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Sample records for unique title statins

  1. Comparing Unique Title Coverage of Web of Science and Scopus in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Philip; Lascar, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The current journal titles in earth and atmospheric sciences, that are unique to each of two databases, Web of Science and Scopus, were identified using different methods. Comparing by subject category shows that Scopus has hundreds of unique titles, and Web of Science just 16. The titles unique to each database have low SCImago Journal Rank…

  2. Comparing Unique Title Coverage of Web of Science and Scopus in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Philip; Lascar, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The current journal titles in earth and atmospheric sciences, that are unique to each of two databases, Web of Science and Scopus, were identified using different methods. Comparing by subject category shows that Scopus has hundreds of unique titles, and Web of Science just 16. The titles unique to each database have low SCImago Journal Rank…

  3. Safety of statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasish Maji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are an established class of drugs with proven efficacy in cardiovascular risk reduction. The concern over statin safety was first raised with the revelation of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis with the use of now withdrawn cerivastatin. Enhanced understanding of the mechanisms behind adverse effects of statins including an insight into the pharmacokinetic properties have minimised fear of statin use among clinicians. Studies reveal that occurrence of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis are rare 1/100000 patient-years. The risk of myopathy/rhabdomyolysis varies between statins due to varying pharmacokinetic profiles. This explains the differing abilities of statins to adverse effects and drug interaction potentials that precipitate adverse effects. Higher dose of rosuvastatin (80 mg/day was associated with proteinuria and hematuria while lower doses were devoid of such effects. Awareness of drugs interacting with statins and knowledge of certain combinations such as statin and fibrates together with monitoring of altered creatine kinase activity may greatly minimise associated adverse effects. Statins also asymptomatically raise levels of hepatic transaminases but are not correlated with hepatotoxicity. Statins are safe and well tolerated including more recent potent statins such as, rosuvastatin. The benefits of intensive statin use in cardiovascular risk reduction greatly outweigh risks. The present review discusses underlying causes of statin-associated adverse effects including management in high risk groups.

  4. The pharmacogenomics of statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelissen, Ingrid C; McLachlan, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    The statin class of cholesterol-lowering drugs have been used for decades to successfully lower plasma cholesterol concentrations and cardiovascular risk. Adverse effects of statins are generally considered mild, but increase with age of patients and polypharmacy. One aspect of statin therapy that is still difficult for prescribers to predict is the individual's response to statin therapy. Recent advances in the field of pharmacogenomics have indicated variants of candidate genes that affect statin efficacy and safety. In this review, a number of candidates that affect statin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are discussed. Some of these candidates, in particular those involved in import and efflux of statins, have now been linked to increased risk of side effects. Furthermore, pharmacogenomic studies continue to reveal new players that are involved in the fine-tuning of the complex regulation of cholesterol homeostasis and response to statins.

  5. STATIN SAFETY REVISITED DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Drapkina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Questions of statins use in liver diseases are discussed. Data from clinical studies on statins safety in cardiac patients with liver diseases are presented. Features of statins use in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis C are considered separately.

  6. Management of statin intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma B Raju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are the revolutionary drugs in the cardiovascular pharmacotherapy. But they also possess several adverse effects like myopathy with elevation of hepatic transaminases (>3 times the upper limit of normal or creatine kinase (>10 times the upper limit of normal and some rare side-effects, including peripheral neuropathy, memory loss, sleep disturbances, and erectile dysfunction. Due to these adverse effects, patients abruptly withdrew statins without consulting physicians. This abrupt discontinuation of statins is termed as statin intolerance. Statin-induced myopathy constitutes two third of all side-effects from statins and is the primary reason for statin intolerance. Though statin intolerance has considerably impacted cardiovascular outcomes in the high-risk patients, it has been well effectively managed by prescribing statins either as alternate-day or once weekly dosage regimen, as combination therapy with a non-statin therapy or and by dietary intervention. The present article reviews the causes, clinical implications of statin withdrawal and management of statin intolerance.

  7. Research progress of Statins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johanna Kampman; WANG Yuyan; Zainab Saraj; Linda Ringsborg Preisler; WANG Yuwen

    2017-01-01

    Statins are one of the most popular lipid-lowering drugs (LLDs).Upon oral administration,these drugs are well absorbed by the intestine and effectively used for the treatment of dyslipidemias.This manuscript aims to investigate the demographics of the data who used Statins,review the benefits and challenges of Statins and the future of the treatment.

  8. Statin resistance and export

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates e.g. to methods of producing statins in transgenic, non-filamentous microorganisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, the present invention relates to the transgenic, non-filamentous microorganisms as such as well as various uses of transmembrane statin e...

  9. Statins: Mechanisms of neuroprotection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Most, Peter J.; Dolga, Amalia; Nijholt, Ingrid M.; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Eisel, Ulrich L. M.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials report that the class of drugs known as statins may be neuroprotective in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, and further trials are currently underway to test whether these drugs are also beneficial in multiple sclerosis and acute stroke treatment. Since statins are well tolerated

  10. Statins : Mechanisms of neuroprotection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Most, Peter J; Dolga, Amalia M; Nijholt, Ingrid M; Luiten, Paul G.; Eisel, Ulrich L M

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials report that the class of drugs known as statins may be neuroprotective in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, and further trials are currently underway to test whether these drugs are also beneficial in multiple sclerosis and acute stroke treatment. Since statins are well tolerated

  11. Statins and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallianou, Natalia G; Kostantinou, Alexandra; Kougias, Marios; Kazazis, Christos

    2014-06-01

    Statins have pleiotropic properties and might exert an effect even in the field of cancer. Statins competitively inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme (HMG-CoA) reductase, the major rate-limiting enzyme that controls the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonic acid. Specifically, inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase by statins has been proved to prevent the synthesis of mevalonic acid, a precursor of non-steroidal isoprenoids, which are lipid attachment molecules for small G proteins, such as Ras, Rho and Rac. Thus, statins may inhibit the synthesis of isoprenoids and thereby suppress the activation of small G proteins. In addition, statins exert pro-apoptotic, anti-angiogenic, and immunomodulatory effects, which may prevent cancer growth. Statins may inhibit the growth of a variety of cancer cell types, including breast, gastric, pancreatic, and prostate carcinoma, neuroblastoma, melanoma, mesothelioma and acute myeloid leukemia cells. They exert pro-apoptotic effects in a wide range of cancer cell lines, but with many differences in the sensitivity to statin-induced cell death among different cancer cell types. Regarding anti-angiogenic effects, multiple statin effects on blood vessel formation by inhibition of angiogenesis through down-regulation of pro-angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and inhibition of adhesion to extracellular matrix by blocking intercellular adhesion molecules have been suggested. The molecular mechanisms of statin immunomodulation often implicate multiple pathways, regarding the regulation of genes encoding key molecules, which are involved in antigen presentation and subsequent immunomodulation. Another mechanism involves the down-regulation of the nuclear factor-kappa-B, which is responsible for the transcription of many genes involved in immunologic mechanisms, such as interferon-inducible protein-10, monocyte chemo-attractant protein 1 and cyclooxygenase-2. Statins

  12. Statin Intolerance: the Clinician's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulc, Tomáš; Ceška, Richard; Gotto, Antonio M

    2015-12-01

    Muscle problems and other adverse symptoms associated with statin use are frequent reasons for non-adherence and discontinuation of statin therapy, which results in inadequate control of hyperlipidemia and increased cardiovascular risk. However, most patients who experience adverse symptoms during statin use are able to tolerate at least some degree of statin therapy. Given the profound cardiovascular benefits derived from statins, an adequate practical approach to statin intolerance is, therefore, of great clinical importance. Statin intolerance can be defined as the occurrence of myalgia or other adverse symptoms that are attributed to statin therapy and that lead to its discontinuation. In reality, these symptoms are actually unrelated to statin use in many patients, especially in those with atypical presentations following long periods of treatment. Thus, the first step in approaching patients with adverse symptoms during the course of statin therapy is identification of those patients for whom true statin intolerance is unlikely, since most of these patients would probably be capable of tolerating adequate statin therapy. In patients with statin intolerance, an altered dosing regimen of very low doses of statins should be attempted and, if tolerated, should gradually be increased to achieve the highest tolerable doses. In addition, other lipid-lowering drugs may be needed, either in combination with statins, or alone, if statins are not tolerated at all. Stringent control of other risk factors can aid in reducing cardiovascular risk if attaining lipid treatment goals proves difficult.

  13. Statins and intracerebral hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Haiping; Hu Zhiping; Lu Wei

    2014-01-01

    Objective To briefly review the literature regarding the impact of statins on the prevention and treatment of stroke,especially on intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH).We described statins' effects,mechanism of ICH,serum total cholesterol and ICH,and the relationship between statins and ICH.Data sources All articles used in this review were mainly searched from the PubMed database with no limitations of language and year of publication.Study selection Randomized controlled studies,prospective cohort studies,animal experiments,and meta-analysis articles related to this topic in the past decade were selected.Results Statins play an important role in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases and also have an impact on the treatment of vascular diseases.There still exist controversies about the relationship between statins and ICH.More clinical and experimental trials indicate that statins do not increase the risk of ICH.Conclusion A low or a regular dose of statins would not increase the risk of ICH.

  14. Statins in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, Jonas

    2011-11-21

    Statins inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. Their main effect is a decrease in circulating levels of LDL cholesterol, which translates into a ~ 20% relative reduction of major vascular events and coronary mortality per mmol/L LDL reduction achieved. Statins are efficient in preventing first cardiovascular events, but the cost-efficiency of primary prevention remains controversial. In primary prevention particularly, the pros and cons of statin therapy should be weighted by considering patient-specific life circumstances and assessing the individual cardiovascular risk, as provided by risk calculators. Since diabetes mellitus poses a high risk even in the absence of known coronary artery disease, statin treatment is generally indicated in these patients. There is no lower LDL threshold defining the limit of treatment benefit; rather, LDL target levels should be sought according to individual cardiovascular risk. If the necessary precautions are taken, e.g., by considering age, co-morbidities and co-medication when choosing the dose, statins are well tolerated and safe, as evidenced by many randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses. If a patient will not tolerate a statin dose necessary to achieve his or her LDL target level, ezetimibe may be added. There is no indication that statins alter cancer risk. Despite recent evidence that statin treatment is associated with a small risk of incident diabetes mellitus, this disadvantage is outweighed by the vascular benefits. Statins have pleiotropic effects, such as anti-inflammatory properties. It is still debated to what extent these effects translate into cardiovascular risk reduction beyond that conferred by LDL reduction.

  15. Primary Prevention With Statins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Martin B; Afzal, Shoaib; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend initiating primary prevention for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) with statins based on absolute ASCVD risk assessment. Recently, alternative trial-based and hybrid approaches were suggested for statin treatment eligibility. OBJECTIVES: This study...... prevention of ASCVD with statins was superior to the trial-based and hybrid approaches. Our results indicate that the ACC/AHA guidelines will prevent more ASCVD events than the trial-based and hybrid approaches, while treating fewer people compared with the trial-based approach....

  16. Controlling Cholesterol with Statins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Controlling Cholesterol with Statins Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... not, the following tips can help keep your cholesterol in check: Talk with your healthcare provider about ...

  17. Management of statin intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Soma B Raju; Kiron Varghese; Madhu, K

    2013-01-01

    Statins are the revolutionary drugs in the cardiovascular pharmacotherapy. But they also possess several adverse effects like myopathy with elevation of hepatic transaminases (>3 times the upper limit of normal) or creatine kinase (>10 times the upper limit of normal) and some rare side-effects, including peripheral neuropathy, memory loss, sleep disturbances, and erectile dysfunction. Due to these adverse effects, patients abruptly withdrew statins without consulting physicians. This abrupt ...

  18. Extracardiac Effects of Statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleyman Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are one of the most commonly used drugs in the world. Although it plays a valuable role in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, it has some extracardiac effects which are frequently ignored by physicians during routine practice. In this review we would like to summarise the potential beneficial or harmful extracardiac effects of statins which comprise a wide spectrum of systems and organs.

  19. Pleiotropic effects of statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narasaraju Kavalipati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins or 3-hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA reductase inhibitors not only prevents the synthesis of cholesterol biosynthesis but also inhibits the synthesis of essential isoprenoid intermediates such as farnesyl pyrophosphate, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, isopentanyl adenosine, dolichols and polyisoprenoid side chains of ubiquinone, heme A, and nuclear lamins. These isoprenoid intermediates are required for activation of various intracellular/signaling proteins- small guanosine triphosphate bound protein Ras and Ras-like proteins like Rho, Rab, Rac, Ral, or Rap which plays an indispensible role in multiple cellular processes. Reduction of circulating isoprenoids intermediates as a result of HMG CoA reductase inhibition by statins prevents activation of these signalling proteins. Hence, the multiple effects of statins such as antiinflammatory effects, antioxidant effects, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory effects, plaque stability, normalization of sympathetic outflow, and prevention of platelet aggregation are due to reduction of circulating isoprenoids and hence inactivation of signalling proteins. These multiple lipid-independent effects of statins termed as statin pleiotropy would potentially open floodgates for research in multiple treatment domains catching attentions of researchers and clinician across the globe.

  20. Biochemistry of Statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egom, Emmanuel Eroume A; Hafeez, Hafsa

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Elevated blood lipids may be a major risk factor for CVD. Due to consistent and robust association of higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol levels with CVD across experimental and epidemiologic studies, therapeutic strategies to decrease risk have focused on LDL-cholesterol reduction as the primary goal. Current medication options for lipid-lowering therapy include statins, bile acid sequestrants, a cholesterol-absorption inhibitor, fibrates, nicotinic acid, and omega-3 fatty acids, which all have various mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetic properties. The most widely prescribed lipid-lowering agents are the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins. Since their introduction in the 1980s, statins have emerged as the one of the best-selling medication classes to date, with numerous trials demonstrating powerful efficacy in preventing cardiovascular outcomes (Kapur and Musunuru, 2008 [1]). The statins are commonly used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and mixed hyperlipidemia. This chapter focuses on the biochemistry of statins including their structures, pharmacokinetics, and mechanism of actions as well as the potential adverse reactions linked to their clinical uses.

  1. Statin Resistance and Export

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ley, Ana

    Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the key enzyme in the mevalonate pathway that leads to the synthesis of cholesterol and ergosterol in animal and fungal cells, respectively. Their extensiveuse in treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases...

  2. Grapefruit Juice and Statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan W; Morris, Joan K; Wald, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    We determined the validity of current medical advice to avoid grapefruit juice consumption while taking 3 widely used statins. A daily glass of grapefruit juice increases blood levels of simvastatin and lovastatin by about 260% if taken at the same time (about 90% if taken 12 hours apart), and atorvastatin by about 80% (whenever taken). Simvastatin 40 mg, lovastatin 40 mg, and atorvastatin 10 mg daily reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels in a 60-year-old man with an LDL cholesterol of 4.8 mmol/L by 37%, reducing ischemic heart disease risk by 61%. When simvastatin or lovastatin are taken at the same time as grapefruit juice, the estimated reduction in LDL cholesterol is 48%, and in heart disease is 70%. If the juice is taken 12 hours before these statins, the reductions are, respectively, 43% and 66%, and for atorvastatin, 42% and 66%. The increased rhabdomyolysis risk from grapefruit juice consumption due to the increased effective statin dose is minimal compared with the greater effect in preventing heart disease. Grapefruit juice should not be contraindicated in people taking statins.

  3. The pharmacology of statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirtori, Cesare R

    2014-10-01

    Statins, inhibitors of the hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase enzyme, are molecules of fungal origin. By inhibiting a key step in the sterol biosynthetic pathway statins are powerful cholesterol lowering medications and have provided outstanding contributions to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Their detection in mycetes traces back to close to 40 years ago: there were, originally, widely opposing views on their therapeutic potential. From then on, intensive pharmaceutical development has led to the final availability in the clinic of seven statin molecules, characterized by differences in bioavailability, lipo/hydrophilicity, cytochrome P-450 mediated metabolism and cellular transport mechanisms. These differences are reflected in their relative power (mg LDL-cholesterol reduction per mg dose) and possibly in parenchymal or muscular toxicities. The impact of the antagonism of statins on a crucial step of intermediary metabolism leads, in fact, both to a reduction of cholesterol biosynthesis as well as to additional pharmacodynamic (so called "pleiotropic") effects. In the face of an extraordinary clinical success, the emergence of some side effects, e.g. raised incidence of diabetes and cataracts as well as frequent muscular side effects, have led to increasing concern by physicians. However, also in view of the present relatively low cost of these drugs, their impact on daily therapy of vascular patients is unlikely to change.

  4. Statins and breast cancer prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahern, Thomas P; Lash, Timothy L; Damkier, Per

    2014-01-01

    Much preclinical and epidemiological evidence supports the anticancer effects of statins. Epidemiological evidence does not suggest an association between statin use and reduced incidence of breast cancer, but does support a protective effect of statins-especially simvastatin-on breast cancer...... recurrence. Here, we argue that the existing evidence base is sufficient to justify a clinical trial of breast cancer adjuvant therapy with statins and we advocate for such a trial to be initiated without delay. If a protective effect of statins on breast cancer recurrence is supported by trial evidence......, then the indications for a safe, well tolerated, and inexpensive treatment can be expanded to improve outcomes for breast cancer survivors. We discuss several trial design opportunities-including candidate predictive biomarkers of statin safety and efficacy-and off er solutions to the key challenges involved...

  5. Statine - ein Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer J

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Zahlreiche klinische Studien konnten in der Vergangenheit zeigen, daß 3-Hydroxy-Methyl-Coenzym A-Reduktase-(HMG-CoA-Reduktase-Hemmer (Statine zu einer signifikanten Reduktion der kardiovaskulären Morbidität und Mortalität in der Primär- und Sekundärprävention führen. Darüber hinaus sind Statine heute die bei weitem potentesten cholesterinsenkenden Medikamente in der klinischen Anwendung. Subanalysen aus der LIPID-Studie konnten zeigen, daß Patienten mit instabiler Angina pectoris zumindest ebenso von einer Therapie mit Statinen profitierten wie Patienten nach einem Myokardinfarkt. Kürzlich publizierte Studien (AVERT oder bislang noch nicht publizierte Studien (MIRACL werden in naher Zukunft mehr Information über die Therapie mit Statinen in der frühen Phase von akuten Koronarsyndromen liefern.

  6. Statin Intolerance: the Clinician’s Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Stulc, Tomáš; Ceška, Richard; Gotto, Antonio M.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle problems and other adverse symptoms associated with statin use are frequent reasons for non-adherence and discontinuation of statin therapy, which results in inadequate control of hyperlipidemia and increased cardiovascular risk. However, most patients who experience adverse symptoms during statin use are able to tolerate at least some degree of statin therapy. Given the profound cardiovascular benefits derived from statins, an adequate practical approach to statin intolerance is, ther...

  7. Genetically Guided Statin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    permission to manufacture, use, or sell any patented invention that may relate to them. Qualified requestors may obtain copies of this report...prescription recommendations. Patients in the usual care arm received general information regarding statin risk and prescriptions. The outcomes measured at 3...previously and is a quick, patient-reported measure of adherence that is easy to implement in the outpatient setting [2]. To assess patients’ beliefs

  8. Statin-associated muscle symptoms: impact on statin therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroes, Erik S; Thompson, Paul D; Corsini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    degradation, thereby providing a potential link between statins and muscle symptoms; controlled mechanistic and genetic studies in humans are necessary to further understanding. The Panel proposes to identify SAMS by symptoms typical of statin myalgia (i.e. muscle pain or aching) and their temporal...... therapeutic potential....

  9. Treating statin-intolerant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pigna G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Marcello Arca, Giovanni PignaAtherosclerosis Unit, Department of Internal Medicine and Allied Medical Specialities, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Statins are effective in reducing cardiovascular events and are safe for almost all patients. Nevertheless, intolerance to statins is frequently faced in clinical practice. This is mostly due to muscular symptoms (myalgia with or without increase of plasma creatinine kinase and/or elevation of hepatic aminotransferases, which overall constitutes approximately two-thirds of reported adverse events during statin therapy. These side effects raise concerns in patients as well as in doctors and are likely to reduce patients' adherence and, as a consequence, the cardiovascular benefit. Therefore, it is mandatory that clinicians improve their knowledge on the clinical aspects of muscular and hepatic side effects of statin therapy as well as their ability to manage patients with statin intolerance. Besides briefly examining the clinical aspects and the mechanisms that are proposed to be responsible for the most common statin-associated side effects, the main purpose of this article is to review the available approaches to manage statin-intolerant patients. The first step is to determine whether the adverse events are indeed related to statin therapy. If so, lowering the dosage or changing statin, alternate dosing options, or the use of nonstatin compounds may be practical strategies. The cholesterol-lowering potency as well as the usefulness of these different approaches in treating statin-intolerant patients will be examined based on currently available data. However, the cardiovascular benefit of these strategies has not been well established, so their use has to be guided by a careful clinical assessment of each patient.Keywords: statin therapy, atorvastatin, rosuvastatin, aminotransferase levels, myopathy

  10. STATINS AND MYOPATHY: MOLECULAR MECHANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Drapkina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety of statin therapy is considered. In particular the reasons of a complication such as myopathy are discussed in detail. The molecular mechanisms of statin myopathy , as well as its risk factors are presented. The role of coenzyme Q10 in the myopathy development and coenzyme Q10 application for the prevention of this complication are considered. 

  11. Do Statins Have Antidepressant Effects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler-Forsberg, Ole; Gasse, Christiane; Berk, Michael

    2017-01-01

    and limited by low generalizability, and some early observational studies have pointed towards potential neuropsychiatric adverse effects of statin treatment. Nevertheless, based on the good tolerability and general safety of the statins, researchers are currently investigating the potential antidepressant......Statins are used widely in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease; a treatment effect that has long been thought to be due to their cholesterol-lowering properties. However, statins also have a wide range of anti-inflammatory effects independent of their lipid......-lowering mechanisms. In depression, low-grade inflammation is a replicated finding, and several studies have shown antidepressant properties of diverse anti-inflammatory drugs. Large observational studies have suggested reduced risks of depression amongst those taking statins, an effect that is thought...

  12. Immunological Aspects of the Statins' Function in Patients with Heart Failure: A Report from the Annual Conference of ESC-Heart Failure 2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maciej Banach; Jaroslaw Dro(z)d(z); Piotr Okonski; Jacek Rysz

    2005-01-01

    The annual meeting of the Heart Failure Association of ESC in Lisbon, in June 2005, was exceptionally successful.There were many very interesting presentations and workshops with the unique title: Statins in heart failureCholesterol-lowering is not the only goal Heart failure (HF) is a progressive disease with coronary artery disease (CAD) as the most often underlying etiology. Treatment to prevent progression of heart failure has been targeted to reverse the consequences of HF and to a less extent the cause - the atherosclerotic plaque itself. On the average 50% of patients with heart failure are treated with lipid intervention. Lipid-lowering treatment with statins clearly reduces morbidity and mortality of patients with documented CAD. Since the prevalent etiology of heart failure is CAD, its prevention may reduce heart failure progression. However, recent studies suggest that pleiotropic effects of statins are more important than the influence related to their cholesterol lowering mechanism. Furthermore it is suggested that low levels of circulating lipoproteins and cholesterol may be independent predictors of impaired outcome in patients with heart failure. There are some possible explanations for this finding. High levels of cholesterol can be beneficial to heart failure patients; cholesterol-rich serum lipoproteins are able to modulate inflammatory immune function because they bind and detoxify bacterial lipopolysaccharide, a very strong stimulator of the release of proinflammatory cytokines that promote heart failure progression and death. So current recommendations strongly emphasize that the aim of treatment of HF is not to lower cholesterol.

  13. STATINS IN POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Patel*, T. D. Goswami, A. D. Sharma and B. S. Arora

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most common endocrine disorder in women. PCOS varies from a mild menstrual disorder to severe disturbance of reproductive and metabolic functions. Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors with intrinsic antioxidant properties, exert profound and broad-reaching effects on various types of tissues. By blocking an early step of the mevalonate pathway, statins inhibit proliferation of several cell types including vascular smooth muscles, hepatocytes, and several neoplastic cell lines. The pleiotropic effects of statins may be due to inhibition of cholesterol synthesis. Some common treatments lifestyle changes, insulin-sensitizing agents.

  14. Beneficial Pleiotropic Effects of Statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Lunder

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: In the current article we review the pharmacological mechanisms of action, which contribute to the beneficial pleiotropic effects of statins. Described mechanisms are supported by the evidence obtained from clinical trials in the last decade.

  15. Statin treatment in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl-Jensen, Gorm; Tsakiri, Anna; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to progressive disability. Statins [hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors] are widely prescribed drugs in hypercholesterolemia. They exert immunomodulatory and neurotrophic effects and are attractive...

  16. Statins: perspectives in cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcos, Laurent; Le Jossic-Corcos, Catherine

    2013-10-01

    Virtually any cell type in a mammalian organism uses Acetyl CoA to yield mevalonate, through the activity of the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase enzyme and, ultimately, cholesterol. Statins have long and quite successfully been used as cholesterol lowering drugs. They reversibly inhibit the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase activity, which is rate limiting in the early steps of the cholesterol synthesis pathway. In addition to these effects, it has also been amply shown that statins may efficiently trigger cancer cell apoptosis, making them a plausible therapeutic option for the treatment of cancer. Whether statins may prevent cancer occurrence is a matter of debate and an unanswered question; undoubtedly experimental models have clearly demonstrated the potential of statins as direct cytotoxic agents, which can reduce tumour development or metastasis spread, even more so when combined with cytotoxic drugs. Until now, however, only few data in humans support the idea that statins could rightfully belong to the group of anticancer drugs. Nevertheless, as cancer cell metabolism is being thoroughly revisited, the mevalonate pathway has recently been reported as truly oncogenic, presenting the attractive possibility that mevalonate pathway inhibitors, such as statins, may join the ranks of anticancer drugs.

  17. Negative statin-related news stories decrease statin persistence and increase myocardial infarction and cardiovascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2016-01-01

    AIM: We tested the hypothesis that statin-related news stories, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, statin dose, calendar year, and socio-demographic status are associated with early statin discontinuation. We also examined frequency and consequences of early statin discontinuation. METHODS...... AND RESULTS: From the entire Danish population, we studied 674 900 individuals aged 40 or older who were initiated on statin therapy in 1995-2010, and followed them until 31 December 2011. Individuals on statins increased from early statin discontinuation increased from 6...... for individuals with vs. without early statin discontinuation were 1.26 (1.21-1.30) for myocardial infarction and 1.18 (1.14-1.23) for death from cardiovascular disease. CONCLUSION: Early statin discontinuation increased with negative statin-related news stories, calendar year, statin dose, male sex, living...

  18. Statin Hepatotoxicity: Is it a Real Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Pranav; Saxena, K. K.; Kapoor, Seema

    2011-01-01

    Statins are the most effective and widely used drugs for treating dyslipidemia, a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. These are one of the safest hypolipidemic drugs but many patients are advised to discontinue statins for the fear of hepatotoxicity. Despite a lack of evidence that statins cause liver diseases, many physicians are reluctant to start statins in patients with an out-of-range liver enzymes value and this reluctance to initiate or interrupt the therapy with statins leads to dyslipidemia and its grave consequences. Further, there are some reports showing an additional benefit of statins in reducing cardiovascular events in patients with abnormal liver function tests. PMID:22567196

  19. Statin Hepatotoxicity: Is it a Real Concern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Sikka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are the most effective and widely used drugs for treating dyslipidemia, a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. These are one of the safest hypolipidemic drugs but many patients are advised to discontinue statins for the fear of hepatotoxicity. Despite a lack of evidence that statins cause liver diseases, many physicians are reluctant to start statins in patients with an out-of-range liver enzymes value and this reluctance to initiate or interrupt the therapy with statins leads to dyslipidemia and its grave consequences. Further, there are some reports showing an additional benefit of statins in reducing cardiovascular events in patients with abnormal liver function tests.

  20. STATINS AND THE RISK OF DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Drapkina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Randomized controlled trials have clearly demonstrated the efficacy of statins in reduction of serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol level by 25-50% from the baseline. Statins may increase the risk of diabetes mellitus (DM in long-term therapy and use of high doses. Diabetogenic action is statins class effect and does not depend on their hydrophobic or hydrophilic properties. However, the use of statins in patients with DM is obligatory. The statins diabetogenic  risk is exaggerated and we will continue to treat our patients with statins.

  1. Many with Diabetes Missing Out on Statins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on statins." But analysis of data from 204 cardiology practices across the United States revealed that 38 ... not been prescribed statins. The American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes ...

  2. Statins and progressive renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buemi, Michele; Senatore, Massimino; Corica, Francesco; Aloisi, Carmela; Romeo, Adolfo; Cavallaro, Emanuela; Floccari, Fulvio; Tramontana, Domenico; Frisina, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    Thanks to the administration of hypocholesterolemic drugs, important advances have been made in the treatment of patients with progressive renal disease. In vitro and in vivo findings demonstrate that statins, the inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, can provide protection against kidney diseases characterized by inflammation and/or enhanced proliferation of epithelial cells occurring in rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, or by increased proliferation of mesangial cells occurring in IgA nephropathy. Many of the beneficial effects obtained occur independent of reduced cholesterol levels because statins can directly inhibit the proliferation of different cell types (e.g., mesangial, renal tubular, and vascular smooth muscle cells), and can also modulate the inflammatory response, thus inhibiting macrophage recruitment and activation, as well as fibrosis. The mechanisms underlying the action of statins are not yet well understood, although recent data in the literature indicate that they can directly affect the proliferation/apoptosis balance, the down-regulation of inflammatory chemokines, and the cytogenic messages mediated by the GTPases Ras superfamily. Therefore, as well as reducing serum lipids, statins and other lipid-lowering agents may directly influence intracellular signaling pathways involved in the prenylation of low molecular weight proteins that play a crucial role in cell signal transduction and cell activation. Statins appear to have important potential in the treatment of progressive renal disease, although further studies are required to confirm this in humans.

  3. Statin intolerance: more questions than answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, John R; Campbell, Kristen B; Lakey, Wanda C

    2014-01-01

    The dramatic effectiveness of statins in improving the course of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease tends to overshadow questions of statin intolerance. Thus after more than 25 years of clinical statin use, intolerance remains a poorly understood, frustrating issue for patients and providers. It has been extraordinarily difficult to define statin intolerance and its implications for clinical practice. Here, we briefly summarize current knowledge and raise questions that need to be addressed.

  4. Use of statins and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Andersen, L; Hallas, Jesper;

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory studies and a single case-control study have suggested a protective effect of statins on the risk of glioma. We wished to investigate the influence of statin use on the risk of glioma in a population-based setting.......Laboratory studies and a single case-control study have suggested a protective effect of statins on the risk of glioma. We wished to investigate the influence of statin use on the risk of glioma in a population-based setting....

  5. STATINS AND RISK OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Drapkina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Besides hypolipidemic effect statins demonstrate some not-lipid (pleotropic ones. Special attention has been paying to statin inducing reduction in bacterial infections incidence and severity, and pneumonia particularly. Results of the large studies on statin influence on infectious disease are presented.

  6. Statin use and survival following glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Hallas, Jesper; Friis, Søren

    2014-01-01

    AIM: While some studies indicate a potential chemopreventive effect of statin use on the risk of glioma, the effect of statins on the prognosis of brain tumours has not yet been examined. We thus conducted a cohort study evaluating the influence of statin use on survival in patients with glioblas...

  7. Muscle rupture associated with statin use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekhart, C.; Jong, L.A.W.; Gross-Martirosyan, L.; Hunsel, F. van

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Statins are used in the treatment of hyperlipidaemia. They are among the most commonly prescribed drugs worldwide. Statins have been linked to musculoskeletal adverse drug reactions. However muscle rupture has not been discussed as an adverse drug reaction to statins so far. The aim of this

  8. LIFESTAT – Living with statins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Christa Lykke; Helge, Jørn Wulff; Krasnik, Allan;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: LIFESTAT is an interdisciplinary project that leverages approaches and knowledge from medicine, the humanities and the social sciences to analyze the impact of statin use on health, lifestyle and well-being in cohorts of Danish citizens. The impetus for the study is the fact that 10% of the ......AIM: LIFESTAT is an interdisciplinary project that leverages approaches and knowledge from medicine, the humanities and the social sciences to analyze the impact of statin use on health, lifestyle and well-being in cohorts of Danish citizens. The impetus for the study is the fact that 10......, and the way people manage to live with the risk (personally, socially and technologically). CONCLUSIONS THE ORIGINALITY AND SUCCESS OF LIFESTAT DEPEND ON AND DERIVE FROM ITS INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH, IN WHICH THE DISCIPLINES CONVERGE INTO THOROUGH AND HOLISTIC STUDY AND DESCRIBE THE IMPACT OF STATIN USE...

  9. Cholesterol confusion and statin controversy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert; Du; Broff; Michel; de; Lorgeril

    2015-01-01

    The role of blood cholesterol levels in coronary heart disease(CHD) and the true effect of cholesterollowering statin drugs are debatable. In particular,whether statins actually decrease cardiac mortality and increase life expectancy is controversial. Concurrently,the Mediterranean diet model has been shown to prolong life and reduce the risk of diabetes,cancer,and CHD. We herein review current data related to both statins and the Mediterranean diet. We conclude that the expectation that CHD could be prevented or eliminated by simply reducing cholesterol appears unfounded. On the contrary,we should acknowledge the inconsistencies of the cholesterol theory and recognize the proven benefits of a healthy lifestyle incorporating a Mediterranean diet to prevent CHD.

  10. LIFESTAT – Living with statins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Christa Lykke; Helge, Jørn Wulff; Krasnik, Allan

    2016-01-01

    and unintended side effects (e.g. myalgia, and glucose and exercise intolerance). METHODS: The LIFESTAT project combines invasive human experiments, biomedical analyses, nationwide surveys, epidemiological studies, qualitative interviews, media content analyses, and ethnographic participant observations....... The study investigates the biological consequences of statin treatment; determines the mechanism(s) by which statin use causes muscle and mitochondrial dysfunction; and analyzes achievement of treatment goals, people's perception of disease risk, media influence on people's risk and health perception......, and the way people manage to live with the risk (personally, socially and technologically). CONCLUSIONS THE ORIGINALITY AND SUCCESS OF LIFESTAT DEPEND ON AND DERIVE FROM ITS INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH, IN WHICH THE DISCIPLINES CONVERGE INTO THOROUGH AND HOLISTIC STUDY AND DESCRIBE THE IMPACT OF STATIN USE...

  11. Current treatment of dyslipidaemia: PCSK9 inhibitors and statin intolerance.

    OpenAIRE

    Koskinas,Konstantinos; Wilhelm, Matthias; Windecker, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Statins are the cornerstone of the management of dyslipidaemias and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Although statins are, overall, safe and well tolerated, adverse events can occur and constitute an important barrier to maintaining long-term adherence to statin treatment. In patients who cannot tolerate statins, alternative treatments include switch to another statin, intermittent-dosage regimens and non-statin lipid-lowering medications. Nonetheless, a high proportion of statin-intoler...

  12. Statin escape phenomenon: Fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkas, Fotios; Elisaf, Moses; Klouras, Eleftherios; Dimitriou, Theodora; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Liberopoulos, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the presence of the so called “statin escape” phenomenon among hyperlipidemic subjects attending a lipid clinic. METHODS This was a retrospective analysis of 1240 hyperlipidemic individuals followed-up for ≥ 3 years. We excluded those individuals meeting one of the following criteria: Use of statin therapy at baseline visit, discontinuation of statin treatment at most recent visit, change in statin treatment during follow-up and poor compliance to treatment. Statin escape phenomenon was defined as an increase in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels at the most recent visit by > 10% compared with the value at 6 mo following initiation of statin treatment. RESULTS Of 181 eligible subjects, 31% exhibited the statin escape phenomenon. No major differences regarding baseline characteristics were found between statin escapers and non-statin escapers. Both escapers and non-escapers had similar baseline LDL-C levels [174 (152-189) and 177 (152-205) mg/dL, respectively]. In comparison with non-escapers, statin escapers demonstrated lower LDL-C levels at 6 mo after treatment initiation [88 (78-97) mg/dL vs 109 (91-129) mg/dL, P statin-treated individuals. The clinical significance of this phenomenon remains uncertain.

  13. Statin use and risk for ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, L; Dehlendorff, C; Friis, Søren

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited data suggest that statin use reduces the risk for ovarian cancer. METHODS: Using Danish nationwide registries, we identified 4103 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer during 2000-2011 and age-matched them to 58,706 risk-set sampled controls. Conditional logistic regression...... was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for epithelial ovarian cancer overall, and for histological types, associated with statin use. RESULTS: We observed a neutral association between ever use of statins and epithelial ovarian cancer risk (OR=0.98, 95% CI=0.......87-1.10), and no apparent risk variation according to duration, intensity or type of statin use. Decreased ORs associated with statin use were seen for mucinous ovarian cancer (ever statin use: OR=0.63, 95% CI=0.39-1.00). CONCLUSIONS: Statin use was not associated with overall risk for epithelial ovarian cancer...

  14. Statins, platelets, and the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew M. Kates

    2007-01-01

    @@ As a class of drugs, statins have gained renown for their ability to effectively reduce cardiovascular events in both patients with heart diseases (secondary prevention)and in those who, while not with manifest heart disease (primary prevention), are at increased risk based on a variety of risk factors including hypertension, diabetes, and age.

  15. Systematic review and metaanalysis of statins for heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia in children: evaluation of cholesterol changes and side effects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Gorman, Clodagh S

    2012-02-01

    Heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (heFH) affects 1 in 500 individuals. Evidence supports the low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-lowering effect of statins for adults with heFH. However, there are concerns regarding the treatment children with heFH. By performing a systematic review and metaanalysis of the published literature, this study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of statins used for children with heFH. A systematic review was performed by searching multiple medical databases and citations to identify reports of randomized controlled trials of statins used to treat children with heFH. The trials were retrieved, reviewed, and subjected to metaanalysis. The search yielded 2,174 titles. Of the 63 studies retrieved and reviewed, 56 were excluded, 7 were included in the systematic review, and 4 were included in the metaanalysis. Significant heterogeneity was detected. The metaanalysis showed significant LDL lowering, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol elevation, and increases in height and weight with statins. The metaanalysis could not be performed for many side effects of statins, but individual trials showed no significant side effects. Quality assessment showed methodologic concerns, with potential for bias. For example, six trials analyzed statin effects without intention to treat despite such a stated intention. Metaanalysis shows significant LDL lowering with statin treatment. Further studies, including epidemiologic and multicenter studies, are required.

  16. Algorithms to Identify Statin Intolerance in Medicare Administrative Claim Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colantonio, Lisandro D; Kent, Shia T; Huang, Lei; Chen, Ligong; Monda, Keri L; Serban, Maria-Corina; Manthripragada, Angelika; Kilgore, Meredith L; Rosenson, Robert S; Muntner, Paul

    2016-10-01

    To compare characteristics of patients with possible statin intolerance identified using different claims-based algorithms versus patients with high adherence to statins. We analyzed 134,863 Medicare beneficiaries initiating statins between 2007 and 2011. Statin intolerance and discontinuation, and high adherence to statins, defined by proportion of days covered ≥80 %, were assessed during the 365 days following statin initiation. Definition 1 of statin intolerance included statin down-titration or discontinuation with ezetimibe initiation, having a claim for a rhabdomyolysis or antihyperlipidemic event followed by statin down-titration or discontinuation, or switching between ≥3 types of statins. Definition 2 included beneficiaries who met Definition 1 and those who down-titrated statin intensity. We also analyzed beneficiaries who met Definition 2 of statin intolerance or discontinued statins. The prevalence of statin intolerance was 1.0 % (n = 1320) and 5.2 % (n = 6985) using Definitions 1 and 2, respectively. Overall, 45,266 (33.6 %) beneficiaries had statin intolerance by Definition 2 or discontinued statins and 55,990 (41.5 %) beneficiaries had high adherence to statins. Compared with beneficiaries with high adherence to statins, those with statin intolerance and who had statin intolerance or discontinued statins were more likely to be female versus male, and black, Hispanic or Asian versus white. The multivariable adjusted odds ratio for statin intolerance by Definitions 1 and 2 comparing patients initiating high versus low/moderate intensity statins were 2.82 (95%CI: 2.42-3.29), and 8.58 (8.07-9.12), respectively, and for statin intolerance or statin discontinuation was 2.35 (2.25-2.45). Definitions of statin intolerance presented herein can be applied to analyses using administrative claims data.

  17. Cholesterol suppresses antimicrobial effect of statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Haeri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Isoprenoid biosynthesis is a key metabolic pathway to produce a wide variety of biomolecules such as cholesterol and carotenoids, which target cell membranes. On the other hand, it has been reported that statins known as inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis and cholesterol lowering agents, may have a direct antimicrobial effect on the some bacteria. The exact action of statins in microbial metabolism is not clearly understood. It is possible that statins inhibit synthesis or utilization of some sterol precursor necessary for bacterial membrane integrity. Accordingly, this study was designed in order to examine if statins inhibit the production of a compound, which can be used in the membrane, and whether cholesterol would replace it and rescue bacteria from toxic effects of statins. Materials and Methods: To examine the possibility we assessed antibacterial effect of statins with different classes; lovastatin, simvastatin, and atorvastatin, alone and in combination with cholesterol on two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis and two Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli bacteria using gel diffusion assay. Results: Our results showed that all of the statins except for lovastatin had significant antibacterial property in S. aureus, E. coli, and Enter. faecalis. Surprisingly, cholesterol nullified the antimicrobial action of effective statins in statin-sensitive bacteria. Conclusion: It is concluded that statins may deprive bacteria from a metabolite responsible for membrane stability, which is effectively substituted by cholesterol.

  18. Statin intolerance - a question of definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algharably, Engi Abdel-Hady; Filler, Iris; Rosenfeld, Stephanie; Grabowski, Katja; Kreutz, Reinhold

    2017-01-01

    Statin therapy is the backbone of pharmacologic therapy for low-density lipoproteins cholesterol lowering and plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular disease prevention. Statin intolerance is understood as the inability to continue using a statin to reduce individual cardiovascular risk sufficiently, due to the development of symptoms or laboratory abnormalities attributable to the initiation or dose escalation of a statin. Muscle symptoms are the most common side effects observed. Areas covered: The main aim of this article is to present a review on published definitions of statin intolerance. In addition, a brief review on clinical aspects and risk factors of statin intolerance is provided and features for a common definition for statin intolerance are suggested. Expert opinion: A definition of statin intolerance by major drug regulatory agencies is not available. In clinical studies, different definitions are chosen and results are not comparable; different medical associations do not agree on one common definition. There is an unmet need to establish a common definition of statin intolerance to ensure an appropriate clinical use of this important drug class. Further work is required to develop a consensus definition on statin intolerance that could have significant positive impact on both research and clinical management.

  19. Despite increased use and sales of statins in India, per capita prescription rates remain far below high-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Niteesh K; Dugani, Sagar; Shrank, William H; Polinski, Jennifer M; Stark, Christina E; Gupta, Rajeev; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Brill, Gregory; Jha, Prabhat

    2014-02-01

    Statin use has increased substantially in North America and Europe, with resultant reductions in cardiovascular mortality. However, little is known about statin use in lower-income countries. India is of interest because of its burden of cardiovascular disease, the unique nature of its prescription drug market, and the growing globalization of drug sales. We conducted an observational study using IMS Health data for the period February 2006-January 2010. During the period, monthly statin prescriptions increased from 45.8 to 84.1 per 1,000 patients with coronary heart disease-an increase of 0.80 prescriptions per month. The proportion of the Indian population receiving a defined daily statin dose increased from 3.35 percent to 7.78 percent. Nevertheless, only a fraction of those eligible for a statin appeared to receive the therapy, even though there were 259 distinct statin products available to Indian consumers in January 2010. Low rates of statin use in India may reflect problems with access to health care, affordability, underdiagnosis, and cultural beliefs. Because of the growing burden of cardiovascular disease in lower-income countries such as India, there is an urgent need to increase statin use and ensure access to safe products whose use is based on evidence. Policies are needed to expand insurance, increase medications' affordability, educate physicians and patients, and improve regulatory oversight.

  20. Do statins protect against upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Aalykke, Claus;

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Recently, an apparent protective effect of statins against upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) was postulated in a post hoc analysis of a randomized trial. We aimed to evaluate the effect of statin use on acute nonvariceal UGB alone or in combinations with low-dose aspirin and other...... of statins with UGB were 0.94 (0.78-1.12) for current use, 1.40 (0.89-2.20) for recent use and 1.42 (0.96-2.10) for past use. The lack of effect was consistent across most patient subgroups, different cumulative or current statin doses and different statin substances. In explorative analyses, a borderline...... significant protective effect was observed for concurrent users of low-dose aspirin [OR 0.43 (0.18-1.05)]. CONCLUSION: Statins do not prevent UGB, except possibly in users of low-dose aspirin....

  1. Statine bei instabiler Angina pectoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marschang G

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Die Statine stellen die derzeit wirksamsten cholesterinsenkenden Medikamente dar, deren Effektivität und Verträglichkeit bereits durch große Primär- und Sekundärpräventionsstudien an zahlreichen Patienten gesichert ist. Subanalysen einiger dieser Interventionsstudien (AFCAPS/TexCAPS, 4S, CARE, LIPID haben eine signifikante Reduktion von Episoden instabiler Angina pectoris und damit verbundener Krankenhausaufenthalte ergeben. In der LIPID-Studie wurde weiters gezeigt, daß Patienten mit einer Anamnese von instabiler Angina pectoris mindestens ebenso wie Postinfarktpatienten von einer Therapie mit einem Statin profitieren. Von zwei derzeit noch nicht publizierten Studien (AVERT, MIRACL wird die Klärung weiterer Fragestellungen (hochdosierte Statintherapie im Vergeich zu Angioplastie, aggressive Cholesterinsenkung als Akuttherapie der instabilen Angina pectoris erwartet.

  2. Statin intolerance in a referral lipid clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Wanda C; Greyshock, Nicole G; Kelley, Carly E; Siddiqui, Mohammad A; Ahmad, Umar; Lokhnygina, Yuliya V; Guyton, John R

    2016-01-01

    Statins effectively prevent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, but rates of statin discontinuation after adverse events are high. Describe the range and relative frequencies of adverse events potentially attributable to statins in lipid referral practice and assess statin rechallenge outcomes. Retrospective cohort study of 642 patients with statin-associated adverse events evaluated in a referral lipid clinic between January 1, 2004 and January 27, 2011. Patients experiencing adverse events by organ system included 92% with musculoskeletal, 8% central nervous system, 10% liver, 8% gastrointestinal, 5% peripheral nervous system, 5% skin, and 3% other events. Overlap of organ system involvement occurred in 22.5%. At least 1 follow-up visit was made by 557 patients, among whom overall median follow-up was 25 months. Among patients treated with a statin in the clinic, 71% remained on a statin at the last follow-up visit. Patients with hepatic transaminase increases by history were numerically more likely than the overall group to resume or remain on statin treatment, whereas those reporting central nervous system or gastrointestinal symptoms trended lower for statin maintenance. Among patients who experienced an adverse event after statin rechallenge, the majority (64%) were being treated with intermittent, nondaily dosing at the time of the adverse event. Although musculoskeletal symptoms are reported by 90% of patients with statin intolerance, symptoms involving other organ systems may be more frequent than previously supposed. Understanding the range of symptoms, time course, and impact on daily activities informs counseling in patient-centered practice, but assessment of causation by statins remains challenging. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Statins-More Than Just Plaque Stabilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish K Khanna

    2008-01-01

    Perioperative statin therapy seems to be associated with a survival benefit, with a variable effect on postoperative cardiovascular morbidity. The available evidence also suggests that, there may be a benefit from including statins in the therapy for treatment of sepsis. Larger prospective, randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm these observations and to determine the optimal timing and duration of statin therapy in the perioperative setting.

  4. Statins and risk of incident diabetes: a collaborative meta-analysis of randomised statin trials.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sattar, Naveed

    2010-02-27

    Trials of statin therapy have had conflicting findings on the risk of development of diabetes mellitus in patients given statins. We aimed to establish by a meta-analysis of published and unpublished data whether any relation exists between statin use and development of diabetes.

  5. Statin tolerability: In defence of placebo-controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Tobert, Jonathan A; Newman, Connie B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Statin intolerance is a barrier to effective lipid-lowering treatment. A significant number of patients stop prescribed statins, or can take only a reduced dose, because of adverse events attributed to the statin, and are then considered statin-intolerant. Methods Examination of differences between statin and placebo in withdrawal rates due to adverse events – a good measure of tolerability – in statin cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with advanced disease and complex medi...

  6. [In vitro study over statins effects on cellular growth curves and its reversibility with mevalonate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan Núñez-Cortés, Jesús; Alvarez Rodriguez, Ysmael; Alvarez Novés, Granada; Recarte Garcia-Andrade, Carlos; Alvarez-Sala Walther, Luis

    2014-01-01

    HMG-CoA-Reductase inhibitors, also known as statins, are currently the most powerful cholesterol-lowering drugs available on the market. Clinical trials and experimental evidence suggest that statins have heavy anti-atherosclerotic effects. These are in part consequence of lipid lowering but also result from pleiotropic actions of the drugs. These so-called pleiotropic properties affect various aspects of cell function, inflammation, coagulation, and vasomotor activity. These effects are mediated either indirectly through LDL-c reduction or via a direct effect on cellular functions. Although many of the pleiotropic properties of statins may be a class effect, some may be unique to certain agents and account for differences in their pharmacological activity. So, although statins typically have similar effects on LDL-c levels, differences in chemical structure and pharmacokinetic profile can lead to variations in pleiotropic effects. In this paper we analize the in vitro effects of different statins over different cell lines from cells implicated in atherosclerotic process: endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and vascular muscular cells. In relation with our results we can proof that the effects of different dosis of different statins provides singular effects over growth curves of different cellular lines, a despite of a class-dependent effects. So, pleiotropic effects and its reversibility with mevalonate are different according with the molecule and the dosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEA. All rights reserved.

  7. [Muscle-related adverse effects of statins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjola-Sintonen, Sinikka; Julkunen, Heikki

    2014-01-01

    Adverse effects on muscles occur in approximately 5 to 10% of patients taking statins. Drug interactions, associated diseases, agedness, low body weight, high statin dose and hereditary factors increase the risk of adverse effects. In most cases the muscle effects are mild and disappear upon discontinuation of the medication. Rhabdomyolysis is a severe though rare complication that can possibly result in renal damage. A totally different muscle-related adverse effect, necrotizing myopathy, has recently been linked to the use of statins. Its characteristic feature is progression of the symptoms in spite of discontinuation of the statin.

  8. Statins Decrease Oxidative Stress and ICD Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L. Bloom

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrate that statins decrease ventricular arrhythmias in internal cardioverter defibrillator (ICD patients. The mechanism is unknown, but evidence links increased inflammatory and oxidative states with increased arrhythmias. We hypothesized that statin use decreases oxidation. Methods. 304 subjects with ICDs were surveyed for ventricular arrhythmia. Blood was analyzed for derivatives of reactive oxygen species (DROMs and interleukin-6 (IL-6. Results. Subjects included 252 (83% men, 58% on statins, 20% had ventricular arrhythmias. Average age was 63 years and ejection fraction (EF 20%. ICD implant duration was 29 ± 27 months. Use of statins correlated with lower ICD events (r=0.12, P=.02. Subjects on statins had lower hsCRP (5.2 versus 6.3; P=.05 and DROM levels (373 versus 397; P=.03. Other factors, including IL-6 and EF did not differ between statin and nonstatin use, nor did beta-blocker or antiarrhythmic use. Multivariate cross-correlation analysis demonstrated that DROMs, statins, IL-6 and EF were strongly associated with ICD events. Multivariate regression shows DROMs to be the dominant predictor. Conclusion. ICD event rate correlates with DROMs, a measure of lipid peroxides. Use of statins is associated with reduced DROMs and fewer ICD events, suggesting that statins exert their effect through reducing oxidation.

  9. Breast cancer growth prevention by statins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Michael J; Esserman, Laura J; Zhou, Yamei; Shoemaker, Mark; Lobo, Margaret; Borman, Elizabeth; Baehner, Frederick; Kumar, Anjali S; Adduci, Kelly; Marx, Corina; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance A; Winters, Mary; Benz, Stephen; Benz, Christopher C

    2006-01-01

    .... We evaluated the effects of statins on breast cancer cell growth, phosphoprotein signaling intermediates, survival/apoptosis regulators, cell cycle regulators, and activated transcription factors...

  10. Statins for aortic valve stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Thiago

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions. Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity, freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. MAIN RESULTS: We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants with placebo (1175 participants. We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2, valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2

  11. Statins and risk of poststroke hemorrhagic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheitz, Jan F; MacIsaac, Rachael L; Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H; Siegerink, Bob; Bath, Philip M; Endres, Matthias; Lees, Kennedy R; Nolte, Christian H

    2016-04-26

    To assess whether statin treatment before or after acute ischemic stroke (AIS) affects the risk of acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), postacute ICH, and mortality within 90 days. Data were sought from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive, an international repository of clinical trials data. Using propensity score matching, we retrospectively compared patients with prior statin treatment and newly initiated statin within 3 days after AIS to patients without statin exposure. Outcomes of interest were acute symptomatic ICH (sICH), any acute ICH, postacute ICH, and mortality during follow-up of 3 months. A total of 8,535 patients (mean age 70 years, 54% male, median baseline NIH Stroke Scale score 13) were analyzed. After propensity score matching, prior statin use was not strongly associated with sICH (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83-2.14) or any ICH (adjusted OR 1.35, 95% CI 0.92-1.98). There was no evidence of an interaction between prior statin use and thrombolysis. New initiation of statins was not associated with postacute ICH (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.60, 95% CI 0.70-3.65). There was a signal towards lower 90-day mortality in patients with prior statin use (adjusted HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.70-1.00) and especially early initiation of statins (adjusted HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.46-0.97). Statin use prior to AIS was not associated with early hemorrhagic complications, irrespective of treatment with thrombolysis. New initiation of statin treatment early after AIS did not affect risk of postacute ICH, but might be associated with reduced mortality. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  12. Statin intolerance: Now a solved problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sikka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are the most effective and widely used drugs for treating dyslipidemia, a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. These are one of the safest hypolipidemic drugs but many patients are bound to discontinue statins due to their side effects. Hepatotoxicity, myotoxicity and peripheral neuropathy are important out of them. Discontinuation of statins leads to dylipidemia and its grave consequences. Hence, there should be enough strategies for statin intolerant patients, so that they can be saved from these consequences. These side effects can be avoided by the awareness of certain factors viz. potential drug interactions and dose adjustment according to patho-physiology of the patient. Baseline investigations for liver function and muscle toxicity should be done before initiating statin therapy. Here, we are discussing various options for statin intolerant hyperlipidemic patients such as lower and intermittent dosing of statins, alternate hypolipidemic drugs, red yeast rice, supplementation with coenzyme Q10 and vitamin D. A number of hypolipidemic drugs are in trial phases and hold promise for statin intolerant patients.

  13. Statin treatment in type 2 diabetes patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Folgerdiena Maria

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes patients have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, therefore statins are recommended for almost all diabetes patients. Although it has been shown that statins can have substantial health and economic benefits, treatment in clinical practice is ofte

  14. Statin treatment in type 2 diabetes patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Folgerdiena Maria

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes patients have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, therefore statins are recommended for almost all diabetes patients. Although it has been shown that statins can have substantial health and economic benefits, treatment in clinical practice is

  15. STATINS AND URSODEOXYCHOLIC ACID: COOPERATION OR NEUTRALITY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Grigorieva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of combined therapy of gallstone disease (GSD, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and hypercholesterolemia (HCE with statins and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA are analyzed. In GSD statin therapy was often accompanied with reduction of bile lithogenicity but did not always accelerate stone litholysis under their combination with UDCA. Statin induced liver injuries are often observed in NAFLD and NASH, adjuvant UDCA therapy shown positive effect on inflammatory and histological liver parameters in these diseases. Serum lipid levels in patients with HCE were reduced most effectively with statin combined with UDCA. Combined therapy with statin and UDCA is recommended in patient with HCE and chronic liver diseases.

  16. Statin use and risk of endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperling, Cecilie D.; Verdoodt, Freija; Friis, Søren

    2017-01-01

    (HRT), obesity, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and education. We evaluated whether the association between statin use and endometrial cancer varied with duration and intensity of statin use, type of endometrial cancer or patient characteristics. RESULTS: The study population comprised......INTRODUCTION: Laboratory and epidemiological evidence have suggested that statin use may protect against the development of certain cancers, including endometrial cancer. In a nationwide registry-based case-control study, we examined the association between statin use and risk of endometrial cancer....... MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cases were female residents of Denmark with a primary diagnosis of endometrial cancer during 2000-2009. For each case, we selected 15 female population controls matched on date of birth (±one month) using risk-set sampling. Ever use of statin was defined as two or more prescriptions...

  17. Statins and risk of diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Tjan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statins are competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, which reduces HMG-CoA to mevalonate, the precursor of cholesterol via squalene. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase results in a decrease in cholesterol production. Since 1987, when the United States Federal Drug Administration (FDA approved lovastatin for clinical use,(1 statins have been widely used for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, particularly coronary heart disease (CHD, which is associated with high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol. Statins are also used in type 2 diabetes mellitus, since this carries a high risk of CHD. Statins have several adverse effects, to which must now be added new onset diabetes. In 2012 the FDA issued a warning about the risk of newly developed diabetes mellitus in older persons, such that statin labels now include information on glycemic effects, including diabetes and increases in hemoglobin A1c or fasting plasma glucose.(2 According to the results of a recent meta-analysis involving 13,966 40+-year patients newly treated with statins between 1 January 1977 and 31 March 2011, a moderate but significant increase was found in the risk of new onset diabetes within the first two years of using regular higher potency statins (rosuvastatin >10 mg, atorvastatin >20 mg, and simvastatin >40 mg, compared with lower potency drugs. Therefore these investigators caution clinicians regarding the use of higher potency statins in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.(2 The use of a new drug carries a “built-in time-bomb”, because nothing is known about its side effects, except for those revealed by animal tests and limited clinical trials. Even a multicenter clinical trial cannot be expected to reveal all possible adverse reactions associated with a new drug. As an illustration, in patients without diabetes mellitus, more than 345 000 cases were needed to detect an increase in fasting

  18. An assessment by the Statin Intolerance Panel: 2014 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, John R; Bays, Harold E; Grundy, Scott M; Jacobson, Terry A; The National Lipid Association Statin Intolerance Panel

    2014-01-01

    This article from the National Lipid Association Statin Intolerance Panel provides a framework for understanding statin intolerance and makes general recommendations for health professionals. For specific guidance on adverse events related to muscle, liver, cognition, and glucose metabolism, one should refer to the other reports of the Statin Safety Task Force for those topics. Although statin adverse effects rarely lead to permanent sequelae, symptomatic intolerance frequently hinders cardiovascular risk reduction by statins. We emphasize here the advisory role of the clinician helping each patient to make personal decisions on statin tolerability. We identify a pressing need for further research on statin intolerance and make suggestions for research design.

  19. One statin, two statins, three statins, more: similarities and differences of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkoski, Beatrice B

    2011-01-01

    Statin drugs (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) are one of the most widely prescribed drugs today. They are considered first-line therapy to lower blood serum cholesterol levels in conjunction with therapeutic lifestyle changes for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. In the following discussion, a brief explanation of the background of statins will explain why they are deemed so important today. The similarities and differences between the different statins will be addressed, including a look at dosage, side effects, and cautions for the seven 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors currently available.

  20. Identification of resting cells by dual-parameter flow cytometry of statin expression and DNA content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellicciari, C.; Mangiarotti, R.; Bottone, M.G.; Danova, M. [Univ. of Pavia (Italy); Wang, E. [Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-12-01

    Statin, a 57-kDa nuclear protein, has been recognized as a unique marker of quiescent (G{sub 0}) cells; specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) against statin have been produced and used to label resting cells in tissue sections and in cultured cells. We present an improved method for the identification of G{sub 0} cells by dual-parameter flow cytometry of statin expression and DNA content. The appropriate technical conditions were set up by using resting and cycling human fibroblasts as a model cell system. Several fixatives proved to be suitable for the immunocytochemical detection of statin; among them, 70% ethanol was selected because this fixation procedure is suitable for DNA staining with intercalating dyes and is routinely used for the immunolabeling of proliferation markers (such as proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA] and Ki-67) and of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) incorporation. Following cell permeabilization with detergent, exposure to the antistatin antibody (S-44), and indirect fluorescein isothiocyanate immunolabeling, cells were counterstained for DNA with propidium iodide and analyzed by dual-parameter flow cytometry. In cells from several animal sources (rat thymocytes and C6 glioma cells, mouse 3T3 cells, and human MCF-7 cells), under different experimental conditions, the expression of statin was found to correlate inversely with that of PCNA and Ki-67, and with the BrdUrd labeling index. In dual-parameter flow scattergrams, G{sub 0} (statin positive) cells can be discriminated from the potentially cycling (statin negative) G{sub 1} cells, i.e., within a cell fraction having the same DNA content. This approach can be envisaged as a powerful tool both for monitoring changes in the resting cell fraction and for investigating the process of G{sub 0}-G{sub 1} transition in unperturbed and drug-treated cell populations. 48 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bharti Chogtu; Rahul Magazine; KL Bairy

    2015-01-01

    The 3-hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductaseinhibitors, statins, are widely used in the primary andsecondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases tolower serum cholesterol levels. As type 2 diabetesmellitus is accompanied by dyslipidemia, statins havea major role in preventing the long term complicationsin diabetes and are recommended for diabetics withnormal low density lipoprotein levels as well. In 2012,United States Food and Drug Administration releasedchanges to statin safety label to include that statinshave been found to increase glycosylated haemoglobinand fasting serum glucose levels. Many studies doneon patients with cardiovascular risk factors have shownthat statins have diabetogenic potential and the effectvaries as per the dosage and type used. The variousmechanisms for this effect have been proposed and oneof them is downregulation of glucose transporters bythe statins. The recommendations by the investigatorsare that though statins can have diabetogenic risk,they have more long term benefits which can outweighthe risk. In elderly patients and those with metabolicsyndrome, as the risk of diabetes increase, the statinsshould be used cautiously. Other than a subset ofpopulation with risk for diabetes; statins still have longterm survival benefits in most of the patients.

  2. Statins and angiogenesis: Is it about connections?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaidakov, Magomed, E-mail: mkhaidakov@uams.edu [Division of Cardiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and VA Medical Center, Little Rock, AR (United States); Wang, Wenze [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Khan, Junaid A.; Kang, Bum-Yong; Hermonat, Paul L. [Division of Cardiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and VA Medical Center, Little Rock, AR (United States); Mehta, Jawahar L., E-mail: Mehtajl@uams.edu [Division of Cardiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and VA Medical Center, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2009-09-25

    Statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, have been shown to induce both angiogenic and angiostatic responses. We attempted to resolve this controversy by studying the effects of two different statins, rosuvastatin and simvastatin, in two different assay systems. In the matrigel angiogenesis assay, both statins enhanced tube formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, p < 0.01 vs. control). In the ex vivo mouse aortic ring sprouting assay, both statins virtually abolished new vessel formation (p < 0.01). As a basic difference between the two models of angiogenesis is dispersed state of endothelial cells vs. compact monolayer, we analyzed influence of statins on endothelial junction proteins. RT-PCR analysis and cytoimmunostaining of HUVECs treated with simvastatin revealed increased expression of VE-cadherin (p < 0.05). The blockade of VE-cadherin with a specific antibody reversed simvastatin-induced tube formation (p < 0.002). These data suggest that statins through VE-cadherin stimulation modulate cell-cell adhesion and diminish the ability of cells to proliferate and migrate. The observations of reduced angiogenesis in the intact vessel may relate to anti-atherosclerotic and anti-cancer effects of statins, and provide a feasible explanation for conflicting data under different experimental conditions.

  3. Equity in statin use in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norris P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Preventive medications such as statins are used to reduce cardiovascular risk. There is some evidence to suggest that people of lower socioeconomic position are less likely to be prescribed statins. In New Zealand, Maori have higher rates of cardiovascular disease. AIM: This study aimed to investigate statin utilisation by socioeconomic position and ethnicity in a region of New Zealand. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study in which data were collected on all prescriptions dispensed from all pharmacies in one city during 2005/6. Linkage with national datasets provided information on patients' age, gender and ethnicity. Socioeconomic position was identified using the New Zealand Index of Socioeconomic Deprivation 2006. RESULTS: Statin use increased with age until around 75 years. Below age 65 years, those in the most deprived socioeconomic areas were most likely to receive statins. In the 55-64 age group, 22.3% of the most deprived population received a statin prescription (compared with 17.5% of the mid and 18.6% of the least deprived group. At ages up to 75 years, use was higher amongst Maori than non-Maori, particularly in middle age, where Maori have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. In the 45-54 age group, 11.6% of Maori received a statin prescription, compared with 8.7% of non-Maori. DISCUSSION: Statin use approximately matched the pattern of need, in contrast to other studies which found under-treatment of people of low socioeconomic position. A PHARMAC campaign to increase statin use may have increased use in high-risk groups in New Zealand.

  4. Adverse effects of statins - myths and reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimić, Iveta; Reiner, Željko

    2015-01-01

    Statins reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity as well as cardiovascular events in patients with a very high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and also in subjects with high or moderate risk by reducing the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Although they are considered to be drugs with a very good safety profile, because of their wide use there are many concerns that their adverse effects might compromise their proven beneficial effects. Therefore this article reviews all the data and provides an evidence- based insight what are the proven adverse effects of statins and what are the "myths" about them. The most important side effects include myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Another side effect is increased activity of liver tests which occurs occasionally and is reversible. However, recent studies even suggest that statin therapy can improve hepatic steatosis. It is beyond any doubt that statins do slightly increase the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in people with two or more components of metabolic syndrome but the cardiovascular benefits of such a treatment by far exceed this risk. Statin therapy has also been associated with some adverse renal effects, eg. acute renal failure, but recent data suggest even a possible protective effect of these drugs on renal dysfunction. Concerns that statins might increase cancer have not been proven. On the contrary, several studies have indicated a possible benefit of these drugs in patients with different types of cancer. Early concerns about cognitive dysfunction and memory loss associated with statins use could not be proven and most recent data even suggest a possible beneficial effect of statins in the prevention of dementia. Systematic reviews and clinical guidelines suggest that the cardiovascular benefits of statins by far out-weight non-cardiovascular harms in patients with cardiovascular risk.

  5. Non-response to (statin) therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trompet, S; Postmus, I; Slagboom, P E

    2016-01-01

    : Baseline characteristics of non-responders to statin therapy (≤10 % LDL-C reduction) were compared with those of high responders (>40 % LDL-C reduction) through a linear regression analysis. In addition, pharmacogenetic candidate gene analysis was performed to show the effect of excluding non......-responders from the analysis. RESULTS: Non-responders to statin therapy were younger (p = 0.001), more often smoked (p ....035) compared to subjects who highly responded to pravastatin treatment. Moreover, excluding non-responders from pharmacogenetic studies yielded more robust results, as standard errors decreased. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that non-responders to statin therapy are more likely to actually be non...

  6. LDL Cholesterol, Statins And PCSK 9 Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjiv

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) is of vital importance for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Statin is the most effective therapy today to lower LDLc by inhibiting HMG-CoA-reductase. However despite intensive statin therapy, there remains a residual risk of recurrent myocardial infarction in about 20–30% cases. Moreover a few patients develop statin intolerance. For severe hypercholesterolemia, statins alone or in combination of ezetimibe, niacin and fenofibrate have been advocated. For homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HOFH), a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein MTP inhibitor (Lopitamide) and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) (Mipomersen) have recently been approved by FDA, USA through ‘Risk evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS)’. Possible future therapies include PCSK-9 inhibitors which have excellent lipid lowering properties. Three monoclonal antibodies (PCSK 9 Inhibitors) alirocumab, evolocumab and Bococizumab are under advanced clinical stage IV trials and awaiting approval by FDA and European Medicines Agency. PMID:26432726

  7. Statin adverse effects: sorting out the evidence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mlodinow, Steven G; Onysko, Mary K; Vandiver, Jeremy W; Hunter, Melissa L; Mahvan, Tracy D

    2014-01-01

    ... has a prominent family history of heart disease. Mr. L agrees to take a low-dose statin, and you prescribe atorvastatin 10 mg and a thiazide diuretic. You advise the patient to contact you imme...

  8. [Statins in the management of dyslipidemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2011-10-01

    Statins, combined with life-style advices, have a key position in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. By inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase enzyme, these medications reduce total and LDL cholesterol levels in a dose-dependent manner. They also exert various pleiotropic effects that may contribute to the cardiovascular protection. Although some differences exist between available statins, a class effect seems predominant. Statins have proven their efficacy in numerous controlled randomized trials (recently pooled in meta-analyses), both in primary and secondary prevention, including various specific populations, among them patients with diabetes. Tolerance and safety profile is rather good even if muscular and hepatic adverse events may occur. The prescription of statins should target high-risk individuals and both therapeutic inertia and drug non-compliance should be avoided.

  9. [Are statins a therapeutic alternative in sepsis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Rivera-Buendía, Santos; Carrillo-Córdova, Jorge Raúl; Carrillo-Córdova, Luis Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Sepsis continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Evidence is emerging from observational studies and basic science research that statins might be associated with reduced mortality in sepsis. Statins have diverse immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory properties independent of their lipid-lowering ability. The protective association between statins and sepsis persisted in high-risk subgroups including patients with diabetes mellitus, those with malignancy, and those receiving steroids. This review discusses the basis of these observations and the current place of statin therapy in patients with sepsis. This is a rapidly growing field of fascinating experimental biology. It suggests an urgent need to investigate the pharmacology of these drugs and reappraise their therapeutic indications in critically ill patients. If this finding is supported by prospective controlled trials, statins may play an important role in sepsis related mortality. By the other hand statins are significantly cheaper than other therapies that have been shown to improve outcome in sepsis, and the demonstration of mortality benefit would have enormous cost-benefit implication.

  10. A review on the use of statins and tocotrienols, individually or in combination for the treatment of osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Majeed, Saif; Mohamed, Norazlina; Soelaiman, Ima-Nirwana

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal tissue undergoes continuous remodeling which makes it unique among other body tissues. Osteoporosis is a common bone metabolic disorder affecting both men and women. Osteoporosis and its complications mainly osteoporotic fractures, have a high impact on health and economy. Current approved medications are associated with numerous side effects, which limit their use. Identification of a new and safe therapy is mandatory. Statins, also known as HMGCoA reductase inhibitors, are frequently used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and for the prevention of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease. Statins improved bone health status in intact and ovariectomised rodents following high clinically intolerable oral doses. However, this beneficial effect of statins could not be significantly demonstrated in humans. The reason behind this discrepancy might be due to the safety and bioavailability of the currently used oral statins. Vitamin E, especially the tocotrienols at the dose 60 mg/kg/day provided significant antiosteoporotic effects in different animal models of osteoporosis. The use of the aforementioned dose of tocotrienols was shown to be safe in both humans and animals. Enhancement of bone formation and reduction of bone resorption were achieved more effectively by a combination of tocotrienols and statins than by either treatment when supplemented separately at clinically tolerable doses. Therefore, the adverse effects associated with high statin doses might be avoided with the coadministration of tocotrienols. Moreover, the combination therapy strategy might be useful for patients who are at high risk of osteoporosis, cardiovascular events and hypercholesterolaemia.

  11. Comparison of effects of different statins on growth and steroidogenesis of rat ovarian theca-interstitial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokalska, Anna; Stanley, Scott D; Villanueva, Jesus A; Ortega, Israel; Duleba, Antoni J

    2014-02-01

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the cellular production of cholesterol and other products of the mevalonate pathway. Statins exert hepatic and extrahepatic effects, modulating the function of various tissues and organs, including ovaries. Previously, we have demonstrated that simvastatin inhibited cellular proliferation and reduced androgen production by ovarian theca-interstitial cells. The above actions are of translational relevance to the most common endocrine disorder among women in reproductive age: polycystic ovary syndrome. However, different statins may have distinctly different profiles of effects on cholesterol and androgens. The present study was designed to compare the effects of several statins on growth and steroidogenesis of rat theca-interstitial cells. The cells were incubated in the absence (control) or in the presence of simvastatin, lovastatin, atorvastatin, or pravastatin. Assessment of effects of statins on cell growth was carried out by evaluation of DNA synthesis and by estimation of the number of viable cells. Effects on steroidogenesis were evaluated by quantification of steroid production and expression of mRNA for the key enzyme regulating androgen production: Cyp17a1. Among tested statins, simvastatin exerted the greatest inhibitory effects on all tested parameters. The rank order of the effects of the tested statins is as follows: simvastatin > lovastatin > atorvastatin ≥ pravastatin. While the lipophilicity is likely to play a major role in determining the ability of statins to act on nonhepatic cells, other factors unique to individual cell types are also likely to be relevant.

  12. Statin use in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Sheena K; Roos, Matt G; Landry, Gregory J

    2016-12-01

    Statins are recommended for use in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) to reduce cardiovascular events and mortality. However, much of the data regarding benefits of statins stem from the cardiovascular literature. Here, we review the literature regarding statin use specifically in patients with PAD regarding its effects on cardiovascular events and mortality, limb-related outcomes, statin use after endovascular interventions, statin dosing, and concerns about statins. We performed a literature review using PubMed for literature after the year 2000. Search terms included "statins," "peripheral arterial disease," "peripheral vascular disease," "lipid-lowering medication," and "cardiovascular disease." There is good evidence of statins lowering cardiovascular events and cardiovascular-related mortality in patients with PAD. Though revascularization rates were reduced with statins, amputation rates and amputation-free survival did not improve. Small randomized controlled trials show that patients taking statins can slightly improve pain-free walking distance or pain-free walking time, although the extent of the effect on quality of life is unclear. Statin use for patients undergoing endovascular interventions is recommended because of the reduction of postoperative cardiovascular events. Not enough data exist to support local effects of systemic statin therapy, such as prevention of restenosis. For statin dosing, there is little increased benefit to intense therapy compared with the adverse effects, whereas moderate-dose therapy has significant benefits with very few adverse effects. Adverse effects of moderate-dose statin therapy are rare and mild and are greatly outweighed by the cardiovascular benefits. There is strong evidence to support use of statins in patients with PAD to reduce cardiovascular events and mortality. Use in patients undergoing open and endovascular interventions is also recommended. Statin use may reduce the need for

  13. High-intensity Statin Treatments in Clinically Stable Patients on Aspirin Monotherapy 12 Months After Drug-eluting Stent Implantation: A Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eui; Cho, Yun-Hyeong; Suh, Yongsung; Cho, Deok-Kyu; Her, Ae-Young; Kim, Yong Hoon; Lee, Kyounghoon; Kang, Woong Chol; Yun, Kyeong Ho; Yoo, Sang-Yong; Cheong, Sang-Sig; Shin, Dong-Ho; Ahn, Chul-Min; Kim, Jung-Sun; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2017-07-14

    Current guidelines on the treatment of blood cholesterol recommend continuous maintenance of high-intensity statin treatment in drug-eluting stent (DES)-treated patients. However, high-intensity statin treatment is frequently underused in clinical practice after stabilization of DES-treated patients. Currently, the impact of continuous high-intensity statin treatment on the incidence of late adverse events in these patients is unknown. We investigated whether high-intensity statin treatment reduces late adverse events in clinically stable patients on aspirin monotherapy 12 months after DES implantation. Clinically stable patients who underwent DES implantation 12 months previously and received aspirin monotherapy were randomly assigned to receive either high-intensity (40mg atorvastatin, n = 1000) or low-intensity (20mg pravastatin, n = 1000) statin treatment. The primary endpoint was adverse clinical events at 12-month follow-up (a composite of all death, myocardial infarction, revascularization, stent thrombosis, stroke, renal deterioration, intervention for peripheral artery disease, and admission for cardiac events). The primary endpoint at 12-month follow-up occurred in 25 patients (2.5%) receiving high-intensity statin treatment and in 40 patients (4.1%) receiving low-intensity statin treatment (HR, 0.58; 95%CI, 0.36-0.92; P = .018). This difference was mainly driven by a lower rate of cardiac death (0 vs 0.4%, P = .025) and nontarget vessel myocardial infarction (0.1 vs 0.7%, P = .033) in the high-intensity statin treatment group. Among clinically stable DES-treated patients on aspirin monotherapy, high-intensity statin treatment significantly reduced late adverse events compared with low-intensity statin treatment. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01557075. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Ischemic heart disease: effectiveness and safety of statin treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ischemic heart disease: effectiveness and safety of statin treatment in a malaysian tertiary healthcare facility. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... and safety of statins in ischemic heart disease (IHD) patients in a Malaysian tertiary ...

  15. Statins in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Ji Sung

    2015-01-01

    Statins have pleiotropic effects of potential neuroprotection. However, because of lack of large randomized clinical trials, current guidelines do not provide specific recommendations on statin initiation in acute ischemic stroke (AIS...

  16. Whether Statins Cut Alzheimer's Risk May Depend on Gender, Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... brain. An expert in aging research, Dr. Eric Larson, executive director of the Group Health Research Institute ... statins." What should people who use statins do? Larson said, "People who have high levels of cholesterol ...

  17. Impact of vitamin D status on statin-induced myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista D. Riche, Pharm.D.

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Vitamin D status may be considered a modifiable risk factor for muscle-related adverse effects of statins, and supplementation of vitamin D (particularly when ⩽20 ng/mL may improve statin tolerance.

  18. Is the 'Anti-Statin' Trend Threatening Lives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 7,600 patients who switched to a different statin medication following an adverse event. About 26 percent of the patients reported an adverse reaction to the second statin drug, but more than 80 percent kept taking ...

  19. An Overview of Statins as Hypolipidemic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao K.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a wealth of evidence suggesting association between Dyslipidemia and Heart Failure. Statins are the treatment of choice for the management of Dyslipidemia because of their proven efficacy and safety profile. They also have an increasing role in managing cardiovascular risk in patients with relatively normal levels of plasma cholesterol. The article reviews the role of Statins in the treatment of Dyslipidemia. Although all statins act by act by blocking the HMG-CoA reductase enzyme, which catalyzes the rate-limiting, step in de novo cholesterol synthesis, they differ in terms of their chemical structures, pharmacokinetic profiles, and lipid-modifying efficacy. Lovastatin, Pravastatin and Simvastatin are derived from fungal metabolites and have elimination half-lives of 1–3 h. Atorvastatin, Cerivastatin (withdrawn from clinical use in 2001, Fluvastatin, Pitavastatin and Rosuvastatin are fully synthetic compounds, with elimination half-lives ranging from 1 h for Fluvastatin to 19 h for Rosuvastatin. As a class, statins are generally well tolerated and serious adverse events, including muscle toxicity leading to rhabdomyolysis, are rare. Consideration of the differences between the statins helps to provide a rational basis for their use in clinical practice.

  20. Statin Induced Myopathy a Patient with Multiple Systemic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Özgül Uçar; İbrahim Kocaoğlu; Ahmet Karagöz; Serkan Gökaslan

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) are the most successful class of drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and dyslipidaemia. However, the popular profile of statins in terms of efficacy has been maligned by theiradverse effects. Statin induced myopathy, which can be seen at any time during the course of therapy, is a clinically important cause of statin intolerance and discontinuation. When a patient with multiple systemic diseases who use numerous medi...

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    Items 1 - 50 of 600 ... ... Metals in the Water and Sediment from Challawa Gorge Dam, Kano, Nigeria ... Vol 7, No 1 (2014), Tiger Nut (Cyperus Esculentus): Composition, Products, Uses and ... Vol 5, No 1 (2012), In Vitro Antiplasmodial Activity and Cytotoxicity of ... List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access.

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    Items 151 - 200 of 373 ... South African Journal of Surgery. ... Vol 54, No 3 (2016), Instilling a culture of safety for laparoscopic ... VS Karthikeyan, P Dhanasekar, SC Sistla, MS Ali, .... Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access. Featuring ...

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    Items 1 - 50 of 158 ... Vol 6, No 2 (2014), A Novel Surgical Pre-suturing Technique for the Management ... VS Parelkar, JL Patel, BV Sanghvi, PB Joshi, SK Sahoo, N Sampat, SN Oak, N Sathe ... an Inguinal Hernia Incision in Simultaneous Laparoscopic Anterior .... List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access.

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    Items 1 - 50 of 77 ... Vol 12, No 1 (2012), Anaesthesia for Surgical Outreach in a Rural ... Trauma Patients with the Hip Flexed Versus Non Flexed (Hamstring Position), Abstract ... following laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a randomized prospective study, Abstract .... List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access.

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    Items 1 - 50 of 162 ... Vol 8, No 1 (2012), A descriptive Survey on Teachers' Perception of EFL Writing ... Vol 12, No 2 (2017), An assessment of mathematics classroom teaching- learning process: ... Vol 3, No 2 (2008), Andragogical Approach for Sustainable .... List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access.

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    Items 151 - 200 of 411 ... Browse Title Index ... Issue, Title ... Vol 1, No 1 (2012), From Theory into Practice: Theatre-in-Education and Child ... Vol 1, No 4 (2012), Inflation - Adjusted Accounting and Corporate Value Redefinition: Fixing Nigeria ...

  7. Statin Lactonization by Uridine 5'-Diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirris, T.J.J.; Ritschel, T.; Bilos, A.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that have proven to be effective in lowering the risk of major cardiovascular events. Although well tolerated, statin-induced myopathies are the most common side effects. Compared to their pharmacologically active acid form, statin lactones are more potent indu

  8. Balancing Primary Prevention and Statin-Induced Diabetes Mellitus Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlani, Yogita; Kattoor, Ajoe John; Pothineni, Naga Venkata; Palagiri, Raga Deepak Reddy; Romeo, Francesco; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2017-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), a modern-day epidemic, is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is believed that statins elevate the risk of incident DM. Multiple trials were suggestive of the hyperglycemic effect of long-term statin use. This has prompted the Food and Drug Administration to include the risk of DM in the product label of statins. New-onset DM with statin use is biologically plausible and can be explained based on the multiple pathways in glucose metabolism affected by statins. Most pivotal clinical trials on statins were not powered to adequately assess the risk of incident DM with statin use, and the results from multiple meta-analyses are mixed. Currently, the US Preventive Services Task Force recommend the use of statins for primary prevention in patients with at least 1 cardiovascular risk factor and a 10-year risk of >7.5%. With the new American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the number of patients eligible for statin therapy has increased exponentially, which also calls for caution and increased vigilance in prescribing physicians regarding the controversies surrounding statin use. This article aims to highlight the existing data on statin use for primary prevention in diabetics and nondiabetics and the association of statins use with new-onset DM and its postulated mechanisms. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. [Broader indication for treatment with statins; the 'heart protection study'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalenhoef, A.F.H.; Stuyt, P.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The introduction of statins has been a breakthrough in the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia. Statins are safe and effective in reducing the risk of coronary heart disease in the general population. The 'Heart protection study' has provided evidence for the benefit of statin treatment in much broad

  10. Antioxidative actions of statins: potential mechanisms for antiathersclerotic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takanori; Yasunari, Kenichi; Nakamura, Munehoro

    2006-05-01

    Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase (statins) are widely used for the prevention of atherosclerotic diseases. The effects of statins on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by in vitro and in vivo were studied. Administration of statins significantly decreased ROS generation in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Effects of Statins on Cardiorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shusuke Yagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease and renal disease have a close relationship that forms a vicious cycle as a cardiorenal syndrome (CRS. Oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular inflammation could be therapeutic targets when the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is activated by accumulation of conventional cardiovascular risk factors; however, a strategy for management of CRS has not been established yet. Statins, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, have not only cholesterol-lowering effects but also pleiotropic effects on cardiovascular systems, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects and improvement of nitric oxide bioavailability. Since recent studies have indicated that statins have beneficial effects on chronic kidney disease and heart failure as well as coronary artery disease in cholesterol-lowering-dependent/independent manners, treatment with statins might be a successful strategy for preventing deterioration of CRS.

  12. Statin use and Parkinson's disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritz, Beate; Manthripragada, Angelika D; Qian, Lei

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether statin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor) use is associated with risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in Denmark. We identified 1,931 patients with a first time diagnosis of PD reported in hospital or outpatient clinic...... records between 2001 and 2006. We density matched to these patients 9,651 population controls by birth year and sex relying on the Danish population register. For every participant, we identified pharmacy records of statin and anti-Parkinson drug prescriptions since 1995 and before index date from...... a prescription medication use database for all Danish residents. Whenever applicable, the index dates for cases and their corresponding controls were advanced to the date of first recorded prescription for anti-Parkinson drugs. In our primary analyses, we excluded all statin prescriptions 2-years before PD...

  13. Statin-induced autoimmune necrotizing myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Ząber

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Myositides comprise a large group of disorders involving limb muscle weakness. In differential diagnosis we have to consider idiopathic myositides, myositides associated with other diseases, and those induced by external factors, e.g. drug-induced. Statins are commonly used drugs, but many patients experience a broad spectrum of adverse effects including symptoms from skeletal muscle. Physicians should pay special attention to patients reporting muscle weakness lasting longer than 12 weeks, despite statin withdrawal, as well as other symptoms: dysphagia, disturbed grip function, elevated creatinine kinase (CK levels and abnormal electromyography. The reported case deals with the problem of differential diagnosis of drug-induced muscle injury, polymyositis with a recently reported myopathy – statin-induced autoimmune necrotizing myositis, related to anti-HMGCR antibodies.

  14. The use of statins in primary prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stürzlinger, Heidi

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of statins in secondary prevention of cardiovascular events is well established. However, there is ongoing discussion about the use of statins in the context of primary prevention. Moreover statins - besides cholesterol-lowering effects - are assumed to have pleiotropic effects. Positive impacts on diseases like stroke, Alzheimer's disease or osteoporosis are discussed but still have to be proven. Objectives: The aim of this report is first to investigate the efficacy and effectiveness of statins in primary prevention of cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular events and second to examine the economic implications for Germany - particularly in comparison to existing prevention programs. Finally ethical questions are considered. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed for the period between 1998 and 2004 which yielded 3704 abstracts. Overall 43 articles were included for assessment and 167 for background information, according to predefined selection criteria. Results: Most studies within the context of primary prevention describe significant risk reductions with regard to cardiovascular events; yet no significant results according to the reduction of the overall mortality rate can be seen. With respect to stroke, osteoporosis and Alzheimer's disease results are inconsistent. Regarding cost-effectiveness of primary prevention with statins results turn out to be inconsistent as well or even negative for populations with low to moderate risk. For groups with high cardiovascular risk the intervention is mostly assessed to be cost-effective. No cost-effectiveness study for Germany was found. According to a rough estimate of future expenses statin drug expenses of the German legal health insurance might increase at least by 50% in the case of an enlargement of the group of recipients. Discussion: To thoroughly estimate the cost-effectiveness of the use of statins in primary prevention in Germany a model calculation

  15. A clinical evaluation of statin pleiotropy: statins selectively and dose-dependently reduce vascular inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, E van der; Koning, G.G.; Vriens, P.W.H.E.; Peeters, M.F.; Meijer, C.A.; Kortekaas, K.E.; Dalman, R.L.; Bockel, J.H. van; Hanemaaijer, R.; Kooistra, T.; Kleemann, R.; Lindeman, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Statins are thought to reduce vascular inflammation through lipid independent mechanisms. Evaluation of such an effect in atherosclerotic disease is complicated by simultaneous effects on lipid metabolism. Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are part of the atherosclerotic spectrum of diseases. Unlike

  16. Genetically Guided Statin Therapy on Statin Perceptions, Adherence, and Cholesterol Lowering: A Pilot Implementation Study in Primary Care Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine H. Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Statin adherence is often limited by side effects. The SLCO1B1*5 variant is a risk factor for statin side effects and exhibits statin-specific effects: highest with simvastatin/atorvastatin and lowest with pravastatin/rosuvastatin. The effects of SLCO1B1*5 genotype guided statin therapy (GGST are unknown. Primary care patients (n = 58 who were nonadherent to statins and their providers received SLCO1B1*5 genotyping and guided recommendations via the electronic medical record (EMR. The primary outcome was the change in Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire, which measured patients’ perceived needs for statins and concerns about adverse effects, measured before and after SLCO1B1*5 results. Concurrent controls (n = 59 were identified through the EMR to compare secondary outcomes: new statin prescriptions, statin utilization, and change in LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c. GGST patients had trends (p = 0.2 towards improved statin necessity and concerns. The largest changes were the “need for statin to prevent sickness” (p < 0.001 and “concern for statin to disrupt life” (p = 0.006. GGST patients had more statin prescriptions (p < 0.001, higher statin use (p < 0.001, and greater decrease in LDL-c (p = 0.059 during follow-up. EMR delivery of SLCO1B1*5 results and recommendations is feasible in the primary care setting. This novel intervention may improve patients’ perceptions of statins and physician behaviors that promote higher statin adherence and lower LDL-c.

  17. Statins in oncological research: from experimental studies to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubatka, Peter; Kruzliak, Peter; Rotrekl, Vladimir; Jelinkova, Sarka; Mladosievicova, Beata

    2014-12-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors are commonly used drugs in the treatment of dyslipidemias, primarily raised cholesterol. Recently, many epidemiological and preclinical studies pointed to anti-tumor properties of statins, including anti-proliferative activities, apoptosis, decreased angiogenesis and metastasis. These processes play an important role in carcinogenesis and, therefore, the role of statins in cancer disease is being seriously discussed among oncologists. Anti-neoplastic properties of statins combined with an acceptable toxicity profile in the majority of individuals support their further development as anti-tumor drugs. The mechanism of action, current preclinical studies and clinical efficacy of statins are reviewed in this paper. Moreover, promising results have been reported regarding the statins' efficacy in some cancer types, especially in esophageal and colorectal cancers, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Statins' hepatotoxicity has traditionally represented an obstacle to the prescription of this class of drugs and this issue is also discussed in this review.

  18. Mechanisms of the statins cytotoxicity in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, Narges; Heidari, Reza; Azarmi, Yadollah; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2013-06-01

    Statins are potent drugs, used as lipid-lowering agents in cardiovascular diseases. Hepatotoxicity is one of the serious adverse effects of statins, and the exact mechanism of hepatotoxicity is not yet clear. In this study, the cytotoxic effects of the most commonly used statins, that is, atorvastatin, lovastatin, and simvastatin toward isolated rat hepatocytes, were evaluated. Markers, such as cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial membrane potential, and the amount of reduced and oxidized glutathione in the statin-treated hepatocytes, were investigated. It was found that the statins caused cytotoxicity toward rat hepatocytes dose dependently. An elevation in ROS formation, accompanied by a significant amount of lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial depolarization, was observed. Cellular glutathione reservoirs were decreased, and a significant amount of oxidized glutathione was formed. This study suggests that the adverse effect of statins toward hepatocytes is mediated through oxidative stress and the hepatocytes mitochondria play an important role in the statin-induced toxicity.

  19. Browse Title Index

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    Items 1 - 50 of 319 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 6, No 1 (2006), Analysis of staff training activities of Borno States Agricultural ... oil companies on the chieftaincy institution in Bayelsa State, Nigeria, Abstract PDF.

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    Items 101 - 111 of 111 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 6, No 2 (2016), Uses of systemic approach and chemist's triangle in ... nomenclature: Effect on senior secondary students' performance in rivers state of ...

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    Items 51 - 100 of 183 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Exploring the job satisfaction and organisational commitment of employees in ... Job insecurity, organisational commitment and work engagement among staff in ...

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    Items 451 - 500 of 1075 ... Browse Title Index ... EL Stellenberg, V Corfield ... programme on coronary artery disease risk in male employees ... Vol 14, No 4 (2008):, Influence of exercise on preconception, pregnant women, the development ...

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    Items 151 - 200 of 200 ... Vol 4, No 1 (2009), Review Article - Book title: Oral tradition as history ... and Argentina in comparison with Nigeria's 2014 pension reform act, Abstract .... quantitative and qualitative techniques in sociological research: a ...

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    Items 401 - 450 of 1075 ... Issue, Title ... beliefs about causes of sport success among Malaysian athletes, Abstract ... Vol 22, No 3:1 (2016), Golf tourism in South Africa: Profiling ... Cup's greening programmes and implications for environmental ...

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    Items 1 - 50 of 65 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index .... Vol 20, No 1 (2013), Implementation of Broad-Based Black Economic ... from the lean construction perspective: A focus on supply chain management, Abstract PDF.

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    Items 1 - 50 of 145 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 16, No 2 (2008), Access to and use of computers among clinical dental ... of undergraduate clinical dental students towards orthodontics and orthodontists in a ...

  9. Genetically Guided Statin Therapy on Statin Perceptions, Adherence, and Cholesterol Lowering: A Pilot Implementation Study in Primary Care Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Josephine H; Joy, Scott V.; Haga, Susanne B.; Orlando, Lori A.; Kraus, William E.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Deepak Voora

    2014-01-01

    Statin adherence is often limited by side effects. The SLCO1B1*5 variant is a risk factor for statin side effects and exhibits statin-specific effects: highest with simvastatin/atorvastatin and lowest with pravastatin/rosuvastatin. The effects of SLCO1B1*5 genotype guided statin therapy (GGST) are unknown. Primary care patients (n = 58) who were nonadherent to statins and their providers received SLCO1B1*5 genotyping and guided recommendations via the electronic medical record (EMR). The pri...

  10. Statins: Cholesterol guidelines and Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil S Menon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins have become an important drug in preventing the occurrence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD. The effectiveness of statins in reducing ASCVD has been established in large-scale clinical trials. The lipid management guidelines have been periodically modified due to accumulating evidence about the proportionate benefit achieved with a progressive reduction in cholesterol levels with higher doses of statins and even in those at low risk of development of ASCVD. The current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines have based its recommendations from data gathered exclusively from randomized controlled trials. It has simplified the use of statins, but also raised questions regarding the validity of its cardiovascular event risk prediction tool. Epidemiology of cardiovascular disease in India differs from the western population; there is an increased the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and atherogenic dyslipidemia phenotype a group not addressed in the current guidelines. The guidelines are based on trials, which do not have a representative South Asian population. This article reviews the relevant literature, and examines the issues involved in adopting the guidelines to the Indian population.

  11. Statins and the cholesterol mortality paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, José Pedro L

    2017-02-01

    Large-scale randomised controlled trials, carried out in the context of secondary cardiovascular prevention, have shown that statins are superior to placebo: these drugs were shown to decrease cardiovascular events and total mortality. A further set of clinical trials compared high intensity to low/standard intensity LDL cholesterol lowering in the same setting (using either statins or a statin/ezetimibe association). In this case, a decrease in LDL cholesterol and a concomitant significant reduction in cardiovascular events were seen with intensive therapy, however with no change in total mortality. This phenomenon we may term the LDL cholesterol mortality paradox. It could be due either to the prevention (by high-intensity therapy) of episodes not severe enough to lead to the death of patients, or to high-intensity therapy leading to the death of some patients at the same time as preventing the death of others, with a null aggregate effect. Several types of adverse effects have been seen with statin therapy, such as a possible increased incidence of Diabetes mellitus and of myopathy. The decision to start high-intensity LDL cholesterol lowering (rather than low- or moderate-intensity statin treatment) should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, taking into consideration the overall aspects of each patient, including the patient's preferences. High-intensity LDL cholesterol lowering, up to the present moment, has failed to produce a change in overall prognosis (total mortality), and should not therefore be mandatory in secondary cardiovascular prevention. It remains to be seen if a similar LDL cholesterol mortality paradox occurs with new drugs targeting plasma lipids.

  12. Editorial: The HTML Title Tag and Its Importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Noruzi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The Title Tag is an HTML code. The text embedded in the title tag of a web page appears as the title of the web page in search engine results. Moreover, the information contained in a title tag appears as a header or label at the top of the screen in the reverse bar of a web browser window (such as Internet Explorer to present obviously the title of the web page that is being viewed. It should be pointed out that checking the web pages presented as "Untitled Document", indicated that some of them have their unique titles and are not untitled. In other words, search engines present many web pages as untitled documents, while they have their unique titles. The question is why such pages are retrieved in response to the title command (i.e. allintitle:Untitled or intitle:Untitled? This is also true for other search engines, like Yahoo, as we tested the title command on Yahoo (title:Untitled.

  13. Role of Pharmacogenomics in Statin Responsiveness; A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niusha behdad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statins have been used for decades as a successful cholesterol-lowering class of medicines. Statins are widely prescribed for the primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. They reduce cardiovascular risk and improve health outcomes in people with cardiovascular disease. Although statins re considered as a safe medicine and are well tolerated by patients, prediction of an individual patient’s response to statin therapy remains unclear. Variation to statin therapy has been attributed to both environmental and genetic factors. In this review, a number of candidate genes that affect statin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are discussed. Moreover, the association of demographic factors with statin response in related studies is described. In this article we have reviewed the literature concerning pharmacogenetic studies on statin response. Thirty seven English-language clinical trials, prospective or retrospective human investigations, case series, case reports, published between 1998 to 2015, were evaluated. Based on these data, there are some candidate genes that have been established as affecting genes on statin efficacy and suggest that drug therapy, based on individuals’ genetic makeup, may result in a clinically important reduction in variation of statin response.

  14. Role of Statin Drugs for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Cassidy Vu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review the potential role and specific impact of statin drugs in women with PCOS. The evidence for this use of statins in PCOS is limited and still under further investigation.Materials and methods: A search was conducted using PubMed, DynaMed and PubMedHealth databases through October 16, 2016 using the terms polycystic ovary syndrome, PCOS, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA , statin, atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pitavastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin and simvastatin. English-language trials evaluating statins in PCOS were obtained and incorporated if they provided relevant data for providers.Results: We summarize twelve trials involving statins in PCOS. The trials were predominantly 12 weeks to 3 months in length (8 of the 12 trials and low to moderate dose of statin drugs were used. The majority (10 of 12 of the trials show that statins reduce testosterone levels or other androgen hormones (DHEA-S and androstenedione, half of the trials evaluating LH/FSH ratio show an improvement, and all had positive effects on lipid profiles.Conclusion: Statins show promising improvements in serum levels of androgens and LH/FSH ratios translating to improved cardiovascular risk factors above and beyond simply lowering LDL levels. More investigation is needed to determine if statins can clinically impact women with PCOS long term, particularly those who are young and are not yet candidates for traditional preventative treatment with a statin medication. 

  15. Use of Statins by Medicare Beneficiaries Post Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary C. Schroeder PhD

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Even though guidelines strongly recommend that patients receive a statin for secondary prevention after an acute myocardial infarction (MI, many elderly patients do not fill a statin prescription within 30 days of discharge. This paper assesses whether patterns of statin use by Medicare beneficiaries post-discharge may be due to a mix of high-quality and low-quality physicians. Our data come from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS Chronic Condition Data Warehouse (CCW and include 100% of Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized for an acute myocardial infarction in 2008 or 2009. Our study sample included physicians treating at least 10 Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries during their MI institutional stay. Physician-specific statin fill rates (the proportion of each physician’s patients with a statin within 30 days post-discharge were calculated to assess physician quality. We hypothesized that if the observed statin rates reflected a mix of high-quality and low-quality physicians, then physician-specific statin fill rates should follow a u-shaped or bimodal distribution. In our sample, 62% of patients filled a statin prescription within 30 days of discharge. We found that the distribution of statin fill rates across physicians was normal, with no clear distinctions in physician quality. Physicians, especially cardiologists, with relatively younger and healthier patient populations had higher rates of statin use. Our results suggest that physicians were engaging in patient-centered care, tailoring treatments to patient characteristics.

  16. Current treatment of dyslipidaemia: PCSK9 inhibitors and statin intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinas, Konstantinos; Wilhelm, Matthias; Windecker, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Statins are the cornerstone of the management of dyslipidaemias and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Although statins are, overall, safe and well tolerated, adverse events can occur and constitute an important barrier to maintaining long-term adherence to statin treatment. In patients who cannot tolerate statins, alternative treatments include switch to another statin, intermittent-dosage regimens and non-statin lipid-lowering medications. Nonetheless, a high proportion of statin-intolerant patients are unable to achieve recommended low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol goals, thereby resulting in substantial residual cardiovascular risk. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a protease implicated in LDL receptor degradation and plays a central role in cholesterol metabolism. In recent studies, PCSK9 inhibition by means of monoclonal antibodies achieved LDL cholesterol reductions of 50% to 70% across various patient populations and background lipid-lowering therapies, while maintaining a favourable safety profile. The efficacy and safety of the monoclonal antibodies alirocumab and evolocumab were confirmed in statin-intolerant patients, indicating that PCSK9 inhibitors represent an attractive treatment option in this challenging clinical setting. PCSK9 inhibitors recently received regulatory approval for clinical use and may be considered in properly selected patients according to current consensus documents, including patients with statin intolerance. In this review we summarise current evidence regarding diagnostic evaluation of statin-related adverse events, particularly statin-associated muscle symptoms, and we discuss current recommendations on the management of statin-intolerant patients. In view of emerging evidence of the efficacy and safety of PCSK9 inhibitors, we further discuss the role of monoclonal PCSK9 antibodies in the management of statin-intolerant hypercholesterolaemic patients.

  17. A clinical evaluation of statin pleiotropy: statins selectively and dose-dependently reduce vascular inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien van der Meij

    Full Text Available Statins are thought to reduce vascular inflammation through lipid independent mechanisms. Evaluation of such an effect in atherosclerotic disease is complicated by simultaneous effects on lipid metabolism. Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA are part of the atherosclerotic spectrum of diseases. Unlike atherosclerotic occlusive disease, AAA is not lipid driven, thus allowing direct evaluation of putative anti-inflammatory effects. The anti-inflammatory potency of increasing doses (0, 20 or 40 mg/day simvastatin or atorvastatin was evaluated in 63 patients that were at least 6 weeks on statin therapy and who underwent open AAA repair. A comprehensive analysis using immunohistochemistry, mRNA and protein analyses was applied on aortic wall samples collected during surgery. The effect of statins on AAA growth was analyzed in a separate prospective study in incorporating 142 patients. Both statins equally effectively and dose-dependently reduced aortic wall expression of NFκB regulated mediators (i.e. IL-6 (P<0.001 and MCP-1 (P<0.001; shifted macrophage polarization towards a M2 phenotype (P<0.0003; selectively reduced macrophage-related markers such as cathepsin K and S (P<0.009 and 0.0027 respectively, and ALOX5 (P<0.0009, and reduced vascular wall NFκB activity (40 mg/day group, P<0.016. No effect was found on other cell types. Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of statins to reduce AAA progression did not indicate an effect of statins on aneurysm growth (P<0.337. Hence, in the context of AAA the clinical relevance of statins pleiotropy appears minimal.

  18. Susceptibility of clinically important dermatophytes against statins and different statin-antifungal combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyilasi, Ildikó; Kocsubé, Sándor; Krizsán, Krisztina; Galgóczy, László; Papp, Tamás; Pesti, Miklós; Nagy, Katalin; Vágvölgyi, Csaba

    2014-02-01

    The investigation of the antifungal activities of drugs whose primary activities are not related to their antimicrobial potential is in the current forefront of research. Statin compounds, which are routinely used as cholesterol-lowering drugs, may also exert direct antimicrobial effects. In this study, the in vitro antifungal activities of various statins (lovastatin, simvastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, rosuvastatin and pravastatin) were examined against one isolate each of four dermatophyte species (Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton rubrum, Microsporum canis and Microsporum gypseum). Basically, statins were effective in inhibiting all dermatophyte studied, but were particularly active against M. canis and T. mentagrophytes. Fluvastatin and simvastatin were active against all of the tested fungi causing a complete inhibition of their growth at very low concentrations (6.25-12.5 μg/ml). Lovastatin and rosuvastatin had inhibitory effects at higher concentrations (25-128 μg/ml), while atorvastatin and pravastatin proved the less effective. The in vitro interactions between statins and different antifungals (ketoconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole, amphotericin B, nystatin, griseofulvin, terbinafine and primycin) were also investigated using a standard chequerboard broth microdilution method. Synergetic interactions were observed in several cases, most of them were noticed when statins were combined with terbinafine and the different azoles. Some combinations were particularly active (ketoconazole-simvastatin or terbinafine-simvastatin), as they were found to exert synergistic effect against all of the investigated isolates. The other antifungals showed synergistic interactions with statins in only certain cases. These results suggest that statins exert substantial antifungal effects against dermatophyte fungi and they should be promising components in a combination therapy as they can act synergistically with a number of clinically used antifungal

  19. A new perspective on nonprescription statins: an opportunity for patient education and involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Valentin

    2007-09-01

    Education of the public and encouragement of patients' involvement in their own health care have been repeatedly proved effective means of increasing health awareness, promoting lifestyle modifications, and improving early disease detection in a variety of clinical scenarios. Despite substantial efforts from different public and private organizations to educate the population on cardiovascular risk, coronary heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the United States, and its prevalence continues to grow. Therefore, alternative approaches with the potential to elicit a meaningful impact in the community deserve consideration. A nonprescription statin program could provide consumers with a tool of proved benefit in cardiovascular risk prevention. The magnitude of the target population (millions of subjects with intermediate to high risk), as well as the safety and efficacy profile of lovastatin 20 mg, support the consideration of this drug for "over-the-counter" availability. Moreover, a nonprescription statin program could represent a unique opportunity not only to enhance patients' involvement in primary prevention but also to reinforce the education of the public and to encourage interaction with health care providers. The success of such a program will undoubtedly require precise labeling of the risks and benefits of the therapy, as well as active support and participation from major medical organizations. In conclusion, nonprescription statin availability, through enhanced unique patients' involvement, offers the potential for enormous public health benefit.

  20. Adverse events of statin-fenofibric acid versus statin monotherapy: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Qiang; Ren, Jingyi; Chen, Hong; Lee, Chongyou; Liang, Wenqing

    2013-03-01

    Patients with mixed dyslipidemia can benefit from the combination of fenofibric acid (FA) with statins, but concerns about adverse events make physicians reluctant to prescribe the combination therapy. In the present study, we performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the efficacy and adverse events in patients taking statins and FA. Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify studies that reported adverse events. Finally, five trials covering 2704 patients were selected in this study. There were significant decreases in TG and increases in HDL-C in patients receiving combination therapy compared with statin monotherapy. The incidence of hepatic toxicity (OR, 3.57; 95% CI, 1.17-10.83; P statin group than in the corresponding statin monotherapy. The incidence of CK elevations and muscle-associated AEs was not statistically different between the two groups. The adverse events in the FA + moderate-dose statin group were almost identical to those in the FA + low-dose statin group. In conclusion, combination therapy could improve the blood lipid profile. Addition of FA to statins therapy is more frequently associated with hepatic and renal toxicity than muscle-associated AEs. Therefore patients taking the combination of FA with statins should have liver enzyme and renal function monitored. However, we still need large-scale and long follow-up period RCTs to definitively confirm the adverse events of FA-statin therapy.

  1. Statin use before diabetes diagnosis and risk of microvascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of statins in the development of microvascular disease in patients with diabetes is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that statin use increases the risk of diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic nephropathy, and gangrene of the foot in individuals with diabetes...... the cumulative incidence of diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic nephropathy, or gangrene of the foot in statin users versus non-statin users. We analysed data with Cox regression models, adjusted for covariates including sex, age at diabetes diagnosis, and method of diabetes diagnosis. To address...... diabetic neuropathy, 1248 developed diabetic nephropathy, and 2392 developed gangrene of the foot. Compared with non-statin users, statin users had a lower cumulative incidence of diabetic retinopathy (hazard ratio 0·60, 95% CI 0·54-0·66; pdiabetic neuropathy (0·66, 0·57-0·75; p

  2. Novel prospects of statins as therapeutic agents in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanti, Simona; Picardi, Paola; Ciaglia, Elena; D'Alessandro, Alba; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Statins are well known competitive inhibitors of hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase enzyme (HMG-CoA reductase), thus traditionally used as cholesterol-lowering agents. In recent years, more and more effects of statins have been revealed. Nowadays alterations of lipid metabolism have been increasingly recognized as a hallmark of cancer cells. Consequently, much attention has been directed toward the potential of statins as therapeutic agents in the oncological field. Accumulated in vitro and in vivo clinical evidence point out the role of statins in a variety of human malignancies, in regulating tumor cell growth and anti-tumor immune response. Herein, we summarize and discuss, in light of the most recent observations, the anti-tumor effects of statins, underpinning the detailed mode of action and looking for their true significance in cancer prevention and treatment, to determine if and in which case statin repositioning could be really justified for neoplastic diseases.

  3. Pleiotropic vascular protective effects of statins in perioperative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shin-Yuan; Roan, Jun-Neng; Luo, Chwan-Yau; Tsai, Yu-Chuan; Lam, Chen-Fuh

    2013-09-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor (statins) is one of the most commonly prescribed agents for controlling hyperlipidemia. Apart from their lipid-lowering property, statins are well known for their pleiotropic effects, such as improvement of vascular endothelial dysfunction, attenuation of inflammatory responses, stabilization of atherosclerotic plaques, inhibition of vascular smooth muscle proliferation, and modulation of procoagulant activity and platelet function. The vasculo-protective effect of statins is mainly mediated by inhibition of the mevalonate pathway and oxidized low-density lipoprotein generation, thereby enhancing the biosynthesis of endothelium-derived nitric oxide. Accumulating clinical evidence strongly suggests that administration of statins reduces overall mortality, the development myocardial infarction and atrial fibrillation, and length of hospital stay after a major cardiac/noncardiac surgery. This review updates the clinical pharmacology and therapeutic applications of statins during major operations, and highlights the anesthesia considerations for perioperative statin therapy.

  4. Statins lower calcium-induced oxidative stress in isolated mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, A; Parihar, M S; Zenebe, W J; Ghafourifar, P

    2012-04-01

    Statins are widely used cholesterol-lowering agents that exert cholesterol-independent effects including antioxidative. The present study delineates the effects of statins, atorvastatin, and simvastatin on oxidative stress and functions of mitochondria that are the primary cellular sources of oxidative stress. In isolated rat liver mitochondria, both the statins prevented calcium-induced cytochrome c release, lipid peroxidation, and opening of the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT). Both the statins decreased the activity of mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS), lowered the intramitochondrial ionized calcium, and increased the mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Our findings suggest that statins lower intramitochondrial ionized calcium that decreases mtNOS activity, lowers oxidative stress, prevents MPT opening, and prevents the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. These results provide a novel framework for understanding the antioxidative properties of statins and their effects on mitochondrial functions.

  5. Statin Induced Myopathy a Patient with Multiple Systemic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgül Uçar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins are the most successful class of drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and dyslipidaemia. However, the popular profile of statins in terms of efficacy has been maligned by theiradverse effects. Statin induced myopathy, which can be seen at any time during the course of therapy, is a clinically important cause of statin intolerance and discontinuation. When a patient with multiple systemic diseases who use numerous medications represent with myalgia and muscle cramps, statin induced myopathy may not be remembered at first. We present a patient with multiple systemic diseases, alcohol and morphine abuse in whom myopathy developed. After exclusion of other etiologies, we concluded that myopathy was related to statin therapy.

  6. Treatment Options for Statin-Associated Muscle Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufs, Ulrich; Scharnagl, Hubert; Halle, Martin; Windler, Eberhard; Endres, Matthias; März, Winfried

    2015-10-30

    About 4.6 million persons in Germany are now taking statins, i.e., drugs that inhibit the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMGCoA) reductase. Statins lower the concentration of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and thereby lessen the rate of cardiovascular events; the size of this effect depends on the extent of lowering of the LDL cholesterol concentration. Muscle symptoms are a clinically relevant side effect of statin treatment. This review is based on pertinent publications retrieved by a selective literature search, and on the current recommendations of the European Atherosclerosis Society. At least 5% of patients taking statins have statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS). The etiology of SAMS is heterogeneous. SAMS may seriously impair quality of life and cause complications of variable severity, up to and including rhabdomyolysis (in about 1 in 100,000 cases). SAMS often lead to a reduction in the prescribed dose of the statin, while also negatively affecting drug adherence. More than 90% of patients with SAMS can keep on taking statins over the long term and gain the full clinical benefit of statin treatment after a switch to another type of statin or a readjustment of the dose or frequency of administration. If the LDL cholesterol concentration is not adequately lowered while the patient is taking a statin in the highest tolerable dose, combination therapy is indicated. SAMS are important adverse effects of statin treatment because they lessen drug adherence. Patients with SAMS should undergo a thorough diagnostic evaluation followed by appropriate counseling. In most cases, statins can be continued, with appropriate adjustments, even in the aftermath of SAMS.

  7. Statin non-adherence: clinical consequences and proposed solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenson, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Large controlled clinical trials have demonstrated reductions with statin therapy in cardiovascular events in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes and stable coronary heart disease and individuals at high risk of a cardiovascular event. In trials of acute coronary syndromes and stable coronary heart disease, high-intensity statin therapy is more effective in the prevention of recurrent cardiovascular events than low-intensity statin therapy. Thus, evidence-based guidelines recomm...

  8. Statins induce differentiation and cell death in neurons and astroglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    März, Pia; Otten, Uwe; Miserez, André R

    2007-01-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of the hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, the rate limiting enzyme for cholesterol biosynthesis. Experimental and clinical studies with statins suggest that they have beneficial effects on neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, it was of interest to characterize the direct effects of statins on CNS neurons and glial cells. We have treated defined cultures of neurons and astrocytes of newborn rats with two lipophilic statins, atorvastatin and simvastatin, and analyzed their effects on morphology and survival. Treatment of astrocytes with statins induced a time- and dose-dependent stellation, followed by apoptosis. Similarly, statins elicited programmed cell death of cerebellar granule neurons but with a higher sensitivity. Analysis of different signaling cascades revealed that statins fail to influence classical pathways such as Akt or MAP kinases, known to be activated in CNS cells. In addition, astrocyte stellation triggered by statins resembled dibutryl-cyclic AMP (db-cAMP) induced morphological differentiation. However, in contrast to db-cAMP, statins induced upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptors, without affecting GFAP expression, indicating separate underlying mechanisms. Analysis of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway revealed that lack of mevalonate and of its downstream metabolites, mainly geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate (GGPP), is responsible for the statin-induced apoptosis of neurons and astrocytes. Moreover, astrocytic stellation triggered by statins was inhibited by mevalonate and GGPP. Interestingly, neuronal cell death was significantly reduced in astrocyte/neuron co-cultures treated with statins. We postulate that under these conditions signals provided by astrocytes, e.g., isoprenoids play a key role in neuronal survival.

  9. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 522 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 12, No 1 (2006), A clinical comparison of disposable airway devices ... Vol 22, No 2 (2016), A new option in airway management: evaluation of the TotalTrack® ...

  10. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 301 - 350 of 463 ... Issue, Title ... Vol 38, No 2 (2016), Prevalence and effect of developmental ... student expectations for working in the tourism and hospitality industry: A ... Vol 38, No 3 (2016), Relationships among residence environment and individual ... of international physical activity questionnaire, Bahasa Malaysia ...

  11. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 201 - 250 of 426 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 21, No 1 (2016), Maximum potential cost-savings attributable to generic ... Vol 22, No 1 (2017), Movement as a critical concept in model generation to attain ... factors influencing paediatric adherence to anti-retroviral therapy, Abstract PDF.

  12. Titles of Midas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Huxley

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The Phrygian inscription on the tomb at Yazılıkaya (8th century gives Midas the titles wanax and lawagtas, paralled in Mycenaean, and there were strong connections between his dynasty and Greek Aeolis.

  13. Significant improvement in statin adherence and cholesterol levels after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Hilde Vaiva Tonstad; Køhn, Morten Ganderup; Berget, Oline Sofie

    2012-01-01

    Not all patients recovering from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are optimally treated with statin, and their adherence to statin treatment may be inadequate. We set out to describe changes in statin treatment adherence and cholesterol values over time.......Not all patients recovering from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are optimally treated with statin, and their adherence to statin treatment may be inadequate. We set out to describe changes in statin treatment adherence and cholesterol values over time....

  14. Molecular mechanisms of statin-induced myotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Mullen, Peter James

    2011-01-01

    Statins are among the most prescribed drugs in Western countries. They reduce morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease and mitigate the risk of stroke. Their major site of action is the liver, where they inhibit HMG-CoA (hydroxyl-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase, the rate-limiting step in cholesterol biosynthesis. Inhibition of this pathway also inhibits various other processes, such as ubiquinone production and the isoprenylation and N-linked glycosylation of proteins. Alteri...

  15. Clinical review: impact of statin substitution policies on patient outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atar, Dan; Carmena, Rafael; Clemmensen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    , the consequences for primary care are under-researched. Our objective was to review data on intensive statin therapy and generic substitution in patients at high cardiovascular risk. RESULTS: Current treatment guidelines for the prevention of cardiovascular disease are consistent in their recommendations regarding...... and recommended therapeutic targets. CONCLUSIONS: Substitution of generic statins may be cost-saving, particularly at the primary prevention level. However, statin substitution policies have not been adequately studied on a population level. Data raise concern that mandated statin substitution may lead...

  16. Statin use and the risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Patricia; Wysowski, Diane K; Downey, Winanne; Butler-Jones, David

    2003-03-01

    The study objective was to investigate a possible association between statin use and breast cancer (BRCA). An historical cohort design based on Saskatchewan's population health services databases was used. All eligible women with > or = 1 statin prescription from 1989 to mid-1997 and an age-sex-matched nonexposed group were followed up to 8.5 years (mean 4.2 years). Relative rates (RR) of BRCA were estimated and stratified by age, statin exposure time, and prior hormone use. Thirteen thousand five hundred ninety-two statin users and 53,880 nonexposed subjects were identified. Eight hundred seventy-nine incident BRCA cases were identified. Statins were not associated with BRCA risk in women 55 years, the RR for BRCA was 1.15 (0.97, 1.37). Stratified analyses revealed increases in risk in short-term statin users and statin users with long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT) exposure. More studies are needed to determine if short-term statin use and statin use with long-term HRT exposure increases postmenopausal BRCA risk. Published by Elsevier Science Inc.

  17. Statin Side Effects: Weigh the Benefits and Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... interact with statins and increase your risk of side effects include: Amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), a medication for irregular heart rhythms Gemfibrozil (Lopid), another variety of cholesterol drug ...

  18. Statin Intolerance: A Literature Review and Management Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxon, David R; Eckel, Robert H

    Statin intolerance is a commonly encountered clinical problem for which useful management strategies exist. Although many patients report statin-related muscle symptoms, studies indicate that the majority of these patients can tolerate a statin upon re-challenge. Alternative statin dosing strategies are an effective way to modify and reintroduce statin therapy for patients reporting adverse symptoms. Correction of vitamin D deficiency and hypothyroidism may improve statin tolerability in some patients. CoQ10 supplementation has been found to be of no benefit for statin-related muscle symptoms in most recent clinical trials. PCSK9 inhibitors are a new therapeutic option that if confirmed as safe and effective by outcomes trials may be of substantial benefit to select patients at high ASCVD risk who are unable to achieve adequate low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering on maximally tolerated statin therapy. Other available medications to lower LDL-C in statin intolerant patients include ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, and fibrates. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Drug-drug interactions that interfere with statin metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Takeshi; Ieiri, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Lipid-lowering drugs, especially hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), are widely used in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic diseases. The benefits of statins are well documented. However, myotoxic side effects, which can sometimes be severe, including myopathy or rhabdomyolysis, have been associated with the use of statins. In some cases, this toxicity is associated with pharmacokinetic alterations. Potent inhibitors of CYP 3A4 significantly increase plasma concentrations of the active forms of simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin. Fluvastatin is metabolized by CYP2C9, while pravastatin, rosuvastatin and pitavastatin are not susceptible to inhibition by any CYP. This review discusses the pharmacokinetic aspects of the drug-drug interaction with statins and genetic polymorphisms in CYPs, which are involved in the metabolism of statins, and highlights the importance of establishing a system utilizing electronic medical information practically to avoid adverse drug reactions. An understanding of the mechanisms underlying statin interactions will help to minimize drug interactions and develop statins that are less prone to adverse interactions. Quantitatively analyzed information for the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering effects of statin based on electronic medical records may be useful for avoiding the adverse effect of statins.

  20. Statins and their use in preventing carotid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Carotid disease may be evaluated by surrogate outcomes, such as intima-media thickness and carotid plaque features, and by clinical end points. Statins stop progression or may induce regression of intima-media thickness, and statins may also stop plaque growth or even induce reduction of plaque...... volume. Areas rich in lipids within plaques may be reduced in size and/or in number of inflammatory cells. Ultrasound reflectivity may be reduced by statin treatment, indicating less lipid/inflammatory content. Finally, statins appear to reduce the risk of all cardiovascular events (eg, stroke...

  1. Pleiotropic effects of statins: new therapeutic targets in drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Onkar; Dhawan, Veena; Sharma, P L; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-07-01

    The HMG Co-enzyme inhibitors and new lipid-modifying agents expand their new therapeutic target options in the field of medical profession. Statins have been described as the most effective class of drugs to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Since the discovery of the first statin nearly 30 years ago, these drugs have become the main therapeutic approach to lower cholesterol levels. The present scientific research demonstrates numerous non-lipid modifiable effects of statins termed as pleiotropic effects of statins, which could be beneficial for the treatment of various devastating disorders. The most important positive effects of statins are anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, anti-diabetes, and antithrombotic, improving endothelial dysfunction and attenuating vascular remodeling besides many others which are discussed under the scope of this review. In particular, inhibition of Rho and its downstream target, Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK), and their agonistic action on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) can be viewed as the principle mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic effects of statins. With gradually increasing knowledge of new therapeutic targets of statins, their use has also been advocated in chronic inflammatory disorders for example rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the scope of review, we highlight statins and their pleiotropic effects with reference to their harmful and beneficial effects as a novel approach for their use in the treatment of devastating disorders. Graphical abstract Pleiotropic effect of statins.

  2. Management of intracerebral hemorrhage--use of statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Matre, Edward T; Sherman, Deb S; Kiser, Tyree H

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a neurologic injury resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Statins play a significant role in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ischemic events. Despite clear benefits of statins in ischemic stroke, post hoc analyses of some studies suggest there may be a link between statin therapy and development of ICH. Direct pharmacologic effects of decreased serum levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins in conjunction with pleiotropic effects are thought to be linked to this possible increase in ICH risk. In the face of the potential of statins to increase the risk of ICH, recent evidence suggests that statins may also have beneficial effects on patient outcomes when continued or initiated following an ICH. This discordance in findings and the overall lack of well-designed prospective clinical trials increase the complexity of clinical decision making when utilizing statin therapy in patients with, or at risk for, ICH. This review evaluates the pharmacologic effects of statin therapy and describes how these effects translate to both risks and benefits in ICH. The current literature regarding the effects of statin therapy on clinical outcomes in ICH is evaluated to help guide clinicians with decisions regarding initiation, continuation, or discontinuation of statin therapy in patients with ICH.

  3. Statins and prevention of venous thromboembolism: Myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Sébastien; Cordeanu, Eléna-Mihaela; Nouri, Salah; Mirea, Corina; Stephan, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    The pleiotropic effects of statins, beyond their cholesterol-lowering properties, are much debated. In primary prevention, several observational cohort and case-control studies appear to show that statins reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism by about 30%. In a single randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial (JUPITER), which included 17,000 patients, rosuvastatin 20mg/day reduced the risk of venous thromboembolism by 43%. However, these patients were at low risk of venous thromboembolism, and the frequency of the event was, in principle, low. In secondary prevention, several observational studies and post-hoc analyses of randomized clinical trials have suggested that statins may prevent recurrence of venous thromboembolism. However, none of these studies had enough scientific weight to form the basis of a recommendation to use statins for secondary prevention. The putative preventive effect of statins appears to be independent of plasma cholesterol concentration and could be a pharmacological property of the statin class, although a dose-effect relationship has not been demonstrated. The mechanism through which statins might prevent venous thrombosis is thought to involve their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects or perhaps a more specific action, by blocking the degradation of antithrombotic proteins. A mechanism involving the action of statins on interactions between risk factors for atherosclerosis and venous thromboembolism is supported by some studies, but not all. In the absence of firm evidence, statins cannot currently be recommended for primary or secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism.

  4. [The combinations of statins and fibrates: pharmacokinetic and clinical implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Santos, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    With mixed dyslipidemia of the atherogenic dyslipidemia type, once the LDL-c objectives have been achieved through statin treatment, there is often a residual risk, for which the addition of a fibrate is recommended. The combination of statins and fibrates has been limited by the possibility of drug interactions, which mostly result in myopathy. Interactions between statins and other drugs are caused by pharmacokinetic mechanisms, mainly by changing the metabolism of statins in the CYP450 enzyme system, in the hepatic glucuronidation pathway or in the transporters responsible for statin distribution in tissues. The most significant adverse eff ect of statins is myopathy, which can also be induced by fibrates and is more frequent when the 2 drugs (statins and fibrates) are combined. This adverse eff ect manifests clinically as myalgia, muscle weakness, increased CK levels and, in its most severe form, rhabdomyolysis. This interaction mainly aff ects gemfibrozil due to its specific action on the CYP450 enzyme system and that interferes with the hepatic glucuronidation of statins by using the same isoenzymes and with organic anion transporters in the liver. When combining statins, we should use other fibric acid derivatives, preferably fenofibrate.

  5. Statins attenuate polymethylmethacrylate-mediated monocyte activation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, Alan J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Periprosthetic osteolysis precipitates aseptic loosening of components, increases the risk of periprosthetic fracture and, through massive bone loss, complicates revision surgery and ultimately is the primary cause for failure of joint arthroplasty. The anti-inflammatory properties of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors belonging to the statin family are well recognized. We investigated a possible role for status in initiating the first stage of the osteolytic cycle, namely monocytic activation. METHODS: We used an in vitro model of the human monocyte\\/macrophage inflammatory response to poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles after pretreat-ing cells with cerivastatin, a potent member of the statin family. Cell activation based upon production of TNF-alpha and MCP-1 cytokines was analyzed and the intracellular Raf-MEK-ERK signal transduction pathway was evaluated using western blot analysis, to identify its role in cell activation and in any cerivastatin effects observed. RESULTS: We found that pretreatment with cerivastatin significantly abrogates the production of inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and MCP-1 by human monocytes in response to polymethylmethacrylate particle activation. This inflammatory activation and attenuation appear to be mediated through the intracellular Raf-MEK-ERK pathway. INTERPRETATION: We propose that by intervening at the upstream activation stage, subsequent osteoclast activation and osteolysis can be suppressed. We believe that the anti-inflammatory properties of statins may potentially play a prophylactic role in the setting of aseptic loosening, and in so doing increase implant longevity.

  6. Adverse events following statin-fenofibrate therapy versus statin alone: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Qiang; Ren, Jingyi; Chen, Hong; Lee, Chongyou; Liang, Wenqing

    2013-03-01

    The combination of fenofibrate with statins is a beneficial therapeutic option for patients with mixed dyslipidaemia, but concerns about adverse events (AEs) make physicians reluctant to use this combination therapy. Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify 13 randomized controlled trials, involving 7712 patients, of statin-fenofibrate therapy versus statin alone for review. There were significant decreases in low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol and increases in high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in patients receiving combination therapy compared with statin therapy alone. The incidence of aminotransferase elevations in the fenofibrate-statin therapy group was significantly higher than in the statin monotherapy group (odds ratio (OR), 1.66; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17-2.37; P 0.05), muscle-associated AEs (OR 0.98; 95% CI 0.88-1.09; P > 0.05) and withdrawals attributed to liver and muscle dysfunction did not differ significantly between the two groups. The efficacy of fenofibrate + standard-dose statin and incidence of AEs in the fenofibrate + standard-dose statin group were almost identical to those in the fenofibrate-statin group. In conclusion, combination therapy improves the blood lipid profile of patients. Fenofibrate-statin combination therapy appears to be as well tolerated as statin monotherapy. Physicians should consider fenofibrate-statin combination therapy in patients but monitor aminotransferase levels to avoid hepatic complications. © 2013 The Authors Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Statins alleviate experimental nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiang Qun; Lim, Tony K Y; Lee, Seunghwan; Zhao, Yuan Qing; Zhang, Ji

    2011-05-01

    The statins are a well-established class of drugs that lower plasma cholesterol levels by inhibiting HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase. They are widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and for the prevention of coronary heart disease. Recent studies suggest that statins have anti-inflammatory effects beyond their lipid-lowering properties. We sought to investigate whether statins could affect neuropathic pain by mediating nerve injury-associated inflammatory responses. The effects of hydrophilic rosuvastatin and lipophilic simvastatin were examined in the mouse partial sciatic nerve ligation model. Systemic daily administration of either statin from days 0 to 14 completely prevented the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. When administered from days 8 to 14 after injury, both statins dose-dependently reduced established hypersensitivity. After treatment, the effects of the statins were washed out within 2 to 7 days, depending on dose. Effects of both statins in alleviating mechanical allodynia were further confirmed in a different injury-associated neuropathic pain model, mental nerve chronic constriction, in rats. Both statins were able to abolish interleukin-1β expression in sciatic nerve triggered by nerve ligation. Additionally, quantitative analysis with Iba-1 and glial fibrillary acid protein immunoreactivity demonstrated that rosuvastatin and simvastatin significantly reduced the spinal microglial and astrocyte activation produced by sciatic nerve injury. The increase of interleukin-1β mRNA in the ipsilateral side of spinal cords was also reduced by the treatment of either statin. We identified a potential new application of statins in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The pain-alleviating effects of statins are likely attributable to their immunomodulatory effects.

  8. Application and progress of coenzyme Q10 in statin myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo LI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Statins have been widely used, however, the reports of muscle toxicity caused by statins are increasing. Coenzyme Q10 is a quinone substance which is in the cell membrane, and it is important material of intercellular signaling, mitochondrial respiratory chain and muscle activity energy. The myopathic symptoms can be significantly improved by taking coenzyme Q10.

  9. [Statins available from chemist shops will not positively affect health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2007-01-01

    Statins should not become available as over- or behind-the-counter drugs at chemist shops. The efficacy of these drugs when given in low dosages has not been proved although the negative aspect of possible side effects remains a realistic possibility. The use of statins as compensation for an unheal

  10. Preoperative statin therapy and infectious complications in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartholt, N L; Rettig, T C D; Schijffelen, M; Morshuis, W J; van de Garde, E M W; Noordzij, P G

    AIM: To assess whether preoperative statin therapy is associated with the risk of postoperative infection in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. METHODS: 520 patients undergoing cardiac surgery in 2010 were retrospectively examined. Data regarding statin and antibiotic use prior to and after

  11. Use of statins and the risk of rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, H. de; Klungel, O.; Dijk, L. van; Vandebriel, R.; Leufkens, H.; Cohen Tervaert, J.W.; Lovenren, H. van

    2009-01-01

    Background: Statins exert immunomodulatory effects which can cause immune-dysregulation and potentially lead to autoimmune reactions. Objectives: To study the association between use of statins and the risk of incident rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: We conducted a case-control study using The N

  12. Statins in chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassimatis, Theodoros I; Goldsmith, David J A

    2014-10-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) have been shown to improve cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in the general population as well as in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Statins' beneficial effects have been attributed to both cholesterol-lowering and cholesterol-independent "pleiotropic" properties. By their pleiotropic effects statins have been shown to reduce inflammation, alleviate oxidative stress, modify the immunologic responses, improve endothelial function and suppress platelet aggregation. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an enormous increase in CVD rates even from early CKD stages. As considerable differences exist in dyslipidemia characteristics and the pathogenesis of CVD in CKD, statins' CV benefits in CKD patients (including those with a kidney graft) should not be considered unequivocal. Indeed, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statins exert diverse effects on dialysis and non-dialysis CKD patients. Therefore, it seems that statins improve CV outcomes in non-dialysis patients whereas exert little (if any) benefit in the dialysis population. It has also been proposed that dyslipidemia might play a causative role or even accelerate renal injury. Moreover, ample experimental evidence suggests that statins ameliorate renal damage. However, a high quality randomized controlled trial (RCT) and metaanalyses do not support a beneficial role of statins in renal outcomes in terms of proteinuria reduction or retardation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline.

  13. Adherence to preventive statin therapy according to socioeconomic position

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallach-Kildemoes, Helle; Andersen, Morten; Diderichsen, Finn;

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To explore whether long-term adherence to preventive statin therapy depends on socioeconomic position (SEP). METHODS: A cohort of individuals without established cardiovascular disease (CVD) or diabetes initiating preventive statin therapy during 2002-2005 was followed in the individual...

  14. The diabetogenic action of statins - mechanisms and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betteridge, D John; Carmena, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    Treatment with statins has transformed primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), including thrombotic stroke. Evidence-based data demonstrate the benefits and safety of statin therapy and help to guide clinicians in the management of populations at high risk of CVD. Nevertheless, clinical trials, meta-analyses and observational studies highlight a 10-12% increase in new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM) among patients receiving statins. The risk further increases with intensive therapy and among individuals with known risk factors for NODM. Mechanisms underpinning this effect are not yet fully understood; however, Mendelian randomization studies suggest that they are related to lowered activity of HMG-CoA reductase, the target of statin therapy. In vitro research indicates that statins potentially impair β-cell function and decrease insulin sensitivity but how these findings relate to patients is unknown. In the clinic, statins should be prescribed on the basis of CVD risk and individual patient characteristics. In addition, diet and lifestyle interventions should be emphasized to help mitigate the risk of NODM. Individuals who develop NODM while taking statins do not exhibit increased microvascular disease, which is reassuring. In diabetes mellitus of long duration, the effect of statins on glycaemic control is small and unlikely to be clinically important.

  15. Statins Reduce the Risks of Relapse to Addiction in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Claudia; Nicolas, Celine; Lafay-Chebassier, Claire; Jaber, Mohamed; Thiriet, Nathalie; Solinas, Marcello

    2016-05-01

    Statins are drugs that have been used for decades in humans for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. More recently, several lines of evidence demonstrate that statins, in addition to their peripheral effects, produce a wide variety of effects in the brain and may be beneficial in neurological and psychiatric conditions. In this study, we allowed rats to self-administer cocaine for several weeks and, at the end of self-administration training, we treated them with low doses of statins daily for a 21-day period of abstinence. Chronic administration of brain-penetrating statins, simvastatin (1 mg/kg) and atorvastatin (1 mg/kg), reduced cocaine seeking compared with vehicle, whereas administration of pravastatin (2 mg/kg), a statin with low brain penetrability, did not. Importantly, the effects of brain-penetrating statins persisted even after discontinuation of the treatment and were specific for drug seeking because drug taking was not altered by simvastatin treatment. Finally, the effects of simvastatin were found to generalize to another drug of abuse such as nicotine, but not to food reward, and to reinstatement of cocaine seeking induced by stress. These results demonstrate that brain-penetrating statins can reduce risks of relapse to addiction. Given their well-known safety profile in humans, statins could be a novel effective treatment for relapse to cocaine and nicotine addiction and their use could be implemented in clinical settings without major health risks.

  16. Statin use and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemmelund, H; Høgh, A; Hundborg, H H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) is associated with high mortality. Research suggests that statins may reduce abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth and improve rAAA outcomes. However, the clinical impact of statins remains uncertain in relation to both the risk and prognosis...

  17. Relative safety profiles of high dose statin regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Escobar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Escobar, Rocio Echarri, Vivencio BarriosDepartment of Cardiology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Recent clinical trials recommend achieving a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of <100 mg/dl in high-risk and <70 mg/dl in very high risk patients. To attain these goals, however, many patients will need statins at high doses. The most frequent side effects related to the use of statins, myopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and increased levels of transaminases, are unusual. Although low and moderate doses show a favourable profile, there is concern about the tolerability of higher doses. During recent years, numerous trials to analyze the efficacy and tolerability of high doses of statins have been published. This paper updates the published data on the safety of statins at high doses.Keywords: statins, high doses, tolerability, liver, muscle

  18. Können Statine den Knochenstoffwechsel positiv beeinflussen?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vock L

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Statine, potente Inhibitoren der HMG-CoA-Reduktase, werden erfolgreich zur Senkung der Cholesterinblutspiegel eingesetzt. In den letzten Jahren sind jedoch zahlreiche andere Wirkungen der Statine aufgedeckt worden, die möglicherweise für den Knochenstoffwechsel von Bedeutung sind: In vitro konnten faszinierende knochenanabole Wirkungen der Statine bewiesen werden. Welche molekularen Mechanismen für diese Beobachtungen genau verantwortlich sind, ist nach wie vor unklar. Auch konnten in anderen In-vitro-Studien, Tiermodellen und klinischen Studien diese eindrucksvollen Resultate nicht immer bestätigt werden. Das vorliegende Bild der Statine im Knochenstoffwechsel ist uneinheitlich. Viele Fragen bleiben offen. Es fehlen neben genaueren Erkenntnissen über die Eigenschaften der einzelnen Statine auch Resultate besser auf diese Fragestellung zugeschnittener Studien.

  19. Hearing Loss Due to Familial Hypercholesterolemia and Statin Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Oylumlu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that high cholesterol levels might have adverse effects on hearing and interest- ingly statins may have beneficial effects on hearing loss. Herein, we share a dramatic improvement in acute hearing loss by statin administration in a young patient with familial hypercholesterolemia. To our knowledge this is the first report indicating the possible role of statins in patients suffering from sudden hearing loss in the context of familial hypercholesterolemia. Although the statin administra- tion as a therapeutic option for sudden hearing loss needs to be clarified in prospective studies, this case report might shed more light for possible association of dyslipidemia and hearing loss and role of statins in such cases.

  20. The role of statins in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyguła-Jurkiewicz, Bożena; Szczurek, Wioletta; Król, Bogumiła; Zembala, Marian

    2014-09-01

    The efficacy of statins in reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with documented coronary artery disease is unquestionable. However, in chronic heart failure (CHF), evidence regarding the beneficial effects of statin therapy remains contradictory. Although numerous retrospective studies have demonstrated improved prognosis in CHF patients treated with statins, two randomized trials, GISSI-HF and CORONA, have not confirmed the benefit of rosuvastatin in this group of patients. The benefits of using statins in CHF probably result mostly from their pleiotropic action, including the improvement of endothelial function, the inhibition of neurohormonal activation, and the reduction of proinflammatory activation. On the other hand, it has been recognized that low cholesterol is associated with worse morbidity and mortality in patients with CHF. It appears that it is necessary to conduct further randomized clinical trials using different kinds of statins in different populations of patients with CHF.

  1. The role of statins in patients after heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyguła-Jurkiewicz, Bożena; Szczurek, Wioletta; Zembala, Marian

    2015-03-01

    Numerous studies have shown that statin therapy initiated early after heart transplantation improves the short- and long-term prognosis, leading to a reduction in the incidence of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV), acute rejection episodes and significantly lowers the incidence of cancer in this patient population. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the beneficial effects of statins in patients after heart transplantation are complex; the effectiveness of statins is associated not only with their hypolipemic action, but also with their pleiotropic properties. Statins have been shown to exert protective and therapeutic effects against cancer because they act as antiproliferative agents, promoting apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis. Moreover, they reduce the number of circulating monocytes, which inhibits the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, adhesion molecules, chemokines, and matrix metalloproteinases, preventing chronic rejection and CAV. For these reasons, statins should be used as part of standard therapy in patients after heart transplantation.

  2. Statins research unfinished saga: desirability versus feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adler Yehuda

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Drugs in the same class are generally thought to be therapeutically equivalent because of similar mechanisms of action (the so-called "class effect". However, statins differ in multiple characteristics, including liver and renal metabolism, half-life, effects on several serum lipid components, bioavailability and potency. Some are fungal derivatives, and others are synthetic compounds. The percentage absorption of an oral dose, amount of protein binding, degree of renal excretion, hydrophilicity, and potency on a weight basis is variable. These differences may be even greater in diabetic patients, who may present diabetes-induced abnormalities in P450 isoforms and altered hepatic metabolic pathways. Thus, it is obvious that head-to-head comparisons between different statins are preferable than trial-to-trial comparisons. Such assessments are of utmost importance, especially in cases in which specific populations with a distinct lipid profile and altered metabolic pathways, like diabetics, are studied. It should be specially pinpointed that patients with metabolic syndrome and diabetes constitute also a special population regarding their atherogenic dyslipidemia, which is usually associated with low HDL-cholesterol, hypertriglyceridemia and predominance of small dense LDL-cholesterol. Therefore, these patients may benefit from fibrates or combined statin/fibrate treatment. This policy is not accomplished since in the real world things are more complex. Trials would require very large sample sizes and long-term follow-up to detect significant differences in myocardial infarction or death between two different statins. Moreover, the fact that new compounds are under several phases of research and development represents an additional drawback for performing the trials. Ideally, head-to-head trials regarding clinically important outcomes should be conducted for all drugs. Nonetheless, the desirability of performing such trials, which

  3. Pharmacogenomics of statins: understanding susceptibility to adverse effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitzmiller JP

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Joseph P Kitzmiller,1 Eduard B Mikulik,1 Anees M Dauki,2 Chandrama Murkherjee,1 Jasmine A Luzum3 1Department of Biological Chemistry and Pharmacology, College of Medicine, 2College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Michigan College of Pharmacy, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract: Statins are a cornerstone of the pharmacologic treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerotic disease is a predominant cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Statins are among the most commonly prescribed classes of medications, and their prescribing indications and target patient populations have been significantly expanded in the official guidelines recently published by the American and European expert panels. Adverse effects of statin pharmacotherapy, however, result in significant cost and morbidity and can lead to nonadherence and discontinuation of therapy. Statin-associated muscle symptoms occur in ~10% of patients on statins and constitute the most commonly reported adverse effect associated with statin pharmacotherapy. Substantial clinical and nonclinical research effort has been dedicated to determining whether genetics can provide meaningful insight regarding an individual patient’s risk of statin adverse effects. This contemporary review of the relevant clinical research on polymorphisms in several key genes that affect statin pharmacokinetics (eg, transporters and metabolizing enzymes, statin efficacy (eg, drug targets and pathways, and end-organ toxicity (eg, myopathy pathways highlights several promising pharmacogenomic candidates. However, SLCO1B1 521C is currently the only clinically relevant pharmacogenetic test regarding statin toxicity, and its relevance is limited to simvastatin myopathy. Keywords: cholesterol, myopathy, lipids, muscle toxicity, pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenetics

  4. Management of intracerebral hemorrhage – use of statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Matre ET

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Edward T Van Matre,1 Deb S Sherman,2 Tyree H Kiser1,21Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Pharmacy, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, CO, USAAbstract: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is a neurologic injury resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Statins play a significant role in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ischemic events. Despite clear benefits of statins in ischemic stroke, post hoc analyses of some studies suggest there may be a link between statin therapy and development of ICH. Direct pharmacologic effects of decreased serum levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins in conjunction with pleiotropic effects are thought to be linked to this possible increase in ICH risk. In the face of the potential of statins to increase the risk of ICH, recent evidence suggests that statins may also have beneficial effects on patient outcomes when continued or initiated following an ICH. This discordance in findings and the overall lack of well-designed prospective clinical trials increase the complexity of clinical decision making when utilizing statin therapy in patients with, or at risk for, ICH. This review evaluates the pharmacologic effects of statin therapy and describes how these effects translate to both risks and benefits in ICH. The current literature regarding the effects of statin therapy on clinical outcomes in ICH is evaluated to help guide clinicians with decisions regarding initiation, continuation, or discontinuation of statin therapy in patients with ICH.Keywords: intracerebral hemorrhage, statin pharmacology, intracranial hemorrhage, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, pleiotropic effects

  5. Statins in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Ji Sung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Statins have pleiotropic effects of potential neuroprotection. However, because of lack of large randomized clinical trials, current guidelines do not provide specific recommendations on statin initiation in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The current study aims to systematically review the statin effect in AIS. Methods From literature review, we identified articles exploring prestroke and immediate post-stroke statin effect on imaging surrogate markers, initial stroke severity, functional outcome, and short-term mortality in human AIS. We summarized descriptive overview. In addition, for subjects with available data from publications, we conducted meta-analysis to provide pooled estimates. Results In total, we identified 70 relevant articles including 6 meta-analyses. Surrogate imaging marker studies suggested that statin might enhance collaterals and reperfusion. Our updated meta-analysis indicated that prestroke statin use was associated with milder initial stroke severity (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval], 1.24 [1.05-1.48]; P=0.013), good functional outcome (1.50 [1.29-1.75]; P<0.001), and lower mortality (0.42 [0.21-0.82]; P=0.0108). In-hospital statin use was associated with good functional outcome (1.31 [1.12-1.53]; P=0.001), and lower mortality (0.41 [0.29-0.58]; P<0.001). In contrast, statin withdrawal was associated with poor functional outcome (1.83 [1.01-3.30]; P=0.045). In patients treated with thrombolysis, statin was associated with good functional outcome (1.44 [1.10-1.89]; P=0.001), despite an increased risk of symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation (1.63 [1.04-2.56]; P=0.035). Conclusions The current study findings support the use of statin in AIS. However, the findings were mostly driven by observational studies at risk of bias, and thereby large randomized clinical trials would provide confirmatory evidence. PMID:26437994

  6. Atherosclerosis, cholesterol, nutrition, and statins – a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebbers, Jan-Olaf

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, which causes approximately half of all deaths of adults over age 60 in industrialized nations, is a pandemic among inappropriately nourished and/or physically hypoactive children, adolescents, and adults world wide. Although nowadays statins are widely prescribed to middle age and elderly adults with high blood lipid levels as pharmacological prevention for the late complications of atherosclerosis, from a critical point of view statins seem not to solve the problem, especially when compared with certain natural ingredients of our nutrition like micronutrients as alternative strategy. Statin ingestion is associated with lowering of serum cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein concentrations; some prospective studies have shown statistical associations with subsequent modest reduction of mortality from cardiovascular disease. However, specific biochemical pathways and pharmacological roles of statins in prevention of atherosclerosis, if any, are unknown. Moreover, there have been no systematic cost-benefit analyses of life-style prophylaxis versus statin prophylaxis versus combined life-style plus statin prophylaxis versus neither life-style nor statin prophylaxis for clinically significant complications of cardiovascular diseases in the elderly. Further, in the trials of effectiveness statins were not compared with management of nutrition, which is the most appropriate alternative intervention. Such studies seem to be important, as the ever increasing world population, especially in developing countries, now demand expensive statins, which may be unaffordable for mitigating the pandemic. Studies of this kind are necessary to identify more precisely those patients for whom cardiovascular benefits will outweigh the risks and costs of the statin treatment in comparison with nutritional interventions. Against the background of the current pathogenetic concept of atherogenesis some of its possible risk factors, particularly the

  7. Hyperlipidemia and statins affect neurological outcome in lumbar spine injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wu-Fu; Liu, Shih-Wei; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Lin, Feng-Shu; Chen, Li-Fu; Wu, Jau-Ching; Chen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Laura; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich; Lo, Su-Shun

    2015-01-05

    The disabling pathophysiologic effects of lipid and neuroprotective effects of statins have recently been demonstrated for acute spinal cord injuries in animal models. This large scale population-based study aimed to investigate the effect hyperlipidemia and the use of statins in patients with lumbar spine injury. The National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan was used to identify patients with lumbar spine injury. A total of 2844 patients were grouped into three: no hyperlipidemia, hyperlipidemia using low-dose of statins (≤90 of the defined daily dosage (DDD)), and severe hyperlipidemia using high-dose of statins (>90 DDD). A Cox multiple regression model was used to compare the incidence rates of disability among the three groups. The results showed that patients with hyperlipidemia appeared a higher risk of permanent disability (adjusted HR = 1.38, p = 0.28). In subgroup analysis, patients with severe hyperlipidemia had a higher risk of disability (adjusted HR = 3.1, p hyperlipidemia using low-dose statins had a similar risk of permanently disability (adjusted HR = 0.83, p = 0.661). Hyperlipidemia adversely affected the neurological outcomes of lumbar spinal injury. Statins may have the potential to reverse this higher risk of disability. However, this beneficiary effect of statins only existed in patients using a lower dose (≤90 DDD).

  8. Statin Use Is Associated With a Lower Risk of TB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Vincent Yi-Fong; Su, Wei-Juin; Yen, Yung-Feng; Pan, Sheng-Wei; Chuang, Pei-Hung; Feng, Jia-Yih; Chou, Kun-Ta; Yang, Kuang-Yao; Lee, Yu-Chin; Chen, Tzeng-Ji

    2017-09-01

    Statins are widely used to lower cholesterol levels and cardiovascular risk. Further, studies have shown that statins may decrease the risks of infectious diseases and infection-related mortality; however, the association between statin use and active TB disease remains unclear. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we conducted a nationwide population-based study. Patients taking statins between 2000 and 2013, without antecedent TB disease, were included. Data from 102,424 statin users and 202,718 age-, sex-, and enrollment date-matched subjects were analyzed. The two cohorts were monitored until December 31, 2013, for incident TB disease. The definition of TB disease was validated using the claims database of Taipei Veterans General Hospital. The statin and matched cohorts were observed for 571,568 and 1,027,385 person-years, respectively. Of the total 305,142 subjects, 1,264 (0.41%) developed subsequent TB disease. Validation study confirmed the accuracy of the definition of TB disease (sensitivity, 96.3%), with excellent interobserver agreement (κ = 1.00). Multivariate analysis revealed a reduced risk of TB disease among the statin cohort (hazard ratio [HR], 0.53; 95% CI, 0.47-0.61; P TB disease risk (365 cDDDs: HR, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.22-0.33; P TB disease. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Problems with statins and the marketing of these medications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2010-04-01

    All statins inhibit hydroxymethylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase but each has a different chemical structure that may have individual advantages. Some pharmaceutical companies have minimized side effects and stated that dose has no relation to incidence. To the contrary, dose is related to side effects with all statins. Myopathy occurs in up to 10.5% of patients taking a high dose. There is an attempt to sell statins that have lost patent protection over-the-counter. However, evidence supports medical supervision as offering greatest patient safety. Concerns were raised about ezetimibe after the initial ENHANCE (efficacy) and SEAS (cancer risk) study but these concerns appear to have been answered. Fenofibrate can be used with a statin but gemfibrozil is contraindicated. Coenzyme Q-10 possibly helps to mitigate the risk of myopathy with a statin but evidence is not universally accepted. JUPITER represented a valid outcomes study but made a claim that rosuvastatin has special value in risk management because of decreased high sensitivity C-Reactive Protein. This actually occurs with any statin, a decrease also enhanced by ezetimibe. Statins have benefited the lives of our patients but, as with any treatment, the physician needs to look critically at all the problems and claims made.

  10. [Statin associated myopathy in clinical practice. Results of DAMA study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, Jesús; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Climent, Elisenda; Millán, Joaquín; Rius, Joan

    Muscle symptoms, with or without elevation of creatin kinase are one of the main adverse effects of statin therapy, a fact that sometimes limits their use. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of patients treated with statins who have complained muscle symptoms and to identify possible predictive factors. A cross-sectional one-visit, non-interventional, national multicenter study including patients of both sexes over 18 years of age referred for past or present muscle symptoms associated with statin therapy was conducted. 3,845 patients were recruited from a one-day record from 2,001 physicians. Myalgia was present in 78.2% of patients included in the study, myositis in 19.3%, and rhabdomyolysis in 2.5%. Patients reported muscle pain in 77.5% of statin-treated individuals, general weakness 42.7%, and cramps 28.1%. Kidney failure, intense physical exercise, alcohol consumption (>30g/d in men and 20g/d in women) and abdominal obesity were the clinical situations associated with statin myopathy. Myalgia followed by myositis are the most frequent statin-related side effects. It should be recommended control environmental factors such as intense exercise and alcohol intake as well as abdominal obesity and renal function of the patient treated with statins. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of statins in the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurleo, Rosella; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2014-09-01

    Statins as inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase are widely prescribed for hypercholesterolemia treatment. In the last years, statins have also been shown to exert immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects which appear to be related to inhibition of isoprenylation of small GTP-binding proteins and, at least in part, independent of their cholesterol-lowering effects. These "pleiotropic" effects make statins an attractive treatment option for immune-mediated disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Studies in vitro and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis animal model seem to support not only the efficacy of statins as immunomodulatory agents but also their potential neuroprotective properties, although the exact mechanism with which statins exert these effects has not yet been fully understood. The immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties of statins provided the incentive for several clinical trials in multiple sclerosis, in which they were tested not only as mono-therapy but also in combination with interferon-β. However, the attempt to translate the results of animal model studies in humans produced conflicting results. Further large, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, designed to evaluate the long-term effects of statins alone or in add-on to other disease-modifying therapies, are needed to support their routine clinical use in multiple sclerosis.

  12. Prescribing trends of statins in Scotland: A drug utilization study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadul M. Helali

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Statins are highly effective in managing hypercholesterolaemia in patients with or without chronic heart disease due to extensive evidence for safety, efficacy and cost effectiveness. Observational cross sectional retrospective cohort study was done in approximately 200 primary care practices in Scotland. Frequency, rates and time trends for statin prescriptions together with demographic data and the prescribing patterns for high dose simvastatin and newer statins in its place was measured. 63%, 27%, 5%, 4% and 1% patients were prescribed simvastatin, atorvastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin and fluvastatin respectively (n=1,91370. Prevalence for individual statin as well as for all statin prescriptions, significantly increased (p<0.05. Except rosuvastatin the incidence of other statins prescription significantly decreased (p<0.05. The highest number of patients, 884 (24% switched to atorvastatin from high dose simvastatin. Increase in prevalent use and decrease in incident use of statins, implies the diminished cardiovascular disease related mortality and subsequent increased life expectancy of patients with cardiovascular disease.

  13. Influence of Statins on Influenza Vaccine Response in Elderly Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Steven; Nicolay, Uwe; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino

    2016-04-15

    Influenza vaccination strategies have targeted elderly individuals because they are at high risk of disease complications and mortality. Statins are a class of drugs used to treat hypercholesterolemia and are frequently used in the elderly population to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, statins are also known to have immunomodulatory effects that could impact influenza vaccine response. In a post hoc analysis, we performed a cross-sectional observational study nested within a comparative immunogenicity clinical trial of adjuvanted versus unadjuvanted influenza vaccine in elderly persons to evaluate the influence of statin therapy on the immune response to vaccination. Overall, data on >5000 trial participants were available for analysis. Comparison of hemagglutination-inhibiting geometric mean titers to influenza A(H1N1), A(H3N2), and B strains revealed that titers were 38% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27%-50%), 67% (95% CI, 54%-80%), and 38% (95% CI, 28%-29%) lower, respectively, in subjects receiving chronic statin therapy, compared with those not receiving chronic statin therapy. This apparent immunosuppressive effect of statins on the vaccine immune response was most dramatic in individuals receiving synthetic statins. These effects were seen in both the adjuvanted and unadjuvanted vaccine groups in the clinical trial. These results, if confirmed, could have implications both for future clinical trials design, as well as for vaccine use recommendations for elderly individuals.

  14. Pharmacogenomic insights into treatment and management of statin-induced myopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Bas JM; Klungel, Olaf H.; Visseren, Frank L.; de Boer, Anthonius; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse

    2009-01-01

    Although statins are generally well tolerated, the most common adverse drug reaction from statin therapy is myopathy. This article reviews the current pharmacogenomic knowledge of statin-induced myopathy. Furthermore, we will discuss the importance of recent pharmacogenetic advances for the treatment and management of statin-induced myopathy. Variation in the SLCO1B1 gene is associated with increased incidence of statin-induced myopathy, particularly with simvastatin and less so with other st...

  15. Statin intolerance ? an attempt at a unified definition. Position paper from an International Lipid Expert Panel

    OpenAIRE

    M. Banach; Rizzo, M.; Toth, PP; Farnier, M.; Davidson, MH; Al-Rasadi, K; Aronow, WS; Athyros, V; Djuric, DM; Ezhov, MV; Greenfield, RS; Hovingh, GK; Kostner, K; Serban, C; Lighezan, D

    2015-01-01

    Statins are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical practice. They are usually well tolerated and effectively prevent cardiovascular events. Most adverse effects associated with statin therapy are muscle-related. The recent statement of the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) has focused on statin associated muscle symptoms (SAMS), and avoided the use of the term ‘statin intolerance’. Although muscle syndromes are the most common adverse effects observed after statin therapy,...

  16. Statin and Its Association With Delirium in the Medical ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Jeffrey F; Corradi, John P; Waszynski, Christine; Noyes, Adam; Duan, Yinghui; Grady, James; Dicks, Robert

    2017-09-01

    To examine the association between statin use and the risk of delirium in hospitalized patients with an admission to the medical ICU. Retrospective propensity-matched cohort analysis with accrual from September 1, 2012, to September 30, 2015. Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT. An initial population of patients with an admission to a medical ICU totaling 10,216 visits were screened for delirium by means of the Confusion Assessment Method. After exclusions, a population of 6,664 was used to match statin users and nonstatin users. The propensity-matched cohort resulted in a sample of 1,475 patients receiving statin matched 1:1 with control patients not using statin. None. Delirium defined as a positive Confusion Assessment Method assessment was the primary end point. The prevalence of delirium was 22.3% in the unmatched cohort and 22.8% in the propensity-matched cohort. Statin use was associated with a significant decrease in the risk of delirium (odds ratio, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.38-0.56). Considering the type of statin used, atorvastatin (0.51; 0.41-0.64), pravastatin (0.40; 0.28-0.58), and simvastatin (0.33; 0.21-0.52) were all significantly associated with a reduced frequency of delirium. The use of statins was independently associated with a reduction in the risk of delirium in hospitalized patients. When considering types of statins used, this reduction was significant in patients using atorvastatin, pravastatin, and simvastatin. Randomized trials of various statin types in hospitalized patients prone to delirium should validate their use in protection from delirium.

  17. Effect of Statins and Anticoagulants on Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

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    Alizadeh, Moein [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre [Research Center, Department of Statistics, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Zilli, Thomas; Van Nguyen, Thu; Guay, Jean-Pierre; Bahary, Jean-Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Taussky, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Statins and anticoagulants (ACs) have both been associated with a less-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) and a better outcome after treatment of localized PCa. The results of these studies might have been confounded because patients might often take both medications. We examined their respective influence on PCa aggressiveness at initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 381 patients treated with either external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for low-risk (n = 152), intermediate-risk (n = 142), or high-risk (n = 87) localized PCa. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate an association between these drug classes and prostate cancer aggressiveness. We tested whether the concomitant use of statins and ACs had a different effect than that of either AC or statin use alone. Results: Of the 381 patients, 172 (45.1%) were taking statins and 141 (37.0%) ACs; 105 patients (27.6%) used both. On univariate analysis, the statin and AC users were associated with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (p = .017) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = .0022). On multivariate analysis, statin use was associated with a PSA level <10 ng/mL (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-6.8; p = .012) and a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.83; p = .03). The use of ACs was associated with a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.59, p = .02). Conclusion: Both AC and statins have an effect on PCa aggressiveness, with statins having a more stringent relationship with the PSA level, highlighting the importance of considering statin use in studies of PCa aggressiveness.

  18. Pleiotropic Effects of Statins in the Perioperative Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galyfos, George; Sianou, Argyri; Filis, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Statins belong to a specific group of drugs that have been described for their ability to control hyperlipidemia as well as for other pleiotropic effects such as improving vascular endothelial function, inhibition of oxidative stress pathways, and anti-inflammatory actions. Accumulating clinical evidence strongly suggests that statins also have a beneficial effect on perioperative morbidity and mortality. Therefore, this review aims to present all recent and pooled data on statin treatment in the perioperative setting as well as to highlight considerations regarding their indications and therapeutic application. PMID:28074822

  19. Cardiovascular effects of statins, beyond lipid-lowering properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihos, Christos G; Pineda, Andres M; Santana, Orlando

    2014-10-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, better known as 'statins', are amongst the most widely used medications in the world. They have become a pivotal component in the primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery and vascular disease. However, a growing amount of evidence has suggested that statins also possess strong pleiotropic effects irrespective of their lipid-lowering properties, which include enhancement of endothelial function, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherothrombotic properties, and immunomodulation. The following provides a comprehensive and updated review of the clinical evidence regarding the pleiotropic effects of statins in cardiovascular disorders and their potential therapeutic benefits.

  20. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Lane

    Full Text Available Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408 and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282. Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05, respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05. Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival

  1. Results of a randomized controlled trial on statin use in dialysis patients had no influence on statin prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ngan N; Jain, Arsh K; Hackam, Dan G; Cuerden, Meaghan S; Suri, Rita S; Huo, Cindy Y; Li, Ping; Clark, William F; Garg, Amit X

    2009-12-01

    Randomized trials provide high-quality evidence for patient care. The Der Deutsche Diabetes Dialyse Studie (4D), a randomized study which demonstrated no benefit of statins among diabetic patients receiving hemodialysis, was published in July 2005. To determine effects of this study we conducted a retrospective, population-based, time series analysis with change-point regression to see if the rate of statin prescription to dialysis patients had been modified. We linked health administrative data for all diabetic hemodialysis patients living in Ontario, Canada, with similar characteristics to the 4D patient cohort. During the nearly 11-year period prior to study publication, the rate of statin use increased almost 14-fold, from 43 to 597 per 1000 patients. For 2.5 years after study publication, rather than diminish, statin use continued to rise to an absolute rate of 676 per 1000 patients. These temporal patterns in statin use closely mimicked trends in the diabetic population not receiving dialysis. The 4D trial had no impact on statin use when we restricted the analysis to incident statin prescriptions or expanded the characteristics of the dialysis patients considered for study. Thus, we found that publication of a large, expensive, randomized controlled trial in patients receiving hemodialysis had no immediate impact on clinical practice. The use of a common cardiovascular medication in this patient population appears to be influenced by other factors.

  2. What makes a good title?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Maria J

    2013-12-01

    The chances are the first thing you when you set out to write an article is the title. But what factors transform a mediocre title into a good title? Firstly, it should be both informative and specific, using words or phrases likely to be used when searching for information, for example 'nurse education' rather than simply 'nurse'. Secondly, it should be concise yet convey the main ideas clearly; articles with short titles reporting study findings have been found to attract higher numbers of viewing and citations. Thirdly, provide details of the study design to assist the reader in making an informed choice about the type of project your article is reporting. In taking these small steps when developing your title, your title can present a more concise, retrievable and clear articulation of your article.

  3. EFFECT OF STATINS ALONE VERSUS STATINS PLUS EZETIMIBE ON CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROSIS IN TYPE 2 DIABETES: THE SANDS TRIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleg, Jerome L.; Mete, Mihriye; Howard, Barbara V.; Umans, Jason G.; Roman, Mary J.; E, Robert; Ratner, MD; Silverman, Angela; Galloway, James M.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Weir, Matthew R.; Wilson, Charlton; Stylianou, Mario; Howard, Wm. James

    2009-01-01

    Objective This secondary analysis from the Stop Atherosclerosis in Native Diabetics Study examines the effects of lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) with statins alone versus statins plus ezetimibe (E) on common carotid artery intimal medial thickness (CIMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes and no prior cardiovascular event. Background It is unknown whether the addition of E to statin therapy affects subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods Within an aggressive group (target LDL-C ≤70mg/dL; non-high-density lipoprotein [non-HDL]-C ≤40 yrs receiving statins plus E versus statins alone. CIMT changes in both aggressive subgroups were compared with changes in the standard subgroups (target LDL-C ≤<100mg/dL; non-HDL-C ≤ 130 mg/dL; SBP ≤130mmHg). Results Mean (95%CI) LDL-C was reduced by 31 (23, 37)mg/dL and 32 (27, 38)mg/dL in the aggressive group receiving statins plus E and statins alone, respectively, compared with changes of 1 (−3, 6) mg/dL in the standard group (p<0.0001 vs both aggressive subgroups. Within the aggressive group, mean IMT at 36mos regressed from baseline similarly in the E (−.025 [−05,.003] mm) and non-E subgroups (−.012 [−.03,.008] mm) but progressed in the standard treatment arm (0.039 [0.02, 0.06] mm), intergroup p<0.0001. Conclusions Reducing LDL-C to aggressive targets resulted in similar regression of CIMT in patients who attained equivalent LDL-C reductions from a statin alone or statin plus E. CIMT increased in those achieving standard targets. PMID:19095139

  4. Comparative efficacy and adverse effects of the addition of ezetimibe to statin versus statin titration in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kumagai, Hiroo; Shuto, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    The recent SHARP trial clearly demonstrated that a reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol with a daily regimen of simvastatin plus ezetimibe safely reduced the incidence of major atherosclerotic events in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to compare the efficacy of and adverse effects from statin uptitration versus statin in combination with ezetimibe since only a few studies have addressed this question. This was a randomized, open-label, multicenter trial that included 286 patients with CKD whose LDL cholesterol levels were not reduced below 120 mg/dl despite a minimum dose of statin therapy. Patients received double doses of statin or usual statin dose with the addition of ezetimibe 10 mg daily. The observation period was 1 year during which time patients were checked regularly in clinic for adverse effects as well as for usual laboratory examinations. The key prespecified outcome was the incidence of adverse effects, which included skeletal muscle complaints, myalgia, muscle weakness, and muscle cramps with and without elevated CK levels. Increases in alanine transaminase (ALT) or aspartate transaminase (AST) levels >2 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) were considered clinically significant adverse effects. Adverse events occurred in 9/145 in the combination group and in 24/141 in the statin uptitration group (p statin uptitration group (p adverse effects such as rhabdomyolysis were noted in either group. Serum creatinine levels remained essentially unchanged in both groups except in CKD stages 4 and 5. Reductions in LDL cholesterol were similar between the two groups at the start of and at the end of the study. During the study, no atherosclerotic events were reported in either group. When statin uptitration produces adverse effects such as myopathy, combination therapy with ezetimibe is recommended instead of statin alone.

  5. Industry sponsorship bias in research findings: a network meta-analysis of LDL cholesterol reduction in randomised trials of statins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Sofia; Ades, A E

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the risk of industry sponsorship bias in a systematically identified set of placebo controlled and active comparator trials of statins. Design Systematic review and network meta-analysis. Eligibility Open label and double blind randomised controlled trials comparing one statin with another at any dose or with control (placebo, diet, or usual care) for adults with, or at risk of developing, cardiovascular disease. Only trials that lasted longer than four weeks with more than 50 participants per trial arm were included. Two investigators assessed study eligibility. Data sources Bibliographic databases and reference lists of relevant articles published between 1 January 1985 and 10 March 2013. Data extraction One investigator extracted data and another confirmed accuracy. Main outcome measure Mean absolute change from baseline concentration of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Data synthesis Study level outcomes from randomised trials were combined using random effects network meta-analyses. Results We included 183 randomised controlled trials of statins, 103 of which were two-armed or multi-armed active comparator trials. When all of the existing randomised evidence was synthesised in network meta-analyses, there were clear differences in the LDL cholesterol lowering effects of individual statins at different doses. In general, higher doses resulted in higher reductions in baseline LDL cholesterol levels. Of a total of 146 industry sponsored trials, 64 were placebo controlled (43.8%). The corresponding number for the non-industry sponsored trials was 16 (43.2%). Of the 35 unique comparisons available in 37 non-industry sponsored trials, 31 were also available in industry sponsored trials. There were no systematic differences in magnitude between the LDL cholesterol lowering effects of individual statins observed in industry sponsored versus non-industry sponsored trials. In industry sponsored trials, the mean change from baseline LDL

  6. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of ongoing statin plus ezetimibe versus doubling the ongoing statin dose in hypercholesterolemic Taiwanese patients: an open-label, randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Chih-Chieh; Lai Wen-Ter; Shih Kuang-Chung; Lin Tsung-Hsien; Lu Chieh-Hua; Lai Hung-Jen; Hanson Mary E; Hwang Juey-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is associated with reduced risk for major coronary events. Despite statin efficacy, a considerable proportion of statin-treated hypercholesterolemic patients fail to reach therapeutic LDL-C targets as defined by guidelines. This study compared the efficacy of ezetimibe added to ongoing statins with doubling the dose of ongoing statin in a population of Taiwanese patients with hypercholesterolemia. Methods This was a rand...

  7. Interim Title V Program Approvals

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-operating-permit-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  8. Statin Pretreatment in Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Jesus de Almeida

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Some authors have found beneficial effect of statins in certain inflammatory conditions, but the effect of statins on acute pancreatitis is not yet defined. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of simvastatin on an experimental model of mild and severe acute pancreatitis. Animals One hundred and one Wistar rats with cerulein or taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis were used in this study. Design The rats were divided into two groups: Group I (n=51 received two previously i.p. injections (18±2 and 3±1 hours of simvastatin (200 μg/kg and Group II (n=50 received two previously i.p. injections of saline. Both groups were subdivided into two subgroups: mild pancreatitis (cerulein-induced; IA, n=10; IIA, n=10 and severe pancreatitis (taurocholateinduced; IB, n=41; IIB, n=40. Main outcome measures The parameters evaluated were: pancreatic vascular permeability, tissue water content, histologic lesion, amylase serum levels in rats with mild pancreatitis (subgroups A; mortality rate, serum levels of IL-6, IL-10, amylase, pulmonary myeloperoxidase activity and ascitic levels of TNF-alpha in rats with severe pancreatitis (subgroups B. Results Serum levels of IL-10 were significantly lower in the simvastatin-treated group as well as the myeloperoxidase activity. There was no significant difference in any of other studied parameters. Conclusion Simvastatin appears to reduce inflammatory cytokines and pulmonary neutrophilic activation in the severe acute pancreatitis model, but there is no significant effect on survival curve, in spite of a clear trend towards a better survival in the simvastatin group.

  9. Study Hints At Link Between Some Statins, Parkinson's Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Study Hints at Link Between Some Statins, Parkinson's Risk But the connection was only seen with ... may have a slightly increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease, a new study suggests. Researchers said the ...

  10. The impact of statin therapy on long-term cardiovascular outcomes in an outpatient cardiology practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hoang M.; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Mercando, Anthony D.; Kalen, Phoenix; Desai, Harit V.; Gandhi, Kaushang; Sharma, Mala; Amin, Harshad; Lai, Trung M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Statins reduce coronary events in patients with coronary artery disease. Material/Methods Chart reviews were performed in 305 patients (217 men and 88 women, mean age 74 years) not treated with statins during the first year of being seen in an outpatient cardiology practice but subsequently treated with statins. Based on the starting date of statins use, the long-term outcomes of myocardial infarction (MI), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABGS) before and after statin use were compared. Results Mean follow-up was 65 months before statins use and 66 months after statins use. MI occurred in 31 of 305 patients (10%) before statins, and in 13 of 305 patients (4%) after statins (pcardiology practice reduces the incidence of MI, PCI, and CABGS. PMID:22129898

  11. The role of HMGCR alternative splicing in statin efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Medina, Marisa Wong; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2009-01-01

    Statins, or 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) inhibitors, are widely prescribed to lower plasma cholesterol levels and reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Despite the well documented efficacy of statins, there is large inter-individual variation in response. Using a panel of immortalized lymphocyte cell lines incubated with simvastatin, we recently found that the magnitude of expression of an alternatively spliced HMGCR transcript lacking exon 13 was inversely corr...

  12. Statins as first-line therapy for acute coronary syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Ostadal, Petr

    2012-01-01

    It has repeatedly been shown that statins decrease morbidity and mortality in patients with atherosclerosis, thus supporting their use for the primary and secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease. Different pathological pathways that are triggered in the setting of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), such as endothelial dysfunction, activation of inflammatory and coagulation cascades, and thrombus formation, are known to be inhibited by statins, thereby justifying the use of these agents in ...

  13. Statins in heart failure: do we need another trial?

    OpenAIRE

    Bonsu KO; Kadirvelu A; Reidpath DD

    2013-01-01

    Kwadwo Osei Bonsu, Amudha Kadirvelu, Daniel Diamond ReidpathSchool of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Sunway Campus, Bandar Sunway, MalaysiaAbstract: Statins lower serum cholesterol and are employed for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. Clinical evidence from observational studies, retrospective data, and post hoc analyses of data from large statin trials in various cardiovascular conditions, as well as small scale randomized trials, suggest survival a...

  14. Evidence for statin therapy in polycystic ovary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    T. Sathyapalan; Atkin, S L

    2010-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age group that is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. In addition to its lipid-lowering effects, statin therapy has shown been shown to have beneficial pleiotropic effects that may contribute to their reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this review, the effect of statins on PCOS is discussed with reference to the underlying potential mechanism of action.

  15. Risk of new-onset diabetes associated with statin use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D Beckett

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify and assess studies investigating the association between statins and new-onset diabetes and determine the clinical significance of this risk. Data sources: A MEDLINE (1977–April 2015, Google Scholar (1997–April 2015, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1977–April 2015 search was performed using the search terms hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors/adverse effects, statins, adverse effects, diabetes mellitus, diabetes mellitus/etiology, and drug-induced. Citations of identified articles and clinical practice guidelines were also reviewed. Study selection and data extraction: Articles describing results from original investigations or meta-analyses specifically designed to assess the association between statins and new-onset diabetes and published in English were included. Data synthesis: A total of 13 cohort studies and seven meta-analyses were included. In all, 11 were retrospective cohort studies and reported some degree of increased risk of new-onset diabetes associated with statins. The two prospective cohort studies differed. One identified increased risk of new-onset diabetes, but the other did not. Increased risk was not identified when any statin was compared to placebo alone, individual statins were compared, or in the single meta-analysis that included observational studies. Overall, the meta-analyses suggest that statin therapy is associated with an increased risk of new-onset diabetes when compared to placebo or active control, and when intensive therapy is compared to moderate therapy. Conclusion: Statins have been associated with a small, but statistically significant risk of new-onset diabetes. Patients with risk factors for developing diabetes mellitus may be at higher risk. This risk is likely outweighed by the benefits of reducing cardiovascular risk.

  16. How to balance cardiorenometabolic benefits and risks of statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soo; Oh, Pyung Chun; Sakuma, Ichiro; Koh, Kwang Kon

    2014-08-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, are important for preventing adverse cardiovascular events not only in patients with a high risk of vascular disease but also in those with a low risk, by reducing the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Statin is associated with deteriorating glucose homeostasis and an increased risk of diabetes mellitus. Moreover, these off-target effects are dose-dependent; it has also been suggested that renal insult can be caused dose-dependently by statin treatment, in contrast to previous studies showing a renoprotective effect. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines recommend the use of high-intensity statin therapy, and extend its use to more people at risk of vascular diseases. However, a European committee has expressed concerns about the potential side effects of using statins in a large fraction of the population for extended periods. This is true of Asian people, for whom the disease burden from cardiovascular disorders is not as great as among Western ethnic groups. There are still many unanswered questions on how to balance the cardiovascular benefits with the potential renometabolic risks of statins. Therefore, genetic or pharmacogenetic approaches are needed to define who is more vulnerable to developing diabetes mellitus or acute kidney injury. In particular, more information is required regarding the metabolism of statins, and their off-target or unknown actions and overall impact. These different renometabolic effects of statins should help in formulating optimal therapeutic strategies for patients for reducing overall morbidity and mortality and not just those associated with cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Statin Decreases Helicobacter pylori Burden in Macrophages by Promoting Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Chih; Huang, Mei-Zi; Wang, Michelle Lily; Lin, Chun-Jung; Lu, Tzu-Li; Lo, Horng-Ren; Pan, Yi-Jiun; Sun, Yu-Chen; Kao, Min-Chuan; Lim, Hui-Jing; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been found to provide protective effects against several bacterial infectious diseases. Although the use of statins has been shown to enhance antimicrobial treated Helicobacter pylori eradication and reduce H. pylori-mediated inflammation, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unclear. In this study, in vitro and ex vivo macrophage models were established to investigate the molecular pathways involved in statin-mediated inhibition of H. pylori-induced inflammation. Our study showed that statin treatment resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intracellular H. pylori burden in both RAW264.7 macrophage cells and murine peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEMs). Furthermore, statin yielded enhanced early endosome maturation and subsequent activation of the autophagy pathway, which promotes lysosomal fusion resulting in degradation of sequestered bacteria, and in turn attenuates interleukin (IL)-1β production. These results indicate that statin not only reduces cellular cholesterol but also decreases the H. pylori burden in macrophages by promoting autophagy, consequently alleviating H. pylori-induced inflammation. PMID:28144585

  18. Clinical evidence of statin therapy in non-dyslipidemic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Nicola; Corsini, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    The clinical benefits of statins are strongly related to their low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering properties. However, considering that the pharmacological target of statins, the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-3-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, is one of the upstream enzyme of the mevalonate pathway, its inhibition may determine a substantial impoverishment of additional lipid moieties required for a proper cellular function. From this hypothesis, several experimental and clinical evidences have been reported indicating additional effects of statins beyond the LDL-C lowering, in particular anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Thus statin therapy, indicated for hyperlipidemic patients for primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) has begun to be considered effective in other diseases not necessarily linked to altered lipid profile. In the present review we summarized the current clinical evidence of the efficacy and safety profile of statins in a variety of diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, venous thromboembolism, liver diseases, polycystic ovary syndrome, and age-related macular degeneration. As discussed in the review, pending large, well designed, randomized trials, it is reasonable to conclude that there is no definitive evidence for the use of statins in the aforementioned diseases.

  19. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of ongoing statin plus ezetimibe versus doubling the ongoing statin dose in hypercholesterolemic Taiwanese patients: an open-label, randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chih-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C is associated with reduced risk for major coronary events. Despite statin efficacy, a considerable proportion of statin-treated hypercholesterolemic patients fail to reach therapeutic LDL-C targets as defined by guidelines. This study compared the efficacy of ezetimibe added to ongoing statins with doubling the dose of ongoing statin in a population of Taiwanese patients with hypercholesterolemia. Methods This was a randomized, open-label, parallel-group comparison study of ezetimibe 10 mg added to ongoing statin compared with doubling the dose of ongoing statin. Adult Taiwanese hypercholesterolemic patients not at optimal LDL-C levels with previous statin treatment were randomized (N = 83 to ongoing statin + ezetimibe (simvastatin, atorvastatin or pravastatin + ezetimibe at doses of 20/10, 10/10 or 20/10 mg or doubling the dose of ongoing statin (simvastatin 40 mg, atorvastatin 20 mg or pravastatin 40 mg for 8 weeks. Percent change in total cholesterol, LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and triglycerides, and specified safety parameters were assessed at 4 and 8 weeks. Results At 8 weeks, patients treated with statin + ezetimibe experienced significantly greater reductions compared with doubling the statin dose in LDL-C (26.2% vs 17.9%, p = 0.0026 and total cholesterol (20.8% vs 12.2%, p = 0.0003. Percentage of patients achieving treatment goal was greater for statin + ezetimibe (58.6% vs doubling statin (41.2%, but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.1675. The safety and tolerability profiles were similar between treatments. Conclusion Ezetimibe added to ongoing statin therapy resulted in significantly greater lipid-lowering compared with doubling the dose of statin in Taiwanese patients with hypercholesterolemia. Studies to assess clinical outcome benefit are ongoing. Trial registration Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00652327

  20. A Nitric Oxide-Donating Statin Decreases Portal Pressure with a Better Toxicity Profile than Conventional Statins in Cirrhotic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sarai Rodríguez; Imma Raurell; Manuel Torres-Arauz; Teresa García-Lezana; Joan Genescà; María Martell

    2017-01-01

    Statins present many beneficial effects in chronic liver disease, but concerns about safety exist. We evaluated the hepatic effects of a nitric oxide-releasing atorvastatin (NCX 6560) compared to conventional statins. Simvastatin, atorvastatin and NCX 6560 were evaluated in four-week bile duct-ligated rats (BDL) simulating decompensated cirrhosis and in thirteen-week carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) intoxicated rats, a model of early cirrhosis. In the BDL model, simvastatin treated rats showed hig...

  1. Statin Use and Adrenal Aldosterone Production in Hypertensive and Diabetic Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudrand, Rene; Pojoga, Luminita H.; Vaidya, Anand; Garza, Amanda E.; Vöhringer, Paul A.; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Hopkins, Paul N.; Yao, Tham M.; Williams, Jonathan; Adler, Gail K.; Williams, Gordon H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Statins substantially reduce cardiovascular mortality and appear to have beneficial effects independent of their lipid lowering properties. We evaluated the hypothesis that statin use may modulate the secretion of aldosterone, a well-known contributor to cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results We measured adrenal hormones in two intervention studies. In study 1 in hypertensive subjects, aldosterone was analyzed at baseline and after angiotensin-II stimulation (AngII) on both high (HS) and low sodium (LS) diets (1122 observations, 15% on statins > 3 months). Statin users had 33% lower aldosterone levels in adjusted models (p lipophilic statins and with higher doses. Statin users had lower blood pressure (BP) and reduced salt sensitivity of BP (p=0.001). In study 2, aldosterone was measured in diabetic patients on a HS diet, before and after AngII stimulation (143 observations, 79% statin users). Again, statin users had 26% lower aldosterone levels (p =0.006), particularly those using lipophilic statins. Ex vivo studies in rat adrenal glomerulosa cells confirmed that lipophilic statins acutely inhibited aldosterone, but not corticosterone, in response to different secretagogues. Conclusions Statin use among hypertensive and diabetic subjects was associated with lower aldosterone secretion in response to AngII and LS diet in two human intervention studies. This effect appeared to be most pronounced with lipophilic statins and higher doses. Future studies to evaluate whether aldosterone inhibition may partially explain the robust cardioprotective effects of statins are warranted. PMID:26432671

  2. Effect of statin use on outcomes of adults with candidemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Cuervo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Statins have immunomodulatory properties and hinder Candida growth. However, it is unknown whether they may improve prognosis in patients with candidemia. We sought to determine the effect of prior statin use on the clinical outcomes of patients suffering candidemia. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Multicenter cohort study of hospitalized adults with candidemia between 2005 and 2011 in six hospitals in Spain, Brazil and Argentina. Of 326 candidemias, 44 (13.5% occurred in statin users and 282 (86.5% in statin non-users. The median value of APACHE II at candidemia diagnosis was similar between groups (18 vs. 16; p=.36. Candida albicans was the most commonly isolated species, followed by C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, and C. krusei. There were no differences regarding appropriate empirical antifungal treatment. Statin users had a lower early (5 d case-fatality rate than non-users (4.5 vs. 17%; p=.031. This effect was not observed with other cardiovascular drugs (aspirin, beta blockers and ACE inhibitors. Independent factor related to early case-fatality rate was APACHE II score (AOR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.03-1.14; p=.002. An appropriate empirical antifungal therapy (AOR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.04-0.26; p=<.001 and prior statin use were independently associated with lower early case-fatality (AOR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.03-0.93; p=.041. Fourteen days (14d and overall (30d case-fatality rates were similar between groups (27% vs. 29%; p=0.77 and 40% vs. 44%; p=.66. CONCLUSIONS: The use of statins might have a beneficial effect on outcomes of patients with candidemia. This hypothesis deserves further evaluation in randomized trials.

  3. Statin use and survival in elderly patients with endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Lara S; Goodman, Marc T; Rimel, B J; Jeon, Christie Y

    2015-05-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic cancer in the United States. Statins have demonstrated anti-cancer effects in other tumor types, such as the breast and lung cancers. The objective of our study was to determine the association between statin use and endometrial cancer survival in a nationally-representative elderly population with endometrial cancer in the U.S. We employed the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results registries and Medicare claims files to collect data from 2987 patients who were diagnosed with endometrial cancer between 2007 and 2009 and who received a hysterectomy. The association between statin use and overall survival was examined using Cox regression models adjusting for follow-up time, age, race, neighborhood income, cancer stage, tumor grade, hysterectomy type, chemotherapy, radiation, impaired glucose tolerance, obesity, dyslipidemia and diabetes. The mortality rate was lower in statin users compared to non-users for both type I (4.6 vs. 5.7 deaths/100 person-years, p=0.08) and type II (11.2 vs. 16.5 deaths/100 person-years, p=0.01) cancer types. However, after adjustment for the time from surgery to statin use and confounding, statin use after a hysterectomy was not significantly associated with a reduction in hazard of death for both type I (hazard ratio [HR] 0.92, 95%CI 0.70,1.2) and type II (HR=0.92, 95%CI 0.65, 1.29, p=0.62) endometrial cancer patients. Accounting for all confounders and biases considered, statin use on or after a hysterectomy was not associated with survival in those with type I or type II disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Statins in nephrotic syndrome: a new weapon against tissue injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buemi, Michele; Nostro, Lorena; Crascì, Eleonora; Barillà, Antonio; Cosentini, Vincenzo; Aloisi, Carmela; Sofi, Tito; Campo, Susanna; Frisina, Nicola

    2005-11-01

    The nephrotic syndrome is characterized by metabolic disorders leading to an increase in circulating lipoproteins levels. Hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia in this case may depend on a reduction in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins catabolism and on an increase in hepatic synthesis of Apo B-containing lipoproteins. These alterations are the starting point of a self-maintaining mechanism, which can accelerate the progression of chronic renal failure. Indeed, hyperlipidemia can affect renal function, increase proteinuria and speed glomerulosclerosis, thus determining a higher risk of progression to dialysis. 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis from mevalonate and its inhibitors, or statins, can therefore interfere with the above-mentioned consequences of hyperlipidemia. Statins are already well known for their effectiveness on primary cardiovascular prevention, which cannot be explained only through their hypolipemic effect. As far as kidney diseases are concerned, statin therapy has been shown to prevent creatinine clearance decline and to slow renal function loss, particularly in case of proteinuria, and its favorable effect may depend only partially on the attenuation of hyperlipidemia. Statins may therefore confer tissue protection through lipid-independent mechanisms, which can be triggered by other mediators, such as angiotensin receptor blockers. Possible pathways for the protective action of statins, other than any hypocholesterolemic effect, are: cellular apoptosis/proliferation balance, inflammatory cytokines production, and signal transduction regulation. Statins also play a role in the regulation of the inflammatory and immune response, coagulation process, bone turnover, neovascularization, vascular tone, and arterial pressure. In this study, we would like to provide scientific evidences for the pleiotropic effects of statins, which could be the starting point for the

  5. Statin-associated muscle symptoms: impact on statin therapy-European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel Statement on Assessment, Aetiology and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroes, Erik S; Thompson, Paul D; Corsini, Alberto; Vladutiu, Georgirene D; Raal, Frederick J; Ray, Kausik K; Roden, Michael; Stein, Evan; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bruckert, Eric; De Backer, Guy; Krauss, Ronald M; Laufs, Ulrich; Santos, Raul D; Hegele, Robert A; Hovingh, G Kees; Leiter, Lawrence A; Mach, Francois; März, Winfried; Newman, Connie B; Wiklund, Olov; Jacobson, Terry A; Catapano, Alberico L; Chapman, M John; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2015-05-01

    Statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS) are one of the principal reasons for statin non-adherence and/or discontinuation, contributing to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) Consensus Panel overviews current understanding of the pathophysiology of statin-associated myopathy, and provides guidance for diagnosis and management of SAMS. Statin-associated myopathy, with significant elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK), is a rare but serious side effect of statins, affecting 1 per 1000 to 1 per 10 000 people on standard statin doses. Statin-associated muscle symptoms cover a broader range of clinical presentations, usually with normal or minimally elevated CK levels, with a prevalence of 7-29% in registries and observational studies. Preclinical studies show that statins decrease mitochondrial function, attenuate energy production, and alter muscle protein degradation, thereby providing a potential link between statins and muscle symptoms; controlled mechanistic and genetic studies in humans are necessary to further understanding. The Panel proposes to identify SAMS by symptoms typical of statin myalgia (i.e. muscle pain or aching) and their temporal association with discontinuation and response to repetitive statin re-challenge. In people with SAMS, the Panel recommends the use of a maximally tolerated statin dose combined with non-statin lipid-lowering therapies to attain recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets. The Panel recommends a structured work-up to identify individuals with clinically relevant SAMS generally to at least three different statins, so that they can be offered therapeutic regimens to satisfactorily address their cardiovascular risk. Further research into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms may offer future therapeutic potential.

  6. Statin-associated muscle symptoms: impact on statin therapy—European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel Statement on Assessment, Aetiology and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroes, Erik S.; Thompson, Paul D.; Corsini, Alberto; Vladutiu, Georgirene D.; Raal, Frederick J.; Ray, Kausik K.; Roden, Michael; Stein, Evan; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Bruckert, Eric; De Backer, Guy; Krauss, Ronald M.; Laufs, Ulrich; Santos, Raul D.; Hegele, Robert A.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Mach, Francois; März, Winfried; Newman, Connie B.; Wiklund, Olov; Jacobson, Terry A.; Catapano, Alberico L.; Chapman, M. John; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Stroes, Erik; Thompson, Paul D.; Corsini, Alberto; Vladutiu, Georgirene D.; Raal, Frederick J.; Ray, Kausik K.; Roden, Michael; Stein, Evan; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Bruckert, Eric; Krauss, Ronald M.; Laufs, Ulrich; Santos, Raul D.; März, Winfried; Newman, Connie B.; John Chapman, M.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; John Chapman, M.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; de Backer, Guy; Catapano, Alberico L.; Hegele, Robert A.; Kees Hovingh, G.; Jacobson, Terry A.; Leiter, Lawrence; Mach, Francois; Wiklund, Olov

    2015-01-01

    Statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS) are one of the principal reasons for statin non-adherence and/or discontinuation, contributing to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) Consensus Panel overviews current understanding of the pathophysiology of statin-associated myopathy, and provides guidance for diagnosis and management of SAMS. Statin-associated myopathy, with significant elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK), is a rare but serious side effect of statins, affecting 1 per 1000 to 1 per 10 000 people on standard statin doses. Statin-associated muscle symptoms cover a broader range of clinical presentations, usually with normal or minimally elevated CK levels, with a prevalence of 7–29% in registries and observational studies. Preclinical studies show that statins decrease mitochondrial function, attenuate energy production, and alter muscle protein degradation, thereby providing a potential link between statins and muscle symptoms; controlled mechanistic and genetic studies in humans are necessary to further understanding. The Panel proposes to identify SAMS by symptoms typical of statin myalgia (i.e. muscle pain or aching) and their temporal association with discontinuation and response to repetitive statin re-challenge. In people with SAMS, the Panel recommends the use of a maximally tolerated statin dose combined with non-statin lipid-lowering therapies to attain recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets. The Panel recommends a structured work-up to identify individuals with clinically relevant SAMS generally to at least three different statins, so that they can be offered therapeutic regimens to satisfactorily address their cardiovascular risk. Further research into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms may offer future therapeutic potential. PMID:25694464

  7. Statin therapy in patients with acute coronary syndrome: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal attainment and effect of statin potency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinwong D

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dujrudee Chinwong,1,2 Jayanton Patumanond,3 Surarong Chinwong,1 Khanchai Siriwattana,4 Siriluck Gunaparn,5 John Joseph Hall,6 Arintaya Phrommintikul5 1Department of Pharmaceutical Care, Faculty of Pharmacy, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 2Clinical Epidemiology Program, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 3Center of Excellence in Applied Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand; 4Division of Medicine, Nakornping Hospital, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 5Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 6Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia Background: Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Current guidelines recommend an LDL-C target of <70 mg/dL (<1.8 mmol/L for acute coronary syndrome (ACS patients, and the first-line treatment to lower lipids is statin therapy. Despite current guidelines and the efficacious lipid-lowering agents available, about half of patients at very high risk, including ACS patients, fail to achieve their LDL-C goal. This study assessed LDL-C goal attainment according to use of high and low potency statins in routine practice in Thailand.Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed by retrieving data from medical records and the electronic hospital database for a tertiary care hospital in Thailand between 2009 and 2011. Included were ACS patients treated with statins at baseline and with follow-up of LDL-C levels. Patients were divided into high or low potency statin users, and the proportion reaching the LDL-C goal of <70 mg/dL was determined. A Cox proportional hazard model was applied to determine the relationship between statin potency and LDL-C goal attainment. Propensity score adjustment

  8. Many Young Adults with High Cholesterol Not on Statins as Recommended

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162877.html Many Young Adults With High Cholesterol Not on Statins as Recommended ... News) -- Too few Americans who need them -- especially young adults -- are getting cholesterol-lowering statin medications, a new ...

  9. Pre-stroke use of statins on stroke outcome : a meta-analysis of observational studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordenier, Ann; De Smedt, Ann; Brouns, Raf; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; De Raedt, Sylvie; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; De Keyser, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Background: Animal pre-clinical studies suggest that statins may have neuroprotective effects in acute ischaemic stroke. Statins might also increase the risk of developing haemorrhagic transformation after thrombolytic treatment. Methods: We performed a systematic review and included studies that

  10. The effect of statins in colorectal cancer is mediated through the bone morphogenetic protein pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kodach, Liudmila L.; Bleuming, Sylvia A.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Hommes, Daniel W.; Van Den Brink, Gus R.; Hardwick, James C. H.

    2007-01-01

    Background & Aims: Epidemiological evidence suggests that statins prevent colorectal cancer (CRC), but the biological mechanism remains obscure. Statins induce bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) expression in bone cells. We have previously shown that BMPs act as tumor suppressors in CRC. We

  11. The effect of statins on average survival in randomised trials, an analysis of end point postponement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Malene Lopez; Christensen, Palle Mark; Hallas, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the average postponement of death in statin trials. SETTING: A systematic literature review of all statin trials that presented all-cause survival curves for treated and untreated. INTERVENTION: Statin treatment compared to placebo. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The average pos...... is limited or who have adverse effects of treatment, withholding statin therapy should be considered.......OBJECTIVE: To estimate the average postponement of death in statin trials. SETTING: A systematic literature review of all statin trials that presented all-cause survival curves for treated and untreated. INTERVENTION: Statin treatment compared to placebo. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The average...... in secondary prevention trials. The median postponement of death for primary and secondary prevention trials were 3.2 and 4.1 days, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Statin treatment results in a surprisingly small average gain in overall survival within the trials' running time. For patients whose life expectancy...

  12. Region 7 Title V facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web map shows the Region 7 Title V facilities (Clean Air Act major sources), any Class I areas within 300 km of R7 States, and any Tribal areas within 50 miles...

  13. Editor's Shelf: International Juvenile Titles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Powell, Brenda

    1994-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of international juvenile picture books and notes those that emphasize text over pictures. The 49 titles present international perspectives for educators, librarians, and parents seeking materials with alternative cultural content. The majority are folk tales. (SLD)

  14. Intensive statin therapy for Indians: Part-I. Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enas, Enas A; Pazhoor, Hancy Chennikkara; Kuruvila, Arun; Vijayaraghavan, Krishnaswami

    2011-01-01

    The underlying disorder in the vast majority of cases of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is atherosclerosis, for which low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is recognized as the first and foremost risk factor. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, popularly called statins, are highly effective and remarkably safe in reducing LDL-C and non-HDL-C levels. Evidence from clinical trials have demonstrated that statin therapy can reduce the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, death, and the need for coronary artery revascularization procedures (CARPs) by 25-50%, depending on the magnitude of LDL-C lowering achieved. Benefits are seen in men and women, young and old, and in people with and without diabetes or prior diagnosis of CVD. Clinical trials comparing standard statin therapy to intensive statin therapy have clearly demonstrated greater benefits in CVD risk reduction (including halting the progression and even reversing coronary atherosclerosis) without any corresponding increase in risk. Numerous outcome trials of intensive statin therapy using atorvastatin 80 mg/d have demonstrated the safety and the benefits of lowering LDL-C to very low levels. This led the USNCEP Guideline Committee to standardize 40 mg/dL as the optimum LDL-C level, above which the CVD risk begins to rise. Recent studies have shown intensive statin therapy can also lower CVD events even in low-risk individuals with LDL-C Asian Indians, the LDL-C target is set at 30 mg/dL lower than that recommended by NCEP. Accordingly, the LDL-C goal is or = 50% reduction in LDL-C. Broader acceptance of this lower LDL-C targets and its implementation could reduce the CVD burden in the Indian population by 50% in the next 25 years. Clinical trial data support an extremely favorable benefit-to-risk ratio of intensive statin therapy with some but not all statins. Atorvastatin 80 mg/d is 100 times safer than aspirin 81 mg/d and 10 times safer than diabetic medications. Intensive statin therapy is more effective

  15. Impact of prescription size on statin adherence and cholesterol levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehler Phillip S

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Therapy with 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Co-enzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins improve outcomes in a broad spectrum of patients with hyperlipidemia. However, effective therapy requires ongoing medication adherence; restrictive pharmacy policies may represent a barrier to successful adherence, particularly among vulnerable patients. In this study we sought to assess the relationship between the quantity of statin dispensed by the pharmacy with patient adherence and total cholesterol. Methods We analyzed a cohort of 3,386 patients receiving more than one fill of statin medications through an integrated, inner-city health care system between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2002. Our measure of adherence was days of drug acquisition divided by days in the study for each patient, with adequate adherence defined as ≥ 80%. Log-binomial regression was used to determine the relative risk of various factors, including prescription size, on adherence. We also assessed the relationship between adherence and total cholesterol using multiple linear regression. Results After controlling for age, gender, race, co-payment, comorbidities, and insurance status, patients who obtained a majority of fills as 60-day supply compared with 30-day supply were more likely to be adherent to their statin medications (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.28–1.55, P Conclusion In a healthcare system serving predominantly indigent patients, the provision of a greater quantity of statin medication at each prescription fill contributes to improved adherence and greater drug effectiveness.

  16. Selected statins produce rapid spinal motor neuron loss in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murinson Beth B

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hmg-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins are widely used to prevent disease associated with vascular disease and hyperlipidemia. Although side effects are uncommon, clinical observations suggest statin exposure may exacerbate neuromuscular diseases, including peripheral neuropathy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Although some have postulated class-effects, prior studies of hepatocytes and myocytes indicate that the statins may exhibit differential effects. Studies of neuronal cells have been limited. Methods We examined the effects of statins on cultured neurons and Schwann cells. Cultured spinal motor neurons were grown on transwell inserts and assessed for viability using immunochemical staining for SMI-32. Cultured cortical neurons and Schwann cells were assessed using dynamic viability markers. Results 7 days of exposure to fluvastatin depleted spinal motor neurons in a dose-dependent manner with a KD of  Conclusions It is known from pharmacokinetic studies that daily treatment of young adults with fluvastatin can produce serum levels in the single micromolar range. We conclude that specific mechanisms may explain neuromuscular disease worsening with statins and further study is needed.

  17. Statins and oxidative stress in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sónia; Reina-Couto, Marta; Albino-Teixeira, António; Sousa, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Statins are the most commonly prescribed drugs for the treatment of dyslipidemia. They are also recommended in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. In addition to decreasing cholesterol synthesis, statins interfere with the synthesis of isoprenoid intermediates, which may explain many of their pleiotropic properties, including their antioxidant effects. Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between the synthesis of reactive oxygen species and their elimination by antioxidant defense systems, with a prevailing pro-oxidant status that results in macromolecular damage and disruption of cellular redox signaling. Reactive oxygen species interfere with various processes that affect cardiac structure and function, contributing to the contractile dysfunction, myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis observed in the pathophysiology of heart failure. By regulating several molecular pathways that control nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity, statins help restore redox homeostasis. These drugs also contribute to the control of inflammation and appear to have a protective role in various diseases. The results of observational studies and clinical trials with statins in heart failure have not been consensual. This review aims to analyze the role of oxidative stress in heart failure and the molecular mechanisms underlying statins' antioxidant properties. It also examines current scientific evidence on the use of these drugs as a specific treatment for heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanisms and assessment of statin-related muscular adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moßhammer, Dirk; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Mörike, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Statin-associated muscular adverse effects cover a wide range of symptoms, including asymptomatic increase of creatine kinase serum activity and life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. Different underlying pathomechanisms have been proposed. However, a unifying concept of the pathogenesis of statin-related muscular adverse effects has not emerged so far. In this review, we attempt to categorize these mechanisms along three levels. Firstly, among pharmacokinetic factors, it has been shown for some statins that inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated hepatic biotransformation and hepatic uptake by transporter proteins contribute to an increase of systemic statin concentrations. Secondly, at the myocyte membrane level, cell membrane uptake transporters affect intracellular statin concentrations. Thirdly, at the intracellular level, inhibition of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase results in decreased intracellular concentrations of downstream metabolites (e.g. selenoproteins, ubiquinone, cholesterol) and alteration of gene expression (e.g. ryanodine receptor 3, glycine amidinotransferase). We also review current recommendations for prescribers. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT OF STATIN-ASSOCIATED MUSCLE DAMAGE PREDICTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To assess the risk factors of statin-associated muscle damage in patient with ischemic heart disease.Material and methods. 258 patients with ischemic heart disease treated with statin were included into the study. Total plasma creatine kinase levels were measured and SLCO1B1*5 genotyping was performed. Relationship between statin therapy and adverse events was evaluated by Naranjo algorithm.Results. Patients with muscle symptoms received statins significantly longer (48.8 vs 11.9 months,...

  20. INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT OF STATIN-ASSOCIATED MUSCLE DAMAGE PREDICTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To assess the risk factors of statin-associated muscle damage in patient with ischemic heart disease.Material and methods. 258 patients with ischemic heart disease treated with statin were included into the study. Total plasma creatine kinase levels were measured and SLCO1B1*5 genotyping was performed. Relationship between statin therapy and adverse events was evaluated by Naranjo algorithm.Results. Patients with muscle symptoms received statins significantly longer (48.8 vs 11.9 months,...

  1. Potential mechanisms and applications of statins on osteogenesis: Current modalities, conflicts and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, Ahmad; Kamali, Amir; Moshiri, Ali

    2015-10-10

    Statins are known for their beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Besides the lipid-lowering properties, statins exert their anabolic effects on the bone by differentiating mesenchymal cells to osteoblasts via upregulating BMP-2 and protecting osteoblasts from apoptosis. In addition, statins have been suggested to be anti-osteoclastic by reducing the osteoclast differentiation and activity. Several in vivo and clinical studies have confirmed the beneficial effects of statins in the treatment of osteoporosis and fracture injuries. However, controversial results exist showing statins may have no benefit and in some instances, they may retard bone repair. Different factors such as type, route of administration, dose and dosage of statins, and the injury model seem to be involved for such controversies. In the present study, the most important issues regarding statins have been reviewed to find out how statins may be beneficial and statin therapy can be improved for treating osteoporosis and fracture injuries. The lipophilic statins particularly simvastatin and atorvastatin are the most investigated statins with beneficial results on bone healing and turnover. Most of the in vivo and clinical studies performed systemic route of administration for treating osteoporosis, with much higher clinical doses than the lipid lowering therapy, which increases the statin related side and out of target effects. In contrast, most of the in vivo studies that used statins for fracture repair have applied local delivery methods with much lower doses via tissue engineering approaches. However, local delivery of statins and statin therapy for fracture repair both have low application in the clinical setting and such methods are still under in vivo investigation. Future clinical trials are needed to elucidate how delivery systems and tissue engineering technologies are able to improve the outcome of statin therapy.

  2. Prognostic and Therapeutic Implications of Statin and Aspirin Therapy in Individuals With Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Benjamin J.W.; Small, Gary; Yam, Yeung; Chen, Li; McPherson, Ruth; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Berman, Daniel S.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cheng, Victor Y.; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Cury, Ricardo; Delago, Augustin; Dunning, Allison; Feuchtner, Gundrun; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Jörg; Karlsberg, Ronald P.; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; LaBounty, Troy; Lin, Fay; Maffei, Erica; Raff, Gilbert L.; Shaw, Leslee J.; Villines, Todd C.; Min, James K.

    2015-01-01

    CAD predicted mortality. Baseline statin therapy was associated with a significant reduction in mortality for individuals with nonobstructive CAD but not for individuals without CAD. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/. Unique identifier NCT01443637 PMID:25676000

  3. The Effect of Ezetimibe/Statin Combination and High-Dose Statin Therapy on Thyroid Autoimmunity in Women with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Cardiovascular Disease: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, R; Szkróbka, W; Okopień, B

    2016-10-01

    Background: Intensive statin therapy was found to reduce thyroid autoimmunity in women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. No similar data are available for other hypolipidemic agents. Methods: The participants of the study were 16 women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and coronary artery disease. On the basis of statin tolerance, they were divided into 2 groups. 8 patients who did not tolerate high-dose statin therapy were treated with a statin, the dose of which was reduced by half, together with ezetimibe. The remaining 8 patients tolerating the treatment continued high-dose statin therapy. Plasma lipids, serum levels of thyrotropin, free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine, as well as titers of thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies were measured at the beginning of the study and 6 months later. Results: Replacing high-dose statin therapy with ezetimibe/statin combination therapy increased serum titers of thyroid peroxidase as well as led to an insignificant increase in serum titers of thyroglobulin antibodies. At the end of the study, thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibody titers were higher in patients receiving the combination therapy than in those treated only with high-dose statin. Conclusions: Our study shows that high-dose statin therapy produces a stronger effect on thyroid autoimmunity than ezetimibe/statin combination therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Recent findings on the health effects of omega-3 fatty acids and statins, and their interactions: do statins inhibit omega-3?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lorgeril Michel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Early randomized controlled trials (RCTs demonstrated the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3, whereas recent RCTs were negative. We now address the issue, focusing on the temporal changes having occurred: most patients in recent RCTs are no longer n-3 deficient and the vast majority are now treated with statins. Recent RCTs testing n-3 against arrhythmias suggest that n-3 reduce the risk only in patients not taking a statin. Other recent RCTs in secondary prevention were negative although, in a post-hoc analysis separating statin users and non-users, non-significant protection of n-3 was observed among statin non-users whereas statin users had no effect. Recent RCTs testing statins - after the implementation of the New Clinical Trial Regulation in 2007 - are negative (or flawed suggesting that the lack of effect of n-3 cannot be attributed to a parallel protection by statins. Finally, statins favor the metabolism of omega-6 fatty acids (n-6, which in turn inhibits n-3 and, contrary to n-3, they increase insulin resistance and the risk of diabetes. Thus, n-3 and statins are counteractive at several levels and statins appear to inhibit n-3.

  5. Balanced pan-PPAR activator bezafibrate in combination with statin: comprehensive lipids control and diabetes prevention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenenbaum Alexander

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract All fibrates are peroxisome proliferators-activated receptors (PPARs-alpha agonists with ability to decrease triglyceride and increase high density lipoprotein- cholesterol (HDL-C. However, bezafibrate has a unique characteristic profile of action since it activates all three PPAR subtypes (alpha, gamma and delta at comparable doses. Therefore, bezafibrate operates as a pan-agonist for all three PPAR isoforms. Selective PPAR gamma agonists (thiazolidinediones are used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. They improve insulin sensitivity by up-regulating adipogenesis, decreasing free fatty acid levels, and reversing insulin resistance. However, selective PPAR gamma agonists also cause water retention, weight gain, peripheral edema, and congestive heart failure. The expression of PPAR beta/ delta in essentially all cell types and tissues (ubiquitous presence suggests its potential fundamental role in cellular biology. PPAR beta/ delta effects correlated with enhancement of fatty acid oxidation, energy consumption and adaptive thermogenesis. Together, these data implicate PPAR beta/delta in fuel combustion and suggest that pan-PPAR agonists that include a component of PPAR beta/delta activation might offset some of the weight gain issues seen with selective PPAR gamma agonists, as was demonstrated by bezafibrate studies. Suggestively, on the whole body level all PPARs acting as one orchestra and balanced pan-PPAR activation seems as an especially attractive pharmacological goal. Conceptually, combined PPAR gamma and alpha action can target simultaneously insulin resistance and atherogenic dyslipidemia, whereas PPAR beta/delta properties may prevent the development of overweight. Bezafibrate, as all fibrates, significantly reduced plasma triglycerides and increased HDL-C level (but considerably stronger than other major fibrates. Bezafibrate significantly decreased prevalence of small, dense low density lipoproteins particles, remnants

  6. Balanced pan-PPAR activator bezafibrate in combination with statin: comprehensive lipids control and diabetes prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Alexander; Fisman, Enrique Z

    2012-11-14

    All fibrates are peroxisome proliferators-activated receptors (PPARs)-alpha agonists with ability to decrease triglyceride and increase high density lipoprotein- cholesterol (HDL-C). However, bezafibrate has a unique characteristic profile of action since it activates all three PPAR subtypes (alpha, gamma and delta) at comparable doses. Therefore, bezafibrate operates as a pan-agonist for all three PPAR isoforms. Selective PPAR gamma agonists (thiazolidinediones) are used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). They improve insulin sensitivity by up-regulating adipogenesis, decreasing free fatty acid levels, and reversing insulin resistance. However, selective PPAR gamma agonists also cause water retention, weight gain, peripheral edema, and congestive heart failure. The expression of PPAR beta/ delta in essentially all cell types and tissues (ubiquitous presence) suggests its potential fundamental role in cellular biology. PPAR beta/ delta effects correlated with enhancement of fatty acid oxidation, energy consumption and adaptive thermogenesis. Together, these data implicate PPAR beta/delta in fuel combustion and suggest that pan-PPAR agonists that include a component of PPAR beta/delta activation might offset some of the weight gain issues seen with selective PPAR gamma agonists, as was demonstrated by bezafibrate studies. Suggestively, on the whole body level all PPARs acting as one orchestra and balanced pan-PPAR activation seems as an especially attractive pharmacological goal. Conceptually, combined PPAR gamma and alpha action can target simultaneously insulin resistance and atherogenic dyslipidemia, whereas PPAR beta/delta properties may prevent the development of overweight. Bezafibrate, as all fibrates, significantly reduced plasma triglycerides and increased HDL-C level (but considerably stronger than other major fibrates). Bezafibrate significantly decreased prevalence of small, dense low density lipoproteins particles, remnants, induced

  7. Statins increase hepatic cholesterol synthesis and stimulate fecal cholesterol elimination in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonewille, Marleen; de Boer, Jan Freark; Mele, Laura; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W.; Wolters, Justina C.; Kuivenhoven, Jan A.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Brufau, Gemma; Groen, Albert K.

    2016-01-01

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. Statins reduce plasma cholesterol levels, but whether this is actually caused by inhibition of de novo cholesterol synthesis has not been clearly established. Using three different statins, we

  8. Statins increase hepatic cholesterol synthesis and stimulate fecal cholesterol elimination in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonewille, Marleen; de Boer, Jan Freark; Mele, Laura; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W; Wolters, Justina C; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Tietge, Uwe J.F.; Brufau Dones, Gemma; Groen, Albert K

    2016-01-01

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. Statins reduce plasma cholesterol levels, but whether this is actually caused by inhibition of de novo cholesterol synthesis has not been clearly established. Using three different statins we

  9. Electrophysiologic and clinico-pathologic characteristics of statin-induced muscle injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdulrazaq

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Atorvastatin increased average creatine kinase, suggesting, statins produce mild muscle injury even in asymptomatic subjects. Diabetic statin users were more prone to develop muscle injury than others. Muscle fiber conduction velocity evaluation is recommended as a simple and reliable test to diagnose statin-induced myopathy instead of invasive muscle biopsy.

  10. Statins increase hepatic cholesterol synthesis and stimulate fecal cholesterol elimination in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonewille, Marleen; de Boer, Jan Freark; Mele, Laura; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W.; Wolters, Justina C.; Kuivenhoven, Jan A.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Brufau, Gemma; Groen, Albert K.

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. Statins reduce plasma cholesterol levels, but whether this is actually caused by inhibition of de novo cholesterol synthesis has not been clearly established. Using three different statins, we

  11. Statin Intake Is Associated With Decreased Insulin Sensitivity During Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroaki; Carvalho, George; Sato, Tamaki; Hatzakorzian, Roupen; Lattermann, Ralph; Codere-Maruyama, Takumi; Matsukawa, Takashi; Schricker, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical trauma impairs intraoperative insulin sensitivity and is associated with postoperative adverse events. Recently, preprocedural statin therapy is recommended for patients with coronary artery disease. However, statin therapy is reported to increase insulin resistance and the risk of new-onset diabetes. Thus, we investigated the association between preoperative statin therapy and intraoperative insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic, dyslipidemic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this prospective, nonrandomized trial, patients taking lipophilic statins were assigned to the statin group and hypercholesterolemic patients not receiving any statins were allocated to the control group. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the hyperinsulinemic-normoglycemic clamp technique during surgery. The mean, SD of blood glucose, and the coefficient of variation (CV) after surgery were calculated for each patient. The association between statin use and intraoperative insulin sensitivity was tested by multiple regression analysis. RESULTS We studied 120 patients. In both groups, insulin sensitivity gradually decreased during surgery with values being on average ∼20% lower in the statin than in the control group. In the statin group, the mean blood glucose in the intensive care unit was higher than in the control group (153 ± 20 vs. 140 ± 20 mg/dL; P statin group (SD, P statin use was independently associated with intraoperative insulin sensitivity (β = −0.16; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Preoperative use of lipophilic statins is associated with increased insulin resistance during cardiac surgery in nondiabetic, dyslipidemic patients. PMID:22829524

  12. Statin use after acute myocardial infarction by patient complexity: are the rates right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, John M; Cook, Elizabeth; Chapman, Cole G; Schroeder, Mary C; A Chrischilles, Elizabeth; Schneider, Kathleen M; Kulchaitanaroaj, Puttarin; Robinson, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Guidelines suggest statin use after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) should be close to universal in patients without safety concerns yet rates are much lower than recommended, decline with patient complexity, and display substantial geographic variation. Trial exclusions have resulted in little evidence to guide statin prescribing for complex patients. To assess the benefits and risks associated with higher rates of statin use after AMI by baseline patient complexity. Sample includes Medicare fee-for-service patients with AMIs in 2008-2009. Instrumental variable estimators using variation in local area prescribing patterns by statin intensity as instruments were used to assess the association of higher statin prescribing rates by statin intensity on 1-year survival, adverse events, and cost by patient complexity. Providers seem to have individualized statin use across patients based on potential risks. Higher statin rates for noncomplex AMI patients were associated with increased survival rates with little added adverse event risk. Higher statin rates for complex AMI patients were associated with tradeoffs between higher survival rates and higher rates of adverse events. Higher rates of statin use for noncomplex AMI patients are associated with outcome rate changes similar to existing evidence. For the complex patients in our study, who were least represented in existing trials, higher statin-use rates were associated with survival gains and higher adverse event risks not previously documented. Policy interventions promoting higher statin-use rates for complex patients may need to be reevaluated taking careful consideration of these tradeoffs.

  13. Effects of ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10) on myopathy in statin users.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaars, C.F.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Statins are associated with muscle complaints, including myositis. The mechanism through which statin use causes muscle toxicity is unknown. One of the theories is that statin therapy reduces coenzyme Q10 levels in muscle mitochondria, which leads to muscle injury and myopathy. Th

  14. Statin induced myopathy and myalgia: time trend analysis and comparison of risk associated with statin class from 1991-2006.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Molokhia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Statins are widely used as a cholesterol lowering medication, reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in high risk patients; and only rarely cause serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs. UK primary care databases of morbidity and prescription data, which now cover several million people, have potential for more powerful analytical approaches to study ADRs including adjusting for confounders and examining temporal effects. METHODS: Case-crossover design in detecting statin associated myopathy ADR in 93, 831 patients, using two independent primary care databases (1991-2006. We analysed risk by drug class, by disease code and cumulative year, exploring different cut-off exposure times and confounding by temporality. RESULTS: Using a 12 and 26 week exposure period, large risk ratios (RR are associated with all classes of statins and fibrates for myopathy: RR 10.6 (9.8-11.4 and 19.9 (17.6-22.6 respectively. At 26 weeks, the largest risks are with fluvastatin RR 33.3 (95% CI 16.8-66.0 and ciprofibrate (with previous statin use RR 40.5 (95% CI 13.4-122.0. AT 12 weeks the differences between cerivastatin and atorvastatin RR for myopathy were found to be significant, RR 2.05 (95% CI 1.2-3.5, and for rosuvastatin and fluvastatin RR 3.0 (95% CI 1.6-5.7. After 12 months of statin initiation, the relative risk for myopathy for all statins and fibrates increased to 25.7 (95% CI 21.8-30.3. Furthermore, this signal was detected within 2 years of first events being recorded. Our data suggests an annual incidence of statin induced myopathy or myalgia of around 11.4 for 16, 591 patients or 689 per million per year. CONCLUSION: There may be differential risks associated with some classes of statin and fibrate. Myopathy related to statin or fibrate use may persist after a long exposure time (12 months or more. These methods could be applied for early detection of harmful drug side effects, using similar primary care diagnostic and prescribing data.

  15. Cardiovascular prevention: lifestyle and statins--competitors or companions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opie, L H; Dalby, A J

    2014-03-01

    Favourable lifestyles promote cardiovascular protection. Exercise can induce beneficial changes in the genome that decrease low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and increase anti-inflammatory markers. The Mediterranean dietary pattern, fortified by nuts, while not reducing weight, reduces mortality. Lifestyle changes combined with statin therapy provide potent protection against coronary heart disease, especially when used for secondary prevention after cardiovascular events. Decisions regarding the initiation of statin therapy for primary prevention are more difficult, requiring consideration of both the LDL-C level and the degree of cardiovascular risk for dyslipidaemic patients. Combining intensive exercise and statin therapy substantially reduces the mortality risk, and thus is potentially the ideal risk-reducing combination.

  16. Statin prescribing according to gender, age and indication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallach-Kildemoes, Helle; Støvring, Henrik; Holme Hansen, Ebba

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALES, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The increasing dispensing of statins has raised concern about the appropriateness of prescribing to various population groups. We aimed to (1) investigate incident and prevalent statin prescribing according to indication, gender and age and (2) relate prescribing...... numbers of statin users according to register proxies for indication, gender and age. RESULTS: In 2010, the prevalence became highest for ages 75-84 and was higher in men than women (37% and 33%, respectively). Indication-specific incidences and prevalences peaked at ages around 65-70, but in myocardial...... infarction, the prevalence was about 80% at ages 45-80. Particularly, incidences tended to be lower in women until ages of about 60 where after gender differences were negligible. In asymptomatic individuals (hypercholesterolaemia, presumably only indication) aged 50+, dispensing was highest in women...

  17. Endothelial progenitor cells: Exploring the pleiotropic effects of statins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Kully; Mamas, Mamas; Butler, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Statins have become a cornerstone of risk modification for ischaemic heart disease patients. A number of studies have shown that they are effective and safe. However studies have observed an early benefit in terms of a reduction in recurrent infarct and or death after a myocardial infarction, prior to any significant change in lipid profile. Therefore, pleiotropic mechanisms, other than lowering lipid profile alone, must account for this effect. One such proposed pleiotropic mechanism is the ability of statins to augment both number and function of endothelial progenitor cells. The ability to augment repair and maintenance of a functioning endothelium may have profound beneficial effect on vascular repair and potentially a positive impact on clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease. The following literature review will discuss issues surrounding endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) identification, role in vascular repair, factors affecting EPC numbers, the role of statins in current medical practice and their effects on EPC number. PMID:28163831

  18. A novel therapeutic effect of statins on nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfrate, Leonilde; Procino, Giuseppe; Wang, David Q-H; Svelto, Maria; Portincasa, Piero

    2015-02-01

    Statins competitively inhibit hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, resulting in reduced plasma total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Recently, it has been shown that statins exert additional 'pleiotropic' effects by increasing expression levels of the membrane water channels aquaporin 2 (AQP2). AQP2 is localized mainly in the kidney and plays a critical role in determining cellular water content. This additional effect is independent of cholesterol homoeostasis, and depends on depletion of mevalonate-derived intermediates of sterol synthetic pathways, i.e. farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate. By up-regulating the expression levels of AQP2, statins increase water reabsorption by the kidney, thus opening up a new avenue in treating patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a hereditary disease that yet lacks high-powered and limited side effects therapy. Aspects related to water balance determined by AQP2 in the kidney, as well as standard and novel therapeutic strategies of NDI are discussed.

  19. Pleiotropic vasoprotective effects of statins: The chicken or the egg?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Kirmizis

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Dimitrios Kirmizis, Dimitrios ChatzidimitriouAristotle University, Thessaloniki, GreeceAbstract: Statins (3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A [HMG-CoA] reductase inhibitors are the most commonly used lipid-lowering drugs. Their main lipid-lowering effect is achieved by an increase in the expression of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol receptors associated with inhibition of cholesterol synthesis through inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase – the first and rate-limiting step in cholesterol synthesis. However, beyond cholesterol synthesis inhibition, inhibition of the HMG-CoA reductase affects as well the synthesis of other molecules with significant roles in different, yet often intercalating, metabolic pathways. On this basis, and supported by an increasing series of advocating epidemiological and experimental data, an extended dialogue has been established over the last few years regarding the nonlipid or “pleiotropic” actions of statins.Keywords: statins, immunomodulatory, pleiotropic effects

  20. Statin-associated weakness in myasthenia gravis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keogh Michael J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Myasthenia gravis is a commonly undiagnosed condition in the elderly. Statin medications can cause weakness and are linked to the development and deterioration of several autoimmune conditions, including myasthenia gravis. Case presentation We report the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian man who presented with acute onset of dysarthria and dysphagia initially attributed to a brain stem stroke. Oculobulbar and limb weakness progressed until myasthenia gravis was diagnosed and treated, and until statin therapy was finally withdrawn. Conclusion Myasthenia gravis may be underappreciated as a cause of acute bulbar weakness among the elderly. Statin therapy appeared to have contributed to the weakness in our patient who was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis.

  1. Statins affect ocular microcirculation in patients with hypercholesterolaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Naim; Spoerl, Eberhard; Fischer, Sabine; Hornykewycz, Karin; Haustein, Michael; Haentzschel, Janek; Pillunat, Lutz E

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the effect of statins on ocular microcirculation in patients with hypercholesterolaemia. Ten patients with hypercholesterolaemia were included in this study. The diameter of retinal vessels was measured continuously with the retinal vessel analyser (RVA) before and 4 weeks after statin therapy. After baseline assessment, a monochromatic luminance flicker was applied to evoke retinal vasodilation. Flicker response was then analysed after 50, 150 and 250 seconds after baseline measurement. Additionally, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride levels were obtained to find a possible correlation between retinal vessel diameter changes and lipid metabolism before and after statin therapy. The mean diameter of the arterioles before statin therapy at baseline was 106.3 ± 1.5 μm and the mean diameter of the venules at baseline was 127.3 ± 2.5 μm. The mean diameter of the arterioles 4 weeks before statin therapy was 107.3 ± 1.8 μm after 50 seconds, 107.9 ± 1.8 μm after 150 seconds and 108.0 ± 1.8 μm after 250 seconds (p = 0.01). The mean diameter of the venules 4 weeks before statin therapy was 128.0 ± 2.6 μm after 50 seconds, 128.2 ± 2.5 μm after 150 seconds and 128.2 ± 2.3 μm after 250 seconds (p = 0.01). The mean diameter of the arterioles 4 weeks after statin therapy at baseline was 107.1 ± 1.6 μm and the mean diameter of the venules at baseline was 127.7 ± 2.3 μm which was significantly different from measurements before statin therapy (p = 0.004). The diameter of the arterioles 4 weeks after statin therapy increased to 109.2 ± 2.1 μm after 50 seconds, to 110.6 ± 2.6 μm after 150 seconds and to 111.8 ± 2.3 μm after 250 seconds with statistical significance at all time points (p = 0.001). The mean diameter of the venules after statin therapy increased to 130.6 ± 2.7 μm after 50 seconds, to 132.1 ± 2.6 μm after 150 seconds and to 133.5 ± 3.0 μm after 250 seconds with

  2. Phenotyping Adverse Drug Reactions: Statin-Related Myotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Laura K; Moretz, Jeremy D; Denny, Joshua C; Peterson, Josh F; Bush, William S

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear the extent to which best practices for phenotyping disease states from electronic medical records (EMRs) translate to phenotyping adverse drug events. Here we use statin-induced myotoxicity as a case study to identify best practices in this area. We compared multiple phenotyping algorithms using administrative codes, laboratory measurements, and full-text keyword matching to identify statin-related myopathy from EMRs. Manual review of 300 deidentified EMRs with exposure to at least one statin, created a gold standard set of 124 cases and 176 controls. We tested algorithms using ICD-9 billing codes, laboratory measurements of creatine kinase (CK) and keyword searches of clinical notes and allergy lists. The combined keyword algorithms produced were the most accurate (PPV=86%, NPV=91%). Unlike in most disease phenotyping algorithms, addition of ICD9 codes or laboratory data did not appreciably increase algorithm accuracy. We conclude that phenotype algorithms for adverse drug events should consider text based approaches.

  3. Effectiveness and safety evaluation in the dyslipidemia treatment with statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Santos Silva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Statins are used to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with a high risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the use of statins does not ensure effectiveness and pharmacotherapeutic safety. In this context, the present study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the therapy with statins in patients with dyslipidemia and high cardiovascular risk. To evaluate these parameters, this study selected 113 dyslipidemic patients with regular statins use of at least seven months. It was an observational cross-sectional study, based on data analysis collected from biochemical tests of patients with dyslipidemia in the public health system in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. Isolated hypercholesterolemia was the most prevalent dyslipidemia type and the most used statin was atorvastatin (84%, followed by simvastatin (16%. The study observed no effectiveness in 58.4% of the patients; 28% had no safety in the treatment, and 48.3% were using doses above the standard dosage. Comparing effectiveness and safety between the same drugs, at standard dosage with higher dosages, there was not any statistical difference in biochemical test results. Therapeutic goals for LDL-C ≤ 70 mg/dL were found in 28% of cases. However, the useof doses above the standard dosage intended to reach very low LDL-C levels should be reevaluated, since there was no statistical difference in reducing the lipid profile, suggesting that the same results can be obtained with a lower standardized dose. This study provides  data relevant to the discussion of statins use and to the necessity of strengthening pharmacotherapeutic monitoring in dyslipidemia treatment.Keywords: Dyslipidemias. Drug Monitoring. Evaluation of Results of Therapeutic Interventions. Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors.  

  4. Ongoing clinical trials of the pleiotropic effects of statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Davignon

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Jean Davignon1, Lawrence A Leiter21Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, CanadaBackground: The multiple effects (ie, pleiotropic effects of statins have received increasing recognition and may have clinical applicability across a broad range of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular conditions. Objective: To determine the relevance and significance of ongoing clinical trials of the pleiotropic effects of statins, focusing on nonlipid effects. Method: Ongoing trials were identified through personal communication, reports presented at scientific meetings (2000–2004, and queries made to AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co, Merck & Co, Novartis, and Pfizer, manufacturers of the currently marketed statins. Published trials and other source material were identified through electronic searches on MEDLINE (1990–2003, abstract books, and references identified from bibliographies of pertinent articles. Eligible studies were the clinical trials of statins currently under way in which primary or secondary outcomes included the statins’ nonlipid (ie, pleiotropic effect(s. Data were extracted and trial quality was assessed by the authors. Results: Of the 22 ongoing trials of the nonlipid effects of statins identified, 10 assessed inflammatory markers and plaque stabilization, 4 assessed oxidized low density lipoprotein/vascular oxidant stress, 3 assessed end-stage renal disease, 3 assessed fibrinogen/viscosity, 2 assessed endothelial function, 2 assessed acute coronary syndrome, 2 assessed aortic stenosis progression, and 1 each assessed hypertension, osteoporosis, ischemic burden, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke (outcomes often overlapped. Conclusion: Given the excellent safety and tolerability of statins as a class, full exploration of their pleiotropic effects has the potential to provide additional benefits to many patients

  5. Associations between statins and COPD: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Keith K

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statins have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties which could possibly influence inflammatory airways disease. We assessed evidence for disease modifying effects of statin treatment in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Methods A systematic review was conducted of studies which reported effects of statin treatment in COPD. Data sources searched included MEDLINE, EMBASE and reference lists. Results Eight papers reporting nine original studies met the selection criteria. One was a randomized controlled trial (RCT, one a retrospective nested case-control study, five were retrospective cohort studies of which one was linked with a case-control study, and one was a retrospective population-based analysis. Outcomes associated with treatment with statins included decreased all-cause mortality in three out of four studies (OR/HR 0.48–0.67 in three studies, OR 0.99 in one study, decreased COPD-related mortality (OR 0.19–0.29, reduction in incidence of respiratory-related urgent care (OR 0.74, fewer COPD exacerbations (OR 0.43, fewer intubations for COPD exacerbations (OR 0.1 and attenuated decline in pulmonary function. The RCT reported improvement in exercise capacity and dyspnea after exercise associated with decreased levels of C-reactive protein and Interleukin-6 in statin users, but no improvement of lung function. Conclusion There is evidence from observational studies and one RCT that statins may reduce morbidity and/or mortality in COPD patients. Further interventional studies are required to confirm these findings.

  6. Association of Continuity of Primary Care and Statin Adherence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Warren

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in medication adherence are a major barrier to effectiveness of chronic condition management. Continuity of primary care may promote adherence. We assessed the association of continuity of primary care with adherence to long-term medication as exemplified by statins.We linked data from a prospective study of 267,091 Australians aged 45 years and over to national data sets on prescription reimbursements, general practice claims, hospitalisations and deaths. For participants having a statin dispense within 90 days of study entry, we computed medication possession ratio (MPR and usual provider continuity index (UPI for the subsequent two years. We used multivariate Poisson regression to calculate the relative risk (RR and 95% confidence interval (CI for the association between tertiles of UPI and MPR adjusted for socio-demographic and health-related patient factors, including age, gender, remoteness of residence, smoking, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, prior heart disease and speaking a language other than English at home. We performed a comparison approach using propensity score matching on a subset of the sample.36,144 participants were eligible and included in the analysis among whom 58% had UPI greater than 75%. UPI was significantly associated with 5% increased MPR for statin adherence (95% CI 1.04-1.06 for highest versus lowest tertile. Dichotomised analysis using a cut-off of UPI at 75% showed a similar effect size. The association between UPI and statin adherence was independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors. Stratification analyses further showed a stronger association among those who were new to statins (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.15-1.54.Greater continuity of care has a positive association with medication adherence for statins which is independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors.

  7. Merger of Ezetimibe and Statin: a Potential Dual Inhibitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xing-lian; XU Xian-xiu; ZHENG Lian-you; BAI Xu

    2011-01-01

    A potential dual inhibitor(4) for exogenous absorption and endogenic synthesis of cholesterol was designed based on the conjugation of the β-lactam pharmacophore of ezetimibe and the δ-1actone pharmacophore of statins. The merger of ezetimibe and statin 4 was synthesized firom p-hydroxybenzaldehyde through a ten-step route.1H NMR analysis showed existence of four pairs of enantiomers(5.7∶5.7∶1∶1, molar ratio). And compound 4 was found to lower total glucose(TG) level in rat serum via a high-cholesterol and high-fat feeding experiment.

  8. The Risk of Hepatotoxicity, New Onset Diabetes and Rhabdomyolysis in the Era of High-Intensity Statin Therapy: Does Statin Type Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benes, Lane B; Bassi, Nikhil S; Davidson, Michael H

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on cholesterol management have placed greater emphasis on high-intensity statin dosing for those with known cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus. Differences in risk of hepatotoxicity, new onset diabetes and rhabdomyolysis specifically between the high-intensity statins and the most common moderate-intensity statin, simvastatin, were not found to a significant degree in this review. Rather, baseline characteristics and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) appear to be more important regarding the risk of these adverse effects. Pharmacogenetic differences in statin metabolism may explain individual susceptibility, however genetic testing is not felt to be cost effective at this time. More importantly, statin choice should consider concomitant use of the many prevalent CYP3A4 inhibitors or inducers, and when present, rosuvastatin selection is recommended to reduce DDIs and risk of statin-induced adverse effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. APPLIED ASPECTS OF SLCO1B1 PHARMACOGENETIC TESTING FOR PREDICTING OF STATIN-INDUCED MYOPATHY AND PERSONALIZATION OF STATINS THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Sychev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical significance of the SLCO1B1 gene polymorphism (encoding an organic anion transport polipeptide in the development of statin induced myopathy is considered. Possible tactics of statin dose determination on the basis of pharmacogenetic testing is discussed. Indications for the use of this approach in clinical practice that should increase the efficacy and safety of the statin therapy are also considered.

  10. Preoperative statin is associated with decreased operative mortality in high risk coronary artery bypass patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Thomas D

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statins are widely prescribed to patients with atherosclerosis. A retrospective database analysis was used to examine the role of preoperative statin use in hospital mortality, for patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. Methods The study population comprised 2377 patients who had isolated CABG at Allegheny General Hospital between 2000 and 2004. Mean age of the patients was 65 ± 11 years (range 27 to 92 years. 1594 (67% were male, 5% had previous open heart procedures, and 4% had emergency surgery. 1004 patients (42% were being treated with a statin at the time of admission. Univariate, bivariate (Chi2, Fisher's Exact and Student's t-tests and multivariate (stepwise linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the association of statin use with mortality following CABG. Results Annual prevalence of preoperative statin use was similar over the study period and averaged 40%. Preoperative clinical risk assessment demonstrated a 2% risk of mortality in both the statin and non-statin groups. Operative mortality was 2.4% for all patients, 1.7% for statin users and 2.8% for non-statin users (p Conclusions Between 2000 and 2004 less than 50% of patients at this institution were receiving statins before admission for isolated CABG. A retrospective analysis of this cohort provides evidence that preoperative statin use is associated with lower operative mortality in high-risk patients.

  11. 36 CFR 254.15 - Title standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Title standards. 254.15... ADJUSTMENTS Land Exchanges § 254.15 Title standards. (a) Title evidence. (1) Unless otherwise specified by the... and “Standards for the Preparation of Title Evidence in Land Acquisitions by the United States”...

  12. Are investments in disease prevention complements? The case of statins and health behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Robert; Darden, Michael; Lakdawalla, Darius

    2014-07-01

    We obtain estimates of associations between statin use and health behaviors. Statin use is associated with a small increase in BMI and moderate (20-33%) increases in the probability of being obese. Statin use was also associated with a significant (e.g., 15% of mean) increase in moderate alcohol use among men. There was no consistent evidence of a decrease in smoking associated with statin use, and exercise worsened somewhat for females. Statin use was associated with increased physical activity among males. Finally, there was evidence that statin use increased the use of blood pressure medication and aspirin for both males and females, although estimates varied considerably in magnitude. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that healthy diet is a strong substitute for statins, but there is only uneven evidence for the hypothesis that investments in disease prevention are complementary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of statins in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Amelia J; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; Arora, Devinder S; Grant, Gary D; McDermott, Catherine M; Perkins, Anthony V; Davey, Andrew K

    2014-11-10

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, commonly referred to as statins, are widely used in the treatment of dyslipidaemia, in addition to providing primary and secondary prevention against cardiovascular disease and stroke. Statins' effects on the central nervous system (CNS), particularly on cognition and neurological disorders such as stroke and multiple sclerosis, have received increasing attention in recent years, both within the scientific community and in the media. Current understanding of statins' effects is limited by a lack of mechanism-based studies, as well as the assumption that all statins have the same pharmacological effect in the central nervous system. This review aims to provide an updated discussion on the molecular mechanisms contributing to statins' possible effects on cognitive function, neurodegenerative disease, and various neurological disorders such as stroke, epilepsy, depression and CNS cancers. Additionally, the pharmacokinetic differences between statins and how these may result in statin-specific neurological effects are also discussed.

  14. Exploitation of pleiotropic actions of statins by using tumour-targeted delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licarete, Emilia; Sesarman, Alina; Banciu, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Statins are drugs traditionally used to lower cholesterol levels in blood. At concentrations 100- to 500-fold higher than those needed for reaching cholesterol lowering activity, they have anti-tumour activity. This anti-tumour activity is based on statins pleiotropic effects derived from their ability to inhibit the mevalonate synthesis and include anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-metastatic actions and modulatory effects on intra-tumour oxidative stress. Thus, in this review, we summarise the possible pleiotropic actions of statins involved in tumour growth inhibition. Since the administration of these high doses of statins is accompanied by severe side effects, targeted delivery of statins seems to be the appropriate strategy for efficient application of statins in oncology. Therefore, we also present an overview of the current status of targeted delivery systems for statins with possible utilisation in oncology.

  15. Cholesterol treatment with statins: Who is left out and who makes it to goal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winters Paul

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whether patient socio-demographic characteristics (age, sex, race/ethnicity, income, and education are independently associated with failure to receive indicated statin therapy and/or to achieve low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C therapy goals are not known. We examined socio-demographic factors associated with a eligibility for statin therapy among those not on statins, and b achievement of statin therapy goals. Methods Adults (21-79 years participating in the United States (US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 1999-2006 were studied. Statin eligibility and achievement of target LDL-C was assessed using the US Third Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III on Treatment of High Cholesterol guidelines. Results Among 6,043 participants not taking statins, 10.4% were eligible. Adjusted predictors of statin eligibility among statin non-users were being older, male, poorer, and less educated. Hispanics were less likely to be eligible but not using statins, an effect that became non-significant with adjustment for language usually spoken at home. Among 537 persons taking statins, 81% were at LDL-C goal. Adjusted predictors of goal failure among statin users were being male and poorer. These risks were not attenuated by adjustment for healthcare access or utilization. Conclusion Among person's not taking statins, the socio-economically disadvantaged are more likely to be eligible and among those on statins, the socio-economically disadvantaged are less likely to achieve statin treatment goals. Further study is needed to identify specific amenable patient and/or physician factors that contribute to these disparities.

  16. Continued Statin Prescriptions After Adverse Reactions and Patient Outcomes: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huabing; Plutzky, Jorge; Shubina, Maria; Turchin, Alexander

    2017-08-15

    Many patients discontinue statin treatment, often after having a possible adverse reaction. The risks and benefits of continued statin therapy after an adverse reaction are not known. To examine the relationship between continuation of statin therapy (any prescription within 12 months after an adverse reaction) and clinical outcomes. Retrospective cohort study. Primary care practices affiliated with 2 academic medical centers. Patients with a presumed adverse reaction to a statin between 2000 and 2011. Information on adverse reactions to statins was obtained from structured electronic medical record data or natural-language processing of narrative provider notes. The primary composite outcome was time to a cardiovascular event (myocardial infarction or stroke) or death. Most (81%) of the adverse reactions to statins were identified from the text of electronic provider notes. Among 28 266 study patients, 19 989 (70.7%) continued receiving statin prescriptions after the adverse reaction. Four years after the presumed adverse event, the cumulative incidence of the composite primary outcome was 12.2% for patients with continued statin prescriptions, compared with 13.9% for those without them (difference, 1.7% [95% CI, 0.8% to 2.7%]; P statin was prescribed after the adverse reaction, 2014 (26.5%) had a documented adverse reaction to the second statin, but 1696 (84.2%) of those patients continued receiving statin prescriptions. The risk for recurrent adverse reactions to statins could not be established for the entire sample. It was also not possible to determine whether patients actually took the statins. Continued statin prescriptions after an adverse reaction were associated with a lower incidence of death and cardiovascular events. Chinese National Key Program of Clinical Science, National Natural Science Foundation of China, and Young Scientific Research Fund of Peking Union Medical College Hospital.

  17. Seventeen years of statin pharmacogenetics : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leusink, Maarten; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; de Bakker, Paul; de Boer, Anthonius; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H

    2016-01-01

    AIM: We evaluated the evidence of pharmacogenetic associations with statins in a systematic review. METHODS: Two separate outcomes were considered of interest: modification of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) response and modification of risk for cardiovascular events. RESULTS: In candida

  18. Ezetimibe Added to Statin Therapy after Acute Coronary Syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannon, Christopher P; Blazing, Michael A; Giugliano, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Statin therapy reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels and the risk of cardiovascular events, but whether the addition of ezetimibe, a nonstatin drug that reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption, can reduce the rate of cardiovascular events further is not known. MET...

  19. Dyslipidaemia in 2013: New statin guidelines and promising novel therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Athyros, Vasilios G

    2014-02-01

    The new ACC/AHA guidelines on treatment of blood cholesterol focus on intensity of statin therapy rather than target levels of lipids. Early studies show substantial reductions in LDL-cholesterol level with antibodies against PCSK9. MicroRNA silencing and gene-repair techniques to treat dyslipidaemia are promising strategies under development.

  20. Comment on: Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In manuscript named “Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus” by Chogtu et al, authors defined that pravastatin 40 mg/dL reduced the risk of diabetes by 30% in West of Scotland Coronary Prevention study. In fact, pravastatin 40 mg/dL reduced coronary heart disease risk approximately 30% in mentioned study.

  1. LIPID-LOWERING EFFICACY OF ROSUVASTATIN COMPARED WITH OTHER STATINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Meshkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of lipid-lowering effect of rosuvastatin is presented, as well as the main results of the study of rosuvastatin therapy efficacy , in comparison with other statins, received in controlled clinical trials of the GALAXY program: COMETS, LUNAR, MERCURY-I, SOLAR, STELLAR.

  2. LIPID-LOWERING EFFICACY OF ROSUVASTATIN COMPARED WITH OTHER STATINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Meshkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of lipid-lowering effect of rosuvastatin is presented, as well as the main results of the study of rosuvastatin therapy efficacy , in comparison with other statins, received in controlled clinical trials of the GALAXY program: COMETS, LUNAR, MERCURY-I, SOLAR, STELLAR.

  3. Statin treatment and the risk of recurrent pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biere-Rafi, Sara; Hutten, Barbara A.; Squizzato, Alessandro; Ageno, Walter; Souverein, Patrick C.; De Boer, A; Gerdes, Victor E. A.; Buller, Harry R.; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Patients with idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE) have a high recurrence risk during and after stopping anticoagulant treatment. Several studies suggest that treatment with statins reduces the incidence of a first episode of VTE, but data on the effects in patients with a previous episode a

  4. Postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients on statins undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LW Drummond

    2013-04-02

    Apr 2, 2013 ... The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS16) for cohort studies was used to assess ... a 25% relative risk reduction (RRR) in AF in the statin group compared to ..... isolated heart valve operations: a propensity score analysis of 3,217.

  5. Statin use and risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnspang, S.; Pottegård, A.; Friis, Søren

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence is conflicting regarding statin use and risk of basal cell (BCC) and squamous cell skin cancer (SCC). METHODS: Using Danish nationwide registries, we identified all patients with incident BCC/SCC during 2005-2009 and matched them to population controls. We computed odds ratios...

  6. Comment on: Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehmet; Ali; Eren; Tevfik; Sabuncu; Hüseyin; Karaaslan

    2016-01-01

    In manuscript named "Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus" by Chogtu et al, authors defined that pravastatin 40 mg/dL reduced the risk of diabetes by 30% in West of Scotland Coronary Prevention study. In fact, pravastatin 40 mg/d L reduced coronary heart disease risk approximately 30% in mentioned study.

  7. Statins, fibrates, and venous thromboembolism: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, A.; Galli, M.; Romualdi, E.; Dentali, F.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Guasti, L.; Venco, A.; Ageno, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims: Recent data suggest a possibile benefit of lipid-lowering drugs, in particular statins, in preventing venous thromboembolism (VTE). The aim of this systematic review of the literature is to assess the effect of lipid-lowering drugs on VTE occurrence. Materials and methods: MEDLINE a

  8. Statins, fibrates, and venous thromboembolism: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, A.; Galli, M.; Romualdi, E.; Dentali, F.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Guasti, L.; Venco, A.; Ageno, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims: Recent data suggest a possibile benefit of lipid-lowering drugs, in particular statins, in preventing venous thromboembolism (VTE). The aim of this systematic review of the literature is to assess the effect of lipid-lowering drugs on VTE occurrence. Materials and methods: MEDLINE

  9. Statins as Modulators of Regulatory T-Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Forero-Peña

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are pharmacological inhibitors of the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR, an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of cholesterol. Some recent experimental studies have shown that besides their effects on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, statins may also have beneficial anti-inflammatory effects through diverse mechanisms. On the other hand, the induction and activity of regulatory T cells (Treg are key processes in the prevention of pathology during chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Hence, strategies oriented towards the therapeutic expansion of Tregs are gaining special attention among biomedical researchers. The potential effects of statins on the biology of Treg are of particular importance because of their eventual application as in vivo inducers of Treg in the treatment of multiple conditions. In this paper we review the experimental evidence pointing out to a potential effect of statins on the role of regulatory T cells in different conditions and discuss its potential clinical significance.

  10. Facing Title V permit constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patankar, U.M. [JACA Corp., Fort Washington, PA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The new Title V operating permit requirement under state regulations pursuant to the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments will cover every emission source at a facility. These rules will significantly affect an operation by setting minimum compliance requirements, mandating periodic compliance certification, prescribing complex monitoring, record keeping and reporting procedures and making state and EPA approval of routine operational changes necessary through a permit amendment. The main concern with Title V is its effect on the operational flexibility of a facility, and individual emission sources within that facility. Unless properly addressed in a permit document, the term operational flexibility, so freely used by regulators in the context of the Title V program, can turn into a misnomer and the ability to operate as before may be significantly compromised under Title V. True operational flexibility is essential for businesses to respond to real changes in the marketplace. In the age of automation, just-in-time inventories and increased competition, flexibility to operate can mean the difference between growth and stagnation.

  11. Can statins improve outcome in colorectal surgery?: Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César M Santos Jr

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Statins are recommended for people who have high serum cholesterol, and this role of statins has been well documented. However, some activities of statins, independent of their lipid-lowering effect, in conditions such as systemic inflammatory response syndrome, nephropathy, and other anti-inflammatory activities that reduce proinflammatory cytokines, are called "pleiotropic" effects of statins. For this reason, many candidates for surgical treatment are users of statins. As a result, benefits are observed in these patients, such as minimized postoperative complications, especially in cardiac or coronary surgery. This study was designed with the purpose of determining the current status of the use of statins as an adjuvant in the prevention of postoperative complications in colorectal surgery. Ongoing studies and future researches will help clarify the potential impact of statins on the prophylaxis of postoperative complications.As estatinas são drogas com o poder de inibir a hidroxi-metil-glutaril coenzima A redutase (HMG-CoA redutase, enzima que age na ativação da cadeia metabólica do colesterol. Portanto, sua principal ação, entre outros efeitos, é diminuir a concentração sérica total desse lipídeo. Por essa razão, muitas pessoas candidatas ao tratamento cirúrgico são pacientes usuários das estatinas. Seus outros efeitos, independente de sua capacidade para baixar os lipídeos circulantes, são denominados "efeitos pleiotrópicos" e estão, principalmente, relacionados à ação de bloqueio das atividades pró-inflamatórias, sobretudo minimizando, nos cardiopatas ou coronariopatas submetidos às operações cardíacas ou coronarianas, a prevalência da síndrome da reação inflamatória sistêmica, inclusive quando desencadeada por infecção. Estudos recentes têm sido elaborados para maiores conhecimentos dos mecanismos de ação das estatinas, especialmente em pacientes cardiopatas submetidos a tratamentos cirúrgicos n

  12. Statins and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus: is there a Rationale for Individualized Statin Therapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarese, E.P.; Szczesniak, A.; Kolodziejczak, M.; Gorny, B.; Kubica, J.; Suryapranata, H.

    2014-01-01

    Statins (hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme-A reductase inhibitors) are first-line agents for the management of hyperlipidemia in patients at high risk of cardiovascular (CV) events, and are the most commonly prescribed CV drugs worldwide. Although safe and generally well tolerated, there is growing evi

  13. Statins: Cardiovascular Risk Reduction in Percutaneous Coronary Intervention—Basic and Clinical Evidence of Hyperacute Use of Statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique C. Morales-Villegas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of LDL-cholesterol concentration in serum, blocking the isoprenylation of GTPases and the activation of myocyte-protective enzyme systems are three mechanisms that currently explain the lipid and non-lipid effects of statins. However, the decrease of LDL-cholesterol, the reduction of inflammation biomarkers and even the atheroregresion, as surrogate effects to the mechanisms of action of statins would be irrelevant if not accompanied by a significant decrease in the incidence of cardiovascular events. Statins like no other pharmacological group have proven to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events and prolong life in any clinical scenario. This article review the basic and clinical evidence that support a new indication for HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors “pharmacological myocardial preconditioning before anticipated ischemia” or hyperacute use of statins in subjects with any coronary syndrome eligible for elective, semi-urgent or primary percutaneous coronary intervention: ARMYDA-Original, NAPLES I-II, ARMYDA-ACS, ARMYDA-RECAPTURE, Non-STEMI-Korean, Korean-STEMI trials.

  14. On the Features and Functions of Film Titles and Relevant Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐璐

    2014-01-01

    Film is an art manifestation which originated from daily life. Besides it is also a mental product conveyed with various kinds of cultural, political, ideological elements. Film title, as the name card to a film, is short in form but rich in meaning, has its own linguistic, cultural, aesthetic and commercial features. Film title translation is a unique field of translation practice but far less explored. In this essay, the author tries to explain the features and functions of film title with cases and provides a scan of film title translation study at home in order to assist translators to find the major difficulties in film title translation and to improve the over-all quality of film title translation in the market.

  15. Unique Path Partitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bessenrodt, Christine; Olsson, Jørn Børling; Sellers, James A.

    2013-01-01

    We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions.......We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions....

  16. Statin-induced diabetes: incidence, mechanisms, and implications [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om P. Ganda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Persuasive data from many randomized controlled trials and large, long-term observational studies indicate a modestly increased risk for the emergence of new diabetes after statin initiation. Several meta-analyses of many statin trials as well as longitudinal population-based studies suggest that the risk factors for diabetes in statin-treated persons include underlying risk for diabetes at baseline (specifically features of metabolic syndrome, the intensity of statin therapy, certain genetic traits independent of diabetes risk, and adherence to lifestyle factors. Limited data suggest statins modestly worsen hyperglycemia and A1c levels in those with pre-existing diabetes or glucose intolerance. The precise mechanism(s of diabetogenesis with statin therapy are unclear, but impaired insulin sensitivity and compromised β cell function via enhanced intracellular cholesterol uptake due to inhibition of intracellular cholesterol synthesis by statins, as well as other mechanisms, may be involved. Furthermore, while statins are known to have anti-inflammatory effects, it is hypothesized that, under dysmetabolic conditions, they might have pro-inflammatory effects via induction of certain inflammasomes. This concept requires further elucidation in the human. Finally, it is clear that the risk–benefit ratio for cardiovascular disease events is strongly in favor of statin therapy in those at risk, despite the emergence of new diabetes. Adherence to lifestyle regimen is critical in the prevention of new diabetes on statins.

  17. Statins exhibit anticancer effects through modifications of the pAkt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraglia, Erica; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

    2012-03-01

    Statins are cholesterol lowering drugs that exhibit antitumor effects in several in vitro and in vivo models, and epidemiological studies indicate that statins prevent cancer. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of statins still needs to be elucidated. We previously demonstrated that single doses of different statins rapidly affect Akt signaling via the purinergic receptor P2X7. In particular, statins down-regulated nuclear pAkt. Here, we report that long-term treatment of A549 cells with high concentrations of statins (15-75 µM) selects cell sub-populations exhibiting altered P2X receptor expression, signs of increased PTEN activity, enhanced PHLPP2, decreased PI3K p110β and inhibited downstream pAkt signaling. Furthermore, the nuclear accumulation of pAkt in response to insulin was inhibited in selected cells. Statin-selected cells displayed reduced proliferation rate and were more vulnerable to etoposide- and 5-fluorouracil-elicited cytotoxic effects. The stability of a selected phenotype (50 µM) was tested for three weeks in the absence of statins. This resulted in a reversal of some, but not all alterations. Importantly, the truncated nuclear insulin response was retained. We conclude that long-term treatment with high doses of statins selects cells exhibiting stable alterations in insulin-Akt signaling and which are vulnerable to DNA damage. Our studies strengthen the hypothesis that an altered Akt signaling has a role in chemopreventive effects of statins.

  18. Statin use is associated with fewer periodontal lesions: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mäkelä Marja

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory processes are considered to participate in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Statins have been used successfully in the prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease. Chronic periodontitis has been suggested to contribute to CVD. The aim of this study was to examine the association of statin use and clinical markers of chronic periodontitis. Methods Periodontal probing pocket depth (PPD values were collected from dental records of 100 consecutive adult patients referred to a university dental clinic for treatment of advanced chronic periodontitis. A novel index, Periodontal Inflammatory Burden Index (PIBI, was derived from the PPD values to estimate systemic effects of periodontitis. Results Periodontitis patients taking statins had a 37% lower number of pathological periodontal pockets than those without statin medication (P = 0.00043. PIBI, which combines and unifies the data on PPD, was 40% smaller in statin using patients than in patients without statin (P = 0.00069. PIBI of subjects on simvastatin and atorvastatin both differed significantly from patients without statin and were on the same level. The subjects' number of teeth had no effect on the results Conclusion Patients on statin medication exhibit fewer signs of periodontal inflammatory injury than subjects without the statin regimen. PIBI provides a tool for monitoring inflammatory load of chronic periodontitis. The apparent beneficial effects of statins may in part be mediated by their pleiotropic anti-inflammatory effect on periodontal tissue.

  19. Statins for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Fiona; Ward, Kirsten; Moore, Theresa HM; Burke, Margaret; Smith, George Davey; Casas, Juan P; Ebrahim, Shah

    2014-01-01

    Background Reducing high blood cholesterol, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in people with and without a past history of coronary heart disease (CHD) is an important goal of pharmacotherapy. Statins are the first-choice agents. Previous reviews of the effects of statins have highlighted their benefits in people with coronary artery disease. The case for primary prevention, however, is less clear. Objectives To assess the effects, both harms and benefits, of statins in people with no history of CVD. Search methods To avoid duplication of effort, we checked reference lists of previous systematic reviews. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 1, 2007), MEDLINE (2001 to March 2007) and EMBASE (2003 to March 2007). There were no language restrictions. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of statins with minimum duration of one year and follow-up of six months, in adults with no restrictions on their total low density lipoprotein (LDL) or high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels, and where 10% or less had a history of CVD, were included. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion and extracted data. Outcomes included all cause mortality, fatal and non-fatal CHD, CVD and stroke events, combined endpoints (fatal and non-fatal CHD, CVD and stroke events), change in blood total cholesterol concentration, revascularisation, adverse events, quality of life and costs. Relative risk (RR) was calculated for dichotomous data, and for continuous data pooled weighted mean differences (with 95% confidence intervals) were calculated. Main results Fourteen randomised control trials (16 trial arms; 34,272 participants) were included. Eleven trials recruited patients with specific conditions (raised lipids, diabetes, hypertension, microalbuminuria). All-cause mortality was reduced by statins (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.96) as was combined fatal and non-fatal CVD endpoints

  20. Avoiding Title V permitting pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laswell, D.L.

    1993-04-01

    Title V of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments requires states to implement new air operating permit programs. States have a great deal of flexibility in developing their permit programs. Industry should work now to ensure that state programs contain the favorable aspects of the federal regulations and do not contain more stringent requirements that are not required under the Clean Air Act. This article outlines areas of the permit program that have the potential to handicap industry`s ability to expand.

  1. Potential use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) as radioprotective agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Gerhard; Henninger, Christian; Huelsenbeck, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely used in the therapy of hypercholesterolemia. Apart from their lipid-lowering activity, they have pleiotropic effects that are attributed to the inhibition of regulatory proteins, including Ras-homologous (Rho) GTPases. Here, we discuss the potential usefulness of statins to prevent normal tissue damage provoked by radiotherapy. Statins reduce the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines stimulated by ionizing radiation in vitro and alleviate IR-induced inflammation and fibrosis in vivo. The currently available data indicate that statins accelerate the rapid repair of DNA double-strand breaks and, moreover, mitigate the DNA damage response induced by IR. Furthermore, statins increase the mRNA expression of DNA repair factors in vivo. Thus, although the molecular mechanisms involved are still ambiguous, preclinical data concordantly show a promising radioprotective capacity of statins.

  2. Do statins prevent Alzheimer's disease? A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneschvar, Homayoun L; Aronson, Mark D; Smetana, Gerald W

    2015-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and occurs commonly in patients 65 and older. There is an urgent need to find an effective management that could help prevent or at least slow down the progress of this major public health problem. Cholesterol related pathways might play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Treatment with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) has been suggested to promote the prevention of Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we discuss potential pathogenetic pathways for the development of Alzheimer's disease and review the evidence regarding the value of statins as a strategy to prevent or delay progression of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Case of Recalcitrant Plantar Warts Associated with Statin Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron G. Wernham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Plantar warts are a common presenting skin complaint caused by the human papillomavirus. 1st line therapies include cryotherapy and topical salicylic acid. Where there is resistance to these treatments, consideration is made for 2nd line therapies, including intralesional bleomycin, imiquimod, 5-fluorouracil, and photodynamic therapy. We present a case of bilateral persistent plantar warts, resistant to treatment with repeated cryotherapy and topical salicylic acid over a 6-year period. Following a patient initiated decision to discontinue their statin medication, we observed rapid clearance of plantar warts without change to standard therapy or their environment. This case correlates with emerging literature demonstrating a link between statin medication and proliferation of HPV through increased levels of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells.

  4. Statins use and coronary artery plaque composition: Results from the International Multicenter CONFIRM Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazato, Ryo; Gransar, Heidi; Berman, Daniel S.; Cheng, Victor Y.; Lin, Fay Y.; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Budoff, Matthew J.; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cury, Ricardo C.; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Chow, Benjamin J.W.; Delago, Augustin; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Joerg; Kaufmann, Philipp; Maffei, Erica; Raff, Gilbert; Shaw, Leslee J.; Villines, Todd C.; Dunning, Allison; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The effect of statins on coronary artery plaque features beyond stenosis severity is not known. Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is a novel non-invasive method that permits direct visualization of coronary atherosclerotic features, including plaque composition. We evaluated the association of statin use to coronary plaque composition type in patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing CCTA. Methods From consecutive individuals, we identified 6673 individuals (2413 on statin therapy and 4260 not on statin therapy) with no known CAD and available statin use status. We studied the relationship between statin use and the presence and extent of specific plaque composition types, which was graded as non-calcified (NCP), mixed (MP), or calcified (CP) plaque. Results The mean age was 59 ± 11 (55% male). Compared to the individuals not taking statins, those taking statins had higher prevalence of risk factors and obstructive CAD. In multivariable analyses, statin use was associated with increased the presence of MP [odds ratio (OR) 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.27–1.68), p < 0.001] and CP (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.36–1.74, p < 0.001), but not NCP (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.96–1.29, p = 0.1). Further, in multivariable analyses, statin use was associated with increasing numbers of coronary segments possessing MP (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.34–1.73, p < 0.001) and CP (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.36–1.70, p < 0.001), but not coronary segments with NCP (OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.94–1.25, p = 0.2). Conclusion Statin use is associated with an increased prevalence and extent of coronary plaques possessing calcium. The longitudinal effect of statins on coronary plaque composition warrants further investigation. PMID:22981406

  5. Frequency and predictors of tablet splitting in statin prescriptions: a population-based analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dormuth, Colin R.; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Brookhart, Alan M.; Carney, Greg; Bassett, Ken; Adams, Stephen; James M. Wright

    2008-01-01

    Background The price per milligram for most statin medications decreases at higher strengths, which provides an economic incentive to split tablets. We sought to determine the frequency with which statin tablets are split, and to evaluate factors associated with this practice. Methods We obtained prescription claims data for statins from the BC Ministry of Health for the period Jan. 1, 1996, to Dec. 31, 2006. We estimated the number of tablets per day, based on the ratio of the number of tabl...

  6. A time course investigation of the statin paradox among valvular interstitial cell phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Monzack, Elyssa L.; Masters, Kristyn S.

    2012-01-01

    Statin drugs are prescribed primarily for their ability to lower cholesterol, but may also exert beneficial side effects unrelated to cholesterol metabolism. Previous work has described a “statin paradox,” where statin treatment decreased osteoblastic markers in valve myofibroblasts while increasing those same markers in preosteoblasts. However, valvular interstitial cells (VICs) themselves are a multipotent cell type, capable of differentiating into activated, myofibroblastic VICs (aVICs) an...

  7. Efficacy of Statin Treatment in Early-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Eun Yeong; Myoung, Chana; Park, Hong-Suk; Kim, Ae Jin; Ro, Han; Chang, Jae Hyun; Lee, Hyun Hee; Chung, Wookyung; Jung, Ji Yong

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents a major medical challenge and frequently coexists with cardiovascular disease (CVD), which can be treated by statin trerapy. However, whether statin treatment affects renal progression and outcomes in CKD patients remains unclear. We retrospectively reviewed CKD patients at Gachon University Gil Medical Center from 2003–2013. From a total of 14,497 CKD patients, 858 statin users were paired with non-users and analyze with propensity score matching was p...

  8. Statins are independently associated with increased HbA1c in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus Thorsten; Andersen, Henrik Ullits; Rossing, Peter

    2016-01-01

    ventricular ejection fraction was not associated with statin use. In multivariable models including age, gender, diabetes duration, BMI, blood pressure, physical activity, family history of cardiovascular disease, physical activity, albuminuria, eGFR, retinopathy, smoking, cholesterol, ejection fraction...... with impaired glycemic control. A causal relationship cannot be determined from this study. Given the benefit on cardiovascular outcome, this should not cause patients to stop statin treatment, but may indicate a need to revisit dose of insulin when starting statin treatment....

  9. Statins and the risk of acute pancreatitis: A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisted, Henriette; Jacobsen, Jacob; Munk, Estrid Muff

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Case reports have suggested that statins may cause acute pancreatitis. AIM: To examine if statins are associated with risk of acute pancreatitis. METHODS: We identified 2576 first-time admitted cases of acute pancreatitis from hospital discharge registers in three Danish counties, and......: Our findings speak against a strong causative effect of statins on the risk of acute pancreatitis, and may even indicate a mild protective effect....

  10. Clinical Profile of Statin Intolerance in the Phase 3 GAUSS-2 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Leslie; Rocco, Michael; Colquhoun, David; Sullivan, David; Rosenson, Robert S; Dent, Ricardo; Xue, Allen; Scott, Rob; Wasserman, Scott M; Stroes, Erik

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that statin intolerance may be more common than reported in randomized trials. However, the statin-intolerant population is not well characterized. The goal of this report is to characterize the population enrolled in the phase 3 Goal Achievement after Utilizing an anti-PCSK9 antibody in Statin Intolerant Subjects Study (GAUSS-2; NCT 01763905). GAUSS-2 compared evolocumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) to ezetimibe in hypercholesterolemic patients who discontinued statin therapy due to statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS). GAUSS-2 was a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study that enrolled patients with elevated LDL-C who were either not on a statin or able to tolerate only a low-dose due to SAMS. Patients had received ≥2 statins and were unable to tolerate any statin dose or increase in dose above a specified weekly dose due to SAMS. Three hundred seven patients (mean [SD] age, 62 [10] years; 54 % males) were randomized 2:1 (evolocumab:ezetimibe). Mean (SD) LDL-C was 4.99 (1.51) mmol/L. Patients had used ≥2 (100 %), ≥3 (55 %), or ≥4 (21 %) statins. Coronary artery disease was present in 29 % of patients. Statin-intolerant symptoms were myalgia in 80 % of patients, weakness in 39 %, and more serious complications in 20 %. In 98 % of patients, SAMS interfered with normal daily activity; in 52 %, symptoms precluded moderate exertion. Evaluation of the GAUSS-2 trial population of statin-intolerant patients demonstrates that most patients were high risk with severely elevated LDL-C and many had statin-associated muscle symptoms that interfered with their quality of life.

  11. Ultrasound Diagnosis of Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon Rupture After Statin Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesselroade, Ryan D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare injury. We report the case of bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture sustained with minimal force while refereeing a football game. The injury was suspected to be associated with statin use as the patient had no other identifiable risk factors.The diagnosis was confirmed using bedside ultrasound. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(4:306-309.

  12. [Prostate cancer dependance upon cholesterol, statins and diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilch, Paweł; Radziszewski, Piotr; Maciukiewicz, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the work is to analyze the influence of higher cholesterol and LDL level on risk of prostate cancer. The work is based on the available literature in that field. The metabolism of cholesterol is mainly regulated by the statins, which may thus inhibit prostate cancer growth. Keeping the appropriate body mass and level of cholesterol by proper diet and physical exercises may be the prophylaxis of prostate cancer.

  13. Association between trajectories of statin adherence and subsequent cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Jessica M; Krumme, Alexis A; Tong, Angela Y; Shrank, William H; Matlin, Olga S; Brennan, Troyen A; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2015-10-01

    Trajectory models have been shown to (1) identify groups of patients with similar patterns of medication filling behavior and (2) summarize the trajectory, the average adherence in each group over time. However, the association between adherence trajectories and clinical outcomes remains unclear. This study investigated the association between 12-month statin trajectories and subsequent cardiovascular events. We identified patients with insurance coverage from a large national insurer who initiated a statin during January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2010. We assessed medication adherence during the 360 days following initiation and grouped patients based on the proportion of days covered (PDC) and trajectory models. We then measured cardiovascular events during the year after adherence assessment. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the association between adherence measures and cardiovascular outcomes; strength of association was quantified by the hazard ratio, the increase in model C-statistic, and the net reclassification index (NRI). Among 519 842 statin initiators, 8777 (1.7%) had a cardiovascular event during follow-up. More consistent medication use was associated with a lower likelihood of clinical events, whether adherence was measured through trajectory groups or PDC. When evaluating the prediction of future cardiovascular events by including a measure of adherence in the model, the best model reclassification was observed when adherence was measured using three or four trajectory groups (NRI = 0.189; 95% confidence interval: [0.171, 0.210]). Statin adherence trajectory predicted future cardiovascular events better than measures categorizing PDC. Thus, adherence trajectories may be useful for targeting adherence interventions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. MICROCIRCULATORY ISCHEMIA AND STATINS: LESSONS OF INTERVENTION CARDIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An. A. Alexandrov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Review is devoted to the pathogenesis of microcirculatory ischemia. Microcirculatory dysfunction has been identified in different groups of patients including syndrome X, diabetes mellitus 2 type, coronary heart disease. In coronary patients after transluminal angioplasty microcirculatory dysfunction is the reason of phenomenon of “non-reflow”. In result the procedure of revascularization is less effective. Therapy by statins can be beneficial for patients with microcirculatory ischemia.

  15. Meta-analysis of studies using statins as a reducer for primary liver cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guo-Chao; Liu, Yan; Ye, Yuan-Yuan; Hao, Fa-Bao; Wang, Kang; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    A protective effect of statins on primary liver cancer (PLC) risk has been suggested. However, issues about the dose–response relationship, the protective effect of individual statins, and PLC risk reduction among at-risk populations remain unsolved. Therefore, a meta-analysis was conducted. PubMed and EMBASE were searched for studies providing the risk ratio (RR) on statins and PLC risk. Summary RRs were calculated using a random-effects model. Twenty-five studies were identified. Stain use was significantly associated with a reduced risk of PLC (RR = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.53–0.69). The summary RR for every additional 50 cumulative defined daily doses per year was 0.87 (95% CI = 0.83–0.91). Evidence of a non-linear dose–response relationship between statins and PLC risk was found (Pnon-linearity < 0.01). All individual statins significantly reduced PLC risk, and the risk reduction was more evident with rosuvastatin. The inverse association between statins and PLC risk remained among populations with common risk factors. Subgroup analyses revealed more significant reduction in PLC risk by statins in high- versus non-high-risk populations (Pinteraction = 0.02). Overall, these findings add to our understanding of the association between statins and PLC risk. Whether statin use is causally associated with a reduced risk of PLC should be further studied. PMID:27198922

  16. Exercise-induced myalgia may limit the cardiovascular benefits of statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opie, Lionel H

    2013-12-01

    The positive health benefits of statins extend beyond the cardiovascular and include increased flow mediated dilation, decreased atrial fibrillation, modest antihypertensive effects and reduced risks of malignancies. Prominent among the statin side-effects are myalgia and muscular weakness, which may be associated with a rise in circulating creatine kinase values. In increasing severity and decreasing incidence, the statin-induced muscle related conditions are myalgia, myopathy with elevated creatine kinase (CK) levels with or without symptoms, and rhabdomyolysis. Statin use may increase CK levels without decreasing average muscle strength or exercise performance. In one large study, only about 2 % had myalgia that could be attributed to statin use. A novel current hypothesis is that statins optimize cardiac mitochondrial function but impair the vulnerable skeletal muscle by inducing different levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these two sites. In an important observational study, both statins and exercise reduced the adverse outcomes of cardiovascular disease, and the effects were additive. The major unresolved problem is that either can cause muscular symptoms with elevation of blood creatine kinase levels. There is, as yet, no clearly defined outcomes based policy to deal with such symptoms from use of either statins or exercise or both. A reasonable practical approach is to assess the creatine kinase levels, and if elevated to reduce the statin dose or the intensity of exercise.

  17. Potentiated cytotoxic effects of statins and ajoene in murine melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledezma, Eliades; Wittig, Olga; Alonso, Jose; Cardier, Jose E

    2009-04-01

    Because statins and ajoene inhibit the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase, we evaluated the hypothesis that the cytotoxic effect of these compounds may be potentiated when both are used in combination on tumor cells. We showed that cotreatment of the murine melanoma B16F10 cell with statins (atorvastatin and pravastatin) and ajoene, all at nontoxic doses, dramatically increased their cytotoxicity. B16F10 cell death induced by statins, but not by ajoene, was prevented by mevalonate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate. To our knowledge, this is the first report that the combination of statins and ajoene, which alters the mevalonate pathway, might potentiate their cytotoxic effects on tumor cells.

  18. Statins inhibited erythropoietin-induced proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Tae; Tsuruoka, Shuichi; Fujimura, Akio

    2010-12-15

    Erythropoietin (EPO) directly stimulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, and this is believed to be one of the mechanisms of vascular access failure of hemodialysis patients. However, precise mechanisms of the EPO-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells are not certain. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are primarily used to reduce cholesterol levels, but also exert other effects, including reno-protective effects. We evaluated the effect of several statins with various hydrophilicities on the EPO-induced proliferation of primary cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. EPO significantly and concentration-dependently increased DNA synthesis as assessed by [³H]thymidine incorporation, cell proliferation as assessed by WST-1 assay, and activation of the p44/42MAPK pathway. Therapeutic doses of statins (pravastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin and fluvastatin) in patients with hypercholesterolemia almost completely suppressed all of the EPO-induced effects in a concentration-dependent manner. Co-addition of mevalonic acid almost completely reversed the effects of statins. Statin alone did not affect the basal proliferation capacity of the cells. The effects were almost similar among the statins. We concluded that statins inhibited EPO-induced proliferation in rat VSMCs at least partly through their inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase activity. In the future, statins might prove useful for the treatment of EPO-induced hyperplasia of vascular access. Because the statins all showed comparable effects irrespective of their hydrophilicities, these effects might be a class effect.

  19. Pleiotropic effects of statins: A boulevard to cardioprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Rohilla

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, referred to as “statins” have been extensively reported to possess lipid lowering effects by inhibiting the synthesis of cholesterol by liver and thereby increasing hepatic cholesterol uptake and reducing circulating lipid levels. Growing body of evidences have shown that apart from lipid lowering effects, statins possess various pleiotropic effects that include improvement in endothelial dysfunction, increased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, enhanced bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO, potent antioxidant potential and anti-inflammatory properties. In relation to cardiovascular pathologies, statins have been shown to inhibit atrial myocardial remodeling, prevent atrial fibrillation, conserve NO production in heart failure, reduce activity of small G-proteins in cardiac hypertrophy and protect the myocardium from lethal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. The mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective potential include phosphatidyl inositol (PI3-kinase/Akt/eNOS pathway, subsequent activation of ATP sensitive potassium (KATP channels by NO resulting in improved myocardial metabolism, release of endogenous adenosine by increasing the activity of adenosine forming enzyme ecto-5V-nucleotidase, inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS production, decrease in oxidative stress and attenuation of apoptosis. The present review article demonstrates the pleiotropic effects of statins beyond their lipid lowering effects. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms involved in stain-induced cardioprotection have been delineated.

  20. [Unmet needs: patients with statin intolerance or familial hypercholesterolemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masana, Luis; Civeira, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The achievement of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) therapeutic targets is especially difficult in some patients at high cardiovascular risk. These patients include persons with statin intolerance and those with very high LDL cholesterol (LDLc) levels such as persons with familial hypercholesterolemia. The proportion of statin-intolerant patients is between 7% and 29%. Alternative lipid-lowering drugs (including ezetimibe) are less effective and are not free from adverse effects. Both alirocumab, with the ODYSSEY ALTERNATIVE study, and evolocumab, with the GAUSS study, have shown strong lipid-lowering efficacy, with much greater tolerability than currently available alternatives, with the result that a larger number of patients achieve therapeutic targets. In familial hypercholesterolemia, the monogenic metabolic disease most frequently associated with high cardiovascular risk, early intervention is cost-effective. Although statins have substantially improved the prognosis of familial hypercholesterolemia, many affected individuals are far from achieving the recommended therapeutic targets. In this patient group, PCSK9 inhibition with monoclonal antibodies has also been shown to be highly effective in reducing LDLc, especially in heterozygous individuals. The studies performed to date have shown that these drugs are safe and effective and can help many patients with familial hypercholesterolemia to drastically reduce their cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. All rights reserved.

  1. CBM split title in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, L.M. [EnCana Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Laurin, W.

    2006-07-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) coal underlies most of central and southern Alberta. This article discussed disputes surrounding CBM ownership and split-titles. Historically, ownership of lands in Alberta implied possession and rights of all under- and overground substances. Surface estates are now typically separated from the subsurface estate, and subsurface estates are further divided either on the basis of substances or stratigraphically to create a split-title. Mineral severances are used to separate respective mineral rights among owners. While there is a relative certainty that under provincial Crown tenure CBM is included in natural gas tenure, there is currently no Canadian jurisprudence in respect of CBM entitlement on split-title private lands. Where compressed natural gas (CNG) and coal are separately held, and CBM ownership is not specifically addressed in the mineral severance, there is no Canadian law respecting CBM ownership. Resolution of ownership issues has proceeded on a case by case basis. Coal owners argue that there is a distinct interrelationship between CBM and its host coal strata. Gas owners argue that the chemical composition of CBM is identical to CNG, and that the recovery method is similar to that of CNG. Courts have historically applied the vernacular test to resolve mineral substance ownership disputes, which considers the meanings of the word coal and coalbed methane as defined by industry. The most recent and relevant application of the vernacular test were the Borys/Anderson, which effectively implemented a gas-oil interface ownership determination, which if applied to a coal grant or reservation, may lead to the conclusion that the coal strata includes CBM. It was concluded that there are 26,000 individual mineral owners in Alberta that may become involved in CBM litigation. and could become parties to litigation. refs., tabs., figs.

  2. Anisotropic uniqueness classes for a degenerate parabolic equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vil' danova, V F [Bashkir State Pedagogical University, Ufa (Russian Federation); Mukminov, F Kh [Bashkir State University, Ufa (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-30

    Anisotropic uniqueness classes of Tacklind type are identified for a degenerate linear parabolic equation of the second order in an unbounded domain. The Cauchy problem and mixed problems with boundary conditions of the first and third type are considered. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  3. Response by sex to statin plus ezetimibe or statin monotherapy: A pooled analysis of 22,231 hyperlipidemic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jianxin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite documented benefits of lipid-lowering treatment in women, a considerable number are undertreated, and fewer achieve treatment targets vs. men. Methods Data were combined from 27 double-blind, active or placebo-controlled studies that randomized adult hypercholesterolemic patients to statin or statin+ezetimibe. Consistency of treatment effect among men (n = 11,295 and women (n = 10,499 was assessed and percent of men and women was calculated to evaluate the between-treatment ability to achieve specified treatment levels between sexes. Results Baseline lipids and hs-CRP were generally higher in women vs. men. Between-treatment differences were significant for both sexes (all p Conclusions These results suggest that small sex-related differences may exist in response to lipid-lowering treatment and achievement of specified lipid and hs-CRP levels, which may have implications when managing hypercholesterolemia in women.

  4. 42 CFR 476.86 - Correlation of Title XI functions with Title XVIII functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Correlation of Title XI functions with Title XVIII functions. 476.86 Section 476.86 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...) Qio Review Functions § 476.86 Correlation of Title XI functions with Title XVIII functions. (a...

  5. Achievement of recommended lipid and lipoprotein levels with combined ezetimibe/statin therapy versus statin alone in patients with and without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, John R; Betteridge, D John; Farnier, Michel; Leiter, Lawrence A; Lin, Jianxin; Shah, Arvind; Johnson-Levonas, Amy O; Brudi, Philippe

    2011-04-01

    Treatment guidelines identify low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) as the primary target of therapy with secondary targets of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) and apolipoprotein B (apoB). Data were pooled from 27 randomised, double-blind, active or placebo-controlled trials in 21,794 adult hypercholesterolaemic patients (LDL-C 1.81-6.48 mmol/L) receiving ezetimibe/statin or statin for 4-24 weeks. Percentages of patients achieving various targets were calculated among diabetes (n = 6541) and non-diabetes (n = 15,253) subgroups. Significantly more patients with and without diabetes achieved specified levels of LDL-C (< 2.59, < 1.99, < 1.81 mmol/L), non-HDL-C (< 3.37, < 2.59 mmol/L) and apoB (< 0.9, < 0.8 g/L) with ezetimibe/statin versus statin. Patients with diabetes had larger mean per cent reductions in LDL-C and non-HDL-C than non-diabetes patients. A greater percentage of patients achieved both the LDL-C and apoB targets and all three LDL-C, apoB, and non-HDL-C targets with ezetimibe/statin versus statin in both subgroups. Patients with diabetes benefitted at least as much as, and sometimes more than, non-diabetes patients following treatment with ezetimibe/statin.

  6. Unique Access to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Don

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the many learning opportunities that broadcast technology students at Ladue Horton Watkins High School in St. Louis, Missouri, experience because of their unique access to technology and methods of learning. Through scaffolding, stepladder techniques, and trial by fire, students learn to produce multiple television programs,…

  7. Association of statin therapy with blood pressure control in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic outpatients in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Manuel; Rolo, Sandra; Macedo, Ana Filipa; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Background: Some clinical evidence revealed that statins, apart from lowering cholesterol levels, also have an antihypertensive effect. Our aim was to evaluate the existence of a possible association of statin therapy with blood pressure (BP) control in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: Patients attending a hypertension/dyslipidemia clinic were prospectively evaluated. Those patients with a diagnosis of stage 1 hypertension and hypercholesterolemia who consented to participate were included in the study, either in the statin group (when taking a statin) or in the control group (when not taking a statin). Exclusion criteria included dementia, pregnancy, or breastfeeding, and history or evidence of stage 2 hypertension. Detailed clinical information was prospectively obtained from medical records. A total of 110 hypertensive patients were assigned to the study (82 in the statin group and 28 in the control group). Results: Although there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in both groups concerning gender, body mass index, antihypertensive pharmacotherapy, and serum levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, a higher BP control was observed in the statin group (P = 0.002). Significantly lower systolic BP (–6.7 mmHg, P = 0.020) and diastolic BP (–6.4 mmHg, P = 0.002) levels were reported in the statin group. Serum levels of low-density lipoprotein were also significantly lower in the statin group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: This observational study detected an association of statin therapy with BP control in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic patients in clinical practice. These findings raise the possibility that statin therapy may be useful for BP control in the studied population. PMID:21716752

  8. Is statin-associated cognitive impairment clinically relevant? A narrative review and clinical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Fernandez, Carlos H; Cameron, Jean-Christy F

    2012-04-01

    To explore the impact of statin use on cognition. A literature search was performed using MEDLINE (1950-November 2011), EMBASE (1980-November 2011), and the Cochrane Library (1960-November 2011) using the search terms "cognition/drug effects," "delirium, dementia, amnestic, cognitive disorders/chemically induced," "memory disorders/chemically induced," "hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors/adverse effects," and "hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors." A bibliographic search on included references was also conducted. Studies were included for analysis if they were conducted in humans and examined the impact of statin use on cognition as either a primary or secondary endpoint; case reports and case series were also included for analysis. Reports of statin-associated cognitive impairment were found primarily in observational studies (eg, case reports/series). One randomized controlled trial demonstrated that simvastatin impaired some measures of cognition compared to placebo. Conversely, in the majority of randomized controlled trials and observational studies, statins were found to have either a neutral or beneficial effect on cognition. Preliminary data suggest that statins that are less lipophilic (ie, pravastatin and rosuvastatin) may be less likely to contribute to cognitive impairment due to limited penetration across the blood-brain barrier. These drugs would be a logical alternative in cases where cognitive impairment secondary to another statin is suspected. Despite several reports of statin-associated cognitive impairment, this adverse effect remains a rare occurrence among the totality of the literature. If statin-associated cognitive impairment is suspected, a trial discontinuation can reveal a temporal relationship. Switching from lipophilic to hydrophilic statins may resolve cognitive impairment. The vascular benefits and putative cognitive benefits outweigh the risk of cognitive impairment associated with statin use; therefore, the

  9. Statin Associated Hepatic Adverse Effects: A Retrospective Review from a Regional Hospital in Sultanate of Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Jose

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed at evaluating the prevalence, pattern and predisposing factors for hepatic adverse effects with statins in a regional hospital in Sultanate of Oman. Methods: A retrospective review of the patient files in Department of Medicine during the year 2011 was done to evaluate any hepatic dysfunction possibly related to statins among the patients. For each case of suspected statin induced hepatic effect, additional details on temporal relationship, pattern of presentation, management, final outcome and any contributing factors were obtained. Difference in the occurrence of hepatic effects based on the patient demographics and drug characteristics was additionally evaluated. Results: A total of 927 patients meeting the inclusion criteria were included for the study. Mean age of the evaluated patients was 63.1 ± 11.37 and median duration of use of statin in months was 22 (IQR, 43.25. In 40 (4% of the 927 patients, there was presence of a hepatic effect considered to be statin related and only in 12 (1% patients a significant transaminase rise (>3 times was observed. Median duration of use of statin among those patients who developed suspected statin induced hepatic effects and those who did not was 45 (IQR,52 and 21 (IQR, 43 months, respectively and the difference observed was statistically significant. A significant difference in the prevalence of hepatic effects was observed only based on the duration of statin use. Conclusion: There was an infrequent occurrence of significant hepatic effects associated with statins in the study population. Our results support the latest recommendations including from United States Federal Drug Administration (US FDA that statins appear to be associated with a very low risk of serious liver injury and that routine periodic monitoring of transaminases does not appear to detect or prevent serious liver injury in association with statins.

  10. Statin Use and Self-Reported Hindering Muscle Complaints in Older Persons: A Population Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, Milly A; Poortvliet, Rosalinde K E; van Blijswijk, Sophie C E; den Elzen, Wendy P J; van Peet, Petra G; de Ruijter, Wouter; Blom, Jeanet W; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2016-01-01

    Statins are widely used by older persons in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Although serious adverse events are rare, many statin users report mild muscle pain and/or muscle weakness. It's unclear what impact statins exert on a patient's daily life. Research on statin related side effects in older persons is relatively scarce. We therefore investigated the relation between statin use and self-reported hindering muscle complaints in older persons in the general population. The present research was performed within the Integrated Systematic Care for Older Persons (ISCOPE) study in the Netherlands (Netherlands trial register, NTR1946). All registered adults aged ≥ 75 years from 59 participating practices (n = 12,066) were targeted. Information about the medical history and statin use at baseline and after 9 months was available for 4355 participants from the Electronic Patient Records of the general practitioners. In the screening questionnaire at baseline we asked participants: 'At the moment, which health complaints limit you the most in your day-to-day life?' Answers indicating muscle or musculoskeletal complaints were coded as such. No specific questions about muscle complaints were asked. The participants had a median age of 80.3 (IQR 77.6-84.4) years, 60.8% were female and 28.5% had a history of CVD. At baseline 29% used a statin. At follow-up, no difference was found in the prevalence of self-reported hindering muscle complaints in statin users compared to non-statin users (3.3% vs. 2.5%, OR 1.39, 95% CI 0.94-2.05; P = 0.98). Discontinuation of statin use during follow-up was independent of self-reported hindering muscle complaints. Based on the present findings, prevalent statin use in this community-dwelling older population is not associated with self-reported hindering muscle complaints; however, the results might be different for incident users.

  11. Statin use and breast cancer survival: a nationwide cohort study from Finland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu J Murtola

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that statins, an established drug group in the prevention of cardiovascular mortality, could delay or prevent breast cancer recurrence but the effect on disease-specific mortality remains unclear. We evaluated risk of breast cancer death among statin users in a population-based cohort of breast cancer patients. The study cohort included all newly diagnosed breast cancer patients in Finland during 1995-2003 (31,236 cases, identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry. Information on statin use before and after the diagnosis was obtained from a national prescription database. We used the Cox proportional hazards regression method to estimate mortality among statin users with statin use as time-dependent variable. A total of 4,151 participants had used statins. During the median follow-up of 3.25 years after the diagnosis (range 0.08-9.0 years 6,011 participants died, of which 3,619 (60.2% was due to breast cancer. After adjustment for age, tumor characteristics, and treatment selection, both post-diagnostic and pre-diagnostic statin use were associated with lowered risk of breast cancer death (HR 0.46, 95% CI 0.38-0.55 and HR 0.54, 95% CI 0.44-0.67, respectively. The risk decrease by post-diagnostic statin use was likely affected by healthy adherer bias; that is, the greater likelihood of dying cancer patients to discontinue statin use as the association was not clearly dose-dependent and observed already at low-dose/short-term use. The dose- and time-dependence of the survival benefit among pre-diagnostic statin users suggests a possible causal effect that should be evaluated further in a clinical trial testing statins' effect on survival in breast cancer patients.

  12. Association between acute statin therapy, survival, and improved functional outcome after ischemic stroke: the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-04-01

    Statins improve infarct volume and neurological outcome in animal stroke models. We investigated the relationship between statin therapy and ischemic stroke outcome in the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

  13. Çoklu Sistemik Hastalığı Olan Bir Hastada Statine Bağlı Miyopati

    OpenAIRE

    Karagöz, Ahmet; UÇAR, Özgül; Kocaoğlu, İbrahim; Gökaslan, Serkan

    2010-01-01

    Hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) are the most successful class of drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and dyslipidaemia. However, the popular profile of statins in terms of efficacy has been maligned by their adverse effects. Statin induced myopathy, which can be seen at any time during the course of therapy, is a clinically important cause of statin intolerance and discontinuation. When a patient with multiple systemic diseases who use numerous med...

  14. Media attention and the influence on the reporting odds ratio in disproportionality analysis : an example of patient reporting of statins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hunsel, Florence; van Puijenbroek, Eugene; van den Berg, Lolkje de Jong; van Grootheest, Kees

    2010-01-01

    Aim To study the influence of media attention about statins and ADRs on the level of disproportionality, expressed as the reporting odds ratio (ROR) for statins in the Lareb database, based on patients' reports. Methods Patient reports about statins, before and after the broadcast of a consumer prog

  15. Statin therapy and mortality in HIV-infected individuals; a Danish nationwide population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line; Kronborg, Gitte; Larsen, Carsten S

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that statins possess diverse immune modulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. As statins might attenuate inflammation, statin therapy has been hypothesized to reduce mortality in HIV-infected individuals. We therefore used a Danish nationwide cohort of HIV-infecte...

  16. Media attention and the influence on the reporting odds ratio in disproportionality analysis : an example of patient reporting of statins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hunsel, Florence; van Puijenbroek, Eugene; van den Berg, Lolkje de Jong; van Grootheest, Kees

    Aim To study the influence of media attention about statins and ADRs on the level of disproportionality, expressed as the reporting odds ratio (ROR) for statins in the Lareb database, based on patients' reports. Methods Patient reports about statins, before and after the broadcast of a consumer

  17. The effect of statins in colorectal cancer is mediated through the bone morphogenetic protein pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kodach, Liudmila L.; Bleuming, Sylvia A.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Hommes, Daniel W.; Van Den Brink, Gus R.; Hardwick, James C. H.

    2007-01-01

    Background & Aims: Epidemiological evidence suggests that statins prevent colorectal cancer (CRC), but the biological mechanism remains obscure. Statins induce bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) expression in bone cells. We have previously shown that BMPs act as tumor suppressors in CRC. We hypothesiz

  18. Impact of statin use on exercise-induced cardiac troponin elevations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsvogels, T.M.H.; Januzzi, J.L., Jr.; Taylor, B.A.; Isaacs, S.K.; D'Hemecourt, P.; Zaleski, A.; Dyer, S.; Troyanos, C.; Weiner, R.B.; Thompson, P.D.; Baggish, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Marathon running commonly causes a transient elevation of creatine kinase and cardiac troponin I (cTnI). The use of statins before marathon running exacerbates the release of creatine kinase from skeletal muscle, but the effect of statin use on exercise-induced cTnI release is unknown. We therefore

  19. Guidelines May Miss Need for Statins in Many U.S. Blacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164170.html Guidelines May Miss Need for Statins in Many U.S. ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. medical organizations have conflicting guidelines on the use of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs ...

  20. Muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling impairment in patients treated with statins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirvent, P., E-mail: pascal.sirvent@univ-bpclermont.fr [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, EA 3533, Laboratoire des Adaptations Métaboliques à l' Exercice en conditions Physiologiques et Pathologiques (AME2P), BP 80026, F-63171 Aubière cedex (France); Fabre, O.; Bordenave, S. [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Hillaire-Buys, D. [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Raynaud De Mauverger, E.; Lacampagne, A.; Mercier, J. [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France)

    2012-03-01

    The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. To date, the patho-physiological mechanisms of statin myotoxicity are still not clearly understood. In previous studies, we showed that acute application in vitro of simvastatin caused impairment of mitochondrial function and dysfunction of calcium homeostasis in human and rat healthy muscle samples. We thus evaluated in the present study, mitochondrial function and calcium signaling in muscles of patients treated with statins, who present or not muscle symptoms, by oxygraphy and recording of calcium sparks, respectively. Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration that involved mainly the complex I of the respiratory chain and altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks. The muscle problems observed in statin-treated patients appear thus to be related to impairment of mitochondrial function and muscle calcium homeostasis, confirming the results we previously reported in vitro. -- Highlights: ► The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. ► Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration. ► Statins-treated patients showed altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks.

  1. Statin Use and Functional Outcome after Tissue Plasminogen Activator Treatment in Acute Ischaemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, I; Uyttenboogaart, M; Koopman, K; De Keyser, J; Luijckx, G J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Preliminary findings suggest that statins may have a neuroprotective effect in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. This study investigated whether patients prior on statin therapy and treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for acute ischaemic stroke have a better functional ou

  2. Statins in the treatment of chronic heart failure: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harst, P.; Voors, Adriaan; van Gilst, W.H.; Bohm, M.; Van Veldhuisen, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Background The efficacy of statin therapy in patients with established chronic heart failure (CHF) is a subject of much debate. Methods and Findings We conducted three systematic literature searches to assess the evidence supporting the prescription of statins in CHF. First, we investigated the part

  3. Statins in the treatment of chronic heart failure : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harst, Pim; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Boehm, Michael; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2006-01-01

    Background The efficacy of statin therapy in patients with established chronic heart failure (CHF) is a subject of much debate. Methods and Findings We conducted three systematic literature searches to assess the evidence supporting the prescription of statins in CHF. First, we investigated the part

  4. Vascular access versus the effect of statins on inflammation and fibrinolysis in renal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Sameiro Faria, Maria; Ribeiro, Sandra; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Miranda, Vasco; Quintanilha, Alexandre; Reis, Flávio; Costa, Elísio; Belo, Luís; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the effect of statin therapy on inflammatory and fibrinolytic/endothelial (dys)function markers in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients under hemodialysis (HD), according to the type of vascular access. This transversal study includes 191 ESRD patients under regular HD, divided into four groups according to vascular access and statin therapy: 87 patients with arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and no statins (AVF-NS), 61 with AVF and statins (AVF-S), 27 with central venous dialysis catheter (CVC) and no statins (CVC-NS) and 16 with CVC and statins (CVC-S). The basic lipid profile and fibrinolytic/endothelial cell function markers were assessed. Patients with CVC presented significantly higher levels of D-dimers compared with AVF groups. CVC-NS patients also presented the highest IL-6 values, which were significantly higher than those presented by CVC-S patients. AVF-S patients presented significantly higher t-PA and PAI-1 values and lower adiponectin levels compared with AVF-NS. Our results demonstrate that patients with CVC, particularly those not under statin therapy, present a higher production and turnover of fibrin. We also found that statin therapy decreases inflammation in CVC patients but is associated with a reduction of adiponectin and increased endothelial function marker levels in AVF patients.

  5. Would Lipophilic Statin Therapy as a Prognostic Factor Improve Survival in Patients With Uterine Cervical Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Moo-Kon; Shin, Byoung-Sub; Ha, Chung-Sik; Park, Won-Young

    2017-09-01

    In vitro studies showed that lipophilic statins inhibit cell growth, adhesion, and invasion and induce apoptosis in cancer cell lines. In uterine cervical cancer, several important factors including age, stage, anemia, lymphovascular invasion, lymph node metastases, and parametrial spread were known to significantly predict survival. We investigated whether statin therapy as a prognostic factor would significantly predict survival in cervical cancer. Patients with stages IB to IV cervical cancer who received radical hysterectomy and/or para-aortic lymph node dissection were included. The statin-use group was identified as patients who were continuously prescribed with lipophilic statins from prediagnostic period of the cancer. The baseline characteristics of both statin-use group and control group were comparable. During a median follow-up of 36.6 months, progression-free survival and overall survival of the statin-use group were significantly higher than the control group (P < 0.001 and P = 0.004, respectively). In multivariate analysis, the statin-use group had an independent prognostic significance compared with other prognostic factors (progression-free survival: hazards ratio = 0.062, 95% confidence interval = 0.008-0.517, P = 0.010; overall survival: hazards ratio = 0.098, 95% confidence interval = 0.041-0.459, P = 0.032). In the present study, continuous lipophilic statin therapy from the prediagnostic period of uterine cervical cancer could reflect favorable outcome, independently.

  6. Effects of statin treatment in patients with coronary artery disease and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hidehiro; Yajima, Junji; Oikawa, Yuji; Tanaka, Shingo; Fukamachi, Daisuke; Suzuki, Shinya; Sagara, Koichi; Otsuka, Takayuki; Matsuno, Shunsuke; Funada, Ryuichi; Kano, Hiroto; Uejima, Tokuhisa; Koike, Akira; Nagashima, Kazuyuki; Kirigaya, Hajime; Sawada, Hitoshi; Aizawa, Tadanori; Yamashita, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Statins reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality from coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the effects of statin therapy in patients with CAD and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain unclear. Within a single hospital-based cohort in the Shinken Database 2004-2010 comprising all patients (n = 15,227) who visited the Cardiovascular Institute, we followed patients with CKD and CAD after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular event (MACCE) was defined by composite end points, including death, myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction, cerebral hemorrhage, and target lesion revascularization. A total of 391 patients were included in this study (median follow-up time 905 ± 679 days). Of these, 209 patients used statins. Patients with statin therapy were younger than those without. Obesity and dyslipidemia were more common, and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was significantly higher, in patients undergoing statin treatment. MACCE and cardiac death tended to be less common, and all-cause death was significantly less common, in patients taking statins. Multivariate analysis showed that low estimated GFR, poor left ventricular ejection fraction, and the absence of statin therapy were independent predictors for all-cause death of CKD patients after PCI. Statin therapy was associated with reduced all-cause mortality in patients with CKD and CAD after PCI.

  7. Statin adherence and treatment LDL-cholesterol response in type 2 diabetes patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, Dianna; Voorham, Jaco; Hak, Eelko; Denig, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Background: In clinical practice statins are not optimally used and lipid targets are not achieved in at least a third of the patients. This lack of treatment response could be due to undertreatment (low-dose statin) and low adherence to treatment. Objectives: To determine the relationship between s

  8. Statin Drugs Markedly Inhibit Testosterone Production by Rat Leydig Cells In Vitro: Implications for Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statin drugs lower blood cholesterol by inhibiting hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme-A reductase. During drug development it was shown that statins inhibit production of cholesterol in the testis. We evaluated testosterone production in vitro, using highly purified rat ...

  9. Statin-Induced Myopathy Is Associated with Mitochondrial Complex III Inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirris, T.J.J.; Renkema, G.H.; Ritschel, T.; Voermans, N.C.; Bilos, A.; Engelen, B.G. van; Brandt, U.; Koopman, W.J.; Beyrath, J.D.; Rodenburg, R.J.; Willems, P.H.; Smeitink, J.A.; Russel, F.G.

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol-lowering statins effectively reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events. Myopathy is the most important adverse effect, but its underlying mechanism remains enigmatic. In C2C12 myoblasts, several statin lactones reduced respiratory capacity and appeared to be strong inhibitors of

  10. Statins and its hepatic effects: Newer data, implications, and changing recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Jose

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic adverse effects are one of the most commonly known adverse effects reported with statins. Frequently, fear of serious hepatic effects contributes to underutilization of statins as well as unnecessary discontinuation of its use among those indicated. There are changing data on the occurrence of these negative hepatic effects, recommendations on their actual risk, monitoring required, and safety of use in those with preexisting hepatic disorders. Based on reviewed literature, statins appear to be associated with a very low risk of true and serious liver injury. Unprecedented fears regarding hepatic adverse effects of statins among prescribers and patients can deny patients of the significant benefits of these agents. Routine periodic monitoring of liver function does not appear to detect or prevent serious liver injury and hence may not be indicated. But the potential of statins to cause significant and serious hepatic effects should not be overlooked in daily clinical practice. Statin use need not be avoided in patients with preexisting liver dysfunction such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, compensated cirrhosis, and compensated chronic liver disease if its use is clearly indicated. Physician's judgment based on the risk and benefit for an individual patient does matter when a strategy is chosen regarding the use of statins and monitoring patients while on statins.

  11. Diagnosis, prevention, and management of statin adverse effects and intolerance: Canadian Working Group Consensus update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, G B John; Tashakkor, A Yashar; Baker, Steven; Bergeron, Jean; Fitchett, David; Frohlich, Jiri; Genest, Jacques; Gupta, Milan; Hegele, Robert A; Ng, Dominic S; Pearson, Glen J; Pope, Janet

    2013-12-01

    The Proceedings of a Canadian Working Group Consensus Conference, first published in 2011, provided a summary of statin-associated adverse effects and intolerance and management suggestions. In this update, new clinical studies identified since then that provide further insight into effects on muscle, cognition, cataracts, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer are discussed. Of these, the arenas of greatest controversy pertain to purported effects on cognition and the emergence of diabetes during long-term therapy. Regarding cognition, the available evidence is not strongly supportive of a major adverse effect of statins. In contrast, the linkage between statin therapy and incident diabetes is more firm. However, this risk is more strongly associated with traditional risk factors for new-onset diabetes than with statin itself and any possible negative effect of new-onset diabetes during statin treatment is far outweighed by the cardiovascular risk reduction benefits. Additional studies are also discussed, which support the principle that systematic statin rechallenge, and lower or intermittent statin dosing strategies are the main methods for dealing with suspected statin intolerance at this time. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of statins on severity of psoriasis: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Ramessur

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: This review highlights the paucity of high quality, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials investigating the effects of statins on psoriasis severity using clinically objective measures. There is insufficient evidence that the use of oral statins as an adjunctive therapy can reduce the severity of psoriasis.

  13. Cancer risk in older people receiving statin therapy: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Wei; Bian, Su-Yan; Zhu, Qi-Wei; Zhao, Yue-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Although statins are well tolerated by most aged people, their potential carcinogenicity is considered as one of the biggest factors limiting the use of statins. The aim of the present study was to determine the risk of cancer in people aged over 60 years receiving statin therapy. Methods A comprehensive search for articles published up to December 2015 was performed, reviews of each randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the effects of statin mono-therapy with placebo on the risk of cancer in people aged > 60 years were conducted and data abstracted. All the included studies were evaluated for publication bias and heterogeneity. Pooled odds ratios (OR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the random effects model. Results A total of 12 RCTs, involving 62,927 patients (31,517 in statin therapy group and 31,410 in control group), with a follow-up duration of 1.9–5.4 years, contributed to the analysis. The statin therapy did not affect the overall incidence of cancer (OR = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.94–1.14, P = 0.52); subgroup analyses showed that neither the variety nor the chemical properties of the statins accounted for the incidence of cancer in older people. Conclusions Our meta-analysis findings do not support a potential cancer risk of statin treatment in people over 60 years old. Further targeted researches with a longer follow-up duration are warranted to confirm this issue.

  14. Uremic Toxins Enhance Statin-Induced Cytotoxicity in Differentiated Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Uchiyama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The risk of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis is considerably increased in statin users with end-stage renal failure (ESRF. Uremic toxins, which accumulate in patients with ESRF, exert cytotoxic effects that are mediated by various mechanisms. Therefore, accumulation of uremic toxins might increase statin-induced cytotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of four uremic toxins—hippuric acid, 3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropionate, indole-3-acetic acid, and 3-indoxyl sulfate—on statin-induced myopathy. Differentiated rhabdomyosarcoma cells were pre-treated with the uremic toxins for seven days, and then the cells were treated with pravastatin or simvastatin. Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed by viability assays and flow cytometry. Pre-treatment with uremic toxins increased statin- but not cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity (p < 0.05 vs. untreated. In addition, the pre-treatment increased statin-induced apoptosis, which is one of the cytotoxic factors (p < 0.05 vs. untreated. However, mevalonate, farnesol, and geranylgeraniol reversed the effects of uremic toxins and lowered statin-induced cytotoxicity (p < 0.05 vs. untreated. These results demonstrate that uremic toxins enhance statin-induced apoptosis and cytotoxicity. The mechanism underlying this effect might be associated with small G-protein geranylgeranylation. In conclusion, the increased severity of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis in patients with ESRF is likely due to the accumulation of uremic toxins.

  15. The benefit of statins in non-cardiac vascular surgery patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2009-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that statins reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary disease. Statins have also been shown to reduce the risk of (recurrent) stroke. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, which plays a causal role in the development of atherosclerotic disease, is

  16. Statin-induced focal myositis of the upper extremity. A report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M., E-mail: wagner.radiologie@herzchirurgie.de [Department of Radiology, Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Salzburger Leite 1, D-97616 Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Muehldorfer-Fodor, M.; Prommersberger, K.J. [Department of Handsurgery, Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Schmitt, R. [Department of Radiology, Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Salzburger Leite 1, D-97616 Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Statins are widely used to lower increased cholesterol levels with the aim to prevent major cardiovascular events. However, they bare the risk of myotoxic side effects. We report on two patients with focal weakness and pain in the upper extremities. In both patients, abnormal MRI signal heights in the muscle groups involved were indicative of the final diagnosis of focal myositis during statin therapy.

  17. Pattern of statin use changes following media coverage of its side effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegbaum, Margit; Liisberg, Kasper Bering; Wallach-Kildemoes, Helle

    2017-01-01

    and whether the user is new (incident) or long term (prevalent). AIM: The aim of this study is to explore whether a Danish newspaper article featuring the side effects of statins affects statin discontinuation in incident versus prevalent users, with the reason for prescription also taken into account...

  18. Predictors and outcomes of increases in creatine phosphokinase concentrations or rhabdomyolysis risk during statin treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Staa, Tjeerd P; Carr, Daniel F; O'Meara, Helen; McCann, Gerry; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim was to evaluate clinical risk factors associated with myotoxicity in statin users. METHODS: This was a cohort study of patients prescribed a statin in UK primary care practices contributing to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Outcomes of interest were creatine phosphokinase (CPK

  19. [Renoprotective effects of statins under the conditions of acute renal failure, caused by rhabdomyolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorskiĭ, I I; Zeleniuk, V G

    2014-01-01

    The experiment on white rats was targeted at the examination of influence of statins (atorvastatin, lovastatin, simvastatin) under the conditions of acute renal failure, caused by rhabdomyolysis. Renoprotective effects of statins were demonstrated by reduction of hyperazotemia and proteinuria and improvement of renal excretory function, which correlated with antioxidant properties of drugs.

  20. Statins reduce new-onset atrial fibrillation in a first-time myocardial infarction population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N; Gislason, Gunnar H; Greve, Anders M

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of statins on reducing new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) in a large real-world post-myocardial infarction (MI) population. Subsequently, to test if different statin doses, various types and compliance affected the incidence of new-onset AF post MI. METHODS: All patien...

  1. Muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling impairment in patients treated with statins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sirvent, P; Fabre, Odile Martine Julie; Bordenave, S

    2012-01-01

    The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. To date, the patho-physiological mechanisms of statin myotoxicity are still not clearly understood. In previous studies, we showed that acute application in vitro of simvastatin caused impairment of mitochondrial function and dys...

  2. To cardiovascular disease and beyond: new therapeutic perspectives of statins in autoimmune diseases and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Pedrera, Chary; Ruiz-Limon, Patricia; Valverde-Estepa, Araceli; Barbarroja, Nuria; Rodriguez-Ariza, Antonio

    2012-06-01

    Statins have been successfully used in patients with hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular diseases, but there is increasing evidence that they exert effects by much exceeding the lowering of cholesterol levels. Statins have antiatherosclerotic, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, immunomodulatory and antithrombotic effects. These "pleiotropic" effects stem from their inhibition of prenylation of the small GTP-binding proteins Ras and Rho, and to the disruption, or depletion, of cholesterol rich membrane micro-domains (membrane rafts). Through these pathways statins modulate immune responses by altering cytokine levels and by affecting the function of cells involved in both innate and adaptive responses. Anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressory properties of statins provide the rationale for their potential application in conditions in which the inflammation and immune response represent key pathogenic mechanisms, such as antiphospholipid syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Reduction of atherosclerosis progression in autoimmunity is also a very important effect. Statins pathways of action in systemic autoimmune diseases, and their potential therapeutic use are discussed in this review. The inhibition of mevalonate pathway by statins impairs modification of Ras and Rho GTPases, which play key roles in signaling pathways related to tumor formation, metastasis and cell death. There is experimental and clinical evidence that statins may improve the therapeutic outcome of anticancer drugs. Thus, this review will also discuss recent insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anticancer effects of statins and their assessment as promising candidates for inclusion into current therapeutic regimens for the treatment of malignant diseases.

  3. Efficacy and Tolerability of Evolocumab vs Ezetimibe in Patients With Muscle-Related Statin Intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Steven E; Stroes, Erik; Dent-Acosta, Ricardo E;

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Muscle-related statin intolerance is reported by 5% to 20% of patients. OBJECTIVE: To identify patients with muscle symptoms confirmed by statin rechallenge and compare lipid-lowering efficacy for 2 nonstatin therapies, ezetimibe and evolocumab. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Two-...

  4. Relation of statin therapy to psychological functioning in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogwegt, Madelein T; Theuns, Dominic A M J; Kupper, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Statin therapy is an important secondary prevention measure in cardiovascular disease. However, the side effects associated with statin use could potentially affect patients' quality of life. Little is known about the influence of statin therapy on the well-being and health status of cardiac...... patients, in general, and patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), in particular. We investigated the association between statin therapy and symptoms of anxiety and depression and patients' health status during the 12 months after implantation, reckoning with statin type and dosage....... Consecutively implanted ICD patients (n = 409; 78.2% men) completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36-item Health Survey at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months after implantation. The data were analyzed using general linear mixed modeling repeated measures...

  5. Statin Use Is Associated with Reduced Mortality in Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Krogh, Signe; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We hypothesized that statin use begun before the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease is associated with reduced mortality. METHODS: We studied all patients diagnosed with interstitial lung disease in the entire Danish population from 1995 through 2009, comparing statin use versus...... no statin use in a nested 1:2 matched study. RESULTS: The cumulative survival as a function of follow-up time from the date of diagnosis of interstitial lung disease (n = 1,786 + 3,572) and idiopathic lung fibrosis (n = 261 + 522) was higher for statin users versus never users (log-rank: P = 7 · 10......(-9) and P = 0.05). The median survival time in patients with interstitial lung disease was 3.3 years in statin users and 2.1 years in never users. Corresponding values in patients with idiopathic lung fibrosis were 3.4 versus 2.4 years. After multivariable adjustment, the hazard ratio for all...

  6. Statin-Induced Myopathy Is Associated with Mitochondrial Complex III Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirris, Tom J J; Renkema, G Herma; Ritschel, Tina; Voermans, Nicol C; Bilos, Albert; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Brandt, Ulrich; Koopman, Werner J H; Beyrath, Julien D; Rodenburg, Richard J; Willems, Peter H G M; Smeitink, Jan A M; Russel, Frans G M

    2015-09-01

    Cholesterol-lowering statins effectively reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events. Myopathy is the most important adverse effect, but its underlying mechanism remains enigmatic. In C2C12 myoblasts, several statin lactones reduced respiratory capacity and appeared to be strong inhibitors of mitochondrial complex III (CIII) activity, up to 84% inhibition. The lactones were in general three times more potent inducers of cytotoxicity than their corresponding acid forms. The Qo binding site of CIII was identified as off-target of the statin lactones. These findings could be confirmed in muscle tissue of patients suffering from statin-induced myopathies, in which CIII enzyme activity was reduced by 18%. Respiratory inhibition in C2C12 myoblasts could be attenuated by convergent electron flow into CIII, restoring respiration up to 89% of control. In conclusion, CIII inhibition was identified as a potential off-target mechanism associated with statin-induced myopathies.

  7. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of HDL cholesterol response to statins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postmus, Iris; Warren, Helen R; Trompet, Stella

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In addition to lowering low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), statin therapy also raises high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. Inter-individual variation in HDL-C response to statins may be partially explained by genetic variation. METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed...... a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify variants with an effect on statin-induced high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) changes. The 123 most promising signals with p... in an independent group of 10 951 statin-treated individuals, providing a total sample size of 27 720 individuals. The only associations of genome-wide significance (pHDL-C response to statin treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Based on results from this study...

  8. Diagnosis, Prevention, and Management of Statin Adverse Effects and Intolerance: Canadian Consensus Working Group Update (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, G B John; Baker, Steven; Bergeron, Jean; Fitchett, David; Frohlich, Jiri; Genest, Jacques; Gupta, Milan; Hegele, Robert A; Ng, Dominic; Pearson, Glen J; Pope, Janet; Tashakkor, A Yashar

    2016-07-01

    The Canadian Consensus Working Group has updated its evaluation of the literature pertaining to statin intolerance and adverse effects. This overview introduces a pragmatic definition of statin intolerance (goal-inhibiting statin intolerance) that emphasizes the effects of symptoms on achieving nationally vetted goals in patients fulfilling indications for lipid-lowering therapy and cardiovascular risk reduction. The Canadian Consensus Working Group provides a structured framework for avoiding, evaluating and managing goal-inhibiting statin intolerance. Particularly difficult practice situations are reviewed, including management in young and elderly individuals, and in athletes and labourers. Finally, targeted at specialty practitioners, more detailed analyses of specific but more unusual adverse effects ascribed to statins are updated including evidence regarding new-onset diabetes, cognitive dysfunction, cataracts, and the rare but important immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. From Lipid-lowering to Anti-inflammation: New Perspective of Statins Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui-xiang YANG; Zuo-yan WANG

    2009-01-01

    The intensive lipid-lowering and the anti-inflammatory effect are the new perspective of statin application in current clinic practice. Patients with coronary heart disease, regardless of lipid levels, should receive lipid-lowering treatment; even those people who have the "normal" blood lipid level may also require lipid-lowering therapy. While the mainstream view was that the clinical benefit of statins was mainly due to the reduction of the LDL-C level, those effects other than lipid-lowering of statins are of more and more importance. In particularly, the anti-inflammatory effect of statins is evidence-based and has become a new point of view that makes people take more and more attention.We look forward to the new evidence-based information and the new available guidelines. In any case, we believe that the era for the primary prevention with anti-inflammatory effect of statins may have already started.

  10. Combined statin-fibrate therapy-induced rhabdomyolysis: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozić Tanja L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Rhabdomyolysis is a rare, but serious and potentially fatal adverse reaction of the statin application that may be developed in any time of therapy. It is characterized by massive destruction of muscles associated with the large increase of creatine kinase (CK leading to myoglobinuria and potential acute renal failure. Combined statin-fibrate therapy increases the risk of rhabdomyolysis, especially in elderly and diabetic patients. Case report An 81-year-old male was admitted to Coronary Care Unit of the Emergency Center, Clinical Center of Serbia (CCS with the clinical picture and electrocardiogram of the acute anterior wall myocardial infarction complicated with pulmonary edema. Laboratory tests on admission showed higher elevated values of serum creatinine 179 μmol/L and BUN 9.2 mmol/L (eGFR 32 mL/min/1.73m2, CK 309 U/L (on day 2: 3476 U/L and mixed hyperlipidemia (total cholesterol 10.3 mmol/L, HDL 2.26 mmol/L, TG 4.85 mmol/L. The patient was treated with thrombolysis medication therapy (Alteplase, anticoagulant and dual antiplatelet therapy, diuretics, organic nitrates, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, antibiotics, and proton pump inhibitors. During seven days, his therapy included combined pravastatin 20 mg and fenofibrate (160 mg, which was discontinued due to pains and weakness of muscles and significantly elevated CC to 7080 U/L (upper limit 200 U/L, but no significant deterioration of renal function was observed. Discontinuation of therapy resulted in CC level normalization and improvement of clinical condition. Conclusion Combined statin and fibrate therapy requires strict clinical control and monitoring of CK i transaminases. Four-time or higher increase of CK requires discontinuation of therapy. In addition, patients are advised to report immediately any pains in muscles, sensibility, weakness or cramps.

  11. Communicating statin evidence to support shared decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Bruce; Ricco, Jason; Wallace, Margaret; Kiefer, David; Rakel, Dave

    2016-04-06

    The practice of clinical medicine rests on a foundation of ethical principles as well as scientific knowledge. Clinicians must artfully balance the principle of beneficence, doing what is best for patients, with autonomy, allowing patients to make their own well-informed health care decisions. The clinical communication process is complicated by varying degrees of confidence in scientific evidence regarding patient-oriented benefits, and by the fact that most medical options are associated with possible harms as well as potential benefits. Evidence-based clinical guidelines often neglect patient-oriented issues involved with the thoughtful practice of shared decision-making, where individual values, goals, and preferences should be prioritized. Guidelines on the use of statin medications for preventing cardiovascular events are a case in point. Current guidelines endorse the use of statins for people whose 10-year risk of cardiovascular events is as low as 7.5%. Previous guidelines set the 10-year risk benchmark at 20%. Meta-analysis of randomized trials suggests that statins can reduce cardiovascular event rates by about 25%, bringing 10-year risk from 7.5 to 5.6%, for example, or from 20 to 15%. Whether or not these benefits should justify the use of statins for individual patients depends on how those advantages are valued in comparison with disadvantages, such as side effect risks, and with inconveniences associated with taking a pill each day and visiting clinicians and laboratories regularly. Whether or not the overall benefit-harm balance justifies the use of a medication for an individual patient cannot be determined by a guidelines committee, a health care system, or even the attending physician. Instead, it is the individual patient who has a fundamental right to decide whether or not taking a drug is worthwhile. Researchers and professional organizations should endeavor to develop shared decision-making tools that provide up-to-date best evidence in

  12. Bilateral patellar tendon rupture associated with statin use

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is an uncommon clinical presentation, which generally affects the under 40s who are active in sport. Bilateral rupture of both tendons is much rarer. It occurs most frequently in patients with predisposing factors such as corticosteroid use or systemic diseases. The authors present the case of a 56-year-old male on long-term statin therapy who sustained this injury following a fall on ice. He had no known risk factors for tendon rupture. Surgical treatment involved ten...

  13. Major diet-drug interactions affecting the kinetic characteristics and hypolipidaemic properties of statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, M P; Sánchez Muniz, F J; Jiménez Redondo, S; Prats Oliván, P; Higueras, F J; Bastida, S

    2010-01-01

    Concomitant administration of statins with food may alter statin pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics, increasing the risk of adverse reactions such as myopathy or rhabdomyolysis or reducing their pharmacological action. This paper reviews major interactions between statins and dietary compounds. Consumption of pectin or oat bran together with Lovastatin reduces absorption of the drug, while alcohol intake does not appear to affect the efficacy and safety of Fluvastatin treatment. Grapefruit juice components inhibit cytochrome P-4503A4, reducing the presystemic metabolism of drugs such as Simvastatin, Lovastatin and Atorvastatin. Follow-up studies on the therapeutic effect of statins in patients consuming a Mediterranean-style diet are necessary to assure the correct prescription because the oil-statin and minor oil compound-statin possible interactions have been only briefly studied. Preliminary study suggests that olive oil can increase the hypolipaemiant effect of Simvastatin with respect sunflower oil. The consumption of polyunsaturated rich oils, throughout the cytochrome P- 450 activation could decrease the half-life of some statins and therefore their hypolipaemic effects. The statins and n-3 fatty acids combined therapy gives rise to pharmacodinamic interaction that improves the lipid profile and leads greater cardioprotection. Although statins are more effective in high endogenous cholesterol production subjects and plant sterols are more effective in high cholesterol absorption efficacy subjects, plant esterols-statins combined therapy generates very positive complementary effects. This review ends suggesting possible diet-stain interactions that require further investigations (e.g. types of olive oils, fruit juices other than grapefruit, fibre or consumption of alcoholic beverages rich in polyphenols or ethanol).

  14. Hemodynamic effects of peri-operative statin therapy in on-pump cardiac surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinz Jose

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peri-operative statin therapy in cardiac surgery cases is reported to reduce the rate of mortality, stroke, postoperative atrial fibrillation, and systemic inflammation. Systemic inflammation could affect the hemodynamic parameters and stability. We set out to study the effect of statin therapy on perioperative hemodynamic parameters and its clinical outcome. Methods In a single center study from 2006 to 2007, peri-operative hemodynamic parameters of 478 patients, who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, were measured. Patients were divided into those who received perioperative statin therapy (n = 276; statin group and those who did not receive statin therapy (n = 202; no-statin group. The two groups were compared together using Kolmogorov-Smirnov-Test, Fisher’s-Exact-Test, and Student’s-T-test. A p value  Results There was no significant difference in the preoperative risk factors. Onset of postoperative atrial fibrillation was not affected by statin therapy. Extended hemodynamic measurements revealed no significant difference between the two groups, apart from Systemic Vascular Resistance Index (SVRI . The no-statin group had a significantly higher SVRI (882 ± 206 vs. 1050 ± 501 dyn s/cm5/m2, p = 0.022. Inotropic support was the same in both groups and no significant difference in the mortality rate was noticed. Also, hemodynamic parameters were not affected by different types and doses of statins. Conclusions Perioperative statin therapy for patients undergoing on-pump coronary bypass grafting or valvular surgery, does not affect the hemodynamic parameters and its clinical outcome.

  15. Statins and morbidity and mortality in COPD in the COMIC study: a prospective COPD cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citgez, Emanuel; van der Palen, Job; Koehorst-Ter Huurne, Kirsten; Movig, Kris; van der Valk, Paul; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein

    2016-01-01

    Both chronic inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidity play an important role in the morbidity and mortality of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Statins could be a potential adjunct therapy. The additional effects of statins in COPD are, however, still under discussion. The aim of this study is to further investigate the association of statin use with clinical outcomes in a well-described COPD cohort. 795 patients of the Cohort of Mortality and Inflammation in COPD (COMIC) study were divided into statin users or not. Statin use was defined as having a statin for at least 90 consecutive days after inclusion. Outcome parameters were 3-year survival, based on all-cause mortality, time until first hospitalisation for an acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) and time until first community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A sensitivity analysis was performed without patients who started a statin 3 months or more after inclusion to exclude immortal time bias. Statin use resulted in a better overall survival (corrected HR 0.70 (95% CI 0.51 to 0.96) in multivariate analysis), but in the sensitivity analysis this association disappeared. Statin use was not associated with time until first hospitalisation for an AECOPD (cHR 0.95, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.22) or time until first CAP (cHR 1.1, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.47). In the COMIC study, statin use is not associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality, time until first hospitalisation for an AECOPD or time until first CAP in patients with COPD.

  16. Statins and morbidity and mortality in COPD in the COMIC study: a prospective COPD cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citgez, Emanuel; van der Palen, Job; Koehorst-ter Huurne, Kirsten; Movig, Kris; van der Valk, Paul; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein

    2016-01-01

    Background Both chronic inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidity play an important role in the morbidity and mortality of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Statins could be a potential adjunct therapy. The additional effects of statins in COPD are, however, still under discussion. The aim of this study is to further investigate the association of statin use with clinical outcomes in a well-described COPD cohort. Methods 795 patients of the Cohort of Mortality and Inflammation in COPD (COMIC) study were divided into statin users or not. Statin use was defined as having a statin for at least 90 consecutive days after inclusion. Outcome parameters were 3-year survival, based on all-cause mortality, time until first hospitalisation for an acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) and time until first community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A sensitivity analysis was performed without patients who started a statin 3 months or more after inclusion to exclude immortal time bias. Results Statin use resulted in a better overall survival (corrected HR 0.70 (95% CI 0.51 to 0.96) in multivariate analysis), but in the sensitivity analysis this association disappeared. Statin use was not associated with time until first hospitalisation for an AECOPD (cHR 0.95, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.22) or time until first CAP (cHR 1.1, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.47). Conclusions In the COMIC study, statin use is not associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality, time until first hospitalisation for an AECOPD or time until first CAP in patients with COPD. PMID:27403321

  17. Essential role of TGF-beta/Smad pathway on statin dependent vascular smooth muscle cell regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Rodríguez-Vita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (also called statins exert proven beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Recent data suggest a protective role for Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-beta in atherosclerosis by regulating the balance between inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation. However, there are no studies about the effect of statins on TGF-beta/Smad pathway in atherosclerosis and vascular cells. METHODOLOGY: In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs statins enhanced Smad pathway activation caused by TGF-beta. In addition, statins upregulated TGF-beta receptor type II (TRII, and increased TGF-beta synthesis and TGF-beta/Smad-dependent actions. In this sense, statins, through Smad activation, render VSMCs more susceptible to TGF-beta induced apoptosis and increased TGF-beta-mediated ECM production. It is well documented that high doses of statins induce apoptosis in cultured VSMC in the presence of serum; however the precise mechanism of this effect remains to be elucidated. We have found that statins-induced apoptosis was mediated by TGF-beta/Smad pathway. Finally, we have described that RhoA inhibition is a common intracellular mechanisms involved in statins effects. The in vivo relevance of these findings was assessed in an experimental model of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E deficient mice: Treatment with Atorvastatin increased Smad3 phosphorylation and TRII overexpression, associated to elevated ECM deposition in the VSMCs within atheroma plaques, while apoptosis was not detected. CONCLUSIONS: Statins enhance TGF-beta/Smad pathway, regulating ligand levels, receptor, main signaling pathway and cellular responses of VSMC, including apoptosis and ECM accumulation. Our findings show that TGF-beta/Smad pathway is essential for statins-dependent actions in VSMCs.

  18. Statin therapy is associated with improved pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Adam G; Gantt, Gerald A; Skacel, Marek; Pai, Rish; Hammel, Jeff P; Kalady, Matthew F

    2013-11-01

    Achieving a pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation improves prognosis in rectal cancer. Statin therapy has been shown to enhance the impact of treatment in several malignancies, but little is known regarding the impact on rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether statin use during neoadjuvant chemoradiation improves pathologic response in rectal cancer. This was a retrospective cohort study based on data from a prospectively maintained colorectal cancer database. The 2 cohorts were defined by statin use during neoadjuvant chemoradiation. This study was performed at a single tertiary referral center. Four hundred seven patients with primary rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant therapy then proctectomy between 2000 and 2012 were included. Ninety-nine patients (24.3%) took a statin throughout the entire course of neoadjuvant therapy. The primary outcome measure was pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy as defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer tumor regression grading system, grades 0 to 3. Patients in the statin cohort had a lower median regression grade (1 vs 2, p = 0.01) and were more likely to have a better response (grades 0-1 vs 2-3) than those not taking a statin (65.7% vs 48.7%, p = 0.004). Statin use remained a significant predictor of an American Joint Committee on Cancer grade 0 to 1 (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.33-3.82) in multivariate analyses. Although statin use itself did not significantly improve oncologic outcomes, an American Joint Committee on Cancer grade 0 to 1 response was associated with statistically significant improvements in overall survival, disease-free survival, cancer-specific mortality, and local recurrence. This was a retrospective study and subject to nonrandomization of patients and incorporated patients on variable statin agents and doses. Statin therapy is associated with an improved response of rectal cancer to

  19. The Cost-Benefit Balance of Statins in Hawai'i: A Moving Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Corey J; Nakagawa, Kazuma; Shohet, Ralph V; Seto, Todd B; Taira, Deborah A

    2017-04-01

    Statins are lipid-lowering medications used for primary and secondary prevention of atherosclerotic disease and represent a substantial portion of drug costs in the United States. A better understanding of prescribing patterns and drug costs should lead to more rational utilization and help constrain health care expenditures in the United States. The 2013 Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data: Part D Prescriber Public Use File for the State of Hawai'i was analyzed. The number of prescriptions for statins, total annual cost, and daily cost were calculated by prescriber specialty and drug. Potential savings from substituting the highest-cost statin with lower-cost statins were calculated. Over 421,000 prescriptions for statins were provided to Medicare Part D beneficiaries in Hawai'i in 2013, which cost $17.6M. The three most commonly prescribed statins were simvastatin (33.4%), atorvastatin (33.4%), and lovastatin (13.9%). Although rosuvastatin comprised 5.4% of the total statin prescriptions, it represented 30.1% of the total cost of statins due to a higher daily cost ($5.53/day) compared to simvastatin ($0.25/day) and atorvastatin ($1.10/day). Cardiologists and general practitioners prescribed the highest percentage of rosuvastatin (8% each). Hypothetical substitution of rosuvastatin would have resulted in substantial annual cost savings (Simvastatin would have saved $1.3M for 25% substitution and $5.1M for 100% substitution, while atorvastatin would have saved $1.1M for 25% substitution and $4.3M for 100% substitution). Among Medicare Part D beneficiaries in Hawai'i, prescribing variation for statins between specialties were observed. Substitution of higher-cost with lower-cost statins may lead to substantial cost savings.

  20. ATP-dependent transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Lucy C.J., E-mail: Luc_ellis@yahoo.co.uk [Section of Translational Medicine, Division of Applied Biology, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Hawksworth, Gabrielle M. [Section of Translational Medicine, Division of Applied Biology, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Weaver, Richard J. [Biologie Servier, Drug Safety Research Centre, 905 Route de Saran, 45520 Gidy (France)

    2013-06-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein-2, MRP2 (human), Mrp2 (rat) are an efflux transporter, responsible for the transport of numerous endogenous and xenobiotic compounds including taurocholate, methotrexate and carboxydichlorofluorescein (CDF). The present study aims to characterise transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 using membrane and vesicle preparations. All statins tested (simvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin and rosuvastatin) stimulated vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in membranes expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2, suggesting that all statins are substrates of human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. The substrate affinity (Km) of all statins for MRP2/Mrp2 was comparable and no correlation between lipophilicity (logD{sub 7.0}) and Km was seen. All statins also inhibited uptake of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, CDF (1 μM) into vesicles expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar IC{sub 50} values. Fitting of the inhibitory data to the hill slope equation, gave hill coefficients (h) of greater than one, suggesting that transport involved more than one binding site for inhibitors of MPR2 and Mrp2. We conclude that statins were transported by both human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar affinity. Statins were also shown to compete with other substrates for transport by MRP2/Mrp2 and that this transport involved more than one binding site on the Mrp2/MRP2 protein. - Highlights: • We characterised MRP2 (human)/Mrp2 (rat)-mediated transport of statins. • We show statins were transported by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. • Statins competed with a known substrate for transport by MRP2/Mrp2. • Competition involved more than one binding site on the MRP2/Mrp2 protein.

  1. Ships Docked at Title V Permitted Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-operating-permit-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  2. 24 CFR 203.387 - Acceptability of customary title evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acceptability of customary title... AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Property Title Transfers and Title Waivers § 203.387 Acceptability of customary title evidence. If the title and title evidence are...

  3. Statin action favors normalization of the plasma lipidome in the atherogenic mixed dyslipidemia of MetS: potential relevance to statin-associated dysglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meikle, Peter J; Wong, Gerard; Tan, Ricardo; Giral, Philippe; Robillard, Paul; Orsoni, Alexina; Hounslow, Neil; Magliano, Dianna J; Shaw, Jonathan E; Curran, Joanne E; Blangero, John; Kingwell, Bronwyn A; Chapman, M John

    2015-12-01

    The impact of statin treatment on the abnormal plasma lipidome of mixed dyslipidemic patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), a group at increased risk of developing diabetes, was evaluated. Insulin-resistant hypertriglyceridemic hypertensive obese males (n = 12) displaying MetS were treated with pitavastatin (4 mg/day) for 180 days; healthy normolipidemic age-matched nonobese males (n = 12) acted as controls. Statin treatment substantially normalized triglyceride (-41%), remnant cholesterol (-55%), and LDL-cholesterol (-39%), with minor effect on HDL-cholesterol (+4%). Lipidomic analysis, normalized to nonHDL-cholesterol in order to probe statin-induced differences in molecular composition independently of reduction in plasma cholesterol, revealed increment in 132 of 138 lipid species that were subnormal at baseline and significantly shifted toward the control group on statin treatment. Increment in alkyl- and alkenylphospholipids (plasmalogens) was prominent, and consistent with significant statin-induced increase in plasma polyunsaturated fatty acid levels. Comparison of the statin-mediated lipidomic changes in MetS with the abnormal plasma lipidomic profile characteristic of prediabetes and T2D in the Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study and San Antonio Family Heart Study cohorts by hypergeometric analysis revealed a significant shift toward the lipid profile of controls, indicative of a marked trend toward a normolipidemic phenotype. Pitavastatin attenuated the abnormal plasma lipidome of MetS patients typical of prediabetes and T2D.

  4. Statins meditate anti-atherosclerotic action in smooth muscle cells by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Kazuki [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Matsumura, Takeshi, E-mail: takeshim@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Senokuchi, Takafumi; Ishii, Norio; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Sarie; Murakami, Saiko [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Nakao, Saya [Department of Environmental & Symbiotic Sciences, Prefectural University of Kumamoto, Kumamoto (Japan); Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tatsuya; Kukidome, Daisuke; Kawasaki, Shuji [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Kawada, Teruo [Laboratory of Nutrition Chemistry, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • Statins induce PPARγ activation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statin-induced PPARγ activation is mediated by COX-2 expression. • Statins suppress cell migration and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statins inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory responses by PPARγ activation. • Fluvastatin suppress the progression of atherosclerosis and induces PPARγ activation in the aorta of apoE-deficient mice. - Abstract: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is an important regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism, and its activation is reported to suppress the progression of atherosclerosis. We have reported that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) activate PPARγ in macrophages. However, it is not yet known whether statins activate PPARγ in other vascular cells. In the present study, we investigated whether statins activate PPARγ in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) and thus mediate anti-atherosclerotic effects. Human aortic SMCs (HASMCs) and human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) were used in this study. Fluvastatin and pitavastatin activated PPARγ in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Statins induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Moreover, treatment with COX-2-siRNA abrogated statin-mediated PPARγ activation in HASMCs. Statins suppressed migration and proliferation of HASMCs, and inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in HASMCs. These effects of statins were abrogated by treatment with PPARγ-siRNA. Treatment with statins suppressed atherosclerotic lesion formation in Apoe{sup −/−} mice. In addition, transcriptional activity of PPARγ and CD36 expression were increased, and the expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α was decreased, in the aorta of statin-treated Apoe{sup −/−} mice. In conclusion, statins mediate anti-atherogenic effects

  5. NASA's unique networking environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1988-01-01

    Networking is an infrastructure technology; it is a tool for NASA to support its space and aeronautics missions. Some of NASA's networking problems are shared by the commercial and/or military communities, and can be solved by working with these communities. However, some of NASA's networking problems are unique and will not be addressed by these other communities. Individual characteristics of NASA's space-mission networking enviroment are examined, the combination of all these characteristics that distinguish NASA's networking systems from either commercial or military systems is explained, and some research areas that are important for NASA to pursue are outlined.

  6. Estimation of Missed Statin Prescription Use in an Administrative Claims Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Rolin L; Patel, Jeetvan G; Hill, Jerrold W; De, Ajita P; Harrison, David J

    2017-09-01

    Nonadherence to statin medications is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and poses a challenge to lipid management in patients who are at risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies have examined statin adherence based on administrative claims data; however, these data may underestimate statin use in patients who participate in generic drug discount programs or who have alternative coverage. To estimate the proportion of patients with missing statin claims in a claims database and determine how missing claims affect commonly used utilization metrics. This retrospective cohort study used pharmacy data from the PharMetrics Plus (P+) claims dataset linked to the IMS longitudinal pharmacy point-of-sale prescription database (LRx) from January 1, 2012, through December 31, 2014. Eligible patients were represented in the P+ and LRx datasets, had ≥1 claim for a statin (index claim) in either database, and had ≥ 24 months of continuous enrollment in P+. Patients were linked between P+ and LRx using a deterministic method. Duplicate claims between LRx and P+ were removed to produce a new dataset comprised of P+ claims augmented with LRx claims. Statin use was then compared between P+ and the augmented P+ dataset. Utilization metrics that were evaluated included percentage of patients with ≥ 1 missing statin claim over 12 months in P+; the number of patients misclassified as new users in P+; the number of patients misclassified as nonstatin users in P+; the change in 12-month medication possession ratio (MPR) and proportion of days covered (PDC) in P+; the comparison between P+ and LRx of classifications of statin treatment patterns (statin intensity and patients with treatment modifications); and the payment status for missing statin claims. Data from 965,785 patients with statin claims in P+ were analyzed (mean age 56.6 years; 57% male). In P+, 20.1% had ≥ 1 missing statin claim post-index; 13.7% were misclassified as

  7. Influence of statins on distinct circulating microRNAs during prolonged aerobic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Pil-Ki; Park, Joseph; Isaacs, Stephanie; Taylor, Beth A; Thompson, Paul D; Troyanos, Chris; D'Hemecourt, Pierre; Dyer, Sophia; Chan, Stephen Y; Baggish, Aaron L

    2016-03-15

    Statins exacerbate exercise-induced skeletal muscle injury. Muscle-specific microRNAs (myomiRs) increase in plasma after prolonged exercise, but the patterns of myomiRs release after statin-associated muscle injury have not been examined. We examined the relationships between statin exposure, in vitro and in vivo muscle contraction, and expression of candidate circulating myomiRs. We measured plasma levels of myomiRs, circulating microRNA-1 (c-miR-1), c-miR-133a, c-miR-206, and c-miR-499-5p from 28 statin-using and 28 nonstatin-using runners before (PRE), immediately after (FINISH), and 24 h after they ran a 42-km footrace (the 2011 Boston marathon) (POST-24). To examine these cellular-regulation myomiRs, we used contracting mouse C2C12 myotubes in culture with and without statin exposure to compare intracellular and extracellular expression of these molecules. In marathoners, c-miR-1, c-miR-133a, and c-miR-206 increased at FINISH, returned to baseline at POST-24, and were unaffected by statin use. In contrast, c-miR-499-5p was unchanged at FINISH but increased at POST-24 among statin users compared with PRE and runners who did not take statins. In cultured C2C12 myotubes, extracellular c-miR-1, c-miR-133a, and c-miR-206 were significantly increased by muscle contraction regardless of statin use. In contrast, extracellular miR-499-5p was unaffected by either isolated statin exposure or isolated carbachol exposure but it was increased when muscle contraction was combined with statin exposure. In summary, we found that statin-potentiated muscle injury during exercise is accompanied by augmented extracellular release of miR-499-5p. Thus c-miR-499-5p may serve as a biomarker of statin-potentiated muscle damage.

  8. Comparing the characteristics of highly cited titles and highly alted titles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didegah, F.; Bowman, T.D.; Bowman, S.; Hartley, J.

    2016-07-01

    This study examines differences in the types of titles for articles that show high altmetric activity (highly alted articles) versus highly cited articles. This work expands on previous research on document titles in combination with a grounded theory approach to develop a codebook in which articles were manually coded based on 11 characteristics. The results show that there are differences and similarities in titles across many of the examined characteristics; highly cited titles and highly mentioned titles on Wikipedia have some similar characteristics such as they have the the highest percentage of substantive words; in addition, there are no or very few titles referencing outside or with humor/lightness on both platforms. Twitter and Facebook also showed some similarities having the highest percentage of humorous/light titles and lowest percentage of substantive words in their titles. (Author)

  9. Efficacy and Safety of Alirocumab 150 mg Every 4 Weeks in Patients With Hypercholesterolemia Not on Statin Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroes, Erik; Guyton, John R; Lepor, Norman

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The PCSK9 antibody alirocumab (75 mg every 2 weeks; Q2W) as monotherapy reduced low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels by 47%. Because the option of a monthly dosing regimen is convenient, ODYSSEY CHOICE II evaluated alirocumab 150 mg Q4W in patients with inadequately cont......: Alirocumab 150 mg Q4W can be considered in patients not on statin with inadequately controlled hypercholesterolemia as a convenient option for lowering LDL-C. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02023879....

  10. Statins meditate anti-atherosclerotic action in smooth muscle cells by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Kazuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Ishii, Norio; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Sarie; Murakami, Saiko; Nakao, Saya; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tatsuya; Kukidome, Daisuke; Kawasaki, Shuji; Kawada, Teruo; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2015-01-30

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is an important regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism, and its activation is reported to suppress the progression of atherosclerosis. We have reported that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) activate PPARγ in macrophages. However, it is not yet known whether statins activate PPARγ in other vascular cells. In the present study, we investigated whether statins activate PPARγ in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) and thus mediate anti-atherosclerotic effects. Human aortic SMCs (HASMCs) and human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) were used in this study. Fluvastatin and pitavastatin activated PPARγ in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Statins induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Moreover, treatment with COX-2-siRNA abrogated statin-mediated PPARγ activation in HASMCs. Statins suppressed migration and proliferation of HASMCs, and inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in HASMCs. These effects of statins were abrogated by treatment with PPARγ-siRNA. Treatment with statins suppressed atherosclerotic lesion formation in Apoe(-/-) mice. In addition, transcriptional activity of PPARγ and CD36 expression were increased, and the expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α was decreased, in the aorta of statin-treated Apoe(-/-) mice. In conclusion, statins mediate anti-atherogenic effects through PPARγ activation in SMCs. These effects of statins on SMCs may be beneficial for the prevention of atherosclerosis.

  11. Gemfibrozil in Combination with Statins-Is It Really Contraindicated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Barbara S; Saseen, Joseph J; Morris, Pamela B

    2016-04-01

    Gemfibrozil is a lipid-modifying agent that belongs to the fibric acid derivative class. Fibric acid derivatives activate peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPAR-α). The primary role of these agents in clinical practice is for the management of hypertriglyceridemia. Triglycerides may be reduced by as much as 74 % in some patients. In addition to lowering triglycerides, these agents can also decrease very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) as well as raise high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Based on the 2013 ACC/AHA Guideline on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults and the National Lipid Association, pharmacologic therapy to reduce triglycerides should be considered when triglyceride levels are ≥500 mg/dL. While the use of gemfibrozil has decreased over the years for a variety of reasons, muscle-associated adverse effects is the predominant reason and the one that is most clinically relevant. However, despite these concerns, there are situations in which the use of gemfibrozil in combination with a statin may be necessary. Understanding the metabolism of gemfibrozil and the degree of interaction with the various statins will assist health-care providers to optimize safety when this combination is clinically indicated.

  12. [Are treatments with statins that are considered unsuitable really unsuitable?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada Alifonso, Cinta; Vilaseca Canals, Jordi; Méndez Trías, M Ángeles; Lozano Ovalle, Silvia; Jusmet Miquel, Javier; Torres Machado, Victoria; Castro Rivera, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    In the Catalonian Institute of health there are 2 well-established circumstances for indicating lipid-lowering drug treatment with statins in the primary prevention of ischaemic heart disease. These are, severe hypercholesterolaemia, with a low density lipoprotein cholesterol equal to or greater than 240mg/dL, or above 130mg/dL when the coronary risk is equal to or greater than 10% at 10 years. There are data that suggest that these 2 criteria are not the only ones used in routine clinical practice, as such that the majority of patients to whom it is indicated, do not meet either of these 2 conditions. This study aims to determine the characteristics of the patients when statins are indicated outside the aforementioned circumstances. It is concluded that around 40% of patients have clinical characteristics that could justify the treatment. The level of suitability could not be established in about 33% of the patients, due to not being able to determine the coronary risk. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. How property title impacts urban consolidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Easthope, Hazel; Warnken, Jan; Sherry, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Continuing urbanisation is triggering an increase in multi-titled housing internationally. This trend has given rise to a substantial research interest in the social consequences of higher density living. Little enquiry, however, has been directed to examining how property title subdivisions gene...

  14. Land Titles and Rice Production in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Den Broeck, Katleen; Newman, Carol; Tarp, Finn

    In most of the empirical literature on land titling, the household is regarded as unitary, and land rights are found to have ambiguous effects on land allocation, investment and productivity. Using data from 12 provinces in Vietnam, we diversify land titles, and show in a household fixed effects ...

  15. Land Titles and Rice Production in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Den Broeck, Katleen; Newman, Carol; Tarp, Finn

    analysis of plot level rice yields that land titles are indeed important. Only exclusively held titles have the expected positive effects, and the positive effect on yields is found in male headed households. Furthermore, a household level rice yield function reveals that exclusive user rights...

  16. Explorations: Title III ESEA Programs in Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa State Dept. of Public Instruction, Des Moines.

    Seventy projects funded by the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Title III, and providing the funds to public school districts to demonstrate the feasibility of educational innovations, are described in this document about Iowa Title III exemplary programs. Projects are subdivided according to planning grants, operational grants, guidance…

  17. Precision and Recall in Title Keyword Searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McJunkin, Monica Cahill

    This study examines precision and recall for title and keyword searches performed in the "FirstSearch" WorldCat database when keywords are used with and without adjacency of terms specified. A random sample of 68 titles in economics were searched in the OCLC (Online Computer Library Center) Online Union Catalog in order to obtain their…

  18. Land Titles and Rice Production in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Den Broeck, Katleen; Newman, Carol; Tarp, Finn

    In most of the empirical literature on land titling, the household is regarded as unitary, and land rights are found to have ambiguous effects on land allocation, investment and productivity. Using data from 12 provinces in Vietnam, we diversify land titles, and show in a household fixed effects...

  19. Land Titles and Rice Production in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Den Broeck, Katleen; Newman, Carol; Tarp, Finn

    In most of the empirical literature on land titling, the household is regarded as unitary, and land rights are found to have ambiguous effects on land allocation, investment and productivity. Using data from 12 provinces in Vietnam, we diversify land titles, and show in a household fixed effects...

  20. Cultural Elements of English Movie Title

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琼

    2013-01-01

    Movie title is the name of a movie which to some extent determines the audience ’s choice to watch the movie or not. English movie title, as a special kind of English language, reflects language and culture of the specific English country. To better understand and appreciate the movie, it is essential to understand the cultural elements of the English movie title. The thesis with start with the introduction of movie title and its naming approaches, then analyze the three cultural elements that is historical, reli-gious and linguistic cultural elements in English movie title in the hope of providing helpful background knowledge for Chinese audience to better appreciate the English culture.

  1. INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT OF STATIN-ASSOCIATED MUSCLE DAMAGE PREDICTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Petrov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the risk factors of statin-associated muscle damage in patient with ischemic heart disease.Material and methods. 258 patients with ischemic heart disease treated with statin were included into the study. Total plasma creatine kinase levels were measured and SLCO1B1*5 genotyping was performed. Relationship between statin therapy and adverse events was evaluated by Naranjo algorithm.Results. Patients with muscle symptoms received statins significantly longer (48.8 vs 11.9 months, р<0.0001 and in higher doses, than patients without muscle pain/weakness. There were not significant differences in creatine kinase levels between patients with and without muscle symptoms. Patients with SLCO1B1*5 genotype were revealed in both groups, but more often (58% among patients with muscle symptoms. Patients with abnormal C allele having muscle symptoms received statins significantly longer, than these without muscle signs (54.7 vs 13.9 months, р=0.0028.Conclusion. Association between occurrence of muscle symptoms and SLCO1B1*5 allele carriership, statin dose and therapy duration was revealed. Creatine kinase examination was not valuable for finding of statin-induced muscle damage.

  2. INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT OF STATIN-ASSOCIATED MUSCLE DAMAGE PREDICTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Petrov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the risk factors of statin-associated muscle damage in patient with ischemic heart disease.Material and methods. 258 patients with ischemic heart disease treated with statin were included into the study. Total plasma creatine kinase levels were measured and SLCO1B1*5 genotyping was performed. Relationship between statin therapy and adverse events was evaluated by Naranjo algorithm.Results. Patients with muscle symptoms received statins significantly longer (48.8 vs 11.9 months, р<0.0001 and in higher doses, than patients without muscle pain/weakness. There were not significant differences in creatine kinase levels between patients with and without muscle symptoms. Patients with SLCO1B1*5 genotype were revealed in both groups, but more often (58% among patients with muscle symptoms. Patients with abnormal C allele having muscle symptoms received statins significantly longer, than these without muscle signs (54.7 vs 13.9 months, р=0.0028.Conclusion. Association between occurrence of muscle symptoms and SLCO1B1*5 allele carriership, statin dose and therapy duration was revealed. Creatine kinase examination was not valuable for finding of statin-induced muscle damage.

  3. Reversal of statin-induced memory dysfunction by co-enzyme Q10: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okeahialam BN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Basil N Okeahialam Cardiology Sub-Unit 1, Department of Medicine, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria Abstract: Statins are useful in the armamentarium of the clinician dealing with dyslipidemia, which increases cardiovascular morbi-mortality in hypertensive and diabetic patients among others. Dyslipidemia commonly exists as a comorbidity factor in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Use of statins is however associated with side effects which at times are so disabling as to interfere with activities of daily living. There are various ways of dealing with this, including use of more water-soluble varieties, intermittent dosing, or use of statin alternatives. Of late, use of co-enzyme Q10 has become acceptable for the muscle side effects. Only one report of any benefit on the rarely reported memory side effect was encountered by the author in the search of English medical literature. This is a report of a documented case of a Nigerian woman with history of statin intolerance in this case, memory dysfunction despite persisting dyslipidemia comorbidity. Her memory dysfunction side effect which interfered with activities of daily living and background muscle pain cleared when coenzyme Q10 was administered alongside low dose statin. Her lipid profile normalized and has remained normal. It is being recommended for use when statin side effects (muscle- and memory-related impair quality of life and leave patient at dyslipidemia-induced cardiovascular morbi-mortality. Keywords: statin, memory dysfunction, co-enzyme Q10, improvement

  4. A statin-loaded reconstituted high-density lipoprotein nanoparticle inhibits atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Tang, Jun; Cormode, David P.; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ozcan, Canturk; Otten, Maarten J.; Zaidi, Neeha; Lobatto, Mark E.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Kuan, Emma L.; Martel, Catherine; Hewing, Bernd; Sager, Hendrik; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Fuster, Valentin; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a key feature of atherosclerosis and a target for therapy. Statins have potent anti-inflammatory properties but these cannot be fully exploited with oral statin therapy due to low systemic bioavailability. Here we present an injectable reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticle carrier vehicle that delivers statins to atherosclerotic plaques. We demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of statin-rHDL in vitro and show that this effect is mediated through the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway. We also apply statin-rHDL nanoparticles in vivo in an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis and show that they accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions in which they directly affect plaque macrophages. Finally, we demonstrate that a 3-month low-dose statin-rHDL treatment regimen inhibits plaque inflammation progression, while a 1-week high-dose regimen markedly decreases inflammation in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Statin-rHDL represents a novel potent atherosclerosis nanotherapy that directly affects plaque inflammation.

  5. Pleiotropic effects of statins in distal human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butrous Ghazwan S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent clinical data suggest statins have transient but significant effects in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. In this study we explored the molecular effects of statins on distal human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs and their relevance to proliferation and apoptosis in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Methods Primary distal human PASMCs from patients and controls were treated with lipophilic (simvastatin, atorvastatin, mevastatin and fluvastatin, lipophobic (pravastatin and nitric-oxide releasing statins and studied in terms of their DNA synthesis, proliferation, apoptosis, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and endothelin-1 release. Results Treatment of human PASMCs with selected statins inhibited DNA synthesis, proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 production in a concentration-dependent manner. Statins differed in their effectiveness, the rank order of anti-mitogenic potency being simvastatin > atorvastatin > > pravastatin. Nevertheless, a novel nitric oxide-releasing derivative of pravastatin (NCX 6550 was effective. Lipophilic statins, such as simvastatin, also enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of iloprost and sildenafil, promoted apoptosis and inhibited the release of the mitogen and survival factor endothelin-1. These effects were reversed by mevalonate and the isoprenoid intermediate geranylgeranylpyrophosphate and were mimicked by inhibitors of the Rho and Rho-kinase. Conclusions Lipophilic statins exert direct effects on distal human PASMCs and are likely to involve inhibition of Rho GTPase signalling. These findings compliment some of the recently documented effects in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  6. Statin use during pregnancy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, D Meeike; Hassani Lahsinoui, Hajar; van de Post, Joris A M; Wiegman, Albert; Wijburg, Frits A; Kastelein, John J P; Hutten, Barbara A

    2012-03-01

    Statins enjoy widespread acceptance as effective drugs to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with and without cardiovascular disease, and are considered safe for long-term use. However, these compounds are contraindicated during pregnancy based on their potential teratogenic effects. Owing to the increasing number of young women eligible for statin therapy and the concern that the discontinuation of statin therapy might be harmful for both mother and child with hypercholesterolemia, gestational exposure to statins has increasingly become an issue of significant clinical importance. In this systematic review of both human and animal studies on the teratogenic effects of statins during pregnancy, we found that most of the available data in fact suggests that statins are unlikely to be teratogenic. In humans, the observed congenital anomalies were isolated and no consistent pattern has emerged to suggest that a common mechanism could underlie these observations. Animal studies show conflicting results, but in the reports in which an excess of congenital anomalies was reported in the statin-treated rodents, excessive doses were used compared with the regimens we commonly prescribe to human subjects.

  7. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and statins in relation to colorectal cancer risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mazyar Shadman; Polly A Newcomb; John M Hampton; Karen J Wernli; Amy Trentham-Dietz

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between individual or combined use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or statins and colorectal cancer risk. METHODS: In a population-based case-control study in women, we examined the association between NSAIDs and statin use and the risk of colorectal cancers. We further investigated whether the use of statins modifies the protective effect of NSAIDs. Female cases ( n = 669)of colorectal cancer aged 50-74 years were identified from a statewide registry in Wisconsin during 1999-2001. Community control women ( n = 1375) were randomly selected from lists of licensed drivers and Medicare beneficiaries. Medication use and risk factor information were gathered during a structured telephone interview. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to calculate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS: Overall, NSAIDs users had a 30% reduction in risk of colorectal cancer (95% CI: 0.56-0.88). Statin use was not associated with colorectal cancer risk (OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 0.74-1.85), regardless of structural type (lipophilic or hydrophilic), duration of use, or recency. There was no evidence of an interaction between NSAIDs and statins and colorectal cancer risk ( P-interaction = 0.28). CONCLUSION: Although our results confirm the inverse association between NSAIDs use and colorectal cancer risk, they do not support a risk reduction in statin users, or an interaction effect of combined NSAIDs and statin use.

  8. Saxagliptin efficacy and safety in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving concomitant statin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryzinski, Brian; Allen, Elsie; Cook, William; Hirshberg, Boaz

    2014-01-01

    To examine whether concomitant statin therapy affects glycemic control with saxagliptin 2.5 and 5mg/d in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Efficacy and safety were analyzed post hoc for pooled data from 9 saxagliptin randomized, placebo-controlled trials with a primary 24-week treatment period (4 monotherapy, 2 add-on to metformin, 1 each add-on to a sulfonylurea, thiazolidinedione, or insulin±metformin). Safety was also assessed in an 11-study, 24-week pool and an extended 20-study pool, which included 9 additional 4- to 52-week randomized studies. Comparisons were performed for patient groups defined by baseline statin use. Saxagliptin produced greater mean reductions in glycated hemoglobin than placebo, with no interaction between treatment and baseline statin use (P=0.47). In patients receiving saxagliptin 2.5 and 5mg and placebo, the proportion of patients with ≥1 adverse event (AE) was 78.1%, 64.0%, and 63.2%, respectively, in patients with any statin use and 70.6%, 57.9%, and 55.0% in patients with no statin use. Serious AEs, deaths, and symptomatic confirmed hypoglycemia (fingerstick glucose ≤50mg/dL) were few and similar, irrespective of baseline statin use. Saxagliptin improves glycemic control and is generally well tolerated in patients with T2DM, irrespective of concomitant statin therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) on progression of kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Linda F

    2008-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease, especially in the setting of proteinuria, is characterized by hyperlipidemia. In animal models, hyperlipidemia causes glomerular foam cells and glomerulosclerosis. Treatment with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) ameliorates kidney disease in these models. The data of the role of hyperlipidemia in progression of human kidney disease are less clear. Data from small studies in glomerular disease suggest that statins decrease proteinuria. Data mainly from cardiovascular studies suggest that statins decrease the loss of glomerular filtration. The benefit of statins may derive from their lipid lowering effects. More recently, data suggest that the benefit of statins is greater than lipid lowering alone. The pleiotropic effects of statins may derive from inhibition of other downstream targets (isoprenoids) of the mevalonic acid pathway that are separate from cholesterol synthesis. Statins inhibits isoprenylation of Ras and Rho GTPases. These effects may lead to decreased monocyte/macrophage infiltration in the glomerulus, decreased mesangial proliferation and decreased accumulation of extracellular matrix and fibrosis. In addition, inhibition of RhoA and Ras may decrease inflammation and increase eNOS activity. These effects could lead to improvement in the progression of kidney disease.

  10. ATP-dependent transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Lucy C J; Hawksworth, Gabrielle M; Weaver, Richard J

    2013-06-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein-2, MRP2 (human), Mrp2 (rat) are an efflux transporter, responsible for the transport of numerous endogenous and xenobiotic compounds including taurocholate, methotrexate and carboxydichlorofluorescein (CDF). The present study aims to characterise transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 using membrane and vesicle preparations. All statins tested (simvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin and rosuvastatin) stimulated vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in membranes expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2, suggesting that all statins are substrates of human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. The substrate affinity (Km) of all statins for MRP2/Mrp2 was comparable and no correlation between lipophilicity (logD7.0) and Km was seen. All statins also inhibited uptake of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, CDF (1μM) into vesicles expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar IC50 values. Fitting of the inhibitory data to the hill slope equation, gave hill coefficients (h) of greater than one, suggesting that transport involved more than one binding site for inhibitors of MPR2 and Mrp2. We conclude that statins were transported by both human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar affinity. Statins were also shown to compete with other substrates for transport by MRP2/Mrp2 and that this transport involved more than one binding site on the Mrp2/MRP2 protein.

  11. Neuroprotective Effects of Low-Dose Statins in the Retinal Ultrastructure of Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Navarro, Judith; Aldea, Pilar; de Hoz, Rosa; Salazar, Juan J; Ramírez, Ana I; Rojas, Blanca; Gallego, Beatriz I; Triviño, Alberto; Tejerina, Teresa; Ramírez, José M

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the pleiotropic effects to statins, we analyze the qualitative and quantitative retinal changes in hypercholesterolemic rabbits after a low-dosage statin treatment. For this purpose, New Zealand rabbits were split into three groups: control (G0; n = 10), fed a standard diet; hypercholesterolemic (G1; n = 8), fed a 0.5% cholesterol-enriched diet for 8 months; and statins (G2; n = 8), fed a 0.5% cholesterol-enriched diet for 8 months, together with the administration of statin (pravastatin or fluvastatin sodium) at a dose of 2 mg / kg / day each diet. The retinas were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry (glial fibrillary acidic protein). The retinal thickness of nuclear and plexiform layers were quantified in semi-thin sections. The results revealed that the low-statin-treated rabbits in comparison with the hypercholesterolemic group showed: i) a more preserved structure in all retinal layers; ii) a significant reduction in retinal thickness; iii) a decrease in cell death in the nuclear-and ganglion-cell layers; iv) a reduction of hydropic degeneration in the plexiform and nerve-fiber layers; v) a preservation of astrocytes and of the retinal area occupied by them; and vi) a better-preserved retinal vascular structure. Our findings indicate that low doses of statins can prevent retinal degeneration, acting on retinal macroglia, neurons and retinal vessels, despite that hypercholesterolemia remained unchanged. Thus, the pleiotropic effects of the statins may help safeguard the retinal ultrastructure.

  12. Renoprotective effect of alprostadil in combination with statins in patients with mild to moderate renal failure undergoing coronary angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei-jing; ZHANG Bu-chun; GUO Rong; WEI Yi-dong; LI Wei-ming; XU Ya-wei

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of alprostadil and statins in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is controversial.The purpose of this study was to explore the efficacy of combined therapy with alprostadil and statins in protecting renal function and preventing contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) in patients undergoing coronary angiography.Methods A total of 156 consecutive patients with mild to moderate renal failure who underwent coronary angiography were enrolled in our study,and randomly categorized into two groups.In the statins group,80 patients were treated with statins before and after coronary angiography.in the alprostadil plus statins group,76 patients were treated with statins and alprostadil before and after coronary angiography.Serum creatinine (SCr),serum cystatin (CysC) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) were detected after administration of contrast media,and adverse events were evaluated within six months.Results In both groups,the SCr,CysC and NGAL significantly increased after coronary angiography and peaked at 48,24 and 6 hours,respectively.SCr,CysC and NGAL were significantly lower in the alprostadil plus statins group than in the statins group (P<0.05).The incidence of CIN in the alprostadil plus statins group was slightly lower than in the statins group.The incidence of adverse events within six months in the alprostadil plus statins group was significantly lower than in the statins group (P=0.034).Conclusions Intravenous alprostadil in combination with oral statins is superior to statins alone for protecting renal function in patients with mild to moderate renal dysfunction who undergo coronary angiography,and can reduce the incidence of adverse events seen within six months.

  13. Statins' effect on plasma levels of Coenzyme Q10 and improvement in myopathy with supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlefield, Nate; Beckstrand, Renea L; Luthy, Karlen E

    2014-02-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins, are medications at the forefront of the battle against cardiovascular disease. Despite their effectiveness, patient compliance with statins has lagged because of medication cost and adverse effects, namely myopathy. Myopathy is the most common side effect of statin use. The purpose of this review is to report plasma levels of CoQ10 in patients taking statins and then to determine the benefit of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on statin-related myopathy as evidenced by symptomatic improvement and increase in serum levels of CoQ10. CINAHL, Medline, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition, and Cochrane Library. Evidence from this review suggests that studies showed a significant relationship between statin intake and decreased serum levels of CoQ10. A few studies showed a benefit in symptoms of myalgia or improvement of serum levels of CoQ10 with supplementation. One study showed no benefit of CoQ10 supplementation when taken with statins. There were no risks of supplementation reported in any of the studies. CoQ10 supplementation might benefit those patients suffering from statin-induced myopathy as evidenced by the results of these studies. Supplementation of CoQ10 at a dose of between 30 and 200 mg daily has shown to have beneficial effects on statin myopathy with no noted side effects. Further research is necessary. ©2013 The Author(s) ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  14. Statin use and breast cancer survival and risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi-Jun; Tu, Chao; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Zhu, Jingjing; Qian, Ke-Qing; Li, Wen-Jing; Wu, Lang

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to determine the associations between statin use and breast cancer survival and risk by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched PubMed, Embase and Web of Science up to August 2015 for identifying relevant prospective or case-control studies, or randomized clinical trials. Five prospective studies involving 60,911 patients reported the association between statin use and breast cancer mortality. Eleven prospective studies, 12 case-control studies and 9 randomized clinical trials involving 83,919 patients reported the association between statin use and breast cancer risk. After pooling estimates from all available studies, there was a significantly negative association between pre-diagnosis statin use and breast cancer mortality (for overall survival (OS): hazard ratio (HR) = 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.54-0.84; for disease specific survival (DSS): HR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.53-0.99). There was also a significant inverse association between post-diagnosis statin use and breast cancer DSS (HR = 0.65, 95% CI 0.43-0.98), although the association with breast cancer OS did not reach statistical significance (HR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.48-1.07). Additionally, there was a non-linear relationship for the duration of post-diagnosis statin use with breast cancer specific mortality. On the other hand, with regards to the relationship between statin use and breast cancer risk, no significant association was detected. Our analyses suggest that although statin use may not influence breast cancer risk, the use of statin may be associated with decrease mortality of breast cancer patients. Further large-scale studies are warranted to validate our findings.

  15. Statins in the treatment of chronic heart failure: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim van der Harst

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The efficacy of statin therapy in patients with established chronic heart failure (CHF is a subject of much debate. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted three systematic literature searches to assess the evidence supporting the prescription of statins in CHF. First, we investigated the participation of CHF patients in randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials designed to evaluate the efficacy of statins in reducing major cardiovascular events and mortality. Second, we assessed the association between serum cholesterol and outcome in CHF. Finally, we evaluated the ability of statin treatment to modify surrogate endpoint parameters in CHF. Using validated search strategies, we systematically searched PubMed for our three queries. In addition, we searched the reference lists from eligible studies, used the "see related articles" feature for key publications in PubMed, consulted the Cochrane Library, and searched the ISI Web of Knowledge for papers citing key publications. Search 1 resulted in the retrieval of 47 placebo-controlled clinical statin trials involving more than 100,000 patients. CHF patients had, however, been systematically excluded from these trials. Search 2 resulted in the retrieval of eight studies assessing the relationship between cholesterol levels and outcome in CHF patients. Lower serum cholesterol was consistently associated with increased mortality. Search 3 resulted in the retrieval of 18 studies on the efficacy of statin treatment in CHF. On the whole, these studies reported favorable outcomes for almost all surrogate endpoints. CONCLUSIONS: Since CHF patients have been systematically excluded from randomized, controlled clinical cholesterol-lowering trials, the effect of statin therapy in these patients remains to be established. Currently, two large, randomized, placebo-controlled statin trials are under way to evaluate the efficacy of statin treatment in terms of reducing clinical endpoints in CHF patients

  16. Reduced esophageal cancer incidence in statin users,particularly with cyclo-oxygenase inhibition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ian; Leonard; Phillip; Beales; Abigail; Hensley; Yoon; Loke

    2013-01-01

    AIM:To examine the association between statin use and the development of esophageal cancer METHODS:We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis.Multiple databases(Pubmed,EMBASE,Cochrane Library,Web of Science,Wiley Interscience and Google Scholar) were systematically searched for studies reporting the association of statin use and the development of esophageal cancer.Literature searching and data abstraction were performed independently by two separate researchers.The quality of studies reviewed was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality assessment scale.Meta-analysis on the relationship between statin use and cancer incidence was performed.The effect of the combination of statin plus a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor was also examined.RESULTS:Eleven studies met eligibility criteria,9 high and 2 medium quality.All were observational studies.Studies examining adenocarcinoma development in Barrett’s esophagus included 317 cancers and 1999 controls,population-based studies examining all esophageal cancers included 371203 cancers and 6083150 controls.In the Barrett’s population the use of statins(OR = 0.57;95%CI:0.43-0.75) and cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors(OR = 0.59;95%CI:0.45-0.77) were independently associated with a reduced incidence of adenocarcinoma.Combined use of a statin plus cyclooxygenase inhibitor was associated with an even lower adenocarcinoma incidence(OR = 0.26;95%CI:0.1-0.68).There was more heterogeneity in the population-based studies but pooled adjusted data showed that statin use was associated with a lower incidence of all combined esophageal cancers(OR = 0.81;95%CI:0.75-0.88).CONCLUSION:Statin use in patients with Barrett’s oesophagus is associated with a significantly lower incidence of adenocarcinoma.The chemopreventive actions of statins,especially combined with cyclooxygenase inhibitors deserve further exploration.

  17. ATVB Council Statement: Non-statin LDL-lowering Therapy and Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegele, Robert A.; Gidding, Samuel S.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; McPherson, Ruth; Raal, Frederick J.; Rader, Daniel J.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Welty, Francine K.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol using statin drugs is foundational therapy to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Here we consider the place of non-statin therapies that also reduce LDL cholesterol in prevention of CVD. Among conventional non-statins, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials showed that bile acid sequestrants, niacin and fibrates given as monotherapy each reduce CVD end points. From trials in which patients’ LDL cholesterol was already well-controlled on a statin, adding ezetimibe incrementally reduced CVD end points, while adding a fibrate or niacin showed no incremental benefit. Among emerging non-statins, monoclonal antibodies against proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) added to a statin and given for up to 78 weeks showed preliminary evidence of reductions in CVD outcomes. While these promising early findings contributed to the recent approval of these agents in Europe and the US, much larger and longer duration outcomes studies are ongoing for definitive proof of CVD benefits. Other non-statin agents recently approved in the US include lomitapide and mipomersen, which both act via distinctive LDL-receptor independent mechanisms to substantially reduce LDL cholesterol in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. We also address some unanswered questions, including measuring alternative biochemical variables to LDL cholesterol, evidence for treating children with monitoring of subclinical atherosclerosis, and potential risks of extremely low LDL cholesterol. As evidence for benefit in CVD prevention accumulates, we anticipate that clinical practice will shift towards more assertive LDL-lowering treatment, using both statins and non-statins initiated earlier in appropriately selected patients. PMID:26376908

  18. Perilipin-5 is regulated by statins and controls triglyceride contents in the hepatocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhi, Cédric; Marquart, Tyler J; Allen, Ryan M; Baldán, Angel

    2014-08-01

    Perilipin-5 (PLIN5) is a member of the perilipin family of lipid droplet (LD)-associated proteins. PLIN5 is expressed in oxidative tissues including the liver, and is critical during LD biogenesis. Studies showed that statins reduce hepatic triglyceride contents in some patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and in rodent models of diet-induced hepatosteatosis. Whether statins alter triglyceride synthesis, storage, and/or utilization within the hepatocyte is unknown, though. Here we tested the hypothesis that statins alter the metabolism of LD in the hepatocyte during physiological conditions, such as fasting-induced steatosis. Mice were gavaged with saline or atorvastatin, and the expression of LD-associated genes was determined in fed and fasted animals. The accumulation of triglycerides and LD was studied in mouse or human primary hepatocytes in response to statins, and following knock-down of SREBP2 or PLIN5. We show that statins decrease the levels of PLIN5, but not other LD-associated genes, in both mouse liver and mouse/human primary hepatocytes, which is paralleled by a significant reduction in both intracellular triglycerides and the number of LD. We identify an atypical negative sterol regulatory sequence in the proximal promoter of mouse/human PLIN5 that recruits the transcription factor SREBP2 and confers response to statins. Finally, we show that the statin-dependent reduction of hepatocyte triglyceride contents is mimicked by partial knock-down of PLIN5; conversely, ectopic overexpression of PLIN5 reverts the statin effect. PLIN5 is a physiological regulator of triglyceride metabolism in the liver, and likely contributes to the pleiotropic effects of statins. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Statin Safety in Chinese: A Population-Based Study of Older Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Q Li

    Full Text Available Compared to Caucasians, Chinese achieve a higher blood concentration of statin for a given dose. It remains unknown whether this translates to increased risk of serious statin-associated adverse events amongst Chinese patients.We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of older adults (mean age, 74 years newly prescribed a statin in Ontario, Canada between 2002 and 2013, where 19,033 Chinese (assessed through a validated surname algorithm were matched (1:3 by propensity score to 57,099 non-Chinese. This study used linked healthcare databases.The follow-up observation period (mean 1.1, maximum 10.8 years was similar between groups, as were the reasons for censoring the observation period (end of follow-up, death, or statin discontinuation. Forty-seven percent (47% of Chinese were initiated on a higher than recommended statin dose. Compared to non-Chinese, Chinese ethnicity did not associate with any of the four serious statin-associated adverse events assessed in this study [rhabdomyolysis hazard ratio (HR 0.61 (95% CI 0.28 to 1.34, incident diabetes HR 1.02 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.30, acute kidney injury HR 0.90 (95% CI 0.72 to 1.13, or all-cause mortality HR 0.88 (95% CI 0.74 to 1.05]. Similar results were observed in subgroups defined by statin type and dose.We observed no higher risk of serious statin toxicity in Chinese than matched non-Chinese older adults with similar indicators of baseline health. Regulatory agencies should review available data, including findings from our study, to decide if a change in their statin dosing recommendations for people of Chinese ethnicity is warranted.

  20. Statin Safety in Chinese: A Population-Based Study of Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daniel Q.; Kim, Richard B.; McArthur, Eric; Fleet, Jamie L.; Hegele, Robert A.; Shah, Baiju R.; Weir, Matthew A.; Molnar, Amber O.; Dixon, Stephanie; Tu, Jack V.; Anand, Sonia; Garg, Amit X.

    2016-01-01

    Background Compared to Caucasians, Chinese achieve a higher blood concentration of statin for a given dose. It remains unknown whether this translates to increased risk of serious statin-associated adverse events amongst Chinese patients. Methods We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of older adults (mean age, 74 years) newly prescribed a statin in Ontario, Canada between 2002 and 2013, where 19,033 Chinese (assessed through a validated surname algorithm) were matched (1:3) by propensity score to 57,099 non-Chinese. This study used linked healthcare databases. Findings The follow-up observation period (mean 1.1, maximum 10.8 years) was similar between groups, as were the reasons for censoring the observation period (end of follow-up, death, or statin discontinuation). Forty-seven percent (47%) of Chinese were initiated on a higher than recommended statin dose. Compared to non-Chinese, Chinese ethnicity did not associate with any of the four serious statin-associated adverse events assessed in this study [rhabdomyolysis hazard ratio (HR) 0.61 (95% CI 0.28 to 1.34), incident diabetes HR 1.02 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.30), acute kidney injury HR 0.90 (95% CI 0.72 to 1.13), or all-cause mortality HR 0.88 (95% CI 0.74 to 1.05)]. Similar results were observed in subgroups defined by statin type and dose. Conclusions We observed no higher risk of serious statin toxicity in Chinese than matched non-Chinese older adults with similar indicators of baseline health. Regulatory agencies should review available data, including findings from our study, to decide if a change in their statin dosing recommendations for people of Chinese ethnicity is warranted. PMID:26954681

  1. Comparison of Clinical Outcomes of Hydrophilic and Lipophilic Statins in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Chul; Jang, Su Young; Cho, Kyung Hoon; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Lee, Min Goo; Ko, Jum Suk; Park, Keun Ho; Sim, Doo Sun; Yoon, Nam Sik; Yoon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Kye Hun; Hong, Young Joon; Park, Hyung Wook; Kim, Ju Han; Jeong, Myung Ho; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun; Kang, Jung Chaee

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims A controversy exists about which statin is preferable for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and clinical impacts of different statins according to lipophilicity have not been established. Methods The 1,124 patients with AMI included in the present study were divided into hydrophilic- and lipophilic-statin groups. In-hospital complications (defined as death, cardiogenic shock, ventricular arrhythmia, infection, bleeding, and renal insufficiency, and other fatal arrhythmias), major adverse cardiac events (MACE), all-cause death, re-myocardial infarction, re-percutaneous coronary intervention (re-PCI), and surgical revascularization were analyzed during a 1-year clinical follow-up. Results Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups, and in-hospital complication rates showed no between-group differences (11.7% vs. 12.8%, p = 0.688). Although MACE at the 1- and 6-month clinical follow-ups occurred more in hydrophilic statin group I (1 month: 10.0% vs. 4.4%, p = 0.001; 6 month: 19.9% vs. 14.2%, p = 0.022), no significant difference in MACE was observed at the 1-year follow-up (21.5% vs. 17.9%, p = 0.172). Both statin groups showed similar efficacy for reducing serum lipid concentrations. A Cox-regression analysis showed that the use of a hydrophilic statin did not predict 1-year MACE, all-cause death, AMI, or re-PCI. Conclusions Although short-term cardiovascular outcomes were better in the lipophilic-statin group, 1-year outcomes were similar in patients with AMI who were administered hydrophilic and lipophilic statins. In other words, the type of statin did not influence 1-year outcomes in patients with AMI. PMID:22016590

  2. Impact of statin adherence on cardiovascular disease and mortality outcomes: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vera, Mary A; Bhole, Vidula; Burns, Lindsay C; Lacaille, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Aims While suboptimal adherence to statin medication has been quantified in real-world patient settings, a better understanding of its impact is needed, particularly with respect to distinct problems of medication taking. Our aim was to synthesize current evidence on the impacts of statin adherence, discontinuation and persistence on cardiovascular disease and mortality outcomes. Methods We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed studies using a mapped search of Medline, Embase and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts databases. Observational studies that met the following criteria were included: defined patient population; statin adherence exposure; defined study outcome [i.e. cardiovascular disease (CVD), mortality]; and reporting of statin-specific results. Results Overall, 28 studies were included, with 19 studies evaluating outcomes associated with statin adherence, six with statin discontinuation and three with statin persistence. Among adherence studies, the proportion of days covered was the most widely used measure, with the majority of studies reporting increased risk of CVD (statistically significant risk estimates ranging from 1.22 to 5.26) and mortality (statistically significant risk estimates ranging from 1.25 to 2.54) among non-adherent individuals. There was greater methodological variability in discontinuation and persistence studies. However, findings of increased CVD (statistically significant risk estimates ranging from 1.22 to 1.67) and mortality (statistically significant risk estimates ranging from 1.79 to 5.00) among nonpersistent individuals were also consistently reported. Conclusions Observational studies consistently report an increased risk of adverse outcomes associated with poor statin adherence. These findings have important implications for patients and physicians and emphasize the importance of monitoring and encouraging adherence to statin therapy. PMID:25364801

  3. Statin Safety in Chinese: A Population-Based Study of Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daniel Q; Kim, Richard B; McArthur, Eric; Fleet, Jamie L; Hegele, Robert A; Shah, Baiju R; Weir, Matthew A; Molnar, Amber O; Dixon, Stephanie; Tu, Jack V; Anand, Sonia; Garg, Amit X

    2016-01-01

    Compared to Caucasians, Chinese achieve a higher blood concentration of statin for a given dose. It remains unknown whether this translates to increased risk of serious statin-associated adverse events amongst Chinese patients. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of older adults (mean age, 74 years) newly prescribed a statin in Ontario, Canada between 2002 and 2013, where 19,033 Chinese (assessed through a validated surname algorithm) were matched (1:3) by propensity score to 57,099 non-Chinese. This study used linked healthcare databases. The follow-up observation period (mean 1.1, maximum 10.8 years) was similar between groups, as were the reasons for censoring the observation period (end of follow-up, death, or statin discontinuation). Forty-seven percent (47%) of Chinese were initiated on a higher than recommended statin dose. Compared to non-Chinese, Chinese ethnicity did not associate with any of the four serious statin-associated adverse events assessed in this study [rhabdomyolysis hazard ratio (HR) 0.61 (95% CI 0.28 to 1.34), incident diabetes HR 1.02 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.30), acute kidney injury HR 0.90 (95% CI 0.72 to 1.13), or all-cause mortality HR 0.88 (95% CI 0.74 to 1.05)]. Similar results were observed in subgroups defined by statin type and dose. We observed no higher risk of serious statin toxicity in Chinese than matched non-Chinese older adults with similar indicators of baseline health. Regulatory agencies should review available data, including findings from our study, to decide if a change in their statin dosing recommendations for people of Chinese ethnicity is warranted.

  4. Statins in heart failure--With preserved and reduced ejection fraction. An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousoulis, Dimitris; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Siasos, Gerasimos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2014-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors or statins beyond their lipid lowering properties and mevalonate inhibition exert also their actions through a multiplicity of mechanisms. In heart failure (HF) the inhibition of isoprenoid intermediates and small GTPases, which control cellular function such as cell shape, secretion and proliferation, is of clinical significance. Statins share also the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor pathway and inactivate extracellular-signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation suppressing inflammatory cascade. By down-regulating Rho/Rho kinase signaling pathways, statins increase the stability of eNOS mRNA and induce activation of eNOS through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/eNOS pathway restoring endothelial function. Statins change also myocardial action potential plateau by modulation of Kv1.5 and Kv4.3 channel activity and inhibit sympathetic nerve activity suppressing arrhythmogenesis. Less documented evidence proposes also that statins have anti-hypertrophic effects - through p21ras/mitogen activated protein kinase pathway - which modulate synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases and procollagen 1 expression affecting interstitial fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction. Clinical studies have partly confirmed the experimental findings and despite current guidelines new evidence supports the notion that statins can be beneficial in some cases of HF. In subjects with diastolic HF, moderately impaired systolic function, low b-type natriuretic peptide levels, exacerbated inflammatory response and mild interstitial fibrosis evidence supports that statins can favorably affect the outcome. Under the lights of this evidence in this review article we discuss the current knowledge on the mechanisms of statins' actions and we link current experimental and clinical data to further understand the possible impact of statins' treatment on HF syndrome.

  5. Differential effects of statins on endogenous H2S formation in perivascular adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcicka, Grażyna; Jamroz-Wiśniewska, Anna; Atanasova, Pepa; Chaldakov, George N; Chylińska-Kula, Beata; Bełtowski, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a new gasotransmitter synthesized enzymatically from l-cysteine in cytosol and is oxidized in mitochondria. In the cardiovascular system, H(2)S regulates vascular tone, inhibits atherogenesis, and protects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. We examined the effect of statins on vascular H(2)S production. Male Wistar rats received pravastatin (40mg/kg/day) or atorvastatin (20mg/kg/day) for 3 weeks and then H(2)S formation was measured in aortic media, periaortic adipose tissue (PAAT) and the liver. Only atorvastatin increased H(2)S production in PAAT whereas both statins stimulated its formation in the liver. Neither statin affected H(2)S production in aortic media. H(2)S formation in post-mitochondrial supernatant was higher than in mitochondria-containing supernatant and was not influenced by statins in any tissue. In addition, oxidation of exogenous H(2)S in isolated liver mitochondria was slower in statin-treated than in control rats. These data indicate that statins increase net H(2)S production by inhibiting its mitochondrial oxidation. Statins had no effect on the activity of H(2)S-metabolizing enzyme, sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, measured at saturating coenzyme Q concentration. Both statins reduced CoQ(9) concentration in plasma and liver, but only atorvastatin decreased CoQ(9) in PAAT. Atorvastatin attenuated phenylephrine-induced contraction of PAAT+ but not of PAAT- aortic rings. Effects of atorvastatin on net H(2)S production, mitochondrial H(2)S oxidation and aortic contractility were abolished by supplementation of exogenous CoQ(9). In conclusion, lipophilic atorvastatin, but not hydrophilic pravastatin, increases net H(2)S production in perivascular adipose tissue by inhibiting its mitochondrial oxidation. This effect is mediated by statin-induced CoQ(9) deficiency and results in the augmentation of anticontractile effect of perivascular adipose tissue.

  6. Clinical Pharmacist Patient-Safety Initiative to Reduce Against-Label Prescribing of Statins With Cyclosporine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Donald G; Todd, Brittany A; Denham, Anne M; Ruppe, Leslie K; Stadler, Sheila L

    2017-02-01

    Against-label prescribing of statins with interacting drugs, such as cyclosporine, represents an important patient safety concern. To implement and evaluate the effectiveness of a clinical pharmacist patient-safety initiative to minimize against-label prescribing of statins with cyclosporine. Kaiser Permanente Colorado clinical pharmacists identified patients receiving both cyclosporine and against-label statin through prescription claims data. Academic detailing on this interaction was provided to health care providers. Clinical pharmacists collaborated with physicians to facilitate conversion to on-label statin. Conversion rates along with changes in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were assessed. Of the 157 patients identified as taking cyclosporine, 48 were receiving concurrent statin therapy. Of these 48 patients, 33 (69%) were on an against-label statin regimen; 25 (76%) of these patients were converted to on-label statin. Overall, patients converted to on-label statin had a mean LDL-C prior to conversion of 82.9 (±26.4) mg/dL and mean LDL-C after conversion of 90.7 (±31.2) mg/dL ( P = 0.21). In all, 17 patients (68%) were switched to pravastatin 20 mg daily and 8 patients (32%) to rosuvastatin 5 mg daily. In patients converted to pravastatin 20 mg daily, the mean LDL-C was 13.5 mg/dL higher than prior to conversion ( P = 0.066). In patients converted to rosuvastatin 5 mg daily, the mean LDL-C was 3.8 mg/dL lower than prior to conversion ( P = 0.73). Utilizing a patient-safety-centered approach, clinical pharmacists were able to reduce the number of patients on against-label statin with cyclosporine while maintaining a comparable level of LDL-C control.

  7. Effects of HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors (Statins On Bone Mineral Density and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehir Samancı

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxy methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins have been shown to have effects on bone metabolism in laboratory studies. While early clinic studies have showed lower risk for osteoporotic fractures among statin users than nonusers, subsequent studies have found mixed results. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of statins on bone mineral density (BMD and bone metabolism. Thirty-five consecutive postmenopausal hypercholesterolemic women who were treated for at least last 6 months with statins were included in the study. Seventy-five normocholesterolemic age-matched postmenopausal women were in the control group. Subjects with a history of any diseases and used drugs that may affect calcium or bone metabolism were excluded from the study. Age, associated illness, years since menopause, and body mass index (BMI were obtained from all the patients including the control group. Besides, serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphates, parathyroid hormone, 25 hydroxy D3, osteocalcin, and urinary calcium excretion were measured. BMD was measured by using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA at femoral neck and 3rd lomber spine. Mean duration of statin use was 28.17±21.17 months. BMI was found to be statistically higher in statin users than nonusers (27.47±3.67kg/m2 and 25.46±3.91 kg/m2, respectively. The markers of bone metabolism used in the study were found to be similar between the groups. BMD was not different in statin users and nonusers at femoral neck and lomber spine. As conclusion, statin use did not affect BMD and bone metabolism in this study. In our opinion large randomised, controlled, prospective clinical trials are needed to accurately determine the role of statins in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  8. Efficacy and safety of alirocumab vs ezetimibe in statin-intolerant patients, with a statin rechallenge arm: The ODYSSEY ALTERNATIVE randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Patrick M; Thompson, Paul D; Cannon, Christopher P; Guyton, John R; Bergeron, Jean; Zieve, Franklin J; Bruckert, Eric; Jacobson, Terry A; Kopecky, Stephen L; Baccara-Dinet, Marie T; Du, Yunling; Pordy, Robert; Gipe, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Statin intolerance limits many patients from achieving optimal low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations. Current options for such patients include using a lower but tolerated dose of a statin and adding or switching to ezetimibe or other non-statin therapies. ODYSSEY ALTERNATIVE (NCT01709513) compared alirocumab with ezetimibe in patients at moderate to high cardiovascular risk with statin intolerance (unable to tolerate ≥2 statins, including one at the lowest approved starting dose) due to muscle symptoms. A placebo run-in and statin rechallenge arm were included in an attempt to confirm intolerance. Patients (n = 361) received single-blind subcutaneous (SC) and oral placebo for 4 weeks during placebo run-in. Patients reporting muscle-related symptoms during the run-in were to be withdrawn. Continuing patients were randomized (2:2:1) to double-blind alirocumab 75 mg SC every 2 weeks (Q2W; plus oral placebo), ezetimibe 10 mg/d (plus SC placebo Q2W), or atorvastatin 20 mg/d (rechallenge; plus SC placebo Q2W) for 24 weeks. Alirocumab dose was increased to 150 mg Q2W at week 12 depending on week 8 LDL-C values. Primary end point was percent change in LDL-C from baseline to week 24 (intent-to-treat) for alirocumab vs ezetimibe. Baseline mean (standard deviation) LDL-C was 191.3 (69.3) mg/dL (5.0 [1.8] mmol/L). Alirocumab reduced mean (standard error) LDL-C by 45.0% (2.2%) vs 14.6% (2.2%) with ezetimibe (mean difference 30.4% [3.1%], P statin-intolerant patients, with fewer skeletal-muscle adverse events vs atorvastatin. Copyright © 2015 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Primary and Secondary Prevention of Acute Coronary Syndromes: The Role of the Statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantis, Evangelos; Troupis, Theodoros; Mazarakis, Antonios; Kyriakos, Giorgos; Troupis, Georgios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    Poor prognosis is strongly associated with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) and, even though a number of treatment strategies are available, the incidence of subsequent serious complications after an acute event is still high. Statins are hypolipidemic factors and recent studies have demonstrated that they have a protective role during the process of atherogenesis and that they reduce mortality caused by cardiovascular diseases. This review tries to reveal the function of the statins as a component of the primary and secondary action of acute coronary syndrome and to describe the lifestyle changes that have the same effect as the use of statins.

  10. Comparison of PCSK9 Inhibitor Evolocumab vs Ezetimibe in Statin-Intolerant Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Steven E; Dent-Acosta, Ricardo E; Rosenson, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    is a monoclonal antibody that binds proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), resulting in marked LDL-C reduction. We report the design of Goal Achievement After Utilizing an Anti-PCSK9 Antibody in Statin-Intolerant Subjects 3 (GAUSS-3), a phase 3, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, ezetimibe......-controlled study to compare effectiveness of 24 weeks of evolocumab 420 mg monthly vs ezetimibe 10 mg daily in hypercholesterolemic patients unable to tolerate an effective statin dose. The study incorporates a novel atorvastatin-controlled, double-blind, crossover phase to objectively identify statin intolerance...

  11. Statins and their role in acute pancreatitis: Case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denzil; Etienne; Yousef; Reda

    2014-01-01

    Statin induced pancreatitis has historically been considered a diagnosis of exclusion,with literature references typically in the form of case reports and observational studies. Recently,larger studies have challenged the correlations made by earlier case reports,and instead demonstrate a mild protective effect in statin users. We present a case report of likely statin induced pancreatitis in a 58-year-old male(which we have attributed to drug-drug interaction with resulting inhibition of hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes) and have reviewed the apparent dichotomy in the available literature.

  12. Competency Commonalities and Accompanying Job Titles Derived from the Six Montana Agricultural Manpower Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amberson, Max L.; And Others

    The report provides essential information for curriculum development relevant to manpower demands for agricultural production and agribusiness in Montana. It focuses on an analysis of 3,500 competency statements to determine the existence of duplication, commonalities, and uniqueness among 76 identified job titles derived from six Agricultural…

  13. Statins in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis: updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nseir, William; Mahamid, Mahmud

    2013-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that refers to the presence of hepatic steatosis without significant intake of alcohol. NAFLD is an asymptomatic disease that can progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The most common cause of mortality in patients with NAFLD or NASH is cardiovascular disease (CVD). Currently, the treatment of NAFLD focuses on gradual weight loss and life style modifications. However, multifactorial treatment of NAFLD or NASH risk factors may be needed to reduce the likelihood of these patients developing CVD. This review discusses the mechanisms that link hyperlipidemia and NAFLD. In addition, the review focuses on the safety and efficacy of statins in patients with NAFLD or NASH, and their effect on the extent of hepatic steatosis and fibrosis based on human studies.

  14. Farmacocinética das estatinas Pharmacokinetics of statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Antonio Helfenstein Fonseca

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available As estatinas são agentes hipolipemiantes que exercem os seus efeitos através da inibição da HMG-CoA redutase, enzima fundamental na síntese do colesterol, levando a uma redução do colesterol tecidual e um conseqüente aumento na expressão dos receptores de LDL. Existem consideráveis diferenças entre as estatinas, no que tange às propriedades farmacocinéticas, bem como ao coeficiente de hidrofilicidade, via hepática de metabolização (especialmente, do citocromo P450 e isoenzimas, meia-vida plasmática e eficácia na redução lipídica. As estatinas também podem diferir na capacidade de interação com outras drogas que utilizam a mesma via de metabolização. Recentemente, muitos efeitos pleiotrópicos têm sido relatados com estas drogas, bem como propriedades antiinflamatórias, melhora na função endotelial e benefícios na hemostasia.Statins are lipid lowering agents that promote their effects on plasma lipids through the inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase, a crucial enzyme in the cascade of cholesterol synthesis, leading to reduction of tissue cholesterol pool and consequently, to an upregulation of the LDL receptor expression. There are considerable differences among statins regarding some pharmacokinetic properties, such as the coefficient of hydrophilicity, via liver metabolism (especially regarding P450 cytochrome and isoenzymes, plasma half-life and efficacy of serum lipid changes. They may also differ regarding interactions with other drugs that share the same pathway of metabolism. Recently, many pleiotropic effects have been reported with these drugs, such as anti-inflammatory properties, improvement in endothelial function and benefits on hemostasis.

  15. Omega-3 carboxylic acids monotherapy and combination with statins in the management of dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benes, Lane B; Bassi, Nikhil S; Davidson, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on cholesterol management placed greater emphasis on statin therapy given the well-established benefits in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Residual risk may remain after statin initiation, in part because of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein cholesterol. Several large trials have failed to show benefit with non-statin cholesterol-lowering medications in the reduction of cardiovascular events. Yet, subgroup analyses showed a benefit in those with hypertriglyceridemia and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, a high-risk pattern of dyslipidemia. This review discusses the benefits of omega-3 carboxylic acids, a recently approved formulation of omega-3 fatty acid with enhanced bioavailability, in the treatment of dyslipidemia both as monotherapy and combination therapy with a statin.

  16. Statin treatment in multiple sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl-Jensen, Gorm; Tsakiri, Anna; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to progressive disability. Statins [hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors] are widely prescribed drugs in hypercholesterolemia. They exert immunomodulatory and neurotrophic effects and are attractive candidates for MS treatment due to reliable safety profiles and favorable costs. Studies of statins in a murine MS model and in open-label trials in MS have shown decreased disease severity. Our objective was to assess current evidence to support statin treatment in MS and clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). We conducted a systematic literature review of EMBASE, PubMed, and CINAHL databases, clinical trials registries, and unpublished conference meeting abstracts as well as reference lists between 1 and 8 June 2014 and repeated it on 1 December 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of statins, in any form or dosage, as monotherapy or add-on to established therapy in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), progressive MS, and CIS were included. Data were extracted using pre-defined fields to measure study quality. Meta-analysis was performed with regards to pre-defined outcome measures of relapse activity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) activity, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) progression, and adverse events using a fixed-effects model due to low heterogeneity between studies. Eight trials were included in the review [five of statin add-on to interferon (IFN)-β treatment in RRMS, one of statin monotherapy in CIS, one of statin monotherapy in optic neuritis (ON)/CIS, and one of statin monotherapy in secondary progressive MS (SPMS)]. Three trials with eligible characteristics had not been published in peer-reviewed journals and were therefore not included. Due to the low number of trials in CIS and SPMS, meta-analysis of primary outcomes was only performed for RRMS studies. Meta-analysis showed no significant effect of statin add-on to IFNβ therapy. Indeed, a trend towards an

  17. Statins can exert dual, concentration dependent effects on HCV entry in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Matthieu; Le, Quoc-Tuan; Seidah, Nabil G; Labonté, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Statins are used daily by a large and increasing number of individuals worldwide. They were initially designed as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) inhibitors to treat patients with hypercholesterolemia. Recent studies on HCV chronically infected individuals have suggested that their use in vivo in combination with PEG-IFN and ribavirin favor the sustained viral response (SVR). Herein, we describe the effects of a set of statins on HCV entry and on HCV key entry factors in vitro. Our results suggest that all tested statins exert a proviral effect through the upregulation of LDLR. Interestingly, at higher concentration, we also provide evidence of a yet unknown competing antiviral effect of statins (except for pravastatin) through the downregulation of CLDN-1. Importantly, this work enlightens the blunt proviral effect of pravastatin at the entry step of HCV in vitro.

  18. A polymorphism in HLA-G modifies statin benefit in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naidoo, D; Wu, A C; Brilliant, M H;

    2015-01-01

    Several reports have shown that statin treatment benefits patients with asthma; however, inconsistent effects have been observed. The mir-152 family (148a, 148b and 152) has been implicated in asthma. These microRNAs suppress HLA-G expression, and rs1063320, a common SNP in the HLA-G 3'UTR...... that is associated with asthma risk, modulates miRNA binding. We report that statins upregulate mir-148b and 152, and affect HLA-G expression in an rs1063320-dependent fashion. In addition, we found that individuals who carried the G minor allele of rs1063320 had reduced asthma-related exacerbations (emergency...... department visits, hospitalizations or oral steroid use) compared with non-carriers (P=0.03) in statin users ascertained in the Personalized Medicine Research Project at the Marshfield Clinic (n=421). These findings support the hypothesis that rs1063320 modifies the effect of statin benefit in asthma...

  19. Statins in the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buemi, Michele; Floccari, Fulvio; Nostro, Lorena; Campo, Susanna; Caccamo, Chiara; Sturiale, Alessio; Aloisi, Carmela; Giacobbe, Maria Stella; Frisina, Nicola

    2007-03-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are among the most widely used hypolypemizing drugs with a pleiotropic activity. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that statins can have a significant effect in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases in the general population. In patients with renal failure, this drug preserves the hypolypemizing efficacy found in the general population without increasing their unwanted side-effects. The re-analysis of data from epidemiological studies conducted on the general population has confirmed that statins provide cardiovascular protection also in subjects with renal failure. These data have been partly confirmed by the findings made by 4D (Die Deutsche Diabetes Dialyse Studie) and Alert studies, conducted on diabetic patients on dialysis and patients with renal transplants, respectively. The results of other studies, such as AURORA, SHARP, REnal and Vascular End stage Disease, and ESPLANADE, clearly indicate that statins prevent cardiovascular disease in patients with renal insufficiency, just as they do in the general population.

  20. Service Locator - Family Planning Title X

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This locator tool will help you find Title X family planning centers that provide high quality and cost-effective family planning and related preventive health...

  1. Korean Friend Receiving Title of Friendship Ambassador

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The CPAFFC held a ceremony on October 8, 2003 to confer the title of Friendship Ambassador upon Korean friend Lee Ik Soon in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the cause of Sino-Korean friendship.

  2. Current Actions Related to Title V

    Science.gov (United States)

    This site will provide basic information on clean air permitting under the title V operating permits program, provide access to state and regional permitting programs, and maintain access to proposed and final regulatory requirements.

  3. Packaging Differences of News Content on Title

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atiqa Sabardila; I Dewa Putu Wijana; Suhandano

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates anything that underlie the differences of the variation on the packaging variation of the news content on the title that is based on the topicalization, the materials of news...

  4. 77 FR 52116 - Title VI; Final Circular

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    .... Department of Justice advised Federal agencies in late 2001, ``although Sandoval foreclosed private judicial.... Recipients will be required to submit, with the Title VI Program, a copy of the Board resolution,...

  5. Code of Federal Regulations Title 21

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database contains the most recent revision from the Government Printing Office (GPO) of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 21 - Food and Drugs.

  6. Code of Federal Regulations Title 21

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database contains the most recent revision from the Government Printing Office (GPO) of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 21 - Food and Drugs.

  7. Safety and Benefit of Discontinuing Statin Therapy in the Setting of Advanced, Life-Limiting Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutner, Jean S.; Blatchford, Patrick J.; Taylor, Don H.; Ritchie, Christine S.; Bull, Janet H.; Fairclough, Diane L.; Hanson, Laura C.; LeBlanc, Thomas W.; Samsa, Greg P.; Wolf, Steven; Aziz, Noreen M.; Currow, David C.; Ferrell, Betty; Wagner-Johnston, Nina; Zafar, S. Yousuf; Cleary, James F.; Dev, Sandesh; Goode, Patricia S.; Kamal, Arif H.; Kassner, Cordt; Kvale, Elizabeth A.; McCallum, Janelle G.; Ogunseitan, Adeboye B.; Pantilat, Steven Z.; Portenoy, Russell K.; Prince-Paul, Maryjo; Sloan, Jeff A.; Swetz, Keith M.; Von Gunten, Charles F.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE For patients with limited prognosis, some medication risks may outweigh the benefits, particularly when benefits take years to accrue; statins are one example. Data are lacking regarding the risks and benefits of discontinuing statin therapy for patients with limited life expectancy. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the safety, clinical, and cost impact of discontinuing statin medications for patients in the palliative care setting. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This was a multicenter, parallel-group, unblinded, pragmatic clinical trial. Eligibility included adults with an estimated life expectancy of between 1 month and 1 year, statin therapy for 3 months or more for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, recent deterioration in functional status, and no recent active cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomized to either discontinue or continue statin therapy and were monitored monthly for up to 1 year. The study was conducted from June 3, 2011, to May 2, 2013. All analyses were performed using an intent-to-treat approach. INTERVENTIONS Statin therapy was withdrawn from eligible patients who were randomized to the discontinuation group. Patients in the continuation group continued to receive statins. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Outcomes included death within 60 days (primary outcome), survival, cardiovascular events, performance status, quality of life (QOL), symptoms, number of nonstatin medications, and cost savings. RESULTS A total of 381 patients were enrolled; 189 of these were randomized to discontinue statins, and 192 were randomized to continue therapy. Mean (SD) age was 74.1 (11.6) years, 22.0% of the participants were cognitively impaired, and 48.8% had cancer. The proportion of participants in the discontinuation vs continuation groups who died within 60 days was not significantly different (23.8% vs 20.3%; 90% CI, −3.5% to 10.5%; P = .36) and did not meet the noninferiority end point. Total QOL was better for the group

  8. Statin use and markers of immunity in the Doetinchem cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda J I De Jong

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that statins can both stimulate and suppress the immune system, and thereby, may influence autoimmune diseases. Therefore, we studied effects of statins on innate and adaptive immunity, and self-tolerance by measuring serological levels of C-reactive protein (CRP, neopterin, immunoglobulin E (IgE antibodies and the presence of autoantibodies (antinuclear antibodies (ANA and IgM rheumatoid factor (RF in the general population. We conducted a nested case-control study within the population-based Doetinchem cohort. Data from health questionnaires, serological measurements and information on medication from linkage to pharmacy-dispensing records were available. We selected 332 statin users (cases and 331 non-users (controls, matched by age, sex, date of serum collection, history of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus type II and stroke. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to estimate effect of statins on the immune system. The median level of CRP in statin users (1.28 mg/L, interquartile range (IQR: 0.59-2.79 was lower than in non-users (1.62 mg/L, IQR: 0.79-3.35, which after adjustment was estimated to be a 28% lower level. We observed an inverse association between duration of statin use and CRP levels. Elevated levels of IgE (>100 IU/mL were more prevalent in statin users compared to non-users. A trend towards increased levels of IgE antibodies in statin users was observed, whereas no associations were found between statin use and levels of neopterin or the presence of autoantibodies. In this general population sub-sample, we observed an anti-inflammatory effect of statin use and a trend towards an increase of IgE levels, an surrogate marker for Th (helper 2 responses without a decrease in neopterin levels, a surrogate marker for Th1 response and/or self-tolerance. We postulate that the observed decreased inflammatory response during statin therapy may be important but is insufficient to induce loss of

  9. Decreased skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA in patients with statin-induced myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Henry A J; Sohi, Gurmeet K; Maguire, John A; Côté, Hélène C F

    2013-02-15

    Statins are widely used to treat hyperlipidemia and lower cardiovascular disease risk. While statins are generally well tolerated, some patients experience statin-induced myopathy (SIM). Statin treatment has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. In this retrospective study, skeletal muscle biopsies from patients diagnosed with SIM were studied. These were compared with biopsies from patients clinically assessed as having statin-unrelated myopathy but whose biopsy showed no or negligible pathology. For each biopsy sample, mtDNA was quantified relative to nuclear DNA (mtDNA content) by qPCR, mtDNA deletions were investigated by long-template PCR followed by gel densitometry, and mtDNA oxidative damage was quantified using a qPCR-based assay. For a subset of matched samples, mtDNA heteroplasmy and mutations were investigated by cloning/sequencing. Skeletal muscle mtDNA content was significantly lower in SIM patients (N=23, mean±SD, 2036±1146) than in comparators (N=24, 3220±1594), p=0.006. There was no difference in mtDNA deletion score or oxidative mtDNA damage between the two groups, and no evidence of increased mtDNA heteroplasmy or somatic mutations was detected. The significant difference in skeletal muscle mtDNA suggests that SIM or statin treatments are associated with depletion of skeletal muscle mtDNA or that patients with an underlying predisposition to SIM have lower mtDNA levels. If statins induce mtDNA depletion, this would likely reflect decreased mitochondria biogenesis and/or increased mitochondria autophagy. Further work is necessary to distinguish between the lower mtDNA as a predisposition to SIM or an effect of SIM or statin treatment.

  10. Do statins reduce hepatitis C RNA titers during routine clinical use?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kimberly A Forde; Connie Law; Rose O'Flynn; David E Kaplan

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To compare hepatitis C virus (HCV) titers in patients with chronic hepatitis C with and without exposure to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins). METHODS: Medical records were reviewed for 6463 patients with documented HCV infection at a single center between March 2004 and September 2006. Patients with confirmed viremia and meeting inclusion criteria were assigned to one of three groups: Group A ( n = 50), dyslipidemic patients with statin usage during HCV RNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) determination; Group B ( n = 49), dyslipidemic patients with prior or future statin usage but not at the time of HCV RNA PCR determination; and Group C ( n = 102),patients without statin usage during the study period.The primary analysis explored the effect of statin therapy on HCV viremia. Secondary analyses assessed class effect, dose response, and effect of other lipidlowering therapies on HCV viral titers.RESULTS: Median HCV RNA titers did not significantly differ among the three groups (Group A: 4 550 000 IU/mL,Group B: 2 850 000 IU/mL, Group C: 3 055 000 IU/mL).For those subjects with longitudinal assessment of HCV viremia prior to and while on statins, there were no significant differences between pre- and post-HCV viral titers. Additionally, no differences in HCV titers were observed at any dose level of the most prescribed statin,simvastatin. However, hypertriglyceridemia independently correlated with HCV titers, and niacin exposure was associated with significantly lower viral titers ( P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: There was no apparent effect of statins on HCV viral replication in this analysis. Further investigation is warranted to explore the possible antiviral properties of triglyceride-lowering agents and their potential role as adjuncts to standard HCV therapy.

  11. Adherence to statin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes: An important dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Farsaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the importance of patients′ adherence to their drug treatments for achieving desired therapeutic goals and the proven role 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors (statins for the health status of patients with cardiovascular diseases, there is not enough information regarding diabetic patients′ adherence to statin therapy in developing countries. In this clinical study we aimed to assess the adherence of diabetes type 2 patients to statin therapy in a research based community clinic in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this prospective clinical study which was done at Isfahan Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, 204 diabetic type 2 patients under treatment with statin were interviewed twice and their demographic data (age, gender, body mass index, education, statin information (type, dose and their serum lipid profile were recorded. Three months after the initial visits, patients were assessed using pill counting method and according to patients′ self-reporting and also assessed low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol goal attainment <100 mg/dl. Results: Adherence rate was 79.7% and 69% according to pill counting and self-reporting among study population. Moreover, 68.4% of patients achieved their LDL cholesterol goal of <100 mg/dl and adherent patients reached therapeutic goal significantly more than those who were considered non-adherence to statin therapy (P < 0.01. Conclusion: Adherence to statin therapy, as reflected by pill count method, is significantly related to LDL cholesterol goal achievement in patients with diabetes and dyslipidemia. Pill count method can be used to identify patients who are nonadherent to statin therapy and at high risk for failure to attain LDL cholesterol goals.

  12. RHOA is a modulator of the cholesterol-lowering effects of statin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Marisa W; Theusch, Elizabeth; Naidoo, Devesh; Bauzon, Frederick; Stevens, Kristen; Mangravite, Lara M; Kuang, Yu-Lin; Krauss, Ronald M

    2012-01-01

    Although statin drugs are generally efficacious for lowering plasma LDL-cholesterol levels, there is considerable variability in response. To identify candidate genes that may contribute to this variation, we used an unbiased genome-wide filter approach that was applied to 10,149 genes expressed in immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from 480 participants of the Cholesterol and Pharmacogenomics (CAP) clinical trial of simvastatin. The criteria for identification of candidates included genes whose statin-induced changes in expression were correlated with change in expression of HMGCR, a key regulator of cellular cholesterol metabolism and the target of statin inhibition. This analysis yielded 45 genes, from which RHOA was selected for follow-up because it has been found to participate in mediating the pleiotropic but not the lipid-lowering effects of statin treatment. RHOA knock-down in hepatoma cell lines reduced HMGCR, LDLR, and SREBF2 mRNA expression and increased intracellular cholesterol ester content as well as apolipoprotein B (APOB) concentrations in the conditioned media. Furthermore, inter-individual variation in statin-induced RHOA mRNA expression measured in vitro in CAP LCLs was correlated with the changes in plasma total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and APOB induced by simvastatin treatment (40 mg/d for 6 wk) of the individuals from whom these cell lines were derived. Moreover, the minor allele of rs11716445, a SNP located in a novel cryptic RHOA exon, dramatically increased inclusion of the exon in RHOA transcripts during splicing and was associated with a smaller LDL-cholesterol reduction in response to statin treatment in 1,886 participants from the CAP and Pravastatin Inflamation and CRP Evaluation (PRINCE; pravastatin 40 mg/d) statin clinical trials. Thus, an unbiased filter approach based on transcriptome-wide profiling identified RHOA as a gene contributing to variation in LDL-cholesterol response to statin, illustrating the

  13. Prescription and adherence to statins of patients with coronary artery disease and hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansur Antonio P.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Statins have proved to be safe and effective in the secondary prevention of coronary artery disease, but the level of prescription and the reasons for nonadherence to treatment in many coronariopathy treatment centers has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to identify reasons for nonadherence to statin therapy. METHODS: We analyzed 207 consecutive patients with coronary artery disease and hypercholesterolemia (total cholesterol > or = 200mg/dL or LDL - cholesterol > or = 130mg/dL. Patients' average age was 61.7±10 year; 111 (53.6% male were and 94 (46.6% were female. We analyzed the level of prescription and adherence to treatment with statins. RESULTS: Statins were prescribed for 139 (67% patients, but only 85 (41% used the drug. In spite of being indicated, statins were not prescribed in 68 (33% patients. Of 54 (26% patients, nonadherent to statins, 67% did not use the drug due to its high cost, 31% due to the lack of instruction, and only 2% due to side effects. Total cholesterol (260.3±42.2 vs 226.4±51.9; p<0.0001 and LDL cholesterol (174.6±38.1 vs 149.6±36.1; p<0.0001 were lower in patients on medication. HDL-cholesterol increased from 37.6±9.6 to 41.5±12.9mg/dL (p=0.02, and triglycerides were not modified in patients using statins. CONCLUSION: The prescription of statins in patients with coronary artery disease and dyslipidemia is high; however, its adherence is far from satisfactory, due to the high cost of the medication. Reduction in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels did not reach the targets recommended by the Brazilian Consensus on Dyslipidemia.

  14. Comparative effectiveness of generic and brand-name statins on patient outcomes: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Joshua J; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Kesselheim, Aaron S; Polinski, Jennifer M; Hutchins, David; Matlin, Olga S; Brennan, Troyen A; Avorn, Jerry; Shrank, William H

    2014-09-16

    Statins are effective in preventing cardiovascular events, but patients do not fully adhere to them. To determine whether patients are more adherent to generic statins versus brand-name statins (lovastatin, pravastatin, or simvastatin) and whether greater adherence improves health outcomes. Observational, propensity score-matched, new-user cohort study. Linked electronic data from medical and pharmacy claims. Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years or older with prescription drug coverage between 2006 and 2008. Initiation of a generic or brand-name statin. Adherence to statin therapy (measured as the proportion of days covered [PDC] up to 1 year) and a composite outcome comprising hospitalization for an acute coronary syndrome or stroke and all-cause mortality. Hazard ratios (HRs) and absolute rate differences were estimated. A total of 90,111 patients who initiated a statin during the study was identified; 83,731 (93%) initiated a generic drug, and 6380 (7%) initiated a brand-name drug. The mean age of patients was 75.6 years, and most (61%) were female. The average PDC was 77% for patients in the generic group and 71% for those in the brand-name group (P<0.001). An 8% reduction in the rate of the clinical outcome was observed among patients in the generic group versus those in the brand-name group (HR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.86 to 0.99]). The absolute difference was -1.53 events per 100 person-years (CI, -2.69 to -0.19 events per 100 person-years). Results may not be generalizable to other populations with different incomes or drug benefit structures. Compared with those initiating brand-name statins, patients initiating generic statins were more likely to adhere and had a lower rate of a composite clinical outcome. Teva Pharmaceuticals.

  15. Effect of statin use on clinical outcomes in ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Ling; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Chen, Pei-Chun; Lee, Jiann-Der; Wang, Hui-Hsuan; Rao, Neal M.; Lee, Meng; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Abstract It remains unclear whether statin therapy should be applied to ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation. The objective of this study was to clarify whether statin therapy can influence the prognosis in recent ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation. We identified ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation between 2001 and 2011 from Taiwan National Health Insurance Database. Patients not treated with statins during the first 90 days after the index stroke were matched to patients treated with statins in the first 90 days in a 2:1 ratio on the basis of age, sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, estimated National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, use of anticoagulant, and year of their entry into the cohort. The primary outcome was the first event of recurrent stroke, and the secondary outcome was in-hospital death. A total of 1546 atrial fibrillation patients with statin therapy in the first 90 days poststroke and 3092 matched atrial fibrillation nonstatin controls were enrolled for this analysis. During the median 2.4-year follow-up, the risk of recurrent stroke was not different between subjects receiving versus not receiving statin therapy (hazard ratios = 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.88 to 1.15). However, patients with atrial fibrillation receiving statin therapy had a reduced risk for death during any hospitalization throughout the long-term follow-up period (hazard ratios = 0.74, 95% confidence interval 0.61 to 0.89). Among ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation, statin therapy initiated during the acute to subacute poststroke stage did not alter the rate of stroke recurrence but was associated with a decreased rate of in-hospital death. PMID:28151869

  16. 45. Ezetimibe and statins yields on silent holter ambulatory myocardial ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Kadro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Further cholestrol lowering may affect silent ischemia detected on holter monitoring. Cholesterol lowering is associated with a reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Statins are the main drugs for cholesterol lowering. Ezetimibe when added to statins gives further reduction in cholesterol but its long-term effect on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and ischemic events is not known. This study sought to determine whether further cholesterol lowering with ezitimibe will also results in a reduction of myocardial ischemia during daily life. We enrolled 50 patients with proven stable coronary artery disease (CAD and at least one episode of ST-segment depression on ambulatory ECG monitoring. All of them were receiving optimal therapy for CAD including statin therapy for cholesterol reduction. 25 patients were randomized to continue their statin therapy (Statin only group and 25 to recieve statin plus ezitimibe 10 mg/day (ezitimibe group. Serum cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels and ambulatory monitoring were repeated after 4–6 months of therapy. The two groups were comparable with respect to baseline characteristics, number of episodes of ST-segment depression, and baseline serum cholesterol levels. The ezitimibe group had lower mean total and LDL cholesterol levels at study end and experienced a significant reduction in the number of episodes of ST-segment depression compared with the statin only group. ST-segment depression was completely resolved in 13 of 25 patients (52% in the ezitimibe group versus 3 of 25 (12% in the statin only group. The ezitimibe group exhibited a highly significant reduction in ambulatory ischemia (P < .001. By logistic regression, treatment with ezitimibe was an independent predictor of ischemia resolution. Further cholesterol lowering with ezitimibe can result in reduction or resolution of myocardial ischemia recorded as episodes of ST-segment depression in ambulatory monitoring of the ECG.

  17. Effects of statin use on muscle strength, cognition, and depressive symptoms in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Joseph V; Tinetti, Mary E; Han, Ling; McAvay, Gail; Foody, Joanne M; Concato, John

    2007-03-01

    To determine the relationship between hydroxymethyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin) use and proximal muscle strength, cognition, and depression in older adults. Observational cohort study. Outpatient primary care clinics. Seven hundred fifty-six community-dwelling veterans aged 65 and older. Timed chair stands (a measure of proximal muscle strength), Trail Making Test Part B (a measure of cognition), and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score were measured at baseline and 1-year follow-up. Participants were assessed for statin prescriptions (and indications for or contraindications to their use), concomitant medication use, comorbidities, and other potential confounders. Statin users (n=315) took a mean 6.6 medications, versus 4.6 for nonusers (n=441), and had a median duration of statin use of 727 days. Statin users were more likely to be white and had (as expected) more cardiac, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular disease. Based on multivariable models adjusting for pertinent covariates, statin users performed modestly better than nonusers for timed chair stands (-0.5 seconds; P=.04), Trail Making Test Part B (-7.7 seconds; P=.08), and depression scores (-0.2 points; P=.49) at follow-up. Of potentially high-risk participants (based on age, comorbidity, and number of medications), statin users also showed similar 1-year changes as nonusers, although worsened depression scores were found in those with greater comorbidity (+0.88 points; P=.10). Older, community-dwelling male participants taking maintenance statin therapy had similar outcomes to those of nonusers in tests of muscle strength, cognition, and depression, but further examination of benefits and harms in different subgroups is warranted.

  18. Statin use after acute myocardial infarction by patient complexity: Are the rates right?

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, JM; Cook, E; Chapman, CG; Schroeder, MC; Chrischilles, EA; Schneider, KM; Kulchaitanaroaj, P; Robinson, J.

    2015-01-01

    Reprinted with permission of the publisher. Background: Guidelines suggest statin use after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) should be close to universal in patients without safety concerns yet rates are much lower than recommended, decline with patient complexity, and display substantial geographic variation. Trial exclusions have resulted in little evidence to guide statin prescribing for complex patients. Objective: Assess the benefits and risks associated with higher rates of sta...

  19. Statin-Associated Muscle-Related Adverse Effects: A Case Series of 354 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cham, Stephanie; Evans, Marcella A.; Denenberg, Julie O.; Golomb, Beatrice A.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective To characterize the properties and natural history of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin)-associated muscle-related adverse effects (MAEs). Design Patient-targeted postmarketing adverse-effect surveillance approach coupling survey design with an open-ended narrative. Setting University-affiliated health care system. Subjects Three hundred fifty-four patients (age range 34–86 yrs) who self-reported muscle-related problems associated with statin therapy. Measurements and Main Results Patients with perceived statin-associated MAEs completed a survey assessing statin drugs and dosages; characteristics of the MAEs; time course of onset, resolution, or recurrence; and impact on quality of life (QOL). Cases were assessed for putative drug adverse-effect causality by using the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale criteria and were evaluated for inclusion in groups for which mortality benefit with statins has been shown. Patients reported muscle pain (93%), fatigue (88%), and weakness (85%). Three hundred patients (85%) met literature criteria for probable or definite drug adverse-effect causality. Ninety-four percent of atorvastatin usages (240/255) generated MAEs versus 61% of lovastatin usages (38/62, pstatins reproduced MAEs in 100% of 39 rechallenges versus 73% (29/40) with lower potency rechallenges (pstatin initiation varied (median 14 wks); some MAEs occurred after long-term symptom-free use. Recurrence with rechallenge had a significantly shorter latency to onset (median 2 wks). The MAEs adversely affected all assessed functional and QOL domains. Most patients with probable or definite MAEs were in categories for which available randomized controlled trial evidence shows no trend to all-cause mortality benefit with statin therapy. Conclusion This study complements available information on the properties and natural history of statin-associated MAEs, affirming dose dependence and strong QOL impact. The data

  20. Long-term statin treatment in children with familial hypercholesterolemia: more insight into tolerability and adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braamskamp, Marjet J A M; Kusters, D Meeike; Avis, Hans J; Smets, Ellen M A; Wijburg, Frits A; Kastelein, John J P; Wiegman, Albert; Hutten, Barbara A

    2015-04-01

    Statins are currently the preferred pharmacological therapy in individuals with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) with the aim to prevent premature atherosclerosis. In adults, these agents have been proven to be safe and well tolerated; however, non-adherence is a significant clinical issue. In this study, we evaluated tolerability and adherence to statin therapy in young adult FH patients 10 years after this was initiated in their childhood. A questionnaire including items on medical history, adherence and reasons for discontinuation was sent to 214 young adult FH patients that initiated statin therapy at least 10 years ago. Tolerability was defined as 100% minus the percentage of patients that discontinued statin therapy due to side effects. Adherence was defined as the extent to which patients took their medication as prescribed by their physician. We labelled patients adherent if they took 80% or more of their pills in the month preceding our assessment. Follow-up was successful in 205 (95.8%) subjects (age 18-30 years). A history of side effects was reported by 40 (19.5%) of the patients, and mainly consisted of muscle complaints and gastrointestinal symptoms. Three patients (1.5%) discontinued statin therapy because of side effects. Rhadbomyolysis or other serious adverse events were not reported. In fact, 169 (82.4%) of 205 patients remained on statin treatment and 78.7% (148 out of 188) were adherent. None of the patient characteristics were significantly associated with adherence. Individuals with FH who started statin therapy in childhood demonstrated good adherence during ten years of treatment. Furthermore, statin therapy was well tolerated; only a small minority discontinued therapy because of side effects and the side effects that were reported were mild in nature.

  1. Effects of statins on the liver: clinical analysis of patients with ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-san; LIU Zheng-xia; L(U) Wen; HU Xing-yue

    2011-01-01

    Background Statins are one of the most common agents prescribed for ischemic stroke patients, but their side effects on the liver are worrisome to both physicians and patients. This study aimed to analyze the features and related factors of the hepatic side effects of, statins in patients with ischemic troke.Methods Four hundred and eighty-one patients with ischemic stroke who had been treated with statins at our department from July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009 were investigated retrospectively. Liver function, including alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), within 6 months after they began to use statins and related factors were analyzed.Results The incidence of mild ALT and AST elevation, less than three times the upper limit of normal, and the incidence of moderate elevation, ALT and AST levels 3-10 times the upper limit of normal, in ischemic stroke patients who had been treated with statins were 2.3% and 2.1%, respectively. These incidences were higher than in patients with common hyperlipidemia or coronary heart disease. The relatively high incidence was associated with older age (>65 years) and chronic liver diseases, and was not related to the type of stroke, gender, and reduction of low-density lipoprotein. The levels of ALT and AST normalized after withdrawal of statins or lowering the dosage. None of the patients developed hepatic failure.Conclusions Asymptomatic elevation of ALT and AST after administration of statins is more likely to occur in ischemic stroke patients than in others, and the elevation is related to age and chronic liver diseases. However, statins are still safe for ischemic stroke patients.

  2. Complexation of Statins with β-Cyclodextrin in Solutions of Small Molecular Additives and Macromolecular Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süle, András; Csempesz, Ferenc

    The solubility of lovastatin and simvastatin (inevitable drugs in the management of cardiovascular diseases) was studied by phase-solubility measurements in multicomponent colloidal and non-colloidal media. Complexation in aqueous solutions of the highly lipophilic statins with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in the absence and the presence of dissolved polyvinyl pyrrolidone, its monomeric compound, tartaric acid and urea, respectively, were investigated. For the characterization of the CD-statin inclusion complexes, stability constants for the associates have been calculated.

  3. Statins decrease dendritic arborization in rat sympathetic neurons by blocking RhoA activation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Woo-Yang; Gonsiorek, Eugene A.; Barnhart, Chris; Davare, Monika A.; Engebose, Abby J.; Lauridsen, Holly; Bruun, Donald; Lesiak, Adam; Wayman, Gary; Bucelli, Robert; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence suggest that statins decrease sympathetic activity, but whether peripheral mechanisms involving direct actions on post-ganglionic sympathetic neurons contribute to this effect is not known. Because tonic activity of these neurons is directly correlated with the size of their dendritic arbor, we tested the hypothesis that statins decrease dendritic arborization in sympathetic neurons. Oral administration of atorvastatin (20 mg/kg/day for 7 days) significantly...

  4. Cardiovascular disease in patients with renal disease: the role of statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellström, Bengt; Holdaas, Hallvard; Jardine, Alan G; Svensson, Maria K; Gottlow, Mattis; Schmieder, Roland E; Zannad, Faiez

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents a major cause of death. The National Kidney Foundation guidelines favour the use of statin therapy for treatment of dyslipidaemia in patients with CKD. Much evidence supports statin therapy for reducing CVD and improving outcomes in the general population, but there is less evidence in patients with CKD. Consequently, prevention of CVD in CKD is based primarily on extrapolation from non-CKD trials. Significantly, in trials specifically designed to investigate patients with CKD, evidence is emerging for improved cardiovascular outcomes with statin therapy. This review describes available data relating to cardiovascular outcomes and the role of statins in patients with CKD, including pre-dialysis, dialysis, and renal transplant patients. The PubMed database was searched (1998-present) to ensure comprehensive identification of publications (including randomised clinical trials) relevant to CKD patients, patterns of cardiovascular outcome in such patients and their relationship to lipid profile, and the role of statins for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular complications. There are conflicting data on the relationship between dyslipidaemia and cardiovascular outcomes, with one major study of statin therapy (4D--Deutsche Diabetes Dialyse Studie) providing equivocal results. Further studies, including AURORA (A study to evaluate the Use of Rosuvastatin in subjects On Regular haemodialysis: an Assessment of survival and cardiovascular events; NCT00240331) in patients receiving haemodialysis, and SHARP (Study of Heart And Renal Protection; NCT00125593) in patients with CKD including those on dialysis, should help to clarify the role of statin therapy in these populations. More studies are needed to elucidate the role of statins in improving cardiovascular outcomes for CKD patients. It is anticipated that ongoing clinical trials geared towards the

  5. Modulation of H2S Metabolism by Statins: A New Aspect of Cardiovascular Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamroz-Wiśniewska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutarylcoenzyme A reductase inhibitors) are commonly used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Statins reduce plasma low-density lipoproteins, inhibit inflammatory reaction, improve endothelial function, ameliorate oxidative stress, and reduce platelet activity. Consequently, statins markedly decrease the risk of acute cardiovascular events. H2S is synthesized in all layers of the vascular wall, including the endothelium, smooth muscle cells, and perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT). Recent Advances: Recent studies demonstrate that PVAT-derived H2S decreases vascular tone by activating KATP and/or KCNQ potassium channels in smooth muscle cells. Lipophilic atorvastatin, but not hydrophilic pravastatin, increases net H2S production in PVAT by inhibiting its mitochondrial oxidation, and augments the anticontractile effect of PVAT. Inhibition of H2S metabolism results from atorvastatin-induced decrease in coenzyme Q, which is a cofactor of H2S oxidation by sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase. In contrast to H2S, statins do not impair mitochondrial oxidation of organic substrates. Critical Issues: Taking into account antiatherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effect of H2S, the gas may mediate some of the beneficial effects of statins on the cardiovascular system. In addition, specific statins differ in their ability to enhance H2S signaling. Future Directions: Since both statins and H2S reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury, the possible effect of statins on H2S oxidation in other tissues such as the heart and the kidney needs to be examined. Inhibition of H2S metabolism may be a new therapeutic strategy to improve H2S signaling, especially in the mitochondrial compartment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 81–94. PMID:22034938

  6. Can adherence to antihypertensive therapy be used to promote adherence to statin therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Chapman

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Richard H Chapman1, Elise M Pelletier1, Paula J Smith1, Craig S Roberts21US Health Economics and Outcomes Research, IMS Health, Falls Church, VA, USA; 2Global Outcomes Research, Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USAObjective: To compare adherence with statin therapy in patients switching to single-pill amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium with patients adding a separate statin to their amlodipine regimen.Methods: We identified hypertensive patients prescribed amlodipine who switched to amlodipine/atorvastatin (switch or added a statin to their amlodipine regimen (add-on from July 2004 to June 2007. Propensity score matching (1 switch:3 add-on was applied based on ‘nearest neighbor’ approach. The primary adherence measure was patients with proportion of days covered (PDC ≥0.80 at 180 days; secondary measures included mean PDC and persistence. A sensitivity analysis was performed, accounting for total statin/amlodipine exposure.Results: Among 4556 matched patients (n = 1139 switch; n = 3417 add-on, mean age was 53.9 years and 52.1% were male. After 180 days, adherence with statin therapy was higher for the switch vs add-on cohort (50.8% vs 44.3%; P < 0.001. After adjusting for pre-index amlodipine adherence, the switch cohort was more likely to be adherent than the add-on cohort (odds ratio: 1.64 [95% confidence interval: 1.42 to 1.89]. Persistence was higher in the switch than the add-on cohort (127.6 vs 117 days; P < 0.001.Conclusion: Hypertensive patients taking amlodipine who initiated statin therapy via single-pill amlodipine/atorvastatin were more likely to remain adherent to their statin than patients adding a separate statin to their antihypertensive regimen.Keywords: adherence, amlodipine, atorvastatin, cardiovascular disease, persistence, single-pill

  7. Effects of Statins on Skeletal Muscle: A Perspective for Physical Therapists

    OpenAIRE

    Di Stasi, Stephanie L.; MacLeod, Toran D.; Winters, Joshua D.; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A

    2010-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia, also known as high blood cholesterol, is a cardiovascular health risk that affects more than one third of adults in the United States. Statins are commonly prescribed and successful lipid-lowering medications that reduce the risks associated with cardiovascular disease. The side effects most commonly associated with statin use involve muscle cramping, soreness, fatigue, weakness, and, in rare cases, rapid muscle breakdown that can lead to death. Often, these side effects can b...

  8. Uniqueness is Important in Competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Ai-Xia; XV Xiu-Lian; HE Da-Ren

    2009-01-01

    We propose a quantitative network description on the function of uniqueness in a competition system. Two statistical parameters, competition ability and uniqueness are defined, and their relationship in ordinary cases is analytically discussed. The competition between Chinese regional universities is taken as an example. The empirical investigation results show that the uniqueness of a university is really important in competition. Also,uniqueness is very helpful in the promotion of the university overall quality.

  9. On Uniqueness of coalitional equilibria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finus, M.; Mouche, van P.H.M.; Rundshagen, B.

    2014-01-01

    For the so-called "new approach" of coalitio formation it is important that coalitional equilibria are unique. Uniqueness comes down to existene and to semi-uniqueness, i.e.\\\\that there exists at most one equilibrium. Although conditions for existence are not problematic, conditions for semi-uniquen

  10. Statins in the management of dyslipidemia associated with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Murray; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2012-02-21

    The cause of death in the majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is accelerated cardiovascular disease and not renal failure per se, suggesting a role for statin therapy in this setting. During the past 6 years three large, randomized, placebo-controlled studies of three different statins have been conducted in the dialysis population-but two of these studies did not demonstrate any benefits of statin therapy, and the third study showed only marginally positive results. To understand why statins have failed to reduce cardiovascular events in patients with ESRD, the basic mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in CKD must be critically examined. The observed negative results in the clinical trials of statin therapy might also reflect the biomarkers and targets that were chosen to be evaluated. The characteristics of dyslipidemia in patients with CKD not yet requiring dialysis treatment differ markedly from those of individuals with established ESRD and form the basis for therapeutic recommendations. The potential adverse effects associated with statin therapy are important to consider in the management of dyslipidemia in patients with CKD.

  11. Statins Increase the Frequency of Circulating CD4+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells in Healthy Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucía Rodríguez-Perea

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins have been shown to modulate the number and the suppressive function of CD4+FOXP3+ T cells (Treg in inflammatory conditions. However, it is not well established whether statin could also affect Treg in absence of inflammation. To address this question, eighteen normocholesterolemic male subjects were treated with lovastatin or atorvastatin daily for 45 days. The frequency and phenotype of circulating Treg were evaluated at days 0, 7, 30, and 45. mRNA levels of FOXP3, IDO, TGF-β, and IL-10 were measured in CD4+ T cells. We found that both statins significantly increased Treg frequency and FOXP3 mRNA levels at day 30. At day 45, Treg numbers returned to baseline values; however, TGF-β and FOXP3 mRNA levels remained high, accompanied by increased percentages of CTLA-4- and GITR-expressing Treg. Treg Ki-67 expression was decreased upon statin treatment. Treg frequency positively correlated with plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c, suggesting a role for HDL-c in Treg homeostasis. Therefore, statins appear to have inflammation-independent immune-modulatory effects. Thus, the increase in Treg cells frequency likely contributes to immunomodulatory effect of statins, even in healthy individuals.

  12. Outcomes from intracerebral hemorrhage among patients pre-treated with statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Ramalho Romero

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins, have been associated with improved clinical outcomes after ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage, but with an increased risk of incidental spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH. We investigated whether the statin use before ICH, was associated with functional independence, 90 days after treatment. METHOD: We analyzed 124 consecutive ICH patients with 90-day outcome data who were enrolled in a prospective cohort study between 2006 and 2009. Eighty-three patients were included in this study. Among ICH survivors, univariate Cox regression models and Kaplan-Meier plots were used to determine subject characteristics that were associated with an increased risk of recurrence. Statin usage was determined through interviewing the patient at the time of ICH and confirmed by reviewing their medical records. Independent status was defined as Glasgow Outcome Scale grades 4 or 5. RESULTS: Statins were used by 20 out of 83 patients (24% before ICH onset. There was no effect from pre-ICH statin use on functional independence rates (28% versus 29%, P=0.84 or mortality (46% versus 45%, P=0.93. CONCLUSION: Pre-ICH statin use is not associated with changes to ICH functional outcome or mortality.

  13. Treatment of Dyslipidemia with Statins and Physical Exercises: Recent Findings of Skeletal Muscle Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Rotta Bonfim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Statin treatment in association with physical exercise practice can substantially reduce cardiovascular mortality risk of dyslipidemic individuals, but this practice is associated with myopathic event exacerbation. This study aimed to present the most recent results of specific literature about the effects of statins and its association with physical exercise on skeletal musculature. Thus, a literature review was performed using PubMed and SciELO databases, through the combination of the keywords “statin” AND “exercise” AND “muscle”, restricting the selection to original studies published between January 1990 and November 2013. Sixteen studies evaluating the effects of statins in association with acute or chronic exercises on skeletal muscle were analyzed. Study results indicate that athletes using statins can experience deleterious effects on skeletal muscle, as the exacerbation of skeletal muscle injuries are more frequent with intense training or acute eccentric and strenuous exercises. Moderate physical training, in turn, when associated to statins does not increase creatine kinase levels or pain reports, but improves muscle and metabolic functions as a consequence of training. Therefore, it is suggested that dyslipidemic patients undergoing statin treatment should be exposed to moderate aerobic training in combination to resistance exercises three times a week, and the provision of physical training prior to drug administration is desirable, whenever possible.

  14. [Statin and risk of falls in the elderly: A sytematic review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas Sanabria, Luis Carlos; Barbosa Balaquera, Stephany; Suarez Acosta, Ana María; García Peña, Ángel Alberto; Cano Gutiérrez, Carlos Alberto

    2017-07-17

    With the high incidence of cardiovascular events in the elderly population the effectiveness of statins in reducing mortality from coronary events has been demonstrated. However, there have been adverse effects, such as myalgia, myopathy, myonecrosis, not to mention the falls as a result of muscle damage with statin use. The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review to assess the literature on the association between statin use and the risk of falls. The databases that were included PUBMED AND SCOPUS, with articles published from January 2000 to May 2016. The MESH terms used for the search were "FALLS" AND "STATIN". Selected studies included cohort populations from the community (>50 years old), and analysed using the Scottish Intercollegiate (SIGN) methodology guidelines, as no randomised controlled study was found. In the study by Ham et al., statin use was shown to be a protective factor for presence of falls. In the second study by Scott et al., there was an increased risk of falls (P=.029) and an impairment in muscle strength and quality muscle (P=.033 and P=.046, respectively). In the third study Haerer et al., found an increased risk of falls (P=.63). The association between use of statins and risk of falls could not be determined with the available evidence, although an association with the involvement of some determinants of muscular function was found. Copyright © 2017 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Treatment of Dyslipidemia with Statins and Physical Exercises: Recent Findings of Skeletal Muscle Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfim, Mariana Rotta, E-mail: mrb-unesp@yahoo.com.br [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Motricidade, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista “Júlio de Mesquita Filho” (UNESP), Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle [Setor de Doenças Neuromusculares, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Amaral, Sandra Lia do; Monteiro, Henrique Luiz [Departamento de Educação Física, Faculdade de Ciências, UNESP, Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    Statin treatment in association with physical exercise practice can substantially reduce cardiovascular mortality risk of dyslipidemic individuals, but this practice is associated with myopathic event exacerbation. This study aimed to present the most recent results of specific literature about the effects of statins and its association with physical exercise on skeletal musculature. Thus, a literature review was performed using PubMed and SciELO databases, through the combination of the keywords “statin” AND “exercise” AND “muscle”, restricting the selection to original studies published between January 1990 and November 2013. Sixteen studies evaluating the effects of statins in association with acute or chronic exercises on skeletal muscle were analyzed. Study results indicate that athletes using statins can experience deleterious effects on skeletal muscle, as the exacerbation of skeletal muscle injuries are more frequent with intense training or acute eccentric and strenuous exercises. Moderate physical training, in turn, when associated to statins does not increase creatine kinase levels or pain reports, but improves muscle and metabolic functions as a consequence of training. Therefore, it is suggested that dyslipidemic patients undergoing statin treatment should be exposed to moderate aerobic training in combination to resistance exercises three times a week, and the provision of physical training prior to drug administration is desirable, whenever possible.

  16. Influence of statin treatment on coronary atherosclerosis visualised using multidetector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Hans [Charite, Medical School, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Klinikum Brandenburg, Department of Cardiology, Angiology, and Pulmonology, Brandenburg an der Havel (Germany); Frieler, Katja [Charite, Medical School, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Medical Statistics, Berlin (Germany); Potsdam Institut fuer Klimaforschung, Potsdam (Germany); Schlattmann, Peter [Charite, Medical School, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Medical Statistics, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd [Charite, Medical School, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Dewey, Marc [Charite, Medical School, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Coronary angiography using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) allows non-invasive assessment of non-calcified, calcified and mixed plaques. Progression of coronary plaques may be influenced by statins. Sixty-three consecutive patients underwent MDCT as a follow-up to their original CT angiography in a retrospective longitudinal study. MDCT was performed by using a voxel size of 0.5 x 0.35 x 0.35 mm{sup 3} at two time points 25 {+-} 3 months apart. Non-calcified, calcified and mixed coronary plaque components were analysed by using volumetric measurement. The influence of statin, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and risk factors was assessed by using a linear random intercept model for plaque growth. The volumes of non-calcified, calcified and mixed coronary plaques significantly (P < 0.001) increased from baseline (medians/interquartile ranges = 21/15-39, 7/3-20 and 36/16-69 mm{sup 3}) to follow-up (29/17-44, 13/6-29 and 41/20-75 mm{sup 3}). Statins significantly slowed the growth of non-calcified plaques (statin coefficient {beta} = -0.0036, P = 0.01) but did not significantly affect the growth rate of mixed or calcified plaques. The effect of statin treatment on non-calcified plaques remained significant after adjusting for LDL levels and cardiac risk factors. Quantification using MDCT shows that progression of non-calcified coronary plaques may be slowed by statins. (orig.)

  17. Statin-induced changes in mitochondrial respiration in blood platelets in rats and human with dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vevera, J; Fišar, Z; Nekovářová, T; Vrablík, M; Zlatohlávek, L; Hroudová, J; Singh, N; Raboch, J; Valeš, K

    2016-11-23

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely used drugs for lowering blood lipid levels and preventing cardiovascular diseases. However, statins can have serious adverse effects, which may be related to development of mitochondrial dysfunctions. The aim of study was to demonstrate the in vivo effect of high and therapeutic doses of statins on mitochondrial respiration in blood platelets. Model approach was used in the study. Simvastatin was administered to rats at a high dose for 4 weeks. Humans were treated with therapeutic doses of rosuvastatin or atorvastatin for 6 weeks. Platelet mitochondrial respiration was measured using high-resolution respirometry. In rats, a significantly lower physiological respiratory rate was found in intact platelets of simvastatin-treated rats compared to controls. In humans, no significant changes in mitochondrial respiration were detected in intact platelets; however, decreased complex I-linked respiration was observed after statin treatment in permeabilized platelets. We propose that the small in vivo effect of statins on platelet energy metabolism can be attributed to drug effects on complex I of the electron transport system. Both intact and permeabilized platelets can be used as a readily available biological model to study changes in cellular energy metabolism in patients treated with statins.

  18. THE PROBLEM OF STATIN USE IN PATIENTS WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES AND CONCOMITANT LIVER DISEASES. WHAT PREVENTS OVERCOMING STATINOPHOBIA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Bel'diev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to a recent study, Russian physicians often and sometimes unreasonably find it impossible to use statins in patients with cardiovascular diseases and concomitant chronic liver diseases. Analysis of domestic publications of recent years reveals the following factors which can impede overcoming statinophobia: 1 fragmentary and contradictory statement of the problem "Statins and liver" in Russian clinical guidelines for management of patients with high cardiovascular risk; 2 common perception that isolated transaminase increase in response to statin therapy is an indicator of "cytolysis" or "cytolytic syndrome"; 3 unreasonably overestimated lipid-lowering activity of combination therapy with low doses of statins and ursodeoxycholic acid; 4 view of the inadmissibility of statin use in patients with transaminase levels more than three upper limit of normal. To overcome these shortcomings and mistakes it seems appropriate to issue national clinical guidelines on statin use in high cardiovascular risk patients with underlying liver disease and/or with elevated transaminases.

  19. Statins: from cholesterol-lowering drugs to novel immunomodulators for the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulivieri, Cristina; Baldari, Cosima T

    2014-10-01

    Statins, a class of drugs that act as inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis and protein isoprenylation, have been proposed as immunomodulatory agents due to their potent effects both on T lymphocytes and on antigen presenting cells. Unfortunately to date the benefits of statin therapy have not been unequivocally established due to contrasting results obtained in the setting of several autoimmune diseases. A major hurdle is our limited mechanistic understanding of the pleiotropic mechanisms underlying statin-mediated immunomodulation. Accumulating evidence has highlighted two CD4(+) T cell subsets, the Th17 and Treg cells, as important disease-related targets of statins. Here we shall review recent findings on the activity of statins on Th17 and Treg differentiation and effector function. Statin-based therapies of multiple sclerosis, a Th17 cell-mediated autoimmune disease, and of Systemic Lupus Erithematosus, characterized by a Th17/Treg imbalance, will be also discussed, based on animal models and clinical trials.

  20. Concomitant use of clopidogrel and statins and risk of major adverse cardiovascular events following coronary stent implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Morten; Johansen, Martin B; Mæng, Michael

    2012-01-01

    quantification of the interaction effect. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS • Clopidogrel and CYP3A4-metabolizing statin use were each associated with a substantially reduced rate of major adverse cardiovascular events within 12 months after coronary stent implantation. • Although we observed an interaction between use...... of clopidogrel and statins, statin use vs. non-use was not associated with an increased rate of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients using clopidogrel after coronary stent implantation. AIMS To examine whether CYP3A4-metabolizing statin use modified the association between clopidogrel use and major......WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT • The CYP3A4 inhibition by lipophilic statins may attenuate the effectiveness of clopidogrel. • No studies have measured drug exposure in a time-varying manner that detects discontinuation and restart of clopidogrel and statin therapy, allowing clinical...

  1. Drug interactions with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins): the importance of CYP enzymes, transporters and pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuvonen, Pertti J

    2010-03-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) can cause skeletal muscle toxicity; the risk of toxicity is elevated by drug interactions and pharmacogenetic factors that increase the concentration of statins in the plasma. Statins are substrates for several membrane transporters that may mediate drug interactions. Inhibitors of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 can decrease the hepatic uptake of many statins, as well as the therapeutic index of these agents. Potent inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A4 can significantly increase the plasma concentrations of the active forms of simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin. Fluvastatin, which is metabolized by CYP2C9, is less prone to pharmacokinetic interactions, while pravastatin, rosuvastatin and pitavastatin are not susceptible to any CYP inhibition. An understanding of the mechanisms of statin interactions will help to minimize drug interactions and to develop statins that are less prone to adverse interactions.

  2. Meta-Analysis of Impact of Different Types and Doses of Statins on New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Navarese, Eliano Pio; Buffon, Antonino; Andreotti, Felicita; Koziński, Marek; Welton, Nicky; Fabiszak, Tomasz; Caputo, Salvatore; GRZEŚK, GRZEGORZ; Kubica, Aldona; Świątkiewicz, Iwona; Sukiennik, Adam; Kelm, Malte; De Servi, Stefano; Kubica, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that statins are associated with an increased risk for new-onset diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with placebo and that this relation is dose dependent. The aim of this study was to perform a comprehensive network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the impact of different types and doses of statins on new-onset DM. RCTs comparing different types and doses of statins with placebo were searched for using the MEDLINE, Embase, ...

  3. Statin Prescription Adhered to Guidelines for Patients Hospitalized due to Acute Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Oh, Mi Sun; Choi, Hye-Yeon; Cho, A-Hyun; Kwon, Hyung-Min; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Byung-Chul; ,

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Secondary stroke prevention guidelines recommend statins for the management of dyslipidemia in ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). This study assessed the guideline-based statin prescription (GBSP) rate in Korea and the associated physician and patient factors. Methods A survey was conducted to assess Korean neurologists' knowledge of and attitude toward the current dyslipidemia management guidelines. The characteristics and discharge statin prescriptio...

  4. Statins induce immunosuppressive effect on heterotopic limb allografts in rat through inhibiting T cell activation and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Chunlei; Yang, Daping; Liu, Guofeng; Dong, Deli; Ma, Zhiqiang; Fu, Hailiang; Zhao, Zhengyu; Sun, Zhiyong

    2009-01-05

    Long-term use of immunosuppressive agents could bring many side effects. Recently, 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl-gutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) have been reported to be immunomodulatory besides lowering serum cholesterol level. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of statins on composite tissue allografts and T lymphocyte in vivo and in vitro. Rats were divided into 5 groups: syngeneic transplantation group (Lewis-Lewis); allogeneic control group (Brown Norway-Lewis, no treatment); low-dose statins group (15 mg /kg); high-dose statins group (30 mg /kg) and cyclosporin A group. In vivo, treatment of statins significantly prolonged allografts survival as compared to control group. Histological findings further supported these clinical results and demonstrated less extent of rejection. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that there was a remarkably reduced T cells infiltration in statins groups. Moreover, the serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma were decreased after statins therapy, while these in control group increased significantly. Meanwhile, transcriptional activities of IL-2 and IFN-gamma were also dramatically down-regulated after statins treatment. In vitro, mixed lymphocyte reaction assay was performed and the results revealed lymphocyte proliferation was inhibited by statins in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, administration of statins exhibited inhibitory effects on CD3/CD28 mediated T cell activation and proliferation. Besides, the results demonstrated that statins significantly down-regulated mRNA expression and suppress cytokine production of IL-2 and IFN-gamma in vitro. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that application of statins could induce immunosuppressive effect and prolong allografts survival through inhibiting activation and proliferation of T cell and reducing production of IL-2 and IFN-gamma.

  5. Mitigation of statins-induced cytotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction by L-carnitine in freshly-isolated rat hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Abdoli, N.; Azarmi, Y.; Eghbal, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Statins are widely used as anti hyperlipidemic agents. Hepatotoxicity is one of their adverse effects appearing in some patients. No protective agents have yet been developed to treat statins-induced hepatotoxicity. Different investigations have suggested L-carnitine as a hepatoprotective agent against drugs-induced toxicity. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of L-carnitine on the cytotoxic effects of statins on the freshly-isolated rat hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from...

  6. Sex and Race Differences in the Association Between Statin Use and the Incidence of Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zissimopoulos, Julie M; Barthold, Douglas; Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Joyce, Geoffrey

    2017-02-01

    To our knowledge, no effective treatments exist for Alzheimer disease, and new molecules are years away. However, several drugs prescribed for other conditions have been associated with reducing its risk. To analyze the association between statin exposure and Alzheimer disease incidence among Medicare beneficiaries. We examined the medical and pharmacy claims of a 20% sample of Medicare beneficiaries from 2006 to 2013 and compared rates of Alzheimer disease diagnosis for 399 979 statin users 65 years of age or older with high or low exposure to statins and with drug molecules for black, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white people, and men and women of Asian, Native American, or unkown race/ethnicity who are referred to as "other." The main outcome was incident diagnosis of Alzheimer disease based on the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. We used Cox proportional hazard models to analyze the association between statin exposure and Alzheimer disease diagnosis for different sexes, races and ethnicities, and statin molecules. The 399 979 study participants included 7794 (1.95%) black men, 24 484 (6.12%) black women, 11 200 (2.80%) Hispanic men, 21 458 (5.36%) Hispanic women, 115 059 (28.77%) white men, and 195 181 (48.80%) white women. High exposure to statins was associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer disease diagnosis for women (hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; 95% CI, 0.82-0.89; PAlzheimer disease risk for white women (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.81-0.92; PAlzheimer disease diagnosis for white women (HR, 0.84, 95% CI, 0.78-0.89), black women (HR, 0.81, 95% CI, 0.67-0.98), and Hispanic men (HR, 0.61, 95% CI, 0.42-0.89) and women (HR, 0.76, 95% CI, 0.60-0.97). Pravastatin and rosuvastatin were associated with reduced Alzheimer disease risk for white women only (HR, 0.82, 95% CI, 0.70-0.95 and HR, 0.81, 95% CI, 0.67-0.98, respectively). High statin exposure was not associated with a statistically significant lower Alzheimer disease risk

  7. Effect of thyroid hormone status and concomitant medication on statin induced adverse effects in hyperlipidemic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, E; Harangi, M; Zsíros, N; Nagy, E V; Paragh, G; Bodor, M

    2014-06-01

    Statins are effective treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and used extensively worldwide. However, adverse effects induced by statins are the major barrier of maximalizing cardiovascular risk reduction. Hypothyroidism and administration of drugs metabolized on the same cytochrome P450 (CYPP450) pathways where statin biotransformation occurs represent a significant risk factor for statin induced adverse effects including myopathy. Simvastatin, atorvastatin and lovastatin are metabolized by CYP3A4, fluvastatin by CYP2C9, while rosuvastatin by CYP2C9 and 2C19. We investigated the levels of the free thyroid hormones and CYP metabolism of concomitant medication in 101 hyperlipidemic patients (age 61.3 +/- 9.9 ys) with statin induced adverse effects including myopathy (56 cases; 55.4%), hepatopathy (39 cases; 38.6%) and gastrointestinal adverse effects (24 cases; 23.8%). Abnormal thyroid hormone levels were found in 5 patients (4.95%); clinical hypothyroidism in 2 and hyperthyroidism in 3 cases. 11 patients had a positive history for hypothyroidism (10.9%). Myopathy occured in one patient with hypothyroidism and two patients with hyperthyroidism. There were no significant differences in the TSH, fT4 and fT3 levels between patients with statin induced myopathy and patients with other types of adverse effects. 78 patients (77.2%) were administered drugs metabolized by CYP isoforms also used by statins (3A4: 66 cases (65.3%); 2C9: 67 cases (66.3%); 2C19: 54 cases (53.5%)). Patients with myopathy took significantly more drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 compared to patients with other types of adverse effects (p statin induced adverse effects. Both abnormal thyroid hormone status and administration of drugs metabolized by CYP3A4, 2C9 and 2C19 are common in our patients with statin induced adverse effects. Normalizing the thyroid hormone status and optimizing of the concomitant medication may reduce the risk of statin induced adverse effects.

  8. Safety of Statin Pretreatment in Intravenous Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Kadlecová, Pavla; Kobayashi, Adam; Czlonkowska, Anna; Brozman, Miroslav; Švigelj, Viktor; Csiba, Laszlo; Kõrv, Janika; Demarin, Vida; Vilionskis, Aleksandras; Jatuzis, Dalius; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Rudolf, Jobst; Krespi, Yakup; Mikulik, Robert

    2015-09-01

    A recent meta-analysis investigating the association between statins and early outcomes in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) indicated that prestroke statin treatment was associated with increased risk of 90-day mortality and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. We investigated the potential association of statin pretreatment with early outcomes in a large, international registry of AIS patients treated with IVT. We analyzed prospectively collected data from the Safe Implementation of Treatments in Stroke-East registry (SITS-EAST) registry on consecutive AIS patients treated with IVT during an 8-year period. Early clinical recovery within 24 hours was defined as reduction in baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of ≥10 points. Favorable functional outcome at 3 months was defined as modified Rankin Scale scores of 0 to 1. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was diagnosed using National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, European-Australasian Acute Stroke Study-II and SITS definitions. A total of 1660 AIS patients treated with IVT fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Patients with statin pretreatment (23%) had higher baseline stroke severity compared with cases who had not received any statin at symptom onset. After adjusting for potential confounders, statin pretreatment was not associated with a higher likelihood of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage defined by any of the 3 definitions. Statin pretreatment was not related to 3-month all-cause mortality (odds ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.57-1.49; P=0.741) or 3-month favorable functional outcome (odds ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-1.27; P=0.364). Statin pretreatment was independently associated with a higher odds of early clinical recovery (odds ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-2.92; P=0.003). Statin pretreatment seems not to be associated with adverse outcomes in AIS patients treated with IVT. The effect

  9. Statin adverse effects: patients' experiences and laboratory monitoring of muscle and liver injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaipichit, Nataporn; Krska, Janet; Pratipanawatr, Thongchai; Jarernsiripornkul, Narumol

    2015-04-01

    Although statins have great benefit on the prevention of cardiovascular diseases with limited adverse effects (AEs), little is known about patients' contribution of AE reports in clinical practice. To explore patients' experiences of statin AEs and related laboratory monitoring in clinical practice. Outpatient clinics of two University hospitals in northeast Thailand. Generic symptom checklist questionnaires for self-reporting AEs were distributed to patients prescribed simvastatin, atorvastatin, or rosuvastatin at outpatient clinics. Clinical information was obtained from medical records. Reported symptoms were assessed for causality considering previously known statin AEs, concomitant diseases and drugs. Potential statin AEs reported by patients and monitoring of laboratory parameters related to musculoskeletal and liver disorders. Of the total 718 valid responses, 76.0 % of patients reported at least one symptom, most of which (69.0 %) were probable/possible statin AEs. Musculoskeletal and liver-related symptoms were reported by 283 (39.4 %) and 134 patients (18.7 %), respectively. Probable/possible AEs were categorized in 56.7 % of their musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal symptoms. Majority of patients had at least one laboratory test on initiation of (64.8 %) and during statin treatment (61.8 %). Patients taking atorvastatin or rosuvastatin, and patients with history of chronic renal diseases were more likely to have creatine kinase (CK) monitored on initiation of and during statin treatment. Additionally, taking drugs which could potentially increase muscle injury (OR 1.929, P statin treatment. Reporters of musculoskeletal symptoms also had significantly higher mean CK level than those not reporting any musculoskeletal symptoms (207.35 ± 155.40 vs. 143.95 ± 83.07 U/L, respectively; P = 0.037). Patient reporting of liver AEs was not related to alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level and monitoring, however, prior history of liver disorders was significantly

  10. Serum low-density lipoprotein levels, statin use, and cognition in patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rej S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Soham Rej,1 Mahwesh Saleem,2,3 Nathan Herrmann,1,3 Anthi Stefatos,4 Allison Rau,3 Krista L Lanctôt1–3 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, 3Neuropsychopharmacology Research Group, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, 4Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada Aim: Statins have been associated with decreased cognition due to the effects of low concentrations of low-density lipoprotein (LDL on brain function. This has remained controversial and is particularly relevant to patients with coronary artery disease (CAD, who have an increased risk of cognitive decline and are frequently prescribed statins. This study hypothesized that low concentration of LDL is associated with poor cognition in CAD patients using statins. It also explored the association between high-dose versus low-dose statins on cognition in this population. Patients and methods: Baseline cross-sectional data from a longitudinal study of 120 statin-using CAD patients were examined (mean statin duration 25±43 months. The main outcomes were measures of global cognition and cognitive domains, with poor cognition defined as cognitive performance ≤1 standard deviation below the population age and education adjusted means. A battery of cognitive tests was used to assess verbal memory, executive function, speed of processing, visuospatial memory, and global cognition. Adjusting for age, sex, education, and other covariates, multivariable logistic regression analyses assessed associations between low LDL levels (<1.5 mmol/L, statin use, and poor cognition. Results: LDL levels were not associated with global cognition or individual cognitive domains. High-dose statin use was associated with higher visuospatial memory (odds ratio, OR [95% confidence interval, CI] =0.12 [0.02–0.66], P=0.01 and executive functioning (OR =0.25 [0.06–0.99], P=0.05. This effect was independent of covariates

  11. Drug-drug interactions between HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and antiviral protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Benoit; Drouot, Sylvain; Barrail-Tran, Aurélie; Taburet, Anne-Marie

    2013-10-01

    The HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are a class of drugs also known as statins. These drugs are effective and widely prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and prevention of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Seven statins are currently available: atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pitavastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin and simvastatin. Although these drugs are generally well tolerated, skeletal muscle abnormalities from myalgia to severe lethal rhabdomyolysis can occur. Factors that increase statin concentrations such as drug-drug interactions can increase the risk of these adverse events. Drug-drug interactions are dependent on statins' pharmacokinetic profile: simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin are metabolized through cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A, while the metabolism of the other statins is independent of this CYP. All statins are substrate of organic anion transporter polypeptide 1B1, an uptake transporter expressed in hepatocyte membrane that may also explain some drug-drug interactions. Many HIV-infected patients have dyslipidemia and comorbidities that may require statin treatment. HIV-protease inhibitors (HIV PIs) are part of recommended antiretroviral treatment in combination with two reverse transcriptase inhibitors. All HIV PIs except nelfinavir are coadministered with a low dose of ritonavir, a potent CYP3A inhibitor to improve their pharmacokinetic properties. Cobicistat is a new potent CYP3A inhibitor that is combined with elvitegravir and will be combined with HIV-PIs in the future. The HCV-PIs boceprevir and telaprevir are both, to different extents, inhibitors of CYP3A. This review summarizes the pharmacokinetic properties of statins and PIs with emphasis on their metabolic pathways explaining clinically important drug-drug interactions. Simvastatin and lovastatin metabolized through CYP3A have the highest potency for drug-drug interaction with potent CYP3A inhibitors such as ritonavir- or cobicistat-boosted HIV-PI or the

  12. Estatinas hipolipêmicas e novas tendências terapêuticas Hypolipemic statins and new therapeutcal trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Leiria Campo

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Statins are the most used drugs for the treatment of hyperlipidemia in primary and secondary prevention, with the aim of decreasing the levels of plasmatic cholesterol- lipoproteins. Owing to their structural similarity to the substrate HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA, they inhibit the HMG-CoA reductase enzyme, disrupting the cholesterol biosynthesis. Currently, six therapeutic statins are available: lovastatin (Mevacor and pravastatin (Pravachol, which are natural, sinvastatin (Zocor, a semi-synthetic derivative, and the totally synthetic statins, fluvastatin (Lescol, atorvastatin (Lipitor and rosuvastatin (Crestor. Recent investigations have showed other important effects of statins, such as antineoplastic action and improvement in endothelial function.

  13. Adherence to drug label recommendations for avoiding drug interactions causing statin-induced myopathy--a nationwide register study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Settergren

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the extent to which clinicians avoid well-established drug-drug interactions that cause statin-induced myopathy. We hypothesised that clinicians would avoid combining erythromycin or verapamil/diltiazem respectively with atorvastatin or simvastatin. In patients with statin-fibrate combination therapy, we hypothesised that gemfibrozil was avoided to the preference of bezafibrate or fenofibrate. When combined with verapamil/diltiazem or fibrates, we hypothesized that the dispensed doses of atorvastatin/simvastatin would be decreased. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of nationwide dispensing data. Odds ratios of interacting erythromycin, verapamil/diltiazem versus respective prevalence of comparator drugs doxycycline, amlodipine/felodipine in patients co-dispensed interacting statins simvastatin/atorvastatin versus patients unexposed (pravastatin/fluvastatin/rosuvastatin was calculated. For fibrates, OR of gemfibrozil versus fenofibrate/bezafibrate in patients co-dispensed any statin was assessed. RESULTS: OR of interacting erythromycin versus comparator doxycycline did not differ between patients on interacting and comparator statins either in patients dispensed high or low statin doses (adjusted OR 0.87; 95% CI 0.60-1.25 and 0.92; 95% CI 0.69-1.23. Interacting statins were less common among patients dispensed verapamil/diltiazem as compared to patients on amlodipine/felodipine (OR high dose 0.62; CI 0.56-0.68 and low dose 0.63; CI 0.58-0.68. Patients on any statin were to a lesser extent dispensed gemfibrozil compared to patients not dispensed a statin (OR high dose 0.65; CI 0.55-0.76 and low dose 0.70; CI 0.63-0.78. Mean DDD (SD for any statin was substantially higher in patients co-dispensed gemfibrozil 178 (149 compared to patients on statin monotherapy 127 (93, (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Prescribers may to some extent avoid co-prescription of statins with calcium blockers and fibrates with an increased risk of myopathy

  14. Relationships between use of statins and arterial stiffness in normotensive and hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-guang; CHEN Bing-wei; L(U) Na-qiang; CHENG Yan-mei; DANG Ai-min

    2013-01-01

    Background Statins improve arterial stiffness in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD).Hypertension is a predominant contributor of arterial stiffening.However,the influence of hypertension on the effect of statins for improving arterial stiffness in CAD patients has seldom been investigated.Therefore,in this study,we investigated the relationships between statin use and arterial stiffness in normotensive and hypertensive CAD patients.Methods Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) was measured in 437 patients,including 220 hypertensive CAD patients (121 used statins,99 did not) and 217 normotensive CAD patients (105 used statins,112 did not).The normotensive and hypertensive CAD patients were matched according to age,sex,and body mass index (BMI).Results In the normotensive and hypertensive CAD patients,lipid profiles were significantly improved in the statin group compared with the non-statin group.No significant differences in the administered statins (i.e.,atorvastatin,simvastatin,rosuvastatin,and pravastatin) and statin therapy duration were found between normotensive and hypertensive CAD patients (all P>0.05).No significant correlation of ba-PWV and statin therapy duration was found in all CAD patients,normotensive CAD patients,or hypertensive CAD patients (all P>0.05).ba-PWV in the statin group was significantly lower than that in the non-statin group in normotensive CAD patients ((1331.68±167.52) cm/s vs.(1468.61±244.54) cm/s,P=0.002) but not in hypertensive CAD patients (P>0.05).In multiple linear regression analyses,statin therapy was significantly associated with ba-PWV after adjusting for confounding variables in normotensive CAD patients (P=0.018) but not in hypertensive CAD patients (P>0.05).Conclusions Statins may significantly improve arterial stiffness in CAD patients,and hypertension may probably influence the effectiveness of statin therapy in improving arterial stiffness in this population.Further studies are required to

  15. Statins use is associated with poorer glycaemic control in a cohort of hypertensive patients with diabetes and without diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background The US Federal and Drug Administration (FDA) recently revised statin drug labels to include the information that increases in fasting serum glucose and glycated haemoglobin levels have been reported with the use of statins. Yet in a survey, 87% of the doctors stated that they had never or infrequently observed increases in glucose or HbA1c levels in patients on statin. In this study we would like to determine the association between the use of statins and glycaemic control in a ret...

  16. Impact of Statins on Cognitive Deficits in Adult Male Rodents after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijun Peng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of statin treatment on cognitive decline is controversial, and the effect of statins on cognitive deficits in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI has yet to be investigated. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the effect of statins on cognitive deficits in adult male rodents after TBI. After identifying eligible studies by searching four electronic databases on February 28, 2014, we assessed study quality, evaluated the efficacy of statin treatment, and performed stratified metaregression and metaregression to assess the influence of study design on statin efficacy. Eleven studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria from a total of 183 publications. The overall methodological quality of these studies was poor. Meta-analysis showed that statins exert statistically significant positive effects on cognitive performance after TBI. Stratified analysis showed that atorvastatin has the greatest effect on acquisition memory, simvastatin has the greatest effect on retention memory, and statin effects on acquisition memory are higher in closed head injury models. Metaregression analysis further showed that that animal species, study quality, and anesthetic agent impact statin effects on retention memory. We conclude that statins might reduce cognitive deficits after TBI. However, additional well-designed and well-reported animal studies are needed to inform further clinical study.

  17. Increasing incidence of statin prescribing for the elderly without previous cardiovascular conditions:  A nation wide register study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Andersen, Morten

    Supported by the growing evidence of the beneficial effects of statins in a range of conditions, statin utilization has increased considerably in most Western countries over the last decade. Objectives To estimate to what extent a widening of indication scope for statins accounts for the increasi...... for initiating statin treatment, including the "abolition of ageism". The fact that treatment incidence grew most among elderly without disease markers reflects a changing prescribing behaviours among general practitioners, presumably related to an increased use of risk scoring....

  18. Adherence to statin treatment following a myocardial infarction: an Italian population-based survey

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    Monaldi B

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bruno Monaldi,1 Giovanni Bologna,2 Geeta Giulia Costa,3 Carlo D'Agostino,4 Fulvio Ferrante,5 Maurizio Filice,6 Anna Maria Grion,7 Alessandra Mingarelli,8 Leonardo Paloscia,9 Roberto Tettamanti,10 Chiara Veronesi,11 Luca Degli Esposti11 1Servizio Farmaceutico, Ospedale G Mazzoni, ASUR Marche, Ascoli Piceno, 2Dipartimento Farmaceutico, Ospedale di Piacenza, AUSL di Piacenza, SSR Emilia-Romagna, Piacenza, 3Dipartimento Scienze Cardiologiche, Toraciche e Vascolari, Università degli Studi di Padova, Padua, 4Unità Operativa Cardiologia, Ospedale Di Venere, ASL di Bari, Bari, 5SC Monitoraggio Attività Farmaceutica, Azienda USL Frosinone, Frosinone, 6Dipartimento Medico, Ospedale Piero Palagi, Azienda Sanitaria di Firenze (ASF, Florence, 7Servizio Farmaceutico, ULSS 16 Padova, Padua, 8Dipartimento Funzionale del Farmaco, ASL di Latina, Latina, 9Unità Operativa UTIC e Cardiologia Interventistica, Ospedale Santo Spirito, ASL di Pescara, Pescara, 10Unità Operativa Complessa Osservatorio Epidemiologico e Sistemi Informativi, ASL della Provincia di Como, Como, 11CliCon Health, Economics and Outcomes Research, Ravenna, Italy Background: Statins are standard therapies after myocardial infarction (MI in the general population. In the current study, we assessed adherence to statin treatment by patients after an MI in Italy, and estimated the effect of in-hospital statin therapy on persistence in treatment during a 2-year follow-up.Patients and methods: This was a retrospective cohort observation study of patients who experienced their MI between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2005. Patients to enroll were identified by a diagnosis of MI at discharge from hospital. Previous drug therapies and hospital admissions for cardiovascular reasons in the 12 months before hospitalization for MI, statin treatment and lipid levels during hospitalization, indication for statin treatment at hospital discharge, and adherence to statin treatment in the following 24 months

  19. Statins and breast cancer stage and mortality in the Women’s Health Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Pinkal; Lehman, Amy; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Kwan, Marilyn L.; Arun, Monica; Manson, JoAnn E.; Lavasani, Sayeh; Wasswertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Sarto, Gloria E.; LeBoff, Meryl; Cauley, Jane; Cote, Michele; Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer; Jay, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association between statins and breast cancer stage and mortality in the Women’s Health Initiative. Methods The study population included 128,675 post-menopausal women aged 50–79 years, out of which there were 7,883 newly diagnosed cases of in situ (19 %), local (61 %)-, regional (19 %)- and distant (1 %)-stage breast cancer and 401 deaths due to breast cancer after an average of 11.5 (SD = 3.7) years of follow-up. Stage was coded using SEER criteria and was stratified into early (in situ and local)- versus late (regional and distant)-stage disease. Information on statins and other risk factors were collected by self- and interviewer-administered questionnaires. Cause of death was based on medical record review. Multivariable-adjusted hazards ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) evaluating the relationship between statin use (at baseline only and in a time-dependent manner) and diagnosis of late-stage breast cancer and breast cancer-specific mortality were computed from Cox proportional hazards analyses after adjusting for appropriate confounders. Results Statins were used by 10,474 women (8 %) at baseline. In the multivariable-adjusted time-dependent model, use of lipophilic statins was associated with a reduction in diagnosis of late-stage breast cancer (HR 0.80, 95 % CI 0.64–0.98, p = 0.035) which was also significant among women with estrogen receptor-positive disease (HR 0.72, 95 % CI 0.56–0.93, p = 0.012). Breast cancer mortality was marginally lower in statin users compared with nonusers (HR 0.59, 95 % CI 0.32–1.06, p = 0.075). Conclusions Prior statin use is associated with lower breast cancer stage at diagnosis. PMID:25736184

  20. Molecular pathology of familial hypercholesterolemia, related dyslipidemias and therapies beyond the statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiz, Fathimath; Hooper, Amanda J; van Bockxmeer, Frank M

    2012-01-01

    The development of the statin class of cholesterol-lowering drugs is one of the most significant success stories of modern pharmacotherapy. World-wide there are an estimated 150 million people on statins, with the emerging economies of India and China predicted to contribute significantly to that number. Notwithstanding their success, a significant number of people cannot tolerate statins because of serious side effects; of equal concern, a substantial proportion of high risk patients fail to reach cholesterol-lowering targets. For these subjects there is an urgent need for new cholesterol-lowering agents to be used alone or in combination with statins. The success of statins has been largely underpinned by knowledge of cholesterol homeostasis at a molecular level, knowledge that was first gleaned in the 1980s from Brown and Goldstein's pioneering studies of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH, OMIM 143890). Follow-up work that has identified a number of intracellular and circulating factors, all capable of disrupting LDL clearance, has revealed that the low-density lipoprotein receptor- (LDLR) mediated clearance pathway is substantially more complex than previously thought. These factors were discovered in studies of individuals with very rare inherited conditions that lead to either hypo- or hypercholesterolemia. These investigations, besides providing clearer insight into the molecular mechanisms regulating plasma LDL concentrations, have also revealed a number of novel therapeutic targets independent from statins. Consequently, a number of novel therapeutic approaches that are based on small interfering bio-molecules, including antisense oligonucleotides, are now in clinical development. These are aimed at impairing the assembly, synthesis and secretion of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and/or accelerating their hepatic catabolism. The aim of this article is to focus on these recent advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of cholesterol