least one ORESTES contig for 162 (65.6%) of the 247 known genes...

  4. MytiBase: a knowledgebase of mussel (M. galloprovincialis transcribed sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roch Philippe

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Bivalves are among the most studied marine organisms due to their ecological role, economic importance and use in pollution biomonitoring, very little information is available on the genome sequences of mussels. This study reports the functional analysis of a large-scale Expressed Sequence Tag (EST sequencing from different tissues of Mytilus galloprovincialis (the Mediterranean mussel challenged with toxic pollutants, temperature and potentially pathogenic bacteria. Results We have constructed and sequenced seventeen cDNA libraries from different Mediterranean mussel tissues: gills, digestive gland, foot, anterior and posterior adductor muscle, mantle and haemocytes. A total of 24,939 clones were sequenced from these libraries generating 18,788 high-quality ESTs which were assembled into 2,446 overlapping clusters and 4,666 singletons resulting in a total of 7,112 non-redundant sequences. In particular, a high-quality normalized cDNA library (Nor01 was constructed as determined by the high rate of gene discovery (65.6%. Bioinformatic screening of the non-redundant M. galloprovincialis sequences identified 159 microsatellite-containing ESTs. Clusters, consensuses, related similarities and gene ontology searches have been organized in a dedicated, searchable database http://mussel.cribi.unipd.it. Conclusion We defined the first species-specific catalogue of M. galloprovincialis ESTs including 7,112 unique transcribed sequences. Putative microsatellite markers were identified. This annotated catalogue represents a valuable platform for expression studies, marker validation and genetic linkage analysis for investigations in the biology of Mediterranean mussels.

  5. Identification of transcribed sequences in the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, K.

    1992-12-01

    The workshop was held at the National Institutes of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland, on October 4 and 5, 1991. Twenty-four investigators attended from England, Germany and the United States. The topics discussed included: Genome sequence analysis using computer assisted detection of open reading frames, splice sites and hexamer patterns, direct exon identification using trapping of internal and 3' exons, and a recombination based system, cDNA library construction and screening, including the use of normalization and subtraction procedures, Alu and splice donor site PCR from hybrid cell lines, and microdissection clones as probes, use of labeled CDNAS as probes to screen lambda and cosmid libraries, and sequencing of random cDNAs.

  6. Origin and relationships of Saintpaulia (Gesneriaceae) based on ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, M; Cronk, Q

    1997-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of eight species of Saintpaulia H. Wendl., 19 species of Streptocarpus Lindl. (representing all major growth forms within the genus), and two outgroups (Haberlea rhodopensis Friv., Chirita spadiciformis W. T. Wang) were examined using comparative nucleotide sequences from the two internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA. The length of the ITS 1 region ranged from 228 to 249 base pairs (bp) and the ITS 2 region from 196 to 245 bp. Pairwise sequence divergence across both spacers for ingroup and outgroup species ranged from 0 to 29%. Streptocarpus is not monophyletic, and Saintpaulia is nested within Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpus is monophyletic. The ITS sequence data demonstrate that the unifoliate Streptocarpus species form a clade, and are also characterized by a unique 47-bp deletion in ITS 2. The results strongly support the monophyly of (1) Saintpaulia, and (2) Saintpaulia plus the African members of the subgenus Streptocarpella of Streptocarpus. The data suggest the evolution of Saintpaulia from Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. The differences in flower and vegetative characters are probably due to ecological adaptation leading to a relatively rapid radiation of Saintpaulia.

  7. Identification of genes transcribed by Pasteurella multocida in rabbit livers through the selective capture of transcribed sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dongchun; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Aiqin; Liu, Jiasen; Yuan, Dongwei; Jiang, Qian; Lin, Huan; Si, Changde; Qu, Liandong

    2012-06-01

    Pasteurella multocida, a Gram-negative nonmotile coccobacillus, is the causative agent of fowl cholera in poultry, hemorrhagic septicemia in cattle, atropic rhinitis in swine, and snuffles in rabbits. The differentially expressed gene profile of P. multocida in infected rabbit livers was identified and compared with that from in vitro culture by selective capture of transcribed sequences. A total of 31 genes were identified, of which 28 encoded enzymes for amino acid biosynthesis and metabolism, intermediary metabolism, and energy metabolism, or proteins for regulatory adaptive responses, general microbial stress response, transport proteins, and secreted proteinases. Three were unknown, novel genes. Five genes representing different categories were chosen randomly and verified by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. All were upregulated by P. multocida in infected rabbit livers, with changes ranging from 1.61- to 13.55-fold when compared with in vitro cultures. This study has identified genes of P. multocida that are upregulated during infection of rabbit livers when compared with in vitro growth conditions. The genes will provide a molecular basis for further study of the pathogenesis of P. multocida.

  8. Additional data for a new Theileria sp. from China based on the sequences of ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junlong; Guan, Guiquan; Liu, Zhijie; Liu, Aihong; Ma, Miling; Bai, Qi; Yin, Hong; Luo, Jianxun

    2013-02-01

    Theileria sinensis was recently isolated and named as an independent Theileria species that infects cattle in China. To date, this parasite has been described based on its morphology, transmission and molecular studies, indicating that it should be classified as a distinct species. To test the validity of this taxon, the two internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S rRNA gene were cloned and sequenced from three T. sinensis isolates. The complete ITS sequences were compared with those of other Theileria sp. available in GenBank. Phylogenetic analyses based on sequence data for the complete ITS sequences indicate that T. sinensis lies in a distinct clade that is separate from that of T. buffeli/orientalis and T. annulata. Sequence comparisons indicate that different T. sinensis isolates possess unique sizes of ITS1 and ITS2 as well as species-specific nucleotide sequences. This analysis provides new molecular data to support the classification of T. sinensis as a distinct species from other known Theileria spp. based on ITS sequences.

  9. Characterization of Dermanyssus gallinae (Acarina: Dermanissydae) by sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, L; Cafiero, M A; Camarda, A; La Salandra, G; Cucchiarini, L; Dachà, M

    2009-10-01

    In the present work mites previously identified as Dermanyssus gallinae De Geer (Acari, Mesostigmata) using morphological keys were investigated by molecular tools. The complete internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), 5.8S ribosomal DNA, and ITS2 region of the ribosomal DNA from mites were amplified and sequenced to examine the level of sequence variations and to explore the feasibility of using this region in the identification of this mite. Conserved primers located at the 3'end of 18S and at the 5'start of 28S rRNA genes were used first, and amplified fragments were sequenced. Sequence analyses showed no variation in 5.8S and ITS2 region while slight intraspecific variations involving substitutions as well as deletions concentrated in the ITS1 region. Based on the sequence analyses a nested PCR of the ITS2 region followed by RFLP analyses has been set up in the attempt to provide a rapid molecular diagnostic tool of D. gallinae.

  10. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing reveals considerable fungal diversity in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, A J; Evanowski, R L; Martin, N H; Boor, K J; Wiedmann, M

    2017-09-13

    Fungi are important spoilage organisms in dairy products. However, little is known about the diversity of naturally occurring spoilage fungi in raw milk and processed dairy products, due at least in part to the fact that classical fungal identification methods require considerable expertise. To gain further insight into the fungal diversity in the dairy system, we isolated fungi from raw milk, raw and pasteurized milk cheese, and yogurt using the selective dichloran rose bengal chloramphenicol agar. In total, 361 fungal isolates were obtained and further characterized by DNA sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the nuclear ribosomal large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene if needed. We conducted BLAST (https://blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Blast.cgi) searches of the ITS region sequences against the UNITE Database (https://unite.ut.ee/analysis.php), and selected other databases if needed, which allowed identification to the species level of 183 isolates and to the genus level of 107 of the 346 isolates that were successfully ITS sequenced. The isolates characterized represented 3 phyla and 19 genera; the most common genera isolated were Penicillium (25% of isolates), Debaryomyces (18%), and Candida (9%). This study not only provides, by using modern molecular tools, a baseline understanding of the types of fungi in dairy products, but also confirms that ITS sequencing is a useful approach for identification of fungal organisms found in the dairy food chain. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. CpSAT-1, a transcribed satellite sequence from the codling moth, Cydia pomonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Věchtová, Pavlína; Dalíková, Martina; Sýkorová, Miroslava; Žurovcová, Martina; Füssy, Zoltán; Zrzavá, Magda

    2016-08-01

    Satellite DNA (satDNA) is a non-coding component of eukaryotic genomes, located mainly in heterochromatic regions. Relevance of satDNA began to emerge with accumulating evidence of its potential yet hardly comprehensible role that it can play in the genome of many organisms. We isolated the first satDNA of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella, Tortricidae, Lepidoptera), a species with holokinetic chromosomes and a single large heterochromatic element, the W chromosome in females. The satDNA, called CpSAT-1, is located on all chromosomes of the complement, although in different amounts. Surprisingly, the satellite is almost missing in the heterochromatic W chromosome. Additionally, we isolated mRNA from all developmental stages (1st-5th instar larva, pupa, adult), both sexes (adult male and female) and several tissues (Malpighian tubules, gut, heart, testes, and ovaries) of the codling moth and showed the CpSAT-1 sequence was transcribed in all tested samples. Using CpSAT-1 specific primers we amplified, cloned and sequenced 40 monomers from cDNA and gDNA, respectively. The sequence analysis revealed a high mutation rate and the presence of potentially functional motifs, mainly in non-conserved regions of the monomers. Both the chromosomal distribution and the sequence analysis suggest that CPSAT-1 has no function in the C. pomonella genome.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of Bambusa (Poaceae: Bambusoideae) based on internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Xia, Nianhe; Lin, Rushun

    2005-12-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of Bambusa species were performed using internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA. The 21 species sampled included members of Bambusa (sensu stricto), Dendrocalamopsis, Dendrocalamus, Guadua, Leleba, and Lingnania. Arundinaria gigantea was used as an outgroup. Using the maximum parsimony method with PAUP*, gaps were treated as missing states or new states. Parsimonious analysis revealed that Dendrocalamus latiflorus was closely related to the members of Dendrocalamopsis. Dendrocalamus membranaceus was a sister species to Dendrocalamus strictus. Three Dendrocalamus species were closely related to and nested in a polyphyletic Bambusa. Bambusa subaequalis was a sister species to B. multiplex, B. emeiensis to B. chungii, B. contracta to B. hainanensis, and B. flexuosa was a sister species to B. sinospinosa, B. tuldoides, B. surrecta, B. intermedia, and B. valida group, which raised doubts about the monophyly of the subgenera Bambusa (sensu stricto), Dendrocalamopsis, Leleba, and Lingnania under the genus Bambusa.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences of rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of Phytophthora sojae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengfei; Han, Yingpeng; Wu, Junjiang; Lv, Huiying; Qiu, Lijuan; Chang, Ruzhen; Jin, Limei; Wang, Jinsheng; Yu, Anliang; Chen, Chen; Nan, Haiyang; Xu, Xiuhong; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Dayong; Zhang, Shuzhen; Li, Wenbin; Chen, Weiyuan

    2007-02-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (ITS1, ITS2 and 5.8S rDNA) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) was amplified via the PCR method in seventeen different isolates of Phytophthora sojae using the common primers of the ITS of fungi. Around 800 bp-1,000 bp fragments were obtained based on the DL2000 marker and the sequences of the PCR products were tested. Taking isolate USA as outgroup, the phylogenetic tree was constructed by means of maximum parsimony analysis, and the genetic evolution among isolates was analyzed. The results showed that there is a great difference between the base constitution of ITS1 and ITS2 among various isolates. The seventeen isolates are classified into three groups, and the isolates from the same region belong to the same group, which shows the variation in geography.

  14. Selection of enzymes for terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of fungal internally transcribed spacer sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Pablo; Manjón, Jose L

    2009-07-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) profiling of the internally transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA of unknown fungal communities is currently unsupported by a broad-range enzyme-choosing rationale. An in silico study of terminal fragment size distribution was therefore performed following virtual digestion (by use of a set of commercially available 135 type IIP restriction endonucleases) of all published fungal ITS sequences putatively annealing to primers ITS1 and ITS4. Different diversity measurements were used to rank primer-enzyme pairs according to the richness and evenness that they showed. Top-performing pairs were hierarchically clustered to test for data dependency. The enzyme set composed of MaeII, BfaI, and BstNI returned much better results than randomly chosen enzyme sets in computer simulations and is therefore recommended for in vitro TRFLP profiling of fungal ITSs.

  15. Internal transcribed spacer primers and sequences for improved characterization of basidiomycetous orchid mycorrhizas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D Lee; McCormick, Melissa K

    2008-01-01

    Despite advances owing to molecular approaches, several hurdles still obstruct the identification of fungi forming orchid mycorrhizas. The Tulasnellaceae exhibit accelerated evolution of the nuclear ribosomal operon, causing most standard primers to fail in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) trials. Insufficient sequences are available from well characterized isolates and fruitbodies. Lastly, taxon-specific PCR primers are needed in order to explore the ecology of the fungi outside of the orchid root. Here, progress in overcoming these hurdles is reported. Broad-spectrum basidiomycete internal transcribed spacer (ITS) primers that do not exclude most known Tulasnellaceae are presented. blast searches and empirical PCR tests support their wide utility within the Basidiomycota. Taxon-specific ITS primers are presented targeted to orchid-associated Tulasnella, and a core component of the Thelephora-Tomentella complex. The efficiency and selectivity of these primer sets are again supported by blast searches and empirical tests. Lastly, ITS DNA sequences are presented from several strains of Epulorhiza, Ceratorhiza, Ceratobasidium, Sistotrema, Thanatephorus and Tulasnella that were originally described in the landmark mycorrhizal studies of Currah and Warcup. Detailed phylogenetic analyses reveal some inconsistencies in species concepts in these taxonomically challenging resupinate basidiomycetes, but also help to place several sequences from environmental samples.

  16. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indonesia Solanaceae based on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Topik; Priyandoko, Didik; Islami, Dina Karina; Wardiny, Putri Yunitha

    2016-02-01

    Solanaceae is one of largest family in Angiosperm group with highly diverse in morphological character. In Indonesia, this group of plant is very popular due to its usefulness as food, ornamental and medicinal plants. However, investigation on phylogenetic relationship among the member of this family in Indonesia remains less attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetics relationship of the family especially distributed in Indonesia. DNA sequences of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of 19 species of Solanaceae and three species of outgroup, which belongs to family Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, and Plantaginaceae, were isolated, amplified, and sequenced. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on parsimony method was conducted with using data derived from the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2, separately, and the combination of all. Results indicated that the phylogenetic tree derived from the combined data established better pattern of relationship than separate data. Thus, three major groups were revealed. Group 1 consists of tribe Datureae, Cestreae, and Petunieae, whereas group 2 is member of tribe Physaleae. Group 3 belongs to tribe Solaneae. The use of the ITS region as a molecular markers, in general, support the global Solanaceae relationship that has been previously reported.

  17. Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1 based sequence typing reveals phylogenetically distinct Ascaris population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic differentiation among morphologically identical Ascaris species is a debatable scientific issue in the context of Ascariasis epidemiology. To explain the disease epidemiology and also the taxonomic position of different Ascaris species, genome information of infecting strains from endemic areas throughout the world is certainly crucial. Ascaris population from human has been genetically characterized based on the widely used genetic marker, internal transcribed spacer1 (ITS1. Along with previously reported and prevalent genotype G1, 8 new sequence variants of ITS1 have been identified. Genotype G1 was significantly present among female patients aged between 10 to 15 years. Intragenic linkage disequilibrium (LD analysis at target locus within our study population has identified an incomplete LD value with potential recombination events. A separate cluster of Indian isolates with high bootstrap value indicate their distinct phylogenetic position in comparison to the global Ascaris population. Genetic shuffling through recombination could be a possible reason for high population diversity and frequent emergence of new sequence variants, identified in present and other previous studies. This study explores the genetic organization of Indian Ascaris population for the first time which certainly includes some fundamental information on the molecular epidemiology of Ascariasis.

  18. The utility of internally transcribed spacer 2 DNA sequences of the nuclear ribosomal gene for distinguishing sibling species of Trichogramma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouthamer, R.; Hu, J.; Kan, van F.J.P.M.; Platner, G.R.; Pinto, J.D.

    1999-01-01

    The usefulness of the internally transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of the nuclear ribosomal gene complex is tested for providing taxonomic characters to identify Trichogramma species. The ITS2 sequences of a group of sibling species of the T. deion/T. pretiosum complexes were determined. A simple and prec

  19. Polyadenylation of RNA transcribed from mammalian SINEs by RNA polymerase III: Complex requirements for nucleotide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulina, Olga R; Golubchikova, Julia S; Ustyantsev, Ilia G; Kramerov, Dmitri A

    2016-02-01

    It is generally accepted that only transcripts synthesized by RNA polymerase II (e.g., mRNA) were subject to AAUAAA-dependent polyadenylation. However, we previously showed that RNA transcribed by RNA polymerase III (pol III) from mouse B2 SINE could be polyadenylated in an AAUAAA-dependent manner. Many species of mammalian SINEs end with the pol III transcriptional terminator (TTTTT) and contain hexamers AATAAA in their A-rich tail. Such SINEs were united into Class T(+), whereas SINEs lacking the terminator and AATAAA sequences were classified as T(-). Here we studied the structural features of SINE pol III transcripts that are necessary for their polyadenylation. Eight and six SINE families from classes T(+) and T(-), respectively, were analyzed. The replacement of AATAAA with AACAAA in T(+) SINEs abolished the RNA polyadenylation. Interestingly, insertion of the polyadenylation signal (AATAAA) and pol III transcription terminator in T(-) SINEs did not result in polyadenylation. The detailed analysis of three T(+) SINEs (B2, DIP, and VES) revealed areas important for the polyadenylation of their pol III transcripts: the polyadenylation signal and terminator in A-rich tail, β region positioned immediately downstream of the box B of pol III promoter, and τ region located upstream of the tail. In DIP and VES (but not in B2), the τ region is a polypyrimidine motif which is also characteristic of many other T(+) SINEs. Most likely, SINEs of different mammals acquired these structural features independently as a result of parallel evolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular Identification of Isolated Fungi from Unopened Containers of Greek Yogurt by DNA Sequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer Region

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman, Irshad M.; Emily Jacobs; Steven Simpson; Khalil Kerdahi

    2014-01-01

    In our previous study, we described the development of an internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 sequencing method, and used this protocol in species-identification of isolated fungi collected from the manufacturing areas of a compounding company known to have caused the multistate fungal meningitis outbreak in the United States. In this follow-up study, we have analyzed the unopened vials of Greek yogurt from the recalled batch to determine the possible cause of microbial contamination in the pr...

  1. Dataset of the transcribed 45S ribosomal RNA sequence of the tree crop “yerba mate”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia M. Aguilera

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution contains data related to the research article entitled “The 18S-25S ribosomal RNA unit of yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil.” (Aguilera et al., 2016 [1]. Through a bioinformatic approach involving NGS data, we provide information of the transcribed 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA sequence of yerba mate, the first reference for the Ilex L. genus. This dataset (Supplementary file 1 comprises information regarding the assembly and annotation of this rRNA unit. The generated data is applicable for comparative analysis and evolutionary studies among Ilex and related taxa. The raw sequencing data used here is available at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank (NCBI Resource Coordinators, 2016 [2] Sequence Read Archive (SRA under the accession SRP043293 and the consensus 45S ribosomal RNA sequence has been deposited there under the accession GFHV00000000.

  2. Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed Spacer and 18S rRNA gene sequences from Lonar lake sediment, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudhagara, Pravin; Ghelani, Anjana; Bhavsar, Sunil; Bhatt, Shreyas

    2015-09-01

    The data in this article contains the sequences of fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) and 18S rRNA gene from a metagenome of Lonar soda lake, India. Sequences were amplified using fungal specific primers, which amplified the amplicon lined between the 18S and 28S rRNA genes. Data were obtained using Fungal tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (fTEFAP) technique and used to analyze fungal profile by the culture-independent method. Primary analysis using PlutoF 454 pipeline suggests the Lonar lake mycobiome contained the 29 different fungal species. The raw sequencing data used to perform this analysis along with FASTQ file are located in the NCBI Sequence Read Archive (SRA) under accession No. SRX889598 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sra/SRX889598).

  3. Intragenomic Profiling Using Multicopy Genes: The rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences of the Freshwater Sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis.

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    Liisi Karlep

    Full Text Available Multicopy genes, like ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA, are widely used to describe and distinguish individuals. Despite concerted evolution that homogenizes a large number of rDNA gene copies, the presence of different gene variants within a genome has been reported. Characterization of an organism by defining every single variant of tens to thousands of rDNA repeat units present in a eukaryotic genome would be quite unreasonable. Here we provide an alternative approach for the characterization of a set of internal transcribed spacer sequences found within every rDNA repeat unit by implementing direct sequencing methodology. The prominent allelic variants and their relative amounts characterizing an individual can be described by a single sequencing electropherogram of the mixed amplicon containing the variants present within the genome. We propose a method for rational analysis of heterogeneity of multicopy genes by compiling a profile based on quantification of different sequence variants of the internal transcribed spacers of the freshwater sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis as an example. In addition to using conventional substitution analysis, we have developed a mathematical method, the proportion model method, to quantify the relative amounts of allelic variants of different length using data from direct sequencing of the heterogeneous amplicon. This method is based on determining the expected signal intensity values (corresponding to peak heights from the sequencing electropherogram by sequencing clones from the same or highly similar amplicon and comparing hypothesized combinations against the values obtained by direct sequencing of the heterogeneous amplicon. This method allowed to differentiate between all specimens analysed.

  4. [RIBOSOMAL DNA INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACER 2 SEQUENCE AS A PHYLOGENETIC MARKER FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF TRICHINELLA NEMATODES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoyevskaya, I M; Spiridonov, S E

    2015-01-01

    The results of testing several primer combinations were used to choose an optimal pair for the amplification of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of ribosomal DNA (direct: Tri58s F 5 CGG TGG ATC RCT TGG CTC GTA CG and reverse: AB28 Rr (CGA CCG CTT ATT GAT ATG C). This pair of primers yields a 900 bp PCR product. Comparative analysis of obtained ITS2 sequences, for 8 Trichinella isolates from different regions of the Russian Federation permits different species and individual genotypes of these parasitic nematodes to be validly distinguished.

  5. Systematic internal transcribed spacer sequence analysis for identification of clinical mold isolates in diagnostic mycology: a 5-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardo, Diana E; Lucke, Katja; Imhof, Alex; Bloemberg, Guido V; Böttger, Erik C

    2010-08-01

    The implementation of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing for routine identification of molds in the diagnostic mycology laboratory was analyzed in a 5-year study. All mold isolates (n = 6,900) recovered in our laboratory from 2005 to 2009 were included in this study. According to a defined work flow, which in addition to troublesome phenotypic identification takes clinical relevance into account, 233 isolates were subjected to ITS sequence analysis. Sequencing resulted in successful identification for 78.6% of the analyzed isolates (57.1% at species level, 21.5% at genus level). In comparison, extended in-depth phenotypic characterization of the isolates subjected to sequencing achieved taxonomic assignment for 47.6% of these, with a mere 13.3% at species level. Optimization of DNA extraction further improved the efficacy of molecular identification. This study is the first of its kind to testify to the systematic implementation of sequence-based identification procedures in the routine workup of mold isolates in the diagnostic mycology laboratory.

  6. Segregation of Leptatherum from Microstegium (Andropogoneae, Poaceae) confirmed by Internal Transcribed Spacer DNA sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.-H.; Veldkamp, J.F.; Kuoh, C.-S.; Tsai, C.-C.; Chiang, Y.-C.

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of Microstegium (Andropogoneae, Poaceae) and some other Andropogoneae species were conducted inferred from the ITS/5.8S sequences. As a result of this study, Microstegium is polyphyletic. There are two rather distant monophyletic clades, one with Microstegium nudum (type of

  7. Genetic Analyses of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences Suggest Introgression and Duplication in the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens.

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    Jie Chen

    Full Text Available The internal transcribed spacer (ITS region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster is widely used in fungal taxonomy and phylogeographic studies. The medicinal and edible mushroom Agaricus subrufescens has a worldwide distribution with a high level of polymorphism in the ITS region. A previous analysis suggested notable ITS sequence heterogeneity within the wild French isolate CA487. The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern and potential mechanism of ITS sequence heterogeneity within this strain. Using PCR, cloning, and sequencing, we identified three types of ITS sequences, A, B, and C with a balanced distribution, which differed from each other at 13 polymorphic positions. The phylogenetic comparisons with samples from different continents revealed that the type C sequence was similar to those found in Oceanian and Asian specimens of A. subrufescens while types A and B sequences were close to those found in the Americas or in Europe. We further investigated the inheritance of these three ITS sequence types by analyzing their distribution among single-spore isolates from CA487. In this analysis, three co-dominant markers were used firstly to distinguish the homokaryotic offspring from the heterokaryotic offspring. The homokaryotic offspring were then analyzed for their ITS types. Our genetic analyses revealed that types A and B were two alleles segregating at one locus ITSI, while type C was not allelic with types A and B but was located at another unlinked locus ITSII. Furthermore, type C was present in only one of the two constitutive haploid nuclei (n of the heterokaryotic (n+n parent CA487. These data suggest that there was a relatively recent introduction of the type C sequence and a duplication of the ITS locus in this strain. Whether other genes were also transferred and duplicated and their impacts on genome structure and stability remain to be investigated.

  8. Genetic Analyses of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences Suggest Introgression and Duplication in the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Moinard, Magalie; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Shouxian; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Zhao, Ruilin; Hyde, Kevin D.; Callac, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster is widely used in fungal taxonomy and phylogeographic studies. The medicinal and edible mushroom Agaricus subrufescens has a worldwide distribution with a high level of polymorphism in the ITS region. A previous analysis suggested notable ITS sequence heterogeneity within the wild French isolate CA487. The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern and potential mechanism of ITS sequence heterogeneity within this strain. Using PCR, cloning, and sequencing, we identified three types of ITS sequences, A, B, and C with a balanced distribution, which differed from each other at 13 polymorphic positions. The phylogenetic comparisons with samples from different continents revealed that the type C sequence was similar to those found in Oceanian and Asian specimens of A. subrufescens while types A and B sequences were close to those found in the Americas or in Europe. We further investigated the inheritance of these three ITS sequence types by analyzing their distribution among single-spore isolates from CA487. In this analysis, three co-dominant markers were used firstly to distinguish the homokaryotic offspring from the heterokaryotic offspring. The homokaryotic offspring were then analyzed for their ITS types. Our genetic analyses revealed that types A and B were two alleles segregating at one locus ITSI, while type C was not allelic with types A and B but was located at another unlinked locus ITSII. Furthermore, type C was present in only one of the two constitutive haploid nuclei (n) of the heterokaryotic (n+n) parent CA487. These data suggest that there was a relatively recent introduction of the type C sequence and a duplication of the ITS locus in this strain. Whether other genes were also transferred and duplicated and their impacts on genome structure and stability remain to be investigated. PMID:27228131

  9. Identification of transcribed sequences in the human genome. Final report, September 15, 1991--September 14, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, K.

    1992-12-01

    The workshop was held at the National Institutes of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland, on October 4 and 5, 1991. Twenty-four investigators attended from England, Germany and the United States. The topics discussed included: Genome sequence analysis using computer assisted detection of open reading frames, splice sites and hexamer patterns, direct exon identification using trapping of internal and 3` exons, and a recombination based system, cDNA library construction and screening, including the use of normalization and subtraction procedures, Alu and splice donor site PCR from hybrid cell lines, and microdissection clones as probes, use of labeled CDNAS as probes to screen lambda and cosmid libraries, and sequencing of random cDNAs.

  10. Molecular Identification of Isolated Fungi from Unopened Containers of Greek Yogurt by DNA Sequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer Region

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    Irshad M. Sulaiman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In our previous study, we described the development of an internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 sequencing method, and used this protocol in species-identification of isolated fungi collected from the manufacturing areas of a compounding company known to have caused the multistate fungal meningitis outbreak in the United States. In this follow-up study, we have analyzed the unopened vials of Greek yogurt from the recalled batch to determine the possible cause of microbial contamination in the product. A total of 15 unopened vials of Greek yogurt belonging to the recalled batch were examined for the detection of fungi in these samples known to cause foodborne illness following conventional microbiological protocols. Fungi were isolated from all of the 15 Greek yogurt samples analyzed. The isolated fungi were genetically typed by DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed all of the isolated fungal isolates from the Greek yogurt to be Rhizomucor variabilis. The generated ITS1 sequences matched 100% with the published sequences available in GenBank. In addition, these yogurt samples were also tested for the presence of five types of bacteria (Salmonella, Listeria, Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Escherichia coli causing foodborne disease in humans, and found negative for all of them.

  11. Differentiation of acetic acid bacteria based on sequence analysis of 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Angel; Mas, Albert

    2011-06-30

    The 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer sequence of sixty-four strains belonging to different acetic acid bacteria genera were analyzed, and phylogenetic trees were generated for each genera. The topologies of the different trees were in accordance with the 16S rRNA gene trees, although the similarity percentages obtained between the species was shown to be much lower. These values suggest the usefulness of including the 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer region as a part of the polyphasic approach required for the further classification of acetic acid bacteria. Furthermore, the region could be a good target for primer and probe design. It has also been validated for use in the identification of unknown samples of this bacterial group from wine vinegar and fruit condiments.

  12. Phylogeny of Ptychostomum (Bryaceae, Musci) inferred from sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and chloroplast rps4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-Ying WANG; Jian-Cheng ZHAO

    2009-01-01

    The phylogeny of Ptychostomum was first undertaken based on analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal (nr) DNA and by combining data from nrDNA ITS and chloroplast DNA rps4 sequences. Maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian analyses all support the conclu-sion that the reinstated genus Ptychostomum is not monophyletic. Ptychostomum funkii (Schwagr.) J. R. Spence (= Bryum funkii Schwagr.) is placed within a clade containing the type species of Bryum, B. argenteum Hedw. The remaining members of Ptychostomum investigated in the present study constitute another well-supported clade. The results are congruent with previous molecular analyses. On the basis of phylogenetic evidence, we agree with Bryum lonchocaulon Mull. Hal., Bryum pallescens Schleich. ex Schwagr., and Bryum pallens Sw. to Ptychostomum.

  13. A plant mitochondrial sequence transcribed in transgenic tobacco chloroplasts is not edited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, C.A.; Hanson, M.R. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Zoubenko, O.V.; Maliga, P. [State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1995-03-01

    RNA editing occurs in two higher-plant organelles, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. Because chloroplasts and mitochondria exhibit some similarity in editing site selection, we investigated whether mitochondrial RNA sequences could be edited in chloroplasts. We produced transgenic tobacco plants that contained chimeric genes in which the second exon of a Petunia hybrida mitochondrial coxII gene was under the control of chloroplast gene regulatory sequences. coxII transcripts accumulated to low or high levels in transgenic chloroplasts containing chimeric genes with the plastid ribosomal protein gene rps16 or the rRNA operon promoter, respectively. Exon 2 of coxII was chosen because it carries seven editing sites and is edited in petunia mitochondria even when located in an abnormal context in an aberrant recombined gene. When editing of the coxII transcripts in transgenic chloroplasts was examined, no RNA editing at any of the usual sites was detected, nor was there any novel editing at any other sites. These results indicate that the RNA editing mechanisms of chloroplasts and mitochondria are not identical but must have at least some organelle-specific components. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region reveals a novel clade of Ichthyophonus sp. from rainbow trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, C.; Purcell, M.K.; Gregg, J.L.; LaPatra, S.E.; Winton, J.R.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    The mesomycetozoean parasite Ichthyophonus hoferi is most commonly associated with marine fish hosts but also occurs in some components of the freshwater rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss aquaculture industry in Idaho, USA. It is not certain how the parasite was introduced into rainbow trout culture, but it might have been associated with the historical practice of feeding raw, ground common carp Cyprinus carpio that were caught by commercial fisherman. Here, we report a major genetic division between west coast freshwater and marine isolates of Ichthyophonus hoferi. Sequence differences were not detected in 2 regions of the highly conserved small subunit (18S) rDNA gene; however, nucleotide variation was seen in internal transcribed spacer loci (ITS1 and ITS2), both within and among the isolates. Intra-isolate variation ranged from 2.4 to 7.6 nucleotides over a region consisting of ~740 bp. Majority consensus sequences from marine/anadromous hosts differed in only 0 to 3 nucleotides (99.6 to 100% nucleotide identity), while those derived from freshwater rainbow trout had no nucleotide substitutions relative to each other. However, the consensus sequences between isolates from freshwater rainbow trout and those from marine/anadromous hosts differed in 13 to 16 nucleotides (97.8 to 98.2% nucleotide identity).

  15. RAPD and internal transcribed spacer sequence analyses reveal Zea nicaraguensis as a section Luxuriantes species close to Zea luxurians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Lu, Yanli; Zheng, Mingmin; Rong, Tingzhao; Tang, Qilin

    2011-04-15

    Genetic relationship of a newly discovered teosinte from Nicaragua, Zea nicaraguensis with waterlogging tolerance, was determined based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA using 14 accessions from Zea species. RAPD analysis showed that a total of 5,303 fragments were produced by 136 random decamer primers, of which 84.86% bands were polymorphic. RAPD-based UPGMA analysis demonstrated that the genus Zea can be divided into section Luxuriantes including Zea diploperennis, Zea luxurians, Zea perennis and Zea nicaraguensis, and section Zea including Zea mays ssp. mexicana, Zea mays ssp. parviglumis, Zea mays ssp. huehuetenangensis and Zea mays ssp. mays. ITS sequence analysis showed the lengths of the entire ITS region of the 14 taxa in Zea varied from 597 to 605 bp. The average GC content was 67.8%. In addition to the insertion/deletions, 78 variable sites were recorded in the total ITS region with 47 in ITS1, 5 in 5.8S, and 26 in ITS2. Sequences of these taxa were analyzed with neighbor-joining (NJ) and maximum parsimony (MP) methods to construct the phylogenetic trees, selecting Tripsacum dactyloides L. as the outgroup. The phylogenetic relationships of Zea species inferred from the ITS sequences are highly concordant with the RAPD evidence that resolved two major subgenus clades. Both RAPD and ITS sequence analyses indicate that Zea nicaraguensis is more closely related to Zea luxurians than the other teosintes and cultivated maize, which should be regarded as a section Luxuriantes species.

  16. RAPD and internal transcribed spacer sequence analyses reveal Zea nicaraguensis as a section Luxuriantes species close to Zea luxurians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Wang

    Full Text Available Genetic relationship of a newly discovered teosinte from Nicaragua, Zea nicaraguensis with waterlogging tolerance, was determined based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA using 14 accessions from Zea species. RAPD analysis showed that a total of 5,303 fragments were produced by 136 random decamer primers, of which 84.86% bands were polymorphic. RAPD-based UPGMA analysis demonstrated that the genus Zea can be divided into section Luxuriantes including Zea diploperennis, Zea luxurians, Zea perennis and Zea nicaraguensis, and section Zea including Zea mays ssp. mexicana, Zea mays ssp. parviglumis, Zea mays ssp. huehuetenangensis and Zea mays ssp. mays. ITS sequence analysis showed the lengths of the entire ITS region of the 14 taxa in Zea varied from 597 to 605 bp. The average GC content was 67.8%. In addition to the insertion/deletions, 78 variable sites were recorded in the total ITS region with 47 in ITS1, 5 in 5.8S, and 26 in ITS2. Sequences of these taxa were analyzed with neighbor-joining (NJ and maximum parsimony (MP methods to construct the phylogenetic trees, selecting Tripsacum dactyloides L. as the outgroup. The phylogenetic relationships of Zea species inferred from the ITS sequences are highly concordant with the RAPD evidence that resolved two major subgenus clades. Both RAPD and ITS sequence analyses indicate that Zea nicaraguensis is more closely related to Zea luxurians than the other teosintes and cultivated maize, which should be regarded as a section Luxuriantes species.

  17. Cluster analysis of human and animal pathogenic Microsporum species and their teleomorphic states, Arthroderma species, based on the DNA sequences of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makimura, K; Tamura, Y; Murakami, A; Kano, R; Nakamura, Y; Hasegawa, A; Uchida, K; Yamaguchi, H

    2001-01-01

    We performed a cluster analysis of human and animal pathogenic Microsporum species and their teleomorphic states, Arthroderma species, including A. otae-related species (M. canis, M. audouinii, M. distortum, M. equinum, M. langeronii, and M. ferrugineum) and M. gypseum complex (A. fulvum, A. gypseum, and A. incurvatum) using DNA sequences of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1). The dendrogram showed the members of A. otae-related species to be monophyletic and to construct an extremely closely related cluster with a long horizontal branch. This ITS1-homologous group of A. otae was organized in 6 unique genotypes, while sequences of the members of the ITS1-homologous group of M. gypseum complex are more diverse. This ITS1-based database of Microsporum species and their teleomorphic states will provide a useful and reliable species identification system: it is time-saving (takes two to three days), accurate and applicable even to strains with atypical morphological features or in a non-culturable state.

  18. Transcribed sequences in the human genome to be held in San Francisco, November 7 and 8, 1992. Final report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, K.

    1993-11-01

    The Second International Workshop on the Identification of Transcribed Sequences was held in San Francisco on November 7--8, 1992. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss and evaluate techniques for developing a complete transcriptional map of the human genome. Such a map requires the positions, sequences, and expression patterns of all genes. This goal is being approached from two different directions, each with strengths and weaknesses. One method is to identify the transcribed sequences from genomic DNA of a given region; the other is to systematically sequence and map cDNAs. The cDNA approach yields sequence information rapidly, but mapping each cDNA is a technical challenge. In the first approach, the map locations of genomic sequences are known at the outset, and the challenge is to identify exons. The efficient construction of a transcriptional map will require a diverse array of techniques.

  19. Crossover Can Be Constructive When Computing Unique Input Output Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian; Yao, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Unique input output (UIO) sequences have important applications in conformance testing of finite state machines (FSMs). Previous experimental and theoretical research has shown that evolutionary algorithms (EAs) can compute UIOs efficiently on many FSM instance classes, but fail on others. However...

  20. Update on Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis typing based on nucleotide sequence variations in internal transcribed spacer regions of rRNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, C H; Helweg-Larsen, J; Tang, X

    1998-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis isolates from 207 clinical specimens from nine countries were typed based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions I and II (ITS1 and ITS2, respectively) of rRNA genes. The number of ITS1 nucleotides has been revised from the...

  1. Innovative approach for transcriptomic analysis of obligate intracellular pathogen: selective capture of transcribed sequences of Ehrlichia ruminantium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefrançois Thierry

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole genome transcriptomic analysis is a powerful approach to elucidate the molecular mechanisms controlling the pathogenesis of obligate intracellular bacteria. However, the major hurdle resides in the low quantity of prokaryotic mRNAs extracted from host cells. Our model Ehrlichia ruminantium (ER, the causative agent of heartwater, is transmitted by tick Amblyomma variegatum. This bacterium affects wild and domestic ruminants and is present in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean islands. Because of its strictly intracellular location, which constitutes a limitation for its extensive study, the molecular mechanisms involved in its pathogenicity are still poorly understood. Results We successfully adapted the SCOTS method (Selective Capture of Transcribed Sequences on the model Rickettsiales ER to capture mRNAs. Southern Blots and RT-PCR revealed an enrichment of ER's cDNAs and a diminution of ribosomal contaminants after three rounds of capture. qRT-PCR and whole-genome ER microarrays hybridizations demonstrated that SCOTS method introduced only a limited bias on gene expression. Indeed, we confirmed the differential gene expression between poorly and highly expressed genes before and after SCOTS captures. The comparative gene expression obtained from ER microarrays data, on samples before and after SCOTS at 96 hpi was significantly correlated (R2 = 0.7. Moreover, SCOTS method is crucial for microarrays analysis of ER, especially for early time points post-infection. There was low detection of transcripts for untreated samples whereas 24% and 70.7% were revealed for SCOTS samples at 24 and 96 hpi respectively. Conclusions We conclude that this SCOTS method has a key importance for the transcriptomic analysis of ER and can be potentially used for other Rickettsiales. This study constitutes the first step for further gene expression analyses that will lead to a better understanding of both ER pathogenicity and the adaptation

  2. Assessment of phylogenetic relationship of rare plant species collected from Saudi Arabia using internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qurainy, F; Khan, S; Nadeem, M; Tarroum, M; Alaklabi, A

    2013-03-11

    The rare and endangered plants of any country are important genetic resources that often require urgent conservation measures. Assessment of phylogenetic relationships and evaluation of genetic diversity is very important prior to implementation of conservation strategies for saving rare and endangered plant species. We used internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA for the evaluation of sequence identity from the available taxa in the GenBank database by using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST). Two rare plant species viz, Heliotropium strigosum claded with H. pilosum (98% branch support) and Pancratium tortuosum claded with P. tenuifolium (61% branch support) clearly. However, some species, viz Scadoxus multiflorus, Commiphora myrrha and Senecio hadiensis showed close relationships with more than one species. We conclude that nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer sequences are useful markers for phylogenetic study of these rare plant species in Saudi Arabia.

  3. Molecular Characterization of Fasciola Samples Using Sequences of Second Internal Transcribed Spacer-rDNA in Different Geographical Localities of Sistan and Balouchestan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Shahbakhsh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Fasciola trematodes are the most common liver flukes, living in a range of animals with global distribution and resulting in profound economic loss and public health challenges. Previous studies have indicated that the sequences of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2 of ribosomal DNA (rDNA provide reliable genetic markers for molecular systemic studies of Fasciola. Objectives: The objective of the present study was to characterize Fasciola samples from different geographical regions of Sistan and Balouchestan province using sequences of second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2 of ribosomal DNA (rDNA. Materials and Methods: Twenty adult trematodes were collected from the livers of slaughtered infected cattle. Total genomic DNA was extracted and ITS-2 rDNA targets were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. All samples were sequenced and investigated using the ClustalW2 sequence alignment tool and MEGA software. The sequences of some Iranian and non-Iranian isolates were used for comparison, in order to evaluate the variation in sequence homology between geographically different trematode populations. Results: The results of comparing the ITS-2 sequences with the BLAST GenBank database showed one type of sequence for F. hepatica and three different types of sequences for F. gigantica in the specimens. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that Fasciola samples from cattle in two geographical locations in Sistan and Balouchestan province represented no genetic diversity in F. hepatica and high genetic variation in F. gigantica.

  4. Molecular Characterization of Fasciola Samples Using Sequences of Second Internal Transcribed Spacer-rDNA in Different Geographical Localities of Sistan and Balouchestan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahbakhsh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The Fasciola trematodes are the most common liver flukes, living in a range of animals with global distribution and resulting in profound economic loss and public health challenges. Previous studies have indicated that the sequences of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2 of ribosomal DNA (rDNA provide reliable genetic markers for molecular systemic studies of Fasciola. Objectives The objective of the present study was to characterize Fasciola samples from different geographical regions of Sistan and Balouchestan province using sequences of second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2 of ribosomal DNA (rDNA. Materials and Methods Twenty adult trematodes were collected from the livers of slaughtered infected cattle. Total genomic DNA was extracted and ITS-2 rDNA targets were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. All samples were sequenced and investigated using the ClustalW2 sequence alignment tool and MEGA software. The sequences of some Iranian and non-Iranian isolates were used for comparison, in order to evaluate the variation in sequence homology between geographically different trematode populations. Results The results of comparing the ITS-2 sequences with the BLAST GenBank database showed one type of sequence for F. hepatica and three different types of sequences for F. gigantica in the specimens. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that Fasciola samples from cattle in two geographical locations in Sistan and Balouchestan province represented no genetic diversity in F. hepatica and high genetic variation in F. gigantica.

  5. DNA authentication of Plantago Herb based on nucleotide sequences of 18S-28S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Fatma Pinar; Yamashita, Hiromi; Guo, Yahong; Terasaka, Kazuyoshi; Kondo, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Shimada, Hiroshi; Fujita, Masao; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Sakai, Eiji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Goda, Yukihiro; Mizukami, Hajime

    2007-07-01

    Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear ribosomal RNA gene were amplified from 23 plant- and herbarium specimens belonging to eight Plantago species (P. asiatica, P. depressa, P. major, P. erosa, P. hostifolia, P. camtschatica, P. virginica and P. lanceolata). Sequence comparison indicated that these Plantago species could be identified based on the sequence type of the ITS locus. Sequence analysis of the ITS regions amplified from the crude drug Plantago Herb obtained in the markets indicated that all the drugs from Japan were derived from P. asiatica whereas the samples obtained in China were originated from various Plantago species including P. asiatica, P. depressa, P. major and P. erosa.

  6. Molecular phylogeny of 21 tropical bamboo species reconstructed by integrating non-coding internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and 2) sequences and their consensus secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Jayadri Sekhar; Bhattacharya, Samik; Pal, Amita

    2017-06-01

    The unavailability of the reproductive structure and unpredictability of vegetative characters for the identification and phylogenetic study of bamboo prompted the application of molecular techniques for greater resolution and consensus. We first employed internal transcribed spacer (ITS1, 5.8S rRNA and ITS2) sequences to construct the phylogenetic tree of 21 tropical bamboo species. While the sequence alone could grossly reconstruct the traditional phylogeny amongst the 21-tropical species studied, some anomalies were encountered that prompted a further refinement of the phylogenetic analyses. Therefore, we integrated the secondary structure of the ITS sequences to derive individual sequence-structure matrix to gain more resolution on the phylogenetic reconstruction. The results showed that ITS sequence-structure is the reliable alternative to the conventional phenotypic method for the identification of bamboo species. The best-fit topology obtained by the sequence-structure based phylogeny over the sole sequence based one underscores closer clustering of all the studied Bambusa species (Sub-tribe Bambusinae), while Melocanna baccifera, which belongs to Sub-Tribe Melocanneae, disjointedly clustered as an out-group within the consensus phylogenetic tree. In this study, we demonstrated the dependability of the combined (ITS sequence+structure-based) approach over the only sequence-based analysis for phylogenetic relationship assessment of bamboo.

  7. A comparison of Peronospora parasitica (Downy mildew) isolates from Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica oleracea using amplified fragment length polymorphism and internal transcribed spacer 1 sequence analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmany, A P; Lynn, J R; Tör, M; Holub, E B; Beynon, J L

    2000-07-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprints and internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequences from 27 Peronospora parasitica isolates (collected from Arabidopsis thaliana or Brassica oleracea), 5 Albugo candida isolates (from the same hosts and from Capsella bursa-pastoris), and 1 Bremia lactucae isolate (from Lactuca sativa) were compared. The AFLP analysis divided the isolates into five groups that correlated with taxonomic species and, in most cases, with host origin. The only exception was a group consisting of A. candida isolates from both B. oleracea and C. bursa-pastoris. ITS1 sequence analysis divided the isolates into the same five groups, demonstrated the divergence between P. parasitica isolates from A. thaliana and B. oleracea, and, using previously published ITS1 sequences, clearly showed the relationship between A. candida isolates from different hosts.

  8. DNA barcode and identification of the varieties and provenances of Taiwan's domestic and imported made teas using ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Chia-Hsiang; Yen, Cheng-En; Chang, Chieh

    2017-04-01

    The major aim of made tea identification is to identify the variety and provenance of the tea plant. The present experiment used 113 tea plants [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] housed at the Tea Research and Extension Substation, from which 113 internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) fragments, 104 trnL intron, and 98 trnL-trnF intergenic sequence region DNA sequences were successfully sequenced. The similarity of the ITS2 nucleotide sequences between tea plants housed at the Tea Research and Extension Substation was 0.379-0.994. In this polymerase chain reaction-amplified noncoding region, no varieties possessed identical sequences. Compared with the trnL intron and trnL-trnF intergenic sequence fragments of chloroplast cpDNA, the proportion of ITS2 nucleotide sequence variation was large and is more suitable for establishing a DNA barcode database to identify tea plant varieties. After establishing the database, 30 imported teas and 35 domestic made teas were used in this model system to explore the feasibility of using ITS2 sequences to identify the varieties and provenances of made teas. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using ITS2 sequences with the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean, which indicated that the same variety of tea plant is likely to be successfully categorized into one cluster, but contamination from other tea plants was also detected. This result provides molecular evidence that the similarity between important tea varieties in Taiwan remains high. We suggest a direct, wide collection of made tea and original samples of tea plants to establish an ITS2 sequence molecular barcode identification database to identify the varieties and provenances of tea plants. The DNA barcode comparison method can satisfy the need for a rapid, low-cost, frontline differentiation of the large amount of made teas from Taiwan and abroad, and can provide molecular evidence of their varieties and provenances. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Evaluation of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) as a molecular marker for phylogenetic inference using sequence and secondary structure information in blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, M A T; Junqueira, A C M; Azeredo-Espin, A M L

    2011-09-01

    The internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) is a small non-coding region located inside the nuclear ribosomal DNA cluster. ITS2 sequence variability is thought to be appropriate to differentiate species and for phylogenetic reconstructions analyses, which can be further improved if structural information is considered. We evaluated the potential of ITS2 as a molecular marker for phylogenetic inference in Calliphoridae (Diptera: Brachycera) using a broad range of inference methods and different substitution models, accounting or not for structural information. Sequence analyses revealed a hierarchically organized pattern of sequence variation and a small level of nucleotide substitution saturation. Intragenomic variation due to small sequence repeats was found mainly in the most variable domain (IV), but it has no significant impact on the phylogenetic signal at the species level. Inferred secondary structures revealed that GC pairs are more frequently found flanking bulges and loops regions in more conserved domains, thus ensuring structure stability. In the phylogenetic analyses, the use of substitution models accounting for structural information significantly improves phylogenetic inference in both neighbour-joining and Bayesian analyses, although the former provides limited resolution for dealing with highly divergent sequences. For Bayesian analyses, a significant improvement in likelihood was observed when considering structure information, although with small changes in topology and overall support, probably reflecting better evolutionary rates estimates. Based on these findings, ITS2 is a suitable molecular marker for phylogenetic analyses in Calliphoridae, at both species and generic level. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  10. Island rescue PCR: a rapid and efficient method for isolating transcribed sequences from yeast artificial chromosomes and cosmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, J M; Tagle, D A; Collins, F S

    1994-06-07

    The identification of transcripts from large genomic regions cloned in yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) or cosmids continues to be a critical and often rate-limiting step in positional cloning of human disease genes. We have developed a PCR-based method for rapid and efficient generation of probes from YACs or cosmids that can be used for cDNA library screening. The method, which we call island rescue PCR (IRP), is based upon the observation that the 5' ends of many genes are associated with (G+C)-rich regions called CpG islands. In IRP, the YAC of interest is digested with a restriction enzyme that recognizes sequences of high CpG content, and vectorette linkers are ligated to the cleaved ends. The PCR is used to amplify the region extending from the cleaved restriction enzyme site to the nearest SINE (Alu) repeat. In many cases this product contains sequences from the 5' end of the associated gene. cDNA clones isolated with these products are then verified by mapping them back to the original YAC. The method allows rapid screening of > 500 kb of human genomic insert in one experiment, is tolerant of contaminating yeast sequences, and can also be applied to cosmid pools. In a control experiment, the method was able to identify cDNA clones for the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene using a probe generated from a YAC in the region. Application of IRP has yielded nine other genes from YACs isolated from chromosome locations 4p16.3 and 17q21.

  11. Molecular phylogeny of Pneumocystis based on 5.8S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacers of rRNA gene sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    To clarify the phylogenetic relationships and species status of Pneumocystis, the 5.8S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS, 1 and 2) of Pneumocystis rRNA derived from rat, gerbil and human were amplified, cloned and sequenced. The genetic distance matrix of six Pneumocystis species compared with other fungi like Taphrina and Saccharomyces indicated that the Pneumocystis genus contained multiple species including Pneumocystis from gerbil. The phylogenetic tree also showed that Pneumocystis from human and monkey formed one group and four rodent Pneumocystis formed another group. Among the four members, Pneumocystis wakefieldiae was most closely related to Pneumocystis murina and Pneumocystis carinii, and was least related to gerbil Pneumocystis.

  12. ERIC and REP-PCR banding patterns and sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer of rDNA of Stemphylium solani isolates from cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Yeshwant R; Mehta, Angela; Rosato, Yoko B

    2002-05-01

    The genetic diversity of the Stemphylium solani isolates from cotton was assessed by Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC) and Repetitive Extragenic Palindromes (REP)-PCR fingerprinting. Twenty eight monosporic isolates of S. solani from cotton were used along with five isolates from tomato and one isolate of Alternaria macrospora from cotton for comparison. The dendrogram obtained revealed clear differences between the cotton and tomato isolates as well as between the tomato isolates from different geographic regions. The genetic relationships among S. solani isolates were also analyzed by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of four isolates representing the three ERIC and REP groups. The tomato isolate from the State of São Paulo showed a distinct ITS sequence from that of the cotton isolates and tomato isolate from the State of Goiás, giving evidence that it belongs to a different genotype of S. solani. This is the first report of the entire sequence of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 regions of S. solani.

  13. A revised nomenclature for transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci

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    Mayer Jens

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs and ERV-like sequences comprise 8% of the human genome. A hitherto unknown proportion of ERV loci are transcribed and thus contribute to the human transcriptome. A small proportion of these loci encode functional proteins. As the role of ERVs in normal and diseased biological processes is not yet established, transcribed ERV loci are of particular interest. As more transcribed ERV loci are likely to be identified in the near future, the development of a systematic nomenclature is important to ensure that all information on each locus can be easily retrieved. Results Here we present a revised nomenclature of transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci that sorts loci into groups based on Repbase classifications. Each symbol is of the format ERV + group symbol + unique number. Group symbols are based on a mixture of Repbase designations and well-supported symbols used in the literature. The presented guidelines will allow newly identified loci to be easily incorporated into the scheme. Conclusions The naming system will be employed by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee for naming transcribed human ERV loci. We hope that the system will contribute to clarifying a certain aspect of a sometimes confusing nomenclature for human endogenous retroviruses. The presented system may also be employed for naming transcribed loci of human non-ERV repeat loci.

  14. Evaluation of Medicinal Categorization of Atractylodes japonica Koidz. by Using Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequencing Analysis and HPLC Fingerprinting Combined with Statistical Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Hoon; Doh, Eui-Jeong; Lee, Guemsan

    2016-01-01

    Atractylodes rhizomes have been used as the herbal medicine "Changchul" or "Baekchul," according to their clinical purpose, in Korea, China, and Japan. Among the Atractylodes species, the medicinal use of Atractylodes japonica has been controversial, as it is categorized as both Changchul and Baekchul in those countries, and, moreover, parts of the rhizome have been differently used, depending on age of the plant, in Korea. Chromatographic fingerprinting by using HPLC combined with chemometric analyses and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing analysis were conducted to classify and identify 34 crude drugs derived from Atractylodes rhizomes. The identification of the samples, authenticated by their morphological features as A. japonica Koidz. (Changchul and Baekchul), A. chinensis Koidz., and A. macrocephala Koidz., was confirmed as A. japonica, A. chinensis, and A. macrocephala by ITS sequencing. The results from chemometric analyses showed that the chemical components of the crude drugs from A. japonica were significantly different from those from A. macrocephala but were similar to those from A. chinensis. The analyses also suggested that the categorization by age of A. japonica as Changchul or Baekchul is not recommended. The results indicate that A. japonica should be categorized as "Changchul" and should not be further categorized by age.

  15. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) from Philornis seguyi (García, 1952) and Philornis torquans (Nielsen, 1913) (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Lucas D; Quiroga, Martín; Manzoli, Darío; Couri, Márcia S; Silvestri, Leonardo; Venzal, José M; Cuervo, Pablo; Beldomenico, Pablo M

    2013-09-01

    Philornis Meinert, 1890 (Diptera: Muscidae) is a genus of Neotropical dipterans that parasitise birds. The currently used external morphological characters to distinguish between species within this genus present some limitations. We used the second internal transcribed spacer region (ITS2) of the rRNA gene as a molecular marker to differentiate adult specimens of Philornis identified morphologically as Philornis torquans and Philornis seguyi from different localities. Specimens identified as P. seguyi from Magdalena (Buenos Aires Province) showed an ITS2 sequence different from that for P. torquans, whereas all other specimens of P. seguyi had sequences identical to those for P. torquans. These findings do not necessarily confirm that specimens from Magdalena indeed belong to P. seguyi, nor that P. seguyi is a valid species. Instead, they alert us about the potential for species misidentification when using morphological characters alone. The use of molecular approaches to aid the identification of Philornis spp. will shed light on the systematics of this group. P. torquans is reported for the first time in Mendoza Province and Uruguay.

  16. Comparative sequence analysis of 5.8S rRNA genes and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of trichomonadid protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felleisen, R S

    1997-08-01

    The taxonomic situation in the genus Tritrichomonas is the subject of controversial discussion: potentially T. foetus and T. suis, the tritrichomonads from cattle and swine, respectively, could belong to the same species. In order to shed some light on this question, a molecular biological analysis was performed. The 5.8S rRNA gene and the flanking internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 and ITS2) of 12 different isolates of 3 Tritrichomonas species T. foetus, T. suis and T. mobilensis were enzymatically amplified by PCR and subcloned. Also, the corresponding regions of the trichomonads Trichomonas vaginalis, T. tenax, T. gallinae and Pentatrichomonas hominis were included in this study. Sequence analysis of cloned fragments was used to compare the parasite isolates. The genus Tritrichomonas exhibited an extremely high degree of homogeneity. All T. foetus and T. suis isolates had identical sequences, and only 1 substitution was found in the ITS2 region of T. mobilensis. In contrast, the genus Trichomonas shared more diversity. The results obtained in this study support a possible future revision of the taxonomic classification of tritrichomonads.

  17. Identification of Giardia species and Giardia duodenalis assemblages by sequence analysis of the 5.8S rDNA gene and internal transcribed spacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciò, Simone M; Beck, Relja; Almeida, Andre; Bajer, Anna; Pozio, Edoardo

    2010-05-01

    PCR assays have been developed mainly to assist investigations into the epidemiology of Giardia duodenalis, the only species in the Giardia genus having zoonotic potential. However, a reliable identification of all species is of practical importance, particularly when water samples and samples from wild animals are investigated. The aim of the present work was to genotype Giardia species and G. duodenalis assemblages using as a target the region spanning the 5.8S gene and the 2 flanking internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) of the ribosomal gene. Primers were designed to match strongly conserved regions in the 3' end of the small subunit and in the 5' end of the large subunit ribosomal genes. The corresponding region (about 310 bp) was amplified from 49 isolates of both human and animal origin, representing all G. duodenalis assemblages as well as G. muris and G. microti. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis showed that G. ardeae, G. muris, G. microti as well as the 7 G. duodenalis assemblages can be easily distinguished. Since the major subgroups within the zoonotic assemblages A and B can be identified by sequence analysis, this assay is also informative for molecular epidemiological studies.

  18. Ecological barcoding of corallivory by second internal transcribed spacer sequences: hosts of coralliophiline gastropods detected by the cnidarian DNA in their stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliverio, Marco; Barco, Andrea; Modica, Maria Vittoria; Richter, Alexandra; Mariottini, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) of the nuclear ribosomal RNA cluster (rDNA) is significantly smaller in the Cnidaria (120-260 bp) than in the rest of the Metazoa. ITS2 is one of the fastest evolving DNA regions among those commonly used in molecular systematics and has been proposed as a possible barcoding gene for Cnidaria to replace the currently problematic mitochondrial sequences used. We have reviewed the intraspecific and interspecific variation of ITS2 rRNA sequences in the Anthozoa. We have observed that the lower limits of the interspecific DNA divergence ranges very often overlap with intraspecific ranges, and identical sequences from individuals of different species are not rare. This finding can result in problems similar to those encountered with the mitochondrial COI, and we conclude that ITS2 does not prove significantly better than COI for standard taxonomic DNA barcoding in Anthozoa. However, ITS2 appears to be a promising gene in the ecological DNA barcoding of corallivory, where taxonomic accuracy at genus or even family level may represent a significant improvement of current knowledge. We have successfully amplified and sequenced ITS2 from template DNA extracted from foot muscle and from stomach contents of corallivorous gastropods, and from their anthozoan hosts. The small size of cnidarian ITS2 makes it a very easy and efficient tool for ecological barcoding of associations. Ecological barcoding of corallivory is an indispensable approach to the study of the associations in deep water, where direct observation is severely limited by logistics and costs.

  19. Piriform spider silk sequences reveal unique repetitive elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David J; Bittencourt, Daniela; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Rech, Elibio L; Lewis, Randolph V

    2010-11-08

    Orb-weaving spider silk fibers are assembled from very large, highly repetitive proteins. The repeated segments contain, in turn, short, simple, and repetitive amino acid motifs that account for the physical and mechanical properties of the assembled fiber. Of the six orb-weaver silk fibroins, the piriform silk that makes the attachment discs, which lashes the joints of the web and attaches dragline silk to surfaces, has not been previously characterized. Piriform silk protein cDNAs were isolated from phage libraries of three species: A. trifasciata , N. clavipes , and N. cruentata . The deduced amino acid sequences from these genes revealed two new repetitive motifs: an alternating proline motif, where every other amino acid is proline, and a glutamine-rich motif of 6-8 amino acids. Similar to other spider silk proteins, the repeated segments are large (>200 amino acids) and highly homogenized within a species. There is also substantial sequence similarity across the genes from the three species, with particular conservation of the repetitive motifs. Northern blot analysis revealed that the mRNA is larger than 11 kb and is expressed exclusively in the piriform glands of the spider. Phylogenetic analysis of the C-terminal regions of the new proteins with published spidroins robustly shows that the piriform sequences form an ortholog group.

  20. Imprinted genes show unique patterns of sequence conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helms Volkhard

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imprinting is an evolutionary conserved mechanism of epigenetic gene regulation in placental mammals that results in silencing of one of the parental alleles. In order to decipher interactions between allele-specific DNA methylation of imprinted genes and evolutionary conservation, we performed a genome-wide comparative investigation of genomic sequences and highly conserved elements of imprinted genes in human and mouse. Results Evolutionarily conserved elements in imprinted regions differ from those associated with autosomal genes in various ways. Whereas for maternally expressed genes strong divergence of protein-encoding sequences is most prominent, paternally expressed genes exhibit substantial conservation of coding and noncoding sequences. Conserved elements in imprinted regions are marked by enrichment of CpG dinucleotides and low (TpG+CpA/(2·CpG ratios indicate reduced CpG deamination. Interestingly, paternally and maternally expressed genes can be distinguished by differences in G+C and CpG contents that might be associated with unusual epigenetic features. Especially noncoding conserved elements of paternally expressed genes are exceptionally G+C and CpG rich. In addition, we confirmed a frequent occurrence of intronic CpG islands and observed a decelerated degeneration of ancient LINE-1 repeats. We also found a moderate enrichment of YY1 and CTCF binding sites in imprinted regions and identified several short sequence motifs in highly conserved elements that might act as additional regulatory elements. Conclusions We discovered several novel conserved DNA features that might be related to allele-specific DNA methylation. Our results hint at reduced CpG deamination rates in imprinted regions, which affects mostly noncoding conserved elements of paternally expressed genes. Pronounced differences between maternally and paternally expressed genes imply specific modes of evolution as a result of differences in

  1. Mutational analysis of DBD*--a unique antileukemic gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yan-shan; Johnson, Betty H; Webb, M Scott; Thompson, E Brad

    2002-01-01

    DBD* is a novel gene encoding an 89 amino acid peptide that is constitutively lethal to leukemic cells. DBD* was derived from the DNA binding domain of the human glucocorticoid receptor by a frameshift that replaces the final 21 C-terminal amino acids of the domain. Previous studies suggested that DBD* no longer acted as the natural DNA binding domain. To confirm and extend these results, we mutated DBD* in 29 single amino acid positions, critical for the function in the native domain or of possible functional significance in the novel 21 amino acid C-terminal sequence. Steroid-resistant leukemic ICR-27-4 cells were transiently transfected by electroporation with each of the 29 mutants. Cell kill was evaluated by trypan blue dye exclusion, a WST-1 tetrazolium-based assay for cell respiration, propidium iodide exclusion, and Hoechst 33258 staining of chromatin. Eleven of the 29 point mutants increased, whereas four decreased antileukemic activity. The remainder had no effect on activity. The nonconcordances between these effects and native DNA binding domain function strongly suggest that the lethality of DBD* is distinct from that of the glucocorticoid receptor. Transfections of fragments of DBD* showed that optimal activity localized to the sequence for its C-terminal 32 amino acids.

  2. Real-Time PCR Identification of Unique Bacillus anthracis Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieślik, P; Knap, J; Kolodziej, M; Mirski, T; Joniec, J; Graniak, G; Zakowska, D; Winnicka, I; Bielawska-Drózd, A

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is a spore-forming, Gram-positive microorganism. It is a causative agent of anthrax, a highly infectious disease. It belongs to the "Bacillus cereus group", which contains other closely related species, including Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus weihenstephanensis, and Bacillus pseudomycoides. B. anthracis naturally occurs in soil environments. The BA5345 genetic marker was used for highly specific detection of B. anthracis with TaqMan probes. The detection limit of a real-time PCR assay was estimated at the level of 16.9 copies (CI95% - 37.4 to 37.86, SD = 0.2; SE = 0.118). Oligonucleotides designed for the targeted sequences (within the tested locus) revealed 100 % homology to B. anthracis strain reference sequences deposited in the database (NCBI) and high specificity to all tested B. anthracis strains. Additional in silico analysis of plasmid markers pag and cap genes with B. anthracis strains included in the database was carried out. Our study clearly indicates that the BA5345 marker can be used with success as a chromosomal marker in routine identification of B. anthracis; moreover, detection of plasmid markers indicates virulence of the examined strains.

  3. Rapid authentication of the precious herb saffron by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) based on internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingming; Shi, Yuhua; Wu, Lan; Guo, Licheng; Liu, Wei; Xiong, Chao; Yan, Song; Sun, Wei; Chen, Shilin

    2016-05-05

    Saffron is one of the most expensive species of Chinese herbs and has been subjected to various types of adulteration because of its high price and limited production. The present study introduces a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique for the differentiation of saffron from its adulterants. This novel technique is sensitive, efficient and simple. Six specific LAMP primers were designed on the basis of the nucleotide sequence of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) nuclear ribosomal DNA of Crocus sativus. All LAMP amplifications were performed successfully, and visual detection occurred within 60 min at isothermal conditions of 65 °C. The results indicated that the LAMP primers are accurate and highly specific for the discrimination of saffron from its adulterants. In particular, 10 fg of genomic DNA was determined to be the limit for template accuracy of LAMP in saffron. Thus, the proposed novel, simple, and sensitive LAMP assay is well suited for immediate on-site discrimination of herbal materials. Based on the study, a practical standard operating procedure (SOP) for utilizing the LAMP protocol for herbal authentication is provided.

  4. Rapid authentication of the precious herb saffron by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) based on internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingming; Shi, Yuhua; Wu, Lan; Guo, Licheng; Liu, Wei; Xiong, Chao; Yan, Song; Sun, Wei; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Saffron is one of the most expensive species of Chinese herbs and has been subjected to various types of adulteration because of its high price and limited production. The present study introduces a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique for the differentiation of saffron from its adulterants. This novel technique is sensitive, efficient and simple. Six specific LAMP primers were designed on the basis of the nucleotide sequence of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) nuclear ribosomal DNA of Crocus sativus. All LAMP amplifications were performed successfully, and visual detection occurred within 60 min at isothermal conditions of 65 °C. The results indicated that the LAMP primers are accurate and highly specific for the discrimination of saffron from its adulterants. In particular, 10 fg of genomic DNA was determined to be the limit for template accuracy of LAMP in saffron. Thus, the proposed novel, simple, and sensitive LAMP assay is well suited for immediate on-site discrimination of herbal materials. Based on the study, a practical standard operating procedure (SOP) for utilizing the LAMP protocol for herbal authentication is provided. PMID:27146605

  5. Characterization of Penicillium species isolated from grape berries by their internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) sequences and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of geosmin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Guerche, Stéphane; Garcia, Carole; Darriet, Philippe; Dubourdieu, Denis; Labarère, Jacques

    2004-06-01

    Geosmin (trans-1,10-dimethyl-trans-9-decalol), an earthy-musty compound, has been identified in wines and in grape juice, in which its presence is highly detrimental to the aromatic quality. Geosmin has a biological origin, and the analysis of rotten grape microflora has been done on two grape varieties (Semillon, Cabernet Sauvignon) from six parcels of the Bordeaux region over 3 years (1999, 2000, 2001). Forty-three Penicillium-related species have been analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for their geosmin production. GC-MS analysis has demonstrated that the earthy odor was always correlated with the presence of geosmin. Phenotypic characterization of Penicillium spp. being ambiguous, a molecular characterization by rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) sequencing was performed for all strains. The results evidenced that all strains producing geosmin belonged to only one species, P. expansum, and that the other strains, not producing geosmin, belonged to three species: P. purpurogenum, P. thomii, and Talaromyces wortmanii.

  6. Leishmania major: genetic heterogeneity of Iranian isolates by single-strand conformation polymorphism and sequence analysis of ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashakori, Mahnaz; Mahnaz, Tashakori; Kuhls, Katrin; Katrin, Kuhls; Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Amer, Al-Jawabreh; Mauricio, Isabel L; Isabel, Mauricio; Schönian, Gabriele; Gabriele, Schönian; Farajnia, Safar; Safar, Farajnia; Alimohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Hossein, Alimohammadian Mohammad

    2006-04-01

    Protozoan parasites of Leishmania major are the causative agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis in different parts of Iran. We applied PCR-based methods to analyze L. major parasites isolated from patients with active lesions from different geographic areas in Iran in order to understand DNA polymorphisms within L. major species. Twenty-four isolates were identified as L. major by RFLP analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) amplicons. These isolates were further studied by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and sequencing of ITS1 and ITS2. Data obtained from SSCP analysis of the ITS1 and ITS2 loci revealed three and four different patterns among all studied samples, respectively. Sequencing of ITS1 and ITS2 confirmed the results of SSCP analysis and showed the potential of the PCR-SSCP method for assessing genetic heterogeneity within L. major. Different patterns in ITS1 were due to substitution of one nucleotide, whereas in ITS2 the changes were defined by variation in the number of repeats in two polymorphic microsatellites. In total five genotypic groups LmA, LmB, LmC, LmD and LmE were identified among L. major isolates. The most frequent genotype, LmA, was detected in isolates collected from different endemic areas of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Iran. Genotypes LmC, LmD and LmE were found only in the new focus of CL in Damghan (Semnan province) and LmB was identified exclusively among isolates of Kashan focus (Isfahan province). The distribution of genetic polymorphisms suggests the existence of distinct endemic regions of L. major in Iran.

  7. Double strand break repair by capture of retrotransposon sequences and reverse-transcribed spliced mRNA sequences in mouse zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ryuichi; Ishii, Masayuki; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Kitazawa, Moe; Usami, Takako; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Kanno, Jun; Ikawa, Masahito; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2015-07-28

    The CRISPR/Cas system efficiently introduces double strand breaks (DSBs) at a genomic locus specified by a single guide RNA (sgRNA). The DSBs are subsequently repaired through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). Here, we demonstrate that DSBs introduced into mouse zygotes by the CRISPR/Cas system are repaired by the capture of DNA sequences deriving from retrotransposons, genomic DNA, mRNA and sgRNA. Among 93 mice analysed, 57 carried mutant alleles and 22 of them had long de novo insertion(s) at DSB-introduced sites; two were spliced mRNAs of Pcnt and Inadl without introns, indicating the involvement of reverse transcription (RT). Fifteen alleles included retrotransposons, mRNAs, and other sequences without evidence of RT. Two others were sgRNAs with one containing T7 promoter-derived sequence suggestive of a PCR product as its origin. In conclusion, RT-product-mediated DSB repair (RMDR) and non-RMDR repair were identified in the mouse zygote. We also confirmed that both RMDR and non-RMDR take place in CRISPR/Cas transfected NIH-3T3 cells. Finally, as two de novo MuERV-L insertions in C57BL/6 mice were shown to have characteristic features of RMDR in natural conditions, we hypothesize that RMDR contributes to the emergence of novel DNA sequences in the course of evolution.

  8. On the origins of the tetraploid Bromus species (section Bromus, Poaceae): insights from internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainouche, M L; Bayer, R J

    1997-10-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal DNA from 22 diploid and tetraploid annual Bromus species of section Bromus (Poaceae) and three species belonging to other Bromus sections, Bromus catharticus (section Ceratochloa), Bromus anomalus (section Pnigma), and Bromus sterilis (section Genea), were investigated by PCR amplification and direct sequencing. The length of the ITS-1 region varied from 215 to 218 bp, and that of the ITS-2 region from 215 to 216 bp, in the species analyzed. ITS-1 was more variable and provided more informative sites (49) than ITS-2 (32). No variation was encountered within species. In pairwise comparison among species of section Bromus, sequence divergence ranged from 0.0 to 8.0% for the combined ITS-1 and ITS-2 regions. Parsimony analysis using Avena longiglumis and Hordeum vulgare as outgroups resulted in well-resolved phylogenetic trees and showed that section Bromus is monophyletic according to the species analyzed outside of the section. The analysis clarified the phylogenetic relationships among monogenomic (diploid) species. Introduction of the allotetraploid species did not change the general topology of the trees obtained using only the diploid species. Although some tetraploid-diploid species relationships will have to be clarified with faster evolving markers, the ITS sequences are shown to be useful for assessing evolutionary relationships among closely related Bromus species, as well as for clarifying taxonomic problems in previously controversial cases (e.g., Bromus alopecuros and Bromus caroli-henrici). New hypotheses are proposed concerning the origin of several allotetraploid species. For example, it is shown that the tetraploid Bromus hordeaceus diverged earlier than all other species of section Bromus, excluding the diploid B. caroli-henrici, which is found to be basal in this group. The tetraploid Bromus arenarius, which was considered a hybrid between sections Bromus and Genea, and the

  9. EXISTENCE AND UNIQUENESS OF WEIGHTED PSEUDO ALMOST AUTOMORPHIC SEQUENCE SOLUTIONS TO SOME SEMILINEAR DIFFERENCE EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a semilinear difference equation in a Banach space. Under some suitable conditions on f, we prove the existence and uniqueness of a weighted pseudo almost automorphic sequence solution to the equation.

  10. Co-infection of Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus spp. among livestock in Malaysia as revealed by amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer II DNA region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus spp. are reported to be the most prevalent and highly pathogenic parasites in livestock, particularly in small ruminants. However, the routine conventional tool used in Malaysia could not differentiate the species accurately and therefore limiting the understanding of the co-infections between these two genera among livestock in Malaysia. This study is the first attempt to identify the strongylids of veterinary importance in Malaysia (i.e., H. contortus and Trichostrongylus spp.) by amplification and sequencing of the Internal Transcribed Spacer II DNA region. Results Overall, 118 (cattle: 11 of 98 or 11.2%; deer: 4 of 70 or 5.7%; goats: 99 of 157 or 63.1%; swine: 4 of 91 or 4.4%) out of the 416 collected fecal samples were microscopy positive with strongylid infection. The PCR and sequencing results demonstrated that 93 samples (1 or 25.0% of deer; 92 or 92.9% of goats) contained H. contortus. In addition, Trichostrongylus colubriformis was observed in 75 (75.8% of 99) of strongylid infected goats and Trichostrongylus axei in 4 (4.0%) of 99 goats and 2 (50.0%) of 4 deer. Based on the molecular results, co-infection of H. contortus and Trichostrongylus spp. (H. contortus + T. colubriformis denoted as HTC; H. contortus + T. axei denoted as HTA) were only found in goats. Specifically, HTC co-infections have higher rate (71 or 45.2% of 157) compared to HTA co-infections (3 or 1.9% of 157). Conclusions The present study is the first molecular identification of strongylid species among livestock in Malaysia which is essential towards a better knowledge of the epidemiology of gastro-intestinal parasitic infection among livestock in the country. Furthermore, a more comprehensive or nationwide molecular-based study on gastro-intestinal parasites in livestock should be carried out in the future, given that molecular tools could assist in improving diagnosis of veterinary parasitology in Malaysia due to its high

  11. 16S-23S Internal Transcribed Spacer Region PCR and Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis has Potential as an Alternative to High Performance Liquid Chromatography for Identification of Slowly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Shradha; Kong, Fanrong; Jelfs, Peter; Gray, Timothy J.; Xiao, Meng; Sintchenko, Vitali; Chen, Sharon C-A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (SG-NTM) of clinical significance remains problematic. This study evaluated a novel method of SG-NTM identification by amplification of the mycobacterial 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region followed by resolution of amplified fragments by sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Fourteen American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) strains and 103 clinical/environmental isolates (total n = 24 species) of SG-NTM were included. Identification was compared with that achieved by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), in-house PCR and 16S/ITS sequencing. Isolates of all species yielded a SCGE profile comprising a single fragment length (or peak) except for M. scrofulaceum (two peaks). SCGE peaks of ATCC strains were distinct except for peak overlap between Mycobacterium kansasii and M. marinum. Of clinical/environmental strains, unique peaks were seen for 7/17 (41%) species (M. haemophilum, M. kubicae, M. lentiflavum, M. terrae, M. kansasii, M. asiaticum and M. triplex); 3/17 (18%) species were identified by HPLC. There were five SCGE fragment length types (I–V) each of M. avium, M. intracellulare and M. gordonae. Overlap of fragment lengths was seen between M. marinum and M. ulcerans; for M. gordonae SCGE type III and M. paragordonae; M. avium SCGE types III and IV, and M. intracellulare SCGE type I; M. chimaera, M. parascrofulaceum and M. intracellulare SCGE types III and IV; M. branderi and M. avium type V; and M. vulneris and M. intracellulare type V. The ITS-SCGE method was able to provide the first line rapid and reproducible species identification/screening of SG-NTM and was more discriminatory than HPLC. PMID:27749897

  12. 16S-23S Internal Transcribed Spacer Region PCR and Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis has Potential as an Alternative to High Performance Liquid Chromatography for Identification of Slowly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Shradha; Kong, Fanrong; Jelfs, Peter; Gray, Timothy J; Xiao, Meng; Sintchenko, Vitali; Chen, Sharon C-A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (SG-NTM) of clinical significance remains problematic. This study evaluated a novel method of SG-NTM identification by amplification of the mycobacterial 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region followed by resolution of amplified fragments by sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Fourteen American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) strains and 103 clinical/environmental isolates (total n = 24 species) of SG-NTM were included. Identification was compared with that achieved by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), in-house PCR and 16S/ITS sequencing. Isolates of all species yielded a SCGE profile comprising a single fragment length (or peak) except for M. scrofulaceum (two peaks). SCGE peaks of ATCC strains were distinct except for peak overlap between Mycobacterium kansasii and M. marinum. Of clinical/environmental strains, unique peaks were seen for 7/17 (41%) species (M. haemophilum, M. kubicae, M. lentiflavum, M. terrae, M. kansasii, M. asiaticum and M. triplex); 3/17 (18%) species were identified by HPLC. There were five SCGE fragment length types (I-V) each of M. avium, M. intracellulare and M. gordonae. Overlap of fragment lengths was seen between M. marinum and M. ulcerans; for M. gordonae SCGE type III and M. paragordonae; M. avium SCGE types III and IV, and M. intracellulare SCGE type I; M. chimaera, M. parascrofulaceum and M. intracellulare SCGE types III and IV; M. branderi and M. avium type V; and M. vulneris and M. intracellulare type V. The ITS-SCGE method was able to provide the first line rapid and reproducible species identification/screening of SG-NTM and was more discriminatory than HPLC.

  13. 16S-23S Internal Transcribed Spacer Region PCR and Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis has Potential as an Alternative to High Performance Liquid Chromatography for Identification of Slowly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Subedi, Shradha; Kong, Fanrong; Jelfs, Peter; Gray, Timothy J; Xiao, Meng; Sintchenko, Vitali; Chen, Sharon C-A.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (SG-NTM) of clinical significance remains problematic. This study evaluated a novel method of SG-NTM identification by amplification of the mycobacterial 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region followed by resolution of amplified fragments by sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Fourteen American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) strains and 103 clinical/environmental isolates (total n = 24 speci...

  14. Phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide sequences confirm a unique plant intercontinental disjunction between tropical Africa, the Caribbean, and the Hawaiian Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namoff, Sandra; Luke, Quentin; Jiménez, Francisco; Veloz, Alberto; Lewis, Carl E; Sosa, Victoria; Maunder, Mike; Francisco-Ortega, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacers and 5.8 regions of the nuclear ribosomal DNA and of the trnH-psbA spacer of the chloroplast genome confirm that the three taxa of the Jacquemontia ovalifolia (Choicy) Hallier f. complex (Convolvulaceae) form a monophyletic group. Levels of nucleotide divergence and morphological differentiation among these taxa support the view that each should be recognized as distinct species. These three species display unique intercontinental disjunction, with one species endemic to Hawaii (Jacquemontia sandwicensis A. Gray.), another restricted to eastern Mexico and the Antilles [Jacquemontia obcordata (Millspaugh) House], and the third confined to East and West Africa (J. ovalifolia). The Caribbean and Hawaiian species are sister taxa and are another example of a biogeographical link between the Caribbean Basin and Polynesia. We provide a brief conservation review of the three taxa based on our collective field work and investigations; it is apparent that J. obcordata is highly threatened and declining in the Caribbean.

  15. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  16. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of a Citrobacter freundii Plasmid Carrying KPC-2 in a Unique Genetic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yancheng; Imirzalioglu, Can; Hain, Torsten; Kaase, Martin; Gatermann, Soeren; Exner, Martin; Mielke, Martin; Hauri, Anja; Dragneva, Yolanta; Bill, Rita; Wendt, Constanze; Wirtz, Angela; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2014-01-01

    The complete and annotated nucleotide sequence of a 54,036-bp plasmid harboring a blaKPC-2 gene that is clonally present in Citrobacter isolates from different species is presented. The plasmid belongs to incompatibility group N (IncN) and harbors the class A carbapenemase KPC-2 in a unique genetic environment. PMID:25395635

  17. Motif signatures of transcribed enhancers

    KAUST Repository

    Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios

    2017-09-14

    In mammalian cells, transcribed enhancers (TrEn) play important roles in the initiation of gene expression and maintenance of gene expression levels in spatiotemporal manner. One of the most challenging questions in biology today is how the genomic characteristics of enhancers relate to enhancer activities. This is particularly critical, as several recent studies have linked enhancer sequence motifs to specific functional roles. To date, only a limited number of enhancer sequence characteristics have been investigated, leaving space for exploring the enhancers genomic code in a more systematic way. To address this problem, we developed a novel computational method, TELS, aimed at identifying predictive cell type/tissue specific motif signatures. We used TELS to compile a comprehensive catalog of motif signatures for all known TrEn identified by the FANTOM5 consortium across 112 human primary cells and tissues. Our results confirm that distinct cell type/tissue specific motif signatures characterize TrEn. These signatures allow discriminating successfully a) TrEn from random controls, proxy of non-enhancer activity, and b) cell type/tissue specific TrEn from enhancers expressed and transcribed in different cell types/tissues. TELS codes and datasets are publicly available at http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/TELS.

  18. Putative and unique gene sequence utilization for the design of species specific probes as modeled by Lactobacillus plantarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concept of utilizing putative and unique gene sequences for the design of species specific probes was tested. The abundance profile of assigned functions within the Lactobacillus plantarum genome was used for the identification of the putative and unique gene sequence, csh. The targeted gene (cs...

  19. Unique nucleotide sequence-guided assembly of repetitive DNA parts for synthetic biology applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torella, JP; Lienert, F; Boehm, CR; Chen, JH; Way, JC; Silver, PA

    2014-08-07

    Recombination-based DNA construction methods, such as Gibson assembly, have made it possible to easily and simultaneously assemble multiple DNA parts, and they hold promise for the development and optimization of metabolic pathways and functional genetic circuits. Over time, however, these pathways and circuits have become more complex, and the increasing need for standardization and insulation of genetic parts has resulted in sequence redundancies-for example, repeated terminator and insulator sequences-that complicate recombination-based assembly. We and others have recently developed DNA assembly methods, which we refer to collectively as unique nucleotide sequence (UNS)-guided assembly, in which individual DNA parts are flanked with UNSs to facilitate the ordered, recombination-based assembly of repetitive sequences. Here we present a detailed protocol for UNS-guided assembly that enables researchers to convert multiple DNA parts into sequenced, correctly assembled constructs, or into high-quality combinatorial libraries in only 2-3 d. If the DNA parts must be generated from scratch, an additional 2-5 d are necessary. This protocol requires no specialized equipment and can easily be implemented by a student with experience in basic cloning techniques.

  20. Generation and analysis of a 29,745 unique Expressed Sequence Tags from the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas assembled into a publicly accessible database: the GigasDatabase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klopp Christophe

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although bivalves are among the most-studied marine organisms because of their ecological role and economic importance, very little information is available on the genome sequences of oyster species. This report documents three large-scale cDNA sequencing projects for the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas initiated to provide a large number of expressed sequence tags that were subsequently compiled in a publicly accessible database. This resource allowed for the identification of a large number of transcripts and provides valuable information for ongoing investigations of tissue-specific and stimulus-dependant gene expression patterns. These data are crucial for constructing comprehensive DNA microarrays, identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms and microsatellites in coding regions, and for identifying genes when the entire genome sequence of C. gigas becomes available. Description In the present paper, we report the production of 40,845 high-quality ESTs that identify 29,745 unique transcribed sequences consisting of 7,940 contigs and 21,805 singletons. All of these new sequences, together with existing public sequence data, have been compiled into a publicly-available Website http://public-contigbrowser.sigenae.org:9090/Crassostrea_gigas/index.html. Approximately 43% of the unique ESTs had significant matches against the SwissProt database and 27% were annotated using Gene Ontology terms. In addition, we identified a total of 208 in silico microsatellites from the ESTs, with 173 having sufficient flanking sequence for primer design. We also identified a total of 7,530 putative in silico, single-nucleotide polymorphisms using existing and newly-generated EST resources for the Pacific oyster. Conclusion A publicly-available database has been populated with 29,745 unique sequences for the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The database provides many tools to search cleaned and assembled ESTs. The user may input and submit

  1. A case of Beauveria bassiana keratitis confirmed by internal transcribed spacer and LSU rDNA D1–D2 sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ligozzi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of fungal keratitis due to Beauveria bassiana in a farmer with Fuchs' dystrophy, treated with amphotericin B. Surgery with penetrating keratoplasty was necessary to resolve the lesions. Susceptibility testing and molecular sequencing permitted the identification and treatment of this rare aetiological agent of invasive fungal disease.

  2. A case of Beauveria bassiana keratitis confirmed by internal transcribed spacer and LSU rDNA D1-D2 sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligozzi, M; Maccacaro, L; Passilongo, M; Pedrotti, E; Marchini, G; Koncan, R; Cornaglia, G; Centonze, A R; Lo Cascio, G

    2014-05-01

    We describe a case of fungal keratitis due to Beauveria bassiana in a farmer with Fuchs' dystrophy, treated with amphotericin B. Surgery with penetrating keratoplasty was necessary to resolve the lesions. Susceptibility testing and molecular sequencing permitted the identification and treatment of this rare aetiological agent of invasive fungal disease.

  3. Molecular detection, identification and phylogenetic inference of Leishmania spp. in some desert lizards from Northwest China by using internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Rong; Guo, Xian-Guang; Liu, Jin-Long; Zhou, Tian-He; Gong, Xiong; Chen, Da-Li; Chen, Jian-Ping

    2016-10-01

    Leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania is still endemic in Northwest China. It has been thought that reptiles could be a reservoir for mammalian leishmaniasis. However, data are still scarce on natural infection of lizards with Leishmania spp. in China. The present study deals with detection, identification and phylogenetic inference of Leishmania parasites at species and intraspecies levels isolated from six desert lizard species from 10 geographical locations in Northwest China using amplification and sequencing of ITS-rDNA. In total, 83 haplotypes were found among 137 ITS1 sequences obtained from up to 64.6% of all captured lizards. Representative sequences of Leishmania available in GenBank were compiled for comparison with the obtained haplotypes. Tree-based species delimitation was achieved by using Bayesian phylogenitc analyses and maximum parsimony approach. Phylogenetic trees congruently supported that the haplotypes were found to belong to three Leishmania species including L. (sauroleishmania) sp., Leishmania tropica and Leishmania donovani complex. A network approach revealed paraphyletic populations of L. (sauroleishmania) sp. and L. tropica at intraspecies level regarding geographical origin and low host specificity. Chinese L. tropica from lizards showed significant heterogeneity as the obtained haplotypes were distributed in different clusters from other countries. Common ancestry was observed between some sequences of L. tropica from lizards and other sequence types from clinical samples from other countries. This may lend support to the potential reservoir role of lizards for human leishmaniasis. Our results appear to be the first molecular evidence for natural infection of lizards in Northwest China with reptilian Leishmania and mammalian Leishmania species. Desert lizards may be considered as putative reservoir hosts for Leishmania in China. Further studies on persistence of the Leishmania parasites in lizards and sandflies are recommended for the

  4. Molecular variation and phylogeny of the Anopheles minimus complex (Diptera: Culicidae) inhabiting Southeast Asian countries, based on ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers, ITS1 and 2, and the 28S D3 sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawabe, Kyoko; Takagi, Masahiro; Tsuda, Yoshio; Tuno, Nobuko

    2003-12-01

    Anopheles minimus (Theobald) is one of the most important vectors of human malaria in Southeast Asia. Morphological studies now have revealed five sibling species as its complex, designated as species A to E. The present study investigated the genetic divergence among An. minimus populations from four countries (Japan, China, Thailand and Indonesia), based on the DNA sequences data of the D3 (the third domain of the 28S ribosomal gene) and ITS2 (the second internal transcribed spacer of the ribosomal gene) is reported. The D3 and ITS2 phylogenetic trees, and the electrophoretic profile of ITS1 (the first internal transcribed spacer of the ribosomal gene) indicated that our An. minimus populations are comprised of three groups: the Japanese population as group I, the population from Guangxi Province of China (GX population) as group II, and others, as group III. The results showed the morphological similarity of group III and GX with the species complex A and B, respectively. It is interesting that both two species A (YN population) and species B (GX) occur in China, and that both species, An. minimus species A (LB-95 population) and the closer population An. flavirostris (Ludlow) (LB-00 population) appeared to be present on the Lombok Island of Indonesia, although in far separated localities. Moreover, this molecular evidence confirms the previous suggestion that the population from the Ishigaki Island of Japan should be classified as a new genetic status species E.

  5. Characterization of tissue expression and full-length coding sequence of a novel human gene mapping at 3q12.1 and transcribed in oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayein, Nicole-Adeline; Stankoff, Bruno; Auffray, Charles; Devignes, Marie-Dominique

    2002-05-01

    Macro-array differential hybridization of a collection of 5058 human gene transcripts represented in an IMAGE infant brain cDNA library has led to the identification of transcripts displaying preferential or specific expression in brain (Genome Res. 9 (1999) 195; http://idefix.upr420.vjf.cnrs.fr/IMAGE). Most of these genes correspond to as yet undescribed functions. Detailed characterization of the expression, sequence, and genome assignment of one of these genes named C3orf4, is reported here. The full-length sequence of the transcript was obtained by 5' extension RT-PCR. The gene transcript (2.8 kb) encodes a 253 amino acid long protein, with four transmembrane domains. The position of the C3orf4 gene was determined at 3q12.1 thanks to the draft sequence of the human genome. It is composed of five exons spanning more than 7 kb. No TATAA box but a CpG island was found upstream of the beginning of the gene. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed a predominant expression in myelinated structures such as corpus callosum and spinal cord. RT-PCR showed expression of the C3orf4 gene in rat optic nerve and cultured oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, but not in astrocytes. This work supports further investigations aimed at determining the role of the C3orf4 gene in myelinating cells.

  6. Evolution, homology conservation, and identification of unique sequence signatures in GH19 family chitinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaya Prakash, N A; Jayanthi, M; Sabarinathan, R; Kangueane, P; Mathew, Lazar; Sekar, K

    2010-05-01

    The discovery of GH (Glycoside Hydrolase) 19 chitinases in Streptomyces sp. raises the possibility of the presence of these proteins in other bacterial species, since they were initially thought to be confined to higher plants. The present study mainly concentrates on the phylogenetic distribution and homology conservation in GH19 family chitinases. Extensive database searches are performed to identify the presence of GH19 family chitinases in the three major super kingdoms of life. Multiple sequence alignment of all the identified GH19 chitinase family members resulted in the identification of globally conserved residues. We further identified conserved sequence motifs across the major sub groups within the family. Estimation of evolutionary distance between the various bacterial and plant chitinases are carried out to better understand the pattern of evolution. Our study also supports the horizontal gene transfer theory, which states that GH19 chitinase genes are transferred from higher plants to bacteria. Further, the present study sheds light on the phylogenetic distribution and identifies unique sequence signatures that define GH19 chitinase family of proteins. The identified motifs could be used as markers to delineate uncharacterized GH19 family chitinases. The estimation of evolutionary distance between chitinase identified in plants and bacteria shows that the flowering plants are more related to chitinase in actinobacteria than that of identified in purple bacteria. We propose a model to elucidate the natural history of GH19 family chitinases.

  7. Use of sequence motifs as barcodes and secondary structures of Internal Transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2, rDNA) for identification of the Indian liver fluke, Fasciola (Trematoda: Fasciolidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, PK; Tandon, V; Biswal, DK; Goswami, LM; Chatterjee, A

    2009-01-01

    Most phylogenetic studies using current methods have focused on primary DNA sequence information. However, RNA secondary structures are particularly useful in systematics because they include characteristics that give “morphological” information which is not found in the primary sequence. Also DNA sequence motifs from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear rRNA repeat are useful for identification of trematodes. The species of liver flukes of the genus Fasciola (Platyhelminthes: Digenea: Fasciolidae) are obligate parasitic trematodes residing in the large biliary ducts of herbivorous mammals. While Fasciola hepatica has a cosmopolitan distribution, the other major species, i.e., F. gigantica is reportedly prevalent in the tropical and subtropical regions of Africa and Asia. To determine the Fasciola sp. of Assam (India) origin based on rDNA molecular data, ribosomal ITS2 region was sequenced (EF027103) and analysed. NCBI databases were used for sequence homology analysis and the phylogenetic trees were constructed based upon the ITS2 using MEGA and a Bayesian analysis of the combined data. The latter approach allowed us to include both primary sequence and RNA molecular morphometrics and revealed a close relationship with isolates of F. gigantica from China, Indonesia and Japan, the isolate from China with significant bootstrap values being the closest. ITS2 sequence motifs allowed an accurate in silico distinction of liver flukes. The data indicate that ITS2 motifs (≤ 50 bp in size) can be considered promising tool for trematode species identification. Using the novel approach of molecular morphometrics that is based on ITS2 secondary structure homologies, phylogenetic relationships of the various isolates of fasciolid species have been discussed. PMID:19294000

  8. Rhoptry-associated protein (rap-1) genes in the sheep pathogen Babesia sp. Xinjiang: Multiple transcribed copies differing by 3' end repeated sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Qingli; Marchand, Jordan; Yang, Congshan; Bonsergent, Claire; Guan, Guiquan; Yin, Hong; Malandrin, Laurence

    2015-07-30

    Sheep babesiosis occurs mainly in tropical and subtropical areas. The sheep parasite Babesia sp. Xinjiang is widespread in China, and our goal is to characterize rap-1 (rhoptry-associated protein 1) gene diversity and expression as a first step of a long term goal aiming at developing a recombinant subunit vaccine. Seven different rap-1a genes were amplified in Babesia sp. Xinjiang, using degenerate primers designed from conserved motifs. Rap-1b and rap-1c gene types could not be identified. In all seven rap-1a genes, the 5' regions exhibited identical sequences over 936 nt, and the 3' regions differed at 28 positions over 147 nt, defining two types of genes designated α and β. The remaining 3' part varied from 72 to 360 nt in length, depending on the gene. This region consists of a succession of two to ten 36 nt repeats, which explains the size differences. Even if the nucleotide sequences varied, 6 repeats encoded the same stretch of amino acids. Transcription of at least four α and two β genes was demonstrated by standard RT-PCR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Deep sequencing reveals different compositions of mRNA transcribed from the F8 gene in a panel of FVIII-producing CHO cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Christian Schrøder; Bolt, Gert; Hansen, Jens J

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is one of the most complex biopharmaceuticals due to the large size, poor protein stability and extensive post-translational modifications. As a consequence, efficient production of FVIII in mammalian cells poses a major challenge, with typical yields two to three...... orders of magnitude lower than for antibodies. In the present study we investigated CHO DXB11 cells transfected with a plasmid encoding human coagulation factor VIII. Single cell clones were isolated from the pool of transfectants and a panel of 14 clones representing a dynamic range of FVIII...... productivities was selected for RNA sequencing analysis. The analysis showed distinct differences in F8 RNA composition between the clones. The exogenous F8-dhfr transcript was found to make up the most abundant transcript in the present clones. No correlation was seen between F8 mRNA levels and the measured...

  10. Influence of sequence identity and unique breakpoints on the frequency of intersubtype HIV-1 recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreha Measho

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 recombination between different subtypes has a major impact on the global epidemic. The generation of these intersubtype recombinants follows a defined set of events starting with dual infection of a host cell, heterodiploid virus production, strand transfers during reverse transcription, and then selection. In this study, recombination frequencies were measured in the C1-C4 regions of the envelope gene in the presence (using a multiple cycle infection system and absence (in vitro reverse transcription and single cycle infection systems of selection for replication-competent virus. Ugandan subtypes A and D HIV-1 env sequences (115-A, 120-A, 89-D, 122-D, 126-D were employed in all three assay systems. These subtypes co-circulate in East Africa and frequently recombine in this human population. Results Increased sequence identity between viruses or RNA templates resulted in increased recombination frequencies, with the exception of the 115-A virus or RNA template. Analyses of the recombination breakpoints and mechanistic studies revealed that the presence of a recombination hotspot in the C3/V4 env region, unique to 115-A as donor RNA, could account for the higher recombination frequencies with the 115-A virus/template. Single-cycle infections supported proportionally less recombination than the in vitro reverse transcription assay but both systems still had significantly higher recombination frequencies than observed in the multiple-cycle virus replication system. In the multiple cycle assay, increased replicative fitness of one HIV-1 over the other in a dual infection dramatically decreased recombination frequencies. Conclusion Sequence variation at specific sites between HIV-1 isolates can introduce unique recombination hotspots, which increase recombination frequencies and skew the general observation that decreased HIV-1 sequence identity reduces recombination rates. These findings also suggest that the majority of

  11. Influence of sequence identity and unique breakpoints on the frequency of intersubtype HIV-1 recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Heather A; Gao, Yong; Galetto, Román; Lalonde, Matthew; Anthony, Reshma M; Giacomoni, Véronique; Abreha, Measho; Destefano, Jeffrey J; Negroni, Matteo; Arts, Eric J

    2006-01-01

    Background HIV-1 recombination between different subtypes has a major impact on the global epidemic. The generation of these intersubtype recombinants follows a defined set of events starting with dual infection of a host cell, heterodiploid virus production, strand transfers during reverse transcription, and then selection. In this study, recombination frequencies were measured in the C1-C4 regions of the envelope gene in the presence (using a multiple cycle infection system) and absence (in vitro reverse transcription and single cycle infection systems) of selection for replication-competent virus. Ugandan subtypes A and D HIV-1 env sequences (115-A, 120-A, 89-D, 122-D, 126-D) were employed in all three assay systems. These subtypes co-circulate in East Africa and frequently recombine in this human population. Results Increased sequence identity between viruses or RNA templates resulted in increased recombination frequencies, with the exception of the 115-A virus or RNA template. Analyses of the recombination breakpoints and mechanistic studies revealed that the presence of a recombination hotspot in the C3/V4 env region, unique to 115-A as donor RNA, could account for the higher recombination frequencies with the 115-A virus/template. Single-cycle infections supported proportionally less recombination than the in vitro reverse transcription assay but both systems still had significantly higher recombination frequencies than observed in the multiple-cycle virus replication system. In the multiple cycle assay, increased replicative fitness of one HIV-1 over the other in a dual infection dramatically decreased recombination frequencies. Conclusion Sequence variation at specific sites between HIV-1 isolates can introduce unique recombination hotspots, which increase recombination frequencies and skew the general observation that decreased HIV-1 sequence identity reduces recombination rates. These findings also suggest that the majority of intra- or intersubtype A

  12. Runtime analysis of the (1+1) EA on computing unique input output sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian; Yao, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Computing unique input output (UIO) sequences is a fundamental and hard problem in conformance testing of finite state machines (FSM). Previous experimental research has shown that evolutionary algorithms (EAs) can be applied successfully to find UIOs for some FSMs. However, before EAs can...... are provably better than random search strategies. This paper presents rigorous theoretical and numerical analyses of the runtime of the (1 + 1) EA and random search on several selected instance classes of this problem. The theoretical analysis shows firstly, that there are instance classes where the EA...... in the theoretical analysis, and the variability of the runtime. The numerical results fit well with the theoretical results, even for small problem instance sizes. Together, these results provide a first theoretical characterisation of the potential and limitations of the (1 + 1) EA on the problem of computing UIOs....

  13. The Complete Genome Sequences, Unique Mutational Spectra, and Developmental Potency of Adult Neurons Revealed by Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Jennifer L; Faust, Gregory G; Rodriguez, Alberto R; Ferguson, William C; Shumilina, Svetlana; Clark, Royden A; Boland, Michael J; Martin, Greg; Chubukov, Pavel; Tsunemoto, Rachel K; Torkamani, Ali; Kupriyanov, Sergey; Hall, Ira M; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2016-03-16

    Somatic mutation in neurons is linked to neurologic disease and implicated in cell-type diversification. However, the origin, extent, and patterns of genomic mutation in neurons remain unknown. We established a nuclear transfer method to clonally amplify the genomes of neurons from adult mice for whole-genome sequencing. Comprehensive mutation detection and independent validation revealed that individual neurons harbor ∼100 unique mutations from all classes but lack recurrent rearrangements. Most neurons contain at least one gene-disrupting mutation and rare (0-2) mobile element insertions. The frequency and gene bias of neuronal mutations differ from other lineages, potentially due to novel mechanisms governing postmitotic mutation. Fertile mice were cloned from several neurons, establishing the compatibility of mutated adult neuronal genomes with reprogramming to pluripotency and development.

  14. Unusual features of the sequences of copies of the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions of Acinetobacter bereziniae, Acinetobacter guillouiae and Acinetobacter baylyi arise from horizontal gene transfer events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslunka, Christopher; Gürtler, Volker; Seviour, Robert

    2015-02-01

    The highly variable nature of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) has been claimed to represent an ideal target for designing species-specific probes/primers capable of differentiating between closely related Acinetobacter species. However, several Acinetobacter species contain multiple ITS copies of variable lengths, and these include Acinetobacter bereziniae, Acinetobacter guillouiae and Acinetobacter baylyi. This study shows these length variations result from inter-genomic insertion/deletion events (indels) involving horizontal transfer of ITS fragments of other Acinetobacter species and possibly unrelated bacteria, as shown previously by us. In some instances, indel incorporation results in the loss of probe target sites in the recipient cell ITS. In other cases, some indel sequences contain target sites for probes designed from a single ITS sequence to target other Acinetobacter species. Hence, these can generate false positives. The largest of the indels that remove probe sites is 683 bp (labelled bay/i1-0), and it derives from the horizontal transfer of a complete ITS between A. bereziniae BCRC15423(T) and A. baylyi strain ADP1. As a consequence, ITS sequencing or fingerprinting cannot be used to distinguish between the 683 bp ITS in these two strains.

  15. Single-Cell DNA barcoding using sequences from the small subunit rRNA and internal transcribed spacer region identifies new species of Trichonympha and Trichomitopsis from the hindgut of the termite Zootermopsis angusticollis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Tai

    Full Text Available To aid in their digestion of wood, lower termites are known to harbour a diverse community of prokaryotes as well as parabasalid and oxymonad protist symbionts. One of the best-studied lower termite gut communities is that of Zootermopsis angusticollis which has been known for almost 100 years to possess 3 species of Trichonympha (T. campanula, T. collaris, and T. sphaerica, 1 species of Trichomitopsis (T. termopsidis, as well as smaller flagellates. We have re-assessed this community by sequencing the small subunit (SSU rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region from a large number of single Trichonympha and Trichomitopsis cells for which morphology was also documented. Based on phylogenetic clustering and sequence divergence, we identify 3 new species: Trichonympha postcylindrica, Trichomitopsis minor, and Trichomitopsis parvus spp. nov. Once identified by sequencing, the morphology of the isolated cells for all 3 new species was re-examined and found to be distinct from the previously described species: Trichonympha postcylindrica can be morphologically distinguished from the other Trichonympha species by an extension on its posterior end, whereas Trichomitopsis minor and T. parvus are smaller than T. termopsidis but similar in size to each other and cannot be distinguished based on morphology using light microscopy. Given that Z. angusticollis has one of the best characterized hindgut communities, the near doubling of the number of the largest and most easily identifiable symbiont species suggests that the diversity of hindgut symbionts is substantially underestimated in other termites as well. Accurate descriptions of the diversity of these microbial communities are essential for understanding hindgut ecology and disentangling the interactions among the symbionts, and molecular barcoding should be a priority for these systems.

  16. Sequence and comparative analysis of the chicken genome provide unique perspectives on vertebrate evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillier, L.W.; Miller, W.; Birney, E.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Aerts, J.; Poel, van der J.J.

    2004-01-01

    We present here a draft genome sequence of the red jungle fowl, Gallus gallus. Because the chicken is a modern descendant of the dinosaurs and the first non-mammalian amniote to have its genome sequenced, the draft sequence of its genome—composed of approximately one billion base pairs of sequence

  17. Sequence and comparative analysis of the chicken genome provide unique perspectives on vertebrate evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillier, L.W.; Miller, W.; Birney, E.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Aerts, J.; Poel, van der J.J.

    2004-01-01

    We present here a draft genome sequence of the red jungle fowl, Gallus gallus. Because the chicken is a modern descendant of the dinosaurs and the first non-mammalian amniote to have its genome sequenced, the draft sequence of its genome—composed of approximately one billion base pairs of sequence a

  18. Quick identification of acetic acid bacteria based on nucleotide sequences of the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer region and of the PQQ-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trcek, Janja

    2005-10-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are well known for oxidizing different ethanol-containing substrates into various types of vinegar. They are also used for production of some biotechnologically important products, such as sorbose and gluconic acids. However, their presence is not always appreciated since certain species also spoil wine, juice, beer and fruits. To be able to follow AAB in all these processes, the species involved must be identified accurately and quickly. Because of inaccuracy and very time-consuming phenotypic analysis of AAB, the application of molecular methods is necessary. Since the pairwise comparison among the 16S rRNA gene sequences of AAB shows very high similarity (up to 99.9%) other DNA-targets should be used. Our previous studies showed that the restriction analysis of 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer region is a suitable approach for quick affiliation of an acetic acid bacterium to a distinct group of restriction types and also for quick identification of a potentially novel species of acetic acid bacterium (Trcek & Teuber 2002; Trcek 2002). However, with the exception of two conserved genes, encoding tRNAIle and tRNAAla, the sequences of 16S-23S rDNA are highly divergent among AAB species. For this reason we analyzed in this study a gene encoding PQQ-dependent ADH as a possible DNA-target. First we confirmed the expression of subunit I of PQQ-dependent ADH (AdhA) also in Asaia, the only genus of AAB which exhibits little or no ADH-activity. Further we analyzed the partial sequences of adhA among some representative species of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The conserved and variable regions in these sequences made possible the construction of A. acetispecific oligonucleotide the specificity of which was confirmed in PCR-reaction using 45 well-defined strains of AAB as DNA-templates. The primer was also successfully used in direct identification of A. aceti from home made cider vinegar as well as for

  19. A Unique Sequence of Financial Accounting Courses Featuring Team Teaching, Linked Courses, Challenging Assignments, and Instruments for Evaluation and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, Heidemarie; Wilson, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Accounting at California State University Northridge (CSUN) has developed a unique sequence of courses designed to ensure that accounting students are trained not only in technical accounting, but also acquire critical thinking, research and communication skills. The courses have proven effective and have embedded assessment…

  20. A Unique Sequence of Financial Accounting Courses Featuring Team Teaching, Linked Courses, Challenging Assignments, and Instruments for Evaluation and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, Heidemarie; Wilson, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Accounting at California State University Northridge (CSUN) has developed a unique sequence of courses designed to ensure that accounting students are trained not only in technical accounting, but also acquire critical thinking, research and communication skills. The courses have proven effective and have embedded assessment…

  1. Analysis on Sequences of Ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacers of Macrobrachium rosenbergii%罗氏沼虾缅甸野生原种rDNA-ITS区序列特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雪峰; 杨国梁; 王军毅; 高强; 宫金华; 叶少群; 张海鹏

    2011-01-01

    Internal transcribed spacers in ribosomal DNA were often used as molecular sequence in phylogenetic study. The complete sequence of internal transcribed spacers of Macrobrachium rosenbergii was isolated by PCR. The length of ITS1 was 1 070 - 1 150 bp with a GC content of 5l. 4% -52.7% , and the length of 5.8S was 163 bp with a GC content of 55.2%. Compared to ITS1, the length of ITS2 (484 -545 bp) was shorter while GC content (53.4% - 54. 6% ) was higher. By comparison of sequence from different individuals, 61 SNP loci were found in ITS1, including 28 C/T transitions (45.9%) , 23 A/G transitions (37.7%), 1 A/T transversions ( 1.6% ), 3 T/G transversions (4.9%), 4 C/G transversions ( 6. 6% ) , and 2 A/C transversions (3.3%); 15 SNP loci were found in ITS2, including 6 C/T transitions (40%), 5 A/G transitions ( 33.3% ), i A/T transversions ( 6. 7% ) , 2 T/G transversions ( 13.3% ), and 1 C/G transversions (6. 7% ). SSR loci were searched by the SSRHunter software, and the results showed that the SSR loci in ITS1 and ITS2 were 14 and 6 respectively, the type of (AG)n was rich in ITS1 and the type of (GA) n was rich in ITS2. There were three repeat units with a length of 59 bp in ITS1, and the loci were 181,390 and 781, respectively. The results of ITS intravariances analysis demonstrated that clones from the same individual were different in length because of SSR. Furthermore, homology comparison of ITS sequence indicated that the similarity of each ITS1 was 45.39% - 50.64% , and the highest occurred between M.rosenbergii and M. hainanense, while the lowest occurred between M. rosenbergii and Exopalaemon carinicauda.5.8S showed very high similarity with other crustaceans, and the homology was 100% between M. rosenbergii and M. nipponense. The similarity of each ITS2 was 42.53% -53.46% , and the highest occurred between M.rosenbergii and M. nipponense, while the lowest occurred between M. rosenbergii and Procambarus clark

  2. Sequence and comparative analysis of the chicken genome provide unique perspectives on vertebrate evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Hillier, LaDeana W.; Miller, Webb; Birney, Ewan; Warren, Wesley; Hardison, Ross C.; Chris P Ponting; Bork, Peer; Burt, Peer; Martien A M Groenen; Delany, Mary E.; Dodgson, Jerry B; Chinwalla, Asif; Cliften, Paul F; Sandra W Clifton; Delehaunty, Kimberly D

    2004-01-01

    We present here a draft genome sequence of the red jungle fowl, Gallus gallus. Because the chicken is a modern descendant of the dinosaurs and the first non-mammalian amniote to have its genome sequenced, the draft sequence of its genome--composed of approximately one billion base pairs of sequence and an estimated 20,000-23,000 genes--provides a new perspective on vertebrate genome evolution, while also improving the annotation of mammalian genomes. For example, the evolutionary distance bet...

  3. A taxonomic re-assessment in the Chinese Bupleurum (Apiaceae):Insights from morphology, nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer, and chloroplast (trnH-psbA, matK) sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Bao WANG; Xiang-GuangMA; Xing-Jin HE

    2011-01-01

    As one of the big genera in Apiaceae,Bupleurum L.has received considerable attention from plant taxonomists.Nevertheless,there are still many gaps in our knowledge of this genus,especially of those species endemic to China that have often been excluded from previous studies.In spite of a few recent studies on the phylogeny and classification of the Chinese Bupleurum,the most essential problem of species delimitation still remains unresolved.We re-evaluate the taxonomy of the Chinese Bupleurum using morphological and molecular evidence.Careful observations of living plants growing the field and herbarium specimens were made to understand the morphological variation and to ensure species identification for the molecular analysis.Phylogenetic analyses were carried out on sequence data of nuclear ribosomal intemal transcribed spacer (nrlTS),trnH-psbA,and matK,using parsimony and Bayesian approaches to evaluate species relationships.Analyses of both nrlTS and combined datasets of the three regions revealed the following results:(i) the Chinese Bupleurum species were divided into two major lineages; and (ii) most species were well defined,but some traditional inter- and infraspecific relationships were not supported.Our results,along with the results of previous works support that the Chinese Bupleurum species were derived from two different lineages and should be placed in Neves and Watson’s subgenus Bupleurum.Our detailed taxonomic re-assessment of several Chinese species resulted in new taxonomic recombinations with rank changes for three species:Bupleurum tenerum,B.amplexicaule,and B.franchetii; new combination for one variety,B.smithii var.flaviflorum; and the description of one variety and one species,B.stenophyllum vat.leiocarpum and B.sikangense.

  4. Misidentification of Aspergillus nomius and Aspergillus tamarii as Aspergillus flavus: characterization by internal transcribed spacer, β-Tubulin, and calmodulin gene sequencing, metabolic fingerprinting, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Emily W T; Chen, Jonathan H K; Lau, Eunice C L; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Fung, Kitty S C; Lee, Kim-Chung; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillus nomius and Aspergillus tamarii are Aspergillus species that phenotypically resemble Aspergillus flavus. In the last decade, a number of case reports have identified A. nomius and A. tamarii as causes of human infections. In this study, using an internal transcribed spacer, β-tubulin, and calmodulin gene sequencing, only 8 of 11 clinical isolates reported as A. flavus in our clinical microbiology laboratory by phenotypic methods were identified as A. flavus. The other three isolates were A. nomius (n = 2) or A. tamarii (n = 1). The results corresponded with those of metabolic fingerprinting, in which the A. flavus, A. nomius, and A. tamarii strains were separated into three clusters based on ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC MS) analysis. The first two patients with A. nomius infections had invasive aspergillosis and chronic cavitary and fibrosing pulmonary and pleural aspergillosis, respectively, whereas the third patient had A. tamarii colonization of the airway. Identification of the 11 clinical isolates and three reference strains by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) showed that only six of the nine strains of A. flavus were identified correctly. None of the strains of A. nomius and A. tamarii was correctly identified. β-Tubulin or the calmodulin gene should be the gene target of choice for identifying A. flavus, A. nomius, and A. tamarii. To improve the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS, the number of strains for each species in MALDI-TOF MS databases should be expanded to cover intraspecies variability.

  5. A Nucleolar PUF RNA-binding Protein with Specificity for a Unique RNA Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Muench, Douglas G

    2015-12-11

    PUF proteins are a conserved group of sequence specific RNA-binding proteins that bind to RNA in a modular fashion. The RNA-binding domain of PUF proteins typically consists of eight clustered Puf repeats. Plant genomes code for large families of PUF proteins that show significant variability in their predicted Puf repeat number, organization, and amino acid sequence. Here we sought to determine whether the observed variability in the RNA-binding domains of four plant PUFs results in a preference for nonclassical PUF RNA target sequences. We report the identification of a novel RNA binding sequence for a nucleolar Arabidopsis PUF protein that contains an atypical RNA-binding domain. The Arabidopsis PUM23 (APUM23) binding sequence was 10 nucleotides in length, contained a centrally located UUGA core element, and had a preferred cytosine at nucleotide position 8. These RNA sequence characteristics differ from those of other PUF proteins, because all natural PUFs studied to date bind to RNAs that contain a conserved UGU sequence at their 5' end and lack specificity for cytosine. Gel mobility shift assays validated the identity of the APUM23 binding sequence and supported the location of 3 of the 10 predicted Puf repeats in APUM23, including the cytosine-binding repeat. The preferred 10-nucleotide sequence bound by APUM23 is present within the 18S rRNA sequence, supporting the known role of APUM23 in 18S rRNA maturation. This work also reveals that APUM23, an ortholog of yeast Nop9, could provide an advanced structural backbone for Puf repeat engineering and target-specific regulation of cellular RNAs.

  6. Assessing the genomic evidence for conserved transcribed pseudogenes under selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Paul M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcribed pseudogenes are copies of protein-coding genes that have accumulated indicators of coding-sequence decay (such as frameshifts and premature stop codons, but nonetheless remain transcribed. Recent experimental evidence indicates that transcribed pseudogenes may regulate the expression of homologous genes, through antisense interference, or generation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs. Here, we assessed the genomic evidence for such transcribed pseudogenes of potential functional importance, in the human genome. The most obvious indicators of such functional importance are significant evidence of conservation and selection pressure. Results A variety of pseudogene annotations from multiple sources were pooled and filtered to obtain a subset of sequences that have significant mid-sequence disablements (frameshifts and premature stop codons, and that have clear evidence of full-length mRNA transcription. We found 1750 such transcribed pseudogene annotations (TPAs in the human genome (corresponding to ~11.5% of human pseudogene annotations. We checked for syntenic conservation of TPAs in other mammals (rhesus monkey, mouse, rat, dog and cow. About half of the human TPAs are conserved in rhesus monkey, but strikingly, very few in mouse (~3%. The TPAs conserved in rhesus monkey show evidence of selection pressure (relative to surrounding intergenic DNA on: (i their GC content, and (ii their rate of nucleotide substitution. This is in spite of distributions of Ka/Ks (ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates, congruent with a lack of protein-coding ability. Furthermore, we have identified 68 human TPAs that are syntenically conserved in at least two other mammals. Interestingly, we observe three TPA sequences conserved in dog that have intermediate character (i.e., evidence of both protein-coding ability and pseudogenicity, and discuss the implications of this. Conclusion Through evolutionary analysis, we

  7. Sequence-based analysis of pQBR103; a representative of a unique, transfer-proficient mega plasmid resident in the microbial community of sugar beet

    OpenAIRE

    Tett, Adrian; Spiers, Andrew J.; Crossman, Lisa C.; Ager, Duane; Ciric, Lena; Dow, J. Maxwell; Fry, John C.; Harris,David; Lilley, Andrew; Oliver, Anna; Parkhill, Julian; Quail, Michael A; Paul. B. Rainey; Saunders, Nigel J.; Seeger, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    The plasmid pQBR103 was found within Pseudomonas populations colonizing the leaf and root surfaces of sugar beet plants growing at Wytham, Oxfordshire, UK. At 425 kb it is the largest self-transmissible plasmid yet sequenced from the phytosphere. It is known to enhance the competitive fitness of its host, and parts of the plasmid are known to be actively transcribed in the plant environment. Analysis of the complete sequence of this plasmid predicts a coding sequence (CDS)-rich genome contain...

  8. Identification of Disulfide Bonds in Protein Proteolytic Degradation Products Using de Novo-Protein Unique Sequence Tags Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Purvine, Samuel O.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-08-01

    Disulfide bonds are a form of posttranslational modification that often determines protein structure(s) and function(s). In this work, we report a mass spectrometry method for identification of disulfides in degradation products of proteins, and specifically endogenous peptides in the human blood plasma peptidome. LC-Fourier transform tandem mass spectrometry (FT MS/MS) was used for acquiring mass spectra that were de novo sequenced and then searched against the IPI human protein database. Through the use of unique sequence tags (UStags) we unambiguously correlated the spectra to specific database proteins. Examination of the UStags’ prefix and/or suffix sequences that contain cysteine(s) in conjunction with sequences of the UStags-specified database proteins is shown to enable the unambigious determination of disulfide bonds. Using this method, we identified the intermolecular and intramolecular disulfides in human blood plasma peptidome peptides that have molecular weights of up to ~10 kDa.

  9. Canonical Horizontal Visibility Graphs are uniquely determined by their degree sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Luque, Bartolo

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal visibility graphs (HVGs) are graphs constructed in correspondence with number sequences that have been introduced and explored recently in the context of graph-theoretical time series analysis. In most of the cases simple measures based on the degree sequence (or functionals of these such as entropies over degree and joint degree distributions) appear to be highly informative features for automatic classification and provide nontrivial information on the associated dynam- ical process, working even better than more sophisticated topological metrics. It is thus an open question why these seemingly simple measures capture so much information. Here we prove that, under suitable conditions, there exist a bijection between the adjacency matrix of an HVG and its degree sequence, and we give an explicit construction of such bijection. As a consequence, under these conditions HVGs are unigraphs and the degree sequence fully encapsulates all the information of these graphs, thereby giving a plausible reason...

  10. Analysis on the Internal Transcribed Spacers (ITS) Sequences and Phyloge-netics of Pepper (Cap s ic um)%辣椒属种资资源ITS序列与系统进化分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刁卫平; 王述彬; 刘金兵; 潘宝贵; 戈伟

    2013-01-01

    分析辣椒属ITS序列,为辣椒属系统位置、进化关系提供分子生物学依据。以辣椒属(Capsicum)4个栽培种36份不同基因型辣椒种质资源为试材,对其rDNA转录间隔区(internal transcribed spacers, ITS)进行PCR扩增。扩增产物经纯化、克隆和测序后,获得ITS序列信息,随后利用MEGA 5.05软件分析其序列特征,并探讨了辣椒属种质资源的系统进化关系。结果表明,辣椒属ITS基本序列全长656 bp,G+C含量57.47%。供试材料的ITS序列长度变异较大,ITS1、5.8S和ITS2区长度变异都有发生。序列比对表明,供试辣椒材料ITS区共有387个变异位点(ITS1:153;5.8S:82;ITS2:152),信息位点322个,同源性为71.0%~100%,遗传分歧为0~0.3604。以烟草为外类群,将ITS1、5.8S和ITS2序列作为一个共同的数据矩阵进行系统发育树构建,辣椒属C. frutescens和C. baccatum种被单独分出,C. chinense和C. annuum种聚在一起,C. annuum与其他3个栽培种的亲缘关系由近至远分别是C. chinense、C. frutescens和C. baccatum,C. annuum种的32份供试材料主要分为3个分支6个亚分支,聚类分析结果与形态分类不能完全对应。%The phylogeny of pepper (Capsicum) was investigated by using ITS sequences and it will provide useful information for pepper classification and evolution. Thirty-six different genotype germplasm resources from four cultivated species in Capsicum were used as materials to amplify the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS). The amplified fragments were purified to be cloned and sequenced. Then sequences character and phylog-enetics relationship were analyzed using MEGA 5.05 software. The Results showed that the length of Capsicum ITS sequences was 656bp, and its G+C content was 57.47%. There have a signification variation of the length of ITS in these materials, it occurred in ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2. It has 387 variable sites in total (thereinto, ITS1

  11. An rpoB signature sequence provides unique resolution for the molecular typing of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaget, Virginie; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Tandeau de Marsac, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The use of morphological characters for the classification of cyanobacteria has often led to ambiguous strain assignment. In the past two decades, the availability of sequences, such as those of the 16S rRNA, nif, cpc and rpoC1 genes, and the use of metagenomics, has steadily increased and has made the reconstruction of evolutionary relationships of some cyanobacterial groups possible in addition to improving strain assignment. Conserved indels (insertions/deletions) are present in all cyanobacterial RpoB (β subunit of RNA polymerase) sequences presently available in public databases. These indels are located in the Rpb2_6 domain of RpoB, which is involved in DNA binding and DNA-directed RNA polymerase activity. They are variable in length (6-44 aa) and sequence, and form part of what appears to be a longer signature sequence (43-81 aa). Indeed, a number of these sequences turn out to be distinctive among several strains of a given genus and even among strains of a given species. These signature sequences can thus be used to identify cyanobacteria at a subgenus level and can be useful molecular markers to establish the taxonomic positions of cyanobacterial isolates in laboratory cultures, and/or to assess cyanobacterial biodiversity in space and time in natural ecosystems.

  12. 帘蛤科贝类rDNA内转录间隔区序列的研究%Study on Sequences of Ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacers of Clams Belonging to the Veneridae Family (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程汉良; 夏德全; 吴婷婷; 孟学平; 吉红九; 董志国

    2006-01-01

    根据18S rDNA、5.8 S rDNA和28 S rDNA保守序列设计引物,应用聚合酶链式反应(PCR)扩增了文蛤(Meretrix meretrix L.)、青蛤(Cyclina sinensis G.)、硬壳蛤(Mercenaria mercenaria L.)和江户布目蛤(Protothaca jedoensis L.)4种帘蛤科贝类的第一内转录间隔区(ITS1)和第二内转录间隔区(ITS2)序列,并进行了测序.结果表明,文蛤、青蛤、硬壳蛤和江户布目蛤的ITS1扩增产物大小分别为978 bp、663 bp、757 bp和942 bp,GC含量分别为61.55%、60.78%、62.48%和64.86%~64.97%,其中ITS1序列长度分别为900bp、585 bp、679 bp和864 bp,是迄今已报道双壳贝类中变化范围最大的,GC含量分别为61.67%、61.03%、63.03%和65.51%~65.62%,江户布目蛤种内ITS1序列有个体差异;ITS2扩增产物大小分别为644 bp、618~620bp、593 bp和513~514 bp,GC含量分别为61.18%、61.29%~61.81%、62.73%和61.48%~61.60%,其中ITS2序列长度分别为412bp、386~388 bp、361bp和281~282 bp,GC含量分别为65.29%、65.21%~66.06%、67.87%和67.38%~67.62%,青蛤和江户布目蛤种内ITS2序列有个体差异.4种蛤ITS1和ITS2序列种间差异很大,有明显的长度多态性,ITS2种间序列相似度73.0%~89.1%,与ITS1的种间序列相似度48.7%~81.5%相比略高.此外,在4种蛤ITS1和ITS2序列中各发现2个与rRNA加工有关的保守区.通过对ITS1和ITS2序列的组装获得了4种蛤5.8S rRNA基因完整序列,序列长度都是157 bp,GC含量57.96%~58.60%,4种蛤5.8S rRNA基因相对保守,种间序列差异度0-6.0%,共有10个变异位点,其中转换4处,颠换6处,硬壳蛤和江户布目蛤5.8S rRNA基因序列完全相同.以ITS2序列(包含5.8S rRNA和28S rRNA基因部分序列)为标记,调用北极蛤科的Arctica islandica相应序列数据作外群,构建了帘蛤科贝类的系统发育树,其拓扑结构显示江户布目蛤与硬壳蛤亲缘关系最近,青蛤与其他3物种的亲缘关系最远.%The first and second internal transcribed

  13. Unique archaeal assemblages in the Arctic Ocean unveiled by massively parallel tag sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galand, Pierre E; Casamayor, Emilio O; Kirchman, David L; Potvin, Marianne; Lovejoy, Connie

    2009-07-01

    The Arctic Ocean plays a critical role in controlling nutrient budgets between the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean. Archaea are key players in the nitrogen cycle and in cycling nutrients, but their community composition has been little studied in the Arctic Ocean. Here, we characterize archaeal assemblages from surface and deep Arctic water masses using massively parallel tag sequencing of the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene. This approach gave a very high coverage of the natural communities, allowing a precise description of archaeal assemblages. This first taxonomic description of archaeal communities by tag sequencing reported so far shows that it is possible to assign an identity below phylum level to most (95%) of the archaeal V6 tags, and shows that tag sequencing is a powerful tool for resolving the diversity and distribution of specific microbes in the environment. Marine group I Crenarchaeota was overall the most abundant group in the Arctic Ocean and comprised between 27% and 63% of all tags. Group III Euryarchaeota were more abundant in deep-water masses and represented the largest archaeal group in the deep Atlantic layer of the central Arctic Ocean. Coastal surface waters, in turn, harbored more group II Euryarchaeota. Moreover, group II sequences that dominated surface waters were different from the group II sequences detected in deep waters, suggesting functional differences in closely related groups. Our results unveiled for the first time an archaeal community dominated by group III Euryarchaeota and show biogeographical traits for marine Arctic Archaea.

  14. Sequencing analysis reveals a unique gene organization in the gyrB region of Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Søren; Christiansen, Gunna

    1994-01-01

    of which showed similarity to that which encodes the LicA protein of Haemophilus influenzae. The organization of the genes in the region showed no resemblance to that in the corresponding regions of other bacteria sequenced so far. The gyrA gene was mapped 35 kb downstream from the gyrB gene....

  15. Comparison of sequencing the D2 region of the large subunit ribosomal RNA gene (MicroSEQ®) versus the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions using two public databases for identification of common and uncommon clinically relevant fungal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbefeville, S; Harris, A; Ferrieri, P

    2017-09-01

    Fungal infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Rapid and accurate identification of fungi is essential to guide accurately targeted antifungal therapy. With the advent of molecular methods, clinical laboratories can use new technologies to supplement traditional phenotypic identification of fungi. The aims of the study were to evaluate the sole commercially available MicroSEQ® D2 LSU rDNA Fungal Identification Kit compared to the in-house developed internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions assay in identifying moulds, using two well-known online public databases to analyze sequenced data. 85 common and uncommon clinically relevant fungi isolated from clinical specimens were sequenced for the D2 region of the large subunit (LSU) of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene with the MicroSEQ® Kit and the ITS regions with the in house developed assay. The generated sequenced data were analyzed with the online GenBank and MycoBank public databases. The D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene identified 89.4% or 92.9% of the 85 isolates to the genus level and the full ITS region (f-ITS) 96.5% or 100%, using GenBank or MycoBank, respectively, when compared to the consensus ID. When comparing species-level designations to the consensus ID, D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene aligned with 44.7% (38/85) or 52.9% (45/85) of these isolates in GenBank or MycoBank, respectively. By comparison, f-ITS possessed greater specificity, followed by ITS1, then ITS2 regions using GenBank or MycoBank. Using GenBank or MycoBank, D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene outperformed phenotypic based ID at the genus level. Comparing rates of ID between D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene and the ITS regions in GenBank or MycoBank at the species level against the consensus ID, f-ITS and ITS2 exceeded performance of the D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene, but ITS1 had similar performance to the D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene using MycoBank. Our results indicated that the MicroSEQ® D2 LSU r

  16. The white dwarf cooling sequence of NGC 6791: an unique tool for stellar astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    García-Berro, E; Renedo, I; Camacho, J; Althaus, L G; Córsico, A H; Salaris, M; Isern, J

    2011-01-01

    NGC 6791 is a well-studied, metal-rich open cluster that is so close to us that can be imaged down to luminosities fainter than that of the termination of its white dwarf cooling sequence, thus allowing for an in-depth study of its white dwarf population. We use a Monte Carlo simulator that employs up-to-date evolutionary cooling sequences for white dwarfs with hydrogen-rich and hydrogen-deficient atmospheres, with carbon-oxygen and helium cores. The cooling sequences for carbon-oxygen cores account for the delays introduced by both Ne^22 sedimentation in the liquid phase and by carbon-oxygen phase separation upon crystallization. We do not find evidence for a substantial fraction of helium-core white dwarfs, and hence our results support the suggestion that the origin of the bright peak of the white dwarf luminosity function can only be attributed to a population of unresolved binary white dwarfs. Moreover, our results indicate that the number distribution of secondary masses of the population of unresolved ...

  17. A transcribed emergency record at minimum cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimt, C R; Becker, S; Fox, B S; Ensminger, F

    1983-09-01

    We have developed a new method of implementing a transcribed emergency record at minimum cost. Dictated emergency records are typed immediately by a transcriber located in the emergency department. This member of the medical record transcriber pool is given other non-urgent medical record material to type when there are no emergency records to type. The costs are reduced to the same level as routine medical records transcription. In 1982, 19,892 of the total 28,000 emergency records were transcribed by adding only 1.35 full-time equivalents (FTEs) to the transcriber pool. The remaining charts were handwritten because insufficient funds had been allocated to type all emergency records. The transcriber is capable of typing a maximum of 64 charts, averaging 13 lines (156 words) each, per 8-hour shift. The service can be phased in gradually as funds for transcribing the emergency record are allocated to the central transcriber pool.

  18. Sequencing rare marine actinomycete genomes reveals high density of unique natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorn, Michelle A; Alanjary, Mohammad M; Aguinaldo, Kristen; Korobeynikov, Anton; Podell, Sheila; Patin, Nastassia; Lincecum, Tommie; Jensen, Paul R; Ziemert, Nadine; Moore, Bradley S

    2016-12-01

    Traditional natural product discovery methods have nearly exhausted the accessible diversity of microbial chemicals, making new sources and techniques paramount in the search for new molecules. Marine actinomycete bacteria have recently come into the spotlight as fruitful producers of structurally diverse secondary metabolites, and remain relatively untapped. In this study, we sequenced 21 marine-derived actinomycete strains, rarely studied for their secondary metabolite potential and under-represented in current genomic databases. We found that genome size and phylogeny were good predictors of biosynthetic gene cluster diversity, with larger genomes rivalling the well-known marine producers in the Streptomyces and Salinispora genera. Genomes in the Micrococcineae suborder, however, had consistently the lowest number of biosynthetic gene clusters. By networking individual gene clusters into gene cluster families, we were able to computationally estimate the degree of novelty each genus contributed to the current sequence databases. Based on the similarity measures between all actinobacteria in the Joint Genome Institute's Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters database, rare marine genera show a high degree of novelty and diversity, with Corynebacterium, Gordonia, Nocardiopsis, Saccharomonospora and Pseudonocardia genera representing the highest gene cluster diversity. This research validates that rare marine actinomycetes are important candidates for exploration, as they are relatively unstudied, and their relatives are historically rich in secondary metabolites.

  19. Fallacy of the Unique Genome: Sequence Diversity within Single Helicobacter pylori Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lori M.; Bernick, David L.; Abedrabbo, Samar; Underwood, Jason G.; Kong, Nguyet; Huang, Bihua C.; Weis, Allison M.; Pourmand, Nader

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many bacterial genomes are highly variable but nonetheless are typically published as a single assembled genome. Experiments tracking bacterial genome evolution have not looked at the variation present at a given point in time. Here, we analyzed the mouse-passaged Helicobacter pylori strain SS1 and its parent PMSS1 to assess intra- and intergenomic variability. Using high sequence coverage depth and experimental validation, we detected extensive genome plasticity within these H. pylori isolates, including movement of the transposable element IS607, large and small inversions, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms, and variation in cagA copy number. The cagA gene was found as 1 to 4 tandem copies located off the cag island in both SS1 and PMSS1; this copy number variation correlated with protein expression. To gain insight into the changes that occurred during mouse adaptation, we also compared SS1 and PMSS1 and observed 46 differences that were distinct from the within-genome variation. The most substantial was an insertion in cagY, which encodes a protein required for a type IV secretion system function. We detected modifications in genes coding for two proteins known to affect mouse colonization, the HpaA neuraminyllactose-binding protein and the FutB α-1,3 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) fucosyltransferase, as well as genes predicted to modulate diverse properties. In sum, our work suggests that data from consensus genome assemblies from single colonies may be misleading by failing to represent the variability present. Furthermore, we show that high-depth genomic sequencing data of a population can be analyzed to gain insight into the normal variation within bacterial strains. PMID:28223462

  20. Fallacy of the Unique Genome: Sequence Diversity within Single Helicobacter pylori Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny L. Draper

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Many bacterial genomes are highly variable but nonetheless are typically published as a single assembled genome. Experiments tracking bacterial genome evolution have not looked at the variation present at a given point in time. Here, we analyzed the mouse-passaged Helicobacter pylori strain SS1 and its parent PMSS1 to assess intra- and intergenomic variability. Using high sequence coverage depth and experimental validation, we detected extensive genome plasticity within these H. pylori isolates, including movement of the transposable element IS607, large and small inversions, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms, and variation in cagA copy number. The cagA gene was found as 1 to 4 tandem copies located off the cag island in both SS1 and PMSS1; this copy number variation correlated with protein expression. To gain insight into the changes that occurred during mouse adaptation, we also compared SS1 and PMSS1 and observed 46 differences that were distinct from the within-genome variation. The most substantial was an insertion in cagY, which encodes a protein required for a type IV secretion system function. We detected modifications in genes coding for two proteins known to affect mouse colonization, the HpaA neuraminyllactose-binding protein and the FutB α-1,3 lipopolysaccharide (LPS fucosyltransferase, as well as genes predicted to modulate diverse properties. In sum, our work suggests that data from consensus genome assemblies from single colonies may be misleading by failing to represent the variability present. Furthermore, we show that high-depth genomic sequencing data of a population can be analyzed to gain insight into the normal variation within bacterial strains.

  1. Multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA for rapid distinction between unique sequence positive and negative marker chromosomes in prenatal diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamers Guus

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC are extra structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified with conventional chromosome banding techniques. These marker chromosomes may cause an abnormal phenotype or be harmless depending on different factors such as genetic content, chromosomal origin and level of mosaicism. When a sSMC is found during prenatal diagnosis, the main question is whether the sSMC contains euchromatin since in most cases this will lead to phenotypic abnormalities. We present the use of Multiplex Ligation Dependent probe Amplification (MLPA for rapid distinction between non-euchromatic and euchromatic sSMC. Results 29 well-defined sSMC found during prenatal diagnosis were retrospectively investigated with MLPA with the SALSA MLPA centromere kits P181 and P182 as well as with the SALSA MLPA telomere kits P036B and P070 (MRC Holland BV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. All unique-sequence positive sSMC were correctly identified with MLPA, whereas the unique-sequence negative sSMC had normal MLPA results. Conclusions Although different techniques exist for identification of sSMC, we show that MLPA is a valuable adjunctive tool for rapidly distinguishing between unique-sequence positive and negative sSMC. In case of positive MLPA results, genetic microarray analysis or, if not available, targeted FISH can be applied for further identification and determination of the exact breakpoints, which is important for prediction of the fetal phenotype. In case of a negative MLPA result, which means that the sSMC most probably does not contain genes, the parents can already be reassured and parental karyotyping can be initiated to assess the heritability. In the mean time, FISH techniques are needed for determination of the chromosomal origin.

  2. Unique features of a Japanese 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' strain revealed by whole genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Katoh

    Full Text Available Citrus greening (huanglongbing is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. It is spread by citrus psyllids and is associated with phloem-limited bacteria of three species of α-Proteobacteria, namely, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', 'Ca. L. americanus', and 'Ca. L. africanus'. Recent findings suggested that some Japanese strains lack the bacteriophage-type DNA polymerase region (DNA pol, in contrast to the Floridian psy62 strain. The whole genome sequence of the pol-negative 'Ca. L. asiaticus' Japanese isolate Ishi-1 was determined by metagenomic analysis of DNA extracted from 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected psyllids and leaf midribs. The 1.19-Mb genome has an average 36.32% GC content. Annotation revealed 13 operons encoding rRNA and 44 tRNA genes, but no typical bacterial pathogenesis-related genes were located within the genome, similar to the Floridian psy62 and Chinese gxpsy. In contrast to other 'Ca. L. asiaticus' strains, the genome of the Japanese Ishi-1 strain lacks a prophage-related region.

  3. Unique Features of Germline Variation in Five Egyptian Familial Breast Cancer Families Revealed by Exome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong C.; Soliman, Amr S.; Cui, Jian; Ramadan, Mohamed; Hablas, Ahmed; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Hussien, Nehal; Ahmed, Ola; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman Nabawy; Seifeldin, Ibrahim A.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic predisposition increases the risk of familial breast cancer. Recent studies indicate that genetic predisposition for familial breast cancer can be ethnic-specific. However, current knowledge of genetic predisposition for the disease is predominantly derived from Western populations. Using this existing information as the sole reference to judge the predisposition in non-Western populations is not adequate and can potentially lead to misdiagnosis. Efforts are required to collect genetic predisposition from non-Western populations. The Egyptian population has high genetic variations in reflecting its divergent ethnic origins, and incident rate of familial breast cancer in Egypt is also higher than the rate in many other populations. Using whole exome sequencing, we investigated genetic predisposition in five Egyptian familial breast cancer families. No pathogenic variants in BRCA1, BRCA2 and other classical breast cancer-predisposition genes were present in these five families. Comparison of the genetic variants with those in Caucasian familial breast cancer showed that variants in the Egyptian families were more variable and heterogeneous than the variants in Caucasian families. Multiple damaging variants in genes of different functional categories were identified either in a single family or shared between families. Our study demonstrates that genetic predisposition in Egyptian breast cancer families may differ from those in other disease populations, and supports a comprehensive screening of local disease families to determine the genetic predisposition in Egyptian familial breast cancer. PMID:28076423

  4. Specific Detection of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus by Amplification of Three Unique DNA Sequences Isolated by Subtraction Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, D; Russell, B W; Hanus, J W

    1997-08-01

    ABSTRACT Three single-copy, unique DNA fragments, designated Cms50, Cms72, and Cms85, were isolated from strain CS3 of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus by subtraction hybridization using driver DNA from C. michiganensis subsp. insidiosus, C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, and Rhodococcus facians. Radio-labeled probes made of these fragments and used in Southern blot analysis revealed each to be absolutely specific to all North American C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus strains tested, including plasmidless and nonmucoid strains. The probes have no homology with genomic DNA from related C. michiganensis subspecies insidiosus, michiganensis, and tessellarius, nor with DNA from 11 additional bacterial species and three unidentified strains, some of which have been previously reported to display cross-reactivity with C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus-specific antisera. The three fragments shared no homology, and they appeared to be separated from each other by at least 20 kbp in the CS3 genome. Internal primer sets permitted amplification of each fragment by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) only from C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus DNA. In a PCR-based sensitivity assay using a primer set that amplifies Cms85, the lowest level of detection of C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus was 100 CFU per milliliter when cells were added to potato core fluid. Erroneous results that may arise from PCR artifacts and mutational events are, therefore, minimized by the redundancy of the primer sets, and the products should be verifiable with unique capture probes in sequence-based detection systems.

  5. Distanced Data: Transcribing Other People's Research Tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Susan A.; Powick, Kelly D.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we report on our qualitative study involving eight individuals hired to transcribe research tapes in university contexts. We consider issues of data analysis and data trustworthiness and the implications for both when transcription is assigned to someone other than the researcher. We explore the challenges transcribers faced…

  6. How eukaryotic genes are transcribed

    OpenAIRE

    Venters, Bryan J; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of eukaryotic gene expression is far more complex than one might have imagined thirty years ago. However, progress towards understanding gene regulatory mechanisms has been rapid and comprehensive, which has made the integration of detailed observations into broadly connected concepts a challenge. This review attempts to integrate the following concepts: 1) a well-defined organization of nucleosomes and modification states at most genes, 2) regulatory networks of sequence-specific ...

  7. How eukaryotic genes are transcribed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venters, Bryan J; Pugh, B Franklin

    2009-06-01

    Regulation of eukaryotic gene expression is far more complex than one might have imagined 30 years ago. However, progress towards understanding gene regulatory mechanisms has been rapid and comprehensive, which has made the integration of detailed observations into broadly connected concepts a challenge. This review attempts to integrate the following concepts: (1) a well-defined organization of nucleosomes and modification states at most genes; (2) regulatory networks of sequence-specific transcription factors; (3) chromatin remodeling coupled to promoter assembly of the general transcription factors and RNA polymerase II; and (4) phosphorylation states of RNA polymerase II coupled to chromatin modification states during transcription. The wealth of new insights arising from the tools of biochemistry, genomics, cell biology, and genetics is providing a remarkable view into the mechanics of gene regulation.

  8. Sequence-based analysis of pQBR103; a representative of a unique, transfer-proficient mega plasmid resident in the microbial community of sugar beet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tett, Adrian; Spiers, Andrew J; Crossman, Lisa C; Ager, Duane; Ciric, Lena; Dow, J Maxwell; Fry, John C; Harris, David; Lilley, Andrew; Oliver, Anna; Parkhill, Julian; Quail, Michael A; Rainey, Paul B; Saunders, Nigel J; Seeger, Kathy; Snyder, Lori A S; Squares, Rob; Thomas, Christopher M; Turner, Sarah L; Zhang, Xue-Xian; Field, Dawn; Bailey, Mark J

    2007-08-01

    The plasmid pQBR103 was found within Pseudomonas populations colonizing the leaf and root surfaces of sugar beet plants growing at Wytham, Oxfordshire, UK. At 425 kb it is the largest self-transmissible plasmid yet sequenced from the phytosphere. It is known to enhance the competitive fitness of its host, and parts of the plasmid are known to be actively transcribed in the plant environment. Analysis of the complete sequence of this plasmid predicts a coding sequence (CDS)-rich genome containing 478 CDSs and an exceptional degree of genetic novelty; 80% of predicted coding sequences cannot be ascribed a function and 60% are orphans. Of those to which function could be assigned, 40% bore greatest similarity to sequences from Pseudomonas spp, and the majority of the remainder showed similarity to other gamma-proteobacterial genera and plasmids. pQBR103 has identifiable regions presumed responsible for replication and partitioning, but despite being tra+ lacks the full complement of any previously described conjugal transfer functions. The DNA sequence provided few insights into the functional significance of plant-induced transcriptional regions, but suggests that 14% of CDSs may be expressed (11 CDSs with functional annotation and 54 without), further highlighting the ecological importance of these novel CDSs. Comparative analysis indicates that pQBR103 shares significant regions of sequence with other plasmids isolated from sugar beet plants grown at the same geographic location. These plasmid sequences indicate there is more novelty in the mobile DNA pool accessible to phytosphere pseudomonas than is currently appreciated or understood.

  9. Comparison of rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences in Oryza sativa L.%栽培稻种内核糖体基因的ITS序列比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴小军; 梁满中; 陈良碧

    2007-01-01

    以普通野生稻(O. rufipogon)为外类群,对栽培稻(O. sativa)籼亚种(O. sativassp. indica)和粳亚种(O. sativassp. japonica)18个材料的核糖体基因(rDNA)内转录间隔区(internal transcribed spacers, ITS)全序列进行比较分析.供试材料中有籼亚种品种(系)9个,粳亚种品种(系)6个,爪哇稻2个和陆稻1个.结果发现,栽培稻种内总变异位点23个,占总碱基数的5.41%;8个信息位点,占总碱基数的1.82%.籼亚种ITS全序列的长度为425~430 bp,G+C含量为74.25%~75.59%;粳亚种ITS序列总长度为425 bp,G+C含量为74.25%~75.59%.以ITS全序列构建的系统树能将栽培稻区分为籼、粳2个亚种群,爪哇稻与籼稻有较近的亲缘关系,这对研究栽培稻的演化有一定的指导意义.

  10. Transcribing and Comparing Classroom and Casual Conversations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王贵华

    2012-01-01

      This article reflects on how to transcribe two audio recordings and conducts a comparative analysis on them, aiming at identifying the typical features of transcribing process and identifying the different features of classroom and casual conversations. The first recording is an institutional conversation recorded in a module called“Communication skills for teachers”in an undergraduate classroom in Singapore. The second is a casual conversation occurring among four MA classmates who met for their second time. The first part of this article focuses on the issues met and the insights gained in transcribing. The second part is a comparative analysis that leads to the conclusion –classroom and casual conversations are two different genres of spoken interactions with distinctive features shaped by field and tenor.

  11. CRISPR multitargeter: a web tool to find common and unique CRISPR single guide RNA targets in a set of similar sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V Prykhozhij

    Full Text Available Genome engineering has been revolutionized by the discovery of clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR and CRISPR-associated system genes (Cas in bacteria. The type IIB Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR/Cas9 system functions in many species and additional types of CRISPR/Cas systems are under development. In the type II system, expression of CRISPR single guide RNA (sgRNA targeting a defined sequence and Cas9 generates a sequence-specific nuclease inducing small deletions or insertions. Moreover, knock-in of large DNA inserts has been shown at the sites targeted by sgRNAs and Cas9. Several tools are available for designing sgRNAs that target unique locations in the genome. However, the ability to find sgRNA targets common to several similar sequences or, by contrast, unique to each of these sequences, would also be advantageous. To provide such a tool for several types of CRISPR/Cas system and many species, we developed the CRISPR MultiTargeter software. Similar DNA sequences in question are duplicated genes and sets of exons of different transcripts of a gene. Thus, we implemented a basic sgRNA target search of input sequences for single-sgRNA and two-sgRNA/Cas9 nickase targeting, as well as common and unique sgRNA target searches in 1 a set of input sequences; 2 a set of similar genes or transcripts; or 3 transcripts a single gene. We demonstrate potential uses of the program by identifying unique isoform-specific sgRNA sites in 71% of zebrafish alternative transcripts and common sgRNA target sites in approximately 40% of zebrafish duplicated gene pairs. The design of unique targets in alternative exons is helpful because it will facilitate functional genomic studies of transcript isoforms. Similarly, its application to duplicated genes may simplify multi-gene mutational targeting experiments. Overall, this program provides a unique interface that will enhance use of CRISPR/Cas technology.

  12. CRISPR multitargeter: a web tool to find common and unique CRISPR single guide RNA targets in a set of similar sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Rajan, Vinothkumar; Gaston, Daniel; Berman, Jason N

    2015-01-01

    Genome engineering has been revolutionized by the discovery of clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated system genes (Cas) in bacteria. The type IIB Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR/Cas9 system functions in many species and additional types of CRISPR/Cas systems are under development. In the type II system, expression of CRISPR single guide RNA (sgRNA) targeting a defined sequence and Cas9 generates a sequence-specific nuclease inducing small deletions or insertions. Moreover, knock-in of large DNA inserts has been shown at the sites targeted by sgRNAs and Cas9. Several tools are available for designing sgRNAs that target unique locations in the genome. However, the ability to find sgRNA targets common to several similar sequences or, by contrast, unique to each of these sequences, would also be advantageous. To provide such a tool for several types of CRISPR/Cas system and many species, we developed the CRISPR MultiTargeter software. Similar DNA sequences in question are duplicated genes and sets of exons of different transcripts of a gene. Thus, we implemented a basic sgRNA target search of input sequences for single-sgRNA and two-sgRNA/Cas9 nickase targeting, as well as common and unique sgRNA target searches in 1) a set of input sequences; 2) a set of similar genes or transcripts; or 3) transcripts a single gene. We demonstrate potential uses of the program by identifying unique isoform-specific sgRNA sites in 71% of zebrafish alternative transcripts and common sgRNA target sites in approximately 40% of zebrafish duplicated gene pairs. The design of unique targets in alternative exons is helpful because it will facilitate functional genomic studies of transcript isoforms. Similarly, its application to duplicated genes may simplify multi-gene mutational targeting experiments. Overall, this program provides a unique interface that will enhance use of CRISPR/Cas technology.

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of a Unique t324-ST541-V Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strain from a Pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Dong Chan; Kim, Byung-Yong; Nam, Hyang-Mi; Jang, Geum-Chan; Jung, Suk-Chan; Lee, Hee-Soo; Park, Yong-Ho; Lim, Suk-Kyung

    2016-04-28

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the major causative agent of nosocomial infection, has also been reported from non-human sources. A sequence type (ST) 541 MRSA isolate designated K12PJN53 was isolated from a healthy pig in 2012. The genome of K12PJN53 consists of 44 contiguous sequences (contigs), totalling 2,880,108 bases with 32.88% GC content. Among the annotated contigs, 14, 17, and 18 contained genes related to antimicrobial resistance, adherence, and toxin genes, respectively. The genomic distance of strain K12PJN53 was close to the ST398 strains. This is the first report of the draft genome sequence of a novel livestock-associated MRSA ST541 strain.

  14. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a unique near-terminal region of the tumorigenic poxvirus, Shope fibroma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massung, R F; McFadden, G; Moyer, R W

    1992-11-01

    Shope fibroma virus (SFV), a tumorigenic poxvirus, has a DNA genome of approximately 160 kb. Previous DNA sequence analysis of SFV has been mainly limited to the terminal inverted repetitions (about 12 kb at each end of the genome) and immediately adjacent regions. We have sequenced a 4 kb fragment located approximately 20 kb from the right-terminal hairpin. Within this region three complete and two partial open reading frames (ORFs) have been identified. Each of the putative polypeptides has sequence similarity to one or more previously identified poxvirus or cellular proteins, with homology to protein kinases, erythrocyte ankyrin and a vaccinia virus virulence-related protein (ORF N1L). The potential significance of these gene products with regard to the phenotype of SFV is discussed.

  15. First steps in qualitative data analysis: transcribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Julia

    2008-04-01

    Qualitative research in primary care deepens understanding of phenomena such as health, illness and health care encounters. Many qualitative studies collect audio or video data (e.g. recordings of interviews, focus groups or talk in consultation), and these are usually transcribed into written form for closer study. Transcribing appears to be a straightforward technical task, but in fact involves judgements about what level of detail to choose (e.g. omitting non-verbal dimensions of interaction), data interpretation (e.g. distinguishing 'I don't, no' from 'I don't know') and data representation (e.g. representing the verbalization 'hwarryuhh' as 'How are you?'). Representation of audible and visual data into written form is an interpretive process which is therefore the first step in analysing data. Different levels of detail and different representations of data will be required for projects with differing aims and methodological approaches. This article is a guide to practical and theoretical considerations for researchers new to qualitative data analysis. Data examples are given to illustrate decisions to be made when transcribing or assigning the task to others.

  16. Genome Sequences of Five Arboviruses in Field-Captured Mosquitoes in a Unique Rural Environment of South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Jun; Klein, Terry A; Kim, Heung-Chul; Yang, Yu; Jima, Dereje D; Richardson, Jason H; Jarman, Richard G

    2016-01-28

    Here, we present the genome sequences of one mesonivirus and four novel arboviruses observed in Culex bitaeniorhynchus and Culex pipiens, captured in and near the demilitarized zone, Republic of Korea. Results suggest the ubiquitous presence of mesoniviruses and the discovery of a potentially new species of arboviruses in field-captured mosquitoes.

  17. Selection of Unique Escherichia coli Clones by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD): Evaluation by Whole Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Karen L.; Godfrey, Paul A.; Stegger, Marc; Andersen, Paal S.; Feldgarden, Michael; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and characterizing clonal diversity is important when analysing fecal flora. We evaluated random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR, applied for selection of Escherichia coli isolates, by whole genome sequencing. RAPD was fast, and reproducible as screening method for selection of distinct E. coli clones in fecal swabs. PMID:24912108

  18. Retroviral sequence located in border region of short unique region and short terminal repeat of Md5 strain of Marek's disease virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh, D; Ito, M; Cho, K O; Kon, Y; Morimura, T; Hayashi, M; Kuwabara, M

    1998-02-01

    A 246-base pair (bp) retroviral sequence, which was homologous to a long terminal repeat of avian erythroblastosis virus (AEV), was detected and cloned from Md5 strain (Md5) of Marek's disease virus type 1 (MDV1) by representational difference analysis (RDA). The retroviral sequence was thought to be located in the border region of short unique region (U(s) and short terminal repeat (TRs), but did not exist in the border region of U(s) and the inverted short repeat (IRs) of the Md5 genome. A cloned fragment of the US/TRs border region of the Md5 genome showed a construction of U-E'-R-U'-E-TRs with the regions designated as follows: E, expanded TRs reported by Jones et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 90, 3855, 1993]; E', a partial copy of the expanded TRs; R, the retroviral sequence detected in Md5 genome; U, TRs-end sequence of U(s); U', a partial copy of TRs-end sequence of U(s). The sequence unit indicated as E'-R-U' was thought to be heterogeneously repeated in the Md5 genome. Since this retroviral sequence reportedly did not exist in the original stock of Md5, the retroviral sequence is thought to be inserted in the Md5 genome without experimental co-infection of avian cells with retrovirus and MDV1. These results suggest that RDA could be useful for the detection of retroviral sequences in the herpesvirus genome.

  19. 5. international workshop on the identification of transcribed sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This workshop was held November 5--8, 1995 in Les Embiez, France. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on mapping the human genome. Attention is focused on the following topics: transcriptional maps; functional analysis; techniques; model organisms; and tissue specific libraries and genes. Abstracts are included of the papers that were presented.

  20. Unique palindromic sequences in synthetic oligonucleotides are required to induce IFN [correction of INF] and augment IFN-mediated [correction of INF] natural killer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S; Yamamoto, T; Kataoka, T; Kuramoto, E; Yano, O; Tokunaga, T

    1992-06-15

    Thirty-mer single-stranded oligonucleotides, with a sequence chosen from the known cDNA encoding the 64-kDa protein named Ag A or the MPB-70 protein of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and the human cellular proteins such as complement component 1 inhibitor and Ig rearranged lambda-chain, were used to dissect the capability to induce IFN and to augment NK cell activity of mouse spleen cells by coincubation in vitro. Three with the hexamer palindromic sequence as GACGTC were active, whereas two kinds of oligonucleotides with no palindrome were inactive. The oligonucleotides containing at least one of the different palindromic sequences showed no activity. When a portion of the sequence of the inactive oligonucleotides was substituted with either palindromic sequence of GACGTC, AGCGCT, or AACGTT, the oligonucleotide acquired the ability to augment NK activity. In contrast, the oligonucleotides substituted with another palindromic sequence such as ACCGGT was without effect. Furthermore, exchange of two neighboring mononucleotides within, but not outside, the active palindromic sequence destroyed the ability of the oligonucleotides to augment NK cell activity. Stimulation of spleen cells with the substituted oligonucleotide, A4a-AAC, induced production of significant amounts of IFN-alpha/beta and small amounts of IFN-gamma. Augmentation of NK activity of the cells by the oligonucleotide was ascribed to IFN-alpha/beta production. These results strongly suggest that the presence of the unique palindromic sequences, such as GACGTC, AGCGCT, and AACGTT, but not ACCGGT, is essential for the immunostimulatory activity of oligonucleotides.

  1. Whole Genome Sequence and Phylogenetic Analysis Show Helicobacter pylori Strains from Latin America Have Followed a Unique Evolution Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Ramírez, Zilia Y.; Mendez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Kato, Ikuko; Bravo, Maria M.; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Thorell, Kaisa; Torres, Roberto; Aviles-Jimenez, Francisco; Camorlinga, Margarita; Canzian, Federico; Torres, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) genetics may determine its clinical outcomes. Despite high prevalence of HP infection in Latin America (LA), there have been no phylogenetic studies in the region. We aimed to understand the structure of HP populations in LA mestizo individuals, where gastric cancer incidence remains high. The genome of 107 HP strains from Mexico, Nicaragua and Colombia were analyzed with 59 publicly available worldwide genomes. To study bacterial relationship on whole genome level we propose a virtual hybridization technique using thousands of high-entropy 13 bp DNA probes to generate fingerprints. Phylogenetic virtual genome fingerprint (VGF) was compared with Multi Locus Sequence Analysis (MLST) and with phylogenetic analyses of cagPAI virulence island sequences. With MLST some Nicaraguan and Mexican strains clustered close to Africa isolates, whereas European isolates were spread without clustering and intermingled with LA isolates. VGF analysis resulted in increased resolution of populations, separating European from LA strains. Furthermore, clusters with exclusively Colombian, Mexican, or Nicaraguan strains were observed, where the Colombian cluster separated from Europe, Asia, and Africa, while Nicaraguan and Mexican clades grouped close to Africa. In addition, a mixed large LA cluster including Mexican, Colombian, Nicaraguan, Peruvian, and Salvadorian strains was observed; all LA clusters separated from the Amerind clade. With cagPAI sequence analyses LA clades clearly separated from Europe, Asia and Amerind, and Colombian strains formed a single cluster. A NeighborNet analyses suggested frequent and recent recombination events particularly among LA strains. Results suggests that in the new world, H. pylori has evolved to fit mestizo LA populations, already 500 years after the Spanish colonization. This co-adaption may account for regional variability in gastric cancer risk. PMID:28293542

  2. Identification of Entamoeba polecki with Unique 18S rRNA Gene Sequences from Celebes Crested Macaques and Pigs in Tangkoko Nature Reserve, North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuda, Josef; Feng, Meng; Imada, Mihoko; Kobayashi, Seiki; Cheng, Xunjia; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Unique species of macaques are distributed across Sulawesi Island, Indonesia, and the details of Entamoeba infections in these macaques are unknown. A total of 77 stool samples from Celebes crested macaques (Macaca nigra) and 14 stool samples from pigs were collected in Tangkoko Nature Reserve, North Sulawesi, and the prevalence of Entamoeba infection was examined by PCR. Entamoeba polecki was detected in 97% of the macaques and all of the pigs, but no other Entamoeba species were found. The nucleotide sequence of the 18S rRNA gene in E. polecki from M. nigra was unique and showed highest similarity with E. polecki subtype (ST) 4. This is the first case of identification of E. polecki ST4 from wild nonhuman primates. The sequence of the 18S rRNA gene in E. polecki from pigs was also unique and showed highest similarity with E. polecki ST1. These results suggest that the diversity of the 18S rRNA gene in E. polecki is associated with differences in host species and geographic localization, and that there has been no transmission of E. polecki between macaques and pigs in the study area.

  3. Draft genome sequence of marine alphaproteobacterial strain HIMB11, the first cultivated representative of a unique lineage within the Roseobacter clade possessing an unusually small genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Bryndan P.; Grote, Jana; Whittaker, Kerry A.; Bender, Sara J.; Luo, Haiwei; Grim, Sharon L.; Brown, Julia M.; Casey, John R.; Dron, Antony; Florez-Leiva, Lennin; Krupke, Andreas; Luria, Catherine M.; Mine, Aric H.; Nigro, Olivia D.; Pather, Santhiska; Talarmin, Agathe; Wear, Emma K.; Weber, Thomas S.; Wilson, Jesse M.; Church, Matthew J.; DeLong, Edward F.; Karl, David M.; Steward, Grieg F.; Eppley, John M.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Schuster, Stephan; Rappé, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Strain HIMB11 is a planktonic marine bacterium isolated from coastal seawater in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii belonging to the ubiquitous and versatile Roseobacter clade of the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae. Here we describe the preliminary characteristics of strain HIMB11, including annotation of the draft genome sequence and comparative genomic analysis with other members of the Roseobacter lineage. The 3,098,747 bp draft genome is arranged in 34 contigs and contains 3,183 protein-coding genes and 54 RNA genes. Phylogenomic and 16S rRNA gene analyses indicate that HIMB11 represents a unique sublineage within the Roseobacter clade. Comparison with other publicly available genome sequences from members of the Roseobacter lineage reveals that strain HIMB11 has the genomic potential to utilize a wide variety of energy sources (e.g. organic matter, reduced inorganic sulfur, light, carbon monoxide), while possessing a reduced number of substrate transporters. PMID:25197450

  4. The Genomic Sequence of the Oral Pathobiont Strain NI1060 Reveals Unique Strategies for Bacterial Competition and Pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Darzi

    Full Text Available Strain NI1060 is an oral bacterium responsible for periodontitis in a murine ligature-induced disease model. To better understand its pathogenicity, we have determined the complete sequence of its 2,553,982 bp genome. Although closely related to Pasteurella pneumotropica, a pneumonia-associated rodent commensal based on its 16S rRNA, the NI1060 genomic content suggests that they are different species thriving on different energy sources via alternative metabolic pathways. Genomic and phylogenetic analyses showed that strain NI1060 is distinct from the genera currently described in the family Pasteurellaceae, and is likely to represent a novel species. In addition, we found putative virulence genes involved in lipooligosaccharide synthesis, adhesins and bacteriotoxic proteins. These genes are potentially important for host adaption and for the induction of dysbiosis through bacterial competition and pathogenicity. Importantly, strain NI1060 strongly stimulates Nod1, an innate immune receptor, but is defective in two peptidoglycan recycling genes due to a frameshift mutation. The in-depth analysis of its genome thus provides critical insights for the development of NI1060 as a prime model system for infectious disease.

  5. A unique model for the variety of multiple populations formation(s) in globular clusters: a temporal sequence

    CERN Document Server

    D'Antona, F; D'Ercole, A; Ventura, P; Milone, A P; Marino, A F; Tailo, M

    2016-01-01

    We explain the multiple populations recently found in the 'prototype' Globular Cluster (GC) NGC 2808 in the framework of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) scenario. The chemistry of the five -or more- populations is approximately consistent with a sequence of star formation events, starting after the supernovae type II epoch, lasting approximately until the time when the third dredge up affects the AGB evolution (age ~90-120Myr), and ending when the type Ia supernovae begin exploding in the cluster, eventually clearing it from the gas. The formation of the different populations requires episodes of star formation in AGB gas diluted with different amounts of pristine gas. In the nitrogen-rich, helium-normal population identified in NGC 2808 by the UV Legacy Survey of GCs, the nitrogen increase is due to the third dredge up in the smallest mass AGB ejecta involved in the star formation of this population. The possibly-iron-rich small population in NGC 2808 may be a result of contamination by a single type Ia su...

  6. Human Blastocystis subtyping with subtype-specific primers developed from unique sequences of the SSU rRNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hisao; Iwamasa, Ayana

    2016-12-01

    The genus Blastocystis is one of the most genetically diverse parasites. Blastocystis isolates from humans and animals have been classified into subtypes (STs) based on the phylogeny of the small subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA). Although human Blastocystis isolates are limited to STs 1-9, the identification of all 9 STs remains challenging due to the lack of specific primers for several STs. The sequencing of partial SSU rDNA is therefore essential for the identification of several STs. In this study, we developed 9 sets of PCR primers to detect each of the 9 kinds of ST in humans. When these ST-specific primer pairs were examined reference Blastocystis for the 9 STs, all 9 amplified only the target ST even in a DNA mixture of all 9 STs. The specificities of the 9 primer sets were tested against several intestinal parasites and fungi found in human stool samples. No amplification with these common human intestinal eukaryotes was observed using the primer pairs for 8 STs, while the ST5 primer set gave only faint bands with some parasites. Since genomic DNA levels of these parasites extracted from Blastocystis-positive cultures are expected to be markedly lower than the pure or highly concentrated DNA samples tested, the cross-amplifications with these organisms are unlikely to be detected when DNA samples are extracted from Blastocystis-positive cultures. The PCR conditions for all 9 primer sets were the same, hence a one-step analysis by PCR amplification, followed by electrophoresis has potential as a simple tool for the subtyping of human Blastocystis isolates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA sequence analysis of conserved and unique regions of swinepox virus: identification of genetic elements supporting phenotypic observations including a novel G protein-coupled receptor homologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massung, R F; Jayarama, V; Moyer, R W

    1993-12-01

    Swinepox virus (SPV) contains a double-stranded cross-linked linear DNA genome of approximately 175 kilobase pairs with terminal inverted repetitions (TIRs) of 4.3 kb. The nucleotide sequence was determined for fragments from several regions of the genome including a 2.85-kb fragment from the central potentially conserved portion and two fragments within the presumed variable near-terminal regions which tend to be unique to a given poxvirus. The core sequence contains one partial and two complete open reading frames that are highly conserved and colinear with three contiguous ORFs within the HindIII D fragment of vaccinia virus (VV). The two near-terminal fragments, encompassing 14.2 and 3.6 kb, are respectively located 2.1 kb internal to the left and right cross-linked termini of the DNA and span the TIR junctions. The sequences encode 25 open reading frames including numerous proteins predicted to be membrane-bound or secreted in infected cells. Several ORFs unique to SPV were identified that may be involved in cell attachment, immune modulation, and pathogenesis including a novel poxvirus G protein-coupled receptor. In addition, several polypeptides encoded within the near-terminal regions of vaccinia virus DNA that function as host range or virulence factors are lacking within this region of swinepox virus including the VV growth factor, complement-binding protein, and ORFs C7L and K1L, associated with host range. The lack of these functional homologues could explain the characteristic attenuated phenotype and limited host range of SPV.

  8. Structural Studies of Geosmin Synthase, a Bifunctional Sesquiterpene Synthase with αα Domain Architecture That Catalyzes a Unique Cyclization-Fragmentation Reaction Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Golda G; Lombardi, Patrick M; Pemberton, Travis A; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M; Cole, Kathryn E; Köksal, Mustafa; Murphy, Frank V; Vedula, L Sangeetha; Chou, Wayne K W; Cane, David E; Christianson, David W

    2015-12-01

    Geosmin synthase from Streptomyces coelicolor (ScGS) catalyzes an unusual, metal-dependent terpenoid cyclization and fragmentation reaction sequence. Two distinct active sites are required for catalysis: the N-terminal domain catalyzes the ionization and cyclization of farnesyl diphosphate to form germacradienol and inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), and the C-terminal domain catalyzes the protonation, cyclization, and fragmentation of germacradienol to form geosmin and acetone through a retro-Prins reaction. A unique αα domain architecture is predicted for ScGS based on amino acid sequence: each domain contains the metal-binding motifs typical of a class I terpenoid cyclase, and each domain requires Mg(2+) for catalysis. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the unliganded N-terminal domain of ScGS and the structure of its complex with three Mg(2+) ions and alendronate. These structures highlight conformational changes required for active site closure and catalysis. Although neither full-length ScGS nor constructs of the C-terminal domain could be crystallized, homology models of the C-terminal domain were constructed on the basis of ∼36% sequence identity with the N-terminal domain. Small-angle X-ray scattering experiments yield low-resolution molecular envelopes into which the N-terminal domain crystal structure and the C-terminal domain homology model were fit, suggesting possible αα domain architectures as frameworks for bifunctional catalysis.

  9. RNA probes, transcribed from synthetic DNA, for in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brysch, W.; Hagendorff, G.; Schlingensiepen, K.H.

    1988-03-25

    Single stranded cRNA probes are ideal for in-situ-hybridization. Synthetic oligodesoxy-ribonucleotides on the other hand allow one to chose nucleotide sequences independently of restriction sites and availability of cloned templates. To combine the advantages of these two methods, the authors used an oligonucleotide, containing a T7-RNA-polymerase promotor sequence and a starting sequence of 6 bases as a template for an in-vitro-transcription reaction with T7-RNA-polymerase. A second oligonucleotide, complementary to basepairs 1-101 was also synthesized and the two strands heated to 95/sup 0/ for 3 min, then kept at 65/sup 0/C for one hour in 80 mM Tris, 12mM MgCl, 4 mM Spermidine, 0,04% Triton and finally cooled on ice. The resulting double stranded DNA was used as a template to transcribe /sup 35/S-labelled cRNA, using DNA, T7-Polymerase, /sup 35/S-UTP, ATP, GTP and CTP and RNasin (Promega). No difference could be observed comparing the resulting hybridization pattern with that obtained by using a plasmid derived cRNA probe of rat brain sodium channel II. Moreover the hybridization signal was clearly distinct from the background labelling resulting from hybridization with a sense control probe of the same specific activity.

  10. Rapid molecular identification of pathogenic yeasts by pyrosequencing analysis of 35 nucleotides of internal transcribed spacer 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Andrew M; Linton, Christopher J; Oliver, Debra; Palmer, Michael D; Szekely, Adrien; Johnson, Elizabeth M

    2010-10-01

    Rapid identification of yeast species isolates from clinical samples is particularly important given their innately variable antifungal susceptibility profiles. Here, we have evaluated the utility of pyrosequencing analysis of a portion of the internal transcribed spacer 2 region (ITS2) for identification of pathogenic yeasts. A total of 477 clinical isolates encompassing 43 different fungal species were subjected to pyrosequencing analysis in a strictly blinded study. The molecular identifications produced by pyrosequencing were compared with those obtained using conventional biochemical tests (AUXACOLOR2) and following PCR amplification and sequencing of the D1-D2 portion of the nuclear 28S large rRNA gene. More than 98% (469/477) of isolates encompassing 40 of the 43 fungal species tested were correctly identified by pyrosequencing of only 35 bp of ITS2. Moreover, BLAST searches of the public synchronized databases with the ITS2 pyrosequencing signature sequences revealed that there was only minimal sequence redundancy in the ITS2 under analysis. In all cases, the pyrosequencing signature sequences were unique to the yeast species (or species complex) under investigation. Finally, when pyrosequencing was combined with the Whatman FTA paper technology for the rapid extraction of fungal genomic DNA, molecular identification could be accomplished within 6 h from the time of starting from pure cultures.

  11. Analysis of 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions in Pasteurellaceae isolated from laboratory rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benga, Laurentiu; Benten, W Peter M; Engelhardt, Eva; Christensen, Henrik; Sager, Martin

    2012-09-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of members of Pasteurellaceae isolated from rodents, including the [Pasteurella] pneumotropica biotypes Jawetz and Heyl, [Actinobacillus] muris, "Hemophilus influenzaemurium" and Bisgaard taxon 17 were studied and their feasibility to discriminate these species was analyzed. The reference strains of all species analyzed showed unique species-specific ITS patterns which were further present in 49 clinical isolates of [P.] pneumotropica biotypes Jawetz and Heyl and [A.] muris allowing their identification by comparison to the reference strains pattern. Sequence analysis of the amplified fragments revealed in all species, with exception of "H. influenzaemurium", a larger ITS(ile+ala) which contained the genes for tRNA(Ile(GAU)) and tRNA(Ala(UGC)) and a smaller ITS(glu) with the tRNA(Glu(UUC)) gene. "H. influenzaemurium" revealed two each of the larger and respectively the smaller ITS fragments. Both the length and the sequence of each ITS type were highly conserved within the [P.] pneumotropica biotypes Jawetz and Heyl and [A.] muris strains tested. On the contrary, ITS sequences revealed significant interspecies variations with identity levels ranging from 61.2 to 89.5% for ITS(ile+ala) and 56.5 to 86.8% for ITS(glu). Sequences regions with significant interspecies variation but highly conserved within the species were identified and might be used to design probes for the identification of rodent Pasteurellaceae to the species level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sequences of two related multiple antibiotic resistance virulence plasmids sharing a unique IS26-related molecular signature isolated from different Escherichia coli pathotypes from different hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Venturini

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC and atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC are important zoonotic pathogens that increasingly are becoming resistant to multiple antibiotics. Here we describe two plasmids, pO26-CRL125 (125 kb from a human O26:H- EHEC, and pO111-CRL115 (115kb from a bovine O111 aEPEC, that impart resistance to ampicillin, kanamycin, neomycin, streptomycin, sulfathiazole, trimethoprim and tetracycline and both contain atypical class 1 integrons with an identical IS26-mediated deletion in their 3´-conserved segment. Complete sequence analysis showed that pO26-CRL125 and pO111-CRL115 are essentially identical except for a 9.7 kb fragment, present in the backbone of pO26-CRL125 but absent in pO111-CRL115, and several indels. The 9.7 kb fragment encodes IncI-associated genes involved in plasmid stability during conjugation, a putative transposase gene and three imperfect repeats. Contiguous sequence identical to regions within these pO26-CRL125 imperfect repeats was identified in pO111-CRL115 precisely where the 9.7 kb fragment is missing, suggesting it may be mobile. Sequences shared between the plasmids include a complete IncZ replicon, a unique toxin/antitoxin system, IncI stability and maintenance genes, a novel putative serine protease autotransporter, and an IncI1 transfer system including a unique shufflon. Both plasmids carry a derivate Tn21 transposon with an atypical class 1 integron comprising a dfrA5 gene cassette encoding resistance to trimethoprim, and 24 bp of the 3´-conserved segment followed by Tn6026, which encodes resistance to ampicillin, kanymycin, neomycin, streptomycin and sulfathiazole. The Tn21-derivative transposon is linked to a truncated Tn1721, encoding resistance to tetracycline, via a region containing the IncP-1α oriV. Absence of the 5 bp direct repeats flanking Tn3-family transposons, indicates that homologous recombination events played a key role in the formation of this complex

  13. The scorpion toxin Bot IX is a potent member of the α-like family and has a unique N-terminal sequence extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Salvatierra, Juan; Bosmans, Frank; Bougis, Pierre E

    2016-09-01

    We report the detailed chemical, immunological and pharmacological characterization of the α-toxin Bot IX from the Moroccan scorpion Buthus occitanus tunetanus venom. Bot IX, which consists of 70 amino acids, is a highly atypical toxin. It carries a unique N-terminal sequence extension and is highly lethal in mice. Voltage clamp recordings on oocytes expressing rat Nav1.2 or insect BgNav1 reveal that, similar to other α-like toxins, Bot IX inhibits fast inactivation of both variants. Moreover, Bot IX belongs to the same structural/immunological group as the α-like toxin Bot I. Remarkably, radioiodinated Bot IX competes efficiently with the classical α-toxin AaH II from Androctonus australis, and displays one of the highest affinities for Nav channels.

  14. Isolation of a human anti-haemophilic factor IX cDNA clone using a unique 52-base synthetic oligonucleotide probe deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine factor IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaye, M; de la Salle, H; Schamber, F; Balland, A; Kohli, V; Findeli, A; Tolstoshev, P; Lecocq, J P

    1983-04-25

    A unique 52mer oligonucleotide deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine Factor IX was synthesized and used as a probe to screen a human liver cDNA bank. The Factor IX clone isolated shows 5 differences in nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence as compared to a previously isolated clone. In addition, precisely one codon has been deleted.Images

  15. alpha-Amylase gene of Streptomyces limosus: nucleotide sequence, expression motifs, and amino acid sequence homology to mammalian and invertebrate alpha-amylases.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the coding and regulatory regions of the alpha-amylase gene (aml) of Streptomyces limosus was determined. High-resolution S1 mapping was used to locate the 5' end of the transcript and demonstrated that the gene is transcribed from a unique promoter. The predicted amino acid sequence has considerable identity to mammalian and invertebrate alpha-amylases, but not to those of plant, fungal, or eubacterial origin. Consistent with this is the susceptibility of the enzym...

  16. Diversity of the marine picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus assessed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms of 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer sequences Diversidad de las picocianobacterias marinas Prochlorococcus y Synechococcus por medio de polimorfismos de longitud de fragmentos de restricción terminal en secuencias del espaciador transcrito interno del ARNr 16S - 23S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARIS LAVIN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the appropriateness of the use of internal transcribed spacer (ITS sequences for the study of population genetics of marine cyanobacteria, we amplified and cloned the 16S rRNA gene plus the 16S-23S ITS regions of six strains of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. We analyzed them by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP. When using the standard application of these techniques, we obtained more than one band or terminal restriction fragment (T-RF per strain or cloned sequence. Reports in literature have suggested that these anomalies can result from the formation of secondary structures. Secondary structures of the ITS sequences of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus strains were computationally modelled at the different temperatures that were used during the polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Modelling results predicted the existence of hairpin loops that would still be present at the extensión temperature; it is likely that these loops produced incomplete and single stranded PCR products. We modified the standard T-RFLP procedure by adding the labelled ITS primer in the last two cycles of the PCR reaction; this resulted, in most cases, in only one T-RF per ribotype. Application of this technique to a natural picoplankton community in marine waters off northern Chile, showed that it was possible to identify the presence, and determine the relative abundance, of several phylogenetic lineages within the genera Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus inhabiting the euphotic zone. Phylogenetic analysis of ITS sequences obtained by cloning and sequencing DNA from the same sample confirmed the presence of the different genotypes. With the proposed modification, T-RFLP profiles should therefore be suitable for studying the diversity of natural populations of cyanobacteria, and should become an important tool to study the factors influencing the genetic structure and

  17. The anti-tumor drug bleomycin preferentially cleaves at the transcription start sites of actively transcribed genes in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Vincent; Chen, Jon K; Galea, Anne M

    2014-04-01

    The genome-wide pattern of DNA cleavage at transcription start sites (TSSs) for the anti-tumor drug bleomycin was examined in human HeLa cells using next-generation DNA sequencing. It was found that actively transcribed genes were preferentially cleaved compared with non-transcribed genes. The 143,600 identified human TSSs were split into non-transcribed genes (82,596) and transcribed genes (61,004) for HeLa cells. These transcribed genes were further split into quintiles of 12,201 genes comprising the top 20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80, and 80-100 % of expressed genes. The bleomycin cleavage pattern at highly transcribed gene TSSs was greatly enhanced compared with purified DNA and non-transcribed gene TSSs. The top 20 and 20-40 % quintiles had a very similar enhanced cleavage pattern, the 40-60 % quintile was intermediate, while the 60-80 and 80-100 % quintiles were close to the non-transcribed and purified DNA profiles. The pattern of bleomycin enhanced cleavage had peaks that were approximately 200 bp apart, and this indicated that bleomycin was identifying the presence of phased nucleosomes at TSSs. Hence bleomycin can be utilized to detect chromatin structures that are present at actively transcribed genes. In this study, for the first time, the pattern of DNA damage by a clinically utilized cancer chemotherapeutic agent was performed on a human genome-wide scale at the nucleotide level.

  18. Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer from serofluid dish, a traditional Chinese fermented food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Serofluid dish (or Jiangshui, in Chinese, a traditional food in the Chinese culture for thousands of years, is made from vegetables by fermentation. In this work, microorganism community of the fermented serofluid dish was investigated by the culture-independent method. The metagenomic data in this article contains the sequences of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions of rRNA genes from 12 different serofluid dish samples. The metagenome comprised of 50,865 average raw reads with an average of 8,958,220 bp and G + C content is 45.62%. This is the first report on metagenomic data of fungal ITS from serofluid dish employing Illumina platform to profile the fungal communities of this little known fermented food from Gansu Province, China. The Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer can be accessed at NCBI, SRA database accession no. SRP067411.

  19. Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer from serofluid dish, a traditional Chinese fermented food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Zhao, Yang; Wu, Zhengrong; Liu, Ronghui; Xu, Ruixiang; Yan, Lei; Li, Hongyu

    2016-03-01

    Serofluid dish (or Jiangshui, in Chinese), a traditional food in the Chinese culture for thousands of years, is made from vegetables by fermentation. In this work, microorganism community of the fermented serofluid dish was investigated by the culture-independent method. The metagenomic data in this article contains the sequences of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rRNA genes from 12 different serofluid dish samples. The metagenome comprised of 50,865 average raw reads with an average of 8,958,220 bp and G + C content is 45.62%. This is the first report on metagenomic data of fungal ITS from serofluid dish employing Illumina platform to profile the fungal communities of this little known fermented food from Gansu Province, China. The Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer can be accessed at NCBI, SRA database accession no. SRP067411.

  20. A mRNA molecule encoding truncated excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1) protein (EAAC2) is transcribed from an independent promoter but not an alternative splicing event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Glutamate transporter EAAC1 removes excitatory neurotransmitter in central nervous system, and alsoabsorbs glutamate in epithelia of intestine, kidney, liver and heart for normal cell growth. When a mousecDNA was screened using EAAC1 cDNA fragment as probe in our lab, a transcript (GenBank U75214)encoding an EAAC1 protein with 148 residues truncated at N-terminal was cloned and named as EAAC2.Sequence analysis shows that EAAC2 has it's own start code and unique 5'UTR that is different from that ofEAAC1. A mouse genomic library was screened and a positive clone including EAAC1 CDS was sequenced(GenBank AF 322393) and indicates that normal EAAC1 transcript (GenBank U73521) is transcribed from10 exons in terms of exon I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X, and EAAC2 transcript is consisted by exonsfrom IV to IX as same as that of EAAC1 and with its unique exonβ upstream to exon IV and exon δdownstream to IX. EAAC2 transcript has a cluster of transcriptional start sites not overlapping with thetranscriptional start sites of EAAC1. These results indicate that EAAC2 is transcribed from an independentpromoter but not an alternative splicing event.

  1. Pyrosequencing analysis of 20 nucleotides of internal transcribed spacer 2 discriminates Candida parapsilosis, Candida metapsilosis, and Candida orthopsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Andrew M; Linton, Christopher J; Oliver, Debra; Palmer, Michael D; Szekely, Adrien; Odds, Frank C; Johnson, Elizabeth M

    2009-07-01

    Two new cryptic sister species, Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis, were recently identified by consistent DNA sequence differences among several genes within the genetically heterogeneous Candida parapsilosis complex. Here, we present data demonstrating that Pyrosequencing analysis of 20 nucleotides of internal transcribed spacer region 2 rapidly and robustly distinguishes between these three closely related Candida species.

  2. Identification of RNA polymerase III-transcribed Alu loci by computational screening of RNA-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Anastasia; Carnevali, Davide; Bollati, Valentina; Fustinoni, Silvia; Pellegrini, Matteo; Dieci, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Of the ∼ 1.3 million Alu elements in the human genome, only a tiny number are estimated to be active in transcription by RNA polymerase (Pol) III. Tracing the individual loci from which Alu transcripts originate is complicated by their highly repetitive nature. By exploiting RNA-Seq data sets and unique Alu DNA sequences, we devised a bioinformatic pipeline allowing us to identify Pol III-dependent transcripts of individual Alu elements. When applied to ENCODE transcriptomes of seven human cell lines, this search strategy identified ∼ 1300 Alu loci corresponding to detectable transcripts, with ∼ 120 of them expressed in at least three cell lines. In vitro transcription of selected Alus did not reflect their in vivo expression properties, and required the native 5'-flanking region in addition to internal promoter. We also identified a cluster of expressed AluYa5-derived transcription units, juxtaposed to snaR genes on chromosome 19, formed by a promoter-containing left monomer fused to an Alu-unrelated downstream moiety. Autonomous Pol III transcription was also revealed for Alus nested within Pol II-transcribed genes. The ability to investigate Alu transcriptomes at single-locus resolution will facilitate both the identification of novel biologically relevant Alu RNAs and the assessment of Alu expression alteration under pathological conditions.

  3. Determination of internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) in Trichomonas vaginalis isolates and differentiation among Trichomonas species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Escribano, Alexandra; Nogal-Ruiz, Juan José; Arán, Vicente J; Escario, José Antonio; Gómez-Barrio, Alicia; Alderete, J F

    2014-04-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the 5.8S rRNA gene and the flanked internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of six Trichomonas vaginalis isolates with different metronidazole sensitivity and geographic origin were genotyped. A multiple sequence alignment was performed with different sequences of other isolates available at the GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ databases, which revealed 5 different sequence patterns. Although a stable mutation in position 66 of the ITS1 (C66T) was observed in 26% (9/34) of the T. vaginalis sequences analyzed, there was 99.7% ITS nucleotide sequence identity among isolates for this sequence. The nucleotide sequence variation among other species of the genus Trichomonas ranged from 3.4% to 9.1%. Surprisingly, the % identity between T. vaginalis and Pentatrichomonas hominis was ~83%. There was >40% divergence in the ITS sequence between T. vaginalis and Tritrichomonas spp., including Tritrichomonas augusta, Tritrichomonas muris, and Tritrichomonas nonconforma and with Tetratrichomonas prowazeki. Dendrograms grouped the trichomonadid sequences in robust clades according to their genera. The absence of nucleotide divergence in the hypervariable ITS regions between T. vaginalis isolates suggests the early divergence of the parasite. Importantly, these data show this ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2 region suitable for inter-species differentiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Staphylococcus aureus strain M1, a unique t024-ST8-IVa Danish methicillin-resistant S. aureus clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larner-Svensson, Hanna; Worning, Peder; Bartels, Mette

    2013-01-01

    We report the genome sequence, in five contigs, of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolate designated M1. This clinical isolate was from the index patient of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in Copenhagen, Denmark, that started in 2003. This strain is se...... is sequence type 8 (ST8), spa type t024, and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec) type IVa....

  5. A proline-rich sequence unique to MEK1 and MEK2 is required for raf binding and regulates MEK function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catling, A D; Schaeffer, H J; Reuter, C W; Reddy, G R; Weber, M J

    1995-10-01

    Mammalian MEK1 and MEK2 contain a proline-rich (PR) sequence that is absent both from the yeast homologs Ste7 and Byr1 and from a recently cloned activator of the JNK/stress-activated protein kinases, SEK1/MKK4. Since this PR sequence occurs in MEKs that are regulated by Raf family enzymes but is missing from MEKs and SEKs activated independently of Raf, we sought to investigate the role of this sequence in MEK1 and MEK2 regulation and function. Deletion of the PR sequence from MEK1 blocked the ability of MEK1 to associate with members of the Raf family and markedly attenuated activation of the protein in vivo following growth factor stimulation. In addition, this sequence was necessary for efficient activation of MEK1 in vitro by B-Raf but dispensable for activation by a novel MEK1 activator which we have previously detected in fractionated fibroblast extracts. Furthermore, we found that a phosphorylation site within the PR sequence of MEK1 was required for sustained MEK1 activity in response to serum stimulation of quiescent fibroblasts. Consistent with this observation, we observed that MEK2, which lacks a phosphorylation site at the corresponding position, was activated only transiently following serum stimulation. Finally, we found that deletion of the PR sequence from a constitutively activated MEK1 mutant rendered the protein nontransforming in Rat1 fibroblasts. These observations indicate a critical role for the PR sequence in directing specific protein-protein interactions important for the activation, inactivation, and downstream functioning of the MEKs.

  6. TriMEDB: A database to integrate transcribed markers and facilitate genetic studies of the tribe Triticeae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida Takuhiro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent rapid accumulation of sequence resources of various crop species ensures an improvement in the genetics approach, including quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis as well as the holistic population analysis and association mapping of natural variations. Because the tribe Triticeae includes important cereals such as wheat and barley, integration of information on the genetic markers in these crops should effectively accelerate map-based genetic studies on Triticeae species and lead to the discovery of key loci involved in plant productivity, which can contribute to sustainable food production. Therefore, informatics applications and a semantic knowledgebase of genome-wide markers are required for the integration of information on and further development of genetic markers in wheat and barley in order to advance conventional marker-assisted genetic analyses and population genomics of Triticeae species. Description The Triticeae mapped expressed sequence tag (EST database (TriMEDB provides information, along with various annotations, regarding mapped cDNA markers that are related to barley and their homologues in wheat. The current version of TriMEDB provides map-location data for barley and wheat ESTs that were retrieved from 3 published barley linkage maps (the barley single nucleotide polymorphism database of the Scottish Crop Research Institute, the barley transcript map of Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, and HarvEST barley ver. 1.63 and 1 diploid wheat map. These data were imported to CMap to allow the visualization of the map positions of the ESTs and interrelationships of these ESTs with public gene models and representative cDNA sequences. The retrieved cDNA sequences corresponding to each EST marker were assigned to the rice genome to predict an exon-intron structure. Furthermore, to generate a unique set of EST markers in Triticeae plants among the public domain, 3472 markers were

  7. Transcribing Disordered Speech: By Target or by Production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to transcribe disordered speech is a vital tool for speech-language pathologists, as accurate description of a client's speech output is needed for both diagnosis and effective intervention. Clients in the speech clinic often use sounds that are not part of the target sound system and which may, in some cases, be sounds not found in…

  8. MOLECULAR PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF MONASCUS FUNGI BASED ON INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACER REGION

    OpenAIRE

    Kikuchi, Y.; N. SUHARNA; Fukatsu, T

    2005-01-01

    A molecular analysis of internal transcribed spacer region has been carried out to reveal the relationship among 16 strains of Monascus spp. A primer set comprised primer ITS1 and ITS4 was used to amplify this region in which they were cloned and scqucnccd. We also compared the sequence result with M. purpureus AF458473, M.ruber AF458470, M. kaoliang AF451859, M. araneous AF458471 and M. pilosus AF451856 and one outgroup species Thermoascus crustaceus U18353. The result showed that 16 M...

  9. Imidacloprid and Thiamethoxam Induced Mutations in Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS2) of Anopheles stephensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhinder, Preety; Chaudhry, Asha; Barna, Bhupinder; Kaur, Satvinderjeet

    2012-05-01

    The present article deals with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotoxicity evaluation of neonicotinoid pesticides, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, by using the genome of a mosquito Anopheles stephensi taken as an experimental model. After treatment of the second instar larvae with LC(20) of the pesticides for 24 h, the induced nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of freshly hatched unfed control and treated individuals was studied from the sequence alignment data and the mutations in the form of insertion, deletion and substitution of bases were recorded. Measurable differences, indicative of the genetic damage due to imidacloprid and thiamethoxam were observed when ITS2 sequences of control and treated individuals were compared. It was found that imidacloprid-treated individual had 8 deletions, 29 insertions, 18 transitions and 33 transversions, whereas thiamethoxam-treated individual had 10 deletions, 8 insertions, 47 transitions and 68 transversions.

  10. Sequence analysis of a Molluscum contagiosum virus DNA region which includes the gene encoding protein kinase 2 and other genes with unique organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Gallardo, A; Moratilla, M; Funes, J M; Agromayor, M; Nuñez, A; Varas, A J; Collado, M; Valencia, A; Lopez-Estebaranz, J L; Esteban, M

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a near left-terminal region from the genome of Molluscum contagiosum virus subtype I (MCVI) was determined. This region was contained within three adjacent BamHI fragments, designated L (2.4 kilobases (kb)), M (1.8 kb), and N (1.6 kb). BamHI cleavage of MCVI DNA produced another 1.6-kb fragment (N'), which had been mapped 30-50 kb from the L,M region. The MCVI restriction fragments were cloned and end-sequenced. The N fragment that maps at the L,M region was identified by the polymerase chain reaction, using primers devised from the sequence of each fragment. The results from this analysis led to establish the relative position of these fragments within the MCVI genome. The analysis of 3.6 kb of DNA sequence revealed the presence of ten open reading frames (ORFs). Comparison of the amino acid sequence of these ORFs to the amino acid sequence of vaccinia virus (VAC) proteins revealed that two complete MCVI ORFs, termed N1L and L1L, showed high degree of homology with VAC F9 and F10 genes, respectively. The F10 gene encodes a 52-kDa serine/threonine protein kinase (protein kinase 2), an essential protein involved in virus morphogenesis. The MCVI homologue (L1L) encoded a putative polypeptide of 443 aa, with a calculated molecular mass of 53 kDa, and 60.5/30.2% sequence identity/similarity to VAC F10. The MCV N1L (213 aa, 24 kDa) showed 42.6/40.6% amino acid sequence identity/similarity to VAC F9, a gene of unknown function encoding a 24-kDa protein with a hydrophobic C-terminal domain, which was conserved in MCVI. The genomic arrangement of MCVI N1L and L1L was equivalent to that of the vaccinia and variola virus homologues. However, the ORFs contained within MCVI fragment M (leftward) showed no homology, neither similarity in genetic organization, to the genes encoded by the corresponding regions of vaccinia and variola viruses.

  11. The mitochondrial genome of the stingless bee Melipona bicolor (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini: sequence, gene organization and a unique tRNA translocation event conserved across the tribe Meliponini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Silvestre

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available At present a complete mtDNA sequence has been reported for only two hymenopterans, the Old World honey bee, Apis mellifera and the sawfly Perga condei. Among the bee group, the tribe Meliponini (stingless bees has some distinction due to its Pantropical distribution, great number of species and large importance as main pollinators in several ecosystems, including the Brazilian rain forest. However few molecular studies have been conducted on this group of bees and few sequence data from mitochondrial genomes have been described. In this project, we PCR amplified and sequenced 78% of the mitochondrial genome of the stingless bee Melipona bicolor (Apidae, Meliponini. The sequenced region contains all of the 13 mitochondrial protein-coding genes, 18 of 22 tRNA genes, and both rRNA genes (one of them was partially sequenced. We also report the genome organization (gene content and order, gene translation, genetic code, and other molecular features, such as base frequencies, codon usage, gene initiation and termination. We compare these characteristics of M. bicolor to those of the mitochondrial genome of A. mellifera and other insects. A highly biased A+T content is a typical characteristic of the A. mellifera mitochondrial genome and it was even more extreme in that of M. bicolor. Length and compositional differences between M. bicolor and A. mellifera genes were detected and the gene order was compared. Eleven tRNA gene translocations were observed between these two species. This latter finding was surprising, considering the taxonomic proximity of these two bee tribes. The tRNA Lys gene translocation was investigated within Meliponini and showed high conservation across the Pantropical range of the tribe.

  12. A unique DNA repair and recombination gene (recN) sequence for identification and intraspecific molecular typing of bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and its comparative analysis with ribosomal DNA sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aundy Kumar; Thekkan Puthiyaveedu Prameela; Rajamma Suseelabhai

    2013-06-01

    Ribosomal gene sequences are a popular choice for identification of bacterial species and, often, for making phylogenetic interpretations. Although very popular, the sequences of 16S rDNA and 16-23S intergenic sequences often fail to differentiate closely related species of bacteria. The availability of complete genome sequences of bacteria, in the recent years, has accelerated the search for new genome targets for phylogenetic interpretations. The recently published full genome data of nine strains of R. solanacearum, which causes bacterial wilt of crop plants, has provided enormous genomic choices for phylogenetic analysis in this globally important plant pathogen. We have compared a gene candidate recN, which codes for DNA repair and recombination function, with 16S rDNA/16-23S intergenic ribosomal gene sequences for identification and intraspecific phylogenetic interpretations in R. solanacearum. recN gene sequence analysis of R. solanacearum revealed subgroups within phylotypes (or newly proposed species within plant pathogenic genus, Ralstonia), indicating its usefulness for intraspecific genotyping. The taxonomic discriminatory power of recN gene sequence was found to be superior to ribosomal DNA sequences. In all, the recN-sequence-based phylogenetic tree generated with the Bayesian model depicted 21 haplotypes against 15 and 13 haplotypes obtained with 16S rDNA and 16-23S rDNA intergenic sequences, respectively. Besides this, we have observed high percentage of polymorphic sites (S 23.04%), high rate of mutations (Eta 276) and high codon bias index (CBI 0.60), which makes the recN an ideal gene candidate for intraspecific molecular typing of this important plant pathogen.

  13. Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens BL-DC-9T simultaneously transcribes many rdhA genes during organohalide respiration with 1,2-DCA, 1,2-DCP, and 1,2,3-TCP as electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Kalpataru; Bowman, Kimberly S; Rainey, Fred A; Siddaramappa, Shivakumara; Challacombe, Jean F; Moe, William M

    2014-05-01

    The genome sequence of the organohalide-respiring bacterium Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellensBL-DC-9(T) contains numerous loci annotated as reductive dehalogenase homologous (rdh) genes based on inferred protein sequence identity with functional dehalogenases of other bacterial species. Many of these genes are truncated, lack adjacent regulatory elements, or lack cognate genes coding for membrane-anchoring proteins typical of the functionally characterized active reductive dehalogenases of organohalide-respiring bacteria. To investigate the expression patterns of the rdh genes in D. lykanthroporepellensBL-DC-9(T), oligonucleotide primers were designed to uniquely target 25 rdh genes present in the genome as well as four putative regulatory genes. RNA extracts from cultures of strain BL-DC-9(T) actively dechlorinating three different electron acceptors, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane were reverse-transcribed and subjected to PCR amplification using rdh-specific primers. Nineteen rdh gene transcripts, including 13 full-length rdhA genes, six truncated rdhA genes, and five rdhA genes having cognate rdhB genes were consistently detected during the dechlorination of all three of the polychlorinated alkanes tested. Transcripts from all four of the putative regulatory genes were also consistently detected. Results reported here expand the diversity of bacteria known to simultaneously transcribe multiple rdh genes and provide insights into the transcription factors associated with rdh gene expression.

  14. Large scale full-length cDNA sequencing reveals a unique genomic landscape in a lepidopteran model insect, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Futahashi, Ryo; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Sasanuma, Shun-ichi; Narukawa, Junko; Ajimura, Masahiro; Jouraku, Akiya; Namiki, Nobukazu; Shimomura, Michihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Suzuki, Masataka G; Daimon, Takaaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Taniai, Kiyoko; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kawaoka, Shinpei; Katsuma, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiki; Noda, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Masahiro; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Tomar, Archana; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Goldsmith, Marian R; Feng, Qili; Xia, Qingyou; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shimada, Toru; Mita, Kazuei

    2013-09-01

    The establishment of a complete genomic sequence of silkworm, the model species of Lepidoptera, laid a foundation for its functional genomics. A more complete annotation of the genome will benefit functional and comparative studies and accelerate extensive industrial applications for this insect. To realize these goals, we embarked upon a large-scale full-length cDNA collection from 21 full-length cDNA libraries derived from 14 tissues of the domesticated silkworm and performed full sequencing by primer walking for 11,104 full-length cDNAs. The large average intron size was 1904 bp, resulting from a high accumulation of transposons. Using gene models predicted by GLEAN and published mRNAs, we identified 16,823 gene loci on the silkworm genome assembly. Orthology analysis of 153 species, including 11 insects, revealed that among three Lepidoptera including Monarch and Heliconius butterflies, the 403 largest silkworm-specific genes were composed mainly of protective immunity, hormone-related, and characteristic structural proteins. Analysis of testis-/ovary-specific genes revealed distinctive features of sexual dimorphism, including depletion of ovary-specific genes on the Z chromosome in contrast to an enrichment of testis-specific genes. More than 40% of genes expressed in specific tissues mapped in tissue-specific chromosomal clusters. The newly obtained FL-cDNA sequences enabled us to annotate the genome of this lepidopteran model insect more accurately, enhancing genomic and functional studies of Lepidoptera and comparative analyses with other insect orders, and yielding new insights into the evolution and organization of lepidopteran-specific genes.

  15. Structure of the gene for the F allele of complement receptor type 1 and sequence of the coding region unique to the S allele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vik, D.P. (Univ. of New Mexico School of Medicine, Alburquerque, NM (United States)); Wong, W.W. (BASF Bioresearch Corporation, Worcester, MA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    The genes for human complement receptor type 1 (CR1) F and S alleles have been cloned and span a region of 133-160 kb on chromosome 1. The F allele was found to comprise 39 exons and the S allele contain and additional 8 exons. The leader sequence and 5[prime]-untranslated region are contained in one exon. Each of the long homologous repeats (LHR), which contain seven short consensus repeats (SCR), is composed of 8 exons. Within a LHR, SCR 1,5, and 7 are each encoded by a single exon, SCR 2 and 6 are each encoded by 2 exons, and a single exon codes for SCR 3 and 4. The transmembrane region is encoded by 2 exons and the cytoplasmic domain and the 3[prime]-untranslated regions are coded for by separate exons. The sequences of the eight S allele-specific exons were very similar to those from LHR-A and -B, as was predicted by comparison of the genomic restriction maps. It had previously been suggested that the alleles of CR1 have arisen by a mechanism of unequal crossover. A comparison of intron sequences from LHR-A, -B, -C indicated that the crossover event between LHR-A and -C that gave rise to LHR-B probably occurred within the fourth exon of these LHR. Likewise, the crossover event between LHR-A and -B that produced LHR-S probably occurred within a 383 bp region around the sixth exon. Analysis of RNA from peripheral blood cells by the S1 nuclease assay indicated that the transcription start site is 111 bp upstream of the translation initiation codon ATG. The 5[prime] rapid amplification of cDNA ends confirmed this position as a transcription start site and revealed another possible start site 29 bp further upstream. 46 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Chloroplast DNA sequence of the green alga Oedogonium cardiacum (Chlorophyceae: Unique genome architecture, derived characters shared with the Chaetophorales and novel genes acquired through horizontal transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux Claude

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To gain insight into the branching order of the five main lineages currently recognized in the green algal class Chlorophyceae and to expand our understanding of chloroplast genome evolution, we have undertaken the sequencing of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA from representative taxa. The complete cpDNA sequences previously reported for Chlamydomonas (Chlamydomonadales, Scenedesmus (Sphaeropleales, and Stigeoclonium (Chaetophorales revealed tremendous variability in their architecture, the retention of only few ancestral gene clusters, and derived clusters shared by Chlamydomonas and Scenedesmus. Unexpectedly, our recent phylogenies inferred from these cpDNAs and the partial sequences of three other chlorophycean cpDNAs disclosed two major clades, one uniting the Chlamydomonadales and Sphaeropleales (CS clade and the other uniting the Oedogoniales, Chaetophorales and Chaetopeltidales (OCC clade. Although molecular signatures provided strong support for this dichotomy and for the branching of the Oedogoniales as the earliest-diverging lineage of the OCC clade, more data are required to validate these phylogenies. We describe here the complete cpDNA sequence of Oedogonium cardiacum (Oedogoniales. Results Like its three chlorophycean homologues, the 196,547-bp Oedogonium chloroplast genome displays a distinctive architecture. This genome is one of the most compact among photosynthetic chlorophytes. It has an atypical quadripartite structure, is intron-rich (17 group I and 4 group II introns, and displays 99 different conserved genes and four long open reading frames (ORFs, three of which are clustered in the spacious inverted repeat of 35,493 bp. Intriguingly, two of these ORFs (int and dpoB revealed high similarities to genes not usually found in cpDNA. At the gene content and gene order levels, the Oedogonium genome most closely resembles its Stigeoclonium counterpart. Characters shared by these chlorophyceans but missing in members

  17. Genome sequencing reveals unique mutations in characteristic metabolic pathways and the transfer of virulence genes between V. mimicus and V. cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duochun; Wang, Haiyin; Zhou, Yanyan; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Fanfei; Du, Pengcheng; Wang, Shujing; Chen, Chen; Kan, Biao

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio mimicus, the species most similar to V. cholerae, is a microbe present in the natural environmental and sometimes causes diarrhea and internal infections in humans. It shows similar phenotypes to V. cholerae but differs in some biochemical characteristics. The molecular mechanisms underlying the differences in biochemical metabolism between V. mimicus and V. cholerae are currently unclear. Several V. mimicus isolates have been found that carry cholera toxin genes (ctxAB) and cause cholera-like diarrhea in humans. Here, the genome of the V. mimicus isolate SX-4, which carries an intact CTX element, was sequenced and annotated. Analysis of its genome, together with those of other Vibrio species, revealed extensive differences within the Vibrionaceae. Common mutations in gene clusters involved in three biochemical metabolism pathways that are used for discrimination between V. mimicus and V. cholerae were found in V. mimicus strains. We also constructed detailed genomic structures and evolution maps for the general types of genomic drift associated with pathogenic characters in polysaccharides, CTX elements and toxin co-regulated pilus (TCP) gene clusters. Overall, the whole-genome sequencing of the V. mimicus strain carrying the cholera toxin gene provides detailed information for understanding genomic differences among Vibrio spp. V. mimicus has a large number of diverse gene and nucleotide differences from its nearest neighbor, V. cholerae. The observed mutations in the characteristic metabolism pathways may indicate different adaptations to different niches for these species and may be caused by ancient events in evolution before the divergence of V. cholerae and V. mimicus. Horizontal transfers of virulence-related genes from an uncommon clone of V. cholerae, rather than the seventh pandemic strains, have generated the pathogenic V. mimicus strain carrying cholera toxin genes.

  18. Unique C2V3 sequence in HIV-1 envelope obtained from broadly neutralizing plasma of a slow progressing patient conferred enhanced virus neutralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Ringe

    Full Text Available Broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 usually develops in chronic infections. Here, we examined the basis of enhanced sensitivity of an env clone amplified from cross neutralizing plasma of an antiretroviral naïve chronically infected Indian patient (ID50 >600-fold higher compared to other autologous env clones. The enhanced autologous neutralization of pseudotyped viruses expressing the sensitive envelope (Env was associated with increased sensitivity to reagents and monoclonal antibodies targeting distinct sites in Env. Chimeric viruses constructed by swapping fragments of sensitive Env into resistant Env backbone revealed that the presence of unique residues within C2V3 region of gp120 governed increased neutralization. The enhanced virus neutralization was also associated with low CD4 dependence as well as increased binding of Env trimers to IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 and was independent of gp120 shedding. Our data highlighted vulnerabilities in the Env obtained from cross neutralizing plasma associated with the exposure of discontinuous neutralizing epitopes and enhanced autologous neutralization. Such information may aid in Env-based vaccine immunogen design.

  19. Using Amazon Mechanical Turk to Transcribe Historical Handwritten Documents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S.I.D. Lang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The developing “information age” is continually unraveling new ways of discovering, presenting and sharing information. Most new academic material is digitally formatted upon its creation and is thus easy to find and query. However, there remains a good deal of material from times prior to the “information age” that has yet to be converted to digital form. Much of this material can be found in library collections—whether academic, public or private—and thus remains available only to a limited number of locals or willing-and-able sojourners. Using OCR technology, most typeset documents can be digitized and made available online; and there are several projects underway to do exactly this. However, there remains little to be done for handwritten materials. Those who own collections of handwritten documents are increasingly wanting to make the content thereof available to the general public. Unfortunately, traditional transcription models typically prove to be expensive or inefficient and pdf snapshots are not searchable. We have developed a model for digital transcription using Google Docs and Amazon's Mechanical Turk. Using this model, one can use an online workforce to efficiently transcribe handwritten texts and perform quality control at a cost much lower than professional transcription services. To illustrate the model we used Amazon’s Mechanical Turk to transcribe and then proofread the Frederick Douglass Diary which we have made available on a public searchable wiki. The total cost of transcription and proofreading for the 72 page diary was less than $25.00 with some pages being transcribed and proofread for as little as $0.04. Our results show that using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk holds great promise for providing an affordable transcription method for hand-written historical documents making them easily sharable and fully searchable.

  20. Definition of Eight Mulberry Species in the Genus Morus by Internal Transcribed Spacer-Based Phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiwei; Chen, Hongyu; Zhang, Chao; Han, Minjing; Li, Tian; Qi, Xiwu; Xiang, Zhonghuai; He, Ningjia

    2015-01-01

    Mulberry, belonging to the order Rosales, family Moraceae, and genus Morus, has received attention because of both its economic and medicinal value, as well as for its important ecological function. The genus Morus has a worldwide distribution, however, its taxonomy remains complex and disputed. Many studies have attempted to classify Morus species, resulting in varied numbers of designated Morus spp. To address this issue, we used information from internal transcribed spacer (ITS) genetic sequences to study the taxonomy of all the members of generally accepted genus Morus. We found that intraspecific 5.8S rRNA sequences were identical but that interspecific 5.8S sequences were diverse. M. alba and M. notabilis showed the shortest (215 bp) and the longest (233 bp) ITS1 sequence length, respectively. With the completion of the mulberry genome, we could identify single nucleotide polymorphisms within the ITS locus in the M. notabilis genome. From reconstruction of a phylogenetic tree based on the complete ITS data, we propose that the Morus genus should be classified into eight species, including M. alba, M. nigra, M. notabilis, M. serrata, M. celtidifolia, M. insignis, M. rubra, and M. mesozygia. Furthermore, the classification of the ITS sequences of known interspecific hybrid clones into both paternal and maternal clades indicated that ITS variation was sufficient to distinguish interspecific hybrids in the genus Morus.

  1. Definition of Eight Mulberry Species in the Genus Morus by Internal Transcribed Spacer-Based Phylogeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiwei Zeng

    Full Text Available Mulberry, belonging to the order Rosales, family Moraceae, and genus Morus, has received attention because of both its economic and medicinal value, as well as for its important ecological function. The genus Morus has a worldwide distribution, however, its taxonomy remains complex and disputed. Many studies have attempted to classify Morus species, resulting in varied numbers of designated Morus spp. To address this issue, we used information from internal transcribed spacer (ITS genetic sequences to study the taxonomy of all the members of generally accepted genus Morus. We found that intraspecific 5.8S rRNA sequences were identical but that interspecific 5.8S sequences were diverse. M. alba and M. notabilis showed the shortest (215 bp and the longest (233 bp ITS1 sequence length, respectively. With the completion of the mulberry genome, we could identify single nucleotide polymorphisms within the ITS locus in the M. notabilis genome. From reconstruction of a phylogenetic tree based on the complete ITS data, we propose that the Morus genus should be classified into eight species, including M. alba, M. nigra, M. notabilis, M. serrata, M. celtidifolia, M. insignis, M. rubra, and M. mesozygia. Furthermore, the classification of the ITS sequences of known interspecific hybrid clones into both paternal and maternal clades indicated that ITS variation was sufficient to distinguish interspecific hybrids in the genus Morus.

  2. Rice Mitochondrial Genes Are Transcribed by Multiple Promoters That Are Highly Diverged

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun-Yu Zhang; Yao-Guang Liu

    2006-01-01

    Plant mitochondrial genes are often transcribed into complex sets of mRNA. To characterize the transcription initiation and promoter structure, the transcript termini of four mitochondrial genes, atp1, atp6, cob,rps7, in rice (Oryza sativa L.), were determined by using a modified circularized RNA reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction method. The results revealed that three genes (atp1, atp6, rps7) were transcribed from multiple initiation sites, indicating the presence of multiple promoters. Two transcription termination sites were detected in three genes (atp6, cob, rps7), respectively. Analysis on the promoter architecture showed that the YRTA (Y=T or C, R=A or G) motifs that are widely present in the mitochondrial promoters of other monocot and dicot plant species were detected only in two of the 12 analyzed promoters.Our data suggest that the promoter sequences in the rice mitochondrial genome are highly diverged in comparison to those in other plants, and the YRTA motif is not an essential element for the promoter activity.

  3. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer region(ITS)genes of two Trypanosoma evansi strains in Buffalo%两株水牛伊氏锥虫内转录间隔区基因序列的测定与系统进化关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石云良; 李健; 黄维义; 张为宇; 张居作; 付强; 张晓溪; 黄文忠; 何国声

    2009-01-01

    为研究从水牛分离到的伊氏锥虫广西株和湖北株的分类学地位,对2株伊氏锥虫的核糖体基因内转录间隔区(ITS1-5.8S-ITS2)基因进行了克隆和测序分析.用CLUSTALXl.83软件多重比对分析了序列差异,应用MEGA4.0软件绘制系统进化树.结果表明,这2株水牛伊氏锥虫的ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rRNA基因扩增产物分别为1 102 bp和1 095 bp,序列存在多态性,其中广西株的ITS-1序列长为340 bp,ITS-2序列长为582 bp,湖北株的ITS-1序列长为339bp,ITS-2序列长为587 bp.系统进化分析显示,这2株伊氏锥虫分布在同一大枝的不同亚群中.%To study the taxonomy position of two Trypanosoma evansi strains from buffalos in Guangxi and Hubei provinces, the ITS (ITSI-5.8S-ITS2) gene of the T. Evansi were amplified by PCR and sequenced. Sequence analysis showed that the length of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 gene of the two T. Evansi strains varied between 1 102 bp and 1 095 bp. The length of ITSI and ITS2 of T. Evansi strain Guangxi was 340 bp and 582 bp respectively, in comparison to those of T. Evansi Hubei strain which was 339 bp and 587 bp respectively. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that these two T. Evansi strains were in the same branch but different subgroups based on ITS gene sequence.

  4. Rhabdovirus-like endogenous viral elements in the genome of Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells are actively transcribed: Implications for adventitious virus detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L

    2016-07-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf) cell lines are used to produce several biologicals for human and veterinary use. Recently, it was discovered that all tested Sf cell lines are persistently infected with Sf-rhabdovirus, a novel rhabdovirus. As part of an effort to search for other adventitious viruses, we searched the Sf cell genome and transcriptome for sequences related to Sf-rhabdovirus. To our surprise, we found intact Sf-rhabdovirus N- and P-like ORFs, and partial Sf-rhabdovirus G- and L-like ORFs. The transcribed and genomic sequences matched, indicating the transcripts were derived from the genomic sequences. These appear to be endogenous viral elements (EVEs), which result from the integration of partial viral genetic material into the host cell genome. It is theoretically impossible for the Sf-rhabdovirus-like EVEs to produce infectious virus particles as 1) they are disseminated across 4 genomic loci, 2) the G and L ORFs are incomplete, and 3) the M ORF is missing. Our finding of transcribed virus-like sequences in Sf cells underscores that MPS-based searches for adventitious viruses in cell substrates used to manufacture biologics should take into account both genomic and transcribed sequences to facilitate the identification of transcribed EVE's, and to avoid false positive detection of replication-competent adventitious viruses.

  5. Endangered Uyghur Medicinal Plant Ferula Identification through the Second Internal Transcribed Spacer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congzhao Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The medicinal plant Ferula has been widely used in Asian medicine, especially in Uyghur medicine in Xinjiang, China. Given that various substitutes and closely related species have similar morphological characteristics, Ferula is difficult to distinguish based on morphology alone, thereby causing confusion and threatening the safe use of Ferula. In this study, internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2 sequences were analyzed and assessed for the accurate identification of two salable Ferula species (Ferula sinkiangensis and Ferula fukangensis and eight substitutes or closely related species. Results showed that the sequence length of ITS2 ranged from 451 bp to 45 bp, whereas guanine and cytosine contents (GC were from 53.6% to 56.2%. A total of 77 variation sites were detected, including 63 base mutations and 14 insertion/deletion mutations. The ITS2 sequence correctly identified 100% of the samples at the species level using the basic local alignment search tool 1 and nearest-distance method. Furthermore, neighbor-joining tree successfully identified the genuine plants F. sinkiangensis and F. fukangensis from their succedaneum and closely related species. These results indicated that ITS2 sequence could be used as a valuable barcode to distinguish Uyghur medicine Ferula from counterfeits and closely related species. This study may broaden DNA barcoding application in the Uyghur medicinal plant field.

  6. Endangered Uyghur Medicinal Plant Ferula Identification through the Second Internal Transcribed Spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Congzhao; Li, Xiaojin; Zhu, Jun; Song, Jingyuan; Yao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal plant Ferula has been widely used in Asian medicine, especially in Uyghur medicine in Xinjiang, China. Given that various substitutes and closely related species have similar morphological characteristics, Ferula is difficult to distinguish based on morphology alone, thereby causing confusion and threatening the safe use of Ferula. In this study, internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequences were analyzed and assessed for the accurate identification of two salable Ferula species (Ferula sinkiangensis and Ferula fukangensis) and eight substitutes or closely related species. Results showed that the sequence length of ITS2 ranged from 451 bp to 45 bp, whereas guanine and cytosine contents (GC) were from 53.6% to 56.2%. A total of 77 variation sites were detected, including 63 base mutations and 14 insertion/deletion mutations. The ITS2 sequence correctly identified 100% of the samples at the species level using the basic local alignment search tool 1 and nearest-distance method. Furthermore, neighbor-joining tree successfully identified the genuine plants F. sinkiangensis and F. fukangensis from their succedaneum and closely related species. These results indicated that ITS2 sequence could be used as a valuable barcode to distinguish Uyghur medicine Ferula from counterfeits and closely related species. This study may broaden DNA barcoding application in the Uyghur medicinal plant field.

  7. Heterogeneity of the internal transcribed spacer region in Leishmania tropica isolates from southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatee, Mohammad Amin; Sharifi, Iraj; Kuhls, Katrin; Kanannejad, Zahra; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; de Almeida, Marcos E; Hatam, Gholamreza; Mirhendi, Hossein

    2014-09-01

    Most of cutaneous leishmaniasis cases occur in only 7 countries, including Iran. Leishmania tropica is the main cause of anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Iran. In order to study the heterogeneity and phylogeny of L. tropica in southern Iran, a total of 61 isolates were obtained from Bam district and the cities Kerman and Shiraz. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) from the ribosomal DNA locus was amplified and then analysed by sequencing. Analysis of the ITS sequences showed four haplotypes in the isolates, including 3 haplotypes among the 58 isolates from the south eastern region, including Bam district and Kerman city, and 2 haplotypes among the 3 isolates from Shiraz city. The results showed a monophyletic structure for the south eastern population. In comparison to GenBank sequences of L. tropica from different countries, most of the southeast Iranian and Indian isolates are comprised in one cluster, while isolates from other countries and few other Iranian isolates group in a different cluster. Analysis of ITS sequences of south eastern L. tropica showed a homogeneous population which could be the basis for other molecular epidemiology studies using more discriminative markers and tracing possible changes in the population structure of L. tropica.

  8. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel

    2015-01-01

    at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. Conclusions The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes...... and involved in the human neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. Results To determine the gene regulatory functions of FUS and EWS at the level of chromatin, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (Ch......IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression...

  9. Sequence analysis of ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer 2 of sym-patric populations of Anopheles sinensis of different feeding preferences%嗜血习性同域分化的中华按蚊种群rDNA-ITS2序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海防; 王怀位; 程鹏; 郭秀霞; 杨培培; 公茂庆

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the existence of genetic divergence of sympatric populations of Anopheles sinensis of different feeding preferences based on the rDNA-ITS2 sequence differences. Methods A large number of wild anopheles popu-lations were trapped all night by man-baited net and calf-baited net that had been set up between high-density natural villages of An. sinensis populations and vector-breeding sites,from which two groups of An. sinensis were separated by morphological iden-tification and brought back to the lab for conventional breeding. A large closed greenhouse which temperature and humidity was appropriate was selected as research settings of mark-release-recapture methods by female mosquitoes ,in the center of which above An. sinensis populations baited by man and calf and respectively correspondingly marked by red and yellow phosphors were released in together,in each side of which An. sinensis were recaptured simultaneously by man-baited net and calf-baited net. An. sinensis populations trapped by man twice were brought back to the lab and bred with man-blood,correspondingly ones trapped by calf with calf-blood. Man-preferring and calf-preferring strains were screened respectively from An. sinensis which had been baited by man and calf by the mark-release-recapture methods after parent and F1 mosquitoes,and sequencing and aligning of both rDNA-ITS2 were conducted via PCR amplification. Results The recapture ratios of wild parental mosquitoes An. sinensis of man-preferring group by man-baited net and calf-baited net were 54.07%(339/627)and 45.93%(288/627)re-spectively,and ones of calf-preferring group by man-baited net and calf-baited net were 58.01%(409/705)and 41.99%(296/705)respectively. Two groups of parental mosquitoes trended towards selecting the original blood hosts in host-seeking prefer-ence(χ2=19.42,P<0.01). The recapture ratios of F1 mosquitoes An. sinensis of man-preferring group by man-baited net and calf-baited net were 63

  10. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The IT...

  11. A revised secondary structure model for the internal transcribed spacer 2 of the green algae Scenedesmus and Desmodesmus and its implication for the phylogen of these algae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hannen, E.J.; Fink, P.; Lürling, M.

    2002-01-01

    Secondary structure analysis of 34 internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS-2) sequences showed that the current model for the green algae Scenedesmus and Desmodesmus is not accurate. In particular, helix I of the currently used model showed considerable deviations from our new model. The newly proposed m

  12. A revised secondary structure model for the internal transcribed spacer 2 of the green algae Scenedesmus and Desmodesmus and its implication for the phylogeny of these algae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannen, van E.J.; Fink, P.; Lürling, M.

    2002-01-01

    Secondary structure analysis of 34 internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS-2) sequences showed that the current model for the green algae Scenedesmus and Desmodesmus is not accurate. In particular, helix I of the currently used model showed considerable deviations from our new model. The newly proposed m

  13. DSAP: deep-sequencing small RNA analysis pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Jung; Liu, Yi-Chung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Lin, Wei-Chen; Gan, Richie Ruei-Chi; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Tang, Petrus

    2010-07-01

    DSAP is an automated multiple-task web service designed to provide a total solution to analyzing deep-sequencing small RNA datasets generated by next-generation sequencing technology. DSAP uses a tab-delimited file as an input format, which holds the unique sequence reads (tags) and their corresponding number of copies generated by the Solexa sequencing platform. The input data will go through four analysis steps in DSAP: (i) cleanup: removal of adaptors and poly-A/T/C/G/N nucleotides; (ii) clustering: grouping of cleaned sequence tags into unique sequence clusters; (iii) non-coding RNA (ncRNA) matching: sequence homology mapping against a transcribed sequence library from the ncRNA database Rfam (http://rfam.sanger.ac.uk/); and (iv) known miRNA matching: detection of known miRNAs in miRBase (http://www.mirbase.org/) based on sequence homology. The expression levels corresponding to matched ncRNAs and miRNAs are summarized in multi-color clickable bar charts linked to external databases. DSAP is also capable of displaying miRNA expression levels from different jobs using a log(2)-scaled color matrix. Furthermore, a cross-species comparative function is also provided to show the distribution of identified miRNAs in different species as deposited in miRBase. DSAP is available at http://dsap.cgu.edu.tw.

  14. Genetic differences in internal transcribed spacer 1 between Dermanyssus gallinae from wild birds and domestic chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännström, S; Morrison, D A; Mattsson, J G; Chirico, J

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the presence of the poultry red mite or the chicken mite, Dermanyssus gallinae De Geer, Acari: Dermanyssidae, in wild bird populations in four different geographical regions of Sweden. The mites identified as D. gallinae were compared genetically with D. gallinae from egg-producing poultry farms in the same regions. The small subunit (SSU) gene, the 5.8S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and the two internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of the rRNA genes were used in the genetic analysis. All D. gallinae mites had identical SSU rRNA, 5.8S rRNA and ITS2 sequences independent of their origin. By contrast, we identified significant differences in the ITS1 sequences. Based on the differences in the ITS1 sequences, the mites could be divided into two genotypes, of wild and domesticated origin, with no variation within the groups. These results imply that wild bird populations are of low importance, if any, as natural reservoirs of D. gallinae in these four geographical regions of Sweden.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of Pectinidae (Bivalvia) based on the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region is a useful genomic region for understanding evolutionary and genetic relationships. In the current study, the molecular phylogenetic analysis of Pectinidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia) was performed using the nucleotide sequences of the nuclear ITS region in nine species of this family. The sequences were obtained from the scallop species Argopecten irradians, Mizuhopecten yessoensis, Amusium pleuronectes and Mimachlamys nobilis, and compared with the published sequences of Aequipecten opercularis, Chlamys farreri, C. distorta, M. varia, Pecten maximus, and an outgroup species Perna viridis. The molecular phylogenetic tree was constructed by the neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony methods. Phylogenetic analysis based on ITS1, ITS2, or their combination always yielded trees of similar topology. The results support the morphological classifications of bivalve and are nearly consistent with classification of two subfamilies (Chlamydinae and Pectininae) formulated by Waller. However, A. irradians, together with A. opercularis made up of genera Amusium, evidences that they may belong to the subfamily Pectinidae. The data are incompatible with the conclusion of Waller who placed them in Chlamydinae by morphological characteristics. These results provide new insights into the evolutionary relationships among scallop species and contribute to the improvement of existing classification systems.

  16. Identification of astigmatid mites using the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) region and its application for phylogenetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noge, Koji; Mori, Naoki; Tanaka, Chihiro; Nishida, Ritsuo; Tsuda, Mitsuya; Kuwahara, Yasumasa

    2005-01-01

    The second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA from 73 specimens of Astigmata was analyzed by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. The length of the ITS2 region varied from 282 to 592 bp. The interspecific variation based on consensus sequences was more than 4.1%, while the intraspecific or intra-individual variation was from 0 to 5.7%. The variation between geographically separated populations (0-3.2%) was almost the same as the variation within strains. The sequences of the ITS2 region of Astigmata were concluded to be species-specific. The phylogenetic tree inferred from the ITS2 region supported Zachvatkin's morphological classification in the subfamily Rhizoglyphinae. The species-specific ITS2 sequence is useful for the species identification of astigmatid mites and for studying low-level phylogenetic relationships.

  17. Syntenic homology of human unique DNA sequences within chromossome regions 5q31, 10q22, 13q32-33 and 19q13.1 in the great apes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallente-Samonte Rhea U.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Homologies between chromosome banding patterns and DNA sequences in the great apes and humans suggest an apparent common origin for these two lineages. The availability of DNA probes for specific regions of human chromosomes (5q31, 10q22, 13q32-33 and 19q13.1 led us to cross-hybridize these to chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes, PTR, gorilla (Gorilla gorilla, GGO and orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus, PPY chromosomes in a search for equivalent regions in the great apes. Positive hybridization signals to the chromosome 5q31-specific DNA probe were observed at HSA 5q31, PTR 4q31, GGO 4q31 and PPY 4q31, while fluorescent signals using the chromosome 10q22-specific DNA probe were noted at HSA 10q22, PTR 8q22, GGO 8q22 and PPY 7q22. The chromosome arms showing hybridization signals to the Quint-EssentialTM 13-specific DNA probe were identified as HSA 13q32-33, PTR 14q32-33, GGO 14q32-33 and PPY 14q32-33, while those presenting hybridization signals to the chromosome 19q13.1-specific DNA probe were identified as HSA 19q13.1, PTR 20q13, GGO 20q13 and PPY 20q13. All four probes presumably hybridized to homologous chromosomal locations in the apes, which suggests a homology of certain unique DNA sequences among hominoid species.

  18. Concurrent cognitive processing and letter sequence transcription deficits in stutterers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, W G

    1990-03-01

    Previous research has indicated that men who stutter transcribe rapidly presented sequences of letters more slowly and less accurately than nonstutterer controls. Experiment 1 demonstrated that the transcription deficit is not limited to task conditions that demand concurrent monitoring and responding. This was evidenced by comparable deficits on a successive response condition that required subjects to write letters after the presentation was complete. The results of Experiment 2 indicated that the deficit is not due to a difficulty by stutterers in parsing streams of stimulus information internally. Their performance did not differentially improve when letters were grouped with brief pauses, nor with experience in transcribing preparsed letter sequences. This experiment also demonstrated that the phenomenon is generalizable to women. In related testing, stutterers were slower than controls in writing internally generated sequences of letters, those of the alphabet forwards and backwards, but not in writing the same two letters, A and B, repetitively nor in the cognitively more demanding task of writing numbers backwards by three's. These results parallel those obtained with finger tapping of same versus unique sequences by stutterers and were interpreted as being consistent with the idea that while stutterers are not generally slower motorically than nonstutterers, they experience difficulty when required to organize and carry out tasks with new multiple response transitions. The two experiments have replicated and extended, under different conditions, the earlier findings of a letter sequence transcription deficit in stutterers, but the nature of the interference still remains to be clarified.

  19. The 2.6 Ma depositional sequence from the Challenger cold-water coral carbonate mound (IODP Exp. 307): a unique palaeo-record of Plio-Pleistocene NE Atlantic climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierens, M. M.; Pirlet, H.; Titschack, J.; Colin, C. C.; Dorschel, B.; Huvenne, V. A.; Wheeler, A. J.; Stuut, J. W.; Latruwe, K.; Vanhaecke, F. F.; O Donnell, R. D.; Henriet, J.

    2009-12-01

    -Pleistocene climate transition. The density of the cold-water coral cover at the site of deposition plays an essential role in sediment deposition and preservation on Challenger Mound. Moreover, the sediment stabilising capacities of a dense coral cover facilitated sediment accumulation on Challenger Mound in the general erosive/non-depositional Pliocene environment present along the NE Atlantic continental margin. A unique, higher resolution record is hence preserved in the lower mound sequence. Overall, the potential of cold-water coral carbonate mounds as intermediate water depth, continental margin, Plio-Pleistocene palaeo-archives is showcased. [1] Foubert & Henriet (2009); [2] Kano et al. (2007)

  20. Suitability of internal transcribed spacers (ITS) as markers for the population genetic structure of Blastocystis spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Guiehdani; Orozco-Mosqueda, Guadalupe Erendira; Lopez-Perez, Merle; Lopez-Escamilla, Eduardo; Córdoba-Aguilar, Alex; Rangel-Gamboa, Lucia; Olivo-Diaz, Angelica; Romero-Valdovinos, Mirza; Maravilla, Pablo; Martinez-Hernandez, Fernando

    2014-10-03

    The purpose of this study was to assess the genetic variation and differentiation of Blastocystis subtypes (STs) recovered from symptomatic children by analysing partial sequences of the small subunit rDNA gene region (SSUrDNA) and internal transcribed spacers (1 and 2) plus the 5.8S region (ITS, ITS1 + 5.8S + ITS2) and comparing with isolates from other countries. Faecal samples from 47 Blastocystis-infected children with gastrointestinal symptoms and negative for pathogenic enterobacteria were analysed. PCR was performed on DNA from all the samples to identify Blastocystis STs, amplifying a fragment of SSUrDNA and the ITS region. The amplicons were purified and sequenced, and consensus sequences were submitted to GenBank; afterwards, SSUrDNA sequences were analysed for genetic diversity according to geographic area. Regarding the Blastocystis STs found, 51% were ST1, 23% ST2, 19% ST3 and 2% ST7. For ITS, a haplotype network tree and Bayesian inference revealed the presence of two novel variants of ST1, clustering some sequences into ST1A and ST1B. The values of nucleotide diversity (π) and haplotype polymorphism (θ) for ST1, ST2 and ST3 ranged from 0 to 1, whereas the ratio of genetic differentiation (FST)/migration index (Nm) showed the highest differentiation between Libya and Thailand-Philippines for ST2 (0.282/0.63). In contrast, a high flow gene was observed between Czech Republic-Denmark-Holland-Spain and USA-Mexico-Colombia for ST1 (0.003/84). Our data on genetic differentiation and gene flow might explain the differences for the prevalence of Blastocystis STs. Moreover, the ITS region could be used as a genetic marker to assess genetic variation in this parasite.

  1. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, Bruce D.; Steck, Gary J.; Norrbom, Allen L.; Rodriguez, Erick J.; Srivastava,Pratibha; Alvarado, Norma Nolazco; Colque, Fredy; Landa, Erick Yábar; Sánchez,Juan José Lagrava; Quisberth, Elizabeth; Peñaranda, Emilio Arévalo; Clavijo, P. A. Rodriguez; Alvarez-Baca,Jeniffer K.; Zapata,Tito Guevara; Ponce, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The ITS1 regions of additional specimens (17 collections) from Central America (México, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Panamá), Brazil, Caribbean Colombia, and coastal Venezuela were sequenced and t...

  2. Telomerase efficiently elongates highly transcribing telomeres in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin O Farnung

    Full Text Available RNA polymerase II transcribes the physical ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes into a variety of long non-coding RNA molecules including telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA. Since TERRA discovery, advances have been made in the characterization of TERRA biogenesis and regulation; on the contrary its associated functions remain elusive. Most of the biological roles so far proposed for TERRA are indeed based on in vitro experiments carried out using short TERRA-like RNA oligonucleotides. In particular, it has been suggested that TERRA inhibits telomerase activity. We have exploited two alternative cellular systems to test whether TERRA and/or telomere transcription influence telomerase-mediated telomere elongation in human cancer cells. In cells lacking the two DNA methyltransferases DNMT1 and DNMT3b, TERRA transcription and steady-state levels are greatly increased while telomerase is able to elongate telomeres normally. Similarly, telomerase can efficiently elongate transgenic inducible telomeres whose transcription has been experimentally augmented. Our data challenge the current hypothesis that TERRA functions as a general inhibitor of telomerase and suggest that telomere length homeostasis is maintained independently of TERRA and telomere transcription.

  3. The internal transcribed spacer rDNA specific markers for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-13

    Sep 13, 2010 ... ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) to distinguish Zanthoxylum piperitum from Zanthoxylum sichinifolium. The ..... rRNA gene sequences were obtained (Figure 4). Length ..... signle-strand conformational polymorphism for recognition of.

  4. Transparency in Transcribing: Making Visible Theoretical Bases Impacting Knowledge Construction from Open-Ended Interview Records

    OpenAIRE

    Skukauskaite, Audra

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a reflexive analysis of two transcripts of an open-ended interview and argues for transparency in transcribing processes and outcomes. By analyzing ways in which a researcher's theories become consequential in producing and using transcripts of an open-ended interview, this paper makes visible the importance of examining and presenting theoretical bases of transcribing decisions. While scholars across disciplines have argued that transcribing is a theoretically laden pro...

  5. ANALISIS KEANEKARAGAMAN KULTIVAR PISANG MENGGUNAKAN PENANDA PCR-RFLP PADA INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACER (ITS DNA RIBOSOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.W.D. Ekasari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Pisang merupakan bahan makanan pokok keempat terpenting di negara berkembang yang memiliki keanekaragaman sangat tinggi. Penanda DNA mikrosatelit dapat membedakan kultivar pisang yang memiliki genom A dengan kultivar pisang bergenom B. Namun penanda mikrosatelit memiliki beberapa keterbatasan, yaitu membutuhkan primer spesifik dan membutuhkan preparasi yang lebih rumit, sehingga membutuhkan waktu dan biaya yang cukup mahal. Polymerase Chain Reaction Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP terhadap DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS ribosom mampu mengklasifikasikan kultivar-kultivar pisang berdasarkan pita restriksi daerah ITS yang dipotong dengan enzim RsaI. Koleksi DNA dari 15 kultivar pisang di Laboratorium Genetika dan Molekular Jurusan Biologi UNNES sudah diklasifikasikan genomnya berdasarkan mikrosatelit. DNA kultivar pisang diamplifikasi menggunakan primer ITS L dan ITS 4 menghasilkan fragmen ITS sebesar 700 pb. Pemotongan fragmen ITS DNA ribosom dengan enzim RsaI menghasilkan fragmen  530 pb yang spesifik untuk genom A, fragmen 350 pb dan 180 pb spesifik untuk genom B. Hasil perbandingan klasifikasi genomik berdasarkan mikrosatelit dan PCR-RFLP dari daerah ITS DNA ribosom menunjukkan bahwa klasifikasi genomnya serupa. Banana is the fourth most important staple foods in developing countries which has very high diversity. Microsatellite markers can be able to differentiate bananas cultivars which have A and B genomes, but this marker has restrictions. It requires a specific primer which is takes time and the costs expensive enough. Polymerase Chain Reaction Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS was able to classify banana cultivars based on the restriction band ITS regions cut by RsaI enzyme. The DNA collection from 15 banana cultivars from the Laboratory of Genetics and Molecular Biology Department of Biological Science UNNES have been classified its

  6. Genetic structure of wild emmer wheat populations as reflected by transcribed versus anonymous SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Zvi; Fahima, Tzion; Abbo, Shahal; Krugman, Tamar; Saranga, Yehoshua

    2008-03-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers have become a major tool in population genetic analyses. The anonymous genomic SSRs (gSSRs) have been recently supplemented with expressed sequence tag (EST) derived SSRs (eSSRs), which represent the transcribed regions of the genome. In the present study, we used 8 populations of wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum subsp. dicoccoides) to compare the usefulness of the two types of SSR markers in assessing allelic diversity and population structure. gSSRs revealed significantly higher diversity than eSSRs in terms of average number of alleles (14.92 vs. 7.4, respectively), polymorphic information content (0.87 vs. 0.68, respectively), and gene diversity (He; 0.55 vs. 0.38, respectively). Despite the overall differences in the level of diversity, Mantel tests for correlations between eSSR and gSSR pairwise genetic distances were found to be significant for each population as well as for all accessions jointly (RM=0.54, p=0.01). Various genetic structure analyses (AMOVA, PCoA, STRUCTURE, unrooted UPGMA tree) revealed a better capacity of eSSRs to distinguish between populations, while gSSRs showed a higher proportion of intrapopulation (among accessions) diversity. We conclude that eSSR and gSSR markers should be employed in conjunction to obtain a high inter- and intra-specific (or inter- and intra-varietal) distinctness.

  7. Internal transcribed spacer guided multiplex PCR for species identification of Convolvulus prostratus and Evolvulus alsinoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Shankhpushpi is a reputed drug from an Indian system of medicine for treating mental disorders and enhancing memory. Two herbs, namely Convolvulus prostratus Forssk. and Evolvulus alsinoides (L. L., are commonly known as Shankhpushpi. Ambiguous vernacular identity can affect the scientific validity of the Shankpushpi-based herbal drug therapy. In the present investigation, a novel and sensitive multiplex PCR method based on polymorphism in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region was developed to establish the molecular identity of C. prostratus and E. alsinoides. DNA was isolated and the ITS region was amplified, sequenced and assembled. Sequences were aligned to identify variable nucleotides in order to develop plant-specific primers. Primers were validated in singleplex reactions and eventually a multiplex assay was developed. This assay was tested for sensitivity and validated by amplifying DNA isolated from the simulated blended powdered plant material. Primers developed for C. prostratus resulted into a 200 bp amplicon and 596 bp for E. alsinoides. The assay was found to be sensitive enough for amplification of low quantities of DNA. The method can detect 10% of the mixing of plants with each other in blended material. This PCR assay can be used for rapid botanical identification of Shankhpushpi plant materials and will improve evidence-based herbal drug therapy.

  8. Energy efficiency trade-offs drive nucleotide usage in transcribed regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Hua; Lu, Guanting; Bork, Peer; Hu, Songnian; Lercher, Martin J

    2016-04-21

    Efficient nutrient usage is a trait under universal selection. A substantial part of cellular resources is spent on making nucleotides. We thus expect preferential use of cheaper nucleotides especially in transcribed sequences, which are often amplified thousand-fold compared with genomic sequences. To test this hypothesis, we derive a mutation-selection-drift equilibrium model for nucleotide skews (strand-specific usage of 'A' versus 'T' and 'G' versus 'C'), which explains nucleotide skews across 1,550 prokaryotic genomes as a consequence of selection on efficient resource usage. Transcription-related selection generally favours the cheaper nucleotides 'U' and 'C' at synonymous sites. However, the information encoded in mRNA is further amplified through translation. Due to unexpected trade-offs in the codon table, cheaper nucleotides encode on average energetically more expensive amino acids. These trade-offs apply to both strand-specific nucleotide usage and GC content, causing a universal bias towards the more expensive nucleotides 'A' and 'G' at non-synonymous coding sites.

  9. rDNA internal transcribed spacer sequence analysis of Lycoris Hert.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-10

    Apr 10, 2012 ... likelihood of hybrid origin of Lycoris species was supported and ITS could be used as a good molecular marker to ... development of leaves of Lycoris does not coincide with ... ITS regions, ITS1 and ITS2, generally evolve more .... widely applied to the fields of intraspecific variation and .... Phenotypic and.

  10. Ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer 1 and internal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-26

    Jul 26, 2010 ... regions for each ecotype and conducted the sequence length, G+C content (%) ..... results (BEMR, GCSL and GRDG) were selected and compared with the ... 2C DNA content to evaluate the phylogenetic relation- ships between 25 ..... This work was supported by Nutraceutical Bio Brain. Korea 21 Project ...

  11. Chicken LRH-1 gene is transcribed from multiple promoters in steroidogenic organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Toshiyuki; Sutou, Shizuyo

    2006-02-15

    Liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) is a homolog of FTZ-F1, a transcription factor of the fruit fly, and belongs to the orphan nuclear receptor family. LRH-1 is expressed in organs derived from the endoderm, including intestine, liver and exocrine pancreas and plays a predominant role in development, bile-acid homeostasis, and reverse cholesterol transport. Recent research has revealed that mammalian LRH-1 is also expressed in the steroidogenic organs and has suggested that LRH-1 shares a role in steroidogenesis with steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1), which is a paralog of LRH-1. In this study, we determined transcription initiation sites of chicken LRH-1 and showed that LRH-1 is expressed as several splicing variants in chicken steroidogenic organs. From three steroidogenic organs, the adrenal glands, ovaries, and testes, several cDNA fragments including different lengths and sequences were amplified by 5'-RACE and these were mainly classified into five types. Using these sequences, chicken genomic database was searched and four types of first exons were identified in chromosome 8. However, the database sequence of these regions included several gaps. So we cloned gap regions by PCR cloning from chicken genomic DNA and found the other type of first exons in the gaps. Moreover, RT-PCR showed the expression of LRH-1 in chicken steroidogenic organs as many splicing variants. We concluded that the chicken LRH-1 gene is transcribed from at least five different transcription initiation sites and alternative splicing produces several types of mRNA in steroidogenic organs.

  12. The Effect of Transcribing on Elementary Iranian EFL Learners’ Listening Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Afsharrad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is motivated by the gap existing between theory and practice in teaching listening. Most of the techniques used to teach listening put more emphasis on top-down processing while listeners’ problems are more of perceptive ones (bottom-up. In order to address the pervasive decoding problem in listening, this study suggests using transcribing exercise as an input enhancement device and investigates its effect on beginning learners’ listening ability. To this end, 31 learners participated in the study. The control group did not have any transcribing practice while the experimental group received transcribing exercise. In the data analysis step, an independent samples t test was employed to compare the two groups. The results show that transcribing has a significant positive effect on beginning learners’ listening comprehension. The findings of the study as well as advantages of transcribing exercise are discussed. Implications of the study and scope for future research are also addressed.

  13. Molecular Phylogenetic Screening of Withania somnifera Relative From Indonesia Based on Internal Transcribed Spacer Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topik Hidayat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera (family Solanaceae, known commonly as Ashwaganda, is one of the important medicinal plants, and recent studies reported that Withanone, one of the chemical components in this plant, has ability to kill cancer cell. Because of endemic state of this plant to South Asia, exploring plant species under the same family which grow well in Indonesia has been of interest. The purpose of this study was to screen the Indonesian plant which has strong phylogenetic relationship with Ashwaganda. Thus, phylogenetic analysis using DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer (ITS region was conducted. Thus, 19 species of Solanaceae and two species of Convolvulaceae as outgroup were examined. Five ITS regions of Ashwaganda retrieved from GenBank were included in the phylogenetic analysis. Parsimony analysis showed that Indonesia Solanaceae comprises seven groups which is consistent with the global Solanaceae relationship as previously reported. Furthermore, our study revealed that two species, Physalis angulata and Physalis peruviana, are relative to W. somnifera. Morphologically, they share characters of flower and fruit. This result indicated that these two species are potential to have similar chemical properties as Ashwaganda, thus we can have new variants of Withanone originated from Indonesia with similar effect.

  14. Structural and Functional Characterization of Noncoding Repetitive RNAs Transcribed in Stressed Human CellsD⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Chiodi, Ilaria; Giordano, Manuela; Cobianchi, Fabio; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    Thermal and chemical stresses induce the formation in human cells of novel and transient nuclear structures called nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). These contain heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) and a specific subset of pre-mRNA processing factors. Nuclear stress bodies are assembled on specific pericentromeric heterochromatic domains containing satellite III (SatIII) DNA. In response to stress, these domains change their epigenetic status from heterochromatin to euchromatin and are transcribed in poly-adenylated RNAs that remain associated with nSBs. In this article, we describe the cloning, sequencing, and functional characterization of these transcripts. They are composed of SatIII repeats and originate from the transcription of multiple sites within the SatIII arrays. Interestingly, the level of SatIII RNAs can be down-regulated both by antisense oligonucleotides and small interfering RNAs (siRNA). Knockdown of SatIII RNA by siRNAs requires the activity of Argonaute 2, a component of the RNA-induced silencing complex. Down-regulation of satellite III RNAs significantly affects the recruitment of RNA processing factors to nSBs without altering the association of HSF-1 with these structures nor the presence of acetylated histones within nSBs. Thus, satellite III RNAs have a major role in the formation of nSBs. PMID:15788562

  15. High-resolution profiling of novel transcribed regions during rat spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmel, Frédéric; Lardenois, Aurélie; Evrard, Bertrand; Rolland, Antoine D; Sallou, Olivier; Dumargne, Marie-Charlotte; Coiffec, Isabelle; Collin, Olivier; Primig, Michael; Jégou, Bernard

    2014-07-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a complex and highly orchestrated combination of processes in which male germline proliferation and differentiation result in the production of mature spermatozoa. If recent genome-wide studies have contributed to the in-depth analysis of the male germline protein-encoding transcriptome, little effort has yet been devoted to the systematic identification of novel unannotated transcribed regions expressed during mammalian spermatogenesis. We report high-resolution expression profiling of male germ cells in rat, using next-generation sequencing technology and highly enriched testicular cell populations. Among 20 424 high-confidence transcripts reconstructed, we defined a stringent set of 1419 long multi-exonic unannotated transcripts expressed in the testis (testis-expressed unannotated transcripts [TUTs]). TUTs were divided into 7 groups with different expression patterns. Most TUTs share many of the characteristics of vertebrate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). We also markedly reinforced the finding that TUTs and known lncRNAs accumulate during the meiotic and postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis in mammals and that X-linked meiotic TUTs do not escape the silencing effects of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Importantly, we discovered that TUTs and known lncRNAs with a peak expression during meiosis define a distinct class of noncoding transcripts that exhibit exons twice as long as those of other transcripts. Our study provides new insights in transcriptional profiling of the male germline and represents a high-quality resource for novel loci expressed during spermatogenesis that significantly contributes to rat genome annotation.

  16. MOLECULAR PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF MONASCUS FUNGI BASED ON INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACER REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. KIKUCHI

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A molecular analysis of internal transcribed spacer region has been carried out to reveal the relationship among 16 strains of Monascus spp. A primer set comprised primer ITS1 and ITS4 was used to amplify this region in which they were cloned and scqucnccd. We also compared the sequence result with M. purpureus AF458473, M.ruber AF458470, M. kaoliang AF451859, M. araneous AF458471 and M. pilosus AF451856 and one outgroup species Thermoascus crustaceus U18353. The result showed that 16 Monascus spp. were divided into two large clades while M. ruber AF458470 was basically separated from all those Monascus. One of the two large clades included the seven M. purpureus strains, M. purpureus AF458473, M. araneosus AF458471 and M. kaoliang AF451859. Another large cladc included the six Monascus sp. strains which typically have whitish colonies, the three M. ruber strains and M.pilosus AF451856. However, even outstanding morphological differences possessed by several white Monascus and one whitish M. purpureus strain, all Monascus strains were suggested to be very closely related with similarity >99% almost 100%. Although this ITS analysis could not discriminate cultural and morphological differentiation of Monascus strains studied, yet there is still little genetic va riation within these strains.

  17. Intragenomic variation in the second internal transcribed spacer of the ribosomal DNA of species of the genera Culex and Lutzia (Diptera: Culicidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiana Tavares Vesgueiro; Bruna Demari-Silva; Rosely dos Santos Malafronte; Maria Anice Mureb Sallum; Mauro Toledo Marrelli

    2011-01-01

    Culex is the largest genus of Culicini and includes vectors of several arboviruses and filarial worms. Many species of Culex are morphologically similar, which makes their identification difficult, particularly when using female specimens. To aid evolutionary studies and species distinction, molecular techniques are often used. Sequences of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) from 16 species of the genus Culex and one of Lutzia were used to assess their genom...

  18. Transparency in Transcribing: Making Visible Theoretical Bases Impacting Knowledge Construction from Open-Ended Interview Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audra Skukauskaite

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a reflexive analysis of two transcripts of an open-ended interview and argues for transparency in transcribing processes and outcomes. By analyzing ways in which a researcher's theories become consequential in producing and using transcripts of an open-ended interview, this paper makes visible the importance of examining and presenting theoretical bases of transcribing decisions. While scholars across disciplines have argued that transcribing is a theoretically laden process (GREEN, FRANQUIZ & DIXON, 1997; KVALE & BRINKMAN, 2009, few have engaged in reflexive analyses of the data history to demonstrate the consequences particular theoretical and methodological approaches pose in producing knowledge claims and inciting dialogues across traditions. The article demonstrates how theory-method-claim relationships in transcribing influence research transparency and warrantability. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1201146

  19. Kekerabatan Genetik Caplak Rhiphicephalus (Boophilus microplus Asal IndonesiaBerdasarkan Sekuen Internal Transcribed Spacer-2 (GENETIC RELATIONSHIP INDONESIAN RHIPHICEPHALUS (BOOPHILUS MICROPLUS TICK BASED ON INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACER-2 SEQUENSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sahara

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Rhiphicephalus (Boophilus microplus is important obligatory blood feeding ectoparasites transmittingmany different viral, bacterial and protozoan and plays a role as a vector of Babesia sp., The leria sp. andAnaplasma sp. in cattle. The accuracy in identifying and distinguishing interspecies and intraspeciesdiversity among parasites is needed to understand the epidemiology, biology and capacity as a vector.Variations in the DNA base sequence of the internal transcribed spacer region2 (ITS 2 has been used asa molecular marker for identification in an effort to determine phylogenetic relationships. The aim of thisstudy was to determine the ITS 2 gene nucleotide sequence of R. microplus, which was expected to beuseful for accurate identification the parasite diversity and phylogenetic relationship among many differentspecies. DNA amplification was conducted using BOO2 forward dan BOO2 reverse primers. The DNAsamples containing ITS2 region fragment of 1099 nt were derived from the nucleotide sequence multiplealignments of R.microplus and other ticks genes obtained from Gene bank using Clustal W software, andthen analyzed using the MEGA program version 6. Genetic distances based on nucleotide sequence weredetermined with Kimura 2-parameter method producing the smallest genetic distance of 0 % and 1.2 %.Construction of phylogenetic trees using the Neighbor joining method showed that ticks from variousregions in Indonesia was species complex which have a closer with R.microplus isolates from India, Laos,South Africa, China and Australia R.australis origin.

  20. Uniqueness and Non-uniqueness in the Einstein Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, H P; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; York, James W.

    2005-01-01

    We examine numerically a sequence of free data for the conformal thin sandwich (CTS) equations representing non-linearly perturbed Minkowski spacetimes. We find only one solution for the standard (four) CTS equations; however, we find {\\em two} distinct solutions for the same free data when the lapse is determined by a fifth elliptic equation arising from specification of the time derivative of the mean curvature. For a given {\\em physical} (conformally scaled) amplitude of the perturbation, the solution for the physical data $g_{ij}, K_{ij}$ nevertheless appears to be unique.

  1. Unique Path Partitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bessenrodt, Christine; Olsson, Jørn Børling; Sellers, James A.

    2013-01-01

    We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions.......We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions....

  2. The Voice Transcription Technique: Use of Voice Recognition Software to Transcribe Digital Interview Data in Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Jennifer L.

    2007-01-01

    Transcribing interview data is a time-consuming task that most qualitative researchers dislike. Transcribing is even more difficult for people with physical limitations because traditional transcribing requires manual dexterity and the ability to sit at a computer for long stretches of time. Researchers have begun to explore using an automated…

  3. Molecular analysis of fungal populations in patients with oral candidiasis using internal transcribed spacer region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieda, Shinsuke; Moriyama, Masafumi; Takeshita, Toru; Takashita, Toru; Maehara, Takashi; Imabayashi, Yumi; Shinozaki, Shoichi; Tanaka, Akihiko; Hayashida, Jun-Nosuke; Furukawa, Sachiko; Ohta, Miho; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is closely associated with changes in the oral fungal flora and is caused primarily by Candida albicans. Conventional methods of fungal culture are time-consuming and not always conclusive. However, molecular genetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of fungal rRNA is rapid, reproducible and simple to perform. In this study we examined the fungal flora in patients with oral candidiasis and investigated changes in the flora after antifungal treatment using length heterogeneity-polymerization chain reaction (LH-PCR) analysis of ITS regions. Fifty-two patients with pseudomembranous oral candidiasis (POC) and 30 healthy controls were included in the study. Fungal DNA from oral rinse was examined for fungal species diversity by LH-PCR. Fungal populations were quantified by real-time PCR and previously-unidentified signals were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. Relationships between the oral fungal flora and treatment-resistant factors were also examined. POC patients showed significantly more fungal species and a greater density of fungi than control individuals. Sixteen fungi were newly identified. The fungal populations from both groups were composed predominantly of C. albicans, though the ratio of C. dubliniensis was significantly higher in POC patients than in controls. The diversity and density of fungi were significantly reduced after treatment. Furthermore, fungal diversity and the proportion of C. dubliniensis were positively correlated with treatment duration. These results suggest that C. dubliniensis and high fungal flora diversity might be involved in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. We therefore conclude that LH-PCR is a useful technique for diagnosing and assessing the severity of oral candidal infection.

  4. Conservation in the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) region of Hematodinium perezi (genotype III) from Callinectes sapidus .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagenkopp Lohan, Katrina M; Small, Hamish J; Shields, Jeffrey D; Place, Allen R; Reece, Kimberly S

    2013-03-13

    Hematodinium spp. infections have been reported from blue crabs Callinectes sapidus in high-salinity waters of the USA from New Jersey to Texas. Recently, H. perezi (genotype III) has been proposed as the parasite species and genotype infecting blue crabs from Virginia; however, it is unknown whether this same genotype is present in blue crabs from other locations. To address this question, we collected 317 blue crabs from Massachusetts, Virginia, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, and Texas to test for the presence of H. perezi (III) using a specific PCR assay targeting the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) region of the ribosomal RNA gene complex. To examine the genetic variation within H. perezi (III), ITS1 region sequences from the parasite in blue crabs from multiple locations were compared to each other and to those of H. perezi (III) found in alternate hosts from Virginia. In total, 34 distinct ITS1 sequence variants of the parasite were identified from blue crabs alone, and 38 distinct variants were identified when alternate hosts were included. However, a single ITS1 sequence variant appeared in all geographic regions and hosts, and also in blue crabs sampled from a previous study. The high similarity among all the ITS1 region sequences examined (>98%) and the observation of a single variant found throughout a large geographic range, strongly suggests that a single species and genotype of Hematodinium, specifically H. perezi (III), infects blue crabs from Virginia to Texas and multiple alternate host species in Virginia.

  5. Identification of forensically important Chrysomya (Diptera: Calliphoridae) species using the second ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Leigh A; Wallman, James F; Dowton, Mark

    2008-05-20

    The identification of forensically important blowflies of the genus Chrysomya (Diptera: Calliphoridae) may be hampered by their close morphological similarities, especially as immatures. In contrast to most previous studies, the utility of a nuclear rather than mitochondrial genetic marker was investigated to solve this problem. The second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was amplified and sequenced from all nine Chrysomya species known from Australia. Difficulties encountered with direct sequencing of ITS2 for Chrysomya flavifrons necessitated cloning prior to sequencing for this species, which revealed a low level (0-0.23%) of intraindividual variation. Five restriction enzymes (DraI, BsaXI, BciVI, AseI and HinfI) were identified that were able to differentiate most members of the genus by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The PCR-RFLP analysis revealed characteristic restriction profiles for all species except the closely related species pairs Chrysomya latifrons+Chrysomya semimetallica and Chrysomya incisuralis+Chrysomya rufifacies. Ch. incisuralis and Ch. rufifacies were able to be separated using the size differences resulting from amplification of the entire ITS region. The lack of intraspecific ITS2 sequence variation among eight Ch. incisuralis specimens was verified by the identical restriction profiles generated from these specimens. A DNA-based approach, such as PCR-RFLP, has the capacity to be useful for the identification of forensic entomological evidence in cases where morphological characters are unreliable.

  6. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Bruce D.; Steck, Gary J.; Norrbom, Allen L.; Rodriguez, Erick J.; Srivastava, Pratibha; Alvarado, Norma Nolazco; Colque, Fredy; Landa, Erick Yábar; Sánchez, Juan José Lagrava; Quisberth, Elizabeth; Peñaranda, Emilio Arévalo; Clavijo, P. A. Rodriguez; Alvarez-Baca, Jeniffer K.; Zapata, Tito Guevara; Ponce, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The ITS1 regions of additional specimens (17 collections) from Central America (México, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Panamá), Brazil, Caribbean Colombia, and coastal Venezuela were sequenced and together with published sequences (Paraguay) provided context for interpretation. A total of six ITS1 sequence variants were recognized in the Andean region comprising four groups. Type I predominates in the southernmost range of Anastrepha fraterculus. Type II predominates in its northernmost range. In the central and northern Andes, the geographic distributions overlap and interdigitate with a strong elevational effect. A discussion of relationships between observed ITS1 types and morphometric types is included. PMID:26798259

  7. Identification of maca (Lepidium meyenii Walp.) and its adulterants by a DNA-barcoding approach based on the ITS sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Jin; Zhao, Qing-Sheng; Liu, Yi-Lan; Zha, Sheng-Hua; Zhao, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Maca (Lepidium meyenii) is an herbaceous plant that grows in high plateaus and has been used as both food and folk medicine for centuries because of its benefits to human health. In the present study, ITS (internal transcribed spacer) sequences of forty-three maca samples, collected from different regions or vendors, were amplified and analyzed. The ITS sequences of nineteen potential adulterants of maca were also collected and analyzed. The results indicated that the ITS sequence of maca was consistent in all samples and unique when compared with its adulterants. Therefore, this DNA-barcoding approach based on the ITS sequence can be used for the molecular identification of maca and its adulterants.

  8. Two maize END-1 orthologs, BETL9 and BETL9like, are transcribed in a non-overlapping spatial pattern on the outer surface of the developing endosperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín eRoyo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the course of a project aimed to isolate transfer cells-specific genes in maize endosperm we have identified the BETL9 gene. BETL9 encodes for a small protein very similar in sequence to the product of the barley transfer cell-specific gene end-1. Both BETL9 and END-1 proteins are lipid transfer proteins, but their function is currently unknown. In situ hybridization analysis confirms that the BETL9 gene is exclusively transcribed in the basal endosperm transfer cell layer during seed development since 10 days after pollination. However, immunolocalization data indicates that the BETL9 protein accumulates in the maternal placento-chalaza cells located just beside the transfer cell layer. This suggests that the BETL9 protein should be transported to the maternal side to exert its, still unknown, function. In addition, we have identified a second maize gene very similar in sequence to BETL9 and we have named it BETL9like. In situ hybridization shows that BETL9like is also specifically transcribed in the developing maize endosperm within the same time frame that BETL9, but in this case it is exclusively expressed in the aleurone cell layer. Consequently, the BETL9 and BETL9like genes are transcribed in a non-overlapping pattern on the outer surface of the maize endosperm. The BETL9 and BETL9like promoter sequences, fused to the GUS reporter gen, accurately reflected the expression pattern observed for the genes in maize. Finally, we have identified in the Arabidopsis genome a set of four genes orthologous to BETL9 and BETL9like and analysed the activity of their promoters in Arabidopsis transgenic plants carrying fusions of their promoter sequences to the GUS reporter. As in the case of the maize genes, the Arabidopsis orthologs showed highly complementary expression patterns.

  9. De novo transcriptome sequencing of axolotl blastema for identification of differentially expressed genes during limb regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Salamanders are unique among vertebrates in their ability to completely regenerate amputated limbs through the mediation of blastema cells located at the stump ends. This regeneration is nerve-dependent because blastema formation and regeneration does not occur after limb denervation. To obtain the genomic information of blastema tissues, de novo transcriptomes from both blastema tissues and denervated stump ends of Ambystoma mexicanum (axolotls) 14 days post-amputation were sequenced and compared using Solexa DNA sequencing. Results The sequencing done for this study produced 40,688,892 reads that were assembled into 307,345 transcribed sequences. The N50 of transcribed sequence length was 562 bases. A similarity search with known proteins identified 39,200 different genes to be expressed during limb regeneration with a cut-off E-value exceeding 10-5. We annotated assembled sequences by using gene descriptions, gene ontology, and clusters of orthologous group terms. Targeted searches using these annotations showed that the majority of the genes were in the categories of essential metabolic pathways, transcription factors and conserved signaling pathways, and novel candidate genes for regenerative processes. We discovered and confirmed numerous sequences of the candidate genes by using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate that de novo transcriptome sequencing allows gene expression analysis in a species lacking genome information and provides the most comprehensive mRNA sequence resources for axolotls. The characterization of the axolotl transcriptome can help elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying blastema formation during limb regeneration. PMID:23815514

  10. Analysis of the 16S–23S rRNA Gene Internal Transcribed Spacer Region in Klebsiella Species▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Cao, Boyang; Yu, Qunfang; Liu, Lei; Gao, Qili; Wang, Lei; Feng, Lu

    2008-01-01

    The 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of Klebsiella spp., including Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae, Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. rhinoscleromatis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella planticola, Klebsiella terrigena, and Klebsiella ornithinolytica, were characterized, and the feasibility of using ITS sequences to discriminate Klebsiella species and subspecies was explored. A total of 336 ITS sequences from 21 representative strains and 11 clinical isolates of Klebsiella were sequenced and analyzed. Three distinct ITS types—ITSnone (without tRNA genes), ITSglu [with a tRNAGlu (UUC) gene], and ITSile+ala [with tRNAIle (GAU) and tRNAAla (UGC) genes]—were detected in all species except for K. pneumoniae subsp. rhinoscleromatis, which has only ITSglu and ITSile+ala. The presence of ITSnone in Enterobacteriaceae had never been reported before. Both the length and the sequence of each ITS type are highly conserved within the species, with identity levels from 0.961 to 1.000 for ITSnone, from 0.967 to 1.000 for ITSglu, and from 0.968 to 1.000 for ITSile+ala. Interspecies sequence identities range from 0.775 to 0.989 for ITSnone, from 0.798 to 0.997 for ITSglu, and from 0.712 to 0.985 for ITSile+ala. Regions with significant interspecies variations but low intraspecies polymorphisms were identified; these may be targeted in the design of probes for the identification of Klebsiella to the species level. Phylogenetic analysis based on ITS regions reveals the relationships among Klebsiella species similarly to that based on 16S rRNA genes. PMID:18753345

  11. Analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer region in Klebsiella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Cao, Boyang; Yu, Qunfang; Liu, Lei; Gao, Qili; Wang, Lei; Feng, Lu

    2008-11-01

    The 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of Klebsiella spp., including Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae, Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. rhinoscleromatis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella planticola, Klebsiella terrigena, and Klebsiella ornithinolytica, were characterized, and the feasibility of using ITS sequences to discriminate Klebsiella species and subspecies was explored. A total of 336 ITS sequences from 21 representative strains and 11 clinical isolates of Klebsiella were sequenced and analyzed. Three distinct ITS types-ITS(none) (without tRNA genes), ITS(glu) [with a tRNA(Glu (UUC)) gene], and ITS(ile+ala) [with tRNA(Ile (GAU)) and tRNA(Ala (UGC)) genes]-were detected in all species except for K. pneumoniae subsp. rhinoscleromatis, which has only ITS(glu) and ITS(ile+ala). The presence of ITS(none) in Enterobacteriaceae had never been reported before. Both the length and the sequence of each ITS type are highly conserved within the species, with identity levels from 0.961 to 1.000 for ITS(none), from 0.967 to 1.000 for ITS(glu), and from 0.968 to 1.000 for ITS(ile+ala). Interspecies sequence identities range from 0.775 to 0.989 for ITS(none), from 0.798 to 0.997 for ITS(glu), and from 0.712 to 0.985 for ITS(ile+ala). Regions with significant interspecies variations but low intraspecies polymorphisms were identified; these may be targeted in the design of probes for the identification of Klebsiella to the species level. Phylogenetic analysis based on ITS regions reveals the relationships among Klebsiella species similarly to that based on 16S rRNA genes.

  12. Combining DGE and RNA-sequencing data to identify new polyA+ non-coding transcripts in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Nicolas; Bou Samra, Elias; Boureux, Anthony; Mancheron, Alban; Rufflé, Florence; Bai, Qiang; De Vos, John; Rivals, Eric; Commes, Thérèse

    2014-03-01

    Recent sequencing technologies that allow massive parallel production of short reads are the method of choice for transcriptome analysis. Particularly, digital gene expression (DGE) technologies produce a large dynamic range of expression data by generating short tag signatures for each cell transcript. These tags can be mapped back to a reference genome to identify new transcribed regions that can be further covered by RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) reads. Here, we applied an integrated bioinformatics approach that combines DGE tags, RNA-Seq, tiling array expression data and species-comparison to explore new transcriptional regions and their specific biological features, particularly tissue expression or conservation. We analysed tags from a large DGE data set (designated as 'TranscriRef'). We then annotated 750,000 tags that were uniquely mapped to the human genome according to Ensembl. We retained transcripts originating from both DNA strands and categorized tags corresponding to protein-coding genes, antisense, intronic- or intergenic-transcribed regions and computed their overlap with annotated non-coding transcripts. Using this bioinformatics approach, we identified ∼34,000 novel transcribed regions located outside the boundaries of known protein-coding genes. As demonstrated using sequencing data from human pluripotent stem cells for biological validation, the method could be easily applied for the selection of tissue-specific candidate transcripts. DigitagCT is available at http://cractools.gforge.inria.fr/softwares/digitagct.

  13. Unique Access to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Don

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the many learning opportunities that broadcast technology students at Ladue Horton Watkins High School in St. Louis, Missouri, experience because of their unique access to technology and methods of learning. Through scaffolding, stepladder techniques, and trial by fire, students learn to produce multiple television programs,…

  14. Whole-Genome Sequences of Mycobacterium tuberculosis TB282 and TB284, a Widespread and a Unique Strain, Respectively, Identified in a Previous Study of Tuberculosis Transmission in Central Los Angeles, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhua

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the genome sequences of two Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates previously identified in central Los Angeles, CA, in the 1990s using a PacBio platform. Isolate TB282 represents a large-cluster strain that caused 27% of the tuberculosis cases, while TB284 represents a strain that caused disease in only one patient. PMID:28082486

  15. Differential Reading, Naming, and Transcribing Speeds of Japanese Romaji and Hiragana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Jun; Leong, Che Kan

    2005-01-01

    The morpho-syllabic Japanese writing system consists of the phonetic scripts of hiragana and katakana, the logographic kanji derived from Chinese characters and the less well researched romaji based on the Roman alphabet. In four experiments we investigated the speed with which Japanese college students read, named, and transcribed romaji as…

  16. Transcribed enhancers lead waves of coordinated transcription in transitioning mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arner, Erik; Daub, Carsten O.; Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that cellular differentiation requires changes to transcriptional networks, dynamic regulation of promoters and enhancers at specific sets of genes has not been previously studied en masse. Exploiting the fact that active promoters and enhancers are transcribed, we...

  17. The Lysine Residues within the Human Ribosomal Protein S17 Sequence Naturally Inserted into the Viral Nonstructural Protein of a Unique Strain of Hepatitis E Virus Are Important for Enhanced Virus Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Kenney, Scott P.; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an important but extremely understudied human pathogen. Due largely to the lack of an efficient cell culture system for HEV, the molecular mechanisms of HEV replication and pathogenesis are poorly understood. Recently, a unique genotype 3 strain of HEV recovered from a chronically infected patient was adapted for growth in HepG2C3A human hepatoma cells. The adaptation of the Kernow C-1 P6 HEV to propagate in HepG2C3A cells selected for a rare virus recombinant that ...

  18. Detection of Abundantly Transcribed Genes and Gene Translocation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Non—Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tarantul

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Several novel, differentially transcribed genes were identified in one centroblastic and one immunoblastic HIV-associated B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (BNHL by subtractive cloning. In both lymphomas, we detected an upregulated transcription of several mitochondrial genes. In the centroblastic B-NHL, we found a high level transcription of nuclear genes including the interferon-inducible gene (INF-ind, the immunoglobulin light chain gene (IgL, the set oncogene, and several unknown genes. The data obtained on upregulated expression of the genes in human B-NHL of HIV-infected patients considerably overlap with those obtained earlier for the B-NHL of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected monkeys. In the centroblastic lymphoma, one transcript revealed a fusion of the 3'-untranslated region of the set gene and the C-terminal region of the IgL gene. This chimeric sequence was confirmed by a site-directed polymerase chain reaction performed with total cDNA and genomic DNA. The expected amplification product was obtained in both cases pointing to a genomic rearrangement. The IgL-set fusion sequence was not found in cDNA preparations and genomic DNA of the immunoblastic HIV-associated B-NHL. Further studies are necessary to determine whether these genes contribute to lymphoma development or can be used as therapeutic targets.

  19. Intragenomic heterogeneity of the 16S rRNA-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer among Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas fluorescens strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyutina, Irina A; Bobrova, Vera K; Matveeva, Eugenia V; Schaad, Norman W; Troitsky, Alexey V

    2004-10-01

    The 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1) from 14 strains of Pseudomonas syringae and P. fluorescens were sequenced. ITS1 exhibited significant sequence variability among different operons within a single genome. From 1 to 4 types of ITS1 were found in individual genomes of the P. syringae and P. fluorescens strains. A total of eight ITS1 types were identified among strains studied. The ITS1 nucleotide sequences consisted of conserved blocks including, among others, a stem-forming region of box B, tRNAIle and tRNAAla genes and several variable blocks. The differences in the variable regions were mostly due to insertions and/or deletions of nucleotide blocks. The intragenomic heterogeneity of ITS1 was brought about by different combinations of variable blocks, which possibly have resulted from recombination and horizontal transfer.

  20. NASA's unique networking environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1988-01-01

    Networking is an infrastructure technology; it is a tool for NASA to support its space and aeronautics missions. Some of NASA's networking problems are shared by the commercial and/or military communities, and can be solved by working with these communities. However, some of NASA's networking problems are unique and will not be addressed by these other communities. Individual characteristics of NASA's space-mission networking enviroment are examined, the combination of all these characteristics that distinguish NASA's networking systems from either commercial or military systems is explained, and some research areas that are important for NASA to pursue are outlined.

  1. 16S partial gene mitochondrial DNA and internal transcribed spacers ribosomal DNA as differential markers of Trichuris discolor populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callejón, R; Halajian, A; de Rojas, M; Marrugal, A; Guevara, D; Cutillas, C

    2012-05-25

    Comparative morphological, biometrical and molecular studies of Trichuris discolor isolated from Bos taurus from Spain and Iran was carried out. Furthermore, Trichuris ovis isolated from B. taurus and Capra hircus from Spain has been, molecularly, analyzed. Morphological studies revealed clear differences between T. ovis and T. discolor isolated from B. taurus but differences were not observed between populations of T. discolor isolated from different geographical regions. Nevertheless, the molecular studies based on the amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 ribosomal DNA and 16S partial gene mitochondrial DNA showed clear differences between both populations of T. discolor from Spain and Iran suggesting two cryptic species. Phylogenetic studies corroborated these data. Thus, phylogenetic trees based on ITS1, ITS2 and 16S partial gene sequences showed that individuals of T. discolor from B. taurus from Iran clustered together and separated, with high bootstrap values, of T. discolor isolated from B. taurus from Spain, while populations of T. ovis from B. taurus and C. hircus from Spain clustered together but separated with high bootstrap values of both populations of T. discolor. Furthermore, a comparative phylogenetic study has been carried out with the ITS1and ITS2 sequences of Trichuris species from different hosts. Three clades were observed: the first clustered all the species of Trichuris parasitizing herbivores (T. discolor, T. ovis, Trichuris leporis and Trichuris skrjabini), the second clustered all the species of Trichuris parasitizing omnivores (Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis) and finally, the third clustered species of Trichuris parasitizing carnivores (Trichuris muris, Trichuris arvicolae and Trichuris vulpis).

  2. In Silico Identification of Co-transcribed Core Cell Cycle Regulators and Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory networks involving transcription factors and core cell cycle regulators are expected to play crucial roles in plant growth and development. In this report, we describe the identification of two groups of co-transcribed core cell cycle regulators and transcription factors via a two-step in silico screening. The core cell cycle regulators include TARDY ASYNCHRONOUS MEIOSIS (CYCA1;2), CYCB1;1, CYCB2;1, CDKB1;2, and CDKB2;2 while the transcription factors include CURLY LEAF, AINTEGUMENTA, a MYB protein, two Forkhead-associated domain proteins, and a SCARECROW family protein. Promoter analysis revealed a potential web of cross- and self-regulations among the identified proteins. Because one criterion for screening for these genes is that they are predominantly transcribed in young organs but not in mature organs, these genes are likely to be particularly involved in Arabidopsis organ growth.

  3. Caryotricha minuta (Xu et al., 2008) nov. comb., a unique marine ciliate (Protista, Ciliophora, Spirotrichea), with phylogenetic analysis of the ambiguous genus Caryotricha inferred from the small-subunit rRNA gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Miao; Shao, Chen; Jiang, Jiamei; Li, Liqiong; Stoeck, Thorsten; Song, Weibo

    2009-02-01

    A population of Kiitricha minuta Xu et al., 2008, a small kiitrichid ciliate, was isolated from a brackish water sample in Jiaozhou Bay, Qingdao, northern China. After comparison of its morphology and infraciliature, it is believed that this morphotype should be assigned to the genus Caryotricha; hence, a new combination is suggested, Caryotricha minuta (Xu et al., 2008) nov. comb. The small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequence was determined in order to elucidate the phylogenetic position of this poorly known, ambiguous genus. The organism can be clearly separated from its congener, Caryotricha convexa Kahl, 1932, by the extremely shortened ventral cirral rows in the posterior ends. Based on the data available, an improved diagnosis is given for the genus: marine Kiitrichidae with prominent buccal field; two highly developed undulating membranes; non-grouped, uniform cirral rows on both ventral and dorsal sides; enlarged transverse cirri present, which are the only differentiated cirri; marginal cirri not present; one short migratory row located posterior to buccal field; structure of dorsal kineties generally in Kiitricha pattern. The sequence of the SSU rRNA gene of C. minuta differs by 13 % from that of Kiitricha marina. Molecular phylogenetic analyses (Bayesian inference, least squares, neighbour joining, maximum parsimony) indicate that Caryotricha, together with Kiitricha, diverges at a deep level from all other spirotrichs. Its branching position is between Phacodiniidia and Licnophoridia. The results strongly support the distinct separation of the Kiitricha-Caryotricha clade, which always branches basal to the Stichotrichia-Hypotrichia-Oligotrichia-Choreotrichia assemblage. These results also confirm the previous hypothesis that the Kiitricha-Caryotricha group, long assumed to be a close relation to the euplotids, represents a taxon at subclass level within the spirotrichs.

  4. Transcribing Southern Min Speech Corpora with a Web-Based Language Learning System

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Jun; Feldmar, Jacques; Laprie, Yves; Fohr, Dominique; Haton, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The paper proposes a human-computation-based scheme for transcribing Southern Min speech corpora. The core idea is to implement a Web-based language learning system to collect orthographic and phonetic labels from a large amount of language learners and choose the commonly input labels as the transcriptions of the corpora. It is essentially a technology of distributed knowledge acquisition. Some computeraided mechanisms are also used to verify the collected transcripti...

  5. Genome comparison without alignment using shortest unique substrings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Möller Friedrich

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence comparison by alignment is a fundamental tool of molecular biology. In this paper we show how a number of sequence comparison tasks, including the detection of unique genomic regions, can be accomplished efficiently without an alignment step. Our procedure for nucleotide sequence comparison is based on shortest unique substrings. These are substrings which occur only once within the sequence or set of sequences analysed and which cannot be further reduced in length without losing the property of uniqueness. Such substrings can be detected using generalized suffix trees. Results We find that the shortest unique substrings in Caenorhabditis elegans, human and mouse are no longer than 11 bp in the autosomes of these organisms. In mouse and human these unique substrings are significantly clustered in upstream regions of known genes. Moreover, the probability of finding such short unique substrings in the genomes of human or mouse by chance is extremely small. We derive an analytical expression for the null distribution of shortest unique substrings, given the GC-content of the query sequences. Furthermore, we apply our method to rapidly detect unique genomic regions in the genome of Staphylococcus aureus strain MSSA476 compared to four other staphylococcal genomes. Conclusion We combine a method to rapidly search for shortest unique substrings in DNA sequences and a derivation of their null distribution. We show that unique regions in an arbitrary sample of genomes can be efficiently detected with this method. The corresponding programs shustring (SHortest Unique subSTRING and shulen are written in C and available at http://adenine.biz.fh-weihenstephan.de/shustring/.

  6. Interferon-gamma up-regulates a unique set of proteins in human keratinocytes. Molecular cloning and expression of the cDNA encoding the RGD-sequence-containing protein IGUP I-5111

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Leffers, H; Madsen, Peder

    1993-01-01

    Treatment of proliferating and quiescent primary human keratinocytes with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) (100 U/ml, 23.5 h) followed by two-dimensional gel analysis revealed three proteins, IGUP I-3421 (M(r) = 48,200, pI = 6.06); IGUP I-3524 (M(r) = 56,900, pI = 5.92), a protein homologous to peptide......, which migrated with the AMA variant of keratinocyte protein IEF SSP 5111, is novel although it exhibits weak similarity to cytoskeletal proteins. IGUP I-5111 contains the RGD sequence found in many extracellular glycoprotein ligands of the integrin receptor family and it is found at least partially......-cultured, unfractionated psoriatic keratinocytes failed to reveal up-regulation of any of the three IFN-gamma-induced proteins suggesting that the effect of IFN-gamma in vivo may be modulated by the activity of other cytokine(s) or growth factor(s). Psoriatic keratinocytes were equally sensitive to IFN...

  7. A novel snoRNA gene cluster in yeast is transcribed as polycistronic pre-snoRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆勇军; 周惠; 周惟欣; 朱远琪; 屈良鹄

    1999-01-01

    Small nueleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) play an important role in eukaryotic rRNA biogenesis. By combination of a computer search of EMBL database and experimental procedure, a novel snoRNA coding sequence (Z8) was screened out and characterized from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Z8 snoRNA gene codes a boxC/D antisonse snoRNA which guides, deduced from structure analysis, the 2’-O-ribose methylation at U2421 of 25S rRNA. After disruption of Z8 snoRNA gene, the methylation at corresponding site was abolished, but no growth delay was observed in various cultural temperatures. Z8 DNA is the first gene of a gene cluster consisting of three cognate snoRNA genes which are located on an intergenie region of chromosome ⅩⅢ. This gene cluster is co-transcribed as a pelycistronic precursor from a+247 bp U snoRNA gene promoter, followed by processing to release individual snoRNAs, representing a new expression pattern of snoRNA genes.

  8. Comparative evolution of S7 Intron 1 and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer in Coilia nasus (Clupeiformes: Engraulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Guo, Hong-Yi; Tang, Wen-Qiao; Yang, Jin-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Coilia nasus is widely distributed in the Yangtze River, the coastal waters of China, Korea and the Ariake Sound of Japan. Several ecotypes exist and this provides a useful model for the study of comparative diversity between molecular markers. Here we analyze and compare the nucleotide sequences between single-copy ribosomal protein S7 gene intron 1 (rpS7) and multiple-copy ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) in this species to compare the phylogenetic signal of the two nuclear genes. Nucleotide substitutions among the two gene sequences and partial sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene were also analyzed. A total of 115 clones for rpS7 and 122 clones for ITS1 were obtained from 37 specimens. The nucleotide sequence length is 741 to 743 bp for rpS7 and 334 to 348 bp for ITS1. Intra- and inter-specimen variation in rpS7 results from nucleotide substitution, while such variation in ITS1 is mainly due to different numbers of short base repeats. The content of G + C is lower in rpS7 (43.5%) than in ITS1 (68.2%). Our results indicate that the proportion of the sequence variable sites is higher in rpS7 (61) than in ITS1 (23); the informative parsimony of rpS7 is evidently higher than that of ITS1 (26 vs. 2); the overall ratio between transitions and transversions in ITS1 is slightly lower than in rpS7, but remarkably lower than in COI. These results suggest that rpS7 is more suitable than ITS1 as a marker for genetic divergence of this group. Furthermore, gene flow is observed between the different geographic populations of C. nasus from the phylogeny of this species based on rpS7, showing that rpS7 has more evolutionary characteristics for understanding the processes of genomic evolution at the intraspecific level.

  9. Comparative Evolution of S7 Intron 1 and Ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacer in Coilia nasus (Clupeiformes: Engraulidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Quan Yang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Coilia nasus is widely distributed in the Yangtze River, the coastal waters of China, Korea and the Ariake Sound of Japan. Several ecotypes exist and this provides a useful model for the study of comparative diversity between molecular markers. Here we analyze and compare the nucleotide sequences between single-copy ribosomal protein S7 gene intron 1 (rpS7 and multiple-copy ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 in this species to compare the phylogenetic signal of the two nuclear genes. Nucleotide substitutions among the two gene sequences and partial sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene were also analyzed. A total of 115 clones for rpS7 and 122 clones for ITS1 were obtained from 37 specimens. The nucleotide sequence length is 741 to 743 bp for rpS7 and 334 to 348 bp for ITS1. Intra- and inter-specimen variation in rpS7 results from nucleotide substitution, while such variation in ITS1 is mainly due to different numbers of short base repeats. The content of G + C is lower in rpS7 (43.5% than in ITS1 (68.2%. Our results indicate that the proportion of the sequence variable sites is higher in rpS7 (61 than in ITS1 (23; the informative parsimony of rpS7 is evidently higher than that of ITS1 (26 vs. 2; the overall ratio between transitions and transversions in ITS1 is slightly lower than in rpS7, but remarkably lower than in COI. These results suggest that rpS7 is more suitable than ITS1 as a marker for genetic divergence of this group. Furthermore, gene flow is observed between the different geographic populations of C. nasus from the phylogeny of this species based on rpS7, showing that rpS7 has more evolutionary characteristics for understanding the processes of genomic evolution at the intraspecific level.

  10. A novel orf108 co-transcribed with the atpA gene is associated with cytoplasmic male sterility in Brassica juncea carrying Moricandia arvensis cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashutosh; Kumar, Pankaj; Dinesh Kumar, V; Sharma, Prakash C; Prakash, Shyam; Bhat, Shripad R

    2008-02-01

    Mitochondrial atpA transcripts were examined in cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) and fertility restorer lines of CMS (Moricandia arvensis) Brassica juncea. Male sterile flowers had longer atpA transcripts than male fertiles. The mitochondrial atpA region of the CMS line was cloned and sequenced. The 5' and 3' ends of the atpA transcripts of the CMS and the fertility restorer lines were mapped and full-length transcripts were cloned and sequenced. A novel orf108 (open reading frame 108) co-transcribed with the atpA gene was found in the male sterile flowers. In the fertility restorer line, the transcript was cleaved within orf108 to yield monocistronic atpA transcripts.

  11. Sequence variation of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region among isolates of Rhizoctonia solani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizoctonia solani is a common and highly heterogeneous fungal species. Sub-specific groups have been created based on hyphal anastomosis (AGs). One of the newer AGs described is AG-11 from soybean and rice seedlings or soil in Arkansas and lupine in Australia (Carling et al. Phytopathology 84:1378-...

  12. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel;

    2015-01-01

    IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression...... at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. Conclusions The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes...

  13. A unique genetic code change in the mitochondrial genome of the parasitic nematode Radopholus similis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Leeuwen Thomas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria (mt contain their own autonomously replicating DNA, constituted as a small circular genome encoding essential subunits of the respiratory chain. Mt DNA is characterized by a genetic code which differs from the standard one. Interestingly, the mt genome of nematodes share some peculiar features, such as small transfer RNAs, truncated ribosomal RNAs and - in the class of Chromadorean nematodes - unidirectional transcription. Findings We present the complete mt genomic sequence (16,791 bp of the plant-parasitic nematode Radopholus similis (class Chromadorea. Although it has a gene content similar to most other nematodes, many idiosyncrasies characterize the extremely AT-rich mt genome of R. similis (85.4% AT. The secondary structure of the large (16S rRNA is further reduced, the gene order is unique, the large non-coding region contains two large repeats, and most interestingly, the UAA codon is reassigned from translation termination to tyrosine. In addition, 7 out of 12 protein-coding genes lack a canonical stop codon and analysis of transcriptional data showed the absence of polyadenylation. Northern blot analysis confirmed that only one strand is transcribed and processed. Furthermore, using nucleotide content bias methods, regions for the origin of replication are suggested. Conclusion The extraordinary mt genome of R. similis with its unique genetic code appears to contain exceptional features correlated to DNA decoding. Therefore the genome may provide an incentive to further elucidate these barely understood processes in nematodes. This comprehension may eventually lead to parasitic nematode-specific control targets as healthy mitochondria are imperative for organism survival. In addition, the presented genome is an interesting exceptional event in genetic code evolution.

  14. Application of the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) of ribosomal DNA as a molecular marker to population analysis in farrer's scallop Chlamys farreri

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ziniu; WEI Xiaohua; KONG Xiaoyu; YU Shanshan

    2007-01-01

    Sequence variation of the first internal transcribed spacer of ribosomal DNA (ITS-1) was examined and its application to the study of genetic variation was explored in four populations of farrer's scallop Chlamys farreri. ITS-1 fragments,with a length of about 300 bp,of 78 individuals collected from Dalian, Qingdao, Yantai in China and Korea respectively were amplified via PCR, cloned and sequenced. Intra-genomic variation was examined by sequencing several clones of single individuals. Alignment and polymorphism analysis detected 44 haplotypes and 50 polymorphic sites which consist of 30 substitutions and 20 indels, indicating a high level of polymorphisms. Sequence analysis also showed a very low level of intra-individual variation. All these features validated the feasibility of application of ITS-1 fragment to population analysis. Polymorphism analysis showed that the Korea sample has the richest genetic variation, followed by Yantai and Qingdao samples. AMOVA (analysis of molecular variance) showed that the majority (96.26%) of genetic variation was distributed within populations and 3.74% resulted from among populations, but with P<0.05 (= 0.042), indicating that the populations in this study have significant divergence. This output was basically concordant with the result arising from RAPD data and different from that from mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequence data. Discussion on this inconsistency was made accordingly.

  15. Uniqueness is Important in Competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Ai-Xia; XV Xiu-Lian; HE Da-Ren

    2009-01-01

    We propose a quantitative network description on the function of uniqueness in a competition system. Two statistical parameters, competition ability and uniqueness are defined, and their relationship in ordinary cases is analytically discussed. The competition between Chinese regional universities is taken as an example. The empirical investigation results show that the uniqueness of a university is really important in competition. Also,uniqueness is very helpful in the promotion of the university overall quality.

  16. On Uniqueness of coalitional equilibria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finus, M.; Mouche, van P.H.M.; Rundshagen, B.

    2014-01-01

    For the so-called "new approach" of coalitio formation it is important that coalitional equilibria are unique. Uniqueness comes down to existene and to semi-uniqueness, i.e.\\\\that there exists at most one equilibrium. Although conditions for existence are not problematic, conditions for semi-uniquen

  17. Combinatory microarray and SuperSAGE analyses identify pairing-dependently transcribed genes in Schistosoma mansoni males, including follistatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Leutner

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis is a disease of world-wide importance and is caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. These parasites exhibit a unique reproduction biology as the female's sexual maturation depends on a constant pairing-contact to the male. Pairing leads to gonad differentiation in the female, and even gene expression of some gonad-associated genes is controlled by pairing. In contrast, no morphological changes have been observed in males, although first data indicated an effect of pairing also on gene transcription in males. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the influence of pairing on males, we performed a combinatory approach applying SuperSAGE and microarray hybridization, generating the most comprehensive data-set on differential transcription available to date. Of 6,326 sense transcripts detected by both analyses, 29 were significantly differentially transcribed. Besides mutual confirmation, the two methods complemented each other as shown by data comparison and real-time PCR, which revealed a number of genes with consistent regulation across all methods. One of the candidate genes, follistatin of S. mansoni (SmFst was characterized in more detail by in situ hybridization and yeast two-hybrid (Y2H interaction analyses with potential binding partners. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Beyond confirming previously hypothesized differences in metabolic processes between pairing-experienced (EM and pairing-unexperienced males (UM, our data indicate that neuronal processes are involved in male-female interaction but also TGFβ-signaling. One candidate revealing significant down-regulation in EM was the TGFβ-pathway controlling molecule follistatin (SmFst. First functional analyses demonstrated SmFst interaction with the S. mansoni TGFβ-receptor agonists inhibin/activin (SmInAct and bone morphogenic protein (SmBMP, and all molecules colocalized in the testes. This indicates a yet unknown role of the TGF

  18. Properties and distribution of pure GA-sequences of mammalian genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guenter Albrecht-Buehler

    Full Text Available The article describes DNA sequences of mammalian genomes that are longer than 50 bases, but consist exclusively of G's and A's ('pure GA-sequences'. Although their frequency of incidence should be 10(-16 or smaller, the chromosomes of human, chimpanzee, dog, cat, rat, and mouse contained many tens of thousands of them ubiquitously located along the chromosomes with a species-dependent density, reaching sizes of up to 1300 [b]. With the exception of a small number of poly-A-, poly-G-, poly-GA-, and poly-GAAA-sequences (combined <0.5%, all pure GA-sequences of the mammals tested were unique individuals, contained several repeated short GA-containing motifs, and shared a common hexa-nucleotide spectrum. At most 2% of the human GA-sequences were transcribed into mRNAs; all others were not coding for proteins. Although this could have made them less subject to natural selection, they contained many [corrected] times fewer point mutations than one should expect from the genome at large. As to the presence of other sequences with similarly restricted base contents, there were approximately as many pure TC-sequences as pure GA-sequences, but many fewer pure AC-, TA, and TG-sequences. There were practically no pure GC-sequences. The functions of pure GA-sequences are not known. Supported by a number of observations related to heat shock phenomena, the article speculates that they serve as genomic sign posts which may help guide polymerases and transcription factors to their proper targets, and/or as spatial linkers that help generate the 3-dimensional organization of chromatin.

  19. In-vivo fusion of human cancer and hamster stromal cells permanently transduces and transcribes human DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, David M; Rooney, Robert J; Loo, Meiyu; Liu, Donglin; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    After demonstrating, with karyotyping, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence in-situ hybridization, the retention of certain human chromosomes and genes following the spontaneous fusion of human tumor and hamster cells in-vivo, it was postulated that cell fusion causes the horizontal transmission of malignancy and donor genes. Here, we analyzed gene expression profiles of 3 different hybrid tumors first generated in the hamster cheek pouch after human tumor grafting, and then propagated in hamsters and in cell cultures for years: two Hodgkin lymphomas (GW-532, GW-584) and a glioblastoma multiforme (GB-749). Based on the criteria of MAS 5.0 detection P-values ≤0.065 and at least a 2-fold greater signal expression value than a hamster melanoma control, we identified 3,759 probe sets (ranging from 1,040 to 1,303 in each transplant) from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of the 3 hybrid tumors, which unambiguously mapped to 3,107 unique Entrez Gene IDs, representative of all human chromosomes; however, by karyology, one of the hybrid tumors (GB-749) had a total of 15 human chromosomes in its cells. Among the genes mapped, 39 probe sets, representing 33 unique Entrez Gene IDs, complied with the detection criteria in all hybrid tumor samples. Five of these 33 genes encode transcription factors that are known to regulate cell growth and differentiation; five encode cell adhesion- and transmigration-associated proteins that participate in oncogenesis and/or metastasis and invasion; and additional genes encode proteins involved in signaling pathways, regulation of apoptosis, DNA repair, and multidrug resistance. These findings were corroborated by PCR and reverse transcription PCR, showing the presence of human alphoid (α)-satellite DNA and the F11R transcripts in additional tumor transplant generations. We posit that in-vivo fusion discloses genes implicated in tumor progression, and gene families coding for the organoid phenotype. Thus, cancer cells

  20. Sequence-structure relations of biopolymers

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Christopher; Reidys, Christian M

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: DNA data is transcribed into single-stranded RNA, which folds into specific molecular structures. In this paper we pose the question to what extent sequence- and structure-information correlate. We view this correlation as structural semantics of sequence data that allows for a different interpretation than conventional sequence alignment. Structural semantics could enable us to identify more general embedded "patterns" in DNA and RNA sequences. Results: We compute the partition function of sequences with respect to a fixed structure and connect this computation to the mutual information of a sequence-structure pair for RNA secondary structures. We present a Boltzmann sampler and obtain the a priori probability of specific sequence patterns. We present a detailed analysis for the three PDB-structures, 2JXV (hairpin), 2N3R (3-branch multi-loop) and 1EHZ (tRNA). We localize specific sequence patterns, contrast the energy spectrum of the Boltzmann sampled sequences versus those sequences that refold ...

  1. Low variation in ribosomal DNA and internal transcribed spacers of the symbiotic fungi of leaf-cutting ants (Attini: Formicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva-Pinhati A.C.O.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaf-cutting ants of the genera Atta and Acromyrmex (tribe Attini are symbiotic with basidiomycete fungi of the genus Leucoagaricus (tribe Leucocoprineae, which they cultivate on vegetable matter inside their nests. We determined the variation of the 28S, 18S, and 5.8S ribosomal DNA (rDNA gene loci and the rapidly evolving internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2 of 15 sympatric and allopatric fungi associated with colonies of 11 species of leafcutter ants living up to 2,600 km apart in Brazil. We found that the fungal rDNA and ITS sequences from different species of ants were identical (or nearly identical to each other, whereas 10 GenBank Leucoagaricus species showed higher ITS variation. Our findings suggest that Atta and Acromyrmex leafcutters living in geographic sites that are very distant from each other cultivate a single fungal species made up of closely related lineages of Leucoagaricus gongylophorus. We discuss the strikingly high similarity in the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of the Atta and Acromyrmex symbiotic L. gongylophorus studied by us, in contrast to the lower similarity displayed by their non-symbiotic counterparts. We suggest that the similarity of our L. gongylophorus isolates is an indication of the recent association of the fungus with these ants, and propose that both the intense lateral transmission of fungal material within leafcutter nests and the selection of more adapted fungal strains are involved in the homogenization of the symbiotic fungal stock.

  2. Secondary structure analyses of the nuclear rRNA internal transcribed spacers and assessment of its phylogenetic utility across the Brassicaceae (mustards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P Edger

    Full Text Available The internal transcribed spacers of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster, termed ITS1 and ITS2, are the most frequently used nuclear markers for phylogenetic analyses across many eukaryotic groups including most plant families. The reasons for the popularity of these markers include: 1. Ease of amplification due to high copy number of the gene clusters, 2. Available cost-effective methods and highly conserved primers, 3. Rapidly evolving markers (i.e. variable between closely related species, and 4. The assumption (and/or treatment that these sequences are non-functional, neutrally evolving phylogenetic markers. Here, our analyses of ITS1 and ITS2 for 50 species suggest that both sequences are instead under selective constraints to preserve proper secondary structure, likely to maintain complete self-splicing functions, and thus are not neutrally-evolving phylogenetic markers. Our results indicate the majority of sequence sites are co-evolving with other positions to form proper secondary structure, which has implications for phylogenetic inference. We also found that the lowest energy state and total number of possible alternate secondary structures are highly significantly different between ITS regions and random sequences with an identical overall length and Guanine-Cytosine (GC content. Lastly, we review recent evidence highlighting some additional problematic issues with using these regions as the sole markers for phylogenetic studies, and thus strongly recommend additional markers and cost-effective approaches for future studies to estimate phylogenetic relationships.

  3. Clinical correlation of variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions of rRNA genes in Pneumocystis carinii f.sp. hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, J; Lee, C H; Jin, S

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse the importance of sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions 1 and 2 of the nuclear rRNA operon in AIDS patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). DESIGN AND METHODS: ITS 1 and 2 genotypes were determined in 162 bronchoalveolar lavage...... samples from 130 patients participating in a prospective cohort study of PCP. RESULTS: A total of 49 different ITS genotypes were detected. ITS genotype was not associated with the clinical severity or outcome of PCP. In 37 of 162 (23%) samples infection with two or more genotypes was observed. A genotype...... switch was detected in six of 10 patients (60%) with recurrent episodes of PCP. However, genotype changes were also seen in 10 of 19 patients (53%) who had repeated bronchoscopies within the same episode of PCP. The same ITS type was observed twice in 13 (46%) of the 28 patients with repeat...

  4. Cyanobacterial ecotypes in different optical microenvironments of a 68 C hot spring mat community revealed by 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferris, Mike J.; Kühl, Michael; Wieland, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    We examined the population of unicellular cyanobacteria (Synechococcus) in the upper 3-mm vertical interval of a 68°C region of a microbial mat in a hot spring effluent channel (Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming). Fluorescence microscopy and microsensor measurements of O2 and oxygenic photosynth......We examined the population of unicellular cyanobacteria (Synechococcus) in the upper 3-mm vertical interval of a 68°C region of a microbial mat in a hot spring effluent channel (Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming). Fluorescence microscopy and microsensor measurements of O2 and oxygenic...... distinct populations over the vertical interval. We were unable to identify patterns in genetic variation in Synechococcus 16S rRNA sequences that correlate with different vertically distributed populations. However, patterns of variation at the internal transcribed spacer locus separating 16S and 23S r...

  5. Transcribing RNA polymerase II is phosphorylated at CTD residue serine-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Rob D; Heidemann, Martin; Albert, Thomas K; Mailhammer, Reinhard; Flatley, Andrew; Meisterernst, Michael; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Eick, Dirk

    2007-12-14

    RNA polymerase II is distinguished by its large carboxyl-terminal repeat domain (CTD), composed of repeats of the consensus heptapeptide Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7. Differential phosphorylation of serine-2 and serine-5 at the 5' and 3' regions of genes appears to coordinate the localization of transcription and RNA processing factors to the elongating polymerase complex. Using monoclonal antibodies, we reveal serine-7 phosphorylation on transcribed genes. This position does not appear to be phosphorylated in CTDs of less than 20 consensus repeats. The position of repeats where serine-7 is substituted influenced the appearance of distinct phosphorylated forms, suggesting functional differences between CTD regions. Our results indicate that restriction of serine-7 epitopes to the Linker-proximal region limits CTD phosphorylation patterns and is a requirement for optimal gene expression.

  6. Transcribed enhancers lead waves of coordinated transcription in transitioning mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arner, Erik; Daub, Carsten O.; Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer; Andersson, Robin; Lilje, Berit; Drabløs, Finn; Lennartsson, Andreas; Rönnerblad, Michelle; Hrydziuszko, Olga; Vitezic, Morana; Freeman, Tom C.; Alhendi, Ahmad M. N.; Arner, Peter; Axton, Richard; Baillie, J. Kenneth; Beckhouse, Anthony; Bodega, Beatrice; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Davis, Margaret; Detmar, Michael; Ehrlund, Anna; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Eslami, Afsaneh; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Ferrai, Carmelo; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Forrester, Lesley; Goldowitz, Daniel; Guler, Reto; Ha, Thomas; Hara, Mitsuko; Herlyn, Meenhard; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Kai, Chieko; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Khachigian, Levon M.; Klinken, S. Peter; Kojima, Soichi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Klein, Sarah; Mejhert, Niklas; Miyaguchi, Ken; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Morris, Kelly J.; Mummery, Christine; Nakachi, Yutaka; Ogishima, Soichi; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Pombo, Ana; Qin, Xian-Yang; Roy, Sugata; Sato, Hiroki; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schwegmann, Anita; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Swoboda, Rolf; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tomoiu, Andru; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo; Yoneda, Misako; Zabierowski, Susan; Zhang, Peter; Abugessaisa, Imad; Bertin, Nicolas; Diehl, Alexander D.; Fukuda, Shiro; Furuno, Masaaki; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hori, Fumi; Ishikawa-Kato, Sachi; Ishizu, Yuri; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kojima, Miki; Kondo, Naoto; Lizio, Marina; Meehan, Terrence F.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nishiyori-Sueki, Hiromi; Sahin, Serkan; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Severin, Jessica; de Hoon, Michiel J. L.; Kawai, Jun; Kasukawa, Takeya; Lassmann, Timo; Suzuki, Harukazu; Kawaji, Hideya; Summers, Kim M.; Wells, Christine; Hume, David A.; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Sandelin, Albin; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2015-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that cellular differentiation requires changes to transcriptional networks, dynamic regulation of promoters and enhancers at specific sets of genes has not been previously studied en masse. Exploiting the fact that active promoters and enhancers are transcribed, we simultaneously measured their activity in 19 human and 14 mouse time courses covering a wide range of cell types and biological stimuli. Enhancer RNAs, then messenger RNAs encoding transcription factors, dominated the earliest responses. Binding sites for key lineage transcription factors were simultaneously overrepresented in enhancers and promoters active in each cellular system. Our data support a highly generalizable model in which enhancer transcription is the earliest event in successive waves of transcriptional change during cellular differentiation or activation. PMID:25678556

  7. PRC2 represses transcribed genes on the imprinted inactive X chromosome in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclary, Emily; Hinten, Michael; Harris, Clair; Sethuraman, Shriya; Gayen, Srimonta; Kalantry, Sundeep

    2017-05-03

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) catalyzes histone H3K27me3, which marks many transcriptionally silent genes throughout the mammalian genome. Although H3K27me3 is associated with silenced gene expression broadly, it remains unclear why some but not other PRC2 target genes require PRC2 and H3K27me3 for silencing. Here we define the transcriptional and chromatin features that predict which PRC2 target genes require PRC2/H3K27me3 for silencing by interrogating imprinted mouse X-chromosome inactivation. H3K27me3 is enriched at promoters of silenced genes across the inactive X chromosome. To abrogate PRC2 function, we delete the core PRC2 protein EED in F1 hybrid trophoblast stem cells (TSCs), which undergo imprinted inactivation of the paternally inherited X chromosome. Eed (-/-) TSCs lack H3K27me3 and Xist lncRNA enrichment on the inactive X chromosome. Despite the absence of H3K27me3 and Xist RNA, only a subset of the inactivated X-linked genes is derepressed in Eed (-/-) TSCs. Unexpectedly, in wild-type (WT) TSCs these genes are transcribed and are enriched for active chromatin hallmarks on the inactive-X, including RNA PolII, H3K27ac, and H3K36me3, but not the bivalent mark H3K4me2. By contrast, PRC2 targets that remain repressed in Eed (-/-) TSCs are depleted for active chromatin characteristics in WT TSCs. A comparative analysis of transcriptional and chromatin features of inactive X-linked genes in WT and Eed (-/-) TSCs suggests that PRC2 acts as a brake to prevent induction of transcribed genes on the inactive X chromosome, a mode of PRC2 function that may apply broadly.

  8. Multiple floating metatarsals: a unique injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trikha Vivek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Concomitant dislocation of the tar-sometatarsal and metatarsophalangeal joints of foot is an extremely rare injury. Such injuries presenting in a single or adjacent dual rays have been described in few cases previously. We describe such an injury in adjacent three metatarsals of a polytrauma patient. These injuries are likely to be missed in the initial assessment of a polytrauma patient. These patients are at risk of an overlooked diagnosis but the consequences of missing this type of injury may be Vivek Trikha*, Tarun Goyal, Amit K Agarwal quite severe. This case is presented in view of its unique-ness along with possible mechanism of injury, the sequence of reduction and follow-up. Knowledge of such injury and its proper management may be useful to the trauma surgeons. Key words: Metatarsal bones; Metatarsophalangeal joint; Wounds and injuries

  9. The Large Mitochondrial Genome of Symbiodinium minutum Reveals Conserved Noncoding Sequences between Dinoflagellates and Apicomplexans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoguchi, Eiichi; Shinzato, Chuya; Hisata, Kanako; Satoh, Nori; Mungpakdee, Sutada

    2015-07-20

    Even though mitochondrial genomes, which characterize eukaryotic cells, were first discovered more than 50 years ago, mitochondrial genomics remains an important topic in molecular biology and genome sciences. The Phylum Alveolata comprises three major groups (ciliates, apicomplexans, and dinoflagellates), the mitochondrial genomes of which have diverged widely. Even though the gene content of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes is reportedly comparable to that of apicomplexans, the highly fragmented and rearranged genome structures of dinoflagellates have frustrated whole genomic analysis. Consequently, noncoding sequences and gene arrangements of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes have not been well characterized. Here we report that the continuous assembled genome (∼326 kb) of the dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium minutum, is AT-rich (∼64.3%) and that it contains three protein-coding genes. Based upon in silico analysis, the remaining 99% of the genome comprises transcriptomic noncoding sequences. RNA edited sites and unique, possible start and stop codons clarify conserved regions among dinoflagellates. Our massive transcriptome analysis shows that almost all regions of the genome are transcribed, including 27 possible fragmented ribosomal RNA genes and 12 uncharacterized small RNAs that are similar to mitochondrial RNA genes of the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Gene map comparisons show that gene order is only slightly conserved between S. minutum and P. falciparum. However, small RNAs and intergenic sequences share sequence similarities with P. falciparum, suggesting that the function of noncoding sequences has been preserved despite development of very different genome structures.

  10. Analysis of expressed sequence tags from Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, D; Reddy, G R; Dame, J B; Almira, E C; Laipis, P J; Ferl, R J; Yang, T P; Rowe, T C; Schuster, S M

    1994-07-01

    An initiative was undertaken to sequence all genes of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in an effort to gain a better understanding at the molecular level of the parasite that inflicts much suffering in the developing world. 550 random complimentary DNA clones were partially sequenced from the intraerythrocytic form of the parasite as one of the approaches to analyze the transcribed sequences of its genome. The sequences, after editing, generated 389 expressed sequence tag sites and over 105 kb of DNA sequences. About 32% of these clones showed significant homology with other genes in the database. These clones represent 340 new Plasmodium falciparum expressed sequence tags.

  11. Characterization of Trichuris trichiura from humans and T. suis from pigs in China using internal transcribed spacers of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G H; Zhou, W; Nisbet, A J; Xu, M J; Zhou, D H; Zhao, G H; Wang, S K; Song, H Q; Lin, R Q; Zhu, X Q

    2014-03-01

    Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis parasitize (at the adult stage) the caeca of humans and pigs, respectively, causing trichuriasis. Despite these parasites being of human and animal health significance, causing considerable socio-economic losses globally, little is known of the molecular characteristics of T. trichiura and T. suis from China. In the present study, the entire first and second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1 and ITS-2) regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of T. trichiura and T. suis from China were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the representative amplicons were cloned and sequenced, and sequence variation in the ITS rDNA was examined. The ITS rDNA sequences for the T. trichiura and T. suis samples were 1222-1267 bp and 1339-1353 bp in length, respectively. Sequence analysis revealed that the ITS-1, 5.8S and ITS-2 rDNAs of both whipworms were 600-627 bp and 655-661 bp, 154 bp, and 468-486 bp and 530-538 bp in size, respectively. Sequence variation in ITS rDNA within and among T. trichiura and T. suis was examined. Excluding nucleotide variations in the simple sequence repeats, the intra-species sequence variation in the ITS-1 was 0.2-1.7% within T. trichiura, and 0-1.5% within T. suis. For ITS-2 rDNA, the intra-species sequence variation was 0-1.3% within T. trichiura and 0.2-1.7% within T. suis. The inter-species sequence differences between the two whipworms were 60.7-65.3% for ITS-1 and 59.3-61.5% for ITS-2. These results demonstrated that the ITS rDNA sequences provide additional genetic markers for the characterization and differentiation of the two whipworms. These data should be useful for studying the epidemiology and population genetics of T. trichiura and T. suis, as well as for the diagnosis of trichuriasis in humans and pigs.

  12. Improved identification of rapidly growing mycobacteria by a 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer region PCR and capillary gel electrophoresis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Gray

    Full Text Available The identification of rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM remains problematic because of evolving taxonomy, limitations of current phenotypic methods and absence of a universal gene target for reliable speciation. This study evaluated a novel method of identification of RGM by amplification of the mycobacterial 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS followed by resolution of amplified fragments by capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE. Nineteen American Type Culture Collection (ATCC Mycobacterium strains and 178 clinical isolates of RGM (12 species were studied. All RGM ATCC strains generated unique electropherograms with no overlap with slowly growing mycobacteria species, including M. tuberculosis. A total of 47 electropherograms for the 178 clinical isolates were observed allowing the speciation of 175/178 (98.3% isolates, including the differentiation of the closely related species, M. massiliense (M. abscessus subspecies bolletii and M. abscessus (M. abscessus sensu stricto. ITS fragment size ranged from 332 to 534 bp and 33.7% of clinical isolates generated electropherograms with two distinct peaks, while the remainder where characterized with a single peak. Unique peaks (fragment lengths were identified for 11/12 (92% RGM species with only M. moriokaense having an indistinguishable electropherogram from a rarely encountered CGE subtype of M. fortuitum. We conclude that amplification of the 16S-23S ITS gene region followed by resolution of fragments by CGE is a simple, rapid, accurate and reproducible method for species identification and characterization of the RGM.

  13. Uniqueness property for quasiharmonic functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevdiyor A. Imomkulov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider a class of continuous functions, called quasiaharmonic functions, admitting best approximations by harmonic polynomials. In this class we prove a uniqueness theorem by analogy with the analytic functions.

  14. Diabetes: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Urinary Incontinence Related Documents PDF Choosing Wisely: Diabetes Tests and Treatments Download Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Diabetes Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ...

  15. Osteoporosis: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Osteoporosis Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... and widely-prescribed medications for the treatment of osteoporosis. Some serious side effects of these medication have ...

  16. Nutrition: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nutrition Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... teeth that are needed for grinding up food, nutrition suffers. If you are unable to chew and ...

  17. Molecular Cloning and Sequencing of Hemoglobin-Beta Gene of Channel Catfish, Ictalurus Punctatus Rafinesque

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Hemoglobin-y gene of channel catfish , lctalurus punctatus, was cloned and sequenced . Total RNA from head kidneys was isolated, reverse transcribed and amplified . The sequence of the channel catfish hemoglobin-y gene consists of 600 nucleotides . Analysis of the nucleotide sequence reveals one o...

  18. Short Interspersed Nuclear Element (SINE) Sequences in the Genome of the Human Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus Af293.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanhayuwa, Lakkhana; Coutts, Robert H A

    2016-01-01

    Novel families of short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) sequences in the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, clinical isolate Af293, were identified and categorised into tRNA-related and 5S rRNA-related SINEs. Eight predicted tRNA-related SINE families originating from different tRNAs, and nominated as AfuSINE2 sequences, contained target site duplications of short direct repeat sequences (4-14 bp) flanking the elements, an extended tRNA-unrelated region and typical features of RNA polymerase III promoter sequences. The elements ranged in size from 140-493 bp and were present in low copy number in the genome and five out of eight were actively transcribed. One putative tRNAArg-derived sequence, AfuSINE2-1a possessed a unique feature of repeated trinucleotide ACT residues at its 3'-terminus. This element was similar in sequence to the I-4_AO element found in A. oryzae and an I-1_AF long nuclear interspersed element-like sequence identified in A. fumigatus Af293. Families of 5S rRNA-related SINE sequences, nominated as AfuSINE3, were also identified and their 5'-5S rRNA-related regions show 50-65% and 60-75% similarity to respectively A. fumigatus 5S rRNAs and SINE3-1_AO found in A. oryzae. A. fumigatus Af293 contains five copies of AfuSINE3 sequences ranging in size from 259-343 bp and two out of five AfuSINE3 sequences were actively transcribed. Investigations on AfuSINE distribution in the fungal genome revealed that the elements are enriched in pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions and inserted within gene-rich regions. We also demonstrated that some, but not all, AfuSINE sequences are targeted by host RNA silencing mechanisms. Finally, we demonstrated that infection of the fungus with mycoviruses had no apparent effects on SINE activity.

  19. Unified English Braille in the United Kingdom: Part 2--Examination by Literary Braille Users, Braille Teachers, and Transcribers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryer, Heather; Home, Sarah; Morley Wilkins, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    To inform decision-making around the adoption of the Unified English Braille (UEB) code in the United Kingdom, a suite of research was carried out. This study involved a variety of braille stakeholders--student braille readers (in full time education), adult braille readers, braille teachers, and braille transcribers. Participants were sent…

  20. Employing 454 amplicon pyrosequencing to reveal intragenomic divergence in the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region in fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Lindner; Tor Carlsen; Henrik Nilsson; Marie Davey; Trond Schumacher; Havard. Kauserud

    2013-01-01

    The rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been accepted as a DNA barcoding marker for fungi and is widely used in phylogenetic studies; however, intragenomic ITS variability has been observed in a broad range of taxa, including prokaryotes, plants, animals, and fungi, and this variability has the potential to inflate species richness estimates in molecular...

  1. Whorl-specific expression of the SUPERMAN gene of Arabidopsis is mediated by cis elements in the transcribed region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Toshiro; Sakai, Hajime; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2003-09-02

    The SUPERMAN (SUP) gene of Arabidopsis is involved in controlling cell proliferation in stamen and carpel primordia and in ovules during flower development. The SUP gene encodes a transcription factor with a C2H2-type zinc finger motif, a serine/proline-rich domain, a basic domain, and a leucine-zipper-like domain and is expressed in a very limited region in stamen primordia and in the developing ovary during flower development. The SUP gene is susceptible to methylation, resulting in epigenetic gene silencing. To understand how the SUP gene is expressed spatially and temporally in its restricted domain, and why methylation of the transcribed region affects early-stage SUP expression, we have identified the SUP cis regulatory elements by characterizing SUP gene fusions. These studies show that the SUP gene has discrete upstream promoter elements required for expression in stamen primordia in early stages and in the ovary in later stages. The promoter activity for stamen primordia is modulated by several positive and negative elements located in the transcribed and translated regions. Several regulatory elements in the transcribed region correlate with the areas of the gene that are heavily methylated in epigenetic alleles; these data provide a possible explanation of how methylation of the transcribed region represses transcription.

  2. Extensive diversity of transcribed TCR-beta in phylogenetically primitive vertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, N A; Rast, J P; Litman, G W

    1996-04-01

    The genetic complexity of the expressed TCR Vbeta repertoire in Heterodontus francisci, the horned shark, a member of the most phylogenetically primitive vertebrate class in which TCR genes have been identified, is addressed. The sequences of 55 spleen cDNA clones encoding TCR-beta genes are compared, and 7 diverse Vbeta families are defined by overall sequence identity and clustering based on phylogenetic distance analyses. At least 18 putative Jbeta sequence types, as well as a consensus diversity (D) element that resembles most closely mammalian TCR Dbeta, can he recognized. Extensive sequence diversity, as well as characteristic TCR-beta length variation in CDR3, is evident. Unlike Ig genes in this species, TCR-beta genes exhibit considerable V family multiplicity and appear to utilize combinatorial mechanisms in the generation of immunologic diversity. in this sense, the TCR-beta genes in this cartilaginous fish and humans are more similar than are the genes encoding Ab proteins in these species.

  3. Antimelanoma CTL recognizes peptides derived from an ORF transcribed from the antisense strand of the 3′ untranslated region of TRIT1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf K Swoboda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncoding regions of the genome play an important role in tumorigenesis of cancer. Using expression cloning, we have identified a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL–defined antigen that recognizes a protein sequence derived from an open reading frame transcribed from the reverse strand in the 3′ untranslated region of tRNA isopentenyltransferase 1 (TRIT1. A peptide derived from this open reading frame (ORF sequence and predicted to bind to HLA-B57, sensitized HLA-B57+ tumor cells to lysis by CTL793. The peptide also induced a CTL response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of patient 793 and in two other melanoma patients. The CTL lysed peptide-pulsed HLA-B57+ target cells and melanoma cells with endogenous antigen expression. The recognition of this antigen is not limited to HLA-B57-restricted CTLs. An HLA-A2 peptide derived from the ORF was able to induce CTLs in PBMC of 2 HLA-A2+ patients. This study describes for the first time a CTL-defined melanoma antigen that is derived from an ORF on the reverse strand of the putative tumor suppressor gene TRIT1. This antigen has potential use as a vaccine or its ability to induce CTLs in vitro could be used as a predictive biomarker.

  4. Development and evaluation of specific PCR primers targeting the ribosomal DNA-internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of peritrich ciliates in environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lei; Zhang, Qianqian; Gong, Jun

    2017-07-01

    Peritrich ciliates are highly diverse and can be important bacterial grazers in aquatic ecosystems. Morphological identifications of peritrich species and assemblages in the environment are time-consuming and expertise-demanding. In this study, two peritrich-specific PCR primers were newly designed to amplify a fragment including the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of ribosomal rDNA from environmental samples. The primers showed high specificity in silico, and in tests with peritrich isolates and environmental DNA. Application of these primers in clone library construction and sequencing yielded exclusively sequences of peritrichs for water and sediment samples. We also found the ITS1, ITS2, ITS, D1 region of 28S rDNA, and ITS+D1 region co-varied with, and generally more variable than, the V9 region of 18S rDNA in peritrichs. The newly designed specific primers thus provide additional tools to study the molecular diversity, community composition, and phylogeography of these ecologically important protists in different systems.

  5. Highly conserved elements discovered in vertebrates are present in non-syntenic loci of tunicates, act as enhancers and can be transcribed during development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanges, Remo; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Gueroult-Bellone, Marion; Roure, Agnes; Ferg, Marco; Meola, Nicola; Amore, Gabriele; Basu, Swaraj; Brown, Euan R.; De Simone, Marco; Petrera, Francesca; Licastro, Danilo; Strähle, Uwe; Banfi, Sandro; Lemaire, Patrick; Birney, Ewan; Müller, Ferenc; Stupka, Elia

    2013-01-01

    Co-option of cis-regulatory modules has been suggested as a mechanism for the evolution of expression sites during development. However, the extent and mechanisms involved in mobilization of cis-regulatory modules remains elusive. To trace the history of non-coding elements, which may represent candidate ancestral cis-regulatory modules affirmed during chordate evolution, we have searched for conserved elements in tunicate and vertebrate (Olfactores) genomes. We identified, for the first time, 183 non-coding sequences that are highly conserved between the two groups. Our results show that all but one element are conserved in non-syntenic regions between vertebrate and tunicate genomes, while being syntenic among vertebrates. Nevertheless, in all the groups, they are significantly associated with transcription factors showing specific functions fundamental to animal development, such as multicellular organism development and sequence-specific DNA binding. The majority of these regions map onto ultraconserved elements and we demonstrate that they can act as functional enhancers within the organism of origin, as well as in cross-transgenesis experiments, and that they are transcribed in extant species of Olfactores. We refer to the elements as ‘Olfactores conserved non-coding elements’. PMID:23393190

  6. Evaluating the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS as a candidate dinoflagellate barcode marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowena F Stern

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA barcoding offers an efficient way to determine species identification and to measure biodiversity. For dinoflagellates, an ancient alveolate group of about 2000 described extant species, DNA barcoding studies have revealed large amounts of unrecognized species diversity, most of which is not represented in culture collections. To date, two mitochondrial gene markers, Cytochrome Oxidase I (COI and Cytochrome b oxidase (COB, have been used to assess DNA barcoding in dinoflagellates, and both failed to amplify all taxa and suffered from low resolution. Nevertheless, both genes yielded many examples of morphospecies showing cryptic speciation and morphologically distinct named species being genetically similar, highlighting the need for a common marker. For example, a large number of cultured Symbiodinium strains have neither taxonomic identification, nor a common measure of diversity that can be used to compare this genus to other dinoflagellates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Internal Transcribed Spacer units 1 and 2 (ITS of the rDNA operon, as a high resolution marker for distinguishing species dinoflagellates in culture. In our study, from 78 different species, the ITS barcode clearly differentiated species from genera and could identify 96% of strains to a known species or sub-genus grouping. 8.3% showed evidence of being cryptic species. A quarter of strains identified had no previous species identification. The greatest levels of hidden biodiversity came from Scrippsiella and the Pfiesteriaceae family, whilst Heterocapsa strains showed a high level of mismatch to their given species name. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ITS marker was successful in confirming species, revealing hidden diversity in culture collections. This marker, however, may have limited use for environmental barcoding due to paralogues, the potential for unidentifiable chimaeras and priming across taxa. In these

  7. Rufus Choate: A Unique Orator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Reed

    Rufus Choate, a Massachusetts lawyer and orator, has been described as a "unique and romantic phenomenon" in America's history. Born in 1799 in Essex, Massachusetts, Choate graduated from Dartmouth College and attended Harvard Law School. Choate's goal was to be the top in his profession. Daniel Webster was Choate's hero. Choate became well…

  8. Uniqueness of PL Minimal Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi NI

    2007-01-01

    Using a standard fact in hyperbolic geometry, we give a simple proof of the uniqueness of PL minimal surfaces, thus filling in a gap in the original proof of Jaco and Rubinstein. Moreover, in order to clarify some ambiguity, we sharpen the definition of PL minimal surfaces, and prove a technical lemma on the Plateau problem in the hyperbolic space.

  9. On the Nagumo uniqueness theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Octavian G. Mustafa; O'Regan, Donal

    2011-01-01

    By a convenient reparametrisation of the integral curves of a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE), we are able to improve the conclusions of the recent contribution [A. Constantin, Proc. Japan Acad. {\\bf 86(A)} (2010), 41--44]. In this way, we establish a flexible uniqueness criterion for ODEs without Lipschitz-like nonlinearities.

  10. The Lasso Problem and Uniqueness

    CERN Document Server

    Tibshirani, Ryan J

    2012-01-01

    The lasso is a popular tool for sparse linear regression, especially for problems in which the number of variables p exceeds the number of observations n. But when p>n, the lasso criterion is not strictly convex, and hence it may not have a unique minimum. An important question is: when is the lasso solution well-defined (unique)? We review results from the literature, which show that if the predictor variables are drawn from a continuous probability distribution, then there is a unique lasso solution with probability one, regardless of the sizes of n and p. We also show that this result extends easily to $\\ell_1$ penalized minimization problems over a wide range of loss functions. A second important question is: how can we deal with the case of non-uniqueness in lasso solutions? In light of the aforementioned result, this case really only arises when some of the predictor variables are discrete, or when some post-processing has been performed on continuous predictor measurements. Though we certainly cannot c...

  11. Uniqueness theorems in linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Knops, Robin John

    1971-01-01

    The classical result for uniqueness in elasticity theory is due to Kirchhoff. It states that the standard mixed boundary value problem for a homogeneous isotropic linear elastic material in equilibrium and occupying a bounded three-dimensional region of space possesses at most one solution in the classical sense, provided the Lame and shear moduli, A and J1 respectively, obey the inequalities (3 A + 2 J1) > 0 and J1>O. In linear elastodynamics the analogous result, due to Neumann, is that the initial-mixed boundary value problem possesses at most one solution provided the elastic moduli satisfy the same set of inequalities as in Kirchhoffs theorem. Most standard textbooks on the linear theory of elasticity mention only these two classical criteria for uniqueness and neglect altogether the abundant literature which has appeared since the original publications of Kirchhoff. To remedy this deficiency it seems appropriate to attempt a coherent description ofthe various contributions made to the study of uniquenes...

  12. Multiple floating metatarsals: a unique injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vivek Trikha; Tarun Goyal; Amit K Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Concomitant dislocation of the tarsometatarsal and metatarsophalangeal joints of foot is an extremely rare injury.Such injuries presenting in a single or adjacent dual rays have been described in few cases previously.We describe such an injury in adjacent three metatarsals of a polytrauma patient.These injuries are likely to be missed in the initial assessment of a polytrauma patient.These patients are at risk of an overlooked diagnosis but the consequences of missing this type of injury may be quite severe.This case is presented in view of its uniqueness along with possible mechanism of injury,the sequence of reduction and follow-up.Knowledge of such injury and its proper management may be useful to the trauma surgeons.

  13. High-resolution mapping and transcriptional activity analysis of chicken centromere sequences on giant lampbrush chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasikova, Alla; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Zlotina, Anna

    2012-12-01

    Exploration into morphofunctional organisation of centromere DNA sequences is important for understanding the mechanisms of kinetochore specification and assembly. In-depth epigenetic analysis of DNA fragments associated with centromeric nucleosome proteins has demonstrated unique features of centromere organisation in chicken karyotype: there are both mature centromeres, which comprise chromosome-specific homogeneous arrays of tandem repeats, and recently evolved primitive centromeres, which consist of non-tandemly organised DNA sequences. In this work, we describe the arrangement and transcriptional activity of chicken centromere repeats for Cen1, Cen2, Cen3, Cen4, Cen7, Cen8, and Cen11 and non-repetitive centromere sequences of chromosomes 5, 27, and Z using highly elongated lampbrush chromosomes, which are characteristic of the diplotene stage of oogenesis. The degree of chromatin packaging and fine spatial organisations of tandemly repetitive and non-tandemly repetitive centromeric sequences significantly differ at the lampbrush stage. Using DNA/RNA FISH, we have demonstrated that during the lampbrush stage, DNA sequences are transcribed within the centromere regions of chromosomes that lack centromere-specific tandem repeats. In contrast, chromosome-specific centromeric repeats Cen1, Cen2, Cen3, Cen4, Cen7, Cen8, and Cen11 do not demonstrate any transcriptional activity during the lampbrush stage. In addition, we found that CNM repeat cluster localises adjacent to non-repetitive centromeric sequences in chicken microchromosome 27 indicating that centromere region in this chromosome is repeat-rich. Cross-species FISH allowed localisation of the sequences homologous to centromeric DNA of chicken chromosomes 5 and 27 in centromere regions of quail orthologous chromosomes.

  14. Unique variations of pbp2x sequences in clinical Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates and penicillin and cefotaxime resistance%肺炎链球菌青霉素结合蛋白基因pbp2x新的变异与青霉素及头孢噻肟耐药

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田素飞; 禇云卓; 陈佰义

    2008-01-01

    included the replacement of Thr338→Ala in the first conservative motif STMK and Leu546→Val adjacent to third conservative motif KSG. The importance of the exchange of His394→Leu was identified in one PNSP isolate 15. The remarkable finding in this study was Met342→Ile following the first conservative motif STMK. pbp2x sequences of eight PRSP isolates shared Lys501-Glu505-Thr507 substitutions which might be served as a unique marker for PRSP in this region. Novel gene and amino acid sequence variants in 17 isolate were identified in this study, and these sequences have been deposited in the GenBank database and assigned accession No. EU044831, EU089706-EU089709, EU106881-EU106884 and EU124672. Conclusion It is likely that the emergence of penicillin and cefotaxime nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae in Shenyang might be associated with novel gene sequence variants.

  15. Diversity of 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS reveals phylogenetic relationships in Burkholderia pseudomallei and its near-neighbors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P Liguori

    Full Text Available Length polymorphisms within the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS have been described as stable genetic markers for studying bacterial phylogenetics. In this study, we used these genetic markers to investigate phylogenetic relationships in Burkholderia pseudomallei and its near-relative species. B. pseudomallei is known as one of the most genetically recombined bacterial species. In silico analysis of multiple B. pseudomallei genomes revealed approximately four homologous rRNA operons and ITS length polymorphisms therein. We characterized ITS distribution using PCR and analyzed via a high-throughput capillary electrophoresis in 1,191 B. pseudomallei strains. Three major ITS types were identified, two of which were commonly found in most B. pseudomallei strains from the endemic areas, whereas the third one was significantly correlated with worldwide sporadic strains. Interestingly, mixtures of the two common ITS types were observed within the same strains, and at a greater incidence in Thailand than Australia suggesting that genetic recombination causes the ITS variation within species, with greater recombination frequency in Thailand. In addition, the B. mallei ITS type was common to B. pseudomallei, providing further support that B. mallei is a clone of B. pseudomallei. Other B. pseudomallei near-neighbors possessed unique and monomorphic ITS types. Our data shed light on evolutionary patterns of B. pseudomallei and its near relative species.

  16. Comparative analysis of a large dataset indicates that internal transcribed spacer (ITS) should be incorporated into the core barcode for seed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, De-Zhu; Gao, Lian-Ming; Li, Hong-Tao; Wang, Hong; Ge, Xue-Jun; Liu, Jian-Quan; Chen, Zhi-Duan; Zhou, Shi-Liang; Chen, Shi-Lin; Yang, Jun-Bo; Fu, Cheng-Xin; Zeng, Chun-Xia; Yan, Hai-Fei; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Sun, Yong-Shuai; Chen, Si-Yun; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Kun; Yang, Tuo; Duan, Guang-Wen

    2011-12-06

    A two-marker combination of plastid rbcL and matK has previously been recommended as the core plant barcode, to be supplemented with additional markers such as plastid trnH-psbA and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS). To assess the effectiveness and universality of these barcode markers in seed plants, we sampled 6,286 individuals representing 1,757 species in 141 genera of 75 families (42 orders) by using four different methods of data analysis. These analyses indicate that (i) the three plastid markers showed high levels of universality (87.1-92.7%), whereas ITS performed relatively well (79%) in angiosperms but not so well in gymnosperms; (ii) in taxonomic groups for which direct sequencing of the marker is possible, ITS showed the highest discriminatory power of the four markers, and a combination of ITS and any plastid DNA marker was able to discriminate 69.9-79.1% of species, compared with only 49.7% with rbcL + matK; and (iii) where multiple individuals of a single species were tested, ascriptions based on ITS and plastid DNA barcodes were incongruent in some samples for 45.2% of the sampled genera (for genera with more than one species sampled). This finding highlights the importance of both sampling multiple individuals and using markers with different modes of inheritance. In cases where it is difficult to amplify and directly sequence ITS in its entirety, just using ITS2 is a useful backup because it is easier to amplify and sequence this subset of the marker. We therefore propose that ITS/ITS2 should be incorporated into the core barcode for seed plants.

  17. Requirement for PBAF in transcriptional repression and repair at DNA breaks in actively transcribed regions of chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Kakarougkas, Andreas; Ismail, Amani; Chambers, Anna; Riballo, Queti; Herbert, Alex; Kunzel, Julia; Lobrich, Markus; Jeggo, Penny; Downs, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Summary Actively transcribed regions of the genome are vulnerable to genomic instability. Recently, it was discovered that transcription is repressed in response to neighboring DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). It is not known whether a failure to silence transcription flanking DSBs has any impact on DNA repair efficiency or whether chromatin remodelers contribute to the process. Here, we show that the PBAF remodeling complex is important for DSB-induced transcriptional silencing and promotes ...

  18. The core and unique proteins of haloarchaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capes Melinda D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the first genome of a halophilic archaeon was sequenced in 2000, biologists have been advancing the understanding of genomic characteristics that allow for survival in the harsh natural environments of these organisms. An increase in protein acidity and GC-bias in the genome have been implicated as factors in tolerance to extreme salinity, desiccation, and high solar radiation. However, few previous attempts have been made to identify novel genes that would permit survival in such extreme conditions. Results With the recent release of several new complete haloarchaeal genome sequences, we have conducted a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis focusing on the identification of unique haloarchaeal conserved proteins that likely play key roles in environmental adaptation. Using bioinformatic methods, we have clustered 31,312 predicted proteins from nine haloarchaeal genomes into 4,455 haloarchaeal orthologous groups (HOGs. We assigned likely functions by association with established COG and KOG databases in NCBI. After identifying homologs in four additional haloarchaeal genomes, we determined that there were 784 core haloarchaeal protein clusters (cHOGs, of which 83 clusters were found primarily in haloarchaea. Further analysis found that 55 clusters were truly unique (tucHOGs to haloarchaea and qualify as signature proteins while 28 were nearly unique (nucHOGs, the vast majority of which were coded for on the haloarchaeal chromosomes. Of the signature proteins, only one example with any predicted function, Ral, involved in desiccation/radiation tolerance in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, was identified. Among the core clusters, 33% was predicted to function in metabolism, 25% in information transfer and storage, 10% in cell processes and signaling, and 22% belong to poorly characterized or general function groups. Conclusion Our studies have established conserved groups of nearly 800 protein clusters present in all

  19. Lithium nephropathy: unique sonographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Salvo, Donald N; Park, Joseph; Laing, Faye C

    2012-04-01

    This case series describes a unique sonographic appearance consisting of numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci seen on renal sonograms of 10 adult patients receiving chronic lithium therapy. Clinically, chronic renal insufficiency was present in 6 and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in 2. Sonography showed numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci. Computed tomography in 5 patients confirmed microcysts and microcalcifications, which were fewer in number than on sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging in 2 patients confirmed microcysts in each case. Renal biopsy in 1 patient showed chronic interstitial nephritis, microcysts, and tubular dilatation. The diagnosis of lithium nephropathy should be considered when sonography shows these findings.

  20. Mucormycosis in India: unique features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Singh, Rachna

    2014-12-01

    Mucormycosis remains a devastating invasive fungal infection, with high mortality rates even after active management. The disease is being reported at an alarming frequency over the past decades from India. Indian mucormycosis has certain unique features. Rhino-orbito-cerebral presentation associated with uncontrolled diabetes is the predominant characteristic. Isolated renal mucormycosis has emerged as a new clinical entity. Apophysomyces elegans and Rhizopus homothallicus are emerging species in this region and uncommon agents such as Mucor irregularis and Thamnostylum lucknowense are also being reported. This review focuses on these distinct features of mucormycosis observed in India.

  1. UNIQUE ORAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raphael M. Ottenbrite; ZHAO Ruifeng; Sam Milstein

    1995-01-01

    An oral drug delivery system using proteinoid microspheres is discussed with respect to its unique dependence on pH. It has been found that certain drugs such as insulin and heparin can be encapsulated in proteinoid spheres at stomach pH's (1-3). These spheres also dissemble at intestinal pH's (6-7) releasing the drug for absorption. Using this technique low molecular weight heparin and human growth hormone have been orally delivered successfully to several animal species. Future work has been proposed to study the interaction and binding of the specific drugs with synthesized oligopeptides.

  2. Analysis of unique beta transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eman, B.; Krmpotic, F.; Tadic, D;

    1967-01-01

    The Heidelberg group measurements [For abstr. see Phys. Rev. Nucl. Sci. Vol. 15 (1965)] of unique forbidden transitions have been analysed. It has been found that experimental shape factors can be reproduced only with the induced pseudoscalar form factor d ...-non-conserving tensor form factor b > 0. In the former case they contradict Daniel's results [See abstr. 1966A10720] for 0- rarr 0+ transitions, whereas in the latter they are in disagreement with other known analyses of mu-meson capture, allowed and forbidden transitions. The conclusion appears to be independent...

  3. Intragenomic variation in the second internal transcribed spacer of the ribosomal DNA of species of the genera Culex and Lutzia (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesgueiro, Fabiana Tavares; Demari-Silva, Bruna; Malafronte, Rosely dos Santos; Sallum, Maria Anice Mureb; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2011-02-01

    Culex is the largest genus of Culicini and includes vectors of several arboviruses and filarial worms. Many species of Culex are morphologically similar, which makes their identification difficult, particularly when using female specimens. To aid evolutionary studies and species distinction, molecular techniques are often used. Sequences of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) from 16 species of the genus Culex and one of Lutzia were used to assess their genomic variability and to verify their applicability in the phylogenetic analysis of the group. The distance matrix (uncorrected p-distance) that was obtained revealed intragenomic and intraspecific variation. Because of the intragenomic variability, we selected ITS2 copies for use in distance analyses based on their secondary structures. Neighbour-joining topology was obtained with an uncorrected p-distance. Despite the heterogeneity observed, individuals of the same species were grouped together and correlated with the current, morphology-based classification, thereby showing that ITS2 is an appropriate marker to be used in the taxonomy of Culex.

  4. Intragenomic variation in the second internal transcribed spacer of the ribosomal DNA of species of the genera Culex and Lutzia (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Tavares Vesgueiro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Culex is the largest genus of Culicini and includes vectors of several arboviruses and filarial worms. Many species of Culex are morphologically similar, which makes their identification difficult, particularly when using female specimens. To aid evolutionary studies and species distinction, molecular techniques are often used. Sequences of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2 of ribosomal DNA (rDNA from 16 species of the genus Culex and one of Lutzia were used to assess their genomic variability and to verify their applicability in the phylogenetic analysis of the group. The distance matrix (uncorrected p-distance that was obtained revealed intragenomic and intraspecific variation. Because of the intragenomic variability, we selected ITS2 copies for use in distance analyses based on their secondary structures. Neighbour-joining topology was obtained with an uncorrected p-distance. Despite the heterogeneity observed, individuals of the same species were grouped together and correlated with the current, morphology-based classification, thereby showing that ITS2 is an appropriate marker to be used in the taxonomy of Culex.

  5. Extensive 5.8S nrDNA polymorphism in Mammillaria (Cactaceae) with special reference to the identification of pseudogenic internal transcribed spacer regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpke, Doerte; Peterson, Angela

    2008-05-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (ITS1, 5.8S rDNA, ITS2) represents the most widely applied nuclear marker in eukaryotic phylogenetics. Although this region has been assumed to evolve in concert, the number of investigations revealing high degrees of intra-individual polymorphism connected with the presence of pseudogenes has risen. The 5.8S rDNA is the most important diagnostic marker for functionality of the ITS region. In Mammillaria, intra-individual 5.8S rDNA polymorphisms of up to 36% and up to nine different types have been found. Twenty-eight of 30 cloned genomic Mammillaria sequences were identified as putative pseudogenes. For the identification of pseudogenic ITS regions, in addition to formal tests based on substitution rates, we attempted to focus on functional features of the 5.8S rDNA (5.8S motif, secondary structure). The importance of functional data for the identification of pseudogenes is outlined and discussed. The identification of pseudogenes is essential, because they may cause erroneous phylogenies and taxonomic problems.

  6. Examination of species boundaries in the Acropora cervicornis group (Scleractinia, cnidaria) using nuclear DNA sequence analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppen, M J; Willis, B L; Vugt, H W; Miller, D J

    2000-09-01

    Although Acropora is the most species-rich genus of the scleractinian (stony) corals, only three species occur in the Caribbean: A. cervicornis, A. palmata and A. prolifera. Based on overall coral morphology, abundance and distribution patterns, it has been suggested that A. prolifera may be a hybrid between A. cervicornis and A. palmata. The species boundaries among these three morphospecies were examined using DNA sequence analyses of the nuclear Pax-C 46/47 intron and the ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS1 and ITS2) and 5.8S regions. Moderate levels of sequence variability were observed in the ITS and 5.8S sequences (up to 5.2% overall sequence difference), but variability within species was as large as between species and all three species carried similar sequences. Since this is unlikely to represent a shared ancestral polymorphism, the data suggest that introgressive hybridization occurs among the three species. For the Pax-C intron, A. cervicornis and A. palmata had very distinct allele frequencies and A. cervicornis carried a unique allele at a frequency of 0.769 (although sequence differences between alleles were small). All A. prolifera colonies examined were heterozygous for the Pax-C intron, whereas heterozygosity was only 0.286 and 0.333 for A. cervicornis and A. palmata, respectively. These data support the hypothesis that A. prolifera is the product of hybridization between two species that have a different allelic composition for the Pax-C intron, i.e. A. cervicornis and A. palmata. We therefore suggest that A. prolifera is a hybrid between A. cervicornis and A. palmata, which backcrosses with the parental species at low frequency.

  7. Unique Features of Mobile Commerce

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Xiaojun; IIJIMA Junichi; HO Sho

    2004-01-01

    While the market potentials and impacts of web-based e-commerce are still in the ascendant, the advances in wireless technologies and mobile networks have brought about a new business opportunity and research attention, what is termed mobile commerce. Commonly, mobile commerce is considered to be another new application of existing web-based e-commerce onto wireless networks, but as an independent business area, mobile commerce has its own advantages and challenges as opposed to traditional e-commerce applications. This paper focuses on exploring the unique features of mobile commerce as. Compared with traditional e-commerce. Also, there are still some limitations arisen in m-commerce in contrast to web-based e-commerce. Finally, current state of mobile commerce in Japan is presented in brief, with an introduction of several cases involving mobile commerce applications in today 's marketplace.

  8. Unique features of space reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, David

    Space reactors are designed to meet a unique set of requirements; they must be sufficiently compact to be launched in a rocket to their operational location, operate for many years without maintenance and servicing, operate in extreme environments, and reject heat by radiation to space. To meet these restrictions, operating temperatures are much greater than in terrestrial power plants, and the reactors tend to have a fast neutron spectrum. Currently, a new generation of space reactor power plants is being developed. The major effort is in the SP-100 program, where the power plant is being designed for seven years of full power, and no maintenance operation at a reactor outlet operating temperature of 1350 K.

  9. The probabilities of unique events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeet S Khemlani

    Full Text Available Many theorists argue that the probabilities of unique events, even real possibilities such as President Obama's re-election, are meaningless. As a consequence, psychologists have seldom investigated them. We propose a new theory (implemented in a computer program in which such estimates depend on an intuitive non-numerical system capable only of simple procedures, and a deliberative system that maps intuitions into numbers. The theory predicts that estimates of the probabilities of conjunctions should often tend to split the difference between the probabilities of the two conjuncts. We report two experiments showing that individuals commit such violations of the probability calculus, and corroborating other predictions of the theory, e.g., individuals err in the same way even when they make non-numerical verbal estimates, such as that an event is highly improbable.

  10. The Evolution of Human Uniqueness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Robert

    2017-01-09

    The human species is an outlier in the natural world. Two million years ago our ancestors were a slightly odd apes. Now we occupy the largest ecological and geographical range of any species, have larger biomass, and process more energy. Usually, this transformation is explained in terms of cognitive ability-people are just smarter than all the rest. In this paper I argue that culture, our ability to learn from each other, and cooperation, our ability to make common cause with large groups of unrelated individuals are the real roots of human uniqueness, and sketch an evolutionary account of how these crucial abilities co-evolved with each other and with other features of our life histories.

  11. Phytophthora-ID.org: A sequence-based Phytophthora identification tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    N.J. Grünwald; F.N. Martin; M.M. Larsen; C.M. Sullivan; C.M. Press; M.D. Coffey; E.M. Hansen; J.L. Parke

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary species identification relies strongly on sequence-based identification, yet resources for identification of many fungal and oomycete pathogens are rare. We developed two web-based, searchable databases for rapid identification of Phytophthora spp. based on sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) or the cytochrome oxidase...

  12. Draft genome sequence of a strain of cosmopolitan fungus Trichoderma atroviride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi-Kunne, X.; Seidl, M.F.; Faino, L.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    An unknown fungus has been isolated as a contaminant of in vitro-grown fungal cultures. In an attempt to identify the contamination, we isolated the causal agent and performed whole-genome sequencing. BLAST analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence against the NCBI database showed 1

  13. Development of a multiplex PCR assay based on the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer for the detection and identification of rodent Pasteurellaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benga, Laurentiu; Benten, W Peter M; Engelhardt, Eva; Bleich, André; Gougoula, Christina; Sager, Martin

    2013-11-01

    The rodents Pasteurellaceae have to be excluded from the specified pathogen free experimental animal facilities. Despite the biological and economic importance of Pasteurellaceae in relation to experimental animals just a few molecular based methods are available for their detection and identification. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a multiplex PCR assay allowing detection of all rodent Pasteurellaceae and identification of [Pasteurella] pneumotropica biotype Jawetz, [P.] pneumotropica biotype Heyl and [Actinobacillus] muris, as the most prevalent members of the group. For this, a Pasteurellaceae common forward primer located on the 16S rRNA gene was used in conjunction with four different reverse primers specific for [P.] pneumotropica biotype Jawetz, [P.] pneumotropica biotype Heyl, [A.] muris and a common reverse primer for all rodent Pasteurellaceae, all targeting the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer sequences. The performance characteristics of the assay were tested against 125 Pasteurellaceae isolates belonging to eleven different species and including 34 strains of [P.] pneumotropica biotype Jawetz, 44 strains of [P.] pneumotropica biotype Heyl and 37 strains of [A.] muris. Additionally, eight other mouse associated bacterial species which could pose a diagnostic problem were included. The assay showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. Identification of the clinical isolates was validated by ITS profiling and when necessary by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This multiplex PCR represents the first molecular tool able to detect and differentiate in a single assay among the Pasteurellaceae found in laboratory mouse and may become a reliable alternative to the present diagnostic methods. © 2013.

  14. Flexible and efficient genome tiling design with penalized uniqueness score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Yang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a powerful tool in whole genome analysis, tiling array has been widely used in the answering of many genomic questions. Now it could also serve as a capture device for the library preparation in the popular high throughput sequencing experiments. Thus, a flexible and efficient tiling array design approach is still needed and could assist in various types and scales of transcriptomic experiment. Results In this paper, we address issues and challenges in designing probes suitable for tiling array applications and targeted sequencing. In particular, we define the penalized uniqueness score, which serves as a controlling criterion to eliminate potential cross-hybridization, and a flexible tiling array design pipeline. Unlike BLAST or simple suffix array based methods, computing and using our uniqueness measurement can be more efficient for large scale design and require less memory. The parameters provided could assist in various types of genomic tiling task. In addition, using both commercial array data and experiment data we show, unlike previously claimed, that palindromic sequence exhibiting relatively lower uniqueness. Conclusions Our proposed penalized uniqueness score could serve as a better indicator for cross hybridization with higher sensitivity and specificity, giving more control of expected array quality. The flexible tiling design algorithm incorporating the penalized uniqueness score was shown to give higher coverage and resolution. The package to calculate the penalized uniqueness score and the described probe selection algorithm are implemented as a Perl program, which is freely available at http://www1.fbn-dummerstorf.de/en/forschung/fbs/fb3/paper/2012-yang-1/OTAD.v1.1.tar.gz.

  15. Relative effects of mutability and selection on single nucleotide polymorphisms in transcribed regions of the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos Christopher I

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motivation Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are the most common type of genetic variation in humans. However, the factors that affect SNP density are poorly understood. The goal of this study was to estimate the relative effects of mutability and selection on SNP density in transcribed regions of human genes. It is important for prediction of the regions that harbor functional polymorphisms. Results We used frequency-validated SNPs resulting from single-nucleotide substitutions. SNPs were subdivided into five functional categories: (i 5' untranslated region (UTR SNPs, (ii 3' UTR SNPs, (iii synonymous SNPs, (iv SNPs producing conservative missense mutations, and (v SNPs producing radical missense mutations. Each of these categories was further subdivided into nine mutational categories on the basis of the single-nucleotide substitution type. Thus, 45 functional/mutational categories were analyzed. The relative mutation rate in each mutational category was estimated on the basis of published data. The proportion of segregating sites (PSSs for each functional/mutational category was estimated by dividing the observed number of SNPs by the number of potential sites in the genome for a given functional/mutational category. By analyzing each functional group separately, we found significant positive correlations between PSSs and relative mutation rates (Spearman's correlation coefficient, at least r = 0.96, df = 9, P P = 0.001, suggesting that selection affects SNP density in transcribed regions of the genome. We used analyses of variance and covariance to estimate the relative effects of selection (functional category and mutability (relative mutation rate on the PSSs and found that approximately 87% of variation in PSS was due to variation in the mutation rate and approximately 13% was due to selection, suggesting that the probability that a site located in a transcribed region of a gene is polymorphic mostly depends on the mutability

  16. CYP1B1: a unique gene with unique characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiq, Muneeb A; Dada, Rima; Sharma, Reetika; Saluja, Daman; Dada, Tanuj

    2014-01-01

    CYP1B1, a recently described dioxin inducible oxidoreductase, is a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily involved in the metabolism of estradiol, retinol, benzo[a]pyrene, tamoxifen, melatonin, sterols etc. It plays important roles in numerous physiological processes and is expressed at mRNA level in many tissues and anatomical compartments. CYP1B1 has been implicated in scores of disorders. Analyses of the recent studies suggest that CYP1B1 can serve as a universal/ideal cancer marker and a candidate gene for predictive diagnosis. There is plethora of literature available about certain aspects of CYP1B1 that have not been interpreted, discussed and philosophized upon. The present analysis examines CYP1B1 as a peculiar gene with certain distinctive characteristics like the uniqueness in its chromosomal location, gene structure and organization, involvement in developmentally important disorders, tissue specific, not only expression, but splicing, potential as a universal cancer marker due to its involvement in key aspects of cellular metabolism, use in diagnosis and predictive diagnosis of various diseases and the importance and function of CYP1B1 mRNA in addition to the regular translation. Also CYP1B1 is very difficult to express in heterologous expression systems, thereby, halting its functional studies. Here we review and analyze these exceptional and startling characteristics of CYP1B1 with inputs from our own experiences in order to get a better insight into its molecular biology in health and disease. This may help to further understand the etiopathomechanistic aspects of CYP1B1 mediated diseases paving way for better research strategies and improved clinical management.

  17. A GWAS sequence variant for platelet volume marks an alternative DNM3 promoter in megakaryocytes near a MEIS1 binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nürnberg, Sylvia T; Rendon, Augusto; Smethurst, Peter A; Paul, Dirk S; Voss, Katrin; Thon, Jonathan N; Lloyd-Jones, Heather; Sambrook, Jennifer G; Tijssen, Marloes R; Italiano, Joseph E; Deloukas, Panos; Gottgens, Berthold; Soranzo, Nicole; Ouwehand, Willem H

    2012-12-06

    We recently identified 68 genomic loci where common sequence variants are associated with platelet count and volume. Platelets are formed in the bone marrow by megakaryocytes, which are derived from hematopoietic stem cells by a process mainly controlled by transcription factors. The homeobox transcription factor MEIS1 is uniquely transcribed in megakaryocytes and not in the other lineage-committed blood cells. By ChIP-seq, we show that 5 of the 68 loci pinpoint a MEIS1 binding event within a group of 252 MK-overexpressed genes. In one such locus in DNM3, regulating platelet volume, the MEIS1 binding site falls within a region acting as an alternative promoter that is solely used in megakaryocytes, where allelic variation dictates different levels of a shorter transcript. The importance of dynamin activity to the latter stages of thrombopoiesis was confirmed by the observation that the inhibitor Dynasore reduced murine proplatelet for-mation in vitro.

  18. Automatic sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Haeseler, Friedrich

    2003-01-01

    Automatic sequences are sequences which are produced by a finite automaton. Although they are not random they may look as being random. They are complicated, in the sense of not being not ultimately periodic, they may look rather complicated, in the sense that it may not be easy to name the rule by which the sequence is generated, however there exists a rule which generates the sequence. The concept automatic sequences has special applications in algebra, number theory, finite automata and formal languages, combinatorics on words. The text deals with different aspects of automatic sequences, in particular:· a general introduction to automatic sequences· the basic (combinatorial) properties of automatic sequences· the algebraic approach to automatic sequences· geometric objects related to automatic sequences.

  19. Tidying up international nucleotide sequence databases: ecological, geographical and sequence quality annotation of its sequences of mycorrhizal fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leho Tedersoo

    Full Text Available Sequence analysis of the ribosomal RNA operon, particularly the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region, provides a powerful tool for identification of mycorrhizal fungi. The sequence data deposited in the International Nucleotide Sequence Databases (INSD are, however, unfiltered for quality and are often poorly annotated with metadata. To detect chimeric and low-quality sequences and assign the ectomycorrhizal fungi to phylogenetic lineages, fungal ITS sequences were downloaded from INSD, aligned within family-level groups, and examined through phylogenetic analyses and BLAST searches. By combining the fungal sequence database UNITE and the annotation and search tool PlutoF, we also added metadata from the literature to these accessions. Altogether 35,632 sequences belonged to mycorrhizal fungi or originated from ericoid and orchid mycorrhizal roots. Of these sequences, 677 were considered chimeric and 2,174 of low read quality. Information detailing country of collection, geographical coordinates, interacting taxon and isolation source were supplemented to cover 78.0%, 33.0%, 41.7% and 96.4% of the sequences, respectively. These annotated sequences are publicly available via UNITE (http://unite.ut.ee/ for downstream biogeographic, ecological and taxonomic analyses. In European Nucleotide Archive (ENA; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/, the annotated sequences have a special link-out to UNITE. We intend to expand the data annotation to additional genes and all taxonomic groups and functional guilds of fungi.

  20. A study of ribonucleoproteins: The sequence of rabbit 18S ribosomal RNA and the identification of proteins associated with messenger RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaughton, J.F. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This study considers the functional role of ribosomal RNA and messenger ribonucleoproteins in the translational regulation of gene expression. The primary structure of rabbit 18S ribosomal RNA was determined by nucleotide sequence analysis of the RNA directly. Rabbit 18S RNA was cleaved with either T{sub 1} ribonuclease or RNase H, using a Pst 1 DNA linker to generate a unique set of overlapping fragments spanning the entire molecule. Both intact and fragmented 18S RNA were end-labeled with {sup 32}P and base-specifically cleaved enzymatically and chemically. Nucleotide sequences were determined from long polyacrylamide sequencing gels run in formamide. To assess functional roles of RNA in gene expression, specific mRNA-protein interactions were also examined. Eukaryotic mRNA is associated with specific proteins that may be important in translational regulation and mRNA stability; mRNP complexes were reconstituted in a message-dependent, cell-free rabbit reticulocyte translation system, using unique mRNA species transcribed in vitro with SP6 polymerase. Transcripts of both rabbit and human {beta}-globin cDNA were labeled with {sup 32}P either throughout the molecule ore selectively at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} terminus.

  1. Enhanced virome sequencing using targeted sequence capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Todd N; Wylie, Kristine M; Herter, Brandi N; Storch, Gregory A

    2015-12-01

    Metagenomic shotgun sequencing (MSS) is an important tool for characterizing viral populations. It is culture independent, requires no a priori knowledge of the viruses in the sample, and may provide useful genomic information. However, MSS can lack sensitivity and may yield insufficient data for detailed analysis. We have created a targeted sequence capture panel, ViroCap, designed to enrich nucleic acid from DNA and RNA viruses from 34 families that infect vertebrate hosts. A computational approach condensed ∼1 billion bp of viral reference sequence into <200 million bp of unique, representative sequence suitable for targeted sequence capture. We compared the effectiveness of detecting viruses in standard MSS versus MSS following targeted sequence capture. First, we analyzed two sets of samples, one derived from samples submitted to a diagnostic virology laboratory and one derived from samples collected in a study of fever in children. We detected 14 and 18 viruses in the two sets, comprising 19 genera from 10 families, with dramatic enhancement of genome representation following capture enrichment. The median fold-increases in percentage viral reads post-capture were 674 and 296. Median breadth of coverage increased from 2.1% to 83.2% post-capture in the first set and from 2.0% to 75.6% in the second set. Next, we analyzed samples containing a set of diverse anellovirus sequences and demonstrated that ViroCap could be used to detect viral sequences with up to 58% variation from the references used to select capture probes. ViroCap substantially enhances MSS for a comprehensive set of viruses and has utility for research and clinical applications.

  2. Transcription factor Reb1 is required for proper transcriptional start site usage at the divergently transcribed TFC6-ESC2 locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Donze, David

    2016-12-05

    Eukaryotic promoters generally contain nucleosome depleted regions near their transcription start sites. In the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, these regions are adjacent to binding sites for general regulatory transcription factors, and the Reb1 protein is commonly bound to promoter DNA near such regions. The yeast TFC6 promoter is a unique RNA polymerase II promoter in that it is autoregulated by its own gene product Tfc6p, which is part of the RNA polymerase III transcription factor complex TFIIIC. We previously demonstrated that mutation of a potential Reb1 binding site adjacent to the TFIIIC binding site in the TFC6 promoter modestly reduces transcript levels, but leads to a severe decrease in Tfc6 protein levels due to an upstream shift in the TFC6 transcription start site. Here we confirm that Reb1p indeed binds to the TFC6 promoter, and is important for proper transcription start site selection and protein expression. Interestingly, loss of Reb1p association at this site has a similar effect on the adjacent divergently transcribed ESC2 promoter, resulting in a significant increase of 5'-extended ESC2 transcripts and reduction of Esc2 protein levels. This altered divergent transcription may be the result of changes in nucleosome positioning at this locus in the absence of Reb1p binding. We speculate that an important function of general regulatory factors such as Reb1p is to establish and maintain proper transcription start sites at promoters, and that when binding of such factors is compromised, resulting effects on mRNA translation may be an underappreciated aspect of gene regulation studies.

  3. Double-stranded RNA transcribed from vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide acts as transcription factor decoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiao [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Gang, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Department of Infectious Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710038, Shaanxi Province (China); Wang, Honghong [No. 518 Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Xi’an 710043, Shaanxi Province (China); Wang, Jiayin [The Genome Institute, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63108 (United States); Zhao, Lina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Xu, Li, E-mail: lxuhelen@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Liu, Zhiguo, E-mail: liuzhiguo@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • A shRNA vector based transcription factor decoy, VB-ODN, was designed. • VB-ODN for NF-κB inhibited cell viability in HEK293 cells. • VB-ODN inhibited expression of downstream genes of target transcription factors. • VB-ODN may enhance nuclear entry ratio for its feasibility of virus production. - Abstract: In this study, we designed a short hairpin RNA vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide (VB-ODN) carrying transcription factor (TF) consensus sequence which could function as a decoy to block TF activity. Specifically, VB-ODN for Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) could inhibit cell viability and decrease downstream gene expression in HEK293 cells without affecting expression of NF-κB itself. The specific binding between VB-ODN produced double-stranded RNA and NF-κB was evidenced by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Moreover, similar VB-ODNs designed for three other TFs also inhibit their downstream gene expression but not that of themselves. Our study provides a new design of decoy for blocking TF activity.

  4. Corky, a gypsy-like retrotransposon is differentially transcribed in Quercus suber tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocheta Margarida

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transposable elements (TEs make up a large part of eukaryotic genomes. Due to their repetitive nature and to the fact that they harbour regulatory signals, TEs can be responsible for chromosomal rearrangements, movement of gene sequences and evolution of gene regulation and function. Retrotransposon ubiquity raises the question about their function in genomes and most are transcriptionally inactive due to rearrangements that compromise their activity. However, the activity of TEs is currently considered to have been one of the major processes in genome evolution. Findings We report on the characterization of a transcriptionally active gypsy-like retrotransposon (named Corky from Quercus suber, in a comparative and quantitative study of expression levels in different tissues and distinct developmental stages through RT-qPCR. We observed Corky’s differential transcription levels in all the tissues analysed. Conclusions These results document that Corky’s transcription levels are not constant. Nevertheless, they depend upon the developmental stage, the tissue analysed and the potential occurring events during an individuals’ life span. This modulation brought upon by different developmental and environmental influences suggests an involvement of Corky in stress response and during development.

  5. FACT prevents the accumulation of free histones evicted from transcribed chromatin and a subsequent cell cycle delay in G1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Morillo-Huesca

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The FACT complex participates in chromatin assembly and disassembly during transcription elongation. The yeast mutants affected in the SPT16 gene, which encodes one of the FACT subunits, alter the expression of G1 cyclins and exhibit defects in the G1/S transition. Here we show that the dysfunction of chromatin reassembly factors, like FACT or Spt6, down-regulates the expression of the gene encoding the cyclin that modulates the G1 length (CLN3 in START by specifically triggering the repression of its promoter. The G1 delay undergone by spt16 mutants is not mediated by the DNA-damage checkpoint, although the mutation of RAD53, which is otherwise involved in histone degradation, enhances the cell-cycle defects of spt16-197. We reveal how FACT dysfunction triggers an accumulation of free histones evicted from transcribed chromatin. This accumulation is enhanced in a rad53 background and leads to a delay in G1. Consistently, we show that the overexpression of histones in wild-type cells down-regulates CLN3 in START and causes a delay in G1. Our work shows that chromatin reassembly factors are essential players in controlling the free histones potentially released from transcribed chromatin and describes a new cell cycle phenomenon that allows cells to respond to excess histones before starting DNA replication.

  6. The carB Gene Encoding the Large Subunit of Carbamoylphosphate Synthetase from Lactococcus lactis Is Transcribed Monocistronically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1998-01-01

    The biosynthesis of carbamoylphosphate is catalyzed by the heterodimeric enzyme carbamoylphosphate synthetase. The genes encoding the two subunits of this enzyme in procaryotes are normally transcribed as an operon, but the gene encoding the large subunit (carB) in Lactococcus lactis is shown to be transcribed as an isolated unit. Carbamoylphosphate is a precursor in the biosynthesis of both pyrimidine nucleotides and arginine. By mutant analysis, L. lactis is shown to possess only one carB gene; the same gene product is thus required for both biosynthetic pathways. Furthermore, arginine may satisfy the requirement for carbamoylphosphate in pyrimidine biosynthesis through degradation by means of the arginine deiminase pathway. The expression of the carB gene is subject to regulation at the level of transcription by pyrimidines, most probably by an attenuator mechanism. Upstream of the carB gene, an open reading frame showing a high degree of similarity to those of glutathione peroxidases from other organisms was identified. PMID:9721272

  7. FACT prevents the accumulation of free histones evicted from transcribed chromatin and a subsequent cell cycle delay in G1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Morillo-Huesca

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The FACT complex participates in chromatin assembly and disassembly during transcription elongation. The yeast mutants affected in the SPT16 gene, which encodes one of the FACT subunits, alter the expression of G1 cyclins and exhibit defects in the G1/S transition. Here we show that the dysfunction of chromatin reassembly factors, like FACT or Spt6, down-regulates the expression of the gene encoding the cyclin that modulates the G1 length (CLN3 in START by specifically triggering the repression of its promoter. The G1 delay undergone by spt16 mutants is not mediated by the DNA-damage checkpoint, although the mutation of RAD53, which is otherwise involved in histone degradation, enhances the cell-cycle defects of spt16-197. We reveal how FACT dysfunction triggers an accumulation of free histones evicted from transcribed chromatin. This accumulation is enhanced in a rad53 background and leads to a delay in G1. Consistently, we show that the overexpression of histones in wild-type cells down-regulates CLN3 in START and causes a delay in G1. Our work shows that chromatin reassembly factors are essential players in controlling the free histones potentially released from transcribed chromatin and describes a new cell cycle phenomenon that allows cells to respond to excess histones before starting DNA replication.

  8. Significance of the first transcribed nucleoside of capped RNA for ligand-induced folding of the cap-binding complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worch, Remigiusz; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Stepinski, Janusz; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Mazza, Catherine; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Cusack, Stephen; Stolarski, Ryszard

    2005-05-01

    Many proteins, including those that bind RNA, change conformation upon binding a ligand, a phenomenon known as induced fit. CBP20, the small subunit of the nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC), recognizes specifically the 5' cap of eukaryotic mRNA and snRNA. The N- and C-terminal regions of the CBP20 subunit of the human nuclear cap-binding complex only acquire a proper fold in complex with capped RNA. The cap is composed of 7-methylguanosine linked by a 5'-to-5' triphosphate bridge to the first transcribed nucleoside of the RNA. The significance of the latter for the capped RNA-CBC association and local folding of CBC has been characterized by emission spectroscopy. Fluorescence titration of CBC has been performed for three selected, mono- and dinucleotide mRNA 5' cap analogues. The measured values of the equilibrium association constant and the corresponding Gibbs free energy depend on the type of the first transcribed nucleoside (purine or pyrimidine), and decrease ~10-fold in the case of a mononucleotide analogue, 7-methylguanosine triphosphate. However, the total quenching of the intrinsic protein fluorescence is similar for each analogue. Changes of the solvent-accessible CBC hydrophobic surface of CBC on binding of the structurally different cap analogues have been followed using bis-ANS fluorescent probe.

  9. Identification and analysis of pig chimeric mRNAs using RNA sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Lei

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene fusion is ubiquitous over the course of evolution. It is expected to increase the diversity and complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes through chimeric sequence segments or altered regulation. However, chimeric mRNAs in pigs remain unclear. Here we identified some chimeric mRNAs in pigs and analyzed the expression of them across individuals and breeds using RNA-sequencing data. Results The present study identified 669 putative chimeric mRNAs in pigs, of which 251 chimeric candidates were detected in a set of RNA-sequencing data. The 618 candidates had clear trans-splicing sites, 537 of which obeyed the canonical GU-AG splice rule. Only two putative pig chimera variants whose fusion junction was overlapped with that of a known human chimeric mRNA were found. A set of unique chimeric events were considered middle variances in the expression across individuals and breeds, and revealed non-significant variance between sexes. Furthermore, the genomic region of the 5′ partner gene shares a similar DNA sequence with that of the 3′ partner gene for 458 putative chimeric mRNAs. The 81 of those shared DNA sequences significantly matched the known DNA-binding motifs in the JASPAR CORE database. Four DNA motifs shared in parental genomic regions had significant similarity with known human CTCF binding sites. Conclusions The present study provided detailed information on some pig chimeric mRNAs. We proposed a model that trans-acting factors, such as CTCF, induced the spatial organisation of parental genes to the same transcriptional factory so that parental genes were coordinatively transcribed to give birth to chimeric mRNAs.

  10. Unique biosynthesis of sesquarterpenes (C35 terpenes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    To the best of my knowledge, only 19 cyclic and 8 linear C35 terpenes have been identified to date, and no family name was assigned to this terpene class until recently. In 2011, it was proposed that these C35 terpenes should be called sesquarterpenes. This review highlights the biosynthesis of two kinds of sesquarterpenes (C35 terpenes) that are produced via cyclization of a linear C35 isoprenoid in Bacillus and Mycobacterium species. In Bacillus species, a new type of terpene cyclase that has no sequence homology with any known terpene synthases, as well as a bifunctional terpene cyclase that biosynthesizes two classes of cyclic terpenes with different numbers of carbons as natural products, have been identified. On the other hand, in Mycobacterium species, the first bifunctional Z-prenyltransferase has been found, but a novel terpene cyclase and a unique polyprenyl reductase remain unidentified. The identification of novel enzyme types should lead to the discovery of many homologous enzymes and their products including novel natural compounds. On the other hand, many enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of natural products have low substrate specificities in vitro. Therefore, to find novel natural products present in organisms, the multifunctionality of enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of natural products should be analyzed.

  11. Supervised Sequence Labelling with Recurrent Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Graves, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Supervised sequence labelling is a vital area of machine learning, encompassing tasks such as speech, handwriting and gesture recognition, protein secondary structure prediction and part-of-speech tagging. Recurrent neural networks are powerful sequence learning tools—robust to input noise and distortion, able to exploit long-range contextual information—that would seem ideally suited to such problems. However their role in large-scale sequence labelling systems has so far been auxiliary.    The goal of this book is a complete framework for classifying and transcribing sequential data with recurrent neural networks only. Three main innovations are introduced in order to realise this goal. Firstly, the connectionist temporal classification output layer allows the framework to be trained with unsegmented target sequences, such as phoneme-level speech transcriptions; this is in contrast to previous connectionist approaches, which were dependent on error-prone prior segmentation. Secondly, multidimensional...

  12. UNIQUENESS ON ZERO PRESSURE GAS DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄飞敏; 王振

    2001-01-01

    By introducing a new idea, the authors prove the uniqueness of weak solution of pressureless gases with the large initial data. In particular, uniqueness theorem is obtained in the same functional space as the existence theorem.

  13. On the uniqueness of supersymmetric attractors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taniya Mandal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the uniqueness of supersymmetric attractors in four-dimensional N=2 supergravity theories coupled to n vector multiplets. We prove that for a given charge configuration the supersymmetry preserving axion free attractors are unique. We generalise the analysis to axionic attractors and state the conditions for uniqueness explicitly. We consider the example of a two-parameter model and find all solutions to the supersymmetric attractor equations and discuss their uniqueness.

  14. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies...

  15. 77 FR 69393 - Unique Device Identification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 801 RIN 0910-AG31 Unique Device Identification... unique device identification system as required by recent amendments to the Federal Food, Drug, and..., FDA published a proposed rule to establish a unique device identification system, as required by...

  16. On chromatic and flow polynomial unique graphs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duan, Yinghua; Wu, Haidong; Yu, Qinglin

    2008-01-01

    ... research on graphs uniquely determined by their chromatic polynomials and more recently on their Tutte polynomials, but rather spotty research on graphs uniquely determined by their flow polynomials or the combination of both chromatic and flow polynomials. This article is an initiation of investigation on graphs uniquely determin...

  17. The carB gene encoding the large subunit of carbamoylphosphate synthetase from Lactococcus lactis is transcribed monocistronically

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1998-01-01

    The biosynthesis of carbamoylphosphate is catalysed by the heterodimeric enzyme carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPSase). The genes encoding the two subunits in procaryotes are normally transcribed as an operon, whereas in Lactococcus lactis, the gene encoding the large subunit (carB) is shown...... to be an isolated transcriptional unit. Carbamoylphosphate is a precursor in the biosynthesis of both pyrimidine nucleotides and arginine. By mutant analysis L. lactis is shown to possess only one carB gene; the same gene product is thus required for both biosynthetic pathways. Furthermore, arginine may satisfy...... the requirement for carbamoylphosphate in pyrimidine biosynthesis through degradation by the arginine deiminase pathway. The expression of the carB gene is subject to regulation at the level of transcription by pyrimidines most probably by an attenuator mechanism. Upstream of the carB gene, an open reading frame...

  18. Unique Signal mathematical analysis task group FY03 status report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baty, Roy Stuart (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Johnston, Anna Marie; Hart, Elizabeth (Utah State University, Logan, UT); White, Allan (NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA); Cooper, James Arlin

    2003-12-01

    The Unique Signal is a key constituent of Enhanced Nuclear Detonation Safety (ENDS). Although the Unique Signal approach is well prescribed and mathematically assured, there are numerous unsolved mathematical problems that could help assess the risk of deviations from the ideal approach. Some of the mathematics-based results shown in this report are: 1. The risk that two patterns with poor characteristics (easily generated by inadvertent processes) could be combined through exclusive-or mixing to generate an actual Unique Signal pattern has been investigated and found to be minimal (not significant when compared to the incompatibility metric of actual Unique Signal patterns used in nuclear weapons). 2. The risk of generating actual Unique Signal patterns with linear feedback shift registers is minimal, but the patterns in use are not as invulnerable to inadvertent generation by dependent processes as previously thought. 3. New methods of testing pair-wise incompatibility threats have resulted in no significant problems found for the set of Unique Signal patterns currently used. Any new patterns introduced would have to be carefully assessed for compatibility with existing patterns, since some new patterns under consideration were found to be deficient when associated with other patterns in use. 4. Markov models were shown to correspond to some of the engineered properties of Unique Signal sequences. This gives new support for the original design objectives. 5. Potential dependence among events (caused by a variety of communication protocols) has been studied. New evidence has been derived of the risk associated with combined communication of multiple events, and of the improvement in abnormal-environment safety that can be achieved through separate-event communication.

  19. Deep sequencing reveals different compositions of mRNA transcribed from the F8 gene in a panel of FVIII-producing CHO cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Christian Schrøder; Bolt, Gert; Hansen, Jens J;

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is one of the most complex biopharmaceuticals due to the large size, poor protein stability and extensive post-translational modifications. As a consequence, efficient production of FVIII in mammalian cells poses a major challenge, with typical yields two to three ...

  20. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based on transcr......The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...

  1. Sequencing Needs for Viral Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, S N; Lam, M; Mulakken, N J; Torres, C L; Smith, J R; Slezak, T

    2004-01-26

    We built a system to guide decisions regarding the amount of genomic sequencing required to develop diagnostic DNA signatures, which are short sequences that are sufficient to uniquely identify a viral species. We used our existing DNA diagnostic signature prediction pipeline, which selects regions of a target species genome that are conserved among strains of the target (for reliability, to prevent false negatives) and unique relative to other species (for specificity, to avoid false positives). We performed simulations, based on existing sequence data, to assess the number of genome sequences of a target species and of close phylogenetic relatives (''near neighbors'') that are required to predict diagnostic signature regions that are conserved among strains of the target species and unique relative to other bacterial and viral species. For DNA viruses such as variola (smallpox), three target genomes provide sufficient guidance for selecting species-wide signatures. Three near neighbor genomes are critical for species specificity. In contrast, most RNA viruses require four target genomes and no near neighbor genomes, since lack of conservation among strains is more limiting than uniqueness. SARS and Ebola Zaire are exceptional, as additional target genomes currently do not improve predictions, but near neighbor sequences are urgently needed. Our results also indicate that double stranded DNA viruses are more conserved among strains than are RNA viruses, since in most cases there was at least one conserved signature candidate for the DNA viruses and zero conserved signature candidates for the RNA viruses.

  2. Unique Physician Identification Number (UPIN) Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Unique Physician Identification Number (UPIN) Directory contains selected information on physicians, doctors of Osteopathy, limited licensed practitioners and...

  3. Graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerema, Stephanie J.; Dekker, Cees

    2016-02-01

    Fast, cheap, and reliable DNA sequencing could be one of the most disruptive innovations of this decade, as it will pave the way for personalized medicine. In pursuit of such technology, a variety of nanotechnology-based approaches have been explored and established, including sequencing with nanopores. Owing to its unique structure and properties, graphene provides interesting opportunities for the development of a new sequencing technology. In recent years, a wide range of creative ideas for graphene sequencers have been theoretically proposed and the first experimental demonstrations have begun to appear. Here, we review the different approaches to using graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing, which involve DNA passing through graphene nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons, and the physisorption of DNA on graphene nanostructures. We discuss the advantages and problems of each of these key techniques, and provide a perspective on the use of graphene in future DNA sequencing technology.

  4. Sequence Classification: 893139 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nhydrase; poorly transcribed under aerobic conditions and at an undetectable level under anaerobic conditions; involved in non-classi...cal protein export pathway; Nce103p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6324292 ...

  5. Sequence Classification: 523339 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nse regulator in two-component regulatory system with PhoQ, transcribes genes expressed under low Mg+ concentration (OmpR family) || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/62179752 ...

  6. Uniqueness of time-independent electromagnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Per W.

    1974-01-01

    As a comment on a recent paper by Steele, a more general uniqueness theorem for time-independent fields is mentioned. ©1974 American Institute of Physics......As a comment on a recent paper by Steele, a more general uniqueness theorem for time-independent fields is mentioned. ©1974 American Institute of Physics...

  7. Some Graphs Containing Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, two classes of graphs of arbitrary order are described which contain unique Hamiltonian cycles. All the graphs have mean vertex degree greater than one quarter the order of the graph. The Hamiltonian cycles are detailed, their uniqueness proved and simple rules for the construction of the adjacency matrix of the graphs are given.…

  8. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  9. 78 FR 58785 - Unique Device Identification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... 16, 801, 803, et al. Unique Device Identification System; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78... 0910-AG31 Unique Device Identification System AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final... will substantially reduce existing obstacles to the adequate identification of medical devices used in...

  10. A note on uniquely (nil clean ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Sahebi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A ring $R$ is uniquely (nil clean in case for any $a\\in R$‎ ‎there exists a uniquely idempotent $e\\in R$ such that $a-e$ is‎ ‎invertible (nilpotent‎. ‎Let‎ ‎$C=\\small\\left(‎‎\\begin{array}{cc}‎‎A & V \\\\‎ ‎W & B‎‎\\end{array}‎‎\\right$‎ ‎be the Morita Context ring‎. ‎We determine conditions under which the rings $A‎, ‎B$‎ ‎are uniquely (nil clean‎. ‎Moreover we show that the center of a uniquely (nil‎‎clean ring is uniquely (nil clean.

  11. Dna Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  12. Let SMIL be your umbrella: software tools for transcribing, coding, and presenting digital video in behavioral research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sujai; Miller, Kevin

    2005-05-01

    Video-based techniques have become central to many areas of social science research, although their use has been limited by the expense and complexity of tools for working with video information. New standards for the representation of digital video make the manipulation of video for observational research a far less time-consuming and expensive process than it once was. We provide an overview of SMIL, a cross-platform markup standard, and guidelines on how it can be used to edit, synchronize, caption, and present video clips with no need to modify the original digital video files. We also present TransTool, a free Windows program that can generate SMIL files for playing video clips of interest along with captions and codes. TransTool can also be used as a transcribing and coding tool that synchronizes video and text such as transcripts. These tools greatly facilitate tasks such as creating video events with multilanguage transcripts, showing synchronized views of the same event, quickly extracting clips from longer video files, and incorporating video clips into presentations and web pages. Example SMIL files and the TransTool program can be downloaded from http://www.psych.uiuc.edu/-kmiller/smil.

  13. The Dictyostelium discoideum acaA gene is transcribed from alternative promoters during aggregation and multicellular development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Galardi-Castilla

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extracellular cAMP is a key extracellular signaling molecule that regulates aggregation, cell differentiation and morphogenesis during multi-cellular development of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. This molecule is produced by three different adenylyl cyclases, encoded by the genes acaA, acrA and acgA, expressed at different stages of development and in different structures. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This article describes the characterization of the promoter region of the acaA gene, showing that it is transcribed from three different alternative promoters. The distal promoter, promoter 1, is active during the aggregation process while the more proximal promoters are active in tip-organiser and posterior regions of the structures. A DNA fragment containing the three promoters drove expression to these same regions and similar results were obtained by in situ hybridization. Analyses of mRNA expression by quantitative RT-PCR with specific primers for each of the three transcripts also demonstrated their different temporal patterns of expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The existence of an aggregation-specific promoter can be associated with the use of cAMP as chemo-attractant molecule, which is specific for some Dictyostelium species. Expression at late developmental stages indicates that adenylyl cyclase A might play a more important role in post-aggregative development than previously considered.

  14. Cloning, sequence analysis, and characterization of the genes involved in isoprimeverose metabolism in Lactobacillus pentosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaillou, S.; Lokman, B.C.; Leer, R.J.; Posthuma, C.; Postma, P.W.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Two genes, xylP and xylQ, from the xylose regulon of Lactobacillus pentosus were cloned and sequenced. Together with the repressor gene of the regulon, xylR, the xylPQ genes form an operon which is inducible by xylose and which is transcribed from a promoter located 145 bp upstream of xylP. A putati

  15. Rapid and accurate identification of isolates of Candida species by melting peak and melting curve analysis of the internally transcribed spacer region 2 fragment (ITS2-MCA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Decat, E.; van Mechelen, E.; Saerens, B.; Vermeulen, S.J.T.; Boekhout, T.; de Blaiser, S.; Vaneechoutte, M.; Deschaght, P.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid identification of clinically important yeasts can facilitate the initiation of anti-fungal therapy, since susceptibility is largely species-dependent. We evaluated melting peak and melting curve analysis of the internally transcribed spacer region 2 fragment (ITS2-MCA) as an identification too

  16. Rapid and accurate identification of isolates of Candida species by melting peak and melting curve analysis of the internally transcribed spacer region 2 fragment (ITS2-MCA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Decat, E.; van Mechelen, E.; Saerens, B.; Vermeulen, S.J.T.; Boekhout, T.; de Blaiser, S.; Vaneechoutte, M.; Deschaght, P.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid identification of clinically important yeasts can facilitate the initiation of anti-fungal therapy, since susceptibility is largely species-dependent. We evaluated melting peak and melting curve analysis of the internally transcribed spacer region 2 fragment (ITS2-MCA) as an identification

  17. [Heterogeneity and homologies of the repeating and unique DNA of dragonflies (Odonata, Insecta)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, N B; Aleshin, V V

    1983-01-01

    A relative content of unique and reiterated nucleotide sequences in DNA of eleven dragonfly species was estimated. The degree of intra- and intergenomic divergence of these DNA sequences was determined by means of DNA-DNA hybridization. Species from different genera share 40-45% of the repetitive sequences and those from different families--from 11 to 20% only. Data on the thermostability of homo- and heteroduplexes suggest that new families of the repetitive sequences have arisen repeatedly during dragonflies evolution. The quality of homologous unique sequences in the DNA compared (20-97%) correlates with the taxonomic relationships of species. Phylogenesis of some dragonfly families is discussed in view of the results obtained.

  18. High Blood Pressure: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z High Blood Pressure Hypertension Unique to Older Adults This section provides ... Pressure Targets are Different for Very Old Adults High blood pressure (also called hypertension) increases your chance of having ...

  19. Arachnoiditis ossificans and syringomyelia: A unique presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F Opalak

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This case demonstrates a unique presentation of AO and highlights the need for CT imaging when a noncommunicating syringx is identified. In addition, surgical decompression can achieve good results when AO is associated with concurrent compressive lesions.

  20. Falls Prevention: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Falls Prevention Unique to Older Adults This section provides ... and Muscle Strengthening Exercises As part of your fall prevention program, you should follow an exercise program ...

  1. Phytogeny of 12 species of genus Glycine Willd. reconstructed with internal transcribed region in nuclear ribosomal DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠东威; 陈受宜; 庄炳昌

    1997-01-01

    The ITS-Is of 24 accessions belong to 10 species of subgenus Glycine, and 2 species of subgenus Soja of genus Glycine were amplified, cloned and sequenced. According to the homology of the sequences, the phy-logeny of the 24 accessions were reconstructed. The reconstructed dendrogram showed that there were some divergent genomic types found in the previously classified species, such as G . tomentella, G. canescens and G. tabacina, and they might be some cryptic species by morphologic analysis.

  2. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-04-01

    Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, and Candida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories.

  3. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Silva Barbedo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, andCandida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories.

  4. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-01-01

    Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, andCandida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories. PMID:27074256

  5. Right temporopolar activation associated with unique perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Tomoki; Konishi, Seiki; Jimura, Koji; Chikazoe, Junichi; Nakamura, Noriko; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2008-05-15

    Unique mode of perception, or the ability to see things differently from others, is one of the psychological resources required for creative mental activities. Behavioral studies using ambiguous visual stimuli have successfully induced diverse responses from subjects, and the unique responses defined in this paradigm were observed in higher frequency in the artistic population as compared to the nonartistic population. However, the neural substrates that underlie such unique perception have yet to be investigated. In the present study, ten ambiguous figures were used as stimuli. The subjects were instructed to say what the figures looked like during functional MRI scanning. The responses were classified as "frequent", "infrequent" or "unique" responses based on the appearance frequency of the same response in an independent age- and gender-matched control group. An event-related analysis contrasting unique vs. frequent responses revealed the greatest activation in the right temporal pole, which survived a whole brain multiple comparison. An alternative parametric modulation analysis was also performed to show that potentially confounding perceptual effects deriving from differences in visual stimuli make no significant contribution to this temporopolar activation. Previous neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies have shown the involvement of the temporal pole in perception-emotion linkage. Thus, our results suggest that unique perception is produced by the integration of perceptual and emotional processes, and this integration might underlie essential parts of creative mental activities.

  6. Application of Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Primer and PCR Clamping by LNA Oligonucleotide to Enhance the Amplification of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions in Investigating the Community Structures of Plant-Associated Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Masakazu; Kawauchi, Tomohiro; Sakai, Masao

    2016-09-29

    The simultaneous extraction of host plant DNA severely limits investigations of the community structures of plant-associated fungi due to the similar homologies of sequences in primer-annealing positions between fungi and host plants. Although fungal-specific primers have been designed, plant DNA continues to be excessively amplified by PCR, resulting in the underestimation of community structures. In order to overcome this limitation, locked nucleic acid (LNA) primers and PCR clamping by LNA oligonucleotides have been applied to enhance the amplification of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. LNA primers were designed by converting DNA into LNA, which is specific to fungi, at the forward primer side. LNA oligonucleotides, the sequences of which are complementary to the host plants, were designed by overlapping a few bases with the annealing position of the reverse primer. Plant-specific DNA was then converted into LNA at the shifted position from the 3' end of the primer-binding position. PCR using the LNA technique enhanced the amplification of fungal ITS regions, whereas those of the host plants were more likely to be amplified without the LNA technique. A denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis displayed patterns that reached an acceptable level for investigating the community structures of plant-associated fungi using the LNA technique. The sequences of the bands detected using the LNA technique were mostly affiliated with known isolates. However, some sequences showed low similarities, indicating the potential to identify novel fungi. Thus, the application of the LNA technique is considered effective for widening the scope of community analyses of plant-associated fungi.

  7. Proteomic analysis of HUH-7 cells harboring in vitro-transcribed full-length hepatitis C virus 1b RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng XUN; Si-hai ZHAO; Chun-xia CAO; Juan SONG; Ming-ming SHAO; Yong-lie CHU

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The present study examined the differential expression of proteins in HuH-7 cells and HUH-7 cells harboring in vitro-transcribed full-length hepatitis C virus 1b RNA (HuH-7-HCV), and elucidated the cellular responses to HCV replication. Methods: The protein profiles of matched pairs of HuH-7-HCV cells and HUH-7 mock cells were analyzed by 2-D electrophoresis (2DE). Solubilized proteins were separated in the first dimension by isoelectric focusing, and by 12.5% SDS-PAGE in the second dimension. The differential protein expression was analyzed by use of image analysis software to identify candidates for HCV infection-associated proteins. Results: In total, 29 protein spots showed increases and 25 protein spots showed decreases in signal in HuH-7-HCV cell 2DE profiles as compared with HuH-7 mock cells. In the next step, the 10 spots showing the greatest in-crease and the 10 spots showing the greatest decrease were excised from gels and the proteins present were identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ioniza-tion Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (MALDI-TOF MS) or MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. In total, 13 proteins were identified successfully. The potential significance of the differential expression due to HCV replication was discussed. Conclusion: Our study identifies changes in the proteome of HuH-7 cells in the presence of HCV replication and yields information of the mechanism of HCV pathogenesis. These results will be useful for the identification of HCV infection-associated proteins that could be molecular targets for treatment.

  8. Unique 16S rRNA sequences of Eurythenes gryllus (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Lysianassidae from the Gulf of Mexico abyssal plain Secuencias únicas 16SrRNA de Eurythenes gryllus (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Lysianassidae de la planicie abisal del Golfo de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elva Escobar-Briones

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Amphipods of the species Eurythenes gryllus were collected at 2 locations on the abyssal plain (~3 400 m of the Gulf of Mexico in order to test whether or not these scavenger amphipods are isolated in this peripheral sea or show connectivity by their predominant swimming behavior, moving horizontally along the abyssal water masses in the region. Partial sequences of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene from 2 individuals of E. gryllus were determined and showed small differences when compared to sequences of other amphipods of the same species from the Atlantic Ocean (3.6 to 3.9% and Pacific Ocean (4.0 to 4.1% and increasing (4.2 to 9.5% when compared to sequences of specimens from sites of less than 500 m. The largest differences (18% were observed when the sequences were compared to that of Eurythenes from the Tongue of the Ocean in spite of its closer geographical distance in the region. Isolation in the deep Gulf of Mexico could be attributed to limited genetic exchange with the western tropical Atlantic through the Caribbean over the 2 040 m deep sill and inexistent at abyssal depth through the Florida Straits.Se recolectaron ejemplares de los anfípodos de la especie Eurythenes gryllus en 2 localidades de la planicie abisal (~3 400 m en el golfo de México con el objeto de evaluar si estos carroñeros se encuentran aislados en el mar marginal o presentan cierta conectividad por su conducta natatoria, desplazándose horizontalmente en las masas de agua que caracterizan la región. Las secuencias parciales del gen mitocondrial 16S rRNA que se obtuvieron de 2 individuos de E. gryllus mostraron diferencias ligeras al compararse con las secuencias de otros anfípodos de la misma especie procedentes de otras zonas del Atlántico (3.6 a 3.9% y del Pacífico (4.0 a 4.1%, incrementándose (4.2 a 9.5% al compararse con secuencias de organismos de aguas someras (<500 m. Las diferencias mayores (18% se observan en la comparación de ejemplares de

  9. Artificial duplicate reads in sequencing data of 454 Genome Sequencer FLX System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Dong; Yangyi Chen; Yan Shen; Shengyue Wang; Guoping Zhao; Weirong Jin

    2011-01-01

    The 454 Genome Sequencer (GS) FLX System is one of the next-generation sequencing systems featured by long reads, high accuracy, and ultra-high throughput.Based on the mechanism of emulsion PCR, a unique DNA template would only generate a unique sequence read after being amplified and sequenced on GS FLX.However,biased amplification of DNA templates might occur in the process of emulsion PCR, which results in production of artificial duplicate reads.Under the condition that each DNA template is unique to another, 3.49%-18.14% of total reads in GS FLX-sequencing data were found to be artificial duplicate reads.These duplicate reads may lead to misunderstanding of sequencing data and special attention should be paid to the potential biases they introduced to the data.

  10. The Role of the Y-Chromosome in the Establishment of Murine Hybrid Dysgenesis and in the Analysis of the Nucleotide Sequence Organization, Genetic Transmission and Evolution of Repeated Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallaseth, Ferez Soli

    The Y-chromosome presents a unique cytogenetic framework for the evolution of nucleotide sequences. Alignment of nine Y-chromosomal fragments in their increasing Y-specific/non Y-specific (male/female) sequence divergence ratios was directly and inversely related to their interspersion on these two respective genomic fractions. Sequence analysis confirmed a direct relationship between divergence ratios and the Alu, LINE-1, Satellite and their derivative oligonucleotide contents. Thus their relocation on the Y-chromosome is followed by sequence divergence rather than the well documented concerted evolution of these non-coding progenitor repeated sequences. Five of the nine Y-chromosomal fragments are non-pseudoautosomal and transcribed into heterogeneous PolyA^+ RNA and thus can be retrotransposed. Evolutionary and computer analysis identified homologous oligonucleotide tracts in several human loci suggesting common and random mechanistic origins. Dysgenic genomes represent the accelerated evolution driving sequence divergence (McClintock, 1984). Sex reversal and sterility characterizing dysgenesis occurs in C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos} derivative strains. High frequency, random, multi-locus deletion products of the feral Y^{ rm Pos}-chromosome are generated in the germlines of F1(C57BL/6J X 129/SvY^{ rm Pos})(male) and C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos}(male) but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos}(male). Equal, 10^{-1}, 10^ {-2}, and 0 copies (relative to males) of Y^{rm Pos}-specific deletion products respectively characterize C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} (HC), (LC), (T) and (F) females. The testes determining loci of inactive Y^{rm Pos}-chromosomes in C57BL/6JY^{rm Pos} HC females are the preferentially deleted/rearranged Y ^{rm Pos}-sequences. Disruption of regulation of plasma testosterone and hepatic MUP-A mRNA levels, TRD of a 4.7 Kbp EcoR1 fragment suggest disruption of autosomal/X-chromosomal sequences. These data and the highly repeated progenitor (Alu, GATA, LINE-1

  11. Utility of 18S rDNA and ITS sequences as population markers for Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Copepoda: Caligidae) parasitising Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in Scotland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shinn, A.P.; Banks, B.A.; Tange, N.; Bron, J.E.; Sommerville, C.; Aoki, T.; Wootten, R.

    2000-01-01

    Genetic differentiation within the salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837), was investigated by the sequencing of specific nucleotide regions. Partial sequences of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) region from single sea lice were amplified

  12. The neXtProt peptide uniqueness checker: a tool for the proteomics community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Mathieu; Gateau, Alain; Teixeira, Daniel; Michel, Pierre-André; Zahn-Zabal, Monique; Lane, Lydie

    2017-05-17

    The neXtProt peptide uniqueness checker allows scientists to define which peptides can be used to validate the existence of human proteins, i.e. map uniquely versus multiply to human protein sequences taking into account isobaric substitutions, alternative splicing and single amino acid variants. The pepx program is available at https://github.com/calipho-sib/pepx and can be launched from the command line or through a cgi web interface. Indexing requires a sequence file in FASTA format. The peptide uniqueness checker tool is freely available on the web at https://www.nextprot.org/tools/peptide-uniqueness-checker and from the neXtProt API at https://api.nextprot.org /. lydie.lane@sib.swiss.

  13. Sequencing the Cotton Genomes-Gossypium spp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PATERSON Andrew H

    2008-01-01

    @@ The genomes of most major crops,including cotton,will be fully sequenced in the next fewyears.Cotton is unusual,although not unique,in that we will need to sequence not only cultivated(tetraploid) genotypes but their diploid progenitors,to understand how elite cottons have surpassedthe productivity and quality of their progenitors.

  14. Novel algorithms for protein sequence analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Kai

    2008-01-01

    Each protein is characterized by its unique sequential order of amino acids, the so-called protein sequence. Biology”s paradigm is that this order of amino acids determines the protein”s architecture and function. In this thesis, we introduce novel algorithms to analyze protein sequences. Chapter 1

  15. Amygdalar enlargement associated with unique perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Tomoki; Konishi, Seiki; Jimura, Koji; Chikazoe, Junichi; Nakamura, Noriko; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    Interference by amygdalar activity in perceptual processes has been reported in many previous studies. Consistent with these reports, previous clinical studies have shown amygdalar volume change in multiple types of psychotic disease presenting with unusual perception. However, the relationship between variation in amygdalar volume in the normal population and the tendency toward unusual or unique perception has never been investigated. To address this issue, we defined an index to represent the tendency toward unique perception using ambiguous stimuli: subjects were instructed to state what the figures looked like to them, and "unique responses" were defined depending on the appearance frequency of the same responses in an age- and gender-matched control group. The index was defined as the ratio of unique responses to total responses per subject. We obtained structural brain images and values of the index from sixty-eight normal subjects. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed a positive correlation between amygdalar volume and the index. Since previous reports have indicated that unique responses were observed at higher frequency in the artistic population than in the nonartistic normal population, this positive correlation suggests that amygdalar enlargement in the normal population might be related to creative mental activity.

  16. YeATS - a tool suite for analyzing RNA-seq derived transcriptome identifies a highly transcribed putative extensin in heartwood/sapwood transition zone in black walnut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Britton, Monica; Wegrzyn, Jill; Butterfield, Timothy; Martínez-García, Pedro José; Reagan, Russell L; Rao, Basuthkar J; Leslie, Charles A; Aradhaya, Mallikarjuna; Neale, David; Woeste, Keith; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptome provides a functional footprint of the genome by enumerating the molecular components of cells and tissues. The field of transcript discovery has been revolutionized through high-throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq). Here, we present a methodology that replicates and improves existing methodologies, and implements a workflow for error estimation and correction followed by genome annotation and transcript abundance estimation for RNA-seq derived transcriptome sequences (YeATS - Yet Another Tool Suite for analyzing RNA-seq derived transcriptome). A unique feature of YeATS is the upfront determination of the errors in the sequencing or transcript assembly process by analyzing open reading frames of transcripts. YeATS identifies transcripts that have not been merged, result in broken open reading frames or contain long repeats as erroneous transcripts. We present the YeATS workflow using a representative sample of the transcriptome from the tissue at the heartwood/sapwood transition zone in black walnut. A novel feature of the transcriptome that emerged from our analysis was the identification of a highly abundant transcript that had no known homologous genes (GenBank accession: KT023102). The amino acid composition of the longest open reading frame of this gene classifies this as a putative extensin. Also, we corroborated the transcriptional abundance of proline-rich proteins, dehydrins, senescence-associated proteins, and the DNAJ family of chaperone proteins. Thus, YeATS presents a workflow for analyzing RNA-seq data with several innovative features that differentiate it from existing software.

  17. Main: Sequences [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sequences Nucleotide Sequence Nucleotide sequence of full length cDNA (trimmed sequence) kome_ine_full_seq...uence_db.fasta.zip kome_ine_full_sequence_db.zip kome_ine_full_sequence_db ...

  18. APOBEC3B cytidine deaminase targets the non-transcribed strand of tRNA genes in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Natalie; Roberts, Steven A; Sterling, Joan F; Malc, Ewa P; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Gordenin, Dmitry A

    2017-05-01

    Variations in mutation rates across the genome have been demonstrated both in model organisms and in cancers. This phenomenon is largely driven by the damage specificity of diverse mutagens and the differences in DNA repair efficiency in given genomic contexts. Here, we demonstrate that the single-strand DNA-specific cytidine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B) damages tRNA genes at a 1000-fold higher efficiency than other non-tRNA genomic regions in budding yeast. We found that A3B-induced lesions in tRNA genes were predominantly located on the non-transcribed strand, while no transcriptional strand bias was observed in protein coding genes. Furthermore, tRNA gene mutations were exacerbated in cells where RNaseH expression was completely abolished (Δrnh1Δrnh35). These data suggest a transcription-dependent mechanism for A3B-induced tRNA gene hypermutation. Interestingly, in strains proficient in DNA repair, only 1% of the abasic sites formed upon excision of A3B-deaminated cytosines were not repaired leading to mutations in tRNA genes, while 18% of these lesions failed to be repaired in the remainder of the genome. A3B-induced mutagenesis in tRNA genes was found to be efficiently suppressed by the redundant activities of both base excision repair (BER) and the error-free DNA damage bypass pathway. On the other hand, deficiencies in BER did not have a profound effect on A3B-induced mutations in CAN1, the reporter for protein coding genes. We hypothesize that differences in the mechanisms underlying ssDNA formation at tRNA genes and other genomic loci are the key determinants of the choice of the repair pathways and consequently the efficiency of DNA damage repair in these regions. Overall, our results indicate that tRNA genes are highly susceptible to ssDNA-specific DNA damaging agents. However, increased DNA repair efficacy in tRNA genes can prevent their hypermutation and maintain both genome and proteome homeostasis. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. The divergently transcribed genes encoding yeast ribosomal proteins L46 and S24 are activated by shared RPG-boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraakman, L S; Mager, W H; Maurer, K T; Nieuwint, R T; Planta, R J

    1989-12-11

    Transcription of the majority of the ribosomal protein (rp) genes in yeast is activated through common cis-acting elements, designated RPG-boxes. These elements have been shown to act as specific binding sites for the protein factor TUF/RAP1/GRF1 in vitro. Two such elements occur in the intergenic region separating the divergently transcribed genes encoding L46 and S24. To investigate whether the two RPG-boxes mediate transcription activation of both the L46 and S24 gene, two experimental strategies were followed: cloning of the respective genes on multicopy vectors and construction of fusion genes. Cloning of the L46 + S24 gene including the intergenic region in a multicopy yeast vector indicated that both genes are transcriptionally active. Using constructs in which only the S24 or the L46 gene is present, with or without the intergenic region, we obtained evidence that the intergenic region is indispensable for transcription activation of either gene. To demarcate the element(s) responsible for this activation, fusions of the intergenic region in either orientation to the galK reporter gene were made. Northern analysis of the levels of hybrid mRNA demonstrated that the intergenic region can serve as an heterologous promoter when it is in the 'S24-orientation'. Surprisingly, however, when fused in the reverse orientation the intergenic region did hardly confer transcription activity on the fusion gene. Furthermore, a 274 bp FnuDII-FnuDII fragment from the intergenic region that contains the RPG-boxes, could replace the naturally occurring upstream activation site (UASrpg) of the L25 rp-gene only when inserted in the 'S24-orientation'. Removal of 15 bp from the FnuDII fragment appeared to be sufficient to obtain transcription activation in the 'L46 orientation' as well. Analysis of a construct in which the RPG-boxes were selectively deleted from the promoter region of the L46 gene indicated that the RPG-boxes are needed for efficient transcriptional activation of

  20. A survey of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer substitution rates across angiosperms: an approximate molecular clock with life history effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whittall Justen B

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A full understanding of the patterns and processes of biological diversification requires the dating of evolutionary events, yet the fossil record is inadequate for most lineages under study. Alternatively, a molecular clock approach, in which DNA or amino acid substitution rates are calibrated with fossils or geological/climatic events, can provide indirect estimates of clade ages and diversification rates. The utility of this approach depends on the rate constancy of molecular evolution at a genetic locus across time and across lineages. Although the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (nrITS is increasingly being used to infer clade ages in plants, little is known about the sources or magnitude of variation in its substitution rate. Here, we systematically review the literature to assess substitution rate variation in nrITS among angiosperms, and we evaluate possible correlates of the variation. Results We summarize 28 independently calibrated nrITS substitution rates ranging from 0.38 × 10-9 to 8.34 × 10-9 substitutions/site/yr. We find that herbaceous lineages have substitution rates almost twice as high as woody plants, on average. We do not find any among-lineage phylogenetic constraint to the rates, or any effect of the type of calibration used. Within life history categories, both the magnitude of the rates and the variance among rates tend to decrease with calibration age. Conclusion Angiosperm nrITS substitution rates vary by approximately an order of magnitude, and some of this variation can be attributed to life history categories. We make cautious recommendations for the use of nrITS as an approximate plant molecular clock, including an outline of more appropriate phylogenetic methodology and caveats against over interpretation of results. We also suggest that for lineages with independent calibrations, much of the variation in nrITS substitution rates may come from uncertainty in calibration

  1. Existence and Uniqueness in Shape from Shading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓雁萍; 李价谷

    1997-01-01

    For the image of a smooth surface object fully contained within the field of view and illuminated in and arbitrary direction,this paper discusses the existence and uniqueness o the conditions for solving a shape-from-shading problem under the conditions that the Fourier series expansion of the image intensity contains only zero and first order terms in a polar coordinate system.Three theorems are established,one for the existence and two for the uniqueness of z-axis symmetric shape from shading.

  2. Nucleotide Sequencing and Identification of Some Wild Mushrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Kumar Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rDNA-ITS (Ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacers fragment of the genomic DNA of 8 wild edible mushrooms (collected from Eastern Chota Nagpur Plateau of West Bengal, India was amplified using ITS1 (Internal Transcribed Spacers 1 and ITS2 primers and subjected to nucleotide sequence determination for identification of mushrooms as mentioned. The sequences were aligned using ClustalW software program. The aligned sequences revealed identity (homology percentage from GenBank data base of Amanita hemibapha [CN (Chota Nagpur 1, % identity 99 (JX844716.1], Amanita sp. [CN 2, % identity 98 (JX844763.1], Astraeus hygrometricus [CN 3, % identity 87 (FJ536664.1], Termitomyces sp. [CN 4, % identity 90 (JF746992.1], Termitomyces sp. [CN 5, % identity 99 (GU001667.1], T. microcarpus [CN 6, % identity 82 (EF421077.1], Termitomyces sp. [CN 7, % identity 76 (JF746993.1], and Volvariella volvacea [CN 8, % identity 100 (JN086680.1]. Although out of 8 mushrooms 4 could be identified up to species level, the nucleotide sequences of the rest may be relevant to further characterization. A phylogenetic tree is constructed using Neighbor-Joining method showing interrelationship between/among the mushrooms. The determined nucleotide sequences of the mushrooms may provide additional information enriching GenBank database aiding to molecular taxonomy and facilitating its domestication and characterization for human benefits.

  3. Nucleotide sequencing and identification of some wild mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudip Kumar; Mandal, Aninda; Datta, Animesh K; Gupta, Sudha; Paul, Rita; Saha, Aditi; Sengupta, Sonali; Dubey, Priyanka Kumari

    2013-01-01

    The rDNA-ITS (Ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacers) fragment of the genomic DNA of 8 wild edible mushrooms (collected from Eastern Chota Nagpur Plateau of West Bengal, India) was amplified using ITS1 (Internal Transcribed Spacers 1) and ITS2 primers and subjected to nucleotide sequence determination for identification of mushrooms as mentioned. The sequences were aligned using ClustalW software program. The aligned sequences revealed identity (homology percentage from GenBank data base) of Amanita hemibapha [CN (Chota Nagpur) 1, % identity 99 (JX844716.1)], Amanita sp. [CN 2, % identity 98 (JX844763.1)], Astraeus hygrometricus [CN 3, % identity 87 (FJ536664.1)], Termitomyces sp. [CN 4, % identity 90 (JF746992.1)], Termitomyces sp. [CN 5, % identity 99 (GU001667.1)], T. microcarpus [CN 6, % identity 82 (EF421077.1)], Termitomyces sp. [CN 7, % identity 76 (JF746993.1)], and Volvariella volvacea [CN 8, % identity 100 (JN086680.1)]. Although out of 8 mushrooms 4 could be identified up to species level, the nucleotide sequences of the rest may be relevant to further characterization. A phylogenetic tree is constructed using Neighbor-Joining method showing interrelationship between/among the mushrooms. The determined nucleotide sequences of the mushrooms may provide additional information enriching GenBank database aiding to molecular taxonomy and facilitating its domestication and characterization for human benefits.

  4. Poly[d(C-A)].poly[d(G-T)] is highly transcribed in the testes of Drosophila hydei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijser, P; Beckers, L; Top, B; Hermans, M; Sinke, R; Hennig, W

    1990-01-01

    Microdissection of the lampbrush loops "threads" and "pseudonucleolus" of Y chromosomes from primary spermatocytes of Drosophila hydei and subsequent microcloning of the DNA yielded several recombinant DNA clones which cross-hybridized in screening the different clone banks. By DNA sequencing we fou

  5. Cohomological uniqueness of some p-groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz Ramos, Antonio; Ruiz, Albert; Viruel, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We consider classifying spaces of a family of p-groups and prove that mod p cohomology enriched with Bockstein spectral sequences determines their homotopy type among p-completed CW-complexes.......We consider classifying spaces of a family of p-groups and prove that mod p cohomology enriched with Bockstein spectral sequences determines their homotopy type among p-completed CW-complexes....

  6. GENOMEMASKER package for designing unique genomic PCR primers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplinski Lauris

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The design of oligonucleotides and PCR primers for studying large genomes is complicated by the redundancy of sequences. The eukaryotic genomes are particularly difficult to study due to abundant repeats. The speed of most existing primer evaluation programs is not sufficient for large-scale experiments. Results In order to improve the efficiency and success rate of automatic primer/oligo design, we created a novel method which allows rapid masking of repeats in large sequence files, for example in eukaryotic genomes. It also allows the detection of all alternative binding sites of PCR primers and the prediction of PCR products. The new method was implemented in a collection of efficient programs, the GENOMEMASKER package. The performance of the programs was compared to other similar programs. We also modified the PRIMER3 program, to be able to design primers from lowercase-masked sequences. Conclusion The GENOMEMASKER package is able to mask the entire human genome for non-unique primers within 6 hours and find locations of all binding sites for 10 000 designed primer pairs within 10 minutes. Additionally, it predicts all alternative PCR products from large genomes for given primer pairs.

  7. Uniqueness vs non-uniqueness in complete connections with modified majority rules

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, J. C. A.; Friedli, S.

    2013-01-01

    We take a closer look at a class of chains with complete connections introduced by Berger, Hoffman and Sidoravicius. Besides giving a sharper description of the uniqueness and non-uniqueness regimes, we show that if the pure majority rule used to fix the dependence on the past is replaced with a function that is Lipschitz at the origin, then uniqueness always holds, even with arbitrarily slow decaying variation.

  8. 4-Dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase, an enzyme of the sex hormone pathway in Mucor mucedo, is constitutively transcribed but its activity is differently regulated in (+) and (-) mating types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimek, Christine; Petzold, Annett; Schultze, Kornelia; Wetzel, Jana; Wolschendorf, Frank; Burmester, Anke; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2005-09-01

    4-Dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase (TDH) converts the (+) mating type sex pheromone 4-dihydromethyltrisporate into methyltrisporate. In Mucor mucedo, this conversion is required only in the (-) mating type. Expression of the TDH encoding TSP1 gene was analyzed qualitatively using reverse-transcribed PCR. TSP1 is constitutively transcribed in the (+) and in the (-) mating type, irrespective of the mating situation. By immunodetection, the translation product is also formed constitutively. In contrast to gene expression, TDH enzyme activity depends on the sexual status of the mycelium. Activity is restricted to the sexually stimulated (-) mating type. Non-stimulated (-), as well as stimulated and non-stimulated (+) mycelia exhibit no activity and do not influence activity in stimulated (-) mycelia. Time course analysis shows strongly increased enzyme activity at 80 min after stimulation. Low activity exists from the onset of stimulation, indicating that additional regulation mechanisms are involved in TDH function.

  9. In a unique position or squeezed out?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Christensen, Inge

    2009-01-01

    language, they experience that their patients disappear, they are seldom involved, and they lack knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: GPs have few experiences with YA cancer patients, but they have a potentially unique role in general primary cancer care if they develop their vocational vocabulary, relate more...

  10. Uniqueness of meromorphic functions concerning differential polynomials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Lei

    2007-01-01

    Based on a unicity theorem for entire funcitions concerning differential polynomials proposed by M. L. Fang and W. Hong, we studied the uniqueness problem of two meromorphic functions whose differential polynomials share the same 1-point by proving two theorems and their related lemmas. The results extend and improve given by Fang and Hong's theorem.

  11. LCA – Unique and Controversial Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This session will focus on case studies and applications that have a unique or controversial aspect. Some of the most recent topics that seem to have significant interest include: LCA-based product declarations, LCA-based standards, LCA-based labels, alternative energy, agricul...

  12. Marketing the Uniqueness of Small Towns. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Douglas; Hogg, David H.

    The key to marketing a town is determining and promoting the town's "differential advantage" or uniqueness that would make people want to visit or live there. Exercises to help communities gain important insights into the town's competitive edge include a brainstorming session with knowledgeable community members, a visitor questionnaire, a…

  13. The Uniqueness of Speech among Motor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Ray

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers evidence that the speech muscles are unique in their genetic, developmental, functional and phenotypical properties. The literature was reviewed using PubMed, ScienceDirect, ComDisDome and other literature-retrieval systems to identify studies reporting on the craniofacial and laryngeal muscles. Particular emphasis was given…

  14. Multicultural Poetry: Voices Unique, yet Universal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webre, Elizabeth C.

    As teachers gravitate more and more to the use of literature and strive to include a range of cultural experiences in their classrooms, the use of poetry from various cultural groups should be considered. Poetry is a very real means of having children see themselves and others as being both unique and yet the same. In considering poetry across…

  15. Tulane Student Designs Unique Learning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    A Louisiana architect has created plans for a unique supplementary learning environment consisting of five circular buildings featuring a planetarium, an indoor display of small animals in their native habitat, an indoor pond, a library, a media center, and an auditorium. (Author/MLF)

  16. Art Libraries: Creating Access to Unique Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Art libraries face similar issues to other types of libraries during the digital transition but have unique twists driven by the needs of their collections. Art library information seekers may possess a sense of what an art library is: a library, set apart, to support the study of art and art history. For art libraries, it is the collection,…

  17. UNIQUENESS OF DIFFERENCE POLYNOMIALS OF MEROMORPHIC FUNCTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘永; 祁晓光

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the uniqueness problems of difference polynomials of meromorphic functions and obtain some results which can be viewed as discrete analogues of the results given by Shibazaki. Some examples are given to show the results in this article are best possible.

  18. Unique characteristics of Geneva apple rootstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Geneva® apple rootstock breeding program has been operating since the early 1970’s. It is a unique program in that it had access to important germplasm resources that later became the USDA ARS apple collection in Geneva, NY. This genetic diversity allowed for the achievement of one of the proj...

  19. Unraveling the evolution of uniquely human cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Evan L

    2016-06-07

    A satisfactory account of human cognitive evolution will explain not only the psychological mechanisms that make our species unique, but also how, when, and why these traits evolved. To date, researchers have made substantial progress toward defining uniquely human aspects of cognition, but considerably less effort has been devoted to questions about the evolutionary processes through which these traits have arisen. In this article, I aim to link these complementary aims by synthesizing recent advances in our understanding of what makes human cognition unique, with theory and data regarding the processes of cognitive evolution. I review evidence that uniquely human cognition depends on synergism between both representational and motivational factors and is unlikely to be accounted for by changes to any singular cognitive system. I argue that, whereas no nonhuman animal possesses the full constellation of traits that define the human mind, homologies and analogies of critical aspects of human psychology can be found in diverse nonhuman taxa. I suggest that phylogenetic approaches to the study of animal cognition-which can address questions about the selective pressures and proximate mechanisms driving cognitive change-have the potential to yield important insights regarding the processes through which the human cognitive phenotype evolved.

  20. Uniqueness and Zeros of -Shift Difference Polynomials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kai Liu; Xin-Ling Liu; Ting-Bin Cao

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the zero distributions of -shift difference polynomials of meromorphic functions with zero order, and obtain two theorems that extend the classical Hayman results on the zeros of differential polynomials to -shift difference polynomials. We also investigate the uniqueness problem of -shift difference polynomials that share a common value.

  1. PRC2 regulates RNA polymerase III transcribed non-translated RNA gene transcription through EZH2 and SUZ12 interaction with TFIIIC complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chang; Li Shuai; Dai Xiaoyan; Ma Ji; Wan Junhu; Jiang Hao; Wang Peng; Liu Zhaoli; Zhang Hongquan

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb repression complex 2 ( PRC2 ) component EZH2 tri-methylates H3 K27 and exerts ep-igenetic repression on target gene expression. EZH2-mediated epigenetic control of RNA polymerase II(Pol II) transcribed coding gene transcription has been well established. However, little is known about EZH2-mediated epigenetic regulation of RNA polymerase III( Pol III) transcription. Here we present a paradigm that EZH2 is in-volved in the repression of Pol III transcription via interaction with transcriptional factor complex IIIC ( TFIIIC ) . EZH2 and H3K27 me3 cooccupy the promoter of tRNATyr, 5S rRNA and 7SL RNA genes. Depletion of EZH2 or inhibition of EZH2 methyl transferase activity led to upregulation of Pol III target gene transcription. EZH2-media-ted repression of Pol III transcribed gene expression requires presence of SUZ12 . SUZ12 was able to interact with TFIIIC complex and knockdown of SUZ12 decreased occupancy of EZH2 and H3 K27 me3 at the promoter of Pol III target genes. Our findings pointed out a previously unidentified role of PRC2 complex in suppressing transcription of Pol III transcribed non-translated RNA genes, putting Pol III on a new layer of epigenetic regulation.

  2. Phylogenetic relationships and generic delimitation in Inuleae subtribe Inulinae (Asteraceae) based on ITS and cpDNA sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Englund, Marcus; Pornpongrungrueng, Pimwadee; Gustafsson, Mats

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships in Inuleae subtribe Inulinae (Asteraceae) were investigated. DNA sequence data from three chloroplast regions (ndhF, trnL-F and psbA-trnH) and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region were analysed separately and in combination using parsimony...

  3. Linking Maternal and Somatic 5S rRNA types with Different Sequence-Specific Non-LTR Retrotransposons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Locati, M.D.; Pagano, J.F.B.; Ensink, W.A.; van Olst, M.; van Leeuwen, S.; Nehrdich, U.; Zhu, K.; Spaink, H.P.; Girard, G.; Rauwerda, H.; Jonker, M.J.; Dekker, R.J.; Breit, T.M.

    5S rRNA is a ribosomal core component, transcribed from many gene copies organized in genomic repeats. Some eukaryotic species have two 5S rRNA types defined by their predominant expression in oogenesis or adult tissue. Our next-generation sequencing study on zebrafish egg, embryo and adult tissue,

  4. Variability of United States isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina based on simple sequence repeats and cross genus transferability to related genera within botryosphaeriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard E; Wadl, Phillip A; Allen, Thomas; McNeill, David; Wang, Xinwang; Moulton, John K; Rinehart, Timothy A; Abbas, Hamed K; Shier, Thomas; Trigiano, Robert N

    2010-09-01

    Twelve simple sequence repeat (SSRs) loci were used to evaluate genetic diversity of 109 isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina collected from different geographical regions and host species throughout the United States (US). Genetic diversity was assessed using Nei's minimum genetic distance, and the usefulness of each locus was determined by calculating the polymorphism information content (PIC). A total of 98 alleles were detected and of these 31 were unique to individual genotypes. Eight of twelve loci were highly informative with PIC values greater than 0.50. The majority of pairwise comparisons of genetic distance were greater than 0.60 indicating moderate to high genetic diversity. Dendrograms based on the genetic dissimilarities were created for the 109 isolates of which 79 were from soybean. Some clustering by host and geography was noted, but, the dendrograms generally grouped isolates independent of host or geography. Additionally, sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) for 10 isolates revealed that all of these isolates were 99% similar. Three SSR loci from M. phaseolina were cross amplified in other genera in the Botryosphaeriaceae. This was the first study of genotyping and assessing genetic diversity of M. phaseolina isolates collected from a widespread host and geographic range across the US with SSRs. With an additional 34 loci publically available for M. phaseolina, the results indicate that previously developed SSRs from one species can be used in future population, ecological, and genetic studies of M. phaseolina and other genera within the Botryosphaeriaceae.

  5. Sequencing chess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atashpendar, Arshia; Schilling, Tanja; Voigtmann, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    We analyze the structure of the state space of chess by means of transition path sampling Monte Carlo simulations. Based on the typical number of moves required to transpose a given configuration of chess pieces into another, we conclude that the state space consists of several pockets between which transitions are rare. Skilled players explore an even smaller subset of positions that populate some of these pockets only very sparsely. These results suggest that the usual measures to estimate both the size of the state space and the size of the tree of legal moves are not unique indicators of the complexity of the game, but that considerations regarding the connectedness of states are equally important.

  6. Unique device identification system. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to establish a system to adequately identify devices through distribution and use. This rule requires the label of medical devices to include a unique device identifier (UDI), except where the rule provides for an exception or alternative placement. The labeler must submit product information concerning devices to FDA's Global Unique Device Identification Database (GUDID), unless subject to an exception or alternative. The system established by this rule requires the label and device package of each medical device to include a UDI and requires that each UDI be provided in a plain-text version and in a form that uses automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) technology. The UDI will be required to be directly marked on the device itself if the device is intended to be used more than once and intended to be reprocessed before each use.

  7. Unique Astrophysics in the Lyman Ultraviolet

    CERN Document Server

    Tumlinson, Jason; Kriss, Gerard; France, Kevin; McCandliss, Stephan; Sembach, Ken; Fox, Andrew; Tripp, Todd; Jenkins, Edward; Beasley, Matthew; Danforth, Charles; Shull, Michael; Stocke, John; Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, Christopher; Froning, Cynthia; Green, James; Oliveira, Cristina; Fullerton, Alex; Blair, Bill; Kruk, Jeff; Sonneborn, George; Penton, Steven; Wakker, Bart; Prochaska, Xavier; Vallerga, John; Scowen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is unique and groundbreaking science to be done with a new generation of UV spectrographs that cover wavelengths in the "Lyman Ultraviolet" (LUV; 912 - 1216 Ang). There is no astrophysical basis for truncating spectroscopic wavelength coverage anywhere between the atmospheric cutoff (3100 Ang) and the Lyman limit (912 Ang); the usual reasons this happens are all technical. The unique science available in the LUV includes critical problems in astrophysics ranging from the habitability of exoplanets to the reionization of the IGM. Crucially, the local Universe (z <= 0.1) is entirely closed to many key physical diagnostics without access to the LUV. These compelling scientific problems require overcoming these technical barriers so that future UV spectrographs can extend coverage to the Lyman limit at 912 Ang.

  8. Theory of uniqueness of Indian Caste System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kumar

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Classical studies on pre-modern Indian social structure have suggested apparent differences between the Indian caste system and social stratification as one can discern in other parts of the world. However, one needs to question such dogmatic assertions that such vast differences really existed. An endeavor is made in this research paper to reflect on the nature of caste hierarchy in pre-modern India. The caste system forms the significant basis of pre-modern Indian social structure. Early writers conceived the caste system of pre-modern India as something unique to India. An attempt is made to question this application of theory of uniqueness in the case of India.

  9. Theory of uniqueness of Indian Caste System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kumar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Classical studies on pre-modern Indian social structure have suggested apparent differences between the Indian caste system and social stratification as one can discern in other parts of the world. However, one needs to question such dogmatic assertions that such vast differences really existed. An endeavor is made in this research paper to reflect on the nature of caste hierarchy in pre-modern India. The caste system forms the significant basis of pre-modern Indian social structure. Early writers conceived the caste system of pre-modern India as something unique to India. An attempt is made to question this application of theory of uniqueness in the case of India.

  10. Uniqueness of entire functions concerning weighted sharing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yao-qiang; MA Chao-wei

    2007-01-01

    The uniqueness problem of entire functions concerning weighted sharing was discussed, and the following theorem was proved. Let f and g be two non-constant entire functions, m, n and k three positive integers, and n>2k+4. If Em(1,(f n)(k))= Em(1,(gn)(k)), then either f (z)=c1ecz and g(z)= c2e-cz, or f =tg, where c, c1 and c2 are three constants satisfying (-1)k(c1c2)n(nc)2k=1, and t is a constant satisfying t n=1. The theorem generalizes the result of Fang [Fang ML, Uniqueness and value sharing of entire functions, Computer & Mathematics with Applications, 2002, 44: 823-831].

  11. USE OF 16S-23S INTERGENIC TRANSCRIBED SPACER IN IDENTIFICATION AND COMMUNITY ANALYSIS OF BACTERIA%基因间隔序列(ITS)在细菌分类鉴定和种群分析中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑雪松; 杨虹; 李道棠; 韩文卿

    2003-01-01

    Use of 16S -23S intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) variability, as a relatively new method, is becoming an important supplement to the molecular methods based on 16S rRNA for which has a fairly constant size and is not divergent enough to give good separation in close relationships. This paper summarizes the structures and characteristics of ITS regions that are extremely variable in copy number, length and sequence per genome. The ITS region can be amplified easily taking advantage of conserved nucleotide stretches at the 5′of the 16S and 3′of the 23S gene, and the amplicon can contain different amounts of the 16S rDNA by choosing primers at different conserved areas within this gene. These primers are listed and discussed for perfecting the methodology of ITS. Furthermore, some recent progresses on the taxonomy, identification and community analysis of bacteria by means of ITS in epidemiology, ecology and artificial environment are reviewed, as well, the virtues and limitations of that method are discussed. Fig 2, Tab 1, Ref 51

  12. Different Flavonoids Can Shape Unique Gut Microbiota Profile In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiacheng; Chen, Long; Xue, Bin; Liu, Qianyue; Ou, Shiyi; Wang, Yong; Peng, Xichun

    2016-09-01

    The impact of flavonoids has been discussed on the relative viability of bacterial groups in human microbiota. This study was aimed to compare the modulation of various flavonoids, including quercetin, catechin and puerarin, on gut microbiota culture in vitro, and analyze the interactions between bacterial species using fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) as carbon source under the stress of flavonoids. Three plant flavonoids, quercetin, catechin, and puerarin, were added into multispecies culture to ferment for 24 h, respectively. The bacterial 16S rDNA amplicons were sequenced, and the composition of microbiota community was analyzed. The results revealed that the tested flavonoids, quercetin, catechin, and puerarin, presented different activities of regulating gut microbiota; flavonoid aglycones, but not glycosides, may inhibit growth of certain species. Quercetin and catechin shaped unique biological webs. Bifidobacterium spp. was the center of the biological web constructed in this study.

  13. GSDC: A Unique Data Center in Korea for HEP research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sang-Un

    2017-04-01

    Global Science experimental Data hub Center (GSDC) at Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information (KISTI) is a unique data center in South Korea established for promoting the fundamental research fields by supporting them with the expertise on Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and the infrastructure for High Performance Computing (HPC), High Throughput Computing (HTC) and Networking. GSDC has supported various research fields in South Korea dealing with the large scale of data, e.g. RENO experiment for neutrino research, LIGO experiment for gravitational wave detection, Genome sequencing project for bio-medical, and HEP experiments such as CDF at FNAL, Belle at KEK, and STAR at BNL. In particular, GSDC has run a Tier-1 center for ALICE experiment using the LHC at CERN since 2013. In this talk, we present the overview on computing infrastructure that GSDC runs for the research fields and we discuss on the data center infrastructure management system deployed at GSDC.

  14. Metalworking Techniques Unlock a Unique Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Approached by West Hartford, Connecticut-based Abbot Ball Company, Glenn Research Center agreed to test an intriguing alloy called Nitinol 60 that had been largely unused for a half century. Using powdered metallurgy, the partners developed a method for manufacturing and working with the material, which Abbott Ball has now commercialized. Nitinol 60 provides a unique combination of qualities that make it an excellent material for ball bearings, among other applications.

  15. Mushrooms—Biologically Distinct and Nutritionally Unique

    OpenAIRE

    Feeney, Mary Jo; Miller, Amy Myrdal; Roupas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mushrooms are fungi, biologically distinct from plant- and animal-derived foods (fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, protein [meat, fish, poultry, legumes, nuts, and seeds]) that comprise the US Department of Agriculture food patterns operationalized by consumer-focused MyPlate messages. Although mushrooms provide nutrients found in these food groups, they also have a unique nutrient profile. Classified into food grouping systems by their use as a vegetable, mushrooms’ increasing use in main e...

  16. A unique case of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Khizar

    2009-01-01

    An 18-year-old Asian girl was referred to the nephrology unit with rapidly progressive renal failure. At the age of 15 she was diagnosed as having systemic lupus erythematosus but had defaulted treatment. Her renal functions improved with cyclophosphamide pulse treatment but she continued to have central nervous system vasculitis, gastrointestinal vasculitis and opportunistic infections making her a unique and challenging case of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  17. Uniqueness from locality and BCFW shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Rodina, Laurentiu

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a BCFW shift which can be used to recursively build the full Yang-Mills amplitude as a function of polarization vectors. Furthermore, in line with the recent results of arXiv:1612.02797, we conjecture that the Yang-Mills scattering amplitude is uniquely fixed by locality and demanding the usual asymptotic behavior under a sufficient number of shifts. Unitarity therefore emerges from locality and constructability. We prove this statement at the leading order in the soft expansion.

  18. Widespread Polycistronic Transcripts in Fungi Revealed by Single-Molecule mRNA Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Gordon

    Full Text Available Genes in prokaryotic genomes are often arranged into clusters and co-transcribed into polycistronic RNAs. Isolated examples of polycistronic RNAs were also reported in some higher eukaryotes but their presence was generally considered rare. Here we developed a long-read sequencing strategy to identify polycistronic transcripts in several mushroom forming fungal species including Plicaturopsis crispa, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Trametes versicolor, and Gloeophyllum trabeum. We found genome-wide prevalence of polycistronic transcription in these Agaricomycetes, involving up to 8% of the transcribed genes. Unlike polycistronic mRNAs in prokaryotes, these co-transcribed genes are also independently transcribed. We show that polycistronic transcription may interfere with expression of the downstream tandem gene. Further comparative genomic analysis indicates that polycistronic transcription is conserved among a wide range of mushroom forming fungi. In summary, our study revealed, for the first time, the genome prevalence of polycistronic transcription in a phylogenetic range of higher fungi. Furthermore, we systematically show that our long-read sequencing approach and combined bioinformatics pipeline is a generic powerful tool for precise characterization of complex transcriptomes that enables identification of mRNA isoforms not recovered via short-read assembly.

  19. Genome sequences and comparative genomics of two Lactobacillus ruminis strains from the bovine and human intestinal tracts

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-08-30

    Abstract Background The genus Lactobacillus is characterized by an extraordinary degree of phenotypic and genotypic diversity, which recent genomic analyses have further highlighted. However, the choice of species for sequencing has been non-random and unequal in distribution, with only a single representative genome from the L. salivarius clade available to date. Furthermore, there is no data to facilitate a functional genomic analysis of motility in the lactobacilli, a trait that is restricted to the L. salivarius clade. Results The 2.06 Mb genome of the bovine isolate Lactobacillus ruminis ATCC 27782 comprises a single circular chromosome, and has a G+C content of 44.4%. In silico analysis identified 1901 coding sequences, including genes for a pediocin-like bacteriocin, a single large exopolysaccharide-related cluster, two sortase enzymes, two CRISPR loci and numerous IS elements and pseudogenes. A cluster of genes related to a putative pilin was identified, and shown to be transcribed in vitro. A high quality draft assembly of the genome of a second L. ruminis strain, ATCC 25644 isolated from humans, suggested a slightly larger genome of 2.138 Mb, that exhibited a high degree of synteny with the ATCC 27782 genome. In contrast, comparative analysis of L. ruminis and L. salivarius identified a lack of long-range synteny between these closely related species. Comparison of the L. salivarius clade core proteins with those of nine other Lactobacillus species distributed across 4 major phylogenetic groups identified the set of shared proteins, and proteins unique to each group. Conclusions The genome of L. ruminis provides a comparative tool for directing functional analyses of other members of the L. salivarius clade, and it increases understanding of the divergence of this distinct Lactobacillus lineage from other commensal lactobacilli. The genome sequence provides a definitive resource to facilitate investigation of the genetics, biochemistry and host

  20. Neuropeptide-like precursor 4 is uniquely expressed during pupal diapause in the flesh fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppression subtractive hybridization comparing brains from diapausing and nondiapausing pupae of the flesh fly, Sarcophaga crassipalpis, suggested that the gene encoding neuropeptide-like precursor 4 (Nplp4) was uniquely expressed during diapause. We have sequenced the full-length cDNA encoding Npl...

  1. Existence and uniqueness of positive solutions for a nonlocal dispersal population model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Wen Sun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we study the solutions of a nonlocal dispersal equation with a spatial weight representing competitions and aggregation. To overcome the limitations of comparison principles, we introduce new definitions of upper-lower solutions. The proof of existence and uniqueness of positive solutions is based on the method of monotone iteration sequences.

  2. A complete alpha1,3-galactosyltransferase gene is present in the human genome and partially transcribed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantéri, Marion; Giordanengo, Valérie; Vidal, Frédérique; Gaudray, Patrick; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2002-12-01

    The synthesis of Galalpha1-3Gal-terminated oligosaccharides (alpha-Gal) epitopes has been interrupted during the course of evolution, starting with Old World primates. Partial sequences similar to the alpha1,3-galactosyltransferase (alpha1,3GalT) gene, which governs the synthesis of alpha-Gal epitopes, have been detected in the human genome and were found to correspond to pseudogenes. We completed the sequence of the human alpha1,3GalT pseudogene present on chromosome 9 and found it to be organized like the murine alpha1,3GalT gene. In human cell lines and several normal and tumor tissues we detected truncated transcripts corresponding to this pseudogene. Considering these mRNAs, translation of an open reading frame containing the first four translated exons but missing the two catalytic exons could predict a truncated alpha1,3GalT polypeptide that should be enzymatically inactive. We show that transcription of human alpha1,3GalT is prematurely terminated at the level of a strong transcriptional stop signal in the middle of intron VII. We were able to reproduce this effect in vitro by subcloning the implicated DNA region upstream from a reporter cDNA. The premature transcriptional arrest of human alpha1,3-GalT gene leads to an ectopic splicing event and to the connection of a short intronic sequence downstream from translated exons. Finally, we show that these truncated transcripts are overexpressed in cell lines with modifications of O-glycans.

  3. pEVL: A Linear Plasmid for Generating mRNA IVT Templates With Extended Encoded Poly(A Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra E Grier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demand for large-scale synthesis of in vitro transcribed (IVT mRNA is being driven by the increasing use of mRNA for transient gene expression in cell engineering and therapeutic applications. An important determinant of IVT mRNA potency is the 3′ polyadenosine (poly(A tail, the length of which correlates with translational efficiency. However, present methods for generation of IVT mRNA rely on templates derived from circular plasmids or PCR products, in which homopolymeric tracts are unstable, thus limiting encoded poly(A tail lengths to ≃120 base pairs (bp. Here, we have developed a novel method for generation of extended poly(A tracts using a previously described linear plasmid system, pJazz. We find that linear plasmids can successfully propagate poly(A tracts up to ≃500 bp in length for IVT mRNA production. We then modified pJazz by removing extraneous restriction sites, adding a T7 promoter sequence upstream from an extended multiple cloning site, and adding a unique type-IIS restriction site downstream from the encoded poly(A tract to facilitate generation of IVT mRNA with precisely defined encoded poly(A tracts and 3′ termini. The resulting plasmid, designated pEVL, can be used to generate IVT mRNA with consistent defined lengths and terminal residue(s.

  4. The N-terminally truncated µ3 and µ3-like opioid receptors are transcribed from a novel promoter upstream of exon 2 in the human OPRM1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Andersen

    Full Text Available The human µ opioid receptor gene, OPRM1, produces a multitude of alternatively spliced transcripts encoding full-length or truncated receptor variants with distinct pharmacological properties. The majority of these transcripts are transcribed from the main promoter upstream of exon 1, or from alternate promoters associated with exons 11 and 13. Two distinct transcripts encoding six transmembrane domain (6TM hMOR receptors, µ3 and µ3-like, have been reported, both starting with the first nucleotide in exon 2. However, no mechanism explaining their initiation at exon 2 has been presented. Here we have used RT-PCR with RNA from human brain tissues to demonstrate that the µ3 and µ3-like transcripts contain nucleotide sequences from the intron 1-exon 2 boundary and are transcribed from a novel promoter located upstream of exon 2. Reporter gene assays confirmed the ability of the novel promoter to drive transcription in human cells, albeit at low levels. We also report the identification of a "full-length" seven transmembrane domain (7TM version of µ3, hMOR-1A2, which also contains exon 1, and a novel transcript, hMOR-1Y2, with the potential to encode the previously reported hMOR-1Y receptor, but with exon Y spliced to exon 4 instead of exon 5 as in hMOR-1Y. Heterologous expression of GFP-tagged hMOR variants in HEK 293 cells showed that both 6TM receptors were retained in the intracellular compartment and were unresponsive to exogenous opioid exposure as assessed by their ability to redistribute or affect cellular cAMP production, or to promote intracellular Ca(2+ release. Co-staining with an antibody specific for endoplasmic reticulum (ER indicated that the µ3-like receptor was retained at the ER after synthesis. 7TM receptors hMOR-1A2 and hMOR-1Y2 resided in the plasma membrane, and were responsive to opioids. Notably, hMOR-1A2 exhibits novel functional properties in that it did not internalize in response to the opioid peptide [D-Ala2, N

  5. Weighted pseudo almost automorphic sequences and their applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Abbas

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article we define the concept of weighted pseudo almost automorphic sequence, and establish some basic properties of these sequences. Further, as an application, we show the existence, uniqueness and global attractivity of weighted pseudo almost automorphic sequence solutions of a neural network model.

  6. Sequencing technologies for animal cell culture research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremkow, Benjamin G; Lee, Kelvin H

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, 2nd and 3rd generation sequencing technologies have made the use of genomic sequencing within the animal cell culture community increasingly commonplace. Each technology's defining characteristics are unique, including the cost, time, sequence read length, daily throughput, and occurrence of sequence errors. Given each sequencing technology's intrinsic advantages and disadvantages, the optimal technology for a given experiment depends on the particular experiment's objective. This review discusses the current characteristics of six next-generation sequencing technologies, compares the differences between them, and characterizes their relevance to the animal cell culture community. These technologies are continually improving, as evidenced by the recent achievement of the field's benchmark goal: sequencing a human genome for less than $1,000.

  7. Isolation of Bacteroides from fish and human fecal samples for identification of unique molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabiri, Leila; Alum, Absar; Rock, Channah; McLain, Jean E; Abbaszadegan, Morteza

    2013-12-01

    Bacteroides molecular markers have been used to identify human fecal contamination in natural waters, but recent work in our laboratory confirmed cross-amplification of several human-specific Bacteroides spp. assays with fecal DNA from fish. For identification of unique molecular markers, Bacteroides from human (n = 4) and fish (n = 7) fecal samples were cultured and their identities were further confirmed using Rapid ID 32A API strips. The 16S rDNA from multiple isolates from each sample was PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced to identify unique markers for development of more stringent human-specific assays. In human feces, Bacteroides vulgatus was the dominant species (75% of isolates), whereas in tilapia feces, Bacteroides eggerthii was dominant (66%). Bacteroides from grass carp, channel catfish, and blue catfish may include Bacteroides uniformis, Bacteroides ovatus, or Bacteroides stercoris. Phylogenic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed distinct Bacteroides groupings from each fish species, while human sequences clustered with known B. vulgatus. None of the fish isolates showed significant similarity to Bacteroides sequences currently deposited in NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information). This study expands the current sequence database of cultured fish Bacteroides. Such data are essential for identification of unique molecular markers in human Bacteroides that can be utilized in differentiating fish and human fecal contamination in water samples.

  8. A unique dual activity amino acid hydroxylase in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Gaskell

    Full Text Available The genome of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii was found to contain two genes encoding tyrosine hydroxylase; that produces L-DOPA. The encoded enzymes metabolize phenylalanine as well as tyrosine with substrate preference for tyrosine. Thus the enzymes catabolize phenylalanine to tyrosine and tyrosine to L-DOPA. The catalytic domain descriptive of this class of enzymes is conserved with the parasite enzyme and exhibits similar kinetic properties to metazoan tyrosine hydroxylases, but contains a unique N-terminal extension with a signal sequence motif. One of the genes, TgAaaH1, is constitutively expressed while the other gene, TgAaaH2, is induced during formation of the bradyzoites of the cyst stages of the life cycle. This is the first description of an aromatic amino acid hydroxylase in an apicomplexan parasite. Extensive searching of apicomplexan genome sequences revealed an ortholog in Neospora caninum but not in Eimeria, Cryptosporidium, Theileria, or Plasmodium. Possible role(s of these bi-functional enzymes during host infection are discussed.

  9. Stationary Black Holes: Uniqueness and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr T. Chruściel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of known black-hole solutions to the stationary Einstein equations has been steadily increasing, sometimes in unexpected ways. In particular, it has turned out that not all black-hole-equilibrium configurations are characterized by their mass, angular momentum and global charges. Moreover, the high degree of symmetry displayed by vacuum and electro vacuum black-hole spacetimes ceases to exist in self-gravitating non-linear field theories. This text aims to review some developments in the subject and to discuss them in light of the uniqueness theorem for the Einstein-Maxwell system.

  10. Stationary Black Holes: Uniqueness and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heusler Markus

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of known black hole solutions to the stationary Einstein equations has increased in an unexpected way during the last decade. In particular, it has turned out that not all black hole equilibrium configurations are characterized by their mass, angular momentum and global charges. Moreover, the high degree of symmetry displayed by vacuum and electro-vacuum black hole space-times ceases to exist in self-gravitating non-linear field theories. This text aims to review some of the recent developments and to discuss them in the light of the uniqueness theorem for the Einstein-Maxwell system.

  11. Unique double recurrence of cerebral arteriovenous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagm, Alhusain; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Ichinose, Shunsuke; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Surgically treated patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are considered cured when the postoperative angiogram proves complete resection. However, despite no residual nidus or early draining vein on postoperative angiogram, rare instances of AVM recurrence have been reported in adults. In this paper, the authors present a case of a 24-year-old woman with asymptomatic double recurrence of her cerebral AVM after angiographically proven complete resection. To the authors' knowledge, this patient represents the first case with double de novo asymptomatic recurrence of Spetzler-Martin grade I AVM. Also, she represents the first case with unique AVM criteria in each recurrence.

  12. A unique variation of superficial palmar arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiji PJ

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a unique variation in the arterial pattern of superficial palmar arch in which it was completed by one of the large terminal branches of radial artery. The origin of the arteria radialis indicis was also peculiar that it was arising from the communicating branch of the radial artery and further reinforced by the first dorsal metacarpal artery that joined it after reaching the volar aspect. Pertinent anatomical knowledge regarding the variations of the palmar arch is significant for the purposes of microvascular repairs and re-implantations.

  13. Type III factors with unique Cartan decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Houdayer, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    We prove that for any free ergodic nonsingular nonamenable action \\Gamma\\ \\actson (X,\\mu) of all \\Gamma\\ in a large class of groups including all hyperbolic groups, the associated group measure space factor $L^\\infty(X) \\rtimes \\Gamma$ has L^\\infty(X) as its unique Cartan subalgebra, up to unitary conjugacy. This generalizes the probability measure preserving case that was established in [PV12]. We also prove primeness and indecomposability results for such crossed products, for the corresponding orbit equivalence relations and for arbitrary amalgamated free products $M_1 *_B M_2$ over a subalgebra B of type I.

  14. Uniqueness of Centauro-type events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augusto, C.R.A.; Barroso, S.L.C.; Beggio, P.C.; Carvalho, A.O. de; Menon, M.J.; Navia, C.E.; Oliveira, R. de; Shibuya, E.H

    2003-07-01

    Analysis to discriminate Centauro events from normal events is made without previous identification of secondary emitted particles. For this purpose their energy and derived quantities like distance from the center of momenta it were mainly used. As a result we found in a sample of (280+87) experimental events only 3 were compatible with 5 Centauro events, but none of them dad a high content of hadrons, characteristic of Centauro events. With this result we are confident about the uniqueness of Centauro events, especially for two events that have vertex directly determined. Comparing with some interaction models features we depict a possible scenario to explain Centauro events.

  15. Uniqueness of the Trautman-Bondi mass

    CERN Document Server

    Chrúsciel, P T; MacCallum, M A H; Chru\\'sciel, Piotr T.; Jezierski, Jacek; Callum, Malcolm A.H. Mac

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that the only functionals, within a natural class, which are monotonic in time for all solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations admitting a smooth ``piece'' of conformal null infinity Scri, are those depending on the metric only through a specific combination of the Bondi `mass aspect' and other next--to--leading order terms in the metric. Under the extra condition of passive BMS invariance, the unique such functional (up to a multiplicative factor) is the Trautman--Bondi energy. It is also shown that this energy remains well-defined for a wide class of `polyhomogeneous' metrics.

  16. Unique supply function equilibrium with capacity constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, Paer [Department of Economics, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 513, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2008-01-15

    Consider a market where producers submit supply functions to a procurement auction with uncertain demand, e.g. an electricity auction. In the Supply Function Equilibrium (SFE), every firm commits to the supply function that maximises expected profit in the one-shot game given the supply functions of competitors. A basic weakness of the SFE is the presence of multiple equilibria. This paper shows that with (i) symmetric producers, (ii) perfectly inelastic demand, (iii) a price cap, and (iv) capacity constraints that bind with a positive probability, there exists a unique, symmetric SFE. (author)

  17. [Celiac disease: an unique autoinmune model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo Sáez, Luis Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Celiac disease is a unique autoimmune disorder, because the environmental precipitant factor is known. It is gluten, the major storage protein of wheat and similar grains. Originally was considered a rare malabsorption syndrome of childhood, but nowadays is recognized a common condition, that affects to 1% of the general population, all over the world', involves to all different races, may be diagnosed at any age, and affects to many organ systems. Therapy for the disease is a gluten-free-diet that must be strict and long-term. This diet cause a total recovery clinical and analytical, with excellent quality of life of patients.

  18. Uniqueness, Self belonging and Intercourse in Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsh, Dr. Marvin / E.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript has ensued from my past studies in biochemistry (PhD, CUNY 1986) and my current endeavors in graduate study in philosophy and anthropology. The current research project began during my period as a graduate student in biochemistry with a professor of classical genetics comment that DNA was unique in the physical world. The paradox presented to relate this notion to existing natural law lead me to evolve and communicate a view that the world itself is a special case of a general...

  19. A unique chromatin signature uncovers early developmental enhancers in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Bajpai, Ruchi; Swigut, Tomek; Brugmann, Samantha A; Flynn, Ryan A; Wysocka, Joanna

    2011-02-10

    Cell-fate transitions involve the integration of genomic information encoded by regulatory elements, such as enhancers, with the cellular environment. However, identification of genomic sequences that control human embryonic development represents a formidable challenge. Here we show that in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), unique chromatin signatures identify two distinct classes of genomic elements, both of which are marked by the presence of chromatin regulators p300 and BRG1, monomethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me1), and low nucleosomal density. In addition, elements of the first class are distinguished by the acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27ac), overlap with previously characterized hESC enhancers, and are located proximally to genes expressed in hESCs and the epiblast. In contrast, elements of the second class, which we term 'poised enhancers', are distinguished by the absence of H3K27ac, enrichment of histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), and are linked to genes inactive in hESCs and instead are involved in orchestrating early steps in embryogenesis, such as gastrulation, mesoderm formation and neurulation. Consistent with the poised identity, during differentiation of hESCs to neuroepithelium, a neuroectoderm-specific subset of poised enhancers acquires a chromatin signature associated with active enhancers. When assayed in zebrafish embryos, poised enhancers are able to direct cell-type and stage-specific expression characteristic of their proximal developmental gene, even in the absence of sequence conservation in the fish genome. Our data demonstrate that early developmental enhancers are epigenetically pre-marked in hESCs and indicate an unappreciated role of H3K27me3 at distal regulatory elements. Moreover, the wealth of new regulatory sequences identified here provides an invaluable resource for studies and isolation of transient, rare cell populations representing early stages of human embryogenesis.

  20. Is thermosensing property of RNA thermometers unique?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premal Shah

    Full Text Available A large number of studies have been dedicated to identify the structural and sequence based features of RNA thermometers, mRNAs that regulate their translation initiation rate with temperature. It has been shown that the melting of the ribosome-binding site (RBS plays a prominent role in this thermosensing process. However, little is known as to how widespread this melting phenomenon is as earlier studies on the subject have worked with a small sample of known RNA thermometers. We have developed a novel method of studying the melting of RNAs with temperature by computationally sampling the distribution of the RNA structures at various temperatures using the RNA folding software Vienna. In this study, we compared the thermosensing property of 100 randomly selected mRNAs and three well known thermometers--rpoH, ibpA and agsA sequences from E. coli. We also compared the rpoH sequences from 81 mesophilic proteobacteria. Although both rpoH and ibpA show a higher rate of melting at their RBS compared with the mean of non-thermometers, contrary to our expectations these higher rates are not significant. Surprisingly, we also do not find any significant differences between rpoH thermometers from other gamma-proteobacteria and E. coli non-thermometers.

  1. Regulation of pri-miRNA processing by a long noncoding RNA transcribed from an ultraconserved region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liz, Julia; Portela, Anna; Soler, Marta; Gómez, Antonio; Ling, Hui; Michlewski, Gracjan; Calin, George A; Guil, Sònia; Esteller, Manel

    2014-07-03

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) control cellular programs by affecting protein-coding genes, but evidence increasingly points to their involvement in a network of ncRNA-ncRNA interactions. Here, we show that a long ncRNA, Uc.283+A, controls pri-miRNA processing. Regulation requires complementarity between the lower stem region of the pri-miR-195 transcript and an ultraconserved sequence in Uc.283+A, which prevents pri-miRNA cleavage by Drosha. Mutation of the site in either RNA molecule uncouples regulation in vivo and in vitro. We propose a model in which lower-stem strand invasion by Uc.283+A impairs microprocessor recognition and efficient pri-miRNA cropping. In addition to identifying a case of RNA-directed regulation of miRNA biogenesis, our study reveals regulatory networks involving different ncRNA classes of importance in cancer.

  2. Identification of unique food handling practices that could represent food safety risks for minority consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Shauna C; Stein, Susan E; Quinlan, Jennifer J

    2012-11-01

    Foodborne illness caused by Salmonella and Campylobacter is a concern for consumers, and there is evidence that minority racial-ethnic populations experience greater rates of illness because of these pathogens. The limited body of research concerning food safety knowledge and practices among minority consumers has focused more on general food safety knowledge than on culturally specific food handling practices. The purpose of the research reported here was to explore food handling behaviors of minority racial-ethnic consumers through in-depth discussions in focus group settings. In this way, we hoped to identify potential unique, previously unidentified food handling practices among these consumers. Nine focus groups were held in Philadelphia, PA. Three focus groups were conducted with African American consumers, three with Hispanic consumers, and three with Asian consumers. In all, 56 consumers participated. Data were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for unique and potentially unsafe food handling behaviors. Potentially unsafe food handling practices identified among all three groups included extended time to transport food from retail to home and washing of raw poultry. Culturally unique behaviors within groups included (i) using hot water (Asian, Hispanic) or acidic solutions (African American, Hispanic) to clean raw poultry, (ii) purchasing live poultry (Asian, Hispanic), (iii) cooking poultry overnight (African American), and (iv) preparing bite-size pieces of meat prior to cooking (Asian, Hispanic). To have focus groups include a limited number of participants and nonrandom sampling means that these themes and trends cannot be extrapolated to represent food mishandling among these populations in general. Results presented here allow modification of an existing food safety survey to identify the prevalence of these food handling practices among consumers of different demographics.

  3. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles unique cost estimating requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, P.; Apgar, H.; Stukes, S.; Sterk, S.

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), also referred to as drones, are aerial platforms that fly without a human pilot onboard. UAVs are controlled autonomously by a computer in the vehicle or under the remote control of a pilot stationed at a fixed ground location. There are a wide variety of drone shapes, sizes, configurations, complexities, and characteristics. Use of these devices by the Department of Defense (DoD), NASA, civil and commercial organizations continues to grow. UAVs are commonly used for intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (ISR). They are also use for combat operations, and civil applications, such as firefighting, non-military security work, surveillance of infrastructure (e.g. pipelines, power lines and country borders). UAVs are often preferred for missions that require sustained persistence (over 4 hours in duration), or are “ too dangerous, dull or dirty” for manned aircraft. Moreover, they can offer significant acquisition and operations cost savings over traditional manned aircraft. Because of these unique characteristics and missions, UAV estimates require some unique estimating methods. This paper describes a framework for estimating UAV systems total ownership cost including hardware components, software design, and operations. The challenge of collecting data, testing the sensitivities of cost drivers, and creating cost estimating relationships (CERs) for each key work breakdown structure (WBS) element is discussed. The autonomous operation of UAVs is especially challenging from a software perspective.

  4. Event Segmentation Ability Uniquely Predicts Event Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Jesse Q.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Hambrick, David Z.; Zacks, Rose T.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Bailey, Heather R.; Eisenberg, Michelle L.; Beck, Taylor M.

    2013-01-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79 years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan. PMID:23942350

  5. Astronomy Outreach for Large and Unique Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, D.; Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Kendall, J. S.; Dugan, C.

    2013-04-01

    In this session, we discuss different approaches to reaching large audiences. In addition to star parties and astronomy events, the audiences for some of the events include music concerts or festivals, sick children and their families, minority communities, American Indian reservations, and tourist sites such as the National Mall. The goal is to bring science directly to the public—to people who attend astronomy events and to people who do not come to star parties, science museums, or science festivals. These programs allow the entire community to participate in astronomy activities to enhance the public appreciation of science. These programs attract large enthusiastic crowds often with young children participating in these family learning experiences. The public will become more informed, educated, and inspired about astronomy and will also be provided with information that will allow them to continue to learn after this outreach activity. Large and unique audiences often have common problems, and their solutions and the lessons learned will be presented. Interaction with the participants in this session will provide important community feedback used to improve astronomy outreach for large and unique audiences. New ways to expand astronomy outreach to new large audiences will be discussed.

  6. An experiment on Lowest Unique Integer Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashi; Hanaki, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally study Lowest Unique Integer Games (LUIGs) to determine if and how subjects self-organize into different behavioral classes. In a LUIG, N(≥ 3) players submit a positive integer up to M and the player choosing the smallest number not chosen by anyone else wins. LUIGs are simplified versions of real systems such as Lowest/Highest Unique Bid Auctions that have been attracting attention from scholars, yet experimental studies are scarce. Furthermore, LUIGs offer insights into choice patterns that can shed light on the alleviation of congestion problems. Here, we consider four LUIGs with N = { 3 , 4 } and M = { 3 , 4 } . We find that (a) choices made by more than 1/3 of subjects were not significantly different from what a symmetric mixed-strategy Nash equilibrium (MSE) predicts; however, (b) subjects who behaved significantly differently from what the MSE predicts won the game more frequently. What distinguishes subjects was their tendencies to change their choices following losses.

  7. The binding specificity of Translocated in LipoSarcoma/FUsed in Sarcoma with lncRNA transcribed from the promoter region of cyclin D1

    OpenAIRE

    Yoneda, Ryoma; Suzuki, Shiho; Mashima, Tsukasa; Kondo, Keiko; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato; Kurokawa, Riki

    2016-01-01

    Background Translocated in LipoSarcoma (TLS, also known as FUsed in Sarcoma) is an RNA/DNA binding protein whose mutation cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In previous study, we demonstrated that TLS binds to long noncoding RNA, promoter-associated ncRNA-D (pncRNA-D), transcribed from the 5? upstream region of cyclin D1 (CCND1), and inhibits the expression of CCND1. Results In order to elucidate the binding specificity between TLS and pncRNA-D, we divided pncRNA-D into seven fragments and ...

  8. The intergenic region between the divergently transcribed niiA and niaD genes of Aspergillus nidulans contains multiple NirA binding sites which act bidirectionally.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The niaD and niiA genes of Aspergillus nidulans, which code, respectively, for nitrate and nitrite reductases, are divergently transcribed, and their ATGs are separated by 1,200 bp. The genes are under the control of the positively acting NirA transcription factor, which mediates nitrate induction. The DNA binding domain of NirA was expressed as a fusion protein with the glutathione S-transferase of Schistosoma japonicum. Gel shift and footprint experiments have shown that in the intergenic r...

  9. Thousands of corresponding human and mouse genomic regions unalignable in primary sequence contain common RNA structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torarinsson, Elfar; Sawera, Milena; Havgaard, Jakob Hull

    2006-01-01

    been investigated. Owing to the limitations in computational methods, comparative genomics has been lacking the ability to compare such nonconserved sequence regions for conserved structural RNA elements. We have investigated the presence of structural RNA elements by conducting a local structural...... alignment, using FOLDALIGN, on a subset of these 100,000 corresponding regions and estimate that 1800 contain common RNA structures. Comparing our results with the recent mapping of transcribed fragments (transfrags) in human, we find that high-scoring candidates are twice as likely to be found in regions...... expressed non-coding RNA sequences not alignable in primary sequence....

  10. Unique chimeric composition of the trehalase gene from brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shin; Nambu, Fumiko; Nambu, Ziro

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the exon/intron structure of the Artemia trehalase gene, four overlapping clones were isolated from a genome library derived from an inbred strain of crustacean Artemia franciscana, and a 49 kb genetic area was re-constructed. The re-constructed area contained eight exons corresponding to the trehalase cDNA sequence that we had previously reported [1]. Comparative analysis of the Artemia trehalase gene with other animal trehalase genes revealed the existence of conserved exon/intron boundaries among different phyla. Comparison of the 5' UTR region of trehalase mRNA obtained by the 5' RACE method with the trehalase genes indicated the existence of a novel exon/intron boundary in the region designated "Exon I". Surprisingly, a part of a mitochondrial ribosomal protein gene (MRP-S33) was found to be inserted in the 5' UTR region of the trehalase gene. This sequence had the same polyadenylation signal that the Artemia MRP-S33 cDNAs did. Using the 3' RACE method, it was demonstrated that the poly (A) additional signal is still functional and that the chimeric mRNAs composed of the 5' UTR of the trehalase mRNA and of the 3' end derived from the MRP-S33 gene are transcribed.

  11. Unique Sequence of Events Triggers Manta Ray Feeding Frenzy in the Southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarla J. Weeks

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Manta rays are classified as Vulnerable to Extinction on the IUCN Red List for Threatened Species. In Australia, a key aggregation site for reef manta rays is Lady Elliot Island (LEI on the Great Barrier Reef, ~7 km from the shelf edge. Here, we investigate the environmental processes that triggered the largest manta ray feeding aggregation yet observed in Australia, in early 2013. We use MODIS sea surface temperature (SST, chlorophyll-a concentration and photic depth data, together with in situ data, to show that anomalous river discharges led to high chlorophyll (anomalies: 10–15 mg∙m−3 and turbid (photic depth anomalies: −15 m river plumes extending out to LEI, and that these became entrained offshore around the periphery of an active cyclonic eddy. Eddy dynamics led to cold bottom intrusions along the shelf edge (6 °C temperature decrease, and at LEI (5 °C temperature decrease. Strongest SST gradients (>1 °C∙km−1 were at the convergent frontal zone between the shelf and eddy-influenced waters, directly overlying LEI. Here, the front intensified on the spring ebb tide to attract and shape the aggregation pattern of foraging manta rays. Future research could focus on mapping the probability and persistence of these ecologically significant frontal zones via remote sensing to aid the management and conservation of marine species.

  12. Unique features of a global human ectoparasite identified through sequencing of the bed bug genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bed bug, Cimex lectularius, has re-established itself as a ubiquitous human ectoparasite throughout much of the world during the last two decades. This global resurgence is likely linked to increased international travel and commerce and widespread insecticide resistance. Analyses of the C. le...

  13. Sequence variation of the 16S to 23S rRNA spacer region in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, H; Møller, P L; Vogensen, F K; Olsen, J E

    2000-01-01

    The possibility for identification of Salmonella enterica serotypes by sequence analysis of the 16S to 23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer was investigated by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA from all operons simultaneously in a collection of 25 strains of 18 different serotypes of S. enterica, and by sequencing individual cloned operons from a single strain. It was only possible to determine the first 117 bases upstream from the 23S rRNA gene by direct sequencing because of variation between the rrn operons. Comparison of sequences from this region allowed separation of only 15 out of the 18 serotypes investigated and was not specific even at the subspecies level of S. enterica. To determine the differences between internal transcribed spacers in more detail, the individual rrn operons of strain JEO 197, serotype IV 43:z4,z23:-, were cloned and sequenced. The strain contained four short internal transcribed spacer fragments of 382-384 bases in length, which were 98.4-99.7% similar to each other and three long fragments of 505 bases with 98.0-99.8% similarity. The study demonstrated a higher degree of interbacterial variation than intrabacterial variation between operons for serotypes of S. enterica.

  14. Complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of Tetrahymena pyriformis and comparison with Paramecium aurelia mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, G; Zhu, Y; Littlejohn, T G; Greenwood, S J; Schnare, M N; Lang, B F; Gray, M W

    2000-03-24

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence of the Tetrahymena pyriformis mitochondrial genome and a comparison of its gene content and organization with that of Paramecium aurelia mtDNA. T. pyriformis mtDNA is a linear molecule of 47,172 bp (78.7 % A+T) excluding telomeric sequences (identical tandem repeats of 31 bp at each end of the genome). In addition to genes encoding the previously described bipartite small and large subunit rRNAs, the T. pyriformis mitochondrial genome contains 21 protein-coding genes that are clearly homologous to genes of defined function in other mtDNAs, including one (yejR) that specifies a component of a cytochrome c biogenesis pathway. As well, T. pyriformis mtDNA contains 22 open reading frames of unknown function larger than 60 codons, potentially specifying proteins ranging in size from 74 to 1386 amino acid residues. A total of 13 of these open reading frames ("ciliate-specific") are found in P. aurelia mtDNA, whereas the remaining nine appear to be unique to T. pyriformis; however, of the latter, five are positionally equivalent and of similar size in the two ciliate mitochondrial genomes, suggesting they may also be homologous, even though this is not evident from sequence comparisons. Only eight tRNA genes encoding seven distinct tRNAs are found in T. pyriformis mtDNA, formally confirming a long-standing proposal that most T. pyriformis mitochondrial tRNAs are nucleus-encoded species imported from the cytosol. Atypical features of mitochondrial gene organization and expression in T. pyriformis mtDNA include split and rearranged large subunit rRNA genes, as well as a split nad1 gene (encoding subunit 1 of NADH dehydrogenase of respiratory complex I) whose two segments are located on and transcribed from opposite strands, as is also the case in P. aurelia. Gene content and arrangement are very similar in T. pyriformis and P. aurelia mtDNAs, the two differing by a limited number of duplication, inversion and rearrangement events

  15. Nuclear RNA sequencing of the mouse erythroid cell transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jennifer A; Clay, Ieuan; Umlauf, David; Chen, Chih-Yu; Moir, Catherine A; Eskiw, Christopher H; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Chakalova, Lyubomira; Nagano, Takashi; Fraser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In addition to protein coding genes a substantial proportion of mammalian genomes are transcribed. However, most transcriptome studies investigate steady-state mRNA levels, ignoring a considerable fraction of the transcribed genome. In addition, steady-state mRNA levels are influenced by both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, and thus do not provide a clear picture of transcriptional output. Here, using deep sequencing of nuclear RNAs (nucRNA-Seq) in parallel with chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) of active RNA polymerase II, we compared the nuclear transcriptome of mouse anemic spleen erythroid cells with polymerase occupancy on a genome-wide scale. We demonstrate that unspliced transcripts quantified by nucRNA-seq correlate with primary transcript frequencies measured by RNA FISH, but differ from steady-state mRNA levels measured by poly(A)-enriched RNA-seq. Highly expressed protein coding genes showed good correlation between RNAPII occupancy and transcriptional output; however, genome-wide we observed a poor correlation between transcriptional output and RNAPII association. This poor correlation is due to intergenic regions associated with RNAPII which correspond with transcription factor bound regulatory regions and a group of stable, nuclear-retained long non-coding transcripts. In conclusion, sequencing the nuclear transcriptome provides an opportunity to investigate the transcriptional landscape in a given cell type through quantification of unspliced primary transcripts and the identification of nuclear-retained long non-coding RNAs.

  16. Nuclear RNA sequencing of the mouse erythroid cell transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Mitchell

    Full Text Available In addition to protein coding genes a substantial proportion of mammalian genomes are transcribed. However, most transcriptome studies investigate steady-state mRNA levels, ignoring a considerable fraction of the transcribed genome. In addition, steady-state mRNA levels are influenced by both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, and thus do not provide a clear picture of transcriptional output. Here, using deep sequencing of nuclear RNAs (nucRNA-Seq in parallel with chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq of active RNA polymerase II, we compared the nuclear transcriptome of mouse anemic spleen erythroid cells with polymerase occupancy on a genome-wide scale. We demonstrate that unspliced transcripts quantified by nucRNA-seq correlate with primary transcript frequencies measured by RNA FISH, but differ from steady-state mRNA levels measured by poly(A-enriched RNA-seq. Highly expressed protein coding genes showed good correlation between RNAPII occupancy and transcriptional output; however, genome-wide we observed a poor correlation between transcriptional output and RNAPII association. This poor correlation is due to intergenic regions associated with RNAPII which correspond with transcription factor bound regulatory regions and a group of stable, nuclear-retained long non-coding transcripts. In conclusion, sequencing the nuclear transcriptome provides an opportunity to investigate the transcriptional landscape in a given cell type through quantification of unspliced primary transcripts and the identification of nuclear-retained long non-coding RNAs.

  17. Conditional and Unique Coloring of Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, P Venkata Subba

    2011-01-01

    For integers $k, r > 0$, a conditional $(k,r)$-coloring of a graph $G$ is a proper $k$-coloring of the vertices of $G$ such that every vertex $v$ of degree $d(v)$ in $G$ is adjacent to at least $\\min\\{r, d(v)\\}$ differently colored vertices. Given $r$, the smallest integer $k$ for which $G$ has a conditional $(k,r)$-coloring is called the $r$th order conditional chromatic number $\\chi_r(G)$ of $G$. We give results (exact values or bounds for $\\chi_r(G)$, depending on $r$) related to the conditional coloring of some graphs. We introduce \\emph{unique conditional colorability} and give some related results. (Keywords. cartesian product of graphs; conditional chromatic number; gear graph; join of graphs.)

  18. Developing innovative programs for unique student populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, D A; Caruso, J; Chauncey, D M

    1994-12-01

    Optometric education has been faced with ever-increasing expectations. These include the ability to educate students and practitioners to care for new patient populations, deal with more diverse and complex clinical problems, to be significant participants in the research community and to fulfill leadership positions within the profession. To fulfill this expectation, schools and colleges need to diversify their program offerings to attract and educate unique student populations who come from diverse backgrounds and bring a range of pre-existing knowledge and skills. This paper provides an overview of The New England College of Optometry's efforts in this area and two programs, the "Advanced Standing International Program" and the "Accelerated Doctor of Optometry Degree Program," are examined in detail. An emphasis is placed on outcomes assessment to ensure the programs are fulfilling their purpose and the results of a retrospective analysis of the two programs is provided.

  19. Computational Transition at the Uniqueness Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Sly, Allan

    2010-01-01

    The hardcore model is a model of lattice gas systems which has received much attention in statistical physics, probability theory and theoretical computer science. It is the probability distribution over independent sets $I$ of a graph weighted proportionally to $\\lambda^{|I|}$ with fugacity parameter $\\lambda$. We prove that at the uniqueness threshold of the hardcore model on the $d$-regular tree, approximating the partition function becomes computationally hard on graphs of maximum degree $d$. Specifically, we show that unless NP$=$RP there is no polynomial time approximation scheme for the partition function (the sum of such weighted independent sets) on graphs of maximum degree $d$ for fugacity $\\lambda_c(d) 0$. Weitz produced an FPTAS for approximating the partition function when $0<\\lambda < \\lambda_c(d)$ so this result demonstrates that the computational threshold exactly coincides with the statistical physics phase transition thus confirming the main conjecture of [28]. We further analyze the s...

  20. Organizing the spatially and temporally unique hydrosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghuijs, Wouter

    2016-04-01

    Growing anthropogenic activity is quickly changing the hydrosphere. Panta Rhei calls for improved understanding of changing hydrosphere dynamics in their connection with human systems. I argue that progress within the Panta Rhei initiative is strongly limited by the absence of hydrological principles that help to organise our spatially and temporally unique hydrosphere; without guiding principles (e.g. classification systems) hydrology will continue to be a case study dominated science that will have a hard time to efficiently improve understanding, estimation and prediction of human affected systems. Exposing such organising principles should not be considered as a step backwards into the recent PUB decade. Instead, it should be regarded as an exciting scientific challenge that is becoming increasingly relevant now the hydrosphere is quickly changing.

  1. Hue discrimination, unique hues and naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachy, Romain; Dias, Jérôme; Alleysson, David; Bonnardel, Valérie

    2012-02-01

    The hue discrimination curve (HDC) that characterizes performances over the entire hue circle was determined by using sinusoidally modulated spectral power distributions of 1.5 c/300 nm with fixed amplitude and twelve reference phases. To investigate relationship between hue discrimination and appearance, observers further performed a free color naming and unique hue tasks. The HDC consistently displayed two minima and two maxima; discrimination is optimal at the yellow/orange and blue/magenta boundaries and pessimal in green and in the extra-spectral magenta colors. A linear model based on Müller zone theory correctly predicts a periodical profile but with a phase-opponency (minima/maxima at 180° apart) which is inconsistent with the empirical HDC's profile.

  2. Injectable hydrogels as unique biomedical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin; Ding, Jiandong

    2008-08-01

    A concentrated fish soup could be gelled in the winter and re-solled upon heating. In contrast, some synthetic copolymers exhibit an inverse sol-gel transition with spontaneous physical gelation upon heating instead of cooling. If the transition in water takes place below the body temperature and the chemicals are biocompatible and biodegradable, such gelling behavior makes the associated physical gels injectable biomaterials with unique applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering etc. Various therapeutic agents or cells can be entrapped in situ and form a depot merely by a syringe injection of their aqueous solutions at target sites with minimal invasiveness and pain. This tutorial review summarizes and comments on this soft matter, especially thermogelling poly(ethylene glycol)-(biodegradable polyester) block copolymers. The main types of injectable hydrogels are also briefly introduced, including both physical gels and chemical gels.

  3. Fullerenes as unique nanopharmaceuticals for disease treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As unique nanoparticles,fullerenes have attracted much attention due to their unparalleled physical,chemical and biological properties.Various functionalized fullerenes with OH,NH2,COOH,and peptide modifications were developed.It summarized the biological activities of fullerenes derivatives in cancer therapy with high efficiency and low toxicity,as reactive oxygen species scavenger and lipid peroxidation inhibitor,to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus and to suppress bacteria and microbial at low concentration.In addition,the mechanism for fullerene to enter cells and biodistribution of fullerene in vivo was also discussed.This research focuses on the current understanding of fullerenes-based nanomaterials in the potential clinical application as well as biological mechanism of fullerenes and its derivatives in disease therapy.

  4. Detecting beer intake by unique metabolite patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde; Jensen, Morten Georg; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of health related effects of beer intake is hampered by the lack of accurate tools for assessing intakes (biomarkers). Therefore, we identified plasma and urine metabolites associated with recent beer intake by untargeted metabolomics and established a characteristic metabolite pattern...... representing raw materials and beer production as a qualitative biomarker of beer intake. In a randomized, crossover, single-blinded meal study (MSt1) 18 participants were given one at a time four different test beverages: strong, regular and non-alcoholic beers and a soft drink. Four participants were...... assigned to have two additional beers (MSt2). In addition to plasma and urine samples, test beverages, wort and hops extract were analyzed by UPLC-QTOF. A unique metabolite pattern reflecting beer metabolome, including metabolites derived from beer raw material (i.e. N-methyl tyramine sulfate and the sum...

  5. Detection and identification of opportunistic Exophiala species using the rolling circle amplification of ribosomal internal transcribed spacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafzadeh, M J; Dolatabadi, S; Saradeghi Keisari, M; Naseri, A; Feng, P; de Hoog, G S

    2013-09-01

    Deep infections by melanized fungi deserve special attention because of a potentially fatal, cerebral or disseminated course of disease in otherwise healthy patients. Timely diagnostics are a major problem with these infections. Rolling circle amplification (RCA) is a sensitive, specific and reproducible isothermal DNA amplification technique for rapid molecular identification of microorganisms. RCA-based diagnostics are characterized by good reproducibility, with few amplification errors compared to PCR. The method is applied here to species of Exophiala known to cause systemic infections in humans. The ITS rDNA region of five Exophiala species (E. dermatitidis, E. oligosperma, E. spinifera, E. xenobiotica, and E. jeanselmei) was sequenced and aligned in view of designing specific padlock probes to be used for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the Exophiala species concerned. The assay proved to successfully amplify DNA of the target fungi at the level of species; while no cross-reactivity was observed. Amplification products were visualized on 1% agarose gels to verify the specificity of probe-template binding. Amounts of reagents were minimized to avoid the generation of false positive results. The sensitivity of RCA may help to improve early diagnostics of these difficult to diagnose infections.

  6. The bacterial magnetosome: a unique prokaryotic organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Brian H; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial magnetosome is a unique prokaryotic organelle comprising magnetic mineral crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer. These inclusions are biomineralized by the magnetotactic bacteria which are ubiquitous, aquatic, motile microorganisms. Magnetosomes cause cells of magnetotactic bacteria to passively align and swim along the Earth's magnetic field lines, as miniature motile compass needles. These specialized compartments consist of a phospholipid bilayer membrane surrounding magnetic crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4). The morphology of these membrane-bound crystals varies by species with a nominal magnetic domain size between 35 and 120 nm. Almost all magnetotactic bacteria arrange their magnetosomes in a chain within the cell there by maximizing the magnetic dipole moment of the cell. It is presumed that magnetotactic bacteria use magnetotaxis in conjunction with chemotaxis to locate and maintain an optimum position for growth and survival based on chemistry, redox and physiology in aquatic habitats with vertical chemical concentration and redox gradients. The biosynthesis of magnetosomes is a complex process that involves several distinct steps including cytoplasmic membrane modifications, iron uptake and transport, initiation of crystallization, crystal maturation and magnetosome chain formation. While many mechanistic details remain unresolved, magnetotactic bacteria appear to contain the genetic determinants for magnetosome biomineralization within their genomes in clusters of genes that make up what is referred to as the magnetosome gene island in some species. In addition, magnetosomes contain a unique set of proteins, not present in other cellular fractions, which control the biomineralization process. Through the development of genetic systems, proteomic and genomic work, and the use of molecular and biochemical tools, the functions of a number of magnetosome membrane proteins have been demonstrated and the molecular

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of Silphium and subtribe Engelmanniinae (Asteraceae: Heliantheae) based on ITS and ETS sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevinger, J A; Panero, J L

    2000-04-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of Silphium and subtribe Engelmanniinae were examined using DNA sequence data. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the external transcribed spacer (ETS) region were sequenced for 39 specimens representing the six genera of subtribe Engelmanniinae (Berlandiera, Chrysogonum, Dugesia, Engelmannia, Lindheimera, and Silphium), plus five additional genera identified as closely related to the Engelmanniinae by chloroplast DNA restriction site analysis, and three outgroups. Phylogenetic analysis supported the monophyly of Silphium with Lindheimera as sister. Silphium can be divided into two sections based upon two well-supported clades that correspond to root type and growth form. These results also supported the expansion of subtribe Engelmanniinae to include Balsamorhiza, Borrichia, Rojasianthe, Vigethia, and Wyethia. We hypothesize that subtribe Engelmanniinae originated in Mesoamerica and later radiated to the United States. We suggest that the cypsela complex, which is present in Berlandiera, Chrysogonum, Engelmannia, and Lindheimera, arose only once and was subsequently lost in Silphium.

  8. R Region of S Type of Cytoplasmic Male Sterility in Maize Mitochondrial DNA is Transcribed in Both Directions and May Be Associated with Male Sterility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGSai-Qun; ZHANGFang-Dong; XIAOHai-Lin; ZHENGYong-Lian

    2004-01-01

    It is well accepted that S type of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in maize (Zea mays L.) isassociated with R region in mitochondrial genome. R region includes two open reading frames——orf355and orf77and it is speculated that orf77is an important candidate gene of CMS. RT-PCR showed that bothDNA strands of R region are transcribed. Nuclear background or developing stages of plant do not influencethe transcription of R region in the strand which also acts as template strand of cox Ⅰ/coxⅡ locating justupstream of R region, but they do influence the transcription of R region in the other strand (templatestrand of orf355-orf77). In tassel with nuclear background of rf3rf3, transcription of the template strand oforf355-orf77 is different from that in etiolated shoots with nuclear background of Rf3- or rf3rf3and tasselwith nuclear background of Rf3-. Compared to the same other three, it is truncated at about 238 base fromthe 5' end of R region. Rabbit antiserum against putative ORF77 expressed in Escherichia coliwas preparedbut Western blot did not detect ORF77 in plant materials. It seems that double-strand transcription of Rregion inhibits the translation of orf77and the transcribing mode of R region may be associated with malesterility.

  9. Émission de photons uniques par un atome unique piégé

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darquié, B.; Beugnon, J.; Jones, M. P. A.; Dingjan, J.; Sortais, Y.; Browaeys, A.; Messin, G.; Grangier, P.

    2006-10-01

    En illuminant un atome unique piégé dans une pince optique de taille micrométrique à l'aide d'impulsions lumineuses résonantes d'une durée de 4 ns, nous avons réalisé une source efficace de photons uniques déclenchés, de polarisation bien définie. Nous avons mesuré la fonction d'autocorrélation temporelle en intensité qui met en évidence un dégroupement de photons presque parfait. Une telle source de photons uniques de haut flux possède des applications potentielles pour le traitement de l'information quantique.

  10. Unique small RNA signatures uncovered in the tammar wallaby genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay James

    2012-10-01

    discovered crasiRNAs. These small RNAs are derived largely from centromere-enriched retroelements, including a novel SINE. Conclusions This study encompasses the first analyses of the major classes of small RNAs for the newly completed tammar genome, validates preliminary annotations using deep sequencing and computational approaches, and provides a foundation for future work on tammar-specific as well as conserved, but previously unknown small RNA progenitors and targets identified herein. The characterization of new miRNA target genes and a unique profile for crasiRNAs has allowed for insight into multiple RNA mediated processes in the tammar, including gene regulation, species incompatibilities, centromere and chromosome function.

  11. 14 CFR 221.203 - Unique rule numbers required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unique rule numbers required. 221.203... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS TARIFFS Electronically Filed Tariffs § 221.203 Unique rule numbers required... bear a unique rule number. (b) The unique rule numbers for the fares specified in this section shall...

  12. Developmentally-regulated extended domains of DNA hypomethylation encompass highly transcribed genes of the human β-globin locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, Melissa J.; Hsu, Mei; Richardson, Christine A.; Olivier, Emmanuel N.; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Fiering, Steven; Lowrey, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective DNA methylation has long been implicated in developmental β-globin gene regulation. However, the mechanism underlying this regulation is unclear, especially since these genes do not contain CpG islands. This has led us to propose and test the hypothesis that, just as for histone modifications, developmentally-specific changes in human β-like globin gene expression are associated with long-range changes in DNA methylation. Methods Bisulfite sequencing was used to determine the methylation state of individual CpG dinucleotides across the β-globin locus in uncultured primary human erythroblasts from fetal liver and bone marrow, and in primitive-like erythroid cells derived from human embryonic stem cells. Results β-globin locus CpGs are generally highly methylated but domains of DNA hypomethylation spanning thousands of base pairs are established around the most highly expressed genes during each developmental stage. These large domains of DNA hypomethylation are found within domains of histone modifications associated with gene expression. We also find hypomethylation of a small proportion of γ-globin promoters in adult erythroid cells, suggesting a mechanism by which adult erythroid cells produce fetal hemoglobin. Conclusion This is one of the first reports to show that changes in DNA methylation patterns across large domains around non-CpG island genes correspond with changes in developmentally-regulated histone modifications and gene expression. This data supports a new model in which extended domains of DNA hypomethylation and active histone marks are coordinately established to achieve developmentally-specific gene expression of non-CpG island genes. PMID:19460471

  13. EGNAS: an exhaustive DNA sequence design algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kick Alfred

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular recognition based on the complementary base pairing of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA is the fundamental principle in the fields of genetics, DNA nanotechnology and DNA computing. We present an exhaustive DNA sequence design algorithm that allows to generate sets containing a maximum number of sequences with defined properties. EGNAS (Exhaustive Generation of Nucleic Acid Sequences offers the possibility of controlling both interstrand and intrastrand properties. The guanine-cytosine content can be adjusted. Sequences can be forced to start and end with guanine or cytosine. This option reduces the risk of “fraying” of DNA strands. It is possible to limit cross hybridizations of a defined length, and to adjust the uniqueness of sequences. Self-complementarity and hairpin structures of certain length can be avoided. Sequences and subsequences can optionally be forbidden. Furthermore, sequences can be designed to have minimum interactions with predefined strands and neighboring sequences. Results The algorithm is realized in a C++ program. TAG sequences can be generated and combined with primers for single-base extension reactions, which were described for multiplexed genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Thereby, possible foldback through intrastrand interaction of TAG-primer pairs can be limited. The design of sequences for specific attachment of molecular constructs to DNA origami is presented. Conclusions We developed a new software tool called EGNAS for the design of unique nucleic acid sequences. The presented exhaustive algorithm allows to generate greater sets of sequences than with previous software and equal constraints. EGNAS is freely available for noncommercial use at http://www.chm.tu-dresden.de/pc6/EGNAS.

  14. Global Existence and Uniqueness of Solutions to Evolution p-Laplacian Systems with Nonlinear Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Yingjie; GAO Wenjie

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the global existence and uniqueness of the initial and boundary value problem to a system of evolution p-Laplacian equations coupled with general nonlinear terms.The authors use skills of inequality estimation and the method of regularization to construct a sequence of approximation solutions,hence obtain the global existence of solutions to a regularized system.Then the global existence of solutions to the system of evolution p-Laplacian equations is obtained with the application of a standard limiting process.The uniqueness of the solution is proven when the nonlinear terms are local Lipschitz continuous.

  15. Unique core genomes of the bacterial family vibrionaceae: insights into niche adaptation and speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahlke Tim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The criteria for defining bacterial species and even the concept of bacterial species itself are under debate, and the discussion is apparently intensifying as more genome sequence data is becoming available. However, it is still unclear how the new advances in genomics should be used most efficiently to address this question. In this study we identify genes that are common to any group of genomes in our dataset, to determine whether genes specific to a particular taxon exist and to investigate their potential role in adaptation of bacteria to their specific niche. These genes were named unique core genes. Additionally, we investigate the existence and importance of unique core genes that are found in isolates of phylogenetically non-coherent groups. These groups of isolates, that share a genetic feature without sharing a closest common ancestor, are termed genophyletic groups. Results The bacterial family Vibrionaceae was used as the model, and we compiled and compared genome sequences of 64 different isolates. Using the software orthoMCL we determined clusters of homologous genes among the investigated genome sequences. We used multilocus sequence analysis to build a host phylogeny and mapped the numbers of unique core genes of all distinct groups of isolates onto the tree. The results show that unique core genes are more likely to be found in monophyletic groups of isolates. Genophyletic groups of isolates, in contrast, are less common especially for large groups of isolate. The subsequent annotation of unique core genes that are present in genophyletic groups indicate a high degree of horizontally transferred genes. Finally, the annotation of the unique core genes of Vibrio cholerae revealed genes involved in aerotaxis and biosynthesis of the iron-chelator vibriobactin. Conclusion The presented work indicates that genes specific for any taxon inside the bacterial family Vibrionaceae exist. These unique core genes encode

  16. Alpbach Summer School - a unique learning experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, K.; Aulinas, J.; Clifford, D.; Krejci, D.; Topham, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Alpbach Summer School is a ten-day program that provides a unique opportunity for young european science and engineering students, both undergraduate and graduate, to learn how to approach the entire design process of a space mission. The theme of the 2010 Summer School was "New Space Missions to Understand Climate Change", a current, challenging, very broad and complex topic. The program was established more than 35 years ago and is organised in two interrelated parts: a series of lectures held by renowned experts in the field (in the case of this specific year, climate change and space engineering experts) that provides a technical and scientific background for the workshops that follow, the core of the Summer School. For the workshops the students are split into four international, interdisciplinary teams of about 15 students. In 2010 every team had to complete a number of tasks, four in total: (1) identify climate change research gaps and design a space mission that has not yet been flown or proposed, (2) define the science objectives and requirements of the mission, (3) design a spacecraft that meets the mission requirements, which includes spacecraft design and construction, payload definition, orbit calculations, but also the satellite launch, operation and mission costs and (4) write up a short mission proposal and present the results to an expert review panel. Achieving these tasks in only a few days in a multicultural, interdisciplinary team represents a major challenge for all participants and provides an excellent practical learning experience. Over the course of the program, students do not just learn facts about climate change and space engineering, but scientists also learn from engineers and engineers from scientists. The participants have to deepen their knowledge in an often unfamiliar field, develop organisational and team-work skills and work under pressure. Moreover, teams are supported by team and roving tutors and get the opportunity to

  17. The AD: The unique anti-accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    Slide show by Maximilien Brice. Voice (French only): Jacques Fichet. Content: Paola Catapano, Django Manglunki, CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Unlike other machines whose performance is measured in terms of energy records, AD's uniqueness resides in the fact that it can very effectively decelerate beams. At the hearth of antimatter production at CERN, the AD is making headlines in the world's press. This provides an excellent opportunity for us to retrace its history in images.   var flash_video_player=get_video_player_path(); insert_player_for_external('Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083-0753-kbps-480x360-25-fps-audio-64-kbps-44-kHz-stereo', 'mms://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083-0480-kbps-384x288-25-fps-audio-128-kbps-48-kHz-stereo.wmv', 'false', 480, 360, 'http://mediaarchive.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083-posterframe-480x360-at-5-percent.jpg', '1357551', true, '');  

  18. Arachnoiditis ossificans and syringomyelia: A unique presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalak, Charles F.; Opalak, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arachnoiditis ossificans (AO) is a rare disorder that was differentiated from leptomeningeal calcification by Kaufman and Dunsmore in 1971. It generally presents with progressive lower extremity myelopathy. Though the underlying etiology has yet to be fully described, it has been associated with various predisposing factors including vascular malformations, previous intradural surgery, myelograms, and adhesive arachnoiditis. Associated conditions include syringomyelia and arachnoid cyst. The preferred diagnostic method is noncontrast computed tomography (CT). Surgical intervention is still controversial and can include decompression and duroplasty or durotomy. Case Description: The authors report the case of a 62-year-old male with a history of paraplegia who presented with a urinary tract infection and dysautonomia. His past surgical history was notable for a C4–C6 anterior fusion and an intrathecal phenol injection for spasticity. A magnetic resonance image (MR) also demonstrated a T6-conus syringx. At surgery, there was significant ossification of the arachnoid/dura, which was removed. After a drain was placed in the syrinx, there was a significant neurologic improvement. Conclusion: This case demonstrates a unique presentation of AO and highlights the need for CT imaging when a noncommunicating syringx is identified. In addition, surgical decompression can achieve good results when AO is associated with concurrent compressive lesions. PMID:26693389

  19. Unique type of isolated cardiac valvular amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reehana Salma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid deposition in heart is a common occurrence in systemic amyloidosis. But localised valvular amyloid deposits are very uncommon. It was only in 1922 that the cases of valvular amyloidosis were reported. Then in 1980, Goffin et al reported another type of valvular amyloidosis, which he called the dystrophic valvular amyloidosis. We report a case of aortic valve amyloidosis which is different from the yet described valvular amyloidosis. Case presentation A 72 years old gentleman underwent urgent aortic valve replacement. Intraoperatively, a lesion was found attached to the inferior surface of his bicuspid aortic valve. Histopathology examination of the valve revealed that the lesion contained amyloid deposits, identified as AL amyloidosis. The serum amyloid A protein (SAP scan was normal and showed no evidence of systemic amyloidosis. The ECG and echocardiogram were not consistent with cardiac amyloidosis. Conclusion Two major types of cardiac amyloidosis have been described in literature: primary-myelomatous type (occurs with systemic amyolidosis, and senile type(s. Recently, a localised cardiac dystrophic valvular amyloidosis has been described. In all previously reported cases, there was a strong association of localised valvular amyloidosis with calcific deposits. Ours is a unique case which differs from the previously reported cases of localised valvular amyloidosis. In this case, the lesion was not associated with any scar tissue. Also there was no calcific deposit found. This may well be a yet unknown type of isolated valvular amyloidosis.

  20. Unique Ganglioside Recognition Strategies for Clostridial Neurotoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Marc A.; Fu, Zhuji; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Baldwin, Michael R. (MCW); (UMC)

    2012-03-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin are the causative agents of the paralytic diseases botulism and tetanus, respectively. The potency of the clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) relies primarily on their highly specific binding to nerve terminals and cleavage of SNARE proteins. Although individual CNTs utilize distinct proteins for entry, they share common ganglioside co-receptors. Here, we report the crystal structure of the BoNT/F receptor-binding domain in complex with the sugar moiety of ganglioside GD1a. GD1a binds in a shallow groove formed by the conserved peptide motif E ... H ... SXWY ... G, with additional stabilizing interactions provided by two arginine residues. Comparative analysis of BoNT/F with other CNTs revealed several differences in the interactions of each toxin with ganglioside. Notably, exchange of BoNT/F His-1241 with the corresponding lysine residue of BoNT/E resulted in increased affinity for GD1a and conferred the ability to bind ganglioside GM1a. Conversely, BoNT/E was not able to bind GM1a, demonstrating a discrete mechanism of ganglioside recognition. These findings provide a structural basis for ganglioside binding among the CNTs and show that individual toxins utilize unique ganglioside recognition strategies.

  1. Condition evaluation of a unique mining site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Junsheng; Chen Frank Y.; Ma Yan; Zhang Siya

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the existing conditions and the stability of a mining site in which the unique features of seismicity, mining activity, hydrological conditions, geological con-ditions, environmental conditions, and future development plans were considered. In particular, the potential subsidence locations near the proposed construction site, the effects of mining boundary profile, and the influence scope of the mining activity on the neighboring areas were investigated using the finite element method. The study results indicate:(1) the overlying sandstone layer to the coal layer is the key to the stability of the mining roof; (2) the broken boundary has the most effect, followed by the arc boundary and linear boundary; (3) the safe distance from the mining boundary should be at least 400 m if the proposed structure is to be built near an active mining site. Other relevant engineering rec-ommendations are also proposed. The concluded results from this study may serve as a guide to other similar sites in the world.

  2. A UNIQUE PSEUDANABAENALEAN (CYANOBACTERIA) GENUS NODOSILINEA GEN. NOV. BASED ON MORPHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR DATA(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkerson Iii, Ralph B; Johansen, Jeffrey R; Kovácik, Lubomir; Brand, Jerry; Kaštovský, Jan; Casamatta, Dale A

    2011-12-01

    The cyanobacteria are a diverse, ancient lineage of oxygenic, phototrophic bacteria. Ubiquitous in nearly all ecosystems, the alpha-level diversity of these organisms lags behind other algal lineages due to a perceived dearth of phylogenetically useful characters. Recent phylogenetic studies of species within the genus Leptolyngbya have demonstrated that this is a polyphyletic assemblage. One group of strains that fits within the current circumscription of Leptolyngbya is genetically and phylogenetically distinct from Leptolyngbya sensu stricto. Members of this clade possess both a morphological synapomorphy and shared 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) secondary structure, allowing the diagnosis of the new cyanobacterial genus Nodosilinea. Members of this genus are united by the unique ability to form nodules along the length of the filament. This trait has been previously observed only in the species Leptolyngbya nodulosa Z. Li et J. Brand, and we have chosen this species as the generitype of Nodosilinea. We currently recognize four species in the genus, N. nodulosa (Z. Li et J. Brand) comb. nov., N. bijugata (Kong.) comb. nov., N. conica sp. nov., and N. epilithica sp. nov.

  3. Bacteriophage P70: unique morphology and unrelatedness to other Listeria bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuki, Martina M; Erne, Doris; Loessner, Martin J; Klumpp, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen, and its bacteriophages find many uses in detection and biocontrol of its host. The novel broad-host-range virulent phage P70 has a unique morphology with an elongated capsid. Its genome sequence was determined by a hybrid sequencing strategy employing Sanger and PacBio techniques. The P70 genome contains 67,170 bp and 119 open reading frames (ORFs). Our analyses suggest that P70 represents an archetype of virus unrelated to other known Listeria bacteriophages.

  4. The Pizza Problem: A Solution with Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Kathryn G.; Mast, Caleb J.

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the issues of coaching and assessing. A preservice middle school teacher's unique solution to the Pizza problem was not what the professor expected. The student's solution strategy, based on sequences and a reinvention of Pascal's triangle, is explained in detail. (Contains 8 figures.)

  5. Evolution of a Unique Systems Engineering Capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert M. Caliva; James A. Murphy; Kyle B. Oswald

    2011-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering laboratory dedicated to supporting U.S. Department of Energy missions in nuclear and energy research, science, and national security. The INL’s Systems Engineering organization supports all of the various programs under this wide array of missions. As with any multifaceted organization, strategic planning is essential to establishing a consistent culture and a value discipline throughout all levels of the enterprise. While an organization can pursue operational excellence, product leadership or customer intimacy, it is extremely difficult to excel or achieve best-in-class at all three. In fact, trying to do so has resulted in the demise of a number of organizations given the very intricate balancing act that is necessary. The INL’s Systems Engineering Department has chosen to focus on customer intimacy where the customer’s needs are first and foremost and a more total solution is the goal. Frequently a total solution requires the employment of specialized tools to manage system complexity. However, it is only after understanding customer needs that tool selection and use would be pursued. This results in using both commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and, in some cases, requires internal development of specialized tools. This paper describes how a unique systems engineering capability, through the development of customized tools, evolved as a result of this customer-focused culture. It also addresses the need for a common information model or analysis framework and presents an overview of the tools developed to manage and display relationships between entities, support trade studies through the application of utility theory, and facilitate the development of a technology roadmap to manage system risk and uncertainty.

  6. Some unique superconductive Properties of Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K. A.

    2013-04-01

    Copper oxides are the only materials that show transition temperatures, Tc, above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen, with a maximum Tmc of 162 K under pressure. Their structure is layered, with one to several CuO2 planes, and upon hole doping, their transition temperature follows a dome-shaped curve with a maximum at Tmc. In the underdoped regime, i.e., below Tmc, a pseudogap T* is found, with T* always being larger than Tc, a property unique to the copper oxides [1]. In the superconducting state, Cooper pairs (two holes with antiparallel spins) are formed that exhibit coherence lengths on the order of a lattice distance in the CuO2 plane and one order of magnitude less perpendicular to it. Their macroscopic wave function is parallel to the CuO2 plane near 100% d at their surface, but only 75% d and 25 % s in the bulk, and near 100% s perpendicular to the plane in YBCO. There are two gaps with the same Tc [2]. As function of doping, the oxygen isotope effect is novel and can be quantitatively accounted for by a two-band vibronic theory [3] near Tmc, and underdoped below it till Tc = 0 with by a formula valid for (bi)polarons [4]. These cuprates are intrinsically heterogeneous in a dynamic way. In terms of quasiparticles, Jahn-Teller bipolarons are present at low doping, and aggregate upon cooling [1], so that probably ramified clusters and/or stripes are formed, leading over to a more Fermi-liquid-type behavior at large carrier concentrations above Tmc.

  7. Unique properties of Plasmodium falciparum porphobilinogen deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Viswanathan Arun; Arumugam, Rajavel; Gopalakrishnan, Bulusu; Jyothsna, Yeleswarapu Sri; Rangarajan, Pundi N; Padmanaban, Govindarajan

    2008-01-04

    The hybrid pathway for heme biosynthesis in the malarial parasite proposes the involvement of parasite genome-coded enzymes of the pathway localized in different compartments such as apicoplast, mitochondria, and cytosol. However, knowledge on the functionality and localization of many of these enzymes is not available. In this study, we demonstrate that porphobilinogen deaminase encoded by the Plasmodium falciparum genome (PfPBGD) has several unique biochemical properties. Studies carried out with PfPBGD partially purified from parasite membrane fraction, as well as recombinant PfPBGD lacking N-terminal 64 amino acids expressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells (DeltaPfPBGD), indicate that both the proteins are catalytically active. Surprisingly, PfPBGD catalyzes the conversion of porphobilinogen to uroporphyrinogen III (UROGEN III), indicating that it also possesses uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) activity, catalyzing the next step. This obviates the necessity to have a separate gene for UROS that has not been so far annotated in the parasite genome. Interestingly, DeltaPfP-BGD gives rise to UROGEN III even after heat treatment, although UROS from other sources is known to be heat-sensitive. Based on the analysis of active site residues, a DeltaPfPBGDL116K mutant enzyme was created and the specific activity of this recombinant mutant enzyme is 5-fold higher than DeltaPfPBGD. More interestingly, DeltaPfPBGDL116K catalyzes the formation of uroporphyrinogen I (UROGEN I) in addition to UROGEN III, indicating that with increased PBGD activity the UROS activity of PBGD may perhaps become rate-limiting, thus leading to non-enzymatic cyclization of preuroporphyrinogen to UROGEN I. PfPBGD is localized to the apicoplast and is catalytically very inefficient compared with the host red cell enzyme.

  8. Cryogenic Vibrational Spectroscopy Provides Unique Fingerprints for Glycan Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masellis, Chiara; Khanal, Neelam; Kamrath, Michael Z; Clemmer, David E; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2017-06-22

    The structural characterization of glycans by mass spectrometry is particularly challenging. This is because of the high degree of isomerism in which glycans of the same mass can differ in their stereochemistry, attachment points, and degree of branching. Here we show that the addition of cryogenic vibrational spectroscopy to mass and mobility measurements allows one to uniquely identify and characterize these complex biopolymers. We investigate six disaccharide isomers that differ in their stereochemistry, attachment point of the glycosidic bond, and monosaccharide content, and demonstrate that we can identify each one unambiguously. Even disaccharides that differ by a single stereogenic center or in the monosaccharide sequence order show distinct vibrational fingerprints that would clearly allow their identification in a mixture, which is not possible by ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry alone. Moreover, this technique can be applied to larger glycans, which we demonstrate by distinguishing isomeric branched and linear pentasaccharides. The creation of a database containing mass, collision cross section, and vibrational fingerprint measurements for glycan standards should allow unambiguous identification and characterization of these biopolymers in mixtures, providing an enabling technology for all fields of glycoscience. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. The Feat of Packaging Eight Unique Genome Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Giese

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses (IAVs harbor a segmented RNA genome that is organized into eight distinct viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP complexes. Although a segmented genome may be a major advantage to adapt to new host environments, it comes at the cost of a highly sophisticated genome packaging mechanism. Newly synthesized vRNPs conquer the cellular endosomal recycling machinery to access the viral budding site at the plasma membrane. Genome packaging sequences unique to each RNA genome segment are thought to be key determinants ensuring the assembly and incorporation of eight distinct vRNPs into progeny viral particles. Recent studies using advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques suggest the formation of vRNP sub-bundles (comprising less than eight vRNPs during their transport on recycling endosomes. The formation of such sub-bundles might be required for efficient packaging of a bundle of eight different genomes segments at the budding site, further highlighting the complexity of IAV genome packaging.

  10. Classifying Genomic Sequences by Sequence Feature Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hua Liu; Dian Jiao; Xiao Sun

    2005-01-01

    Traditional sequence analysis depends on sequence alignment. In this study, we analyzed various functional regions of the human genome based on sequence features, including word frequency, dinucleotide relative abundance, and base-base correlation. We analyzed the human chromosome 22 and classified the upstream,exon, intron, downstream, and intergenic regions by principal component analysis and discriminant analysis of these features. The results show that we could classify the functional regions of genome based on sequence feature and discriminant analysis.

  11. A Defective mRNA Cleavage and Polyadenylation Complex Facilitates Expansions of Transcribed (GAAn Repeats Associated with Friedreich’s Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. McGinty

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Expansions of microsatellite repeats are responsible for numerous hereditary diseases in humans, including myotonic dystrophy and Friedreich’s ataxia. Whereas the length of an expandable repeat is the main factor determining disease inheritance, recent data point to genomic trans modifiers that can impact the likelihood of expansions and disease progression. Detection of these modifiers may lead to understanding and treating repeat expansion diseases. Here, we describe a method for the rapid, genome-wide identification of trans modifiers for repeat expansion in a yeast experimental system. Using this method, we found that missense mutations in the endoribonuclease subunit (Ysh1 of the mRNA cleavage and polyadenylation complex dramatically increase the rate of (GAAn repeat expansions but only when they are actively transcribed. These expansions correlate with slower transcription elongation caused by the ysh1 mutation. These results reveal an interplay between RNA processing and repeat-mediated genome instability, confirming the validity of our approach.

  12. Molecular identification of the light brown apple moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in California using a polymerase chain reaction assay of the internal transcribed spacer 2 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, N B; Ledezma, L A; Vasquez, J D; Epstein, M; Kerr, P H; Kinnee, S; Sage, O; Gilligan, T M

    2009-12-01

    A molecular protocol using a hemi-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) is reported for the diagnosis of light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), in California. This protocol distinguishes the light brown apple moth from other moths in California based on size differences of PCR amplicons that are visualized on agarose gels. The molecular diagnostic tool generated no false negatives based on analysis of 337 light brown apple moths collected from California, Hawaii, England, New Zealand, and Australia. Analysis of a data set including 424 moths representing other tortricid species generated correct identification for >95% of the samples and only two false positives. Of the 761 moths tested only fourteen produced no PCR amplicons and five generated inconclusive data.

  13. Accurate and Practical Identification of 20 Fusarium Species by Seven-Locus Sequence Analysis and Reverse Line Blot Hybridization, and an In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Study▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Xiao, Meng; Kong, Fanrong; Chen, Sharon; Dou, Hong-Tao; Sorrell, Tania; Li, Ruo-Yu; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Eleven reference and 25 clinical isolates of Fusarium were subject to multilocus DNA sequence analysis to determine the species and haplotypes of the fusarial isolates from Beijing and Shandong, China. Seven loci were analyzed: the translation elongation factor 1 alpha gene (EF-1α); the nuclear rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS), large subunit (LSU), and intergenic spacer (IGS) regions; the second largest subunit of the RNA polymerase gene (RPB2); the calmodulin gene (CAM); and the mitochondrial small subunit (mtSSU) rRNA gene. We also evaluated an IGS-targeted PCR/reverse line blot (RLB) assay for species/haplotype identification of Fusarium. Twenty Fusarium species and seven species complexes were identified. Of 25 clinical isolates (10 species), the Gibberella (Fusarium) fujikuroi species complex was the commonest (40%) and was followed by the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) (36%) and the F. incarnatum-F. equiseti species complex (12%). Six FSSC isolates were identified to the species level as FSSC-3+4, and three as FSSC-5. Twenty-nine IGS, 27 EF-1α, 26 RPB2, 24 CAM, 18 ITS, 19 LSU, and 18 mtSSU haplotypes were identified; 29 were unique, and haplotypes for 24 clinical strains were novel. By parsimony informative character analysis, the IGS locus was the most phylogenetically informative, and the rRNA gene regions were the least. Results by RLB were concordant with multilocus sequence analysis for all isolates. Amphotericin B was the most active drug against all species. Voriconazole MICs were high (>8 μg/ml) for 15 (42%) isolates, including FSSC. Analysis of larger numbers of isolates is required to determine the clinical utility of the seven-locus sequence analysis and RLB assay in species classification of fusaria. PMID:21389150

  14. Comparative analyses of potato expressed sequence tag libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Catherine M; Stegalkina, Svetlana S; Ascenzi, Robert A; Bougri, Oleg; Hart, Amy L; Utterbach, Teresa R; Vanaken, Susan E; Riedmuller, Steve B; White, Joseph A; Cho, Jennifer; Pertea, Geo M; Lee, Yuandan; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Sultana, Razvan; Tsai, Jennifer; Quackenbush, John; Griffiths, Helen M; Restrepo, Silvia; Smart, Christine D; Fry, William E; Van Der Hoeven, Rutger; Tanksley, Steve; Zhang, Peifen; Jin, Hailing; Yamamoto, Miki L; Baker, Barbara J; Buell, C Robin

    2003-02-01

    The cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum) shares similar biology with other members of the Solanaceae, yet has features unique within the family, such as modified stems (stolons) that develop into edible tubers. To better understand potato biology, we have undertaken a survey of the potato transcriptome using expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from diverse tissues. A total of 61,940 ESTs were generated from aerial tissues, below-ground tissues, and tissues challenged with the late-blight pathogen (Phytophthora infestans). Clustering and assembly of these ESTs resulted in a total of 19,892 unique sequences with 8,741 tentative consensus sequences and 11,151 singleton ESTs. We were able to identify a putative function for 43.7% of these sequences. A number of sequences (48) were expressed throughout the libraries sampled, representing constitutively expressed sequences. Other sequences (13,068, 21%) were uniquely expressed and were detected only in a single library. Using hierarchal and k means clustering of the EST sequences, we were able to correlate changes in gene expression with major physiological events in potato biology. Using pair-wise comparisons of tuber-related tissues, we were able to associate genes with tuber initiation, dormancy, and sprouting. We also were able to identify a number of characterized as well as novel sequences that were unique to the incompatible interaction of late-blight pathogen, thereby providing a foundation for further understanding the mechanism of resistance.

  15. Comparative Analyses of Potato Expressed Sequence Tag Libraries1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Catherine M.; Stegalkina, Svetlana S.; Ascenzi, Robert A.; Bougri, Oleg; Hart, Amy L.; Utterbach, Teresa R.; Vanaken, Susan E.; Riedmuller, Steve B.; White, Joseph A.; Cho, Jennifer; Pertea, Geo M.; Lee, Yuandan; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Sultana, Razvan; Tsai, Jennifer; Quackenbush, John; Griffiths, Helen M.; Restrepo, Silvia; Smart, Christine D.; Fry, William E.; van der Hoeven, Rutger; Tanksley, Steve; Zhang, Peifen; Jin, Hailing; Yamamoto, Miki L.; Baker, Barbara J.; Buell, C. Robin

    2003-01-01

    The cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum) shares similar biology with other members of the Solanaceae, yet has features unique within the family, such as modified stems (stolons) that develop into edible tubers. To better understand potato biology, we have undertaken a survey of the potato transcriptome using expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from diverse tissues. A total of 61,940 ESTs were generated from aerial tissues, below-ground tissues, and tissues challenged with the late-blight pathogen (Phytophthora infestans). Clustering and assembly of these ESTs resulted in a total of 19,892 unique sequences with 8,741 tentative consensus sequences and 11,151 singleton ESTs. We were able to identify a putative function for 43.7% of these sequences. A number of sequences (48) were expressed throughout the libraries sampled, representing constitutively expressed sequences. Other sequences (13,068, 21%) were uniquely expressed and were detected only in a single library. Using hierarchal and k means clustering of the EST sequences, we were able to correlate changes in gene expression with major physiological events in potato biology. Using pair-wise comparisons of tuber-related tissues, we were able to associate genes with tuber initiation, dormancy, and sprouting. We also were able to identify a number of characterized as well as novel sequences that were unique to the incompatible interaction of late-blight pathogen, thereby providing a foundation for further understanding the mechanism of resistance. PMID:12586867

  16. Main: Sequences [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sequences Amino Acid Sequence Amino Acid sequence of full length cDNA (Longest ORF) kome_ine_full_seq...uence_amino_db.fasta.zip kome_ine_full_sequence_amino_db.zip kome_ine_full_sequence_amino_db ...

  17. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  18. Mice have a transcribed L-threonine aldolase/GLY1 gene, but the human GLY1 gene is a non-processed pseudogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Alasdair J

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are three pathways of L-threonine catabolism. The enzyme L-threonine aldolase (TA has been shown to catalyse the conversion of L-threonine to yield glycine and acetaldehyde in bacteria, fungi and plants. Low levels of TA enzymatic activity have been found in vertebrates. It has been suggested that any detectable activity is due to serine hydroxymethyltransferase and that mammals lack a genuine threonine aldolase. Results The 7-exon murine L-threonine aldolase gene (GLY1 is located on chromosome 11, spanning 5.6 kb. The cDNA encodes a 400-residue protein. The protein has 81% similarity with the bacterium Thermotoga maritima TA. Almost all known functional residues are conserved between the two proteins including Lys242 that forms a Schiff-base with the cofactor, pyridoxal-5'-phosphate. The human TA gene is located at 17q25. It contains two single nucleotide deletions, in exons 4 and 7, which cause frame-shifts and a premature in-frame stop codon towards the carboxy-terminal. Expression of human TA mRNA was undetectable by RT-PCR. In mice, TA mRNA was found at low levels in a range of adult tissues, being highest in prostate, heart and liver. In contrast, serine/threonine dehydratase, another enzyme that catabolises L-threonine, is expressed very highly only in the liver. Serine dehydratase-like 1, also was most abundant in the liver. In whole mouse embryos TA mRNA expression was low prior to E-15 increasing more than four-fold by E-17. Conclusion Mice, the western-clawed frog and the zebrafish have transcribed threonine aldolase/GLY1 genes, but the human homolog is a non-transcribed pseudogene. Serine dehydratase-like 1 is a putative L-threonine catabolising enzyme.

  19. The Einstein constraints: uniqueness and non-uniqueness in the conformal thin sandwich approach

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgarte, T W; Pfeiffer, H P; Baumgarte, Thomas W.; Murchadha, Niall \\'{O}; Pfeiffer, Harald P.

    2006-01-01

    We study the appearance of multiple solutions to certain decompositions of Einstein's constraint equations. Pfeiffer and York recently reported the existence of two branches of solutions for identical background data in the extended conformal thin-sandwich decomposition. We show that the Hamiltonian constraint alone, when expressed in a certain way, admits two branches of solutions with properties very similar to those found by Pfeiffer and York. We construct these two branches analytically for a constant-density star in spherical symmetry, but argue that this behavior is more general. In the case of the Hamiltonian constraint this non-uniqueness is well known to be related to the sign of one particular term, and we argue that the extended conformal thin-sandwich equations contain a similar term that causes the breakdown of uniqueness.

  20. Unique clusters of Archaea in Salar de Huasco, an athalassohaline evaporitic basin of the Chilean Altiplano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorador, Cristina; Vila, Irma; Remonsellez, Francisco; Imhoff, Johannes F; Witzel, Karl-Paul

    2010-08-01

    Analyses of clone libraries from water and sediments of different sites from Salar de Huasco, a high-altitude athalassohaline wetland in the Chilean Altiplano, revealed the presence of five unique clusters of uncultured Archaea that have not been previously reported or specifically assigned. These sequences were distantly related (83-96% sequence identity) to a limited number of other clone sequences and revealed no identity to cultured Archaea. The abundance of Archaea and Bacteria was estimated using qPCR and community composition was examined through the construction of clone libraries of archaeal 16S rRNA gene. Archaea were found to be dominant over Bacteria in sediments from two saline sites (sites H4: 6.31 x 10(4) and site H6: 1.37 x 10(4) microS cm(-1)) and in one of the water samples (freshwater from site H0: 607 muS cm(-1)). Euryarchaeotal sequences were more abundant than crenarchaeotal sequences. Many of the clone sequences (52%) were similar to uncultured archaeal groups found in marine ecosystems having identity values between 99% and 97%. A major fraction of the sequences (40%) were members of Methanobacteria, while others were included in the Marine Benthic Groups B and D, the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group, the Terrestrial Miscellaneous Euryarchaeotal Group, Marine Group I and Halobacteria. The presence of uncultured archaeal groups in Salar de Huasco extends their known distribution in inland waters, providing new clues about their possible function in the environment.