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Sample records for unique thylakoid membrane

  1. Unique Thylakoid Membrane Architecture of a Unicellular N2-Fixing Cyanobacterium Revealed by Electron Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberton, Michelle L.; Austin, Jotham R.; Berg, R. H.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria, descendants of the endosymbiont that gave rise to modern-day chloroplasts, are vital contributors to global biological energy conversion processes. A thorough understanding of the physiology of cyanobacteria requires detailed knowledge of these organisms at the level of cellular architecture and organization. In these prokaryotes, the large membrane protein complexes of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains function in the intracellular thylakoid membranes. Like plants, the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in cyanobacteria has direct impact on cellular bioenergetics, protein transport, and molecular trafficking. However, whole-cell thylakoid organization in cyanobacteria is not well understood. Here we present, by using electron tomography, an in-depth analysis of the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in a unicellular cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. Based on the results of three-dimensional tomographic reconstructions of near-entire cells, we determined that the thylakoids in Cyanothece 51142 form a dense and complex network that extends throughout the entire cell. This thylakoid membrane network is formed from the branching and splitting of membranes and encloses a single lumenal space. The entire thylakoid network spirals as a peripheral ring of membranes around the cell, an organization that has not previously been described in a cyanobacterium. Within the thylakoid membrane network are areas of quasi-helical arrangement with similarities to the thylakoid membrane system in chloroplasts. This cyanobacterial thylakoid arrangement is an efficient means of packing a large volume of membranes in the cell while optimizing intracellular transport and trafficking.

  2. Unique thylakoid membrane architecture of a unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium revealed by electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberton, Michelle; Austin II, Jotham R; Berg, R. Howard; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria, descendants of the endosymbiont that gave rise to modern-day chloroplasts, are vital contributors to global biological energy conversion processes. A thorough understanding of the physiology of cyanobacteria requires detailed knowledge of these organisms at the level of cellular architecture and organization. In these prokaryotes, the large membrane protein complexes of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains function in the intracellular thylakoid membranes. Like plants, the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in cyanobacteria has direct impact on cellular bioenergetics, protein transport, and molecular trafficking. However, whole-cell thylakoid organization in cyanobacteria is not well understood. Here we present, by using electron tomography, an in-depth analysis of the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in a unicellular cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. Based on the results of three-dimensional tomographic reconstructions of near-entire cells, we determined that the thylakoids in Cyanothece 51142 form a dense and complex network that extends throughout the entire cell. This thylakoid membrane network is formed from the branching and splitting of membranes and encloses a single lumenal space. The entire thylakoid network spirals as a peripheral ring of membranes around the cell, an organization that has not previously been described in a cyanobacterium. Within the thylakoid membrane network are areas of quasi-helical arrangement with similarities to the thylakoid membrane system in chloroplasts. This cyanobacterial thylakoid arrangement is an efficient means of packing a large volume of membranes in the cell while optimizing intracellular transport and trafficking.

  3. Unique thylakoid membrane architecture of a unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium revealed by electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberton, Michelle; Austin, Jotham R; Berg, R Howard; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria, descendants of the endosymbiont that gave rise to modern-day chloroplasts, are vital contributors to global biological energy conversion processes. A thorough understanding of the physiology of cyanobacteria requires detailed knowledge of these organisms at the level of cellular architecture and organization. In these prokaryotes, the large membrane protein complexes of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains function in the intracellular thylakoid membranes. Like plants, the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in cyanobacteria has direct impact on cellular bioenergetics, protein transport, and molecular trafficking. However, whole-cell thylakoid organization in cyanobacteria is not well understood. Here we present, by using electron tomography, an in-depth analysis of the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in a unicellular cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. Based on the results of three-dimensional tomographic reconstructions of near-entire cells, we determined that the thylakoids in Cyanothece 51142 form a dense and complex network that extends throughout the entire cell. This thylakoid membrane network is formed from the branching and splitting of membranes and encloses a single lumenal space. The entire thylakoid network spirals as a peripheral ring of membranes around the cell, an organization that has not previously been described in a cyanobacterium. Within the thylakoid membrane network are areas of quasi-helical arrangement with similarities to the thylakoid membrane system in chloroplasts. This cyanobacterial thylakoid arrangement is an efficient means of packing a large volume of membranes in the cell while optimizing intracellular transport and trafficking.

  4. Visualizing structural dynamics of thylakoid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Masakazu; Yokono, Makio; Nakano, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    To optimize photosynthesis, light-harvesting antenna proteins regulate light energy dissipation and redistribution in chloroplast thylakoid membranes, which involve dynamic protein reorganization of photosystems I and II. However, direct evidence for such protein reorganization has not been visualized in live cells. Here we demonstrate structural dynamics of thylakoid membranes by live cell imaging in combination with deconvolution. We observed chlorophyll fluorescence in the antibiotics-induced macrochloroplast in the moss Physcomitrella patens. The three-dimensional reconstruction uncovered the fine thylakoid membrane structure in live cells. The time-lapse imaging shows that the entire thylakoid membrane network is structurally stable, but the individual thylakoid membrane structure is flexible in vivo. Our observation indicates that grana serve as a framework to maintain structural integrity of the entire thylakoid membrane network. Both the structural stability and flexibility of thylakoid membranes would be essential for dynamic protein reorganization under fluctuating light environments. PMID:24442007

  5. Global Proteomic Analysis Reveals an Exclusive Role of Thylakoid Membranes in Bioenergetics of a Model Cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberton, Michelle; Saha, Rajib; Jacobs, Jon M.; Nguyen, Amelia Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2016-04-07

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes with highly differentiated membrane systems. These organisms contain an outer membrane, plasma membrane, and an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the photosynthetic and respiratory machinery are found. This existence of compartmentalization and differentiation of membrane systems poses a number of challenges for cyanobacterial cells in terms of organization and distribution of proteins to the correct membrane system. Proteomics studies have long sought to identify the components of the different membrane systems, and to date about 450 different proteins have been attributed to either the plasma membrane or thylakoid membrane. Given the complexity of these membranes, many more proteins remain to be identified in these membrane systems, and a comprehensive catalog of plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane proteins is needed. Here we describe the identification of 635 proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by quantitative iTRAQ isobaric labeling; of these, 459 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and 176 were localized to the thylakoid membrane. Surprisingly, we found over 2.5 times the number of unique proteins identified in the plasma membrane compared to the thylakoid membrane. This suggests that the protein composition of the thylakoid membrane is more homogeneous than the plasma membrane, consistent with the role of the plasma membrane in diverse cellular processes including protein trafficking and nutrient import, compared to a more specialized role for the thylakoid membrane in cellular energetics. Overall, the protein composition of the Synechocystis 6803 plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane is quite similar to the E.coli plasma membrane and Arabidopsis thylakoid membrane, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 can therefore be described as a gram-negative bacterium that has an additional internal membrane system that fulfils the energetic requirements of the cell.

  6. Global Proteomic Analysis Reveals an Exclusive Role of Thylakoid Membranes in Bioenergetics of a Model Cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberton, Michelle; Saha, Rajib; Jacobs, Jon M; Nguyen, Amelia Y; Gritsenko, Marina A; Smith, Richard D; Koppenaal, David W; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2016-06-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes with highly differentiated membrane systems. These organisms contain an outer membrane, plasma membrane, and an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the photosynthetic and respiratory machinery are found. This existence of compartmentalization and differentiation of membrane systems poses a number of challenges for cyanobacterial cells in terms of organization and distribution of proteins to the correct membrane system. Proteomics studies have long sought to identify the components of the different membrane systems in cyanobacteria, and to date about 450 different proteins have been attributed to either the plasma membrane or thylakoid membrane. Given the complexity of these membranes, many more proteins remain to be identified, and a comprehensive catalogue of plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane proteins is needed. Here we describe the identification of 635 differentially localized proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by quantitative iTRAQ isobaric labeling; of these, 459 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and 176 were localized to the thylakoid membrane. Surprisingly, we found over 2.5 times the number of unique proteins identified in the plasma membrane compared with the thylakoid membrane. This suggests that the protein composition of the thylakoid membrane is more homogeneous than the plasma membrane, consistent with the role of the plasma membrane in diverse cellular processes including protein trafficking and nutrient import, compared with a more specialized role for the thylakoid membrane in cellular energetics. Thus, our data clearly define the two membrane systems with distinct functions. Overall, the protein compositions of the Synechocystis 6803 plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane are quite similar to that of the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli and thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis chloroplasts, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 can therefore be described as a Gram

  7. Global Proteomic Analysis Reveals an Exclusive Role of Thylakoid Membranes in Bioenergetics of a Model Cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberton, Michelle; Saha, Rajib; Jacobs, Jon M.; Nguyen, Amelia Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2016-04-07

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes with highlydifferentiated membrane systems. These organisms contain an outer membrane, plasma membrane, and an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the photosynthetic and respiratory machinery are found. This existence of compartmentalization and differentiation of membrane systems poses a number of challenges for cyanobacterial cells in terms of organization and distribution of proteins to the correct membrane system. Proteomics studies have long sought to identify the components of the different membrane systems in cyanobacteria, and to date about 450 different proteins have been attributed to either the plasma membrane or thylakoid membrane. Given the complexity of these membranes, many more proteins remain to be identified, and a comprehensive catalogue of plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane proteins is needed. Here we describe the identification of 635 differentially localized proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by quantitative iTRAQ isobaric labeling; of these, 459 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and 176 were localized to the thylakoid membrane. Surprisingly, we found over 2.5 times the number of unique proteins identified in the plasma membrane compared with the thylakoid membrane. This suggests that the protein composition of the thylakoid membrane is more homogeneous than the plasma membrane, consistent with the role of the plasma membrane in diverse cellular processes including protein trafficking and nutrient import, compared with a more specialized role for the thylakoid membrane in cellular energetics. Thus, our data clearly define the two membrane systems with distinct functions. Overall, the protein compositions of the Synechocystis 6803 plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane are quite similar to that of the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli and thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis chloroplasts, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 can therefore be described as a Gram

  8. Role of membrane glycerolipids in photosynthesis, thylakoid biogenesis and chloroplast development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    The lipid bilayer of the thylakoid membrane in plant chloroplasts and cyanobacterial cells is predominantly composed of four unique lipid classes; monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). MGDG and DGDG are uncharged galactolipids that constitute the bulk of thylakoid membrane lipids and provide a lipid bilayer matrix for photosynthetic complexes as the main constituents. The glycolipid SQDG and phospholipid PG are anionic lipids with a negative charge on their head groups. SQDG and PG substitute for each other to maintain the amount of total anionic lipids in the thylakoid membrane, with PG having indispensable functions in photosynthesis. In addition to biochemical studies, extensive analyses of mutants deficient in thylakoid lipids have revealed important roles of these lipids in photosynthesis and thylakoid membrane biogenesis. Moreover, recent studies of Arabidopsis thaliana suggest that thylakoid lipid biosynthesis triggers the expression of photosynthesis-associated genes in both the nucleus and plastids and activates the formation of photosynthetic machineries and chloroplast development. Meanwhile, galactolipid biosynthesis is regulated in response to chloroplast functionality and lipid metabolism at transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review summarizes the roles of thylakoid lipids with their biosynthetic pathways in plants and discusses the coordinated regulation of thylakoid lipid biosynthesis with the development of photosynthetic machinery during chloroplast biogenesis.

  9. Interfacial properties and emulsification performance of thylakoid membrane fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamayo Tenorio, A.; Jong, de E.W.M.; Nikiforidis, K.; Boom, R.M.; Goot, van der A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Thylakoids membranes are sophisticated, dynamic structures found in plant leaves, composed of protein complexes in a dynamic lipid matrix. The interfacial absorption dynamics and viscoelasticity of thylakoid membranes fragments were measured to assess the properties of the interfacial layer and to e

  10. Revealing the Dynamics of Thylakoid Membranes in Living Cyanobacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana; O'Neill, Hugh; Liberton, Michelle; Urban, Volker S.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ohl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that make major contributions to the production of the oxygen in the Earth atmosphere. The photosynthetic machinery in cyanobacterial cells is housed in flattened membrane structures called thylakoids. The structural organization of cyanobacterial cells and the arrangement of the thylakoid membranes in response to environmental conditions have been widely investigated. However, there is limited knowledge about the internal dynamics of these membranes in terms of their flexibility and motion during the photosynthetic process. We present a direct observation of thylakoid membrane undulatory motion in vivo and show a connection between membrane mobility and photosynthetic activity. High-resolution inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 assessed the flexibility of cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane sheets and the dependence of the membranes on illumination conditions. We observed softer thylakoid membranes in the dark that have three-to four fold excess mobility compared to membranes under high light conditions. Our analysis indicates that electron transfer between photosynthetic reaction centers and the associated electrochemical proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane result in a significant driving force for excess membrane dynamics. These observations provide a deeper understanding of the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular architecture.

  11. Genome-wide analysis of thylakoid-bound ribosomes in maize reveals principles of cotranslational targeting to the thylakoid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoschke, Reimo; Barkan, Alice

    2015-03-31

    Chloroplast genomes encode ∼ 37 proteins that integrate into the thylakoid membrane. The mechanisms that target these proteins to the membrane are largely unexplored. We used ribosome profiling to provide a comprehensive, high-resolution map of ribosome positions on chloroplast mRNAs in separated membrane and soluble fractions in maize seedlings. The results show that translation invariably initiates off the thylakoid membrane and that ribosomes synthesizing a subset of membrane proteins subsequently become attached to the membrane in a nuclease-resistant fashion. The transition from soluble to membrane-attached ribosomes occurs shortly after the first transmembrane segment in the nascent peptide has emerged from the ribosome. Membrane proteins whose translation terminates before emergence of a transmembrane segment are translated in the stroma and targeted to the membrane posttranslationally. These results indicate that the first transmembrane segment generally comprises the signal that links ribosomes to thylakoid membranes for cotranslational integration. The sole exception is cytochrome f, whose cleavable N-terminal cpSecA-dependent signal sequence engages the thylakoid membrane cotranslationally. The distinct behavior of ribosomes synthesizing the inner envelope protein CemA indicates that sorting signals for the thylakoid and envelope membranes are distinguished cotranslationally. In addition, the fractionation behavior of ribosomes in polycistronic transcription units encoding both membrane and soluble proteins adds to the evidence that the removal of upstream ORFs by RNA processing is not typically required for the translation of internal genes in polycistronic chloroplast mRNAs.

  12. The molecular architecture of the chloroplast thylakoid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefansson, H.

    1996-08-01

    Non-detergent procedure for isolation of sub-thylakoid vesicle populations derived from different structural domains of the chloroplast thylakoid membrane has been developed. Sub-thylakoid vesicles representing the grana, grana core, stroma lamellae, and the grana margins have been isolated and their protein composition has been investigated. Furthermore a novel non-detergent procedure for investigating the pigment composition of photosynthetic complexes located in the different structural domains has been developed. This procedure circumvents selective extractions, an perturbing effect often combined with detergent isolations of membrane bound protein complexes. The fractionation experiments show that the NADPH dehydrogenase, suggested to operate as NADPH or ferredoxin-plastoquinone oxidoreductase in cyclic electron transport around photosystem I, is stoichiometrically depleted on photosystem I basis in the grana domain. The fractionation studies are consistent with the model of the thylakoid membrane where the photosystems in the grana are operating in a linear electron transport whereas the site of cyclic electron transport is in the stroma lamellae. It is suggested that partial destacking of grana, as a result of light-induced protein phosphorylation, may promote the exposure of the granal photosystem I centers to the chloroplast stroma and thereby enhance their participation in cyclic electron transport activity. 146 refs, 18 figs

  13. Protons, the thylakoid membrane, and the chloroplast ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junge, W

    1989-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic theory, proton pumps and ATP synthases are coupled by lateral proton flow through aqueous phases. Three long-standing challenges to this concept, all of which have been loosely subsumed under 'localized coupling' in the literature, were examined in the light of experiments carried out with thylakoids: (1) Nearest neighbor interaction between pumps and ATP synthases. Considering the large distances between photosystem II and CFoCF1, in stacked thylakoids this is a priori absent. (2) Enhanced proton diffusion along the surface of the membrane. This could not be substantiated for the outer side of the thylakoid membrane. Even for the interface between pure lipid and water, two laboratories have reported the absence of enhanced diffusion. (3) Localized proton ducts in the membrane. Intramembrane domains that can transiently trap protons do exist in thylakoid membranes, but because of their limited storage capacity for protons, they probably do not matter for photophosphorylation under continuous light. Seemingly in favor of localized proton ducts is the failure of a supposedly permeant buffer to enhance the onset lag of photophosphorylation. However, it was found that failure of some buffers and the ability of others in this respect were correlated with their failure/ability to quench pH transients in the thylakoid lumen, as predicted by the chemiosmotic theory. It was shown that the chemiosmotic concept is a fair approximation, even for narrow aqueous phases, as in stacked thylakoids. These are approximately isopotential, and protons are taken in by the ATP synthase straight from the lumen. The molecular mechanism by which F0F1 ATPases couple proton flow to ATP synthesis is still unknown. The threefold structural symmetry of the headpiece that, probably, finds a corollary in the channel portion of these enzymes appeals to the common wisdom that structural symmetry causes functional symmetry. "Rotation catalysis" has been proposed. It is

  14. Thylakoid membrane maturation and PSII activation are linked in greening Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Sandra; Bernát, Gábor; Seidel, Tobias; Rupprecht, Eva; Kahmann, Uwe; Schneider, Dirk

    2013-10-01

    Thylakoid membranes are typical and essential features of both chloroplasts and cyanobacteria. While they are crucial for phototrophic growth of cyanobacterial cells, biogenesis of thylakoid membranes is not well understood yet. Dark-grown Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells contain only rudimentary thylakoid membranes but still a relatively high amount of phycobilisomes, inactive photosystem II and active photosystem I centers. After shifting dark-grown Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells into the light, "greening" of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells, i.e. thylakoid membrane formation and recovery of photosynthetic electron transport reactions, was monitored. Complete restoration of a typical thylakoid membrane system was observed within 24 hours after an initial lag phase of 6 to 8 hours. Furthermore, activation of photosystem II complexes and restoration of a functional photosynthetic electron transport chain appears to be linked to the biogenesis of organized thylakoid membrane pairs.

  15. Identification of Thylakoid Membrane Protein Complexes by Using a BN-Chip/MS Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Longquan Fan; Yinghong Pan

    2012-01-01

    Thylakoid membrane protein complexes of wheat (Triticum aestivum Linn.)play crucial roles in growth and crop production.Knowledge of the composition and structure of protein complexes,as well as protein interactions,will result in a much deeper understanding of metabolic pathways and cellular processes than protein identities alone,especially if the complexes can be separated in the native forms.Whereas the analysis of membrane protein complexes is a significant challenge due to their hydrophobic properties and relatively low abundance.A rapid and efficient method of identifying membrane protein complexes will greatly facilitate the investigation of agriculture.The present work developed an BN-Chip/MS approach for exhaustive separation and identification of protein complexes,by combining using blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) and chip-based high-performance liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-Chip/ESI-QT-OF-MS,Chip/MS).By using this approach,seventy-five nonredundant proteins of wheat thylakoid membrane complexes were identified from digested 13 bands of BN-gel.When the protocol of BN separation was not used,only 37 nonredundant proteins had been identified and among of them 9 proteins were uniquely identi? ed.This BN-Chip/MS approach is rapid and efficient for identifying protein complexes in wheat thylakoid membranes,and also providing reliable foundations for further functional research of wheat chloroplast and for identifying protein complexes of other species.

  16. Vipp1 is required for basic thylakoid membrane formation but not for the assembly of thylakoid protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseeva, Elena; Ossenbühl, Friederich; Sippel, Claudia; Cho, Won K; Stein, Bernhard; Eichacker, Lutz A; Meurer, Jörg; Wanner, Gerhard; Westhoff, Peter; Soll, Jürgen; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2007-02-01

    Vipp1 (vesicle inducing protein in plastids 1) is found in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts where it is essential for thylakoid formation. Arabidopsis thaliana mutant plants with a reduction of Vipp1 to about 20% of wild type content become albinotic at an early stage. We propose that this drastic phenotype results from an inability of the remaining Vipp1 protein to assemble into a homo-oligomeric complex, indicating that oligomerization is a prerequisite for Vipp1 function. A Vipp1-ProteinA fusion protein, expressed in the Deltavipp1 mutant background, is able to reinstate oligomerization and restore photoautotrophic growth. Plants containing Vipp1-ProteinA in amounts comparable to Vipp1 in the wild type exhibit a wild type phenotype. However, plants with a reduced amount of Vipp1-ProteinA protein are growth-retarded and significantly paler than the wild type. This phenotype is caused by a decrease in thylakoid membrane content and a concomitant reduction in photosynthetic activity. To the extent that thylakoid membranes are made in these plants they are properly assembled with protein-pigment complexes and are photosynthetically active. This strongly supports a function of Vipp1 in basic thylakoid membrane formation and not in the functional assembly of thylakoid protein complexes. Intriguingly, electron microscopic analysis shows that chloroplasts in the mutant plants are not equally affected by the Vipp1 shortage. Indeed, a wide range of different stages of thylakoid development ranging from wild-type-like chloroplasts to plastids nearly devoid of thylakoids can be observed in organelles of one and the same cell.

  17. Light Activation of Rubisco by Rubisco Activase and Thylakoid Membranes : PROTEINS, ENZYMES AND METABOLISM

    OpenAIRE

    William J., Campbell; William L., OGREN; Photosynthesis Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture

    1992-01-01

    A reconstituted system comprising ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco), rubisco activase, washed thylakoid membranes, and ATP was used to demonstrate a light-dependent stimulation of rubisco activation. ATP, ribulose bisphosphate, H^+ , and Mg^ concentrations are normally light-dependent variables in the chloroplast but were maintained at pre-determined levels. Results indicated that rubisco activase and washed thylakoid membranes are sufficient to catalyze light stimulation ...

  18. Functional flexibility and acclimation of the thylakoid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanervo, Eira; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2005-12-01

    Light is an elusive substrate for the function of photosynthetic light reactions of photosynthesis in the thylakoid membrane. Therefore structural and functional dynamics, which occur in the timescale from seconds to several days, are required both at low and high light conditions. The best characterized short-time regulation mechanism at low light is a rapid state transition, resulting in higher absorption cross section of PSI at the expense of PSII. If the low light conditions continue, activation of the lhcb-genes and synthesis of the light-harvesting proteins will occur to optimize the functions of PSII and PSI. At high light, the transition to state 2 is completely inhibited, but the feedback de-excitation of absorbed energy as heat, known as the energy-dependent quenching (q(E)), is rapidly set up. It requires, at least, the DeltapH-dependent activation of violaxanthin de-epoxidase and involvement of the PsbS protein. Another crucial mechanism for protection against the high light stress is the PSII repair cycle. Furthermore, the water-water cycle, cyclic electron transfer around PSI and chlororespiration are important means induced under high irradiation, functioning mainly to avoid an excess production of reactive oxygen species.

  19. Multiple sources of carbonic anhydrase activity in pea thylakoids: soluble and membrane-bound forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, Natalia N; Ignatova, Lyudmila K; Ivanov, Boris N

    2007-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity of pea thylakoids, thylakoid membranes enriched with photosystem I (PSI-membranes), or photosystem II (PSII-membranes) as well as both supernatant and pellet after precipitation of thylakoids treated with detergent Triton X-100 were studied. CA activity of thylakoids in the presence of varying concentrations of Triton X-100 had two maxima, at Triton/chlorophyll (triton/Chl) ratios of 0.3 and 1.0. CA activities of PSI-membranes and PSII-membranes had only one maximum each, at Triton/Chl ratio 0.3 or 1.0, respectively. Two CAs with characteristics of the membrane-bound proteins and one CA with characteristics of the soluble proteins were found in the medium after thylakoids were incubated with Triton. One of the first two CAs had mobility in PAAG after native electrophoresis the same as that of CA residing in PSI-membranes, and the other CA had mobility the same as the mobility of CA residing in PSII-membranes, but the latter was different from CA situated in PSII core-complex (Ignatova et al. 2006 Biochemistry (Moscow) 71:525-532). The properties of the "soluble" CA removed from thylakoids were different from the properties of the known soluble CAs of plant cell: apparent molecular mass was about 262 kD and it was three orders more sensitive to the specific CA inhibitor, ethoxyzolamide, than soluble stromal CA. The data are discussed as indicating the presence of, at least, four CAs in pea thylakoids.

  20. Quantitative local photosynthetic flux measurements at isolated chloroplasts and thylakoid membranes using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Kim; Martin, Sophie; Robinson, Colin; Unwin, Patrick R

    2013-07-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) offers a fast and quantitative method to measure local fluxes within photosynthesis. In particular, we have measured the flux of oxygen and ferrocyanide (Fe(CN)6(4-)), from the artificial electron acceptor ferricyanide (Fe(CN)6(3-)), using a stationary ultramicroelectrode at chloroplasts and thylakoid membranes (sourced from chloroplasts). Oxygen generation at films of chloroplasts and thylakoid membranes was detected directly during photosynthesis, but in the case of thylakoid membranes, this switched to sustained oxygen consumption at longer illumination times. An initial oxygen concentration spike was detected over both chloroplast and thylakoid membrane films, and the kinetics of the oxygen generation were extracted by fitting the experimental data to a finite element method (FEM) simulation. In contrast to previous work, the oxygen generation spike was attributed to the limited size of the plastoquinone pool, a key component in the linear electron transport pathway and a contributing factor in photoinhibition. Finally, the mobile nature of the SECM probe, and its high spatial resolution, also allowed us to detect ferrocyanide produced from a single thylakoid membrane. These results further demonstrate the power of SECM for localized flux measurements in biological processes, in this case photosynthesis, and that the high time resolution, combined with FEM simulations, allows the elucidation of quantitative kinetic information.

  1. Isolation and characterization of a thylakoid membrane module showing partial light and dark reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Diksha Narhar; Sainis, Jayashree Krishna

    2005-05-15

    A functional thylakoid membrane module of photosynthesis was isolated from cell free extracts of Anacystis nidulans by stepwise sequential ultracentrifugation. The thylakoid membrane fractions sedimenting at 40,000 x g, followed by 90,000 x g and finally at 150,000 x g were collected. These fractions had all the components of electron transport chain, ATP synthase, phycobiliproteins, ferredoxin-NADP reductase but no ferredoxin. Five sequential enzymes of Calvin cycle viz phosphoriboisomerase, phosphoribulokinase, RuBP carboxylase, 3-PGA kinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were found to be associated with thylakoid membranes. Among the three different thylakoid fractions, the 150,000 x g fraction showed highest activities of these enzymes and also higher rate of whole chain electron transport activity on chlorophyll basis. An important finding was that the 150,000 x g fraction showed appreciably higher rate of R-5-P+ADP+Pi dependent CO2 fixation in light compared to the other two fractions, indicating the efficiency of this fraction in utilizing ATP for Calvin cycle. This thylakoid membrane fraction represents a fully functional module exhibiting a synchronized system of light and dark reactions of photosynthesis. Most of the components of this module remained together even after sucrose density gradient centrifugation. This is the first report on the isolation of a photosynthetic module involving membrane and soluble proteins.

  2. Carbonic anhydrase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana thylakoid membrane and fragments enriched with PSI or PSII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Lyudmila K; Rudenko, Natalia N; Mudrik, Vilen A; Fedorchuk, Tat'yana P; Ivanov, Boris N

    2011-12-01

    The procedure of isolating the thylakoids and the thylakoid membrane fragments enriched with either photosystem I or photosystem II (PSI- and PSII-membranes) from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves was developed. It differed from the one used with pea and spinach in durations of detergent treatment and centrifugation, and in concentrations of detergent and Mg(2+) in the media. Both the thylakoid and the fragments preserved carbonic anhydrase (CA) activities. Using nondenaturing electrophoresis followed by detection of CA activity in the gel stained with bromo thymol blue, one low molecular mass carrier of CA activity was found in the PSI-membranes, and two carriers, a low molecular mass one and a high molecular mass one, were found in the PSII-membranes. The proteins in the PSII-membranes differed in their sensitivity to acetazolamide (AA), a specific CA inhibitor. AA at 5 × 10(-7) M inhibited the CA activity of the high molecular mass protein but stimulated the activity of the low molecular mass carrier in the PSII-membranes. At the same concentration, AA moderately inhibited, by 30%, the CA activity of PSI-membranes. CA activity of the PSII-membranes was almost completely suppressed by the lipophilic CA inhibitor, ethoxyzolamide at 10(-9) M, whereas CA activity of the PSI-membranes was inhibited by this inhibitor even at 5 × 10(-7) M just the same as for AA. The observed distribution of CA activity in the thylakoid membranes from A. thaliana was close to the one found in the membranes of pea, evidencing the general pattern of CA activity in the thylakoid membranes of C3-plants.

  3. Distribution and dynamics of electron transport complexes in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu-Ning

    2016-03-01

    The cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane represents a system that can carry out both oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration simultaneously. The organization, interactions and mobility of components of these two electron transport pathways are indispensable to the biosynthesis of thylakoid membrane modules and the optimization of bioenergetic electron flow in response to environmental changes. These are of fundamental importance to the metabolic robustness and plasticity of cyanobacteria. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the distribution and dynamics of electron transport components in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes. Global understanding of the principles that govern the dynamic regulation of electron transport pathways in nature will provide a framework for the design and synthetic engineering of new bioenergetic machinery to improve photosynthesis and biofuel production. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Conrad Mullineaux.

  4. Correlation between spatial (3D) structure of pea and bean thylakoid membranes and arrangement of chlorophyll-protein complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rumak, Izabela; Mazur, Radoslaw; Gieczewska, Katarzyna; Koziol-Lipinska, Joanna; Kierdaszuk, Borys; Michalski, Wojtek P.; Shiell, Brian J.; Venema, Jan Henk; Vredenberg, Wim J.; Mostowska, Agnieszka; Garstka, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Background: The thylakoid system in plant chloroplasts is organized into two distinct domains: grana arranged in stacks of appressed membranes and non-appressed membranes consisting of stroma thylakoids and margins of granal stacks. It is argued that the reason for the development of appressed membr

  5. Hydroponics on a chip: analysis of the Fe deficient Arabidopsis thylakoid membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Gómez, Stephen M; Whitelegge, Julian P; Nishio, John N

    2009-04-13

    The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was used to evaluate the thylakoid membrane proteome under Fe-deficient conditions. Plants were cultivated using a novel hydroponic system, called "hydroponics on a chip", which yields highly reproducible plant tissue samples for physiological analyses, and can be easily used for in vivo stable isotope labeling. The thylakoid membrane proteome, from intact chloroplasts isolated from Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient plants grown with hydroponics on a chip, was analyzed using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Intact masses of thylakoid membrane proteins were measured, many for the first time, and several proteins were identified with post-translational modifications that were altered by Fe deficiency; for example, the doubly phosphorylated form of the photosystem II oxygen evolving complex, PSBH, increased under Fe-deficiency. Increased levels of photosystem II protein subunit PSBS were detected in the Fe-deficient samples. Antioxidant enzymes, including ascorbate peroxidase and peroxiredoxin Q, were only detected in the Fe-deficient samples. We present the first biochemical evidence that the two major LHC IIb proteins (LHCB1 and LHCB2) may have significantly different functions in the thylakoid membrane. The study illustrates the utility of intact mass proteomics as an indispensable tool for functional genomics. "Hydroponics on a chip" provides the ability to grow A. thaliana under defined conditions that will be useful for systems biology.

  6. Digalactosyl-diacylglycerol-deficiency lowers the thermal stability of thylakoid membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krumova, S.K.B.; Laptenok, S.; Kovács, L.; Toth, T.; Hoek, van A.; Garab, G.; Amerongen, van H.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of digalactosyl-diacylglycerol (DGDG) on the organization and thermal stability of thylakoid membranes, using wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the DGDG-deficient mutant, dgd1. Circular-dichroism measurements reveal that DGDG-deficiency hampers the formation of the

  7. Supramolecular Organization of Thylakoid Membranes in De-etioplasts Upon Exposure to Light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yangyang Wang; Weitong Cui; Shihua Shen; Hui Chen

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplast is the most prominent form of plastid occurring in all green plant tissues and contains a thylakoid membrane system that carries the photosynthetic electron transport chain converting light energy into chemical energy in the forms of ATP and NADPH.Thylakoids are the dominating structure inside fully mature chloroplasts.The formation and alteration of the thylakoid membrane structure and composition are closely connected to the development of the chloroplasts from simple,undifferentiated proplastids.Despite the importance of thylakoid membranes for photosynthesis and the energy metabolism of plants,the molecular processes connected to the origin,synthesis,maintenance and adaptation of thylakoid membranes remain poorly understood.In this study,the proteome difference in developing thylakoid membranes,including integral and peripheral proteins,in the process of de-etiolated rice seedlings were analyzed by 2-DE,and the structural changes and effects of such difference on photosynthetic ability were also examined.The ultrastructure of etioplasts changed notably upon exposure to light for 1 h,5 h and 9 h.After 5 h of illumination,paracrystalline PLB transformation was completed with transverse short tubules dispersed in stroma.The first stacked thylakoid membranes were observed at time point 9 h of illumination.In the continuous illumination,the formation of intergranal thylakoid was directly from PLB material without an intervening vesicular stage.In order to investigate the function and organization of the photosynthetic membrane proteins,the low-temperature (77 K) fluorescence emission spectra of membrane factions isolated from etioplasts,de-etioplasts and mature chloroplasts were investigated.The fluorescence emission spectra from de-etioplasts and mature chloroplasts exhibited a clear red maximum centered at 681 nm and a shoulder in the far-red region near 735 nm.The 681 nm band was slightly red-shifted with the increase of illumination duration

  8. Production of superoxide in chloroplast thylakoid membranes ESR study with cyclic hydroxylamines of different lipophilicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuleva, Marina; Klenina, Irina; Proskuryakov, Ivan; Kirilyuk, Igor; Ivanov, Boris

    2011-04-06

    Accumulation of nitroxide radicals, DCP· or TMT·, under illumination of a thylakoid suspension containing either hydrophilic, DCP-H, or lipophilic, TMT-H, cyclic hydroxylamines that have high rate constants of the reaction with superoxide radicals, was measured using ESR. A slower accumulation of TMT· in contrast with DCP· accumulation was explained by re-reduction of TMT· by the carriers of the photosynthetic electron transport chain within the membrane. Superoxide dismutase suppressed TMT· accumulation to a lesser extent than DCP· accumulation. The data are interpreted as evidencing the production of intramembrane superoxide in thylakoids.

  9. Anisotropic Circular Dichroism Signatures of Oriented Thylakoid Membranes and Lamellar Aggregates of LHCII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miloslavina, Y.; Hind, G.; Lambrev, P. H.; Javorfi, T.; Varkonyi, Z.; Karlicky, V.; Wall, J. S.; Garab, G.

    2011-06-12

    In photosynthesis research, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is an indispensable tool to probe molecular architecture at virtually all levels of structural complexity. At the molecular level, the chirality of the molecule results in intrinsic CD; pigment-pigment interactions in protein complexes and small aggregates can give rise to excitonic CD bands, while 'psi-type' CD signals originate from large, densely packed chiral aggregates. It has been well established that anisotropic CD (ACD), measured on samples with defined non-random orientation relative to the propagation of the measuring beam, carries specific information on the architecture of molecules or molecular macroassemblies. However, ACD is usually combined with linear dichroism and can be distorted by instrumental imperfections, which given the strong anisotropic nature of photosynthetic membranes and complexes, might be the reason why ACD is rarely studied in photosynthesis research. In this study, we present ACD spectra, corrected for linear dichroism, of isolated intact thylakoid membranes of granal chloroplasts, washed unstacked thylakoid membranes, photosystem II (PSII) membranes (BBY particles), grana patches, and tightly stacked lamellar macroaggregates of the main light-harvesting complex of PSII (LHCII). We show that the ACD spectra of face- and edge-aligned stacked thylakoid membranes and LHCII lamellae exhibit profound differences in their psi-type CD bands. Marked differences are also seen in the excitonic CD of BBY and washed thylakoid membranes. Magnetic CD (MCD) spectra on random and aligned samples, and the largely invariable nature of the MCD spectra, despite dramatic variations in the measured isotropic and anisotropic CD, testify that ACD can be measured without substantial distortions and thus employed to extract detailed information on the (supra)molecular organization of photosynthetic complexes. An example is provided showing the ability of CD data to indicate such an

  10. Anisotropic Circular Dichroism Signatures of Oriented Thylakoid Membranes and Lamellar Aggregates of LHCII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miloslavina Y.; Hind G.; Lambrev, P. H.; Javorfi, T.; Varkonyi, Z.; Karlicky, V.; Wall, J. S.; Garab, G.

    2012-03-01

    In photosynthesis research, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is an indispensable tool to probe molecular architecture at virtually all levels of structural complexity. At the molecular level, the chirality of the molecule results in intrinsic CD; pigment-pigment interactions in protein complexes and small aggregates can give rise to excitonic CD bands, while 'psi-type' CD signals originate from large, densely packed chiral aggregates. It has been well established that anisotropic CD (ACD), measured on samples with defined non-random orientation relative to the propagation of the measuring beam, carries specific information on the architecture of molecules or molecular macroassemblies. However, ACD is usually combined with linear dichroism and can be distorted by instrumental imperfections, which given the strong anisotropic nature of photosynthetic membranes and complexes, might be the reason why ACD is rarely studied in photosynthesis research. In this study, we present ACD spectra, corrected for linear dichroism, of isolated intact thylakoid membranes of granal chloroplasts, washed unstacked thylakoid membranes, photosystem II (PSII) membranes (BBY particles), grana patches, and tightly stacked lamellar macroaggregates of the main light-harvesting complex of PSII (LHCII). We show that the ACD spectra of face- and edge-aligned stacked thylakoid membranes and LHCII lamellae exhibit profound differences in their psi-type CD bands. Marked differences are also seen in the excitonic CD of BBY and washed thylakoid membranes. Magnetic CD (MCD) spectra on random and aligned samples, and the largely invariable nature of the MCD spectra, despite dramatic variations in the measured isotropic and anisotropic CD, testify that ACD can be measured without substantial distortions and thus employed to extract detailed information on the (supra)molecular organization of photosynthetic complexes. An example is provided showing the ability of CD data to indicate such an

  11. Salt-induced redox-independent phosphorylation of light harvesting chlorophyll a/b proteins in Dunaliella salina thylakoid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian-De; Shen, Yun-Gang

    2005-02-17

    This study investigated the regulation of the major light harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein (LHCII) phosphorylation in Dunaliella salina thylakoid membranes. We found that both light and NaCl could induce LHCII phosphorylation in D. salina thylakoid membranes. Treatments with oxidants (ferredoxin and NADP) or photosynthetic electron flow inhibitors (DCMU, DBMIB, and stigmatellin) inhibited LHCII phosphorylation induced by light but not that induced by NaCl. Furthermore, neither addition of CuCl(2), an inhibitor of cytochrome b(6)f complex reduction, nor oxidizing treatment with ferricyanide inhibited light- or NaCl-induced LHCII phosphorylation, and both salts even induced LHCII phosphorylation in dark-adapted D. salina thylakoid membranes as other salts did. Together, these results indicate that the redox state of the cytochrome b(6)f complex is likely involved in light- but not salt-induced LHCII phosphorylation in D. salina thylakoid membranes.

  12. Quantification of superoxide radical production in thylakoid membrane using cyclic hydroxylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuleva, Marina; Klenina, Irina; Mysin, Ivan; Kirilyuk, Igor; Opanasenko, Vera; Proskuryakov, Ivan; Ivanov, Boris

    2015-12-01

    Applicability of two lipophilic cyclic hydroxylamines (CHAs), CM-H and TMT-H, and two hydrophilic CHAs, CAT1-H and DCP-H, for detection of superoxide anion radical (O2(∙-)) produced by the thylakoid photosynthetic electron transfer chain (PETC) of higher plants under illumination has been studied. ESR spectrometry was applied for detection of the nitroxide radical originating due to CHAs oxidation by O2(∙-). CHAs and corresponding nitroxide radicals were shown to be involved in side reactions with PETC which could cause miscalculation of O2(∙-) production rate. Lipophilic CM-H was oxidized by PETC components, reducing the oxidized donor of Photosystem I, P700(+), while at the same concentration another lipophilic CHA, TMT-H, did not reduce P700(+). The nitroxide radical was able to accept electrons from components of the photosynthetic chain. Electrostatic interaction of stable cation CAT1-H with the membrane surface was suggested. Water-soluble superoxide dismutase (SOD) was added in order to suppress the reaction of CHA with O2(∙-) outside the membrane. SOD almost completely inhibited light-induced accumulation of DCP(∙), nitroxide radical derivative of hydrophilic DCP-H, in contrast to TMT(∙) accumulation. Based on the results showing that change in the thylakoid lumen pH and volume had minor effect on TMT(∙) accumulation, the reaction of TMT-H with O2(∙-) in the lumen was excluded. Addition of TMT-H to thylakoid suspension in the presence of SOD resulted in the increase in light-induced O2 uptake rate, that argued in favor of TMT-H ability to detect O2(∙-) produced within the membrane core. Thus, hydrophilic DCP-H and lipophilic TMT-H were shown to be usable for detection of O2(∙-) produced outside and within thylakoid membranes.

  13. Biochemical Properties and Inhibition Kinetics of Phosphatase from Wheat Thylakoid Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A phosphatase that hydrolyses phosphate monoesters has been isolated from wheat thylakoid membranes.Biochemical properties and inhibition kinetics of the phosphatase were investigated using several ions, organic solvents, and inhibitors. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. PH82-2-2) thylakoid membrane phosphatase activity was activated by Mg2+, Ca2+, and Fe2+ and was inhibited by Mn2+ and Cu2+. For example, enzyme activity was activated 34.81% by 2 mmol/L Mg2+, but was inhibited 22.3% and 8.5% by 2 and 1 mmol/L Cu2+, respectively.Methanol, ethanol and glycol were all able to activate enzyme activity. Enzyme activity was activated 58.5%, 48.2%,and 8.7% by 40% ethanol, methanol and glycol, respectively. From these results, it can be seen that the degree of activation of the phosphatase was greatest for ethanol and the type of activation was uncompetitive. Moreover,the activity of the thylakoid membrane phosphatase was inhibited by molybdate, vanadate, phosphate, and fluoride and the type of inhibition produced by these elements was uncompetitive, non-competitive, competitive and mixed, respectively.

  14. The supramolecular architecture, function, and regulation of thylakoid membranes in red algae: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hai-Nan; Xie, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2010-11-01

    Red algae are a group of eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms. Phycobilisomes (PBSs), which are composed of various types of phycobiliproteins and linker polypeptides, are the main light-harvesting antennae in red algae, as in cyanobacteria. Two morphological types of PBSs, hemispherical- and hemidiscoidal-shaped, are found in different red algae species. PBSs harvest solar energy and efficiently transfer it to photosystem II (PS II) and finally to photosystem I (PS I). The PS I of red algae uses light-harvesting complex of PS I (LHC I) as a light-harvesting antennae, which is phylogenetically related to the LHC I found in higher plants. PBSs, PS II, and PS I are all distributed throughout the entire thylakoid membrane, a pattern that is different from the one found in higher plants. Photosynthesis processes, especially those of the light reactions, are carried out by the supramolecular complexes located in/on the thylakoid membranes. Here, the supramolecular architecture, function and regulation of thylakoid membranes in red algal are reviewed.

  15. The evolutionarily conserved protein PHOTOSYNTHESIS AFFECTED MUTANT71 is required for efficient manganese uptake at the thylakoid membrane in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Anja; Steinberger, Iris; Herdean, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    In plants, algae, and cyanobacteria, photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the light-driven oxidation of water. The oxygen-evolving complex of PSII is a Mn4CaO5 cluster embedded in a well-defined protein environment in the thylakoid membrane. However, transport of manganese and calcium into the thylakoid...... by oxygen evolution rates) and for manganese incorporation. Manganese binding to PSII was severely reduced in pam71 thylakoids, particularly in PSII supercomplexes. In cation partitioning assays with intact chloroplasts, Mn2+ and Ca2+ ions were differently sequestered in pam71, with Ca2+ enriched in pam71...

  16. Change of proton motive force across thylakoid membrane in soybean leaf during state transitions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Change of proton gradient across thylakoid membrane in soybean leaves was studied with millisecond delayed light emission (ms-DLE) during the course of state transitions which were indicated by the chlorophyll fluorescence at room temperature and 77 K. When dark-adapted leaves were induced to stateⅠ with far-red light, Fm/Fo, F685/F735 and the intensity of fast phase of ms-DLE were affected slightly. However, during the induction to stateⅡ with red light, both Fm/Fo and F685/F735 decreased immediately and the former were quicker than the latter. In this interval, the intensity of fast phase of ms-DLE increased to a maximum and then decreased to a lower value during the transition to stateⅡ. Nigericin, an uncoupler which eliminates the proton gradient across thylakoid membrane, inhibited the increase in the intensity of fast phase of ms-DLE during the transition to stateⅡ. Another uncoupler, valinomycin, which eliminates the membrane potential, did not affect the changes of the intensity of fast phase. These results suggest that the prompt increase in the intensity of fast phase of ms-DLE at the beginning of transitions to stateⅡ is correlated mainly with the proton gradient released from water oxidation in photosystemⅡ.

  17. The role of putrescine in the regulation of proteins and fatty acids of thylakoid membranes under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Sheng; Yuan, Yinghui; Chen, Jie; Sun, Jin; Zhang, Wenhua; Tang, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Min; Guo, Shirong

    2015-10-05

    Polyamines can alleviate the inhibitory effects of salinity on plant growth by regulating photosynthetic efficiency. However, little information is available to explain the specific mechanisms underlying the contribution of polyamines to salt tolerance of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here, we investigated the role of putrescine (Put) on the photosynthetic apparatus of cucumber seedlings under salt stress. We found that NaCl stress resulted in severe ion toxicity and oxidative stress in cucumber chloroplasts. In addition, salinity caused a significant increase in the saturated fatty acid contents of thylakoid membranes. Put altered unsaturated fatty acid content, thereby alleviating the disintegration of thylakoid grana lamellae and reducing the number of plastoglobuli in thylakoid membranes. BN-PAGE revealed Put up-regulated the expression of ATP synthase, CP47, D1, Qb, and psbA proteins and down-regulated CP24, D2, and LHCII type III in NaCl-stressed thylakoid membranes. qRT-PCR analysis of gene expression was used to compare transcript and protein accumulation among 10 candidate proteins. For five of these proteins, induced transcript accumulation was consistent with the pattern of induced protein accumulation. Our results suggest that Put regulates protein expression at transcriptional and translational levels by increasing endogenous polyamines levels in thylakoid membranes, which may stabilise photosynthetic apparatus under salt stress.

  18. Nonlinear Dielectric Spectroscopy as an Indirect Probe of Metabolic Activity in Thylakoid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy (NDS is a non-invasive probe of cellular metabolic activity with potential application in the development of whole-cell biosensors. However, the mechanism of NDS interaction with metabolic membrane proteins is poorly understood, partly due to the inherent complexity of single cell organisms. Here we use the light-activated electron transport chain of spinach thylakoid membrane as a model system to study how NDS interacts with metabolic activity. We find protein modification, as opposed to membrane pump activity, to be the dominant source of NDS signal change in this system. Potential mechanisms for such protein modifications include reactive oxygen species generation and light-activated phosphorylation.

  19. A bestrophin-like protein modulates the proton motive force across the thylakoid membrane in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhikun Duan; Fanna Kong; Lin Zhang; Wenjing Li; Jiao Zhang; Lianwei Peng

    2016-01-01

    During photosynthesis, photosynthetic electron transport generates a proton motive force (pmf) across the thylakoid membrane, which is used for ATP biosynthesis via ATP synthase in the chloroplast. The pmf is composed of an electric potential (DC) and an osmotic component (DpH). Partitioning between these components in chloroplasts is strictly regulated in response to fluctuating environments. However, our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that regulate pmf partitioning is limited. Here, we report a bestrophin-like protein (AtBest), which is critical for pmf partitioning. While the DpH component was slightly reduced in atbest, the DC component was much greater in this mutant than in the wild type, resulting in less efficient activation of nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) upon both illumination and a shift from low light to high light. Although no visible phenotype was observed in the atbest mutant in the greenhouse, this mutant exhibited stronger photoinhibition than the wild type when grown in the field. AtBest belongs to the bestrophin family proteins, which are believed to function as chloride (Cl?) channels. Thus, our findings reveal an important Cl? channel required for ion transport and homeo-stasis across the thylakoid membrane in higher plants. These processes are essential for fine-tuning photosynthesis under fluctuating environmental conditions.

  20. Selective nitration of PsbO1 inhibits oxygen evolution from isolated Arabidopsis thylakoid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Misa; Shigeto, Jun; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Morikawa, Hiromichi

    2017-04-03

    Treatment of isolated Arabidopsis thaliana thylakoid membranes with nitrogen dioxide (NO2) induces selective nitration of the tyrosine residue at the ninth amino acid ((9)Tyr) of PsbO1. This selective nitration is triggered by light and is inhibited by photosynthetic electron transport inhibitors. Therefore, we postulated that, similar to (161)Tyr of D1 (YZ), (9)Tyr of PsbO1 is redox active and is selectively oxidized by photosynthetic electron transport in response to illumination to a tyrosyl radical that is highly susceptible to nitration. This tyrosyl radical may combine rapidly at diffusion-controlled rates with NO2 to form 3-nitrotyrosine. If this postulation is correct, the nitration of (9)Tyr of PsbO1 should decrease oxygen evolution activity. We investigated the effects of PsbO1 nitration on oxygen evolution from isolated thylakoid membranes, and found that nitration decreased oxygen evolution to ≥ 0% of the control. Oxygen evolution and nitration were significantly negatively correlated. This finding is consistent with redox active properties of the (9)Tyr gene of PsbO1, and suggests that PsbO1 (9)Tyr acts as an electron relay, such as YZ in the photosystem II oxygenic electron transport chain.

  1. Relationships between unsaturation of thylakoid membrane lipids and xanthophyll cycle in rice under chilling and high light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To explore the differences of chilling induced sensitivity to photoinhibition between indica and japonica, xanthophyll cycle component, activity of violaxanthin deepoxidase (VDE), and unsaturation of thylakoid membrane lipids were measured. Varieties used were japonica 9516 and indica Shanyou 63 (SY 63).

  2. Ribosomal protein S6 kinase1 coordinates with TOR-Raptor2 to regulate thylakoid membrane biosynthesis in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Linxiao; Yu, Yonghua; Hu, Weiqin; Min, Qiming; Kang, Huiling; Li, Yilu; Hong, Yue; Wang, Xuemin; Hong, Yueyun

    2016-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K) functions as a key component in the target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway involved in multiple processes in eukaryotes. The role and regulation of TOR-S6K in lipid metabolism remained unknown in plants. Here we provide genetic and pharmacological evidence that TOR-Raptor2-S6K1 is important for thylakoid galactolipid biosynthesis and thylakoid grana modeling in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Genetic suppression of S6K1 caused pale yellow-green leaves, defective thylakoid grana architecture. S6K1 directly interacts with Raptor2, a core component in TOR signaling, and S6K1 activity is regulated by Raptor2 and TOR. Plants with suppressed Raptor2 expression or reduced TOR activity by inhibitors mimicked the S6K1-deficient phenotype. A significant reduction in galactolipid content was found in the s6k1, raptor2 mutant or TOR-inhibited plants, which was accompanied by decreased transcript levels of the set of genes such as lipid phosphate phosphatase α5 (LPPα5), MGDG synthase 1 (MGD1), and DGDG synthase 1 (DGD1) involved in galactolipid synthesis, compared to the control plants. Moreover, loss of LPPα5 exhibited a similar phenotype with pale yellow-green leaves. These results suggest that TOR-Raptor2-S6K1 is important for modulating thylakoid membrane lipid biosynthesis, homeostasis, thus enhancing thylakoid grana architecture and normal photosynthesis ability in rice.

  3. Loss of the SPHF homologue Slr1768 leads to a catastrophic failure in the maintenance of thylakoid membranes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J Bryan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In cyanobacteria the photosystems are localised to, and maintained in, specialist membranes called the thylakoids. The mechanism driving the biogenesis of the thylakoid membranes is still an open question, with only two potential biogenesis factors, Vipp1 and Alb3 currently identified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated a slr1768 knockout using the pGEM T-easy vector and REDIRECT. By comparing growth and pigment content (chlorophyll a fluoresence of the Δslr1768 mutant with the wild-type, we found that Δslr1768 has a conditional phenotype; specifically under high light conditions (130 µmol m(-2 s(-1 thylakoid biogenesis is disrupted leading to cell death on a scale of days. The thylakoids show considerable disruption, with loss of both structure and density, while chlorophyll a density decreases with the loss of thylakoids, although photosynthetic efficiency is unaffected. Under low light (30 µmol m(-2 s(-1 the phenotype is significantly reduced, with a growth rate similar to the wild-type and only a low frequency of cells with evident thylakoid disruption. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first example of a gene that affects the maintenance of the thylakoid membranes specifically under high light, and which displays a phenotype dependent on light intensity. Our results demonstrate that Slr1768 has a leading role in acclimatisation, linking light damage with maintenance of the thylakoids.

  4. Changes in Unsaturated Levels of Fatty Acids in Thylakoid PSⅡ Membrane Lipids During Chilling-induced Resistance in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Qin Zhu; Chun-Mei Yu; Xin-Yan Liu; Ben-Hua Ji; De-Mao Jiao

    2007-01-01

    Temperature is one of the abiotic factors limiting growth and productivity of plants. In the present work, the effect of low non-freezing temperature, as an inducer of "chilling resistance", was studied in three cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa L.), japonica cv. 9516 (j-9516), the two parental lines of superhigh-yield hybrid rice between subspecies,Peiai/E32 (ji-PE), and the traditional indica hybrid rice Shanyou 63 (i-SY63). Leaves of chill-treated rice showed chilling-induced resistance, as an increase of their low-temperature tolerance was measured using chlorophyll fluorescence measurements, revealing a change in photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ) efficiency. After 5 d of exposure to 11℃ under low light (100 μ mol·m-2·s-1), levels of unsaturated fatty acids in PSⅡ thylakoid membrane lipids decreased during the initial 1-2 d, then increased slowly and reached 99.2%, 95.3% and 90.1% of the initial value (0 d) in j-9516,ji-PE and i-SY63, respectively, on the fifth day. However, under medium light (600 μmol·m-2·s-1), all cultivars experienced similar substantial photoinhibition, which approached steady state levels after a decline in levels of unsaturated fatty acids in PSII thylakoid membrane lipids to about 57.1%, 53.8% and 44.5% of the initial values (0 d) in j-9516,ji-PE and i-SY63 on the fifth day. Under either chilling-induced resistance (the former) or low temperature photoinhibition (the latter) conditions, the changes of other physiological parameters such as D1 protein contents,electron transport activities of PSII (ETA), Fv/Fm, xanthophyl cycle activities expressed by DES (deepoxide state)were consistent with that of levels of unsaturated fatty acids in PSⅡ thylakoid membrane lipids. So there were negative correlations between saturated levels of fatty acids (16:1(3t), 16:0, 18:0), especially the 16:1(3t) fatty acid on thylakoid membrane and other physiological parameters, such as D1 protein contents, ETA and (A+Z)/(A+V+Z). A specific role of

  5. 植物叶绿体类囊体膜及膜蛋白研究进展%Progress in chloroplast thylakoid membrane and membrane proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡锋; 黄俊丽; 秦峰; 岳彩黎; 王贵学

    2011-01-01

    In plants and eukaryotic algae, photosynthesis takes place in chloroplasts. Light reaction occurs in the thylakoid membranes. Thylakoid membranes contain integral and peripheral membrane protein complexes,including the pigments that absorb light energy, which form the photosystems. Much attention has been focused on the thylakoid membranes because of its significance in photosynthesis. Analysis of thylakoid membranes will benefit the study of photosynthetic mechanism. The present review summarizes the three-dimensional conformation,membrane protein composition and function of thylakoid membranes.%叶绿体是植物和真核藻类进行光合作用的场所.存在于叶绿体类囊体膜上的蛋白质复合物含有光反应所需的光合色素和电子传递链组分,在光合作用过程中,光化学反应发生在类囊体膜上.因此,类囊体膜是光能向化学能转化的主要场所,因而也一直是光合作用研究的热点.叶绿体类囊体膜的深入研究可以促进光合作用的分子机理研究.该文就叶绿体类囊体膜的三维构象及类囊体膜蛋白的组成和功能研究进行了综述.

  6. Dynamic flexibility in the structure and function of photosystem II in higher plant thylakoid membranes: the grana enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jan M; Chow, Wah Soon; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Grana are not essential for photosynthesis, yet they are ubiquitous in higher plants and in the recently evolved Charaphyta algae; hence grana role and its need is still an intriguing enigma. This article discusses how the grana provide integrated and multifaceted functional advantages, by facilitating mechanisms that fine-tune the dynamics of the photosynthetic apparatus, with particular implications for photosystem II (PSII). This dynamic flexibility of photosynthetic membranes is advantageous in plants responding to ever-changing environmental conditions, from darkness or limiting light to saturating light and sustained or intermittent high light. The thylakoid dynamics are brought about by structural and organizational changes at the level of the overall height and number of granal stacks per chloroplast, molecular dynamics within the membrane itself, the partition gap between appressed membranes within stacks, the aqueous lumen encased by the continuous thylakoid membrane network, and even the stroma bathing the thylakoids. The structural and organizational changes of grana stacks in turn are driven by physicochemical forces, including entropy, at work in the chloroplast. In response to light, attractive van der Waals interactions and screening of electrostatic repulsion between appressed grana thylakoids across the partition gap and most probably direct protein interactions across the granal lumen (PSII extrinsic proteins OEEp-OEEp, particularly PsbQ-PsbQ) contribute to the integrity of grana stacks. We propose that both the light-induced contraction of the partition gap and the granal lumen elicit maximisation of entropy in the chloroplast stroma, thereby enhancing carbon fixation and chloroplast protein synthesizing capacity. This spatiotemporal dynamic flexibility in the structure and function of active and inactive PSIIs within grana stacks in higher plant chloroplasts is vital for the optimization of photosynthesis under a wide range of environmental and

  7. Arabidopsis CHL27, located in both envelope and thylakoid membranes, is required for the synthesis of protochlorophyllide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tottey, Stephen; Block, Maryse A; Allen, Michael; Westergren, Tomas; Albrieux, Catherine; Scheller, Henrik V; Merchant, Sabeeha; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2003-12-23

    CHL27, the Arabidopsis homologue to Chlamydomonas Crd1, a plastid-localized putative diiron protein, is required for the synthesis of protochlorophyllide and therefore is a candidate subunit of the aerobic cyclase in chlorophyll biosynthesis. delta-Aminolevulinic acid-fed antisense Arabidopsis plants with reduced amounts of Crd1/CHL27 accumulate Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester, the substrate of the cyclase reaction. Mutant plants have chlorotic leaves with reduced abundance of all chlorophyll proteins. Fractionation of Arabidopsis chloroplast membranes shows that Crd1/CHL27 is equally distributed on a membrane-weight basis in the thylakoid and inner-envelope membranes.

  8. N-terminal structure of maize ferredoxin:NADP+ reductase determines recruitment into different thylakoid membrane complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twachtmann, Manuel; Altmann, Bianca; Muraki, Norifumi; Voss, Ingo; Okutani, Satoshi; Kurisu, Genji; Hase, Toshiharu; Hanke, Guy T

    2012-07-01

    To adapt to different light intensities, photosynthetic organisms manipulate the flow of electrons through several alternative pathways at the thylakoid membrane. The enzyme ferredoxin:NADP(+) reductase (FNR) has the potential to regulate this electron partitioning because it is integral to most of these electron cascades and can associate with several different membrane complexes. However, the factors controlling relative localization of FNR to different membrane complexes have not yet been established. Maize (Zea mays) contains three chloroplast FNR proteins with totally different membrane association, and we found that these proteins have variable distribution between cells conducting predominantly cyclic electron transport (bundle sheath) and linear electron transport (mesophyll). Here, the crystal structures of all three enzymes were solved, revealing major structural differences at the N-terminal domain and dimer interface. Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana of maize FNRs as chimeras and truncated proteins showed the N-terminal determines recruitment of FNR to different membrane complexes. In addition, the different maize FNR proteins localized to different thylakoid membrane complexes on expression in Arabidopsis, and analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence and photosystem I absorbance demonstrates the impact of FNR location on photosynthetic electron flow.

  9. Herbicides affect fluorescence and electron transfer activity of spinach chloroplasts, thylakoid membranes and isolated Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrella, Andrea; Catucci, Lucia; Agostiano, Angela

    2010-08-01

    In this work, studies on the effects produced by atrazine, terbutryn or diuron onto spinach photosynthetic materials were performed by observing changes in fluorescence emission and in electron transfer activities of the bio-samples in the presence of such herbicides; chloroplasts, thylakoids, Photosystem II-enriched thylakoids (BBYs) and isolated Photosystem II (PSII) were employed. This approach evidenced differences in the herbicide-photosynthetic material interactions going up-down from chloroplasts to proteins. Rapid emission increments were detected for chloroplasts and thylakoids, in particular in the presence of terbutryn; no remarkable emission increment was recorded when BBYs or PSII were used for this assay. The dependences of the chloroplast and thylakoid emission intensities upon herbicide concentration were investigated with responses even at concentrations below 10(-7)M. The influence of lowering the temperature was also tested, and the stabilizing effects on the resistances of the bio-samples against herbicides were recorded. Furthermore, Hill Reaction-based colorimetric assays were performed to monitor the electron transfer activities of the bio-samples in the presence of herbicides, after brief incubations. As a result, chloroplasts and thylakoids resulted to be sensitive tools in responding to concentrations even lower than 10(-7)M of most herbicides; nevertheless, an interesting sensitivity to herbicides was also observed for PSII. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol deficiency in Arabidopsis affects pigment composition in the prolamellar body and impairs thylakoid membrane energization and photoprotection in leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronsson, Henrik; Schöttler, Mark A; Kelly, Amélie A; Sundqvist, Christer; Dörmann, Peter; Karim, Sazzad; Jarvis, Paul

    2008-09-01

    Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) is the major lipid constituent of chloroplast membranes and has been proposed to act directly in several important plastidic processes, particularly during photosynthesis. In this study, the effect of MGDG deficiency, as observed in the monogalactosyldiacylglycerol synthase1-1 (mgd1-1) mutant, on chloroplast protein targeting, phototransformation of pigments, and photosynthetic light reactions was analyzed. The targeting of plastid proteins into or across the envelope, or into the thylakoid membrane, was not different from wild-type in the mgd1 mutant, suggesting that the residual amount of MGDG in mgd1 was sufficient to maintain functional targeting mechanisms. In dark-grown plants, the ratio of bound protochlorophyllide (Pchlide, F656) to free Pchlide (F631) was increased in mgd1 compared to the wild type. Increased levels of the photoconvertible pigment-protein complex (F656), which is photoprotective and suppresses photooxidative damage caused by an excess of free Pchlide, may be an adaptive response to the mgd1 mutation. Leaves of mgd1 suffered from a massively impaired capacity for thermal dissipation of excess light due to an inefficient operation of the xanthophyll cycle; the mutant contained less zeaxanthin and more violaxanthin than wild type after 60 min of high-light exposure and suffered from increased photosystem II photoinhibition. This is attributable to an increased conductivity of the thylakoid membrane at high light intensities, so that the proton motive force is reduced and the thylakoid lumen is less acidic than in wild type. Thus, the pH-dependent activation of the violaxanthin de-epoxidase and of the PsbS protein is impaired.

  11. Small-angle neutron scattering study of the ultrastructure of chloroplast thylakoid membranes - Periodicity and structural flexibility of the stroma lamellae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posselt, Dorthe; Nagy, Gergely; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J. K.

    2012-01-01

    The multilamellar organization of freshly isolated spinach and pea chloroplast thylakoid membranes was studied using small-angle neutron scattering. A broad peak at similar to 0.02 angstrom(-1) is ascribed to diffraction from domains of ordered, unappressed stroma lamellae, revealing a repeat dis...

  12. Changes in antenna sizes of photosystems during state transitions in granal and stroma-exposed thylakoid membrane of intact chloroplasts in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunchul; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Kumazaki, Shigeichi

    2015-04-01

    In chloroplasts of plants and algae, state transition is an important regulatory mechanism to maintain the excitation balance between PSI and PSII in the thylakoid membrane. Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) plays a key role as the regulated energy distributor between PSI and PSII. It is widely accepted that LHCII, which is bound to PSII localized mainly in the granal thylakoid, migrates to bind with PSI localized mainly in the stroma-exposed thylakoid under preferential excitation of PSII. The phenomena have been extensively characterized by many methods. However, the exchange of LHCII between PSII and PSI has not been directly observed in vivo at physiological temperatures. Herein we applied fluorescence spectromicroscopy to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts in order to observe in vivo changes in fluorescence spectra of granal and stromal thylakoid regions during the state transition. The microscopic fluorescence spectra obtained from a few sections with different depths were decomposed into PSI and PSII spectra and self-absorption effects were removed. We were able to determine amplitude changes of PSI and PSII in fluorescence spectra solely due to state transition. Subdomain analysis of granal and stromal thylakoid regions clarified variant behaviors in the different regions.

  13. Fingerprinting the macro-organisation of pigment-protein complexes in plant thylakoid membranes in vivo by circular-dichroism spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Tünde N; Rai, Neha; Solymosi, Katalin; Zsiros, Ottó; Schröder, Wolfgang P; Garab, Győző; van Amerongen, Herbert; Horton, Peter; Kovács, László

    2016-09-01

    Macro-organisation of the protein complexes in plant thylakoid membranes plays important roles in the regulation and fine-tuning of photosynthetic activity. These delicate structures might, however, undergo substantial changes during isolating the thylakoid membranes or during sample preparations, e.g., for electron microscopy. Circular-dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a non-invasive technique which can thus be used on intact samples. Via excitonic and psi-type CD bands, respectively, it carries information on short-range excitonic pigment-pigment interactions and the macro-organisation (chiral macrodomains) of pigment-protein complexes (psi, polymer or salt-induced). In order to obtain more specific information on the origin of the major psi-type CD bands, at around (+)506, (-)674 and (+)690nm, we fingerprinted detached leaves and isolated thylakoid membranes of wild-type and mutant plants and also tested the effects of different environmental conditions in vivo. We show that (i) the chiral macrodomains disassemble upon mild detergent treatments, but not after crosslinking the protein complexes; (ii) in different wild-type leaves of dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous angiosperms the CD features are quite robust, displaying very similar excitonic and psi-type bands, suggesting similar protein composition and (macro-) organisation of photosystem II (PSII) supercomplexes in the grana; (iii) the main positive psi-type bands depend on light-harvesting protein II contents of the membranes; (iv) the (+)506nm band appears only in the presence of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes and does not depend on the xanthophyll composition of the membranes. Hence, CD spectroscopy can be used to detect different macro-domains in the thylakoid membranes with different outer antenna compositions in vivo.

  14. Light-triggered selective nitration of PsbO1 in isolated Arabidopsis thylakoid membranes is inhibited by photosynthetic electron transport inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Misa; Shigeto, Jun; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Morikawa, Hiromichi

    2016-12-01

    PsbO1 is exclusively nitrated when isolated thylakoid membranes are incubated in a buffer bubbled with nitrogen dioxide (NO2) containing NO2 and nitrite. NO2 is the primary intermediate for this selective nitration. Isolated thylakoid membranes were incubated in NO2-bubbled buffer at 25°C in the light or dark. Protein analysis confirmed the selective nitration of PsbO1. Illumination was found to be essential in PsbO1 nitration. A nitration mechanism whereby nitratable tyrosine residues of PsbO1 are, prior to nitration, selectively photo-oxidized by photosynthetic electron transport to tyrosyl radicals to combine with NO2 to form 3-nitrotyrosine was hypothesized. We tested the electron transport inhibitors 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1- dimethylurea, sodium azide, and 1,5-diphenylcarbazide and found distinct inhibition of nitration of PsbO1. We also propose a possible nitration mechanism.

  15. A fluorescence detected magnetic resonance investigation of the carotenoid triplet states associated with Photosystem II of isolated spinach thylakoid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Santabarbara, S; Carbonera, D; Heathcote, P

    2005-01-01

    The carotenoid triplet populations associated with the fluorescence emission chlorophyll forms of Photosystem II have been investigated in isolated spinach thylakoid membranes by means of fluorescence detected magnetic resonance in zero field (FDMR). The spectra collected in the 680-690 nm emission range, have been fitted by a global analysis procedure. At least five different carotenoid triplet states coupled to the terminal emitting chlorophyll forms of PS II, peaking at 682 nm, 687 nm and 692 nm, have been characterised. The triplets associated with the outer antenna emission forms, at 682 nm, have zero field splitting parameters D = 0.0385 cm/sup -1/, E = 0.00367 cm/sup -1/; D = 0.0404 cm/sup -1/, E = 0.00379 cm/sup -1/ and D = 0.0386 cm/sup -1/, E = 0.00406 cm/sup -1/ which are very similar to those previously reported for the xanthophylls of the isolated LHC II complex. Therefore the FDMR spectra recorded in this work provide insights into the organisation of the LHC II complex in the unperturbed enviro...

  16. Research on the ultrafast fluorescence property of thylakoid membranes of the wild-type and mutant rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任兆玉; 许晓明; 王水才; 辛越勇; 贺俊芳; 侯洵

    2003-01-01

    A high yielding rice variety mutant (Oryza sativa L., Zhenhui 249) with low chlorophyll b (Chl b) has been discovered in natural fields. It has a quality character controlled by a pair of recessive genes (nuclear gene). The partial loss of Chl b in content affects the efficiency of light harvest in a light harvest complex (LHC), thus producing the difference of the exciting energy transfer and the efficiency of photochemistry conversion between the mutant and wild-type rice in photosynthetic unit. The efficiency of utilizing light energy is higher in the mutant than that in the wildtype rice relatively. For further discussion of the above-mentioned difference and learning about the mechanism of the increase in the photochemical efficiency of the mutant, the pico-second resolution fluorescence spectrum measurement with delay-frame-scanning single photon counting technique is adopted. Thylakoid membranes of the mutant and the wild-type rice are excited by an Ar+ laser with a pulse width of 120ps, repetition rate of 4MHz and wavelength of 514nm. Compared with the time and spectrum property of exciting fluorescence, conclusions of those ultrafast dynamic experiments are: 1) The speeds of the exciting energy transferred in photo-system I are faster than that in photo-system II in both samples. 2) The speeds of the exciting energy transfer of mutant sample are faster than those of the wildtype. This might be one of the major reasons why the efficiency of photosynthesis is higher in mutant than that in the wild-type rice.

  17. The effect of microgravity on proton permeability of thylakoid membranes and contribution of II and I photosystems in photosynthetic electron transport in pea chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotareva, E K; Onoiko, E B; Sytnik, S K; Podorvanov, V V

    1999-07-01

    According to a number investigations microgravity conditions affect membrane apparatus of photosynthesis in cells of higher plants and alga [for review, see Kordyum et al., 1994; Kordyum, 1997]. (see for review). Chloroplasts of space-grown pea plants showed disintegration of grana, shrinkage of the membrane constituting the grana stacks and other structural perturbance of the photosynthetic membranes. However there have been no studies on the effect of microgravity on proton permeability of thylakoid membranes and closely connected with this parameter their photochemical characteristics. The aim of the study is investigation of microgravity effects on protonic permeability of photosynthetic membrane and contribution of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI) in electron transfer from water to potassium ferrycianide (FeCy) in isolated pea chloroplasts. Pea.

  18. Adaptational changes in the lipids and fatty acid profile of the cell and thylakoid membrane of rice plants exposed to sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Janet F; Sharma, Prabhat Kumar

    2010-07-01

    Adaptational changes occurring in the lipids and fatty acids of the cell and the thylakoid membrane in response to high light treatment, was studied in 30 days old rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Jyothi) plants grown under low (150-200 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) or moderate (600-800 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) light conditions. Results were compared with rice plants grown in high (1200-2200 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) light conditions. Exposure of rice plants and isolated chloroplast to high light, resulted in an increase in the amount of malonaldehyde, indicating oxidation of membrane lipids. Qualitative and quantitative changes in the phosphoglycolipids and quantitative changes in neutral lipids were observed in rice plants grown under the different growth conditions. A few of the phosphoglycolipids and neutral lipids were present exclusively in plants grown at low or moderate or high light, indicating requirement of different type of lipid composition of rice plants in response to their different growth irradiances. However, no significant quantitative changes were observed in the different saturated and unsaturated fatty acid groups of total lipids in low, moderate and high light grown rice plants, as a result of exposure to high light. No qualitative changes in the fatty acid composition due to difference in growth irradiance or high light treatment were seen. The changes observed in the phosphoglycolipids and neutral lipid composition of cell and thylakoid membrane of low, moderate and high light grown rice plants in response to high light, are probably the result of physiological changes in the rice plants, to sustain optimum structure and function of the cell and thylakoid membrane to maintain active physiological functions to endure high light conditions.

  19. The synthesis of NPQ-effective zeaxanthin depends on the presence of a transmembrane proton gradient and a slightly basic stromal side of the thylakoid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Reimund; Opitz, Christian; Lepetit, Bernard; Wilhelm, Christian

    2008-11-01

    In the present study we address the question which factors during the synthesis of zeaxanthin determine its capacity to act as a non-photochemical quencher of chlorophyll fluorescence. Our results show that zeaxanthin has to be synthesized in the presence of a transmembrane proton gradient. However, it is not essential that the proton gradient is generated by the light-driven electron transport. NPQ-effective zeaxanthin can also be formed by an artificial proton gradient in the dark due to ATP hydrolysis. Zeaxanthin that is synthesized in the dark in the absence of a proton gradient by the low pH-dependent activation of violaxanthin de-epoxidase is not able to induce NPQ. The second important factor during the synthesis of zeaxanthin is the pH-value of the stromal side of the thylakoid membrane. Here we show that the stromal side has to be neutral or slightly basic in order to generate zeaxanthin which is able to induce NPQ. Thylakoid membranes in reaction medium pH 5.2, which experience low pH-values on both sides of the membrane, are unable to generate NPQ-effective zeaxanthin, even in the presence of an additional light-driven proton gradient. Analysing the pigment contents of purified photosystem II light-harvesting complexes we are further able to show that the NPQ ineffectiveness of zeaxanthin formed in the absence of a proton gradient is not caused by changes in its rebinding to the light-harvesting proteins. Purified monomeric and trimeric light-harvesting complexes contain comparable amounts of zeaxanthin when they are isolated from thylakoid membranes enriched in either NPQ-effective or ineffective zeaxanthin.

  20. Reciprocal regulation of protein synthesis and carbon metabolism for thylakoid membrane biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra-Viola Bohne

    Full Text Available Metabolic control of gene expression coordinates the levels of specific gene products to meet cellular demand for their activities. This control can be exerted by metabolites acting as regulatory signals and/or a class of metabolic enzymes with dual functions as regulators of gene expression. However, little is known about how metabolic signals affect the balance between enzymatic and regulatory roles of these dual functional proteins. We previously described the RNA binding activity of a 63 kDa chloroplast protein from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which has been implicated in expression of the psbA mRNA, encoding the D1 protein of photosystem II. Here, we identify this factor as dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (DLA2, a subunit of the chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (cpPDC, which is known to provide acetyl-CoA for fatty acid synthesis. Analyses of RNAi lines revealed that DLA2 is involved in the synthesis of both D1 and acetyl-CoA. Gel filtration analyses demonstrated an RNP complex containing DLA2 and the chloroplast psbA mRNA specifically in cells metabolizing acetate. An intrinsic RNA binding activity of DLA2 was confirmed by in vitro RNA binding assays. Results of fluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation experiments support a role of DLA2 in acetate-dependent localization of the psbA mRNA to a translation zone within the chloroplast. Reciprocally, the activity of the cpPDC was specifically affected by binding of psbA mRNA. Beyond that, in silico analysis and in vitro RNA binding studies using recombinant proteins support the possibility that RNA binding is an ancient feature of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferases. Our results suggest a regulatory function of DLA2 in response to growth on reduced carbon energy sources. This raises the intriguing possibility that this regulation functions to coordinate the synthesis of lipids and proteins for the biogenesis of photosynthetic membranes.

  1. The transporter SynPAM71 is located in the plasma membrane and thylakoids, and mediates manganese tolerance in Synechocystis PCC6803

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandini, Chiara; Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Husted, Søren

    2017-01-01

    symptoms were observed in WT cells exposed to excess Mn. Moreover, CyanoP, which is involved in the early steps of PSII assembly, is massively upregulated in ΔSynPAM71. SynPAM71 was detected in both the plasma membrane and, to a lesser extent, the thylakoid membranes. Our results suggest that SynPAM71...... to chloroplast Mn homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we characterize the function of its homolog in Synechocystis (SynPAM71). We used a loss-of-function line (ΔSynPAM71), wild-type (WT) cells exposed to Mn stress and strains expressing a tagged variant of SynPAM71 to characterize the role of SynPAM71...... in cyanobacterial Mn homeostasis. The ΔSynPAM71 strain displays an Mn-sensitive phenotype with reduced levels of chlorophyll and PSI accumulation, defects in PSII photochemistry and intracellular Mn enrichment, particularly in the thylakoid membranes. These effects are attributable to Mn toxicity, as very similar...

  2. Quality control of Photosystem II: the mechanisms for avoidance and tolerance of light and heat stresses are closely linked to membrane fluidity of the thylakoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasusi Yamamoto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available When oxygenic photosynthetic organisms are exposed to excessive light and/or heat, Photosystem II is damaged and electron transport is blocked. In these events, reactive oxygen species, endogenous radicals and lipid peroxidation products generated by photochemical reaction and/or heat cause the damage. Regarding light stress, plants first dissipate excessive light energy captured by light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complexes as heat to avoid the hazards, but once light stress is unavoidable, they tolerate the stress by concentrating damage in a particular protein in photosystem II, i.e. the reaction-center binding D1 protein of Photosystem II. The damaged D1 is removed by specific proteases and replaced with a new copy produced through de novo synthesis (reversible photoinhibition. When light intensity becomes extremely high, irreversible aggregation of D1 occurs and thereby D1 turnover is prevented. Once the aggregated products accumulate in Photosystem II complexes, removal of them by proteases is difficult, and irreversible inhibition of Photosystem II takes place (irreversible photoinhibition. Important is that various aspects of both the reversible and irreversible photoinhibition are highly dependent on the membrane fluidity of the thylakoids. Heat stress-induced inactivation of photosystem II is an irreversible process, which may be also affected by the fluidity of the thylakoid membranes. Here I describe why the membrane fluidity is a key to regulate the avoidance and tolerance of Photosystem II on environmental stresses.

  3. Electrospun superhydrophobic membranes with unique structures for membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuan; Loh, Chun-Heng; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G

    2014-09-24

    With modest temperature demand, low operating pressure, and high solute rejection, membrane distillation (MD) is an attractive option for desalination, waste treatment, and food and pharmaceutical processing. However, large-scale practical applications of MD are still hindered by the absence of effective membranes with high hydrophobicity, high porosity, and adequate mechanical strength, which are important properties for MD permeation fluxes, stable long-term performance, and effective packing in modules without damage. This study describes novel design strategies for highly robust superhydrophobic dual-layer membranes for MD via electrospinning. One of the newly developed membranes comprises a durable and ultrathin 3-dimensional (3D) superhydrophobic skin and porous nanofibrous support whereas another was fabricated by electrospinning 3D superhydrophobic layers on a nonwoven support. These membranes exhibit superhydrophobicity toward distilled water, salty water, oil-in-water emulsion, and beverages, which enables them to be used not only for desalination but also for other processes. The superhydrophobic dual-layer membrane #3S-N with nanofibrous support has a competitive permeation flux of 24.6 ± 1.2 kg m(-2) h(-1) in MD (feed and permeate temperate were set as 333 and 293 K, respectively) due to the higher porosity of the nanofibrous scaffold. Meanwhile, the membranes with the nonwoven support exhibit greater mechanical strength due to this support combined with better long-term performance because of the thicker 3D superhydrophobic layers. The morphology, pore size, porosity, mechanical properties, and liquid enter pressure of water of these superhydrophobic composite membranes with two different structures are reported and compared with commercial polyvinylidene fluoride membranes.

  4. Spectroelectrochemistry of P700 in native photosystem I particles and diethyl ether-treated thylakoid membranes from spinach and Thermosynechococcus elongatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanrong; Nakamura, Akimasa; Kuroiwa, Yoshinori; Kato, Yuki; Watanabe, Tadashi

    2008-04-02

    The redox potentials (E(composite function')) of P700 in intact and diethyl ether-treated thylakoid membranes as well as native photosystem (PS) I particles from spinach and Thermosynechococcus elongatus have been measured by a spectroelectrochemistry with an error range of +/-2-3 mV. Stepwise removal of antenna pigments by ether treatment caused distinct shifts of the E( composite function') value with increasing degree of water saturation in ether; negatively from +471 to +428 mV for spinach, but positively from +423 to +436 mV for T. elongatus. Such a contrasting behavior is discussed by invoking the mode of action of ether on the microenvironments around P700.

  5. Interdependence between oscillations and transients of delayed fluorescence induction processes in the thylakoid membrane of the intact maize leaf: Responses to effects of increased temperatures and drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radenović Čedomir N.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard induction processes of delayed fluorescence (DF of chlorophyll (induction signals occur when an intact leaf segment of maize inbreds and hybrids is kept in the phosphoroscope darkroom for more than 15 minutes (t > 15 min, and at the same time the leaf is illuminated with the intermittent white light. Resolved induction processes of DF chlorophyll into transients: A, B, C, D and E occur when the intact leaf segment of maize inbreds and hybrids is kept in the phosphoroscope darkroom for a significantly shorter period (500 s > t > 30 s, with the time rate t of 30 s, prior to its illumination with the intermittent white light. Induction transients: A, B, C, D and E are characterized with the time of their generation: tA = 31±6 ms (A, tB = 5 ± 0,5 s (B, tC = 15±5 s (C, tD = 360±20 s (D and tE = 670±35 s (E, dynamics of changes in transients intensities (IA, IB, IC, ID and IE and mechanisms of their generation. The induction processes of chlorophyll DF of the intact leaf of maize inbreds and hybrids resolved into transients: A, B, C, D and E are accompanied by the occurrence and different levels of activation energy (Ea, kJ mol-1 that correspond to critical temperatures ranging from 28 to 33°C. The generation mechanisms of induction transients A, B, C, D and E classify them into two groups. Transients A and B are of a physical character, while the transients: C, D, and E are of a chemical character. It is shown that the generation of the induction transients: B, C, D and E simultaneously follows establishing of the oscillations of induction processes of the DF chlorophyll. Oscillating of induction processes of DF chlorophyll is explained by the ion (K+, Na+, H+, Cl- transport mechanism across the thylakoid membrane of the intact leaf of maize inbreds and hybrids grown under conditions of air drought, increased temperatures and water deficiency in the medium.

  6. Superoxide production in aprotic interior of chloroplast thylakoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M; Asada, K

    1988-12-01

    The site of superoxide production in spinach thylakoids was found to be the aprotic interior of the thylakoid membranes near the P700 chlorophyll a protein at the reaction center of photosystem I complexes. This conclusion was drawn from the following findings. (i) Cytochrome c reduction by illuminated thylakoids, which was confirmed to be superoxide dependent by the failure of this reaction to occur in anaerobiosis, was completely inhibited by a dibutyl catechol, but partially inhibited by a hydrophilic disulfonated derivative. (ii) P700 chlorophyll a proteins were preferentially iodinated by lactoperoxidase by the use of hydrogen peroxide that was derived from the disproportionation of superoxides in illuminated thylakoids. (iii) Hydrogen peroxide production and oxygen uptake were induced by ammonium chloride, a proton conductor that can permeate through thylakoid membranes, but whole superoxide in the bulk solution was oxidized back to molecular oxygen by cytochrome c. The effective concentration of ammonium chloride decreased to one-sixtieth of the original, when an ammonium ion ionophore, nonactin, was added. Thus, the weak acid allowed superoxide to yield hydrogen peroxide disproportionately in the thylakoid membrane interior.

  7. High Yield Non-detergent Isolation of Photosystem I-Light-harvesting Chlorophyll II Membranes from Spinach Thylakoids: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ORGANIZATION OF THE PS I ANTENNAE IN HIGHER PLANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Adam J; Frankel, Laurie K; Bricker, Terry M

    2015-07-24

    Styrene-maleic acid copolymer was used to effect a non-detergent partial solubilization of thylakoids from spinach. A high density membrane fraction, which was not solubilized by the copolymer, was isolated and was highly enriched in the Photosystem (PS) I-light-harvesting chlorophyll (LHC) II supercomplex and depleted of PS II, the cytochrome b6/f complex, and ATP synthase. The LHC II associated with the supercomplex appeared to be energetically coupled to PS I based on 77 K fluorescence, P700 photooxidation, and PS I electron transport light saturation experiments. The chlorophyll (Chl) a/b ratio of the PS I-LHC II membranes was 3.2 ± 0.9, indicating that on average, three LHC II trimers may associate with each PS I. The implication of these findings within the context of higher plant PS I antenna organization is discussed.

  8. The essence of being extremophilic: the role of the unique archaeal membrane lipids : the role of the unique archaeal membrane lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vossenberg, J.L C M; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1998-01-01

    In extreme environments, mainly Archaea are encountered. The archaeal cytoplasmic membrane contains unique ether lipids that cannot easily be degraded, are temperature- and mechanically resistant, and highly salt tolerant. Moreover, thermophilic and extreme acidophilic Archaea possess

  9. Rethinking the existence of a steady-state Δψ component of the proton motive force across plant thylakoid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew P; Ruban, Alexander V

    2014-02-01

    Light-driven photosynthetic electron transport is coupled to the movement of protons from the chloroplast stroma to the thylakoid lumen. The resulting proton motive force that is generated is used to drive the conformational rotation of the transmembrane thylakoid ATPase enzyme which converts ADP (adenosine diphosphate) and Pi (inorganic phosphate) into ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the energy currency of the plant cell required for carbon fixation and other metabolic processes. According to Mitchell's chemiosmotic hypothesis, the proton motive force can be parsed into the transmembrane proton gradient (ΔpH) and the electric field gradient (Δψ), which are thermodynamically equivalent. In chloroplasts, the proton motive force has been suggested to be split almost equally between Δψ and ΔpH (Kramer et al., Photosynth Res 60:151-163, 1999). One of the central pieces of evidence for this theory is the existence of a steady-state electrochromic shift (ECS) absorption signal detected ~515 nm in plant leaves during illumination. The interpretation of this signal is complicated, however, by a heavily overlapping absorption change ~535 nm associated with the formation of photoprotective energy dissipation (qE) during illumination. In this study, we present new evidence that dissects the overlapping contributions of the ECS and qE-related absorption changes in wild-type Arabidopsis leaves using specific inhibitors of the ΔpH (nigericin) and Δψ (valinomycin) and separately using leaves of the Arabidopsis lut2npq1 mutant that lacks qE. In both cases, our data show that no steady-state ECS signal persists in the light longer than ~60 s. The consequences of our observations for the suggesting parsing of steady-state thylakoid proton motive force between (ΔpH) and the electric field gradient (Δψ) are discussed.

  10. The photoelectrical properties of thylakoid membrane from two plants fabricated on Nano-ZnO%两种植物类囊体膜在纳米ZnO上的组装和光电性质

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘双; 张攀辉; 邱宇; 张建; 于道永

    2012-01-01

    ZnO nanowires were synthesized on the FTO glass by hydrothermal method and characterized by atomic force microscopy(AFM) and scanning electron microscopy(SEM).Thylakoid membranes isolated from higher plant spinach and marine green alga Ulva lactuca were fabricated on the ZnO nanowires by using Langmuir Blodgett(LB) technique.The photoelectrical properties of these two resulting systems were assessed and compared by solar cell test system.Photocurrents were both observed the solar cells containing the LB films of the thylakoid membranes of these two plants.The photoelectric conversion efficiencies of solar cells were increased significantly with the numbers of LB film layer.In addition,the photoelectric conversion efficiency of cell containing Ulva thylakoid membrane was much higher than that of spinach.%用水热合成法在掺氟氧化锡(SnO2:F,FTO)导电玻璃上合成了ZnO纳米线并用原子力显微镜(AFM)和扫描电镜(SEM)对其进行了表征。利用LB膜技术将高等植物菠菜(Spinacia oleracea)和海洋绿藻石莼(Ulva lactuca)的类囊体膜分别固定在纳米ZnO上组装成光电池,用太阳能测试系统检测比较了其光电性质。研究表明,由两种植物的类囊体膜LB膜组成的光电池都能产生光生电流;蛋白LB膜的层数显著影响了光电池的光电转化效率,随着层数的增加,光电转化效率大大增加。此外,石莼类囊体膜组装的光电池光电转化效率明显高于菠菜类囊体膜。

  11. 盐胁迫对水稻幼苗类囊体膜脂肪酸组分的影响%Effects of Salt Stress on Fatty Acid Composition of Thylakoid Membrane of Two Rice Cultivars Differing in Salt Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王仁雷; 华春; 周峰; 周泉澄; 周斌伟

    2008-01-01

    [Objective] The aim of the study is to understand the changes of fatty acid composition of rice thylakoid membrane under salt stress. [Method] Under salt stress of different concentrations of NaCl, rice seedlings of Pokkali and Peta with six leaves and one central leaf were used as experimental materials to extract the fatty acid from their thylakoid membranes, and gas chromatograph(1890) was used to analyze fatty acid composition. [Result] Fatty acid component 14∶ 0, 18∶ 0, 16∶ 1(3t), 18∶ 1 in both the two experimental materials showed little variations in the first four days of salt stress, whereafter they increased slightly; while the fatty acid component 16∶ 0 and level of saturation of fatty acid (LSFA) showed the similar variation trend in the first four days of treatment compared to those of the fatty acid components mentioned above, whereafter they rose in Pokkali and presented an opposite variation trend in Peta; fatty acid component 18∶ 3 and level of unsaturation of fatty acid (LUFA) reduced all the time under stress condition, and the reducing amplitude in 100 mmol/L NaCl treatment group was smaller than that of 100 mmol/L NaCl treatment group, and in Pokkali was smaller than that in Peta under specific conditions. Meanwhile, level of saturation of fatty acid in both experimental materials increased, and the rising amplitude in Peta was smaller than that of Pokkali. [Conclusion] With regard to LUFA, Pokkali is endowed with more salt tolerance than Peta.

  12. RECOVERY ACT - Thylakoid Assembly and Folded Protein Transport by the Tat Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabney-Smith, Carole [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)

    2016-07-18

    Assembly of functional photosystems complete with necessary intrinsic (membrane-bound) and extrinsic proteins requires the function of at least 3 protein transport pathways in thylakoid membranes. Our research focuses on one of those pathways, a unique and essential protein transport pathway found in the chloroplasts of plants, bacteria, and some archaebacteria, the Twin arginine translocation (Tat) system. The chloroplast Tat (cpTat) system is thought to be responsible for the proper location of ~50% of thylakoid lumen proteins, several of which are necessary for proper photosystem assembly, maintenance, and function. Specifically, cpTat systems are unique because they transport fully folded and assembled proteins across ion tight membranes using only three membrane components, Tha4, Hcf106, and cpTatC, and the protonmotive force generated by photosynthesis. Despite the importance of the cpTat system in plants, the mechanism of transport of a folded precursor is not well known. Our long-term goal is to investigate the role protein transport systems have on organelle biogenesis, particularly the assembly of membrane protein complexes in thylakoids of chloroplasts. The objective of this proposal is to correlate structural changes in the membrane-bound cpTat component, Tha4, to the mechanism of translocation of folded-precursor substrates across the membrane bilayer by using a cysteine accessibility and crosslinking approach. Our central hypothesis is that the precursor passes through a proteinaceous pore of assembled Tha4 protomers that have undergone a conformational or topological change in response to transport. This research is predicated upon the observations that Tha4 exists in molar excess in the membrane relative to the other cpTat components; its regulated assembly to the precursor-bound receptor; and our data showing oligomerization of Tha4 into very large complexes in response to transport. Our rationale for these studies is that understanding cp

  13. Isolation of a unique membrane protein from Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réveiller, F L; Suh, S J; Sullivan, K; Cabanes, P A; Marciano-Cabral, F

    2001-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri, an amoeboflagellate, is the causative agent of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis, a fulminating disease of the central nervous system. In order to elucidate the mechanisms of pathogenicity of this amoeba, a cDNA expression library was prepared from N. fowleri RNA. A specific protein was found to be expressed from a cDNA clone designated Mp2CL5. Northern blot analysis showed that the Mp2CL5 mRNA was expressed in pathogenic N. fowleri but was not expressed in non-pathogenic Naegleria species nor in Acanthamoeba. Western blot analysis using anti-N. fowleri antiserum demonstrated that IPTG-induced Escherichia coli Mp2CL5 expressed a 23-kDa recombinant protein. The Mp2CL5 recombinant protein was histidine-tagged and purified to homogeneity from E. coli. A polyclonal rabbit antiserum was prepared against the purified Mp2CL5 recombinant protein. This antibody was used to further characterize the Mp2CL5 native protein expressed by N. fowleri. Western blot analysis in conjunction with immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated the presence of a native protein of 17 kDa on the plasma membrane of N. fowleri trophozoites. The native N. fowleri protein was expressed in the logarithmic phase of trophozoite growth and the production of this protein increased through the stationary phase of growth. Studies are in progress to examine further its role as a virulence factor.

  14. Structure and dynamics of thylakoids in land plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pribil, Mathias; Labs, Mathias; Leister, Dario

    2014-01-01

    of the granum. Stacking of grana is thought to be due to adhesion between Lhcb proteins (LHCII or CP26) located in opposed thylakoid membranes. The grana margins contain oligomers of CURT1 proteins, which appear to control the size and number of grana discs in a dosage- and phosphorylation-dependent manner...

  15. 菊花黄绿叶突变体的光合与类囊体膜光谱%Characteristics of Photosynthesis and Spectra Properties of Thylakoid Membranes in the Yellow-Green Leaf Mutant of Chrysanthemum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常青山; 张利霞; 陈煜; 陈素梅; 刘兆磊; 房伟民; 陈发棣

    2013-01-01

    In order to study photosynthetic mechanism of the yellow-green leaf mutant- 'Jinglingguozi ' of chrysanthemum, the characteristics of photosynthesis and the spectra properties of thylakoid membrane in the green and yellow leaf tissue of the mutant were studied. We measured the photosynthesis, stomatal characteristics, room temperature absorption spectra, chlorophyll emission fluorescence spectra of thylakoid membrane. The results that compared to the green leaf tissue of the mutant, the yellow leaf tissue had lower net photosynthetic rate ( Pn ) , light saturation point (LSP) , dark respiration rate (Rd) , apparent quantum yield (AQY) , but higher light compensation point (LCP). The yellow leaf tissue had lower stomata limit value ( Ls ) , but higher non-stomata limit value. There was no significant difference in the characteristics of stomatal microstructure between the green leaf and yellow leaf tissue. The absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra significantly decreased in the yellow leaf tissue. The yellow leaf tissue had significantly lower capacity of the capture and excitation of light energy and lower the photosynthetic capacity than the green leaf tissue did, which was caused by non-stomata factors, such as a decrease of the function of thylakoid membrane.%以菊花‘金陵国紫’黄绿叶突变体为试验材料,研究该突变体黄绿叶的绿叶与黄叶组织光合与类囊体膜光谱特性.对突变体黄绿叶中绿叶与黄叶组织的光合速率、光响应曲线、气孔特征与类囊体膜光谱特性进行测定与分析.结果表明:与绿叶组织相比,突变体黄叶组织的净光合速率、光饱和点、暗呼吸速率、表观量子效率均显著低于绿叶组织,而光补偿点则显著高于绿叶组织;黄叶组织的气孔限制值低于绿叶组织,非气孔限制值则显著高于绿叶组织,而黄叶与绿叶组织的气孔特征并无显著性差异.突变体黄叶组织类囊体膜叶绿素捕光能力与受激

  16. Arabidopsis ANGULATA10 is required for thylakoid biogenesis and mesophyll development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova-Sáez, Rubén; Mateo-Bonmatí, Eduardo; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Candela, Héctor; Micol, José Luis

    2014-06-01

    The chloroplasts of land plants contain internal membrane systems, the thylakoids, which are arranged in stacks called grana. Because grana have not been found in Cyanobacteria, the evolutionary origin of genes controlling the structural and functional diversification of thylakoidal membranes in land plants remains unclear. The angulata10-1 (anu10-1) mutant, which exhibits pale-green rosettes, reduced growth, and deficient leaf lateral expansion, resulting in the presence of prominent marginal teeth, was isolated. Palisade cells in anu10-1 are larger and less packed than in the wild type, giving rise to large intercellular spaces. The ANU10 gene encodes a protein of unknown function that localizes to both chloroplasts and amyloplasts. In chloroplasts, ANU10 associates with thylakoidal membranes. Mutant anu10-1 chloroplasts accumulate H2O2, and have reduced levels of chlorophyll and carotenoids. Moreover, these chloroplasts are small and abnormally shaped, thylakoidal membranes are less abundant, and their grana are absent due to impaired thylakoid stacking in the anu10-1 mutant. Because the trimeric light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) has been reported to be required for thylakoid stacking, its levels were determined in anu10-1 thylakoids and they were found to be reduced. Together, the data point to a requirement for ANU10 for chloroplast and mesophyll development.

  17. Mediatorless solar energy conversion by covalently bonded thylakoid monolayer on the glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinhwan; Im, Jaekyun; Kim, Sunghyun

    2016-04-01

    Light reactions of photosynthesis that take place in thylakoid membranes found in plants or cyanobacteria are among the most effective ways of utilizing light. Unlike most researches that use photosystem I or photosystem II as conversion units for converting light to electricity, we have developed a simple method in which the thylakoid monolayer was covalently immobilized on the glassy carbon electrode surface. The activity of isolated thylakoid membrane was confirmed by measuring evolving oxygen under illumination. Glassy carbon surfaces were first modified with partial or full monolayers of carboxyphenyl groups by reductive C-C coupling using 4-aminobenzoic acid and aniline and then thylakoid membrane was bioconjugated through the peptide bond between amine residues of thylakoid and carboxyl groups on the surface. Surface properties of modified surfaces were characterized by cyclic voltammetry, contact angle measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Photocurrent of 230 nA cm(-2) was observed when the thylakoid monolayer was formed on the mixed monolayer of 4-carboxylpheny and benzene at applied potential of 0.4V vs. Ag/AgCl. A small photocurrent resulted when the 4-carboxyphenyl full monolayer was used. This work shows the possibility of solar energy conversion by directly employing the whole thylakoid membrane through simple surface modification.

  18. Liquid but Durable: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Explain the Unique Properties of Archaeal-Like Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugunov, Anton O.; Volynsky, Pavel E.; Krylov, Nikolay A.; Boldyrev, Ivan A.; Efremov, Roman G.

    2014-12-01

    Archaeal plasma membranes appear to be extremely durable and almost impermeable to water and ions, in contrast to the membranes of Bacteria and Eucaryota. Additionally, they remain liquid within a temperature range of 0-100°C. These are the properties that have most likely determined the evolutionary fate of Archaea, and it may be possible for bionanotechnology to adopt these from nature. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to assess at the atomistic level the structure and dynamics of a series of model archaeal membranes with lipids that have tetraether chemical nature and ``branched'' hydrophobic tails. We conclude that the branched structure defines dense packing and low water permeability of archaeal-like membranes, while at the same time ensuring a liquid-crystalline state, which is vital for living cells. This makes tetraether lipid systems promising in bionanotechnology and material science, namely for design of new and unique membrane nanosystems.

  19. Acute Effects of a Spinach Extract Rich in Thylakoids on Satiety: A Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rebello, Candida J.; Chu, Jessica; Beyl, Robbie; Edwall, Dan; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte; Frank L. Greenway

    2015-01-01

    Objective: By retarding fat digestion, thylakoids, the internal photosynthetic membrane system of green plants, promote the release of satiety hormones. This study examined the effect of consuming a single dose of concentrated extract of thylakoids from spinach on satiety, food intake, lipids, and glucose compared to a placebo. Design: Sixty overweight and obese individuals enrolled in a double-blind randomized crossover study consumed the spinach extract or placebo in random order at least a...

  20. Molecular analysis of a thylakoid K+ channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    The work undertaken during the prior granting period sought to use a novel probe to identify and clone plant ion (K) channels. It was also proposed that in vitro biochemical studies of cation transport across purified preparations of thylakoid membrane be employed to characterize a putative K channel in this membrane system. Over the last several years (including those of the previous grant period), an enormous data base of partially-sequenced mRNAs and numerous genomes (including those of plants) has evolved and provides a powerful alternative to this brute-force approach to identify and clone cDNAs ending physiologically important membrane proteins such as channels. The utility of searching genetic databases for relevant sequences, in addition to the difficulty of working with membrane proteins, led to changes in research focus during the prior granting period, and has resulted in the identification of a new class of plant ion channels, which will be the focus of research during the proposed new granting period.

  1. Increase in electron transfer activity in photosystem Ⅱ of spinach thylakoids caused by conversion of phosphatidyl-glycerol to phosphatidic acid molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Feng; YANG Zhenle; LI Liangbi; KUANG Tingyun

    2003-01-01

    The techniques of oxygen electrode polarography, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacryamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and thin layer chromatography (TLC) were employed to investigate the effect of phospholipase D treatment on physiological function of spinach thylakoids. It was shown that the phospholipase D treatment on thylakoid resulted in the degradation of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and occurrence of phosphatidic acid (PA). The changes of PG to PA molecules caused an increase in oxygen evolution in photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ), which was accompanied by an uncoupling effect on thylakoid membrane. It was revealed that the head-groups of PG molecules play an important role in the maintenance of the appropriate physiological activity of thylakoid membrane.

  2. A difference gel electrophoresis study on thylakoids isolated from poplar leaves reveals a negative impact of ozone exposure on membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohler, Sacha; Sergeant, Kjell; Hoffmann, Lucien; Dizengremel, Pierre; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Renaut, Jenny; Jolivet, Yves

    2011-07-01

    Populus tremula L. x P. alba L. (Populus x canescens (Aiton) Smith), clone INRA 717-1-B4, saplings were subjected to 120 ppb ozone exposure for 28 days. Chloroplasts were isolated, and the membrane proteins, solubilized using the detergent 1,2-diheptanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), were analyzed in a difference gel electrophoresis (DiGE) experiment comparing control versus ozone-exposed plants. Extrinsic photosystem (PS) proteins and adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) subunits were detected to vary in abundance. The general trend was a decrease in abundance, except for ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR), which increased after the first 7 days of exposure. The up-regulation of FNR would increase NAPDH production for reducing power and detoxification inside and outside of the chloroplast. Later on, FNR and a number of PS and ATPase subunits decrease in abundance. This could be the result of oxidative processes on chloroplast proteins but could also be a way to down-regulate photochemical reactions in response to an inhibition in Calvin cycle activity.

  3. Blue-light mediated accumulation of nuclear-encoded transcripts coding for proteins of the thylakoid membrane is absent in the phytochrome-deficient aurea mutant of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelmüller, R; Kendrick, R E; Briggs, W R

    1989-08-01

    Polyclonal antibodies against pea phytochrome detect 2 protein bands (about 116 and 120 kDa) on blots of crude protein extracts and protein of microsomal preparations of dark-grown tomato seedlings. Both protein bands are undetectable in Western blots of the aurea mutant extracts. Neither protein band is detectable after isogenic wild-type seedlings are illuminated with 3 h of red light, either in the crude extract or in the membrane fraction of the irradiated seedlings; this result is consistent with the hypothesis that both bands are phytochrome. When dark-grown wild-type seedlings are illuminated with 3 h of red light or blue light against a red light background, the transcript levels for chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins of photosystem I and II, plastocyanin, and the subunit II of photosystem I increase. In all cases, the same fluence rate of blue light is much more effective than red light alone, a result that indicates the involvement of a blue/UV-A light photoreceptor in addition to the involvement of the far-red-absorbing form of phytochrome, Pfr. The aurea mutant responds neither to red light nor to blue light. Thus, no Pfr-independent induction of the four transcripts by a blue/UV-A light photoreceptor can be measured in the aurea mutant.

  4. Two roles of thylakoid lipids in modifying the activity of herbicides which inhibit photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupatt, C.C. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Thylakoid lipids may modify the activity of herbicides which inhibit electron transport at the Q/sub B/ protein of photosystem II in two ways: (1) lipids can act as a hydrophobic barrier to a binding site localized close to the loculus of the membrane, and (2) changes in lipid composition can reduce the ability of inhibitors to block electron transport, possibly due to a change in the conformation of the Q/sub B/ protein. The herbicide binding site was localized close to the locular side of the thylakoid membrane by determining the activity of a number of substituted phenylurea and s-triazine herbicides in inverted and non-inverted thylakoids. Quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis showed that inversion of thylakoids reduced the requirement of molecular lipophilicity deemed necessary for phenylurea activity in non-inverted membranes, whereas s-triazines exhibited no differences in the lipophilicity requirement in thylakoid membranes of either orientation. The binding affinity of /sup 14/C-diuron was reduced in bicarbonate-depleted thylakoids relative to reconstituted or control membranes, as is the case with atrazine binding. These observations support a model of the herbicide binding site containing both common and herbicide family specific binding domains. Thylakoids isolated either from detached lambs quarters (Chenopodium album L.) leaves, treated with SAN 6706, or from soybean (Glycine max L.), with norflurazon or pyrazon applied preemergence, exhibited decreased susceptibility to atrazine. The ability of lipid-modifying treatments to decrease the atrazine susceptibility of field-grown soybeans was also investigated.

  5. Proteins affecting thylakoid morphology - the key to understanding vesicle transport in chloroplasts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Emelie; Aronsson, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that a Rab protein, CPRabA5e (CP = chloroplast localized), is located in chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana where it is involved in various processes, such as thylakoid biogenesis and vesicle transport. Using a yeast two-hybrid method, CPRabA5e was shown to interact with a number of chloroplast proteins, including the CURVATURE THYLAKOID 1A (CURT1A) protein and the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein (LHCB1.5). CURT1A has recently been shown to modify thylakoid architecture by inducing membrane curvature in grana, whereas LHCB1.5 is a protein of PSII (Photosystem II) facilitating light capture. LHCB1.5 is imported to chloroplasts and transported to thylakoid membranes using the post-translational Signal Recognition Particle (SRP) pathway. With this information as starting point, we here discuss their subsequent protein-protein interactions, given by the literature and Interactome 3D. CURT1A itself and several of the proteins interacting with CURT1A and LHCB1.5 have relations to vesicle transport and thylakoid morphology, which are also characteristics of cprabA5e mutants. This highlights the previous hypothesis of an alternative thylakoid targeting pathway for LHC proteins using vesicles, in addition to the SRP pathway.

  6. A Mr 95,000 polypeptide in Porphyridium cruentum phycobilisomes and thylakoids: Possible function in linkage of phycobilisomes to thylakoids and in energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlinger, Thomas; Gantt, Elisabeth

    1982-01-01

    Two pigmented polypeptides with the same molecular weight (Mr 95,000) were isolated from the photosynthetic apparatus of Porphyridium cruentum by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A blue polypeptide from phycobilisomes had absorption and fluorescence emission spectra similar to those of allophycocyanin. A green-pigmented polypeptide from photosynthetic membranes (free of phycobilisomes) contained chlorophyll a. Several properties were common to the Mr 95,000 polypeptides from both sources: (i) identical molecular weights, (ii) identical gel electrophoresis patterns after limited protease digestion, and (iii) immunological crossreactivity with an IgG fraction directed against the Mr 95,000 polypeptide from phycobilisomes. On the basis of this evidence, a common polypeptide exists in phycobilisomes and thylakoids, and it probably anchors the phycobilisome to the thylakoid membrane. The fluorescence emission overlap of the blue and green polypeptides suggests that they are involved in the transfer of energy from phycobilisomes to thylakoids. Images PMID:16593227

  7. Bizonoplast, a unique chloroplast in the epidermal cells of microphylls in the shade plant Selaginella erythropus (Selaginellaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheue, Chiou-Rong; Sarafis, Vassilios; Kiew, Ruth; Liu, Ho-Yih; Salino, Alexandre; Kuo-Huang, Ling-Long; Yang, Yuen-Po; Tsai, Chi-Chu; Lin, Chun-Hung; Yong, Jean W H; Ku, Maurice S B

    2007-12-01

    Study of the unique leaf anatomy and chloroplast structure in shade-adapted plants will aid our understanding of how plants use light efficiently in low light environments. Unusual chloroplasts in terms of size and thylakoid membrane stacking have been described previously in several deep-shade plants. In this study, a single giant cup-shaped chloroplast, termed a bizonoplast, was found in the abaxial epidermal cells of the dorsal microphylls and the adaxial epidermal cells of the ventral microphylls in the deep-shade spike moss Selaginella erythropus. Bizonoplasts are dimorphic in ultrastructure: the upper zone is occupied by numerous layers of 2-4 stacked thylakoid membranes while the lower zone contains both unstacked stromal thylakoids and thylakoid lamellae stacked in normal grana structure oriented in different directions. In contrast, other cell types in the microphylls contain chloroplasts with typical structure. This unique chloroplast has not been reported from any other species. The enlargement of epidermal cells into funnel-shaped, photosynthetic cells coupled with specific localization of a large bizonoplast in the lower part of the cells and differential modification in ultrastructure within the chloroplast may allow the plant to better adapt to low light. Further experiments are required to determine whether this shade-adapted organism derives any evolutionary or ecophysiological fitness from these unique chloroplasts.

  8. T Lymphocyte Activation Threshold and Membrane Reorganization Perturbations in Unique Culture Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, C. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative activation thresholds and cellular membrane reorganization are mechanisms by which resting T cells modulate their response to activating stimuli. Here we demonstrate perturbations of these cellular processes in a unique culture system that non-invasively inhibits T lymphocyte activation. During clinorotation, the T cell activation threshold is increased 5-fold. This increased threshold involves a mechanism independent of TCR triggering. Recruitment of lipid rafts to the activation site is impaired during clinorotation but does occur with increased stimulation. This study describes a situation in which an individual cell senses a change in its physical environment and alters its cell biological behavior.

  9. Consumption of thylakoid-rich spinach extract reduces hunger, increases satiety and reduces cravings for palatable food in overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenblom, Eva-Lena; Egecioglu, Emil; Landin-Olsson, Mona; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte

    2015-08-01

    Green-plant membranes, thylakoids, have previously been found to increase postprandial release of the satiety hormone GLP-1, implicated in reward signaling. The purpose of this study was to investigate how treatment with a single dose of thylakoids before breakfast affects homeostatic as well as hedonic hunger, measured as wanting and liking for palatable food (VAS). We also examined whether treatment effects were correlated to scores for eating behavior. Compared to placebo, intake of thylakoids significantly reduced hunger (21% reduction, p satiety (14% increase, p hunger, associated with overeating and obesity. Individuals scoring higher for emotional eating behavior may have enhanced treatment effect on cravings for palatable food.

  10. Unique membrane properties and enhanced signal processing in human neocortical neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Guy; Verhoog, Matthijs B; Testa-Silva, Guilherme; Deitcher, Yair; Lodder, Johannes C; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Morales, Juan; DeFelipe, Javier; de Kock, Christiaan PJ; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Segev, Idan

    2016-01-01

    The advanced cognitive capabilities of the human brain are often attributed to our recently evolved neocortex. However, it is not known whether the basic building blocks of the human neocortex, the pyramidal neurons, possess unique biophysical properties that might impact on cortical computations. Here we show that layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons from human temporal cortex (HL2/3 PCs) have a specific membrane capacitance (Cm) of ~0.5 µF/cm2, half of the commonly accepted 'universal' value (~1 µF/cm2) for biological membranes. This finding was predicted by fitting in vitro voltage transients to theoretical transients then validated by direct measurement of Cm in nucleated patch experiments. Models of 3D reconstructed HL2/3 PCs demonstrated that such low Cm value significantly enhances both synaptic charge-transfer from dendrites to soma and spike propagation along the axon. This is the first demonstration that human cortical neurons have distinctive membrane properties, suggesting important implications for signal processing in human neocortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16553.001 PMID:27710767

  11. A new concept for ferredoxin-NADP(H) oxidoreductase binding to plant thylakoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, J Philipp; Lintala, Minna; Soll, Jürgen; Mulo, Paula; Bölter, Bettina

    2010-11-01

    During the evolution of photosynthesis, regulatory circuits were established that allow the precise coupling of light-driven electron transfer chains with downstream processes such as carbon fixation. The ferredoxin (Fd):ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR) couple is an important mediator for these processes because it provides the transition from exclusively membrane-bound light reactions to the mostly stromal metabolic pathways. Recent progress has allowed us to revisit how FNR is bound to thylakoids and to revaluate the current view that only membrane-bound FNR is active in photosynthetic reactions. We argue that the vast majority of thylakoid-bound FNR of higher plants is not necessary for photosynthesis. We furthermore propose that the correct distribution of FNR between stroma and thylakoids is used to efficiently regulate Fd-dependent electron partitioning in the chloroplast. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunoelectron microscopy for locating calvin cycle enzymes in the thylakoids of synechocystis 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rachna; Ortleb, Stefan; Sainis, Jayashree Krishna; Melzer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Unicellular cyanobacteria Synechocystis 6803 were fixed using high-pressure freezing (HPF) and freeze substitution without any chemical cross-linkers. Immunoelectron microscopy of these cells showed that five sequential enzymes of the Calvin cycle (phosphoriboisomerase, phosphoribulokinase, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), 3-phosphoglyceratekinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and the catalytic portion of the chloroplast H+-ATP synthase (CF1) are located adjacent to the thylakoid membranes. Cell-free extracts of Synechocystis were processed by ultracentrifugation to isolate thylakoid fractions sedimenting at 40,000, 90,000, and 150,000 g. Among these, the 150,000-g fraction showed the highest linked activity of the above five sequential Calvin cycle enzymes and also the highest coordinated activity of light and dark reactions as assessed by ribose-5-phosphate (R-5-P) +ADP dependent CO2 fixation. Immunogold labeling of this membrane fraction confirmed the presence of the above five enzymes as well as the catalytic portion of the CF1 ATP synthase. Notably, the protein A-gold labeling of the thylakoids was observed without use of chemical cross-linkers and in spite of the normal washing steps used during standard immunolabeling. The results showed that soluble Calvin cycle enzymes might be organized along the thylakoid membranes.

  13. Immunoelectron Microscopy for Locating Calvin Cycle Enzymes in the Thylakoids of Synechocystis 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rachna Agarwal; Stefan Ortleb; Jayashree Krishna Saini; Michael Melzer

    2009-01-01

    Unicellular cyanobacteria Synechocystis 6803 were fixed using high-pressure freezing (HPF) and freeze substitution without any chemical cross-linkers. Immunoelectron microscopy of these cells showed that five sequential enzymes of the Calvin cycle (phosphoriboisomerase, phosphoribulokinase, ribulose-l,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), 3-phosphoglyceratekinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and the catalytic portion of the chloroplast H+-ATP synthase (CF1) are located adjacent to the thylakoid membranes. Cell-free extracts of Synechocystis were processed by ultracentrifugation to isolate thylakoid fractions sedimenting at 40 000, 90 000, and 150 000 g.Among these, the 150 000-g fraction showed the highest linked activity of the above five sequential Calvin cycle enzymes and also the highest coordinated activity of light and dark reactions as assessed by ribose-5-phosphate (R-5-P) +ADP dependent CO2 fixation. Immunogold labeling of this membrane fraction confirmed the presence of the above five enzymes as well as the catalytic portion of the CF1 ATP synthase. Notably, the protein A-gold labeling of the thylakoids was observed without use of chemical cross-linkers and in spite of the normal washing steps used during standard immunolabeling. The results showed that soluble Calvin cycle enzymes might be organized along the thylakoid membranes.

  14. Supplementation by thylakoids to a high carbohydrate meal decreases feelings of hunger, elevates CCK levels and prevents postprandial hypoglycaemia in overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenblom, Eva-Lena; Montelius, Caroline; Östbring, Karolina; Håkansson, Maria; Nilsson, Sofia; Rehfeld, Jens F; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte

    2013-09-01

    Thylakoids are chlorophyll-containing membranes in chloroplasts that have been isolated from green leaves. It has been previously shown that thylakoids supplemented with a high-fat meal can affect cholecystokinin (CCK), ghrelin, insulin and blood lipids in humans, and can act to suppress food intake and prevent body weight gain in rodents. This study investigates the addition of thylakoids to a high carbohydrate meal and its effects upon hunger motivation and fullness, and the levels of glucose, insulin, CCK, ghrelin and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in overweight women. Twenty moderately overweight female subjects received test meals on three different occasions; two thylakoid enriched and one control, separated by 1 week. The test meals consisted of a high carbohydrate Swedish breakfast, with or without addition of thylakoids. Blood samples and VAS-questionnaires were evaluated over a 4-h period. Addition of thylakoids suppressed hunger motivation and increased secretion of CCK from 180 min, and prevented postprandial hypoglycaemia from 90 min following food intake. These effects indicate that thylakoids may intensify signals of satiety. This study therefore suggests that the dietary addition of thylakoids could aid efforts to reduce food intake and prevent compensational eating later in the day, which may help to reduce body weight over time.

  15. Human blood basophils display a unique phenotype including activation linked membrane structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stain, C; Stockinger, H; Scharf, M; Jäger, U; Gössinger, H; Lechner, K; Bettelheim, P

    1987-12-01

    To evaluate the membrane marker profile of human basophils a panel of well-established monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs, n = 60) was used for a combined toluidine/immunofluorescence staining procedure. Myeloid-associated MoAbs (particularly MoAbs against the LFA-1 family (CD11, CDw18), MoAbs directed against lactosylceramide (CDw17), anti-glycoprotein (gp) 150 MoAbs MCS 2 and MY 7 (CDw13), anti-gp 67 MoAb MY 9, anti Fc gamma-receptor (mol wt 40 kd) MoAb CIKM5, anti-CR 1 MoAb E 11, and the antiglycolipid MoAb VIM-2) were reactive with basophils, indicating a close relationship to other mature myeloid cells. Under normal conditions, basophils surprisingly express at least three activation-linked structures not detectable on mature neutrophils, ie, the p45 structure defined by MoAbs OKT-10 and VIP-2b, the p24 structure identified by the CD9 MoAb BA-2, and the receptor for interleukin 2 (IL 2) recognized by three different MoAbs (anti-TAC, IL2RI, anti-IL 2). Moreover, under short-term culture conditions basophils both in mononuclear cell (MNC) suspension and as purified fractions display the HLA-DR and T4 antigens. The neutrophilic/eosinophilic structure 3-fucosyl-N-acetyllactosamine is expressed on basophils only after neuraminidase treatment. Basophils were not stained at all by CD 16 MoAbs directed against the Fc gamma-receptor (mol wt 50 to 70 kd) of neutrophils, by the MoAb 63D3 (CDw12) recognizing the monocyte/granulocyte-associated p 200 antigen, and by the CDw 14 antibodies (VIM-13, Mo 2) defining the monocyte-specific structure p 55. Enriched basophils freshly obtained from chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL) patients yielded identical results in FACS analyses. In summary, these data indicate that basophils generate a unique combination of surface determinants and possibly represent an activated cell population.

  16. A novel method for fabricating composite mosaic membrane with unique NF selectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Jindun; Kemperman, A.J.B.; Koops, G.H.; Wessling, M.

    2006-01-01

    A novel method of fabricating composite mosaic membranes was studied on the basis of interfacial polymerization (IP) by coating a thin selective layer onto the surface of a micro-porous hollow-fiber membrane, in which, 2,5-diaminobenzene sulfonic acid was used as one monomer of the IP reaction, and

  17. A NOVEL METHOD FOR FABRICATING COMPOSITE MOSAIC MEMBRANE WITH UNIQUE NF SELECTIVITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jindun Liu; A. J. B. Kemperman; G. H. Koops; M. Wessling

    2006-01-01

    A novel method of fabricating composite mosaic membranes was studied on the basis of interfacial polymerization (IP) by coating a thin selective layer onto the surface of a micro-porous hollow-fiber membrane, in which,2,5-diaminobenzene sulfonic acid was used as one monomer of the IP reaction, and a mixture of trimesoyl chloride(TMCI) and 4-(chloromethyl) benzoyl chloride as the other monomer. Through the IP reaction a thin selective layer with negatively charged groups could be first formed on the polyethersulfone (PES) support membrane. Then trimethylamine solution was introduced to modify the IP layer through a quaternization reaction. Thus the selective layer of this composite membrane contained both negatively charged and positively charged groups to perform the mosaic functionality.Characterization of the composite mosaic membranes was carried out through permeation experiments using different inorganic salts and dyes. The experimental results showed that the membranes could permeate both mono- and bi-valent inorganic salts, but reject larger organic molecules. Such a mosaic membrane is potentially useful for the separation of salts from water-soluble organics, especially in dye and textile industries.

  18. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Truschel; D Sengupta; A Foote; A Heroux; M Macbeth; A Linstedt

    2011-12-31

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  19. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truschel, S.T.; Heroux, A.; Sengupta, D.; Foote, A.; Macbeth, M. R.; Linstedt, A. D.

    2011-06-10

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  20. Trichloroacetate affects the EPR SignalⅡslow and SignalⅠin the thylakoid of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    One electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal, named SignalⅡslow, originates from the oxidized Tyrosine 160 (YDo) of D2 polypeptide of photosystemⅡ reaction center. After adding high concentration trichloroacetate (TCA) to the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii thylakoid suspension, this signal was abolished in a minute. Treatment of TCA also removes a few of polypeptides, including three extrinsic polypeptides of oxygen-evolving complex, from the thylakoid membrane. Based upon the analysis of the microenvironment around YD with a three-dimensional model, it is indicated that relatively high hydrophobicity of this microenvironment may be the essential prerequisite for TCA to affect YD. It has been observed that TCA treatment also retards the decay of the SignalⅠ, produced by the oxidized reaction center chlorophyll dimer (P700+) of photosys- temⅠ.

  1. Inhibition by penem of processing peptidases from cyanobacteria and chloroplast thylakoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbrook, A C; Packer, J C; Howe, C J

    1996-12-02

    Proteins targeted to the thylakoid lumen of plants and cyanobacteria and the periplasmic space of cyanobacteria are synthesised with N-terminal presequences which are removed following translocation across the membrane. These presequences are thought to direct translocation of the preprotein by a sec-type pathway. Detergent extracts of cyanobacterial and chloroplast membranes contain enzymes which are capable of processing precursors to the mature size. We show that the processing of a range of precursors by both cyanobacterial and chloroplast enzymes is inhibited by the penem SB216357. This is the first report of an inhibitor of these enzymes and indicates that they are type 1 signal peptidases.

  2. Unique battery with an active membrane separator having uniform physico-chemically functionalized ion channels and a method making the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Ruscic, Katarina J [Chicago, IL; Sears, Devin N [Spruce Grove, CA; Smith, Luis J [Natick, MA; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL

    2012-02-21

    The invention relates to a unique battery having an active, porous membrane and method of making the same. More specifically the invention relates to a sealed battery system having a porous, metal oxide membrane with uniform, physicochemically functionalized ion channels capable of adjustable ionic interaction. The physicochemically-active porous membrane purports dual functions: an electronic insulator (separator) and a unidirectional ion-transporter (electrolyte). The electrochemical cell membrane is activated for the transport of ions by contiguous ion coordination sites on the interior two-dimensional surfaces of the trans-membrane unidirectional pores. The membrane material is designed to have physicochemical interaction with ions. Control of the extent of the interactions between the ions and the interior pore walls of the membrane and other materials, chemicals, or structures contained within the pores provides adjustability of the ionic conductivity of the membrane.

  3. Unique battery with an active membrane separator having uniform physico-chemically functionalized ion channels and a method making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Ruscic, Katarina J [Chicago, IL; Sears, Devin N [Spruce Grove, CA; Smith, Luis J [Natick, MA; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL

    2012-02-21

    The invention relates to a unique battery having an active, porous membrane and method of making the same. More specifically the invention relates to a sealed battery system having a porous, metal oxide membrane with uniform, physicochemically functionalized ion channels capable of adjustable ionic interaction. The physicochemically-active porous membrane purports dual functions: an electronic insulator (separator) and a unidirectional ion-transporter (electrolyte). The electrochemical cell membrane is activated for the transport of ions by contiguous ion coordination sites on the interior two-dimensional surfaces of the trans-membrane unidirectional pores. The membrane material is designed to have physicochemical interaction with ions. Control of the extent of the interactions between the ions and the interior pore walls of the membrane and other materials, chemicals, or structures contained within the pores provides adjustability of the ionic conductivity of the membrane.

  4. The unique ion permeability profile of cochlear fibrocytes and its contribution to establishing their positive resting membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takamasa; Nin, Fumiaki; Murakami, Shingo; Ogata, Genki; Uetsuka, Satoru; Choi, Samuel; Nakagawa, Takashi; Inohara, Hidenori; Komune, Shizuo; Kurachi, Yoshihisa; Hibino, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Eukaryotic cells exhibit negative resting membrane potential (RMP) owing to the high K(+) permeability of the plasma membrane and the asymmetric [K(+)] between the extracellular and intracellular compartments. However, cochlear fibrocytes, which comprise the basolateral surface of a multilayer epithelial-like tissue, exhibit a RMP of +5 to +12 mV in vivo. This positive RMP is critical for the formation of an endocochlear potential (EP) of +80 mV in a K(+)-rich extracellular fluid, endolymph. The epithelial-like tissue bathes fibrocytes in a regular extracellular fluid, perilymph, and apically faces the endolymph. The EP, which is essential for hearing, represents the potential difference across the tissue. Using in vivo electrophysiological approaches, we describe a potential mechanism underlying the unusual RMP of guinea pig fibrocytes. The RMP was +9.0 ± 3.7 mV when fibrocytes were exposed to an artificial control perilymph (n = 28 cochleae). Perilymphatic perfusion of a solution containing low [Na(+)] (1 mM) markedly hyperpolarized the RMP to -31.1 ± 11.2 mV (n = 10; p control, Tukey-Kramer test after one-way ANOVA). Accordingly, the EP decreased. Little change in RMP was observed when the cells were treated with a high [K(+)] of 30 mM (+10.4 ± 2.3 mV; n = 7; p = 0.942 versus the control). During the infusion of a low [Cl(-)] solution (2.4 mM), the RMP moderately hyperpolarized to -0.9 ± 3.4 mV (n = 5; p control), although the membranes, if governed by Cl(-) permeability, should be depolarized. These observations imply that the fibrocyte membranes are more permeable to Na(+) than K(+) and Cl(-), and this unique profile and [Na(+)] gradient across the membranes contribute to the positive RMP.

  5. The Primitive Thylakoid-Less Cyanobacterium Gloeobacter Is a Common Rock-Dwelling Organism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mareš

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are an ancient group of photosynthetic prokaryotes, which are significant in biogeochemical cycles. The most primitive among living cyanobacteria, Gloeobacter violaceus, shows a unique ancestral cell organization with a complete absence of inner membranes (thylakoids and an uncommon structure of the photosynthetic apparatus. Numerous phylogenetic papers proved its basal position among all of the organisms and organelles capable of plant-like photosynthesis (i.e., cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of algae and plants. Hence, G. violaceus has become one of the key species in evolutionary study of photosynthetic life. It also numbers among the most widely used organisms in experimental photosynthesis research. Except for a few related culture isolates, there has been little data on the actual biology of Gloeobacter, being relegated to an "evolutionary curiosity" with an enigmatic identity. Here we show that members of the genus Gloeobacter probably are common rock-dwelling cyanobacteria. On the basis of morphological, ultrastructural, pigment, and phylogenetic comparisons of available Gloeobacter strains, as well as on the basis of three new independent isolates and historical type specimen, we have produced strong evidence as to the close relationship of Gloeobacter to a long known rock-dwelling cyanobacterial morphospecies Aphanothece caldariorum. Our results bring new clues to solving the 40 year old puzzle of the true biological identity of Gloeobacter violaceus, a model organism with a high value in several biological disciplines. A probable broader distribution of Gloeobacter in common wet-rock habitats worldwide is suggested by our data, and its ecological meaning is discussed taking into consideration the background of cyanobacterial evolution. We provide observations of previously unknown genetic variability and phenotypic plasticity, which we expect to be utilized by experimental and evolutionary researchers worldwide.

  6. The Primitive Thylakoid-Less Cyanobacterium Gloeobacter Is a Common Rock-Dwelling Organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareš, Jan; Hrouzek, Pavel; Kaňa, Radek; Ventura, Stefano; Strunecký, Otakar; Komárek, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an ancient group of photosynthetic prokaryotes, which are significant in biogeochemical cycles. The most primitive among living cyanobacteria, Gloeobacter violaceus, shows a unique ancestral cell organization with a complete absence of inner membranes (thylakoids) and an uncommon structure of the photosynthetic apparatus. Numerous phylogenetic papers proved its basal position among all of the organisms and organelles capable of plant-like photosynthesis (i.e., cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of algae and plants). Hence, G. violaceus has become one of the key species in evolutionary study of photosynthetic life. It also numbers among the most widely used organisms in experimental photosynthesis research. Except for a few related culture isolates, there has been little data on the actual biology of Gloeobacter, being relegated to an “evolutionary curiosity” with an enigmatic identity. Here we show that members of the genus Gloeobacter probably are common rock-dwelling cyanobacteria. On the basis of morphological, ultrastructural, pigment, and phylogenetic comparisons of available Gloeobacter strains, as well as on the basis of three new independent isolates and historical type specimen, we have produced strong evidence as to the close relationship of Gloeobacter to a long known rock-dwelling cyanobacterial morphospecies Aphanothece caldariorum. Our results bring new clues to solving the 40 year old puzzle of the true biological identity of Gloeobacter violaceus, a model organism with a high value in several biological disciplines. A probable broader distribution of Gloeobacter in common wet-rock habitats worldwide is suggested by our data, and its ecological meaning is discussed taking into consideration the background of cyanobacterial evolution. We provide observations of previously unknown genetic variability and phenotypic plasticity, which we expect to be utilized by experimental and evolutionary researchers worldwide. PMID:23823729

  7. The identification of global patterns and unique signatures of proteins across 14 environments using outer membrane proteomics of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliep, Martin; Ryall, Ben; Ferenci, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    We test the hypothesis that organisms sourced from different environments exhibit unique fingerprints in macromolecular composition. Experimentally, we followed proteomic changes with 14 different sub-lethal environmental stimuli in Escherichia coli at controlled growth rates. The focus was on the outer membrane sub-proteome, which is known to be extremely sensitive to environmental controls. The analyses surprisingly revealed that pairs of proteins belonging to very different regulons, such as Slp and OmpX or FadL and OmpF, have the closest patterns of change with the 14 conditions. Fe-limited and cold-cultured bacteria have the most distinct global patterns of spot changes, but the patterns with fast growth and oxygen limitation are the closest amongst the 14 environments. These unexpected but statistically robust results suggest that we have an incomplete picture of bacterial regulation across different stress responses; baseline choices and growth-rate influences are probably underestimated factors in such systems-level analysis. In terms of our aim of getting a unique profile for each of the 14 investigated environments, we find that it is unnecessary to compare all the proteins in a proteome and that a panel of five proteins is sufficient for identification of environmental fingerprints. This demonstrates the future feasibility of tracing the history of contaminating bacteria in hospitals, foods or industrial settings as well as for released organisms and biosecurity purposes.

  8. Fe deficiency induced changes in rice (Oryza sativa L.) thylakoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwen; Xu, Chao; Li, Kang; Cai, Xiaojie; Wu, Min; Chen, Guoxiang

    2017-01-01

    Iron deficiency is an important abiotic stress that limits productivity of crops all over the world. We selected a hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.), LYPJ, which is super high-yield and widely cultured in China, to investigate changes in the components and structure of thylakoid membranes and photosynthetic performance in response to iron deficiency. Our results demonstrated that photosystem I (PSI) is the primary target for iron deficiency, while the changes in photosystem II (PSII) are important for rebuilding a balance in disrupted energy utilization and dissipation caused by differential degradation of photosynthetic components. The result of immunoblot analysis suggested that the core subunit PsaA declined drastically, while PsbA remained relatively stable. Furthermore, several organizational changes of the photosynthetic apparatus were found by BN-PAGE, including a marked decrease in the PSI core complexes, the Cytb 6 /f complex, and the trimeric form of the LHCII antenna, consistent with the observed unstacking grana. The fluorescence induction analysis indicated a descending PSII activity with energy dissipation enhanced markedly. In addition, we proposed that the crippled CO2 assimilation could be compensated by the enhanced of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), which is suggested by the decreased ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and photosynthetic efficiency.

  9. Chronic and selective inhibition of basolateral membrane Na-K-ATPase uniquely regulates brush border membrane Na absorption in intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Palanikumar; Gayam, Swapna; Arthur, Subha; Palaniappan, Balasubramanian; Singh, Soudamani; Dick, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Na-K-ATPase, an integral membrane protein in mammalian cells, is responsible for maintaining the favorable intracellular Na gradient necessary to promote Na-coupled solute cotransport processes [e.g., Na-glucose cotransport (SGLT1)]. Inhibition of brush border membrane (BBM) SGLT1 is, at least in part, due to the diminished Na-K-ATPase in villus cells from chronically inflamed rabbit intestine. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of Na-K-ATPase inhibition on the two major BBM Na absorptive pathways, specifically Na-glucose cotransport and Na/H exchange (NHE), in intestinal epithelial (IEC-18) cells. Na-K-ATPase was inhibited using 1 mM ouabain or siRNA for Na-K-ATPase-α1 in IEC-18 cells. SGLT1 activity was determined as 3-O-methyl-d-[3H]glucose uptake. Na-K-ATPase activity was measured as the amount of inorganic phosphate released. Treatment with ouabain resulted in SGLT1 inhibition at 1 h but stimulation at 24 h. To further characterize this unexpected stimulation of SGLT1, siRNA silencing was utilized to inhibit Na-K-ATPase-α1. SGLT1 activity was significantly upregulated by Na-K-ATPase silencing, while NHE3 activity remained unaltered. Kinetics showed that the mechanism of stimulation of SGLT1 activity was secondary to an increase in affinity of the cotransporter for glucose without a change in the number of cotransporters. Molecular studies demonstrated that the mechanism of stimulation was not secondary to altered BBM SGLT1 protein levels. Chronic and direct silencing of basolateral Na-K-ATPase uniquely regulates BBM Na absorptive pathways in intestinal epithelial cells. Specifically, while BBM NHE3 is unaffected, SGLT1 is stimulated secondary to enhanced affinity of the cotransporter. PMID:25652450

  10. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystall

  11. Light-dependent degradation of the QB-protein in isolated pea thylakoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohad, I.; Kyle, D. J.; Hirschberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The 32 000-dalton QB-protein of photosystem II (PS II) is rapidly damaged and removed from isolated pea thylakoids during incubation in the light resulting in a loss of photosynthetic electron flow through PS II. This in vitro photoinhibition is similar to that previously reported with intact Chlamydomonas cells. The damage occurs at a faster rate in vitro, however, due to the inability of isolated thylakoids to synthesize replacement QB-protein. The removal of the damaged QB-protein does not require any soluble components of the chloroplast stroma and is unaffected by the protease inhibitors phenyl-methylsulfonylfluoride or antipain. Unlike the effect of trypsin, no low mol. wt. membrane-bound or soluble fragments of the labelled QB-protein could be identified either by autoradiography or immunologically using polyclonal antibodies specific for the QB-protein. The lightinduced damage to the QB-protein (indicated by a loss of QB functional activity), preceded the removal of the protein from the membrane. We conclude that photodamage of the QB-protein generates a conformational change which renders the protein susceptible to attack by a highly efficient, intrinsic membrane protease. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:16453621

  12. Cooperative Reformable Channel System with Unique Recognition of Small Gas Molecules in a two-dimensional ZIF-membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motevalli, Benyamin; Taherifar, Neda; Liu, Zhe

    We report a cooperative reformable channel system in a coordination porous polymer, named as ZIF-L. Three types of local flexible ligands coexist in the crystal structure of this polymer, resulting in ultra-flexibility. The reformable channel is able to regulate permeation of a nonspherical guest molecule, such as N2 or CO2, based on its longer molecular dimension, which is in a striking contrast to conventional molecular sieves that regulate the shorter cross-sectional dimension of the guest molecules. Our density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that the guest molecule induces dynamic motion of the flexible ligands, leading to the channel reformation, and then the guest molecule reorientates itself to fit in the reformed channel. Such a unique ``induced fit-in'' mechanism causes the gas molecule to pass through 6 membered-ring windows in the c- crystal direction of ZIF-L with its longer axis parallel to the window plane. Our experimental permeance of N2 through the ZIF-L membranes is about three times greater than that of CO2, supporting the DFT simulation predictions.

  13. Thymic Nurse Cells Exhibit Epithelial Progenitor Phenotype and Create Unique Extra-Cytoplasmic Membrane Space for Thymocyte Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Tonya M.; Chilukuri, Rajendra V.E.; Martinez, Marcia; Olushoga, Zachariah; Blake, Andrew; Brohi, Moazzam; Walker, Christopher; Samms, Michael; Guyden, Jerry C.

    2010-01-01

    Thymic nurse cells (TNCs) are epithelial cells in the thymic cortex that contain as many as fifty thymocytes within specialized cytoplasmic vacuoles. The function of this cell-in-cell interaction has created controversy since their discovery in 1980. Further, some skepticism exists about the idea that apoptotic thymocytes within the TNC complex result from negative selection, a process believed to occur exclusively within the medulla. In this report, we have microscopic evidence that defines a unique membranous environment wherein lipid raft aggregates around the αβTCR expressed on captured thymocytes and class II MHC molecules expressed on TNCs. Further, immunohistological examination of thymic sections show TNCs located within the cortico-medullary junction to express cytokeratins five and eight (K5 and K8), and the transcription factor Trp-63, the phenotype defined elsewhere as the thymic epithelial progenitor subset. Our results suggest that the microenvironment provided by TNCs plays an important role in thymocyte selection as well as the potential for TNCs to be involved in the maintenance of thymic epithelia. PMID:20035931

  14. MitoNEET Is a Uniquely Folded 2Fe-2S Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Protein Stabilized By Pioglitazone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paddock, M.L.; Wiley, S.E.; Axelrod, H.L.; Cohen, A.E.; Roy, M.; Abresch, E.C.; Capraro, D.; Murphy, A.N.; Nechushtai, R.; Dixon, J.E.; Jennings, P.A.; /UC, San Diego /SLAC, SSRL /Hebrew U.

    2007-10-19

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) proteins are key players in vital processes involving energy homeostasis and metabolism from the simplest to most complex organisms. We report a 1.5 Angstrom x-ray crystal structure of the first identified outer mitochondrial membrane Fe-S protein, mitoNEET. Two protomers intertwine to form a unique dimeric structure that constitutes a new fold to not only the {approx}650 reported Fe-S protein structures but also to all known proteins. We name this motif the NEET fold. The protomers form a two-domain structure: a {beta}-cap domain and a cluster-binding domain that coordinates two acid-labile 2Fe-2S clusters. Binding of pioglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing thiazolidinedione used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, stabilizes the protein against 2Fe-2S cluster release. The biophysical properties of mitoNEET suggest that it may participate in a redox-sensitive signaling and/or in Fe-S cluster transfer.

  15. Artificially acquired chlorophyll b is highly acceptable to the thylakoid-lacking cyanobacterium, Gloeobacter violaceus PCC 7421.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Mie; Akimoto, Seiji; Mimuro, Mamoru; Tsuchiya, Tohru

    2014-08-01

    Unicellular cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus is an only known oxygenic photosynthetic organism that lacks thylakoid membrane. Molecular phylogenetic analyses indicate that G. violaceus is an early-branching cyanobacterium within cyanobacterial clade. Therefore, the photosynthetic system of G. violaceus is considered to be partly similar to that of the ancestral cyanobacteria that would lack thylakoid membrane. G. violaceus possesses chlorophyll (Chl) a as the only chlorophyll species like most cyanobacteria. It was proposed that the ancestral oxygenic photosynthetic organism had not only Chl a and phycobilins but also Chl b. However, no organism which contains both Chl a and Chl b and lacks thylakoid membrane has been found in nature. Therefore, we introduced the chlorophyllide a oxygenase gene responsible for Chl b biosynthesis into G. violaceus. In the resultant transformant, Chl b accumulated at approximately 11% of total Chl independent of growth phase. Photosystem I complexes isolated from the transformant contained Chl b at 9.9% of total Chl. The presence of Chl b in the photosystem I complexes did not inhibit trimer formation. Furthermore, time-resolved fluorescence spectrum demonstrated that Chl b transferred energy to Chl a in the photosystem I complexes and did not disturb the energy transfer among the Chl a molecules. These results show that G. violaceus is tolerant to artificially produced Chl b and suggest the flexibility of photosystem for Chl composition in the ancestral oxygenic photosynthetic organism.

  16. Carotenoid-chlorophyll coupling and fluorescence quenching correlate with protein packing density in grana-thylakoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleboom, Christoph-Peter; Yoo, Sunny; Liao, Pen-Nan; Compton, Ian; Haase, Winfried; Kirchhoff, Helmut; Walla, Peter Jomo

    2013-09-26

    The regulation of light-harvesting in photosynthesis under conditions of varying solar light irradiation is essential for the survival and fitness of plants and algae. It has been proposed that rearrangements of protein distribution in the stacked grana region of thylakoid membranes connected to changes in the electronic pigment-interaction play a key role for this regulation. In particular, carotenoid-chlorophyll interactions seem to be crucial for the down-regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting. So far, it has been difficult to determine the influence of the dense protein packing found in native photosynthetic membrane on these interactions. We investigated the changes of the electronic couplings between carotenoids and chlorophylls and the quenching in grana thylakoids of varying protein packing density by two-photon spectroscopy, conventional chlorophyll fluorometry, low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy, and electron micrographs of freeze-fracture membranes. We observed an increasing carotenoid-chlorophyll coupling and fluorescence quenching with increasing packing density. Simultaneously, the antennas size and excitonic connectivity of Photosystem II increased with increasing quenching and carotenoid-chlorophyll coupling whereas isolated, decoupled LHCII trimers decreased. Two distinct quenching data regimes could be identified that show up at different protein packing densities. In the regime corresponding to higher protein packing densities, quenching is strongly correlated to carotenoid-chlorophyll interactions whereas in the second regime, a weak correlation is apparent with low protein packing densities. Native membranes are in the strong-coupling data regime. Consequently, PSII and LHCII in grana membranes of plants are already quenched by protein crowding. We concluded that this ensures efficient electronic connection of all pigment-protein complexes for intermolecular energy transfer to the reaction centers and allows simultaneously

  17. Role of plastid transglutaminase in LHCII polyamination and thylakoid electron and proton flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos E Ioannidis

    Full Text Available Transglutaminases function as biological glues in animal cells, plant cells and microbes. In energy producing organelles such as chloroplasts the presence of transglutaminases was recently confirmed. Furthermore, a plastidial transglutaminase has been cloned from maize and the first plants overexpressing tgz are available (Nicotiana tabacum TGZ OE. Our hypothesis is that the overexpression of plastidal transglutaminase will alter photosynthesis via increased polyamination of the antenna of photosystem II. We have used standard analytical tools to separate the antenna from photosystem II in wild type and modified plants, 6 specific antibodies against LHCbs to confirm their presence and sensitive HPLC method to quantify the polyamination level of these proteins. We report that bound spermidine and spermine were significantly increased (∼80% in overexpressors. Moreover, we used recent advances in in vivo probing to study simultaneously the proton and electron circuit of thylakoids. Under physiological conditions overexpressors show a 3-fold higher sensitivity of the antenna down regulation loop (qE to the elicitor (luminal protons which is estimated as the ΔpH component of thylakoidal proton motive force. In addition, photosystem (hyper-PSIIα with an exceptionally high antenna (large absorption cross section, accumulate in transglutaminase over expressers doubling the rate constant of light energy utilization (Kα and promoting thylakoid membrane stacking. Polyamination of antenna proteins is a previously unrecognized mechanism for the modulation of the size (antenna absorption cross section and sensitivity of photosystem II to down regulation. Future research will reveal which peptides and which residues of the antenna are responsible for such effects.

  18. Function and evolution of channels and transporters in photosynthetic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeil, Bernard E; Schoefs, Benoît; Spetea, Cornelia

    2014-03-01

    Chloroplasts from land plants and algae originated from an endosymbiotic event, most likely involving an ancestral photoautotrophic prokaryote related to cyanobacteria. Both chloroplasts and cyanobacteria have thylakoid membranes, harboring pigment-protein complexes that perform the light-dependent reactions of oxygenic photosynthesis. The composition, function and regulation of these complexes have thus far been the major topics in thylakoid membrane research. For many decades, we have also accumulated biochemical and electrophysiological evidence for the existence of solute transthylakoid transport activities that affect photosynthesis. However, research dedicated to molecular identification of the responsible proteins has only recently emerged with the explosion of genomic information. Here we review the current knowledge about channels and transporters from the thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana and of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. No homologues of these proteins have been characterized in algae, although similar sequences could be recognized in many of the available sequenced genomes. Based on phylogenetic analyses, we hypothesize a host origin for most of the so far identified Arabidopsis thylakoid channels and transporters. Additionally, the shift from a non-thylakoid to a thylakoid location appears to have occurred at different times for different transport proteins. We propose that closer control of and provision for the thylakoid by products of the host genome has been an ongoing process, rather than a one-step event. Some of the proteins recruited to serve in the thylakoid may have been the result of the increased specialization of its pigment-protein composition and organization in green plants.

  19. Unique battery with a multi-functional, physicochemically active membrane separator/electrolyte-electrode monolith and a method making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Ruscic, Katarina J.; Sears, Devin N.; Smith, Luis J.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2012-07-24

    The invention relates to a unique battery having a physicochemically active membrane separator/electrolyte-electrode monolith and method of making the same. The Applicant's invented battery employs a physicochemically active membrane separator/electrolyte-electrode that acts as a separator, electrolyte, and electrode, within the same monolithic structure. The chemical composition, physical arrangement of molecules, and physical geometry of the pores play a role in the sequestration and conduction of ions. In one preferred embodiment, ions are transported via the ion-hoping mechanism where the oxygens of the Al2O3 wall are available for positive ion coordination (i.e. Li+). This active membrane-electrode composite can be adjusted to a desired level of ion conductivity by manipulating the chemical composition and structure of the pore wall to either increase or decrease ion conduction.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of the thylakoid ATP/ADP carrier reveals new insights into its function restricted to green plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia eSpetea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ATP is the common energy currency of cellular metabolism in all living organisms. Most of them synthesize ATP in the cytosol or on the mitochondrial inner membrane, whereas land plants, algae and cyanobacteria also produce it on the thylakoid membrane during the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis. From the site of synthesis, ATP is transported to the site of utilization via intracellular membranes transporters. One major type of ATP transporter is represented by the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier family. Here we review a recently characterized member, namely the thylakoid ATP/ADP carrier from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtTAAC. Thus far, no orthologues of this carrier have been characterized in other organisms, although similar sequences can be recognized in many sequenced genomes. Protein Sequence database searches and phylogenetic analyses indicate the absence of TAAC in cyanobacteria and its appearance early in the evolution of photosynthetic eukaryotes. The TAAC clade is composed of carriers found in land plants and some green algae, but no proteins from other photosynthetic taxa, such as red algae, brown algae and diatoms. This implies that TAAC-like sequences arose only once before the divergence of green algae and land plants. Based on these findings, it is proposed that TAAC may have evolved in response to the need of a new activity in higher photosynthetic eukaryotes. This activity may provide the energy to drive reactions during biogenesis and turnover of photosynthetic complexes, which are heterogenously distributed in a thylakoid membrane system composed of appressed and non-appressed regions.

  1. Unique Charge Storage Characteristics of FEP/THV/FEP Sandwich Electret Membrane Polarized by Thermally Charging Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang-Jin; Lei, Ming-Feng; Xiao, Hui-Ming; Wu, Ling

    2014-12-01

    Utilizing the synergy of three processes (space charge injection, dipole orientation and interfacial polarization) which determine the electret properties, a sandwich electret membrane FEP/THV/FEP (FEP: fluorinated ethylene propylene, THV: tetrafluoroethylene-hexafluoropropylene-vinylidene) is prepared by the laminating method and the thermal charging technology. The surface potential measurement indicates that the sandwich electret membrane exhibits excellent charge storage stability. When washing the sample surface with alcohol, its surface potential first undergoes decay to zero, and then quickly restores to a high value. The surface potential value is associated with the charging electric field and temperature. The best charging condition is 18.75 MV·m-1 and 130°C. A charge storage profile is proposed, and the experimental results are in good agreement with this profile.

  2. Biotic stress induced demolition of thylakoid structure and loss in photoelectron transport of chloroplasts in papaya leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Rashmi Madhumita; Biswal, Basanti

    2008-04-01

    Papaya mosaic virus (PMV) causes severe mosaic symptoms in the papaya (Carica papaya L.) leaves. The PMV-induced alterations in photosystem II (PS II) structure and photochemical functions were probed. An increase in chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence polarization suggests pathogen-induced transformation of thylakoid membrane to a gel phase. This transformation in physical state of thylakoid membrane may result in alteration in topology of pigments on pigment-binding proteins as reflected in pathogen-induced loss in the efficiency of energy transfer from carotenoids to chlorophylls. The fast Chl a fluorescence induction kinetics of healthy and PMV-infected plants by F(O)-F(J)-F(I)-F(P) transients revealed pathogen-induced perturbation on PS II acceptor side electron transfer equilibrium between Q(A) and Q(B) and in the pool size of electron transport acceptors. Pathogen-induced loss in photosynthetic pigments, changes in thylakoid structure and decrease in the ratio of F(V)/F(M) (photochemical potential of PS II) further correlate with the loss in photoelectron transport of PS II as probed by 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP)-Hill reaction. Restoration of the loss by 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPC), an exogenous electron donor, that donates electron directly to reaction centre II bypassing the oxygen evolving system (OES), leads towards the conclusion that OES is one of the major targets of biotic stress. Further, the data suggest that chlorophyll fluorescence could be used as a non-invasive handy tool to assess the loss in photosynthetic efficiency and symptom severity in infected green tissues vis-a-vis the healthy ones.

  3. Spinach thylakoid polyphenol oxidase isolation, activation, and properties of the native chloroplast enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golbeck, J.H.; Cammarata, K.V.

    1981-05-01

    Polyphenol oxidase activity (E.C. 1.14,18.1) has been found in two enzyme species isolated from thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts. The proteins were released from the membrane by sonication and purified >900-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and ion-exchange chromatography. The enzymes appear to be the tetramer and monomer of a subunit with a molecular weight of 42,500 as determined by lithium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Sonication releases polyphenol oxidase from the membrane largely in the latent state. In the absence of added fatty acids, the isolated enzyme spontaneously, but slowly, activates with time. Purified polyphenol oxidase utilizes o-diphenols as substrates and shows no detectable levels of monophenol or p-diphenol oxidase activities. Suitable substrates include chlorogenic acid, catechol, caffeic acid, pyrogallol, and dopamine; however, the enzyme is substrate-inhibited by the last four at concentrations near their K/sub m/. A large seasonal variation in polyphenol oxidase activity may result from a decrease in enzyme content rather than inhibition of the enzyme present.

  4. Membraner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner......Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner...

  5. Photosynthetic Membranes of Synechocystis or Plants Convert Sunlight to Photocurrent through Different Pathways due to Different Architectures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy I Pinhassi

    Full Text Available Thylakoid membranes contain the redox active complexes catalyzing the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis in cyanobacteria, algae and plants. Crude thylakoid membranes or purified photosystems from different organisms have previously been utilized for generation of electrical power and/or fuels. Here we investigate the electron transferability from thylakoid preparations from plants or the cyanobacterium Synechocystis. We show that upon illumination, crude Synechocystis thylakoids can reduce cytochrome c. In addition, this crude preparation can transfer electrons to a graphite electrode, producing an unmediated photocurrent of 15 μA/cm2. Photocurrent could be obtained in the presence of the PSII inhibitor DCMU, indicating that the source of electrons is QA, the primary Photosystem II acceptor. In contrast, thylakoids purified from plants could not reduce cyt c, nor produced a photocurrent in the photocell in the presence of DCMU. The production of significant photocurrent (100 μA/cm2 from plant thylakoids required the addition of the soluble electron mediator DCBQ. Furthermore, we demonstrate that use of crude thylakoids from the D1-K238E mutant in Synechocystis resulted in improved electron transferability, increasing the direct photocurrent to 35 μA/cm2. Applying the analogous mutation to tobacco plants did not achieve an equivalent effect. While electron abstraction from crude thylakoids of cyanobacteria or plants is feasible, we conclude that the site of the abstraction of the electrons from the thylakoids, the architecture of the thylakoid preparations influence the site of the electron abstraction, as well as the transfer pathway to the electrode. This dictates the use of different strategies for production of sustainable electrical current from photosynthetic thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria or higher plants.

  6. Photosynthetic Membranes of Synechocystis or Plants Convert Sunlight to Photocurrent through Different Pathways due to Different Architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhassi, Roy I; Kallmann, Dan; Saper, Gadiel; Larom, Shirley; Linkov, Artyom; Boulouis, Alix; Schöttler, Mark-Aurel; Bock, Ralph; Rothschild, Avner; Adir, Noam; Schuster, Gadi

    2015-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes contain the redox active complexes catalyzing the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis in cyanobacteria, algae and plants. Crude thylakoid membranes or purified photosystems from different organisms have previously been utilized for generation of electrical power and/or fuels. Here we investigate the electron transferability from thylakoid preparations from plants or the cyanobacterium Synechocystis. We show that upon illumination, crude Synechocystis thylakoids can reduce cytochrome c. In addition, this crude preparation can transfer electrons to a graphite electrode, producing an unmediated photocurrent of 15 μA/cm2. Photocurrent could be obtained in the presence of the PSII inhibitor DCMU, indicating that the source of electrons is QA, the primary Photosystem II acceptor. In contrast, thylakoids purified from plants could not reduce cyt c, nor produced a photocurrent in the photocell in the presence of DCMU. The production of significant photocurrent (100 μA/cm2) from plant thylakoids required the addition of the soluble electron mediator DCBQ. Furthermore, we demonstrate that use of crude thylakoids from the D1-K238E mutant in Synechocystis resulted in improved electron transferability, increasing the direct photocurrent to 35 μA/cm2. Applying the analogous mutation to tobacco plants did not achieve an equivalent effect. While electron abstraction from crude thylakoids of cyanobacteria or plants is feasible, we conclude that the site of the abstraction of the electrons from the thylakoids, the architecture of the thylakoid preparations influence the site of the electron abstraction, as well as the transfer pathway to the electrode. This dictates the use of different strategies for production of sustainable electrical current from photosynthetic thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria or higher plants.

  7. MET1 is a thylakoid-associated TPR protein involved in photosystem II supercomplex formation and repair in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Nazmul H; Friso, Giulia; Poliakov, Anton; Ponnala, Lalit; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) requires constant disassembly and reassembly to accommodate replacement of the D1 protein. Here, we characterize Arabidopsis thaliana MET1, a PSII assembly factor with PDZ and TPR domains. The maize (Zea mays) MET1 homolog is enriched in mesophyll chloroplasts compared with bundle sheath chloroplasts, and MET1 mRNA and protein levels increase during leaf development concomitant with the thylakoid machinery. MET1 is conserved in C3 and C4 plants and green algae but is not found in prokaryotes. Arabidopsis MET1 is a peripheral thylakoid protein enriched in stroma lamellae and is also present in grana. Split-ubiquitin assays and coimmunoprecipitations showed interaction of MET1 with stromal loops of PSII core components CP43 and CP47. From native gels, we inferred that MET1 associates with PSII subcomplexes formed during the PSII repair cycle. When grown under fluctuating light intensities, the Arabidopsis MET1 null mutant (met1) showed conditional reduced growth, near complete blockage in PSII supercomplex formation, and concomitant increase of unassembled CP43. Growth of met1 in high light resulted in loss of PSII supercomplexes and accelerated D1 degradation. We propose that MET1 functions as a CP43/CP47 chaperone on the stromal side of the membrane during PSII assembly and repair. This function is consistent with the observed differential MET1 accumulation across dimorphic maize chloroplasts.

  8. The Arabidopsis Thylakoid Protein PAM68 Is Required for Efficient D1 Biogenesis and Photosystem II Assembly[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Ute; Zühlke, Jessica; Rengstl, Birgit; Kreller, Renate; Makarenko, Elina; Rühle, Thilo; Schünemann, Danja; Jahns, Peter; Weisshaar, Bernd; Nickelsen, Jörg; Leister, Dario

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a multiprotein complex that functions as a light-driven water:plastoquinone oxidoreductase in photosynthesis. Assembly of PSII proceeds through a number of distinct intermediate states and requires auxiliary proteins. The photosynthesis affected mutant 68 (pam68) of Arabidopsis thaliana displays drastically altered chlorophyll fluorescence and abnormally low levels of the PSII core subunits D1, D2, CP43, and CP47. We show that these phenotypes result from a specific decrease in the stability and maturation of D1. This is associated with a marked increase in the synthesis of RC (the PSII reaction center-like assembly complex) at the expense of PSII dimers and supercomplexes. PAM68 is a conserved integral membrane protein found in cyanobacterial and eukaryotic thylakoids and interacts in split-ubiquitin assays with several PSII core proteins and known PSII assembly factors. Biochemical analyses of thylakoids from Arabidopsis and Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 suggest that, during PSII assembly, PAM68 proteins associate with an early intermediate complex that might contain D1 and the assembly factor LPA1. Inactivation of cyanobacterial PAM68 destabilizes RC but does not affect larger PSII assembly complexes. Our data imply that PAM68 proteins promote early steps in PSII biogenesis in cyanobacteria and plants, but their inactivation is differently compensated for in the two classes of organisms. PMID:20923938

  9. The Arabidopsis thylakoid protein PAM68 is required for efficient D1 biogenesis and photosystem II assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Ute; Zühlke, Jessica; Rengstl, Birgit; Kreller, Renate; Makarenko, Elina; Rühle, Thilo; Schünemann, Danja; Jahns, Peter; Weisshaar, Bernd; Nickelsen, Jörg; Leister, Dario

    2010-10-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a multiprotein complex that functions as a light-driven water:plastoquinone oxidoreductase in photosynthesis. Assembly of PSII proceeds through a number of distinct intermediate states and requires auxiliary proteins. The photosynthesis affected mutant 68 (pam68) of Arabidopsis thaliana displays drastically altered chlorophyll fluorescence and abnormally low levels of the PSII core subunits D1, D2, CP43, and CP47. We show that these phenotypes result from a specific decrease in the stability and maturation of D1. This is associated with a marked increase in the synthesis of RC (the PSII reaction center-like assembly complex) at the expense of PSII dimers and supercomplexes. PAM68 is a conserved integral membrane protein found in cyanobacterial and eukaryotic thylakoids and interacts in split-ubiquitin assays with several PSII core proteins and known PSII assembly factors. Biochemical analyses of thylakoids from Arabidopsis and Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 suggest that, during PSII assembly, PAM68 proteins associate with an early intermediate complex that might contain D1 and the assembly factor LPA1. Inactivation of cyanobacterial PAM68 destabilizes RC but does not affect larger PSII assembly complexes. Our data imply that PAM68 proteins promote early steps in PSII biogenesis in cyanobacteria and plants, but their inactivation is differently compensated for in the two classes of organisms.

  10. Dietary green-plant thylakoids decrease gastric emptying and gut transit, promote changes in the gut microbial flora, but does not cause steatorrhea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenblom, Eva-Lena; Weström, Björn R.; Linninge, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    , and specifically the Bacteriodes fragilis group, were increased by thylakoid treatment versus placebo, while thylakoids did not cause steatorrhea. Dietary supplementation with thylakoids thus affects satiety both via appetite hormones and GI fullness, and affects the microbial composition without causing GI...... adverse effects such as steatorrhea. This suggests thylakoids as a novel agent in prevention and treatment of obesity....

  11. Identification of the Ndh (NAD(P)H-Plastoquinone-oxidoreductase) Complex in Etioplast Membranes of Barley : Changes during Photomorphogenesis of Chloroplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Alfredo, Guera; Pedro G.de, Nova; Bartolome, Sabater; Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Universidad de Alcala de Henares

    2000-01-01

    In the last few years the presence in thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts of a NAD(P)H-plastoquinone oxidoreductase complex (Ndh complex) homologous to mitochondrial complex I has been well established. Herein, we report the identification of the Ndh complex in barley etioplast membranes. Two plastid DNA-encoded polypeptides of the Ndh complex (NDH-A and NDH-F) were relatively more abundant in etioplast membranes than in thylakoids from greening chloroplasts. Conversion of etioplast into chlo...

  12. PSB27: A thylakoid protein enabling Arabidopsis to adapt to changing light intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Xin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept of Plant and Microbial Biology; Garcia, Veder J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept of Plant and Microbial Biology; Buchanan, Bob B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept of Plant and Microbial Biology; Luan, Sheng [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept of Plant and Microbial Biology

    2016-08-22

    dissect the mechanism of action for CYP38. Our studies suggest an “autoinhibitory” model for CYP38 action. We plan to test this model and determine the mechanistic details for CYP38 function by biochemical and genetic procedures. 2. To determine the mechanism of action of FKBP20-2/FKBP16-3. Studies on FBKP16-3 and FKBP20-2 suggest that they may work together as a redox-dependent duo in PSII assembly. We will test this hypothesis using biochemical and genetic tools. 3. To determine the function of lumenal FKBPs by multi-gene mutagenesis approach. Using new genetic knockout (KO) procedures especially CRISPR/CAS9 system, we plan to generate multi-gene KO models that will likely provide vital information on those FKBPs with functional redundancy. 4. Functional analysis of thylakoid lumen network. We will focus our effort on objectives 1-3. Objective 4 represents a long-term goal to establish a more comprehensive network of proteins in the thylakoid lumen and their function in the assembly and maintenance of photosynthetic complexes. I hypothesize that the 16 immunophilin-type chaperones and foldases in the thylakoid lumen constitute an “assembly line” for the various components in the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Understanding this assembly line will enable further engineering of more efficient photosynthetic machines to capture more light energy and enhance plant productivity. Furthermore, it is envisioned that such molecular “assembly line” may be rebuilt to produce artificial photosynthesis in vitro or in non-photosynthetic organisms. These are highly relevant to the mission of “Photosynthetic Systems” and “Physical Biosciences” programs to “enhance our understanding of energy capture, conversion, and/or storage.” During the funding period, we have performed a number of experiments under the proposed objectives and obtained several new results. We have found in Objective 1 that CYP38 is associated to the thylokoid membrane with a larger

  13. Comparison of lipid membrane-water partitioning with various organic solvent-water partitions of neutral species and ionic species: Uniqueness of cerasome as a model for the stratum corneum in partition processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Keda; Fahr, Alfred; Abraham, Michael H; Acree, William E; Tobin, Desmond J; Liu, Xiangli

    2015-10-15

    Lipid membrane-water partitions (e.g., immobilized artificial membrane systems where the lipid membrane is a neutral phospholipid monolayer bound to gel beads) were compared to various organic solvent-water partitions using linear free energy relationships. To this end, we also measured the retention factors of 36 compounds (including neutral and ionic species) from water to liposomes made up of 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine and 3-sn-phosphatidyl-l-serine (80:20, mol/mol), employing liposome electrokinetic chromatography in this work. The results show that lipid membranes exhibit a considerably different chemical environment from those of organic solvents. For both neutral species and ionic species, partitions into the more polar hydroxylic solvents are chemically closer to partition into the lipid membrane as compared to partitions into the less polar hydroxylic solvents and into aprotic solvents. This means that solutes partition into the polar parts of lipid membranes, regardless of whether they are charged or not. In addition, cerasome (i.e., liposome composed mainly of stratum corneum lipids) was compared with regular phospholipid liposomes as a possible model for human stratum corneum in partitions. It was found that the cerasome-water partition exhibits a better chemical similarity to skin permeation. This is probably due to the unique structures of ceramides that occur in cerasome and in the stratum corneum lipid domain. We further show that membranes in membrane-water partitions exhibit very different properties.

  14. Localization of Membrane Proteins in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 (Radial Asymmetry in the Photosynthetic Complexes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, D. M.; Troyan, T. A.; Sherman, L. A.

    1994-09-01

    Localization of membrane proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 was determined by transmission electron microscopy utilizing immunocytochemistry with cells prepared by freeze-substitution. This preparation procedure maintained cellular morphology and permitted detection of cellular antigens with high sensitivity and low background. Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 is a unicellular cyanobacterium with thylakoids organized in concentric layers toward the periphery of the cell. Cytochrome oxidase was localized almost entirely in the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas a carotenoprotein (P35) was shown to be a cell wall component. The major photosystem II (PSII) proteins (D1, D2 CP43, and CP47) were localized throughout the thylakoids. Proteins of the Cyt b6/f complex were found to have a similar distribution. Thylakoid luminal proteins, such as the Mn-stabilizing protein, were located primarily in the thylakoid, but a small, reproducible fraction was found in the outer compartment. The photosystem I (PSI) reaction center proteins and the ATP synthase proteins were found associated mostly with the outermost thylakoid and with the cytoplasmic membrane. These results indicated that the photosynthetic apparatus is not evenly distributed throughout the thylakoids. Rather, there is a radial asymmetry such that much of the PSI and the ATPase synthase is located in the outermost thylakoid. The relationship of this structure to the photosynthetic mechanism is discussed. It is suggested that the photosystems are separated because of kinetic differences between PSII and PSI, as hypothesized by H.-W. Trissl and C. Wilhelm (Trends Biochem Sci [1993] 18:415-419).

  15. Translocation of a phycoerythrin alpha subunit across five biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Sven B; Fan, Enguo; Hempel, Franziska; Maier, Uwe-G; Klösgen, Ralf Bernd

    2007-10-12

    Cryptophytes, unicellular algae, evolved by secondary endosymbiosis and contain plastids surrounded by four membranes. In contrast to cyanobacteria and red algae, their phycobiliproteins do not assemble into phycobilisomes and are located within the thylakoid lumen instead of the stroma. We identified two gene families encoding phycoerythrin alpha and light-harvesting complex proteins from an expressed sequence tag library of the cryptophyte Guillardia theta. The proteins bear a bipartite topogenic signal responsible for the transport of nuclear encoded proteins via the ER into the plastid. Analysis of the phycoerythrin alpha sequences revealed that more than half of them carry an additional, third topogenic signal comprising a twin arginine motif, which is indicative of Tat (twin arginine transport)-specific targeting signals. We performed import studies with several derivatives of one member using a diatom transformation system, as well as intact chloroplasts and thylakoid vesicles isolated from pea. We demonstrated the different targeting properties of each individual part of the tripartite leader and show that phycoerythrin alpha is transported across the thylakoid membrane into the thylakoid lumen and protease-protected. Furthermore, we showed that thylakoid transport of phycoerythrin alpha takes place by the Tat pathway even if the 36 amino acid long bipartite topogenic signal precedes the actual twin arginine signal. This is the first experimental evidence of a protein being targeted across five biological membranes.

  16. Hacking the thylakoid proton motive force for improved photosynthesis: modulating ion flux rates that control proton motive force partitioning into Δψ and ΔpH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Geoffry A; Rutherford, A William; Kramer, David M

    2017-09-26

    There is considerable interest in improving plant productivity by altering the dynamic responses of photosynthesis in tune with natural conditions. This is exemplified by the 'energy-dependent' form of non-photochemical quenching (qE), the formation and decay of which can be considerably slower than natural light fluctuations, limiting photochemical yield. In addition, we recently reported that rapidly fluctuating light can produce field recombination-induced photodamage (FRIP), where large spikes in electric field across the thylakoid membrane (Δψ) induce photosystem II recombination reactions that produce damaging singlet oxygen ((1)O2). Both qE and FRIP are directly linked to the thylakoid proton motive force (pmf), and in particular, the slow kinetics of partitioning pmf into its ΔpH and Δψ components. Using a series of computational simulations, we explored the possibility of 'hacking' pmf partitioning as a target for improving photosynthesis. Under a range of illumination conditions, increasing the rate of counter-ion fluxes across the thylakoid membrane should lead to more rapid dissipation of Δψ and formation of ΔpH. This would result in increased rates for the formation and decay of qE while resulting in a more rapid decline in the amplitudes of Δψ-spikes and decreasing (1)O2 production. These results suggest that ion fluxes may be a viable target for plant breeding or engineering. However, these changes also induce transient, but substantial mismatches in the ATP : NADPH output ratio as well as in the osmotic balance between the lumen and stroma, either of which may explain why evolution has not already accelerated thylakoid ion fluxes. Overall, though the model is simplified, it recapitulates many of the responses seen in vivo, while spotlighting critical aspects of the complex interactions between pmf components and photosynthetic processes. By making the programme available, we hope to enable the community of photosynthesis researchers to

  17. Ultrastructural changes in the membrane system of isolated chloroplasts of spinach under the influence of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors AA and EA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Vodka

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (АА and EA on the membrane system of isolated chloroplasts of spinach were investigated. Under the influence of AA the considerable alterations in granal structure occurred, the thickness of the granal thylakoids increased by 36% and the interspace between thylakoids by 10% comparable with the control. As a result of EA treatment, the thickness of granal thylakoids enhanced by 31% and the interspace between thylakoids increased by 8% in comparison to the control. It was shown that structure of the granal system of the chloroplast was more sensitive to AA than EA. The data obtained can indicate a decrease in the activity of the thylakoid carbonic anhydrase, inhibition of electron transport and photosynthetic process as a whole in the presence of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (AA and EA.

  18. Thylakoids suppress appetite by increasing cholecystokinin resulting in lower food intake and body weight in high-fat fed mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhnke, Rickard; Lindqvist, Andreas; Göransson, Nathanael

    2009-01-01

    affect food intake and body weight during long-term feeding in mice. Female apolipoprotein E-deficient mice were fed a high-fat diet containing 41% of fat by energy with and without thylakoids for 100 days. Mice fed the thylakoid-enriched diet had suppressed food intake, body weight gain and body fat...... fat mass. There was no sign of desensitization in the animals treated with thylakoids. The results suggest that thylakoids are useful to suppress appetite and body weight gain when supplemented to a high-fat food during long-term feeding....... compared with the high-fat fed control mice. Reduced serum glucose, serum triglyceride and serum free fatty acid levels were found in the thylakoid-treated animals. The satiety hormone cholecystokinin was elevated, suggesting this hormone mediates satiety. Leptin levels were reduced, reflecting a decreased...

  19. A twin arginine signal peptide and the pH gradient trigger reversible assembly of the thylakoid [Delta]pH/Tat translocase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hiroki; Cline, Kenneth

    2002-04-15

    The thylakoid DeltapH-dependent/Tat pathway is a novel system with the remarkable ability to transport tightly folded precursor proteins using a transmembrane DeltapH as the sole energy source. Three known components of the transport machinery exist in two distinct subcomplexes. A cpTatC-Hcf106 complex serves as precursor receptor and a Tha4 complex is required after precursor recognition. Here we report that Tha4 assembles with cpTatC-Hcf106 during the translocation step. Interactions among components were examined by chemical cross-linking of intact thylakoids followed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. cpTatC and Hcf106 were consistently associated under all conditions tested. In contrast, Tha4 was only associated with cpTatC and Hcf106 in the presence of a functional precursor and the DeltapH. Interestingly, a synthetic signal peptide could replace intact precursor in triggering assembly. The association of all three components was transient and dissipated upon the completion of protein translocation. Such an assembly-disassembly cycle could explain how the DeltapH/Tat system can assemble translocases to accommodate folded proteins of varied size. It also explains in part how the system can exist in the membrane without compromising its ion and proton permeability barrier.

  20. Photoactivation of electrogenic activity in chloroplasts and its relation to photoinduced swelling of thylakoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulychev, A.A.; Vredenberg, W.J.

    2000-01-01

    In patch-clamp experiments on isolated chloroplasts of Peperomia metallica Lind. et Rodig. (Piperaceae), the replacement of 50 mM KCl in a medium with 50 mM NH4Cl strongly influenced the parameters of photocurrent known to reflect the generation of electric potential in thylakoids. The addition of N

  1. Thylakoids promote release of the satiety hormone cholecystokinin while reducing insulin in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhnke, Rickard; Lindbo, Agnes; Larsson, Therese

    2009-01-01

    (CCK, leptin and ghrelin), insulin and blood metabolites (glucose and free fatty acids). RESULTS: The CCK level increased, in particular between the 120 min time-point and onwards, the ghrelin level was reduced at 120 min and leptin level increased at 360 min after intake of the thylakoid-enriched meal...

  2. Phycobilisome-thylakoid Topography on Photosynthetically Active Vesicles of Porphyridium cruentum1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, Machi F.; Gantt, Elisabeth

    1981-01-01

    Conditions are described for isolating functional phycobilisome-thylakoid vesicles from the red alga Porphyridium cruentum. Phycobilisome-thylakoid vesicles were prepared by brief sonication and centrifugation in a medium containing 0.5 molar sucrose, 0.5 molar potassium phosphate, and 0.3 molar sodium citrate (pH 7.0). They required ferricyanide as an oxidant and had O2 evolution rates (about 450 micromoles O2 per hour per milligram chlorophyll) higher than whole cells (about 250 micromoles O2 per hour per milligram chlorophyll). Energy transfer to photosystem II chlorophyll was evident from a high F695 nanometer (−196 C) emission peak. Preparations could be stored for over 24 hours and were considerably more stable than those from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis (Katoh T, E Gantt 1979 Biochim Biophys Acta 546: 383-393). In electron micrographs of negatively stained material, the active thylakoid vesicles were found covered by closely spaced phycobilisomes on their external surface. The phycobilisome number in negatively stained vesicles was 450 per square micrometer, which was in the same range as the 400 per square micrometer observed in surface sections. A cell containing 1.5 × 10−6 micrograms phycoerythrin and 1.3 × 10−6 micrograms chlorophyll was found to contain 5 to 7 × 105 phycobilisomes on a thylakoid area of 1.1 to 1.6 × 103 square micrometers. Images PMID:16661723

  3. Proteomics of the chloroplast: systematic identification and targeting analysis of lumenal and peripheral thylakoid proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltier, J B; Friso, G; Kalume, D E

    2000-01-01

    The soluble and peripheral proteins in the thylakoids of pea were systematically analyzed by using two-dimensional electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, and N-terminal Edman sequencing, followed by database searching. After correcting to eliminate possible isoforms and post-translational modificati...... of proteomics for plant biology and homology-based searching with mass spectrometry data is discussed....

  4. Reversible membrane reorganizations during photosynthesis in vivo: revealed by small-angle neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagy, Gergely; Posselt, Dorthe; Kovacs, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we determined characteristic repeat distances of the photosynthetic membranes in living cyanobacterial and eukaryotic algal cells, and in intact thylakoid membranes isolated from higher plants with time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering. This non-invasive technique rev...

  5. Kinetics of structural reorganizations in multilamellarphotosynthetic membranes monitored by small-angle neutronscattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagy, Gergely; Kovacs, Laszlo; Unnep, Renata;

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the power of time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering experiments for the investigation of the structure and structural reorganizations of multilamellar photosynthetic membranes. In addition to briefly summarizing our results on thylakoid membranes isolated from higher plants a...

  6. A unique HEAT repeat-containing protein SHOOT GRAVITROPISM6 is involved in vacuolar membrane dynamics in gravity-sensing cells of Arabidopsis inflorescence stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Yasuko; Yano, Daisuke; Nagafusa, Kiyoshi; Kato, Takehide; Saito, Chieko; Uemura, Tomohiro; Ueda, Takashi; Nakano, Akihiko; Tasaka, Masao; Terao Morita, Miyo

    2014-04-01

    Plant vacuoles play critical roles in development, growth and stress responses. In mature cells, vacuolar membranes (VMs) display several types of structures, which are formed by invagination and folding of VMs into the lumenal side and can gradually move and change shape. Although such VM structures are observed in a broad range of tissue types and plant species, the molecular mechanism underlying their formation and maintenance remains unclear. Here, we report that a novel HEAT-repeat protein, SHOOT GRAVITROPISM6 (SGR6), of Arabidopsis is involved in the control of morphological changes and dynamics of VM structures in endodermal cells, which are the gravity-sensing cells in shoots. SGR6 is a membrane-associated protein that is mainly localized to the VM in stem endodermal cells. The sgr6 mutant stem exhibits a reduced gravitropic response. Higher plants utilize amyloplast sedimentation as a means to sense gravity direction. Amyloplasts are surrounded by VMs in Arabidopsis endodermal cells, and the flexible and dynamic structure of VMs is important for amyloplast sedimentation. We demonstrated that such dynamic features of VMs are gradually lost in sgr6 endodermal cells during a 30 min observation period. Histological analysis revealed that amyloplast sedimentation was impaired in sgr6. Detailed live-cell imaging analyses revealed that the VM structures in sgr6 had severe defects in morphological changes and dynamics. Our results suggest that SGR6 is a novel protein involved in the formation and/or maintenance of invaginated VM structures in gravity-sensing cells.

  7. Structure and membrane organization of photosystem II in green plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hankamer, B; Barber, J; Boekema, EJ

    1997-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the pigment protein complex embedded in the thylakoid membrane of higher plants, algae, and cyanobacteria that uses solar energy to drive the photosynthetic water-splitting reaction. This chapter reviews the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures of PSII as

  8. The changes in the chloroplast membranes of pea leaves under the influence of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (ions of copper and zinc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Vodka

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Тhe effects of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, such as ions Cu2+ and Zn2+, on the membrane system of chloroplasts in pea leaves were investigated. After treatment of pea leaves with 250 mM Cu2+ or 400 mM Zn2+ we observed changes in the granal structure and compactness of the thylakoids in granae. It was shown that the thickness of granal thylakoids and the interspace between thylakoids increased comparing to control. Changes of the size and structure of thylakoids and granae in treated leaves may be associated with the enhanced accumulation of CO2 in the membrane. It is suggested that the carbonic anhydrase may also play a structural role in chloroplast granae.

  9. Membrane-Active Epithelial Keratin 6A Fragments (KAMPs Are Unique Human Antimicrobial Peptides with a Non-αβ Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Tsz Ying Lee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is a pressing global health problem that threatens millions of lives each year. Natural antimicrobial peptides and their synthetic derivatives, including peptoids and peptidomimetics, are promising candidates as novel antibiotics. Recently, the C-terminal glycine-rich fragments of human epithelial keratin 6A were found to have bactericidal and cytoprotective activities. Here, we used an improved 2-dimensional NMR method coupled with a new protocol for structural refinement by low temperature simulated annealing to characterize the solution structure of these kerain-derived antimicrobial peptides (KAMPs. Two specific KAMPs in complex with membrane mimicking sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS micelles displayed amphipathic conformations with only local bends and turns, and a central 10-residue glycine-rich hydrophobic strip that is central to bactericidal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of non-αβ structure for human antimicrobial peptides. Direct observation of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that KAMPs deformed bacterial cell envelopes and induced pore formation. Notably, in competitive binding experiments, KAMPs demonstrated binding affinities to LPS and LTA that did not correlate with their bactericidal activities, suggesting peptide-LPS and peptide-LTA interactions are less important in their mechanisms of action. Moreover, immunoprecipitation of KAMPs-bacterial factor complexes indicated that membrane surface lipoprotein SlyB and intracellular machineries NQR sodium pump and ribosomes are potential molecular targets for the peptides. Results of this study improve our understanding of the bactericidal function of epithelial cytokeratin fragments, and highlight an unexplored class of human antimicrobial peptides, which may serve as non-αβ peptide scaffolds for the design of novel peptide-based antibiotics.

  10. The FupA/B protein uniquely facilitates transport of ferrous iron and siderophore-associated ferric iron across the outer membrane of Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Bhaswati

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious Gram-negative pathogen that replicates intracellularly within the mammalian host. One of the factors associated with virulence of F. tularensis is the protein FupA that mediates high-affinity transport of ferrous iron across the outer membrane. Together with its paralogue FslE, a siderophore–ferric iron transporter, FupA supports survival of the pathogen in the host by providing access to the essential nutrient iron. The FupA orthologue in the attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS) is encoded by the hybrid gene fupA/B, the product of an intergenic recombination event that significantly contributes to attenuation of the strain. We used 55Fe transport assays with mutant strains complemented with the different paralogues to show that the FupA/B protein of LVS retains the capacity for high-affinity transport of ferrous iron, albeit less efficiently than FupA of virulent strain Schu S4. 55Fe transport assays using purified siderophore and siderophore-dependent growth assays on iron-limiting agar confirmed previous findings that FupA/B also contributes to siderophore-mediated ferric iron uptake. These assays further demonstrated that the LVS FslE protein is a weaker siderophore–ferric iron transporter than the orthologue from Schu S4, and may be a result of the sequence variation between the two proteins. Our results indicate that iron-uptake mechanisms in LVS differ from those in Schu S4 and that functional differences in the outer membrane iron transporters have distinct effects on growth under iron limitation. PMID:24307666

  11. Dietary thylakoids suppress blood glucose and modulate appetite-regulating hormones in pigs exposed to oral glucose tolerance test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montelius, Caroline; Szwiec, Katarzyna; Kardas, Marek

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Dietary chloroplast thylakoids have previously been found to reduce food intake and body weight in animal models, and to change metabolic profiles in humans in mixed-food meal studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the modulatory effects of thylakoids on glucose......, and decreased late postprandial secretion of ghrelin. CONCLUSION: Dietary thylakoids may be a novel agent in reducing the glycaemic responses to high carbohydrate and high glycaemic index foods. Thylakoids may in the future be promising for treatment and prevention of diabetes, overweight and obesity....... metabolism and appetite-regulating hormones during an oral glucose tolerance test in pigs fed a high fat diet. METHODS: Six pigs were fed a high fat diet (36 energy% fat) for one month before oral glucose tolerance test (1 g/kg d-glucose) was performed. The experiment was designed as a cross-over study...

  12. The effect of metal chelators on the production of hydroxyl radicals in thylakoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyrychová, Iva; Pospísil, Pavel; Naus, Jan

    2006-06-01

    The effect of metal chelators (EDTA, DTPA and Desferal) on the metal-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was studied using EPR spin-trapping spectroscopy. The formation of hydroxyl radicals (OH*) in both chemical (Fenton reaction) and biological (thylakoids) systems was stimulated by EDTA. DTPA promoted the generation of OH* in the presence of strong reducing agents, whereas in their absence it acted as an antioxidant. Desferal suppressed OH* production even in the presence of reductants. In our study, we have shown that metal chelators can both stimulate and suppress the formation of OH*, depending on the experimental conditions. In illuminated thylakoids we have observed prooxidant effect of EDTA and DTPA, possibly due to their reduction by some component of the electron transport chain. According to our results, metal chelators should not be used as antioxidants without prior testing of their effect in given samples.

  13. Specific interaction of IM30/Vipp1 with cyanobacterial and chloroplast membranes results in membrane remodeling and eventually in membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich, Jennifer; Thurotte, Adrien; Schneider, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    The photosynthetic light reaction takes place within the thylakoid membrane system in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. Besides its global importance, the biogenesis, maintenance and dynamics of this membrane system are still a mystery. In the last two decades, strong evidence supported the idea that these processes involve IM30, the inner membrane-associated protein of 30kDa, a protein also known as the vesicle-inducing protein in plastids 1 (Vipp1). Even though we just only begin to understand the precise physiological function of this protein, it is clear that interaction of IM30 with membranes is crucial for biogenesis of thylakoid membranes. Here we summarize and discuss forces guiding IM30-membrane interactions, as the membrane properties as well as the oligomeric state of IM30 appear to affect proper interaction of IM30 with membrane surfaces. Interaction of IM30 with membranes results in an altered membrane structure and can finally trigger fusion of adjacent membranes, when Mg(2+) is present. Based on recent results, we finally present a model summarizing individual steps involved in IM30-mediated membrane fusion. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  14. Biogenesis of cytochrome b6 in photosynthetic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Marcoux, Denis; Wollman, Francis-André; de Vitry, Catherine

    2009-06-29

    In chloroplasts, binding of a c'-heme to cytochrome b(6) on the stromal side of the thylakoid membranes requires a specific mechanism distinct from the one at work for c-heme binding to cytochromes f and c(6) on the lumenal side of membranes. Here, we show that the major protein components of this pathway, the CCBs, are bona fide transmembrane proteins. We demonstrate their association in a series of hetero-oligomeric complexes, some of which interact transiently with cytochrome b(6) in the process of heme delivery to the apoprotein. In addition, we provide preliminary evidence for functional assembly of cytochrome b(6)f complexes even in the absence of c'-heme binding to cytochrome b(6). Finally, we present a sequential model for apo- to holo-cytochrome b(6) maturation integrated within the assembly pathway of b(6)f complexes in the thylakoid membranes.

  15. The 1.7 Å resolution structure of At2g44920, a pentapeptide-repeat protein in the thylakoid lumen of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Shuisong; McGookey, Michael E.; Tinch, Stuart L.; Jones, Alisha N.; Jayaraman, Seetharaman; Tong, Liang; Kennedy, Michael A. (Miami U); (Columbia)

    2012-01-09

    At2g44920 belongs to a diverse family (Pfam PF00805) of pentapeptide-repeat proteins (PRPs) that are present in all known organisms except yeast. PRPs contain at least eight tandem-repeating sequences of five amino acids with an approximate consensus sequence (STAV)(D/N)(L/F)(S/T/R)(X). Recent crystal structures show that PRPs adopt a highly regular four-sided right-handed {beta}-helical structure consisting mainly of type II and type IV {beta}-turns, sometimes referred to as a repeated five-residue (or Rfr) fold. Among sequenced genomes, PRP genes are most abundant in cyanobacteria, leading to speculation that PRPs play an important role in the unique lifestyle of photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Despite the recent structural characterization of several cyanobacterial PRPs, most of their functions remain unknown. Plants, whose chloroplasts are of cyanobacterial origin, have only four PRP genes in their genomes. At2g44920 is one of three PRPs located in the thylakoid lumen. Here, the crystal structure of a double methionine mutant of residues 81-224 of At2g44920, the naturally processed fragment of one of its full-length isoforms, is reported at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of At2g44920 consists of the characteristic Rfr fold with five uninterrupted coils made up of 25 pentapeptide repeats and {alpha}-helical elements capping both termini. A disulfide bridge links the two {alpha}-helices with a conserved loop between the helical elements at its C-terminus. This structure represents the first structure of a PRP protein whose subcellular location has been experimentally confirmed to be the thylakoid lumen in a plant species.

  16. Supplementation by thylakoids to a high carbohydrate meal decreases feelings of hunger, elevates CCK levels and prevents postprandial hypoglycaemia in overweight women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenblom, Eva-Lena; Montelius, Caroline; Östbring, Karolina

    2013-01-01

    over a 4-h period. Addition of thylakoids suppressed hunger motivation and increased secretion of CCK from 180 min, and prevented postprandial hypoglycaemia from 90 min following food intake. These effects indicate that thylakoids may intensify signals of satiety. This study therefore suggests...

  17. Microoxic Niches within the Thylakoid Stroma of Air-Grown Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Protect [FeFe]-Hydrogenase and Support Hydrogen Production under Fully Aerobic Environment1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liran, Oded; Milrad, Yuval; Eilenberg, Haviva; Weiner, Iddo

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic hydrogen production in the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is catalyzed by two [FeFe]-hydrogenase isoforms, HydA1 and HydA2, both irreversibly inactivated upon a few seconds exposure to atmospheric oxygen. Until recently, it was thought that hydrogenase is not active in air-grown microalgal cells. In contrast, we show that the entire pool of cellular [FeFe]-hydrogenase remains active in air-grown cells due to efficient scavenging of oxygen. Using membrane inlet mass spectrometry, 18O2 isotope, and various inhibitors, we were able to dissect the various oxygen uptake mechanisms. We found that both chlororespiration, catalyzed by plastid terminal oxidase, and Mehler reactions, catalyzed by photosystem I and Flavodiiron proteins, significantly contribute to oxygen uptake rate. This rate is considerably enhanced with increasing light, thus forming local anaerobic niches at the proximity of the stromal face of the thylakoid membrane. Furthermore, we found that in transition to high light, the hydrogen production rate is significantly enhanced for a short duration (100 s), thus indicating that [FeFe]-hydrogenase functions as an immediate sink for surplus electrons in aerobic as well as in anaerobic environments. In summary, we show that an anaerobic locality in the chloroplast preserves [FeFe]-hydrogenase activity and supports continuous hydrogen production in air-grown microalgal cells. PMID:27443604

  18. Dietary thylakoids reduce visceral fat mass and increase expression of genes involved in intestinal fatty acid oxidation in high-fat fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenblom, Eva-Lena; Egecioglu, Emil; Montelius, Caroline; Ramachandran, Deepti; Bonn, Britta; Weström, Björn; Mansouri, Abdelhak; Langhans, Wolfgang; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    Thylakoids reduce body weight gain and body fat accumulation in rodents. This study investigated whether an enhanced oxidation of dietary fat-derived fatty acids in the intestine contributes to the thylakoid effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat diet with (n = 8) or without thylakoids (n = 8) for 2 wk. Body weight, food intake, and body fat were measured, and intestinal mucosa was collected and analyzed. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure gene expression levels of key enzymes involved in fatty acid transport, fatty acid oxidation, and ketogenesis. Another set of thylakoid-treated (n = 10) and control rats (n = 10) went through indirect calorimetry. In the first experiment, thylakoid-treated rats (n = 8) accumulated 25% less visceral fat than controls. Furthermore, fatty acid translocase (Fat/Cd36), carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (Cpt1a), and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (Hmgcs2) genes were upregulated in the jejunum of the thylakoid-treated group. In the second experiment, thylakoid-treated rats (n = 10) gained 17.5% less weight compared with controls and their respiratory quotient was lower, 0.86 compared with 0.91. Thylakoid-intake resulted in decreased food intake and did not cause steatorrhea. These results suggest that thylakoids stimulated intestinal fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis, resulting in an increased ability of the intestine to handle dietary fat. The increased fatty acid oxidation and the resulting reduction in food intake may contribute to the reduced fat accumulation in thylakoid-treated animals.

  19. Multiple types of association of photosystem II and its light-harvesting antenna in partially solubilized photosystem II membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, EJ; van Roon, H; Calkoen, F; Bassi, R; Dekker, JP; Dekker, Jan P.

    1999-01-01

    Photosystem II is a multisubunit pigment-protein complex embedded in the thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts. It utilizes light for photochemical energy conversion, and is heavily involved in the regulation of the energy flow. We investigated the structural organization of photosystem II and its ass

  20. Novel protein phosphorylation site identification in spinach stroma membranes by titanium dioxide microcolumns and tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinalducci, Sara; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Mohammed, Shabaz

    2006-01-01

    In this work, spinach stroma membrane, instead of thylakoid, has been investigated for the presence of phosphorylated proteins. We identified seven previously unknown phosphorylation sites by taking advantage of TiO(2) phosphopeptides enrichment coupled to mass spectrometric analysis. Upon illumi...

  1. Overexpression of thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase shows enhanced resistance to chilling stress in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ming; Feng, Hai-Long; Wang, Li-Yan; Li, Dong; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2012-06-15

    Photosynthesis provides a strong reducing power and a high risk for generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) particularly under chilling stress. Ascorbate peroxidases (APXs) reduce H(2)O(2) to water and play an important role in the antioxidant system of plants. Though thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase (tAPX) has been thought to be key regulator of intracellular levels of H(2)O(2), its physiological significance in the response to chilling stress is still under discussion. To study the contribution of tAPX to the ROS scavenging, a tomato thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase gene (LetAPX) was isolated and transgenic tomatoes were obtained. The LetAPX-GFP fusion protein was targeted to chloroplast in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplast. RNA blotting analysis revealed that the LetAPX transcript expression was up-regulated by chilling, high light, exogenous salicylic acid (SA) and methyl viologen (MV). Over expression of LetAPX in tomatoes conferred tolerance to chilling stress by maintaining higher reduced glutathione (GSH) content, chlorophyll and APX activities compared with wild type (WT) plants. Furthermore, transgenic plants showed lower levels of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and ion leakage, lower malendialdehyde (MDA) content, higher net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and higher maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm). The oxidizable P700 decreased more obviously in WT than that in transgenic plants under chilling stress in low irradiance. The results suggested that over expression of tAPX played a key role both in alleviating photo inhibition of PSI and PSII and enhancing their tolerance to chilling stress.

  2. Anchoring a plant cytochrome P450 via PsaM to the thylakoids in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002: evidence for light-driven biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lærke Münter Lassen

    Full Text Available Plants produce an immense variety of specialized metabolites, many of which are of high value as their bioactive properties make them useful as for instance pharmaceuticals. The compounds are often produced at low levels in the plant, and due to their complex structures, chemical synthesis may not be feasible. Here, we take advantage of the reducing equivalents generated in photosynthesis in developing an approach for producing plant bioactive natural compounds in a photosynthetic microorganism by functionally coupling a biosynthetic enzyme to photosystem I. This enables driving of the enzymatic reactions with electrons extracted from the photosynthetic electron transport chain. As a proof of concept, we have genetically fused the soluble catalytic domain of the cytochrome P450 CYP79A1, originating from the endoplasmic reticulum membranes of Sorghum bicolor, to a photosystem I subunit in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, thereby targeting it to the thylakoids. The engineered enzyme showed light-driven activity both in vivo and in vitro, demonstrating the possibility to achieve light-driven biosynthesis of high-value plant specialized metabolites in cyanobacteria.

  3. Flow-force relationships in lettuce thylakoids. 2. Effect of the uncoupler FCCP on local proton resistances at the ATPase level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigalat, C; de Kouchkovsky, Y; Haraux, F

    1993-09-28

    The relationship between the steady-state proton gradient (delta pH) and the rate of phosphorylation was investigated in thylakoids under various conditions. Under partial uncoupling by carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP), the rate of ATP synthesis was reduced by less than expected from the decrease of delta pH. This was observed in the case of the pyocyanine-mediated cyclic electron flow around photosystem 1, but not with the H2O-->photosystem 2-->cytochrome b6f-->photosystem 1-->methyl viologen system. In state 4, a unique relation was found between delta pH and the "phosphate potential", delta Gp, regardless of whether the energy level was controlled by light input or FCCP. The anomalous effect of FCCP on the rate of ATP synthesis disappeared when the ATPase was partially blocked by the reversible inhibitor venturicidin, but not in the presence of tentoxin, an irreversible inhibitor. These results are consistent with the existence of a small kinetic barrier for protons, limiting their access to the ATPase. This resistance would be collapsed by FCCP.

  4. Nuclear, Virescent Mutants of Zea mays L. with High Levels of Chlorophyll (a/b) Light-Harvesting Complex during Thylakoid Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polacco, M L; Chang, M T; Neuffer, M G

    1985-04-01

    We have found nuclear, recessive mutants in Zea mays L. where assembly of the major chlorophyll (a/b) light-harvesting complex (LHC) was not delayed relative to most other thylakoid protein complexes during thylakoid biogenesis. This contrasts with the normal development of maize chloroplasts (NR Baker, R Leech 1977 Plant Physiol 60: 640-644). All four mutants examined were allelic and virescent, and displayed visibly higher yields of leaf Chl fluorescence during greening. Fully greened mutants had normal leaf Chl fluorescence yield and normal levels of LHC, and grew to maturity under field conditions. Therefore, delayed LHC assembly is not an obligate feature of thylakoid differentiation.Assigning the molecular basis for the mutation should provide information concerning reguation of LHC assembly. Several possibilities are discussed. The pleiotropic mutant phenotype is not attributable to defects in thylakoid glycerolipid synthesis. Thylakoids isolated from greening mutant leaf sections had elevated glycerolipid/Chl ratios. In addition, both the molar distribution and acyl composition of four major glycerolipids were normal for developing mutant thylakoids.

  5. Nuclear, Virescent Mutants of Zea mays L. with High Levels of Chlorophyll (a/b) Light-Harvesting Complex during Thylakoid Assembly 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polacco, Mary L.; Chang, M. T.; Neuffer, M. Gerald

    1985-01-01

    We have found nuclear, recessive mutants in Zea mays L. where assembly of the major chlorophyll (a/b) light-harvesting complex (LHC) was not delayed relative to most other thylakoid protein complexes during thylakoid biogenesis. This contrasts with the normal development of maize chloroplasts (NR Baker, R Leech 1977 Plant Physiol 60: 640-644). All four mutants examined were allelic and virescent, and displayed visibly higher yields of leaf Chl fluorescence during greening. Fully greened mutants had normal leaf Chl fluorescence yield and normal levels of LHC, and grew to maturity under field conditions. Therefore, delayed LHC assembly is not an obligate feature of thylakoid differentiation. Assigning the molecular basis for the mutation should provide information concerning reguation of LHC assembly. Several possibilities are discussed. The pleiotropic mutant phenotype is not attributable to defects in thylakoid glycerolipid synthesis. Thylakoids isolated from greening mutant leaf sections had elevated glycerolipid/Chl ratios. In addition, both the molar distribution and acyl composition of four major glycerolipids were normal for developing mutant thylakoids. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16664140

  6. Thylakoid redox signals are integrated into organellar-gene-expression-dependent retrograde signalling in the prors1-1 mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eTadini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Perturbations in organellar gene expression (OGE and the thylakoid redox state (TRS activate retrograde signalling pathways that adaptively modify nuclear gene expression (NGE, according to developmental and metabolic needs. The prors1-1 mutation in Arabidopsis down-regulates the expression of the nuclear gene Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase1 (PRORS1 which acts in both plastids and mitochondria, thereby impairing protein synthesis in both organelles and triggering OGE-dependent retrograde signalling. Because the mutation also affects thylakoid electron transport, TRS-dependent signals may likewise have an impact on the changes in NGE observed in this genotype. In this study, we have investigated whether signals related to TRS are actually integrated into the OGE-dependent retrograde signalling pathway. To this end, the chaos mutation (for chlorophyll a/b binding protein harvesting-organelle specific, which shows a partial loss of PSII antennae proteins and thus a reduction in PSII light absorption capability, was introduced into the prors1-1 mutant background. The resulting double mutant displayed a prors1-1-like reduction in plastid translation rate and a chaos-like decrease in PSII antenna size, whereas the hyper-reduction of the thylakoid electron transport chain, caused by the prors1-1 mutation, was alleviated, as determined by monitoring chlorophyll (Chl fluorescence and thylakoid phosphorylation. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the nucleus-encoded photosynthesis genes down-regulated in the prors1-1 mutant are expressed at nearly wild-type rates in prors1-1 chaos leaves, and this recovery is reflected in the steady-state levels of their protein products in the chloroplast. We therefore conclude that signals related to photosynthetic electron transport and TRS, and indirectly to carbohydrate metabolism and energy balance, are indeed fed into the OGE-dependent retrograde pathway to modulate NGE and adjust the abundance of chloroplast proteins.

  7. Chloroplast ATP Synthase Modulation of the Thylakoid Proton Motive Force: Implications for Photosystem I and Photosystem II Photoprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Kanazawa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In wild type plants, decreasing CO2 lowers the activity of the chloroplast ATP synthase, slowing proton efflux from the thylakoid lumen resulting in buildup of thylakoid proton motive force (pmf. The resulting acidification of the lumen regulates both light harvesting, via the qE mechanism, and photosynthetic electron transfer through the cytochrome b6f complex. Here, we show that the cfq mutant of Arabidopsis, harboring single point mutation in its γ-subunit of the chloroplast ATP synthase, increases the specific activity of the ATP synthase and disables its down-regulation under low CO2. The increased thylakoid proton conductivity (gH+ in cfq results in decreased pmf and lumen acidification, preventing full activation of qE and more rapid electron transfer through the b6f complex, particularly under low CO2 and fluctuating light. These conditions favor the accumulation of electrons on the acceptor side of PSI, and result in severe loss of PSI activity. Comparing the current results with previous work on the pgr5 mutant suggests a general mechanism where increased PSI photodamage in both mutants is caused by loss of pmf, rather than inhibition of CEF per se. Overall, our results support a critical role for ATP synthase regulation in maintaining photosynthetic control of electron transfer to prevent photodamage.

  8. Identification of an Atypical Membrane Protein Involved in the Formation of Protein Disulfide Bonds in Oxygenic Photosynthetic Organisms*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Abhay K.; Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi, Maitrayee; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria nearly three billion years ago provided abundant reducing power and facilitated the elaboration of numerous oxygen-dependent reactions in our biosphere. Cyanobacteria contain an internal thylakoid membrane system, the site of photosynthesis, and a typical Gram-negative envelope membrane system. Like other organisms, the extracytoplasmic space in cyanobacteria houses numerous cysteine-containing proteins. However, the ...

  9. Chloroplast membrane transport: interplay of prokaryotic and eukaryotic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vothknecht, Ute C; Soll, Jürgen

    2005-07-18

    Chloroplasts are specific plant organelles of prokaryotic origin. They are separated from the surrounding cell by a double membrane, which represents an effective barrier for the transport of metabolites and proteins. Specific transporters in the inner envelope membrane have been described, which facilitate the exchange of metabolites. In contrast, the outer envelope has been viewed for a long time as a molecular sieve that offers a mere size constriction to the passage of molecules. This view has been challenged lately, and a number of specific and regulated pore proteins of the outer envelope (OEPs) have been identified. These pores seem to have originated by adaptation of outer membrane proteins of the cyanobacterial ancestor of the chloroplast. In a similar fashion, the transport of proteins across the two envelope membranes is achieved by two hetero-oligomeric protein complexes called Toc (translocon in the outer envelope of chloroplasts) and Tic (translocon in the inner envelope of chloroplasts). The phylogenetic provenance of the translocon components is less clear, but at least the channel protein of the Toc translocon is of cyanobacterial origin. Characteristic of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts is furthermore a specialized internal membrane system, the thylakoids, on which the components of the photosynthetic machinery are located. Despite the importance of this membrane, very little is known about its phylogenetic origin or the manner of its synthesis. Vipp1 appears to be a ubiquitous component of thylakoid formation, while in chloroplasts of land plants, additionally a vesicle transport system of eukaryotic origin might be involved in this process.

  10. PSII-LHCII supercomplex organizations in photosynthetic membrane by coarse-grained simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Pao, Chun-Wei; Smit, Berend

    2015-03-12

    Green plant photosystem II (PSII) and light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) in the stacked grana regions of thylakoid membranes can self-organize into various PSII-LHCII supercomplexes with crystalline or fluid-like supramolecular structures to adjust themselves with external stimuli such as high/low light and temperatures, rendering tunable solar light absorption spectrum and photosynthesis efficiencies. However, the mechanisms controlling the PSII-LHCII supercomplex organizations remain elusive. In this work, we constructed a coarse-grained (CG) model of the thylakoid membrane including lipid molecules and a PSII-LHCII supercomplex considering association/dissociation of moderately bound-LHCIIs. The CG interaction between CG beads were constructed based on electron microscope (EM) experimental results, and we were able to simulate the PSII-LHCII supramolecular organization of a 500 × 500 nm(2) thylakoid membrane, which is compatible with experiments. Our CGMD simulations can successfully reproduce order structures of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes under various protein packing fractions, free-LHCII:PSII ratios, and temperatures, thereby providing insights into mechanisms leading to PSII-LHCII supercomplex organizations in photosynthetic membranes.

  11. Unique Path Partitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bessenrodt, Christine; Olsson, Jørn Børling; Sellers, James A.

    2013-01-01

    We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions.......We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions....

  12. Development of a Transient Absorption Spectrometer for the Study of the Proton-motive Force (PMF) in Plant Thylakoid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jens Christopher

    A transient-absorption spectrometer to study the electric field component of the proton-motive force (PMF) has been developed. Excitation by an actinic light source (655nm) causes absorption changes of pigments in the sample at 520nm on the order of 0.1%. Using a probe light source at 520nm, the change in transmission before and after actinic excitation can be detected and quantified. Because the change in transmission is small, a high signal to noise ratio (SNR) is required. To reduce the effect of optical shot noise and front end electrical noise a high intensity source at 520nm is utilized. However, continuous high intensity light at 520nm over time can cause actinic excitation in the sample, so the 520nm probe is pulsed at high optical intensity and low duty cycle to reduce the net incident flux. The developed system includes 1) a LED driver to drive 1A current pulses through three high power probe LEDs and four high power actinic LEDs, 2) an analog front end which uses a 10mm by 10mm photodiode and a trans-impedance amplifier to detect the pulses, as well as several signal processing stages, 3) a microcontroller to generate the probe timing waveforms, digitize the detected signal, and send the data to a PC, and 4) a LabView computer interface to set input parameters, display the collected data, and save the data to a text file. Experimental verification of system peformance was performed by testing the system with and without a plant sample. The results show that the system works as expected and is capable of measuring the data required to determine the electric field component of the PMF.

  13. Lipid composition determines the effects of arbutin on the stability of membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hincha, D K; Oliver, A E; Crowe, J H

    1999-01-01

    Arbutin (hydroquinone-beta-D-glucopyranoside) is an abundant solute in the leaves of many freezing- or desiccation-tolerant plants. Its physiological role in plants, however, is not known. Here we show that arbutin protects isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) thylakoid membranes from freeze-thaw damage. During freezing of liposomes, the presence of only 20 mM arbutin led to complete leakage of a soluble marker from egg PC (EPC) liposomes. When the nonbilayer-forming chloroplast lipid mono...

  14. Unassisted membrane insertion as the initial step in DeltapH/Tat-dependent protein transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Bo; Frielingsdorf, Stefan; Klösgen, Ralf Bernd

    2006-02-01

    In the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts as well as in the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria, the DeltapH/Tat-dependent protein transport pathway is responsible for the translocation of folded proteins. Using the chimeric 16/23 protein as model substrate in thylakoid transport experiments, we dissected the transport process into several distinct steps that are characterized by specific integral translocation intermediates. Formation of the early translocation intermediate Ti-1, which still exposes the N and the C terminus to the stroma, is observed with thylakoids pretreated with (i) solutions of chaotropic salts or alkaline pH, (ii) protease, or (iii) antibodies raised against TatA, TatB, or TatC. Membrane insertion takes place even into liposomes, demonstrating that proteinaceous components are not required. This suggests that Tat-dependent transport may be initiated by the unassisted insertion of the substrate into the lipid bilayer, and that interaction with the Tat translocase takes place only in later stages of the process.

  15. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M.; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A.; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J.; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion. PMID:25897076

  16. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-05-29

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion.

  17. Unique Access to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Don

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the many learning opportunities that broadcast technology students at Ladue Horton Watkins High School in St. Louis, Missouri, experience because of their unique access to technology and methods of learning. Through scaffolding, stepladder techniques, and trial by fire, students learn to produce multiple television programs,…

  18. High-performance solid oxide fuel cells based on a thin La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.2O3-δ electrolyte membrane supported by a nickel-based anode of unique architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haibin; Chen, Yu; Chen, Fanglin; Zhang, Yujun; Liu, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) based on a thin La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.2O3-δ (LSGM) electrolyte membrane supported by a nickel-based anode often suffers from undesirable reaction/diffusion between the Ni anode and the LSGM during high-temperature co-firing. In this study, a high performance intermediate-temperature SOFC is fabricated by depositing thin LSGM electrolyte membranes on a LSGM backbone of unique architecture coated with nano-sized Ni and Gd0.1Ce0.9O2-δ (GDC) particles via a combination of freeze-drying tape-casting, slurry drop-coating, and solution infiltration. The thickness of the dense LSGM electrolyte membranes is ∼30 μm while the undesirable reaction/diffusion between Ni and LSGM are effectively hindered because of the relatively low firing temperature, as confirmed by XRD analysis. Single cells show peak power densities of 1.61 W cm-2 at 700 °C and 0.52 W cm-2 at 600 °C using 3 vol% humidified H2 as fuel and ambient air as oxidant. The cell performance is very stable for 115 h at a constant current density of 0.303 A cm-2 at 600 °C.

  19. Photosynthetic electron transport inhibition by 2-substituted 4-alkyl-6-benzylamino-1,3,5-triazines with thylakoids from wild- type and atrazine-resistant Chenopodium album

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okano, R.; Ohki, A.; Ohki, S.; Kohno, H.; Rensen, van J.J.S.; Böger, P.; Wakabayashi, K.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of 2-benzylamino-1,3,5-triazines on photosynthetic electron transport (PET) was measured with thylakoids isolated from atrazine-resistant, wild-type Chenopodium album, and spinach to find novel 1,3,5-triazine herbicides bearing a strong PET inhibition. The PET inhibition assay with Chenop

  20. Age dependent alterations in photosystem II acceptor side in Cucumis sativus cotyledonary leaf thylakoids: analysis of binding characteristics of herbicide [14C]-atrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, J S; Baig, M A; Mohanty, P

    1999-02-01

    Senescence induced temporal changes in photosystems can be conveniently studied in cotyledonary leaves. We monitored the protein, chlorophyll and electron transport activities in Cucumis sativus cv Poinsette cotyledonary leaves and observed that by 20th day, there was a 50%, 41% and 30-33% decline in the chlorophyll, protein and photosystem II activity respectively when compared to 6th day cotyledonary leaves taken as control. We investigated the changes in photosystem II activity (O2 evolution) as a function of light intensity. The photosystem II functional antenna decreased by 27% and the functional photosystem II units decreased by 30% in 20-day old cotyledonary leaf thylakoids. The herbicide [14C]-atrazine binding assay to monitor specific binding of the herbicide to the acceptor side of photosystem II reaction centre protein, D1, showed an increase in the affinity for atrazine towards D1 protein and decrease in the QB binding sites in 20th day leaf thylakoids when compared to 6th day leaf thylakoids. The western blot analysis also suggested a decrease in steady state levels of D1 protein in 20th day cotyledonary leaf thylakoids as compared to 6th day sample which is in agreement with [14C]-atrazine binding assay and light saturation kinetics.

  1. A novel chloroplast localized Rab GTPase protein CPRabA5e is involved in stress, development, thylakoid biogenesis and vesicle transport in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Sazzad; Alezzawi, Mohamed; Garcia-Petit, Christel; Solymosi, Katalin; Khan, Nadir Zaman; Lindquist, Emelie; Dahl, Peter; Hohmann, Stefan; Aronsson, Henrik

    2014-04-01

    A novel Rab GTPase protein in Arabidopsis thaliana, CPRabA5e (CP = chloroplast localized) is located in chloroplasts and has a role in transport. Transient expression of CPRabA5e:EGFP fusion protein in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves, and immunoblotting using Arabidopsis showed localization of CPRabA5e in chloroplasts (stroma and thylakoids). Ypt31/32 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are involved in regulating vesicle transport, and CPRabA5e a close homolog of Ypt31/32, restores the growth of the ypt31Δ ypt32(ts) mutant at 37 °C in yeast complementation. Knockout mutants of CPRabA5e displayed delayed seed germination and growth arrest during oxidative stress. Ultrastructural studies revealed that after preincubation at 4 °C mutant chloroplasts contained larger plastoglobules, lower grana, and more vesicles close to the envelopes compared to wild type, and vesicle formation being enhanced under oxidative stress. This indicated altered thylakoid development and organization of the mutants. A yeast-two-hybrid screen with CPRabA5e as bait revealed 13 interacting partner proteins, mainly located in thylakoids and plastoglobules. These proteins are known or predicted to be involved in development, stress responses, and photosynthesis related processes, consistent with the stress phenotypes observed. The results observed suggest a role of CPRabA5e in transport to and from thylakoids, similar to cytosolic Rab proteins involved in vesicle transport.

  2. Photosynthetic electron transport inhibition by 2-substituted 4-alkyl-6-benzylamino-1,3,5-triazines with thylakoids from wild- type and atrazine-resistant Chenopodium album

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okano, R.; Ohki, A.; Ohki, S.; Kohno, H.; Rensen, van J.J.S.; Böger, P.; Wakabayashi, K.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of 2-benzylamino-1,3,5-triazines on photosynthetic electron transport (PET) was measured with thylakoids isolated from atrazine-resistant, wild-type Chenopodium album, and spinach to find novel 1,3,5-triazine herbicides bearing a strong PET inhibition. The PET inhibition assay with

  3. NASA's unique networking environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1988-01-01

    Networking is an infrastructure technology; it is a tool for NASA to support its space and aeronautics missions. Some of NASA's networking problems are shared by the commercial and/or military communities, and can be solved by working with these communities. However, some of NASA's networking problems are unique and will not be addressed by these other communities. Individual characteristics of NASA's space-mission networking enviroment are examined, the combination of all these characteristics that distinguish NASA's networking systems from either commercial or military systems is explained, and some research areas that are important for NASA to pursue are outlined.

  4. Broad host range plasmid-based gene transfer system in the cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus which lacks thylakoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Haitao; XU Xudong

    2004-01-01

    Gloeobacter violaceus, a cyanobacterium lack of thylakoids, is refractory to genetic manipulations because its cells are enveloped by a thick gelatinous sheath and in colonial form.In this study, a large number of single cells were obtained by repeated pumping with a syringe with the gelatinous sheath removed.And an exogenous broad host range plasmid pKT210 was conjugatively transferred into G.violaceus.Analyses with dot-blot hybridization and restriction mapping showed that the exogenous plasmid pKT210 had been introduced into G.violaceus and stably maintained with no alteration in its structure.pKT210 extracted from G.violaceus exconjugants could be transformed into the mcr- mrr- E.coli strain DH10B but not the mcr+ mrr+ strain DH5α, which suggests that a methylase system may be present in G.violaceus.

  5. Excitation energy transfer between Light-harvesting complex II and Photosystem I in reconstituted membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Parveen; Lingvay, Mónika; Kiss, Teréz; Deák, Róbert; Bóta, Attila; Ughy, Bettina; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H

    2016-04-01

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII), the major peripheral antenna of Photosystem II in plants, participates in several concerted mechanisms for regulation of the excitation energy and electron fluxes in thylakoid membranes. In part, these include interaction of LHCII with Photosystem I (PSI) enhancing the latter's absorption cross-section - for example in the well-known state 1 - state 2 transitions or as a long-term acclimation to high light. In this work we examined the capability of LHCII to deliver excitations to PSI in reconstituted membranes in vitro. Proteoliposomes with native plant thylakoid membrane lipids and different stoichiometric ratios of LHCII:PSI were reconstituted and studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence emission from LHCII was strongly decreased in PSI-LHCII membranes due to trapping of excitations by PSI. Kinetic modelling of the time-resolved fluorescence data revealed the existence of separate pools of LHCII distinguished by the time scale of energy transfer. A strongly coupled pool, equivalent to one LHCII trimer per PSI, transferred excitations to PSI with near-unity efficiency on a time scale of less than 10ps but extra LHCIIs also contributed significantly to the effective antenna size of PSI, which could be increased by up to 47% in membranes containing 3 LHCII trimers per PSI. The results demonstrate a remarkable competence of LHCII to increase the absorption cross-section of PSI, given the opportunity that the two types of complexes interact in the membrane.

  6. Mutants, Overexpressors, and Interactors of Arabidopsis Plastocyanin Isoforms: Revised Roles of Plastocyanin in Photosynthetic Electron Flow and Thylakoid Redox State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paolo Pesaresi; Michael Scharfenberg; Martin Weigel; Irene Granlund; Wolfgang P. Schr(o)der; Giovanni Finazzi; Fabrice Rappaport; Simona Masiero; Antonella Furini; Peter Jahns; Dario Leister

    2009-01-01

    Two homologous plastocyanin isoforms are encoded by the genes PETE1 and PETE2 in the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis thaliana. The PETE2 transcript is expressed at considerably higher levels and the PETE2 protein is the more abundant isoform. Null mutations in the PETE genes resulted in plants, designated pete1 and pete2, with decreased plas-tocyanin contents. However, despite reducing plastocyanin levels by over~90%, a pete2 null mutation on its own affects rates of photosynthesis and growth only slightly, whereas pete1 knockout plants, with about 60-80% of the wild-type plastocyanin level, did not show any alteration. Hence, plastocyanin concentration is not limiting for photosynthetic elec-tron flow under optimal growth conditions, perhaps implying other possible physiological roles for the protein. Indeed, plastocyanin has been proposed previously to cooperate with cytochrome C6A (Cyt C6A) in thylakoid redox reactions, but we find no evidence for a physical interaction between the two proteins, using interaction assays in yeast. We observed homodimerization of Cyt C6A in yeast interaction assays, but also Cyt C6A homodimers failed to interact with plastocyanin. Moreover, phenotypic analysis of atc6-1 pete1 and atc6-1 pete2 double mutants, each lacking Cyt C6A and one of the two plastocyanin-encoding genes, failed to reveal any genetic interaction. Overexpression of either PETE1 or PETE2 in the pete1 pete2 double knockout mutant background results in essentially wild-type photosynthetic performance, excluding the possibility that the two plastocyanin isoforms could have distinct functions in thylakoid electron flow.

  7. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...... for the lateral organization of membranes as wells as for physical properties like bending, permeability and elasticity...

  8. The bacterial magnetosome: a unique prokaryotic organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Brian H; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial magnetosome is a unique prokaryotic organelle comprising magnetic mineral crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer. These inclusions are biomineralized by the magnetotactic bacteria which are ubiquitous, aquatic, motile microorganisms. Magnetosomes cause cells of magnetotactic bacteria to passively align and swim along the Earth's magnetic field lines, as miniature motile compass needles. These specialized compartments consist of a phospholipid bilayer membrane surrounding magnetic crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4). The morphology of these membrane-bound crystals varies by species with a nominal magnetic domain size between 35 and 120 nm. Almost all magnetotactic bacteria arrange their magnetosomes in a chain within the cell there by maximizing the magnetic dipole moment of the cell. It is presumed that magnetotactic bacteria use magnetotaxis in conjunction with chemotaxis to locate and maintain an optimum position for growth and survival based on chemistry, redox and physiology in aquatic habitats with vertical chemical concentration and redox gradients. The biosynthesis of magnetosomes is a complex process that involves several distinct steps including cytoplasmic membrane modifications, iron uptake and transport, initiation of crystallization, crystal maturation and magnetosome chain formation. While many mechanistic details remain unresolved, magnetotactic bacteria appear to contain the genetic determinants for magnetosome biomineralization within their genomes in clusters of genes that make up what is referred to as the magnetosome gene island in some species. In addition, magnetosomes contain a unique set of proteins, not present in other cellular fractions, which control the biomineralization process. Through the development of genetic systems, proteomic and genomic work, and the use of molecular and biochemical tools, the functions of a number of magnetosome membrane proteins have been demonstrated and the molecular

  9. Uniqueness is Important in Competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Ai-Xia; XV Xiu-Lian; HE Da-Ren

    2009-01-01

    We propose a quantitative network description on the function of uniqueness in a competition system. Two statistical parameters, competition ability and uniqueness are defined, and their relationship in ordinary cases is analytically discussed. The competition between Chinese regional universities is taken as an example. The empirical investigation results show that the uniqueness of a university is really important in competition. Also,uniqueness is very helpful in the promotion of the university overall quality.

  10. On Uniqueness of coalitional equilibria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finus, M.; Mouche, van P.H.M.; Rundshagen, B.

    2014-01-01

    For the so-called "new approach" of coalitio formation it is important that coalitional equilibria are unique. Uniqueness comes down to existene and to semi-uniqueness, i.e.\\\\that there exists at most one equilibrium. Although conditions for existence are not problematic, conditions for semi-uniquen

  11. A Zea mays 39-kDa thylakoid transglutaminase catalyses the modification by polyamines of light-harvesting complex II in a light-dependent way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Mea, M; Di Sandro, A; Dondini, L; Del Duca, S; Vantini, F; Bergamini, C; Bassi, R; Serafini-Fracassini, D

    2004-09-01

    A transglutaminase (TGase; EC 2.3.2.13) activity, which shared many properties with the TGase activity of the Helianthus tuberosus chloroplast, was observed in the Zea mays L. chloroplast and in its fractions. This activity was found to be prevalent in thylakoids; bis-(glutamyl) spermidine and bis-(glutamyl) putrescine were the main polyamine conjugates formed. Light stimulated the endogenous thylakoid activity. Putrescine, spermidine and spermine were conjugated to the isolated light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHCII) with different degrees of efficiency, spermine being the polyamine most efficiently conjugated. A TGase with a light-sensitive activity was identified in the photosystem II-enriched fraction. Its partial purification on a sucrose gradient allowed the separation of a 39-kDa band, which was immunorecognised by two anti-TGase antibodies (Ab-3 and rat prostatic gland-TGase). Both a colorimetric and a radiometric assay for TGase activity, the former carried out in the presence of biotinylated cadaverine and the latter in the presence of polyamines labelled with radioactive isotopes and resulting in the isolation of glutamyl-polyamines, further confirmed that the thylakoid enzyme is indeed a calcium-dependent transglutaminase (Thyl-TGase). At variance with guinea pig liver and erythrocyte TGases, which are insensitive to light, the activity of the thylakoid transglutaminase is affected by light. Moreover, this enzyme, when tested with purified LHCII as substrate, catalysed the production of mono- and bis-glutamyl-polyamines in equal amounts, whereas the 'animal' enzymes produced mainly mono-derivatives. Herein, it is discussed whether this light sensitivity is due to the enzyme or the substrate.

  12. Genetic Analysis of Arabidopsis Mutants Impaired in Plastid Lipid Import Reveals a Role of Membrane Lipids in Chloroplast Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, J.; Xu, C.

    2011-03-01

    The biogenesis of photosynthetic membranes in plants relies largely on lipid import from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and this lipid transport process is mediated by TGD proteins in Arabidopsis. Such a dependency of chloroplast biogenesis on ER-to-plastid lipid transport was recently exemplified by analyzing double mutants between tgd1-1 or tgd4-3 and fad6 mutants. The fad6 mutants are defective in the desaturation of membrane lipids in chloroplasts and therefore dependent on import of polyunsaturated lipid precursors from the ER for constructing a competent thylakoid membrane system. In support of a critical role of TGD proteins in ER-to-plastid lipid trafficking, we showed that the introduction of the tgd mutations into fad6 mutant backgrounds led to drastic reductions in relative amounts of thylakoid lipids. Moreover, the tgd1-1 fad6 and tgd4-3 fad6 double mutants were deficient in polyunsaturated fatty acids in chloroplast membrane lipids, and severely compromised in the biogenesis of photosynthetic membrane systems. Here we report that these double mutants are severely impaired in chloroplast division. The possible role of membrane lipids in chloroplast division is discussed.

  13. Antisense-mediated suppression of tomato thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase influences anti-oxidant network during chilling stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ming; Ma, Na-Na; Li, Dong; Deng, Yong-Sheng; Kong, Fan-Ying; Lv, Wei; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2012-09-01

    Photosynthesis is a well-established source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants particularly under chilling stress. Ascorbate peroxidase (APXs) plays an important role in the anti-oxidant system by utilizing AsA as specific electron donor to reduce H(2)O(2) to water. In order to investigate the possible mechanisms of ascorbate peroxidsae (APX) in photoprotection under chilling stress, a tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase gene (LetAPX) was isolated and antisense transgenic tomato plants were produced. Under chilling stress, transgenic plants accumulated more H(2)O(2), and showed higher levels of ion leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA), lower net photosynthetic rate (Pn), lower maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) and less content of D1 protein compared with wild type (WT) plants. On the other hand, after chilling stress, transgenic plants showed higher reduced ascorbate (AsA) and activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) than those in WT plants, and the expression of several known stress-responsive and antioxidative genes was also higher at the end of chilling treatment. These results suggested that the suppression of LetAPX gene induced compensatory anti-oxidant mechanisms in tomato, and inactivation of tAPX may have a regulatory role in facilitating redox signaling pathways under chilling stress. Furthermore, transient increases in ROS levels also have a vital role in stress signaling and thereby in the survival of plants under chilling conditions.

  14. Membrane associated qualitative differences in cell ultrastructure of chemically and high pressure cryofixed plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechmann, Bernd; Müller, Maria; Zellnig, Günther

    2007-06-01

    Membrane contrast can sometimes be poor in biological samples after high pressure freezing (HPF) and freeze substitution (FS). The addition of water to the FS-medium has been shown to improve membrane contrast in animal tissue and yeast. In the present study we tested the effects of 1% and 5% water added to the FS-medium (2% osmium with 0.2% uranyl acetate in anhydrous acetone) on the quality and visibility of membranes in high pressure frozen leaf samples of Cucurbita pepo L. plants and compared them to chemically fixed cells (3% glutaraldehyde post-fixed with 1% osmium tetroxide). The addition of water to the FS-medium drastically decreased the amounts of well preserved cells and did not significantly improve the quality nor visibility of membranes. In samples that were freeze substituted in FS-media containing 1% and 5% water the width of thylakoid membranes was found to be significantly increased of about 20% and the perinuclear space was up to 76% wider in comparison to what was found in samples which were freeze substituted without water. No differences were found in the thickness of membranes between chemically and cryofixed cells that were freeze substituted in the FS-medium without water. Nevertheless, in chemically fixed cells the intrathylakoidal space was about 120% wider than in cryofixed cells that were freeze substituted with or without water. The present results demonstrate that the addition of water to the FS-medium does not improve membrane contrast but changes the width of thylakoid membranes and the perinuclear space in the present plant material. The addition of water to the FS-medium is therefore not as essential for improved membrane contrast in the investigated plant samples as it was observed in cells of animal tissues and yeast cells.

  15. Flip-flop of phospholipids in proteoliposomes reconstituted from detergent extract of chloroplast membranes: kinetics and phospholipid specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archita Rajasekharan

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells are compartmentalized into distinct sub-cellular organelles by lipid bilayers, which are known to be involved in numerous cellular processes. The wide repertoire of lipids, synthesized in the biogenic membranes like the endoplasmic reticulum and bacterial cytoplasmic membranes are initially localized in the cytosolic leaflet and some of these lipids have to be translocated to the exoplasmic leaflet for membrane biogenesis and uniform growth. It is known that phospholipid (PL translocation in biogenic membranes is mediated by specific membrane proteins which occur in a rapid, bi-directional fashion without metabolic energy requirement and with no specificity to PL head group. A recent study reported the existence of biogenic membrane flippases in plants and that the mechanism of plant membrane biogenesis was similar to that found in animals. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time ATP independent and ATP dependent flippase activity in chloroplast membranes of plants. For this, we generated proteoliposomes from Triton X-100 extract of intact chloroplast, envelope membrane and thylakoid isolated from spinach leaves and assayed for flippase activity using fluorescent labeled phospholipids. Half-life time of flipping was found to be 6 ± 1 min. We also show that: (a intact chloroplast and envelope membrane reconstituted proteoliposomes can flip fluorescent labeled analogs of phosphatidylcholine in ATP independent manner, (b envelope membrane and thylakoid reconstituted proteoliposomes can flip phosphatidylglycerol in ATP dependent manner, (c Biogenic membrane ATP independent PC flipping activity is protein mediated and (d the kinetics of PC translocation gets affected differently upon treatment with protease and protein modifying reagents.

  16. Supported ionic liquid membrane in membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.; Wenten, I. G.

    2017-01-01

    Membrane reactor is a device that integrates membrane based separation and (catalytic) chemical reaction vessel in a single device. Ionic liquids, considered to be a relatively recent magical chemical due to their unique properties, have a large variety of applications in all areas of chemical industries. Moreover, the ionic liquid can be used as membrane separation layer and/or catalytically active site. This paper will review utilization of ionic liquid in membrane reactor related applications especially Fischer-Tropsch, hydrogenation, and dehydrogenation reaction. This paper also reviews about the capability of ionic liquid in equilibrium reaction that produces CO2 product so that the reaction will move towards the product. Water gas shift reaction in ammonia production also direct Dimethyl Ether (DME) synthesis that produces CO2 product will be discussed. Based on a review of numerous articles on supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) indicate that ionic liquids have the potential to support the process of chemical reaction and separation in a membrane reactor.

  17. Membrane reactor. Membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindo, Y.; Wakabayashi, K. (National Chemical Laboratory for Industry, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1990-08-05

    Many reaction examples were introduced of membrane reactor, to be on the point of forming a new region in the field of chemical technology. It is a reactor to exhibit excellent function, by its being installed with membrane therein, and is generally classified into catalyst function type and reaction promotion type. What firstly belongs to the former is stabilized zirconia, where oxygen, supplied to the cathodic side of membrane with voltage, impressed thereon, becomes O {sup 2 {minus}} to be diffused through the membrane and supplied, as variously activated oxygenous species, on the anodic side. Examples with many advantages can be given such as methane coupling, propylene oxidation, methanating reaction of carbon dioxide, etc. Apart, palladium film and naphion film also belong to the former. While examples of the latter comprise, among others, decomposition of hydrogen sulfide by porous glass film and dehydrogenation of cyclohexane or palladium alloy film, which are expected to be developed and materialized in the industry. 33 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Biobased Membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenders, E.A.B.; Zlopasa, J.; Picken, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of a composition for forming a bio-compatible membrane applicable to building material, such as concrete, cement, etc., to a meth od of applying said composition for forming a bio-compatible membrane, a biocompatible membrane, use of said membrane for various pu

  19. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  20. Identification of the Ndh (NAD(P)H-plastoquinone-oxidoreductase) complex in etioplast membranes of barley: changes during photomorphogenesis of chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéra, A; de Nova, P G; Sabater, B

    2000-01-01

    In the last few years the presence in thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts of a NAD(P)H-plastoquinone oxidoreductase complex (Ndh complex) homologous to mitochondrial complex I has been well established. Herein, we report the identification of the Ndh complex in barley etioplast membranes. Two plastid DNA-encoded polypeptides of the Ndh complex (NDH-A and NDH-F) were relatively more abundant in etioplast membranes than in thylakoids from greening chloroplasts. Conversion of etioplast into chloroplast, after light exposure of barley seedlings grown in the dark, was accompanied by a decrease in the NADH dehydrogenase activity associated to plastid membranes. Using native-PAGE and immunolabelling techniques we have determined that a NADH specific dehydrogenase activity associated with plastid membranes, which was more active in etioplasts than in greening chloroplasts, contained the NDH-A and NDH-F polypeptides. These results complemented by those obtained through blue-native-PAGE indicated that NDH-A and NDH-F polypeptides are part of a 580 kDa NADH dependent dehydrogenase complex present in etioplast membranes. This finding proves that accumulation of the Ndh complex is independent of light. The decrease in the relative levels and specific activity of this complex during the transition from etioplast to chloroplasts was accompanied by a parallel decrease in the specific activity of peroxidase associated to plastid membranes. Based on the mentioned observations it is proposed that an electron transport chain from NADH to H2O2 could be active in barley etioplasts.

  1. Impermeable atomic membranes from graphene sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, J Scott; Verbridge, Scott S; Alden, Jonathan S; van der Zande, Arend M; Parpia, Jeevak M; Craighead, Harold G; McEuen, Paul L

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate that a monolayer graphene membrane is impermeable to standard gases including helium. By applying a pressure difference across the membrane, we measure both the elastic constants and the mass of a single layer of graphene. This pressurized graphene membrane is the world's thinnest balloon and provides a unique separation barrier between 2 distinct regions that is only one atom thick.

  2. Uniqueness property for quasiharmonic functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevdiyor A. Imomkulov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider a class of continuous functions, called quasiaharmonic functions, admitting best approximations by harmonic polynomials. In this class we prove a uniqueness theorem by analogy with the analytic functions.

  3. Diabetes: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Urinary Incontinence Related Documents PDF Choosing Wisely: Diabetes Tests and Treatments Download Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Diabetes Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ...

  4. Osteoporosis: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Osteoporosis Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... and widely-prescribed medications for the treatment of osteoporosis. Some serious side effects of these medication have ...

  5. Nutrition: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nutrition Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... teeth that are needed for grinding up food, nutrition suffers. If you are unable to chew and ...

  6. Proteomic analysis of chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition in tomato reveals metabolic shifts coupled with disrupted thylakoid biogenesis machinery and elevated energy-production components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsan, Cristina; Zouine, Mohamed; Maza, Elie; Bian, Wanping; Egea, Isabel; Rossignol, Michel; Bouyssie, David; Pichereaux, Carole; Purgatto, Eduardo; Bouzayen, Mondher; Latché, Alain; Pech, Jean-Claude

    2012-10-01

    A comparative proteomic approach was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins in plastids at three stages of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening (mature-green, breaker, red). Stringent curation and processing of the data from three independent replicates identified 1,932 proteins among which 1,529 were quantified by spectral counting. The quantification procedures have been subsequently validated by immunoblot analysis of six proteins representative of distinct metabolic or regulatory pathways. Among the main features of the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition revealed by the study, chromoplastogenesis appears to be associated with major metabolic shifts: (1) strong decrease in abundance of proteins of light reactions (photosynthesis, Calvin cycle, photorespiration) and carbohydrate metabolism (starch synthesis/degradation), mostly between breaker and red stages and (2) increase in terpenoid biosynthesis (including carotenoids) and stress-response proteins (ascorbate-glutathione cycle, abiotic stress, redox, heat shock). These metabolic shifts are preceded by the accumulation of plastid-encoded acetyl Coenzyme A carboxylase D proteins accounting for the generation of a storage matrix that will accumulate carotenoids. Of particular note is the high abundance of proteins involved in providing energy and in metabolites import. Structural differentiation of the chromoplast is characterized by a sharp and continuous decrease of thylakoid proteins whereas envelope and stroma proteins remain remarkably stable. This is coincident with the disruption of the machinery for thylakoids and photosystem biogenesis (vesicular trafficking, provision of material for thylakoid biosynthesis, photosystems assembly) and the loss of the plastid division machinery. Altogether, the data provide new insights on the chromoplast differentiation process while enriching our knowledge of the plant plastid proteome.

  7. Three-Dimensional Visualization of the Tubular-Lamellar Transformation of the Internal Plastid Membrane Network during Runner Bean Chloroplast Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suski, Szymon

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is a complex process that is integrated with plant development, leading to fully differentiated and functionally mature plastids. In this work, we used electron tomography and confocal microscopy to reconstruct the process of structural membrane transformation during the etioplast-to-chloroplast transition in runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus). During chloroplast development, the regular tubular network of paracrystalline prolamellar bodies (PLBs) and the flattened porous membranes of prothylakoids develop into the chloroplast thylakoids. Three-dimensional reconstruction is required to provide us with a more complete understanding of this transformation. We provide spatial models of the bean chloroplast biogenesis that allow such reconstruction of the internal membranes of the developing chloroplast and visualize the transformation from the tubular arrangement to the linear system of parallel lamellae. We prove that the tubular structure of the PLB transforms directly to flat slats, without dispersion to vesicles. We demonstrate that the grana/stroma thylakoid connections have a helical character starting from the early stages of appressed membrane formation. Moreover, we point out the importance of particular chlorophyll-protein complex components in the membrane stacking during the biogenesis. The main stages of chloroplast internal membrane biogenesis are presented in a movie that shows the time development of the chloroplast biogenesis as a dynamic model of this process. PMID:27002023

  8. Membranous nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000472.htm Membranous nephropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Membranous nephropathy is a kidney disorder that leads to changes ...

  9. Firing membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappert, Emiel Jan

    2015-01-01

    Thermal processing is commonly employed to alter the chemistry and microstructure of membrane layers. It can shape, strengthen, and give functionality to a membrane. A good understanding of the processes taking place during the thermal processing of a membrane material allows for optimization and tu

  10. Organization into Higher Ordered Ring Structures Counteracts Membrane Binding of IM30, a Protein Associated with Inner Membranes in Chloroplasts and Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich, Jennifer; Wulf, Verena; Hennig, Raoul; Saur, Michael; Markl, Jürgen; Sönnichsen, Carsten; Schneider, Dirk

    2016-07-15

    The IM30 (inner membrane-associated protein of 30 kDa), also known as the Vipp1 (vesicle-inducing protein in plastids 1), has a crucial role in thylakoid membrane biogenesis and maintenance. Recent results suggest that the protein binds peripherally to membranes containing negatively charged lipids. However, although IM30 monomers interact and assemble into large oligomeric ring complexes with different numbers of monomers, it is still an open question whether ring formation is crucial for membrane interaction. Here we show that binding of IM30 rings to negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol membrane surfaces results in a higher ordered membrane state, both in the head group and in the inner core region of the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, by using gold nanorods covered with phosphatidylglycerol layers and single particle spectroscopy, we show that not only IM30 rings but also lower oligomeric IM30 structures interact with membranes, although with higher affinity. Thus, ring formation is not crucial for, and even counteracts, membrane interaction of IM30.

  11. The microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CW-15 as a solar cell for hydrogen peroxide photoproduction. Comparison between free and immobilized cells and thylakoids for energy conversion efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, W.; Galvan, F.; Rosa, F.F. de la [Instituto de Bioquimica Vegetal y Fotosintesis, Universidad de Sevilla y CSIC, Sevilla (Spain)

    1995-11-28

    Immobilized cells and thylakoid vesicles of the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CW-15 have been developed as a solar cell because of their capabilities of producing hydrogen peroxide. This compound is an efficient and clean fuel used for rocket propulsion, motors and for heating. Hydrogen peroxide is produced by the photosystem in a catalyst cycle in which a redox mediator (methyl viologen) is reduced by electrons obtained from water by the photosynthetic apparatus of the microalga and it is re-oxidized by the oxygen dissolved in the solution. The photoproduction has been investigated using a discontinuous system with whole cells, or thylakoid vesicles, free or immobilized on alginate. The stimulation by azide as an inhibitor of catalase has also been analyzed. Under determined optimum conditions, the photoproduction by Ca-alginate entrapped cells, with a rate of 33 {mu}mol H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/mg Chl.h, was maintained for several hours with an energy conversion efficiency of 0.25%

  12. Membrane Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Physics, mathematics and chemistry all play a vital role in understanding the true nature and functioning of biological membranes, key elements of living processes. Besides simple spectroscopic observations and electrical measurements of membranes we address in this book the phenomena of coexistence and independent existence of different membrane components using various theoretical approaches. This treatment will be helpful for readers who want to understand biological processes by applying both simple observations and fundamental scientific analysis. It provides a deep understanding of the causes and effects of processes inside membranes, and will thus eventually open new doors for high-level pharmaceutical approaches towards fighting membrane- and cell-related diseases.

  13. Localization of phosphatidylcholine in outer envelope membrane of spinach chloroplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the effects of phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus on the extent of phospholipid hydrolysis in envelope membrane vesicles and in intact chloroplasts. When isolated envelope vesicles were incubated in presence of phospholipase C, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol, but not phosphatidylinositol, were totally converted into diacylglycerol if they were available to the enzyme (i.e., when the vesicles were sonicated in presence of phospholipase C). These experiments demonstrate that phospholipase C can be used to probe the availability of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol in the cytosolic leaflet of the outer envelope membrane from spinach chloroplasts. When isolated, purified, intact chloroplasts were incubated with low amounts of phospholipase C (0.3 U/mg chlorophyll) under very mild conditions (12 degrees C for 1 min), greater than 80% of phosphatidylcholine molecules and almost none of phosphatidylglycerol molecules were hydrolyzed. Since we have also demonstrated, by using several different methods (phase-contrast and electron microscopy, immunochemical and electrophoretic analyses) that isolated spinach chloroplasts, and especially their outer envelope membrane, remained intact after mild treatment with phospholipase C, we can conclude that there is a marked asymmetric distribution of phospholipids across the outer envelope membrane of spinach chloroplasts. Phosphatidylcholine, the major polar lipid of the outer envelope membrane, is almost entirely accessible from the cytosolic side of the membrane and therefore is probably localized in the outer leaflet of the outer envelope bilayer. On the contrary, phosphatidylglycerol, the major polar lipid in the inner envelope membrane and the thylakoids, is probably not accessible to phospholipase C from the cytosol and therefore is probably localized mostly in the inner leaflet of the outer envelope membrane and in the other chloroplast membranes. PMID:3988805

  14. Rufus Choate: A Unique Orator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Reed

    Rufus Choate, a Massachusetts lawyer and orator, has been described as a "unique and romantic phenomenon" in America's history. Born in 1799 in Essex, Massachusetts, Choate graduated from Dartmouth College and attended Harvard Law School. Choate's goal was to be the top in his profession. Daniel Webster was Choate's hero. Choate became well…

  15. Uniqueness of PL Minimal Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi NI

    2007-01-01

    Using a standard fact in hyperbolic geometry, we give a simple proof of the uniqueness of PL minimal surfaces, thus filling in a gap in the original proof of Jaco and Rubinstein. Moreover, in order to clarify some ambiguity, we sharpen the definition of PL minimal surfaces, and prove a technical lemma on the Plateau problem in the hyperbolic space.

  16. On the Nagumo uniqueness theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Octavian G. Mustafa; O'Regan, Donal

    2011-01-01

    By a convenient reparametrisation of the integral curves of a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE), we are able to improve the conclusions of the recent contribution [A. Constantin, Proc. Japan Acad. {\\bf 86(A)} (2010), 41--44]. In this way, we establish a flexible uniqueness criterion for ODEs without Lipschitz-like nonlinearities.

  17. The Lasso Problem and Uniqueness

    CERN Document Server

    Tibshirani, Ryan J

    2012-01-01

    The lasso is a popular tool for sparse linear regression, especially for problems in which the number of variables p exceeds the number of observations n. But when p>n, the lasso criterion is not strictly convex, and hence it may not have a unique minimum. An important question is: when is the lasso solution well-defined (unique)? We review results from the literature, which show that if the predictor variables are drawn from a continuous probability distribution, then there is a unique lasso solution with probability one, regardless of the sizes of n and p. We also show that this result extends easily to $\\ell_1$ penalized minimization problems over a wide range of loss functions. A second important question is: how can we deal with the case of non-uniqueness in lasso solutions? In light of the aforementioned result, this case really only arises when some of the predictor variables are discrete, or when some post-processing has been performed on continuous predictor measurements. Though we certainly cannot c...

  18. Photosynthetic membrane development studied using picosecond fluorescence kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karukstis, K.K.; Sauer, K.

    1983-01-01

    Using measurements of the kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence emission, the development of the photosynthetic membrane during etioplast-to-chloroplast differentiation was investigated. Tthe chlorophyll fluorescence decay kinetics of pea chloroplasts from plants grown under intermittent (2 min light-118 min dark) and continuous light regimes were monitored with a single-proton timing system with picosecond resolution. The changes in the fluorescence yields and decay kinetics were associated with known structural and organizational developmental phenomena in the chloroplast. This correlation provides a more detailed assignment of the origins of the fluorescence decay components than has been previously obtained by studying only mature chloroplasts. In particular, the analysis of the variable kinetics and multiexponential character of the fluorescence emission during thylakoid development focuses on the organization of photosynthetic units and the degree of communication between reaction centers in the same photosystem. These results further demonstrate that the age of etiolated tissue is critical to plastid development.

  19. Lipid membranes on nanostructured silicon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slade, Andrea Lynn; Lopez, Gabriel P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ista, Linnea K. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); O' Brien, Michael J. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bisong, Paul (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Zeineldin, Reema R. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Last, Julie A.; Brueck, Stephen R. J. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-12-01

    A unique composite nanoscale architecture that combines the self-organization and molecular dynamics of lipid membranes with a corrugated nanotextured silicon wafer was prepared and characterized with fluorescence microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. The goal of this project was to understand how such structures can be assembled for supported membrane research and how the interfacial interactions between the solid substrate and the soft, self-assembled material create unique physical and mechanical behavior through the confinement of phases in the membrane. The nanometer scale structure of the silicon wafer was produced through interference lithography followed by anisotropic wet etching. For the present study, a line pattern with 100 nm line widths, 200 nm depth and a pitch of 360 nm pitch was fabricated. Lipid membranes were successfully adsorbed on the structured silicon surface via membrane fusion techniques. The surface topology of the bilayer-Si structure was imaged using in situ tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The membrane was observed to drape over the silicon structure producing an undulated topology with amplitude of 40 nm that matched the 360 nm pitch of the silicon structure. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments found that on the microscale those same structures exhibit anisotropic lipid mobility that was coincident with the silicon substructure. The results showed that while the lipid membrane maintains much of its self-assembled structure in the composite architecture, the silicon substructure indeed influences the dynamics of the molecular motion within the membrane.

  20. BIOGENESIS OF THYLAKOID MEMBRANES WITH RECONSTRUCTION OF CHLOROPHYLL-PROTEIN COMPLEXES IN DELETION-MUTANT OF ORF469 IN BLUE-GREEN ALGA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuQingyu; WangRuiyong; XuHong; WireVermaas

    1997-01-01

    The transformable blue green alga is used productively for mutation and deletion studies to provide functional information regarding photosynthetic reaction center complexes. We wish to take the application of transformable blue-green algal systems one step further ,and set out the

  1. Localization of cyanobacterial photosystem II donor-side subunits by electron microscopy and the supramolecular organization of photosystem II in the thylakoid membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhl, Helena; Rögner, Matthias; Breemen, Jan F.L. van; Boekema, Egbert J.

    1999-01-01

    A large set of electron microscopy projections of photosystem II (PSII) dimers isolated from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus was characterized by single particle image analysis. In addition to previously published maps at lower resolution [Boekema, E.J., Hankamer, B., Bald, D., Kruip, J.,

  2. Light-dependent reversal of dark-chilling induced changes in chloroplast structure and arrangement of chlorophyll-protein complexes in bean thylakoid membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garstka, M; Drozak, A; Rosiak, M; Venema, JH; Kierdaszuk, B; Simeonova, E; van Hasselt, PR; Dobrucki, J; Mostowska, A

    2005-01-01

    Changes in chloroplast structure and rearrangement of chlorophyll-protein (CP) complexes were investigated in detached leaves of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Eureka), a chilling-sensitive plant, during 5-day dark-chilling at 1 degrees C and subsequent 3-h photoactivation under white light (200 mu

  3. Uniqueness theorems in linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Knops, Robin John

    1971-01-01

    The classical result for uniqueness in elasticity theory is due to Kirchhoff. It states that the standard mixed boundary value problem for a homogeneous isotropic linear elastic material in equilibrium and occupying a bounded three-dimensional region of space possesses at most one solution in the classical sense, provided the Lame and shear moduli, A and J1 respectively, obey the inequalities (3 A + 2 J1) > 0 and J1>O. In linear elastodynamics the analogous result, due to Neumann, is that the initial-mixed boundary value problem possesses at most one solution provided the elastic moduli satisfy the same set of inequalities as in Kirchhoffs theorem. Most standard textbooks on the linear theory of elasticity mention only these two classical criteria for uniqueness and neglect altogether the abundant literature which has appeared since the original publications of Kirchhoff. To remedy this deficiency it seems appropriate to attempt a coherent description ofthe various contributions made to the study of uniquenes...

  4. Protein secretion in the Archaea : multiple paths towards a unique cell surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Sonja-Verena; Szabo, Zalan; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    Archaea are similar to other prokaryotes in most aspects of cell structure but are unique with respect to the lipid composition of the cytoplasmic membrane and the structure of the cell surface. Membranes of archaea are composed of glycerol-ether lipids instead of glycerol-ester lipids and are based

  5. Uniqueness and Non-uniqueness in the Einstein Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, H P; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; York, James W.

    2005-01-01

    We examine numerically a sequence of free data for the conformal thin sandwich (CTS) equations representing non-linearly perturbed Minkowski spacetimes. We find only one solution for the standard (four) CTS equations; however, we find {\\em two} distinct solutions for the same free data when the lapse is determined by a fifth elliptic equation arising from specification of the time derivative of the mean curvature. For a given {\\em physical} (conformally scaled) amplitude of the perturbation, the solution for the physical data $g_{ij}, K_{ij}$ nevertheless appears to be unique.

  6. Studies on the interactions of bisphenols with anionic phospholipids of decomposer membranes in model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniatowski, Marcin; Sobolewska, Katarzyna; Flasiński, Michał; Wydro, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) and other bisphenols constitute a class of organic pollutants, which because of their estrogenic properties, low dose activity and bioaccumulation pose considerable risk for public health as well as for the environment. Accumulated in the sediment bisphenols can endanger the decomposers' populations being incorporated into their cellular membranes; however, the mechanism of their membrane activity is unknown. Therefore, to study these phenomena we applied anionic phospholipid Langmuir monolayers as simple but versatile models of decomposers biomembranes. Phosphatidylglycerols and cardiolipins are not only the main components of bacterial membranes but also of crucial importance in mitochondrial and thylakoid membranes in eukaryotic cells. In our investigations we applied five compounds of the bisphenol class most commonly detected in the environment. To characterize the bisphenols-model membrane interactions we applied multiple mutually independent methods of physical chemistry; namely: the Langmuir monolayer technique, surface potential measurements, Brewster angle microscopy for the visualization of the monolayers' texture and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction for the discussion of the phospholipids packing within the monolayers. Our studies indicated that all the investigated bisphenols interact with the model membrane, but the strength of the interactions is dependent on the bisphenol structure and hydrophobicity and the fluidity of the model membranes. We proved that bisphenol S often treated as the least toxic BPA analog can also be incorporated to the model membranes changing their structure and fluidity.

  7. Red cell membrane: past, present, and future

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohandas, Narla; Gallagher, Patrick G

    2008-01-01

    .... The non-nucleated red cell is unique among human cell type in that the plasma membrane, its only structural component, accounts for all of its diverse antigenic, transport, and mechanical characteristics...

  8. Lithium nephropathy: unique sonographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Salvo, Donald N; Park, Joseph; Laing, Faye C

    2012-04-01

    This case series describes a unique sonographic appearance consisting of numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci seen on renal sonograms of 10 adult patients receiving chronic lithium therapy. Clinically, chronic renal insufficiency was present in 6 and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in 2. Sonography showed numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci. Computed tomography in 5 patients confirmed microcysts and microcalcifications, which were fewer in number than on sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging in 2 patients confirmed microcysts in each case. Renal biopsy in 1 patient showed chronic interstitial nephritis, microcysts, and tubular dilatation. The diagnosis of lithium nephropathy should be considered when sonography shows these findings.

  9. Mucormycosis in India: unique features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Singh, Rachna

    2014-12-01

    Mucormycosis remains a devastating invasive fungal infection, with high mortality rates even after active management. The disease is being reported at an alarming frequency over the past decades from India. Indian mucormycosis has certain unique features. Rhino-orbito-cerebral presentation associated with uncontrolled diabetes is the predominant characteristic. Isolated renal mucormycosis has emerged as a new clinical entity. Apophysomyces elegans and Rhizopus homothallicus are emerging species in this region and uncommon agents such as Mucor irregularis and Thamnostylum lucknowense are also being reported. This review focuses on these distinct features of mucormycosis observed in India.

  10. UNIQUE ORAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raphael M. Ottenbrite; ZHAO Ruifeng; Sam Milstein

    1995-01-01

    An oral drug delivery system using proteinoid microspheres is discussed with respect to its unique dependence on pH. It has been found that certain drugs such as insulin and heparin can be encapsulated in proteinoid spheres at stomach pH's (1-3). These spheres also dissemble at intestinal pH's (6-7) releasing the drug for absorption. Using this technique low molecular weight heparin and human growth hormone have been orally delivered successfully to several animal species. Future work has been proposed to study the interaction and binding of the specific drugs with synthesized oligopeptides.

  11. Analysis of unique beta transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eman, B.; Krmpotic, F.; Tadic, D;

    1967-01-01

    The Heidelberg group measurements [For abstr. see Phys. Rev. Nucl. Sci. Vol. 15 (1965)] of unique forbidden transitions have been analysed. It has been found that experimental shape factors can be reproduced only with the induced pseudoscalar form factor d ...-non-conserving tensor form factor b > 0. In the former case they contradict Daniel's results [See abstr. 1966A10720] for 0- rarr 0+ transitions, whereas in the latter they are in disagreement with other known analyses of mu-meson capture, allowed and forbidden transitions. The conclusion appears to be independent...

  12. Iron stabilizes thylakoid protein-pigment complexes in Indian mustard during Cd-phytoremediation as revealed by BN-SDS-PAGE and ESI-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, M Irfan; D'Amici, Gian Maria; Fagioni, Marco; Rinalducci, Sara; Zolla, Lello

    2010-07-01

    Two-dimensional BN-SDS-PAGE, ESI-MS/MS and electron microscopy (EM) were used to study the role of iron (Fe) under cadmium (Cd) stress in retention of thylakoidal multiprotein complexes (MPCs) and chloroplast ultrastructure of Indian mustard, a moderate hyperaccumulator plant. Mustard was grown hydroponically with or without iron for 17 days and then exposed to CdCl2 for 3 days. Fe deficiency led to an increase in oxidative stress and damage to chloroplast/thylakoids accompanied by a decrease in chlorophyll content; exposure of plants to Cd further enhanced the oxidative stress and Cd accumulation (more in -Fe plants). However, the presence of iron aided plants in the suppression of oxidative stress and retention of chloroplasts and chlorophylls under Cd stress. Proteomic analyses by 2D BN-SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry showed that Fe deficiency considerably decreased the amount of LHCII trimer, ATPase-F1 portion, cyt b6/f and RuBisCO. No or less reduction, was observed for PSI(RCI+LHCI), the PSII-core monomer, and the PSII subcomplex, while an increase in the LHCII monomer was noted. Under iron deficiency, Cd proved to be very deleterious to MPCs, except for the PSII subcomplex, the LHCII monomer and free proteins which were increased. Iron proved to be very protective in retaining almost all the complexes. MPCs showed greater susceptibility to Cd than Fe deficiency, mainly at the level of RuBisCO and cyt b6/f; an increase in the amount of the PSII subcomplex, LHCII monomer and free proteins indicates differences in the mechanisms affected by Fe deficiency and Cd stress when compared to Fe-fed plants. This study furthers our understanding of the sites actually damaged in MPCs under Fe deficiency and Cd stress. A role emerges for iron in the protection of MPCs and, hence, of the chloroplast. The present study also indicates the importance of iron for efficient phytoextraction/phytoremediation.

  13. Conserved and plant-unique mechanisms regulating plant post-Golgi traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru eFujimoto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Membrane traffic plays crucial roles in diverse aspects of cellular and organelle functions in eukaryotic cells. Molecular machineries regulating each step of membrane traffic including the formation, tethering, and fusion of membrane carriers are largely conserved among various organisms, which suggests that the framework of membrane traffic is commonly shared among eukaryotic lineages. However, in addition to the common components, each organism has also acquired lineage-specific regulatory molecules that may be associated with the lineage-specific diversification of membrane trafficking events. In plants, comparative genomic analyses also indicate that some key machineries of membrane traffic are significantly and specifically diversified. In this review, we summarize recent progress regarding plant-unique regulatory mechanisms for membrane traffic, with a special focus on vesicle formation and fusion components in the post-Golgi trafficking pathway.

  14. Unique Features of Mobile Commerce

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Xiaojun; IIJIMA Junichi; HO Sho

    2004-01-01

    While the market potentials and impacts of web-based e-commerce are still in the ascendant, the advances in wireless technologies and mobile networks have brought about a new business opportunity and research attention, what is termed mobile commerce. Commonly, mobile commerce is considered to be another new application of existing web-based e-commerce onto wireless networks, but as an independent business area, mobile commerce has its own advantages and challenges as opposed to traditional e-commerce applications. This paper focuses on exploring the unique features of mobile commerce as. Compared with traditional e-commerce. Also, there are still some limitations arisen in m-commerce in contrast to web-based e-commerce. Finally, current state of mobile commerce in Japan is presented in brief, with an introduction of several cases involving mobile commerce applications in today 's marketplace.

  15. Unique features of space reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, David

    Space reactors are designed to meet a unique set of requirements; they must be sufficiently compact to be launched in a rocket to their operational location, operate for many years without maintenance and servicing, operate in extreme environments, and reject heat by radiation to space. To meet these restrictions, operating temperatures are much greater than in terrestrial power plants, and the reactors tend to have a fast neutron spectrum. Currently, a new generation of space reactor power plants is being developed. The major effort is in the SP-100 program, where the power plant is being designed for seven years of full power, and no maintenance operation at a reactor outlet operating temperature of 1350 K.

  16. The probabilities of unique events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeet S Khemlani

    Full Text Available Many theorists argue that the probabilities of unique events, even real possibilities such as President Obama's re-election, are meaningless. As a consequence, psychologists have seldom investigated them. We propose a new theory (implemented in a computer program in which such estimates depend on an intuitive non-numerical system capable only of simple procedures, and a deliberative system that maps intuitions into numbers. The theory predicts that estimates of the probabilities of conjunctions should often tend to split the difference between the probabilities of the two conjuncts. We report two experiments showing that individuals commit such violations of the probability calculus, and corroborating other predictions of the theory, e.g., individuals err in the same way even when they make non-numerical verbal estimates, such as that an event is highly improbable.

  17. The Evolution of Human Uniqueness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Robert

    2017-01-09

    The human species is an outlier in the natural world. Two million years ago our ancestors were a slightly odd apes. Now we occupy the largest ecological and geographical range of any species, have larger biomass, and process more energy. Usually, this transformation is explained in terms of cognitive ability-people are just smarter than all the rest. In this paper I argue that culture, our ability to learn from each other, and cooperation, our ability to make common cause with large groups of unrelated individuals are the real roots of human uniqueness, and sketch an evolutionary account of how these crucial abilities co-evolved with each other and with other features of our life histories.

  18. Hybrid Filter Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laicer, Castro; Rasimick, Brian; Green, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Cabin environmental control is an important issue for a successful Moon mission. Due to the unique environment of the Moon, lunar dust control is one of the main problems that significantly diminishes the air quality inside spacecraft cabins. Therefore, this innovation was motivated by NASA s need to minimize the negative health impact that air-suspended lunar dust particles have on astronauts in spacecraft cabins. It is based on fabrication of a hybrid filter comprising nanofiber nonwoven layers coated on porous polymer membranes with uniform cylindrical pores. This design results in a high-efficiency gas particulate filter with low pressure drop and the ability to be easily regenerated to restore filtration performance. A hybrid filter was developed consisting of a porous membrane with uniform, micron-sized, cylindrical pore channels coated with a thin nanofiber layer. Compared to conventional filter media such as a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, this filter is designed to provide high particle efficiency, low pressure drop, and the ability to be regenerated. These membranes have well-defined micron-sized pores and can be used independently as air filters with discreet particle size cut-off, or coated with nanofiber layers for filtration of ultrafine nanoscale particles. The filter consists of a thin design intended to facilitate filter regeneration by localized air pulsing. The two main features of this invention are the concept of combining a micro-engineered straight-pore membrane with nanofibers. The micro-engineered straight pore membrane can be prepared with extremely high precision. Because the resulting membrane pores are straight and not tortuous like those found in conventional filters, the pressure drop across the filter is significantly reduced. The nanofiber layer is applied as a very thin coating to enhance filtration efficiency for fine nanoscale particles. Additionally, the thin nanofiber coating is designed to promote capture of

  19. CYP1B1: a unique gene with unique characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiq, Muneeb A; Dada, Rima; Sharma, Reetika; Saluja, Daman; Dada, Tanuj

    2014-01-01

    CYP1B1, a recently described dioxin inducible oxidoreductase, is a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily involved in the metabolism of estradiol, retinol, benzo[a]pyrene, tamoxifen, melatonin, sterols etc. It plays important roles in numerous physiological processes and is expressed at mRNA level in many tissues and anatomical compartments. CYP1B1 has been implicated in scores of disorders. Analyses of the recent studies suggest that CYP1B1 can serve as a universal/ideal cancer marker and a candidate gene for predictive diagnosis. There is plethora of literature available about certain aspects of CYP1B1 that have not been interpreted, discussed and philosophized upon. The present analysis examines CYP1B1 as a peculiar gene with certain distinctive characteristics like the uniqueness in its chromosomal location, gene structure and organization, involvement in developmentally important disorders, tissue specific, not only expression, but splicing, potential as a universal cancer marker due to its involvement in key aspects of cellular metabolism, use in diagnosis and predictive diagnosis of various diseases and the importance and function of CYP1B1 mRNA in addition to the regular translation. Also CYP1B1 is very difficult to express in heterologous expression systems, thereby, halting its functional studies. Here we review and analyze these exceptional and startling characteristics of CYP1B1 with inputs from our own experiences in order to get a better insight into its molecular biology in health and disease. This may help to further understand the etiopathomechanistic aspects of CYP1B1 mediated diseases paving way for better research strategies and improved clinical management.

  20. Immunogold localization of acyl carrier protein in plants and Escherichia coli: Evidence for membrane association in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabas, A R; Smith, C G

    1988-08-01

    Immunogold labelling was used to study the distribution of acyl carrier protein (ACP) in Escherichia coli and a variety of plant tissues. In E. coli, ACP is distributed throughout the cytoplasm, confirming the observation of S. Jackowski et al. (1985, J. Bacteriol., 162, 5-8_. In the mesocarp of Avocado (Persea americana) and maturing seeds of oil-seed rape (Brassica napus cv. Jet Neuf), over 95% of the ACP is localised to plastids. The protein is almost exclusively located in the chloroplasts of leaf material from oil-seed rape. Approximately 80% of the gold particles associated with the ACP were further localized to the thylakoid membrane of the chloroplast. Since acetyl-CoA carboxylase has been reported to be localized to the thylakoid membrane (C.G. Kannangara and C.J. Jensen, 1975, Eur. J. Biochem., 54, 25-30), these results are consistent with the view that the two sequential enzymes in fatty-acid synthesis are in close spacial proximity.

  1. Unique properties of Plasmodium falciparum porphobilinogen deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Viswanathan Arun; Arumugam, Rajavel; Gopalakrishnan, Bulusu; Jyothsna, Yeleswarapu Sri; Rangarajan, Pundi N; Padmanaban, Govindarajan

    2008-01-04

    The hybrid pathway for heme biosynthesis in the malarial parasite proposes the involvement of parasite genome-coded enzymes of the pathway localized in different compartments such as apicoplast, mitochondria, and cytosol. However, knowledge on the functionality and localization of many of these enzymes is not available. In this study, we demonstrate that porphobilinogen deaminase encoded by the Plasmodium falciparum genome (PfPBGD) has several unique biochemical properties. Studies carried out with PfPBGD partially purified from parasite membrane fraction, as well as recombinant PfPBGD lacking N-terminal 64 amino acids expressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells (DeltaPfPBGD), indicate that both the proteins are catalytically active. Surprisingly, PfPBGD catalyzes the conversion of porphobilinogen to uroporphyrinogen III (UROGEN III), indicating that it also possesses uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) activity, catalyzing the next step. This obviates the necessity to have a separate gene for UROS that has not been so far annotated in the parasite genome. Interestingly, DeltaPfP-BGD gives rise to UROGEN III even after heat treatment, although UROS from other sources is known to be heat-sensitive. Based on the analysis of active site residues, a DeltaPfPBGDL116K mutant enzyme was created and the specific activity of this recombinant mutant enzyme is 5-fold higher than DeltaPfPBGD. More interestingly, DeltaPfPBGDL116K catalyzes the formation of uroporphyrinogen I (UROGEN I) in addition to UROGEN III, indicating that with increased PBGD activity the UROS activity of PBGD may perhaps become rate-limiting, thus leading to non-enzymatic cyclization of preuroporphyrinogen to UROGEN I. PfPBGD is localized to the apicoplast and is catalytically very inefficient compared with the host red cell enzyme.

  2. UNIQUENESS ON ZERO PRESSURE GAS DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄飞敏; 王振

    2001-01-01

    By introducing a new idea, the authors prove the uniqueness of weak solution of pressureless gases with the large initial data. In particular, uniqueness theorem is obtained in the same functional space as the existence theorem.

  3. On the uniqueness of supersymmetric attractors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taniya Mandal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the uniqueness of supersymmetric attractors in four-dimensional N=2 supergravity theories coupled to n vector multiplets. We prove that for a given charge configuration the supersymmetry preserving axion free attractors are unique. We generalise the analysis to axionic attractors and state the conditions for uniqueness explicitly. We consider the example of a two-parameter model and find all solutions to the supersymmetric attractor equations and discuss their uniqueness.

  4. 77 FR 69393 - Unique Device Identification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 801 RIN 0910-AG31 Unique Device Identification... unique device identification system as required by recent amendments to the Federal Food, Drug, and..., FDA published a proposed rule to establish a unique device identification system, as required by...

  5. On chromatic and flow polynomial unique graphs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duan, Yinghua; Wu, Haidong; Yu, Qinglin

    2008-01-01

    ... research on graphs uniquely determined by their chromatic polynomials and more recently on their Tutte polynomials, but rather spotty research on graphs uniquely determined by their flow polynomials or the combination of both chromatic and flow polynomials. This article is an initiation of investigation on graphs uniquely determin...

  6. Primordial membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2017-01-01

    Cellular membranes, which are self-assembled bilayer structures mainly composed of lipids, proteins and conjugated polysaccharides, are the defining feature of cell physiology. It is likely that the complexity of contemporary cells was preceded by simpler chemical systems or protocells during the...

  7. Robotic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette

    2008-01-01

    , Vivisection and Strange Metabolisms, were developed at the Centre for Information Technology and Architecture (CITA) at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen as a means of engaging intangible digital data with tactile physical material. As robotic membranes, they are a dual examination...

  8. Trienoic fatty acids and plant tolerance of temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Routaboul Jean-Marc; Browse John

    2002-01-01

    The biophysical reactions of light harvesting and electron transport during photosynthesis take place in a uniquely constructed bilayer, the thylakoid. In all photosynthetic eukaryotes, the complement of atypical glycerolipid molecules that form the foundation of this membrane are characterised by sugar head-groups and a very high level of unsaturation in the fatty acids that occupy the central portion of the thylakoid bilayer. alpha-linolenic (18:3) or a combination of 18:3 and hexadecatrien...

  9. Hereditary spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and other red cell membrane disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Lydie; Galimand, Julie; Fenneteau, Odile; Mohandas, Narla

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis are the two most common inherited red cell membrane disorders resulting from mutations in genes encoding various red cell membrane and skeletal proteins. Red cell membrane, a composite structure composed of lipid bilayer linked to spectrin-based membrane skeleton is responsible for the unique features of flexibility and mechanical stability of the cell. Defects in various proteins involved in linking the lipid bilayer to membrane skeleton result in loss in membrane cohesion leading to surface area loss and hereditary spherocytosis while defects in proteins involved in lateral interactions of the spectrin-based skeleton lead to decreased mechanical stability, membrane fragmentation and hereditary elliptocytosis. The disease severity is primarily dependent on the extent of membrane surface area loss. Both these diseases can be readily diagnosed by various laboratory approaches that include red blood cell cytology, flow cytometry, ektacytometry, electrophoresis of the red cell membrane proteins, and mutational analysis of gene encoding red cell membrane proteins.

  10. Polymer-nanoinorganic particles composite membranes: a brief overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenliang XU; Liyun YU; Lingfeng HAN

    2009-01-01

    Polymer-nanoinorganic particles composite membranes present an interesting approach for improving the physical and chemical, as well as separation properties of polymer membranes, because they possess character-istics of both organic and inorganic membranes such as good permeability, selectivity, mechanical strength, ther-mal stability and so on. The preparations and structures of polymer-nanoinorganic particles composite membranes and their unique properties are reviewed.

  11. Thylakoid-Inspired Multishell g-C3N4 Nanocapsules with Enhanced Visible-Light Harvesting and Electron Transfer Properties for High-Efficiency Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhenwei; Yang, Dong; Li, Zhen; Nan, Yanhu; Ding, Fei; Shen, Yichun; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2017-01-24

    Inspired by the orderly stacked nanostructure and highly integrated function of thylakoids in a natural photosynthesis system, multishell g-C3N4 (MSCN) nanocapsule photocatalysts have been prepared by SiO2 hard template with different shell layers. The resultant triple-shell g-C3N4 (TSCN) nanocapsules display superior photocatalysis performance to single-shell and double-shell counterparts owing to excellent visible-light harvesting and electron transfer properties. Specially, with the increase of the shell layer number, light harvesting is greatly enhanced. There is an increase of the entire visible range absorption arising from the multiple scattering and reflection of the incident light within multishell nanoarchitectures as well as the light transmission within the porous thin shells, and an increase of absorption edge arising from the decreased quantum size effect. The electron transfer is greatly accelerated by the mesopores in the thin shells as nanoconduits and the high specific surface area of TSCN (310.7 m(2) g(-1)). With the tailored hierarchical nanostructure features, TSCN exhibits a superior visible-light H2-generation activity of 630 μmol h(-1) g(-1) (λ > 420 nm), which is among one of the most efficient metal-free g-C3N4 photocatalysts. This study demonstrates a bioinspired approach to the rational design of high-performance nanostructured visible-light photocatalysts.

  12. Regulation and Levels of the Thylakoid K+/H+ Antiporter KEA3 Shape the Dynamic Response of Photosynthesis in Fluctuating Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Ute; Leonelli, Lauriebeth; Correa Galvis, Viviana; Strand, Deserah; Quinn, Erica H; Jonikas, Martin C; Niyogi, Krishna K

    2016-07-01

    Crop canopies create environments of highly fluctuating light intensities. In such environments, photoprotective mechanisms and their relaxation kinetics have been hypothesized to limit photosynthetic efficiency and therefore crop yield potential. Here, we show that overexpression of the Arabidopsis thylakoid K(+)/H(+) antiporter KEA3 accelerates the relaxation of photoprotective energy-dependent quenching after transitions from high to low light in Arabidopsis and tobacco. This, in turn, enhances PSII quantum efficiency in both organisms, supporting that in wild-type plants, residual light energy quenching following a high to low light transition represents a limitation to photosynthetic efficiency in fluctuating light. This finding underscores the potential of accelerating quenching relaxation as a building block for improving photosynthetic efficiency in the field. Additionally, by overexpressing natural KEA3 variants with modification to the C-terminus, we show that KEA3 activity is regulated by a mechanism involving its lumen-localized C-terminus, which lowers KEA3 activity in high light. This regulatory mechanism fine-tunes the balance between photoprotective energy dissipation in high light and maximum quantum yield in low light, likely to be critical for efficient photosynthesis in fluctuating light conditions.

  13. Research and development to overcome fouling of membranes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narang, S.C.; Sharma, S.K.; Hum, G.; Ventura, S.C.; Roberts, D.L.; Gottschlich, D.; Ahner, N.

    1998-11-01

    To overcome fouling of membranes, SRI International is developing a unique piezoelectric backing for ultrafiltration membranes. This backing is capable of producing local turbulence next to the membrane to minimize concentration polarization and the rate of buildup of solutes and particulate matter on the membrane surface. We have studied piezoelectrically assisted ultrafiltration in more detail, with the objective to apply this process to industrial ultrafiltrations. We conducted several ultrafiltration experiments on flat sheet membranes with model dextran solutions and with electrocoat paint to study flux enhancement as a function of parameters such as feed flow rate, feed pressure, as well as the piezodriver-membrane system.

  14. Role of cardiolipins in the inner mitochondrial membrane: insight gained through atom-scale simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Róg, Tomasz; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Munck, Nana

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial membranes are unique in many ways. Unlike other cellular membranes, they are comprised of two membranes instead of just one, and cardiolipins, one of the abundant lipid species in mitochondrial membranes, are not found in significant amounts elsewhere in the cell. Among other aspect...

  15. Living Membranes as Environmental Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-19

    not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. Tufts University 20 Professors Row Medford, MA...establishing the fundamentals to bring the living membrane concept to fruition. Chemical and biological weapons (CBW) present unique challenges with regards...of target bacteria  Genetically malleable host organism  Tailorable cellulose pellicle formulation  Biologically -driven rather than chemical

  16. Age-dependent variation in membrane lipid synthesis in leaves of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellgren, Lars; Sandelius, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    leaf of older plants, acetate was predominantly allocated into phosphatidylglycerol (PG), which remained the major radiolabelled lipid during the 3 d studied. The proportion of radioactivity recovered in MGDG decreased with increasing plant age up to 20 d, suggesting that, in expanded leaves, MGDG...... is more stable and requires renewal to a lower extent than PG. When the second oldest leaf approached senescence, labelling of MGDG again increased, indicating an increased need for thylakoid repair. The proportion of acetate allocated into phosphatidylethanolamine and free sterols was largest in leaves...... of 18-26-d-old plants and in the youngest leaves, respectively. Thus, these results demonstrate that the distribution of newly synthesized fatty acids between acyl lipid synthesis in the chloroplast and extraplastidial membranes strongly varies with leaf age, as do the proportion utilized for sterol...

  17. Unique proteomic signatures distinguish macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Becker

    Full Text Available Monocytes differentiate into heterogeneous populations of tissue macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that regulate inflammation and immunity. Identifying specific populations of myeloid cells in vivo is problematic, however, because only a limited number of proteins have been used to assign cellular phenotype. Using mass spectrometry and bone marrow-derived cells, we provided a global view of the proteomes of M-CSF-derived macrophages, classically and alternatively activated macrophages, and GM-CSF-derived DCs. Remarkably, the expression levels of half the plasma membrane proteins differed significantly in the various populations of cells derived in vitro. Moreover, the membrane proteomes of macrophages and DCs were more distinct than those of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Hierarchical cluster and dual statistical analyses demonstrated that each cell type exhibited a robust proteomic signature that was unique. To interrogate the phenotype of myeloid cells in vivo, we subjected elicited peritoneal macrophages harvested from wild-type and GM-CSF-deficient mice to mass spectrometric and functional analysis. Unexpectedly, we found that peritoneal macrophages exhibited many features of the DCs generated in vitro. These findings demonstrate that global analysis of the membrane proteome can help define immune cell phenotypes in vivo.

  18. Unique Physician Identification Number (UPIN) Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Unique Physician Identification Number (UPIN) Directory contains selected information on physicians, doctors of Osteopathy, limited licensed practitioners and...

  19. Alternative membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, A.K.; Pitchumani, S.; Sridhar, P.; Shukla, A.K. [Central Electrochemical Research Inst., Karaikudi (India)

    2009-07-01

    Nafion, a perfluoro-sulfonated membrane, is utilized as a membrane electrolyte in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). However, to realize optimum PEFC performance, the Nafion membrane needs to be fully humidified, making the system quite costly. Therefore, in order to solve this problem, alternative membrane electrolytes that could operate under low humidity conditions are needed. This paper reported on composite Nafion membranes with ceramic/inorganic fillers such as silica and mesoporous zirconium phosphate (MZP). Silica was impregnated to the Nafion matrix by a unique water hydrolysis sol-gel route and casted as a composite membrane while MZP, a solid-super-acid-proton-conducting medium as well as water absorbing material was synthesized by a co-assembly technique and impregnated to the Nafion matrix to form a composite membrane. The performance of the PEFCs with Nafion membrane and composite membranes was tested with hydrogen/oxygen gas and hydrogen/air feeds at varying relative humidity (RH) values under ambient conditions. It was concluded that under RH value as low as 18 per cent, the PEFC with Nafion membrane delivers a peak-power density of only 130 mW/square centimeter.

  20. Roles of Lipids in Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Endo, Kaichiro; Wada, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes in cyanobacterial cells and chloroplasts of algae and higher plants are the sites of oxygenic photosynthesis. The lipid composition of the thylakoid membrane is unique and highly conserved among oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. Major lipids in thylakoid membranes are glycolipids, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, digalactosyldiacylglycerol and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, and the phospholipid, phosphatidylglycerol. The identification of almost all genes involved in the biosynthesis of each lipid class over the past decade has allowed the generation and isolation of mutants of various photosynthetic organisms incapable of synthesizing specific lipids. Numerous studies using such mutants have revealed that these lipids play important roles not only in the formation of the lipid bilayers of thylakoid membranes but also in the folding and assembly of the protein subunits in photosynthetic complexes. In addition to the studies with the mutants, recent X-ray crystallography studies of photosynthetic complexes in thylakoid membranes have also provided critical information on the association of lipids with photosynthetic complexes and their activities. In this chapter, we summarize our current understanding about the structural and functional involvement of thylakoid lipids in oxygenic photosynthesis.

  1. Uniqueness of time-independent electromagnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Per W.

    1974-01-01

    As a comment on a recent paper by Steele, a more general uniqueness theorem for time-independent fields is mentioned. ©1974 American Institute of Physics......As a comment on a recent paper by Steele, a more general uniqueness theorem for time-independent fields is mentioned. ©1974 American Institute of Physics...

  2. Some Graphs Containing Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, two classes of graphs of arbitrary order are described which contain unique Hamiltonian cycles. All the graphs have mean vertex degree greater than one quarter the order of the graph. The Hamiltonian cycles are detailed, their uniqueness proved and simple rules for the construction of the adjacency matrix of the graphs are given.…

  3. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  4. 78 FR 58785 - Unique Device Identification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... 16, 801, 803, et al. Unique Device Identification System; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78... 0910-AG31 Unique Device Identification System AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final... will substantially reduce existing obstacles to the adequate identification of medical devices used in...

  5. A note on uniquely (nil clean ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Sahebi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A ring $R$ is uniquely (nil clean in case for any $a\\in R$‎ ‎there exists a uniquely idempotent $e\\in R$ such that $a-e$ is‎ ‎invertible (nilpotent‎. ‎Let‎ ‎$C=\\small\\left(‎‎\\begin{array}{cc}‎‎A & V \\\\‎ ‎W & B‎‎\\end{array}‎‎\\right$‎ ‎be the Morita Context ring‎. ‎We determine conditions under which the rings $A‎, ‎B$‎ ‎are uniquely (nil clean‎. ‎Moreover we show that the center of a uniquely (nil‎‎clean ring is uniquely (nil clean.

  6. Description of Gloeomargarita lithophora gen. nov., sp. nov., a thylakoid-bearing basal-branching cyanobacterium with intracellular carbonates, and proposal for Gloeomargaritales ord. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, David; Tavera, Rosaluz; Benzerara, Karim; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Couradeau, Estelle; Gérard, Emmanuelle; Loussert Fonta, Céline; Novelo, Eberto; Zivanovic, Yvan; López-García, Purificación

    2016-11-21

    A unicellular cyanobacterium, strain Alchichica-D10, was isolated from microbialites of the alkaline Lake Alchichica, Mexico. The cells were short rods (3.9 ± 0.6 μm in length and 1.1 ± 0.1 μm in width) forming biofilms of intense emerald green color. They exhibited red autofluorescence under UV light excitation. UV-visible absorption spectra revealed that they contain chlorophyll a and phycocyanin, and electron microscopy showed the presence of thylakoids. The strain grew within a temperature range of 15-30 °C. Genomic DNA G+C content was 52.2 mol%. The most remarkable feature of this species was its granular cytoplasm, due to the presence of numerous intracellular spherical granules (16-26 per cell) with an average diameter of 270 nm. These granules, easily visible under scanning electron microscopy, were composed of amorphous carbonate containing Ca, Mg, Ba, and Sr. A multi-gene phylogeny based on the analysis of 59 conserved protein markers supported robustly that this strain occupies a deep position in the cyanobacterial tree. Based on its phenotypic characters and phylogenetic position, strain Alchichica-D10 is considered to represent a new genus and novel species of cyanobacteria for which the name Gloeomargarita lithophora gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Alchichica-D10 (Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa CCAP strain 1437/1; Collections de Cyanobactéries et Microalgues Vivantes of the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris strain PMC 919.15). Furthermore, a new family, Gloeomargaritaceae, and a new order, Gloeoemargaritales, are proposed to accommodate this species under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants.

  7. Unique functional properties of somatostatin-expressing GABAergic neurons in mouse barrel cortex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gentet, L.J.; Kremer, Y.; Taniguchi, H.; Huang, Z.J.; Staiger, J.F.; Petersen, C.C.H.

    2012-01-01

    Neocortical GABAergic neurons have diverse molecular, structural and electrophysiological features, but the functional correlates of this diversity are largely unknown. We found unique membrane potential dynamics of somatostatin-expressing (SOM) neurons in layer 2/3 of the primary somatosensory

  8. Hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped carbon membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong

    2017-08-03

    The present invention is a structure, method of making and method of use for a novel macroscopic hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped, nano-porous carbon membrane (HNDCMs) with asymmetric and hierarchical pore architecture that can be produced on a large-scale approach. The unique HNDCM holds great promise as components in separation and advanced carbon devices because they could offer unconventional fluidic transport phenomena on the nanoscale. Overall, the invention set forth herein covers a hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped carbon membranes and methods of making and using such a membranes.

  9. Membrane heredity and early chloroplast evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, T

    2000-04-01

    Membrane heredity was central to the unique symbiogenetic origin from cyanobacteria of chloroplasts in the ancestor of Plantae (green plants, red algae, glaucophytes) and to subsequent lateral transfers of plastids to form even more complex photosynthetic chimeras. Each symbiogenesis integrated disparate genomes and several radically different genetic membranes into a more complex cell. The common ancestor of Plantae evolved transit machinery for plastid protein import. In later secondary symbiogeneses, signal sequences were added to target proteins across host perialgal membranes: independently into green algal plastids (euglenoids, chlorarachneans) and red algal plastids (alveolates, chromists). Conservatism and innovation during early plastid diversification are discussed.

  10. Fabrication of bioinspired composite nanofiber membranes with robust superhydrophobicity for direct contact membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuan; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G

    2014-06-03

    The practical application of membrane distillation (MD) for water purification is hindered by the absence of desirable membranes that can fulfill the special requirements of the MD process. Compared to the membranes fabricated by other methods, nanofiber membranes produced by electrospinning are of great interest due to their high porosity, low tortuosity, large surface pore size, and high surface hydrophobicity. However, the stable performance of the nanofiber membranes in the MD process is still unsatisfactory. Inspired by the unique structure of the lotus leaf, this study aimed to develop a strategy to construct superhydrophobic composite nanofiber membranes with robust superhydrophobicity and high porosity suitable for use in MD. The newly developed membrane consists of a superhydrophobic silica-PVDF composite selective skin formed on a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) porous nanofiber scaffold via electrospinning. This fabrication method could be easily scaled up due to its simple preparation procedures. The effects of silica diameter and concentration on membrane contact angle, sliding angle, and MD performance were investigated thoroughly. For the first time, the direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) tests demonstrate that the newly developed membranes are able to present stable high performance over 50 h of testing time, and the superhydrophobic selective layer exhibits excellent durability in ultrasonic treatment and a continuous DCMD test. It is believed that this novel design strategy has great potential for MD membrane fabrication.

  11. Modeling electrically active viscoelastic membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitikantha Roy

    Full Text Available The membrane protein prestin is native to the cochlear outer hair cell that is crucial to the ear's amplification and frequency selectivity throughout the whole acoustic frequency range. The outer hair cell exhibits interrelated dimensional changes, force generation, and electric charge transfer. Cells transfected with prestin acquire unique active properties similar to those in the native cell that have also been useful in understanding the process. Here we propose a model describing the major electromechanical features of such active membranes. The model derived from thermodynamic principles is in the form of integral relationships between the history of voltage and membrane resultants as independent variables and the charge density and strains as dependent variables. The proposed model is applied to the analysis of an active force produced by the outer hair cell in response to a harmonic electric field. Our analysis reveals the mechanism of the outer hair cell active (isometric force having an almost constant amplitude and phase up to 80 kHz. We found that the frequency-invariance of the force is a result of interplay between the electrical filtering associated with prestin and power law viscoelasticity of the surrounding membrane. Paradoxically, the membrane viscoelasticity boosts the force balancing the electrical filtering effect. We also consider various modes of electromechanical coupling in membrane with prestin associated with mechanical perturbations in the cell. We consider pressure or strains applied step-wise or at a constant rate and compute the time course of the resulting electric charge. The results obtained here are important for the analysis of electromechanical properties of membranes, cells, and biological materials as well as for a better understanding of the mechanism of hearing and the role of the protein prestin in this mechanism.

  12. Major Intrinsic Proteins in Biomimetic Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Biological membranes define the structural and functional boundaries in living cells and their organelles. The integrity of the cell depends on its ability to separate inside from outside and yet at the same time allow massive transport of matter in and out the cell. Nature has elegantly met...... this challenge by developing membranes in the form of lipid bilayers in which specialized transport proteins are incorporated. This raises the question: is it possible to mimic biological membranes and create a membrane based sensor and/or separation device? In the development of a biomimetic sensor....../separation technology, a unique class of membrane transport proteins is especially interesting the major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Generally, MIPs conduct water molecules and selected solutes in and out of the cell while preventing the passage of other solutes, a property critical for the conservation of the cells...

  13. Carbon Nanotube Membranes: Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Energy-Efficient Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-03-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Porifera is developing carbon nanotube membranes that allow more efficient removal of CO2 from coal plant exhaust. Most of today’s carbon capture methods use chemical solvents, but capture methods that use membranes to draw CO2 out of exhaust gas are potentially more efficient and cost effective. Traditionally, membranes are limited by the rate at which they allow gas to flow through them and the amount of CO2 they can attract from the gas. Smooth support pores and the unique structure of Porifera’s carbon nanotube membranes allows them to be more permeable than other polymeric membranes, yet still selective enough for CO2 removal. This approach could overcome the barriers facing membrane-based approaches for capturing CO2 from coal plant exhausts.

  14. High Blood Pressure: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z High Blood Pressure Hypertension Unique to Older Adults This section provides ... Pressure Targets are Different for Very Old Adults High blood pressure (also called hypertension) increases your chance of having ...

  15. Arachnoiditis ossificans and syringomyelia: A unique presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F Opalak

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This case demonstrates a unique presentation of AO and highlights the need for CT imaging when a noncommunicating syringx is identified. In addition, surgical decompression can achieve good results when AO is associated with concurrent compressive lesions.

  16. Falls Prevention: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Falls Prevention Unique to Older Adults This section provides ... and Muscle Strengthening Exercises As part of your fall prevention program, you should follow an exercise program ...

  17. Right temporopolar activation associated with unique perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Tomoki; Konishi, Seiki; Jimura, Koji; Chikazoe, Junichi; Nakamura, Noriko; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2008-05-15

    Unique mode of perception, or the ability to see things differently from others, is one of the psychological resources required for creative mental activities. Behavioral studies using ambiguous visual stimuli have successfully induced diverse responses from subjects, and the unique responses defined in this paradigm were observed in higher frequency in the artistic population as compared to the nonartistic population. However, the neural substrates that underlie such unique perception have yet to be investigated. In the present study, ten ambiguous figures were used as stimuli. The subjects were instructed to say what the figures looked like during functional MRI scanning. The responses were classified as "frequent", "infrequent" or "unique" responses based on the appearance frequency of the same response in an independent age- and gender-matched control group. An event-related analysis contrasting unique vs. frequent responses revealed the greatest activation in the right temporal pole, which survived a whole brain multiple comparison. An alternative parametric modulation analysis was also performed to show that potentially confounding perceptual effects deriving from differences in visual stimuli make no significant contribution to this temporopolar activation. Previous neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies have shown the involvement of the temporal pole in perception-emotion linkage. Thus, our results suggest that unique perception is produced by the integration of perceptual and emotional processes, and this integration might underlie essential parts of creative mental activities.

  18. Using absorbable collagen membranes for guided tissue regeneration, guided bone regeneration, and to treat gingival recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H L; Carroll, W J

    2000-05-01

    This article reviews the role of barrier membranes in guided tissue regeneration (GTR) and guided bone regeneration (GBR), including the advantages of using absorbable barrier membranes in GTR and GBR and the unique properties of collagen membranes. The indications and contraindications for using collagen membranes for these procedures are examined, and successful cases are presented. Finally, the role of collagen membranes in the future of regenerative therapy is considered.

  19. From biological membranes to biomimetic model membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes play an essential role in the cellular protection as well as in the control and the transport of nutrients. Many mechanisms such as molecular recognition, enzymatic catalysis, cellular adhesion and membrane fusion take place into the biological membranes. In 1972, Singer et al. provided a membrane model, called fluid mosaic model, in which each leaflet of the bilayer is formed by a homogeneous environment of lipids in a fluid state including globular assembling of proteins and glycoproteins. Since its conception in 1972, many developments were brought to this model in terms of composition and molecular organization. The main development of the fluid mosaic model was made by Simons et al. (1997 and Brown et al. (1997 who suggested that membrane lipids are organized into lateral microdomains (or lipid rafts with a specific composition and a molecular dynamic that are different to the composition and the dynamic of the surrounding liquid crystalline phase. The discovery of a phase separation in the plane of the membrane has induced an explosion in the research efforts related to the biology of cell membranes but also in the development of new technologies for the study of these biological systems. Due to the high complexity of biological membranes and in order to investigate the biological processes that occur on the membrane surface or within the membrane lipid bilayer, a large number of studies are performed using biomimicking model membranes. This paper aims at revisiting the fundamental properties of biological membranes in terms of membrane composition, membrane dynamic and molecular organization, as well as at describing the most common biomimicking models that are frequently used for investigating biological processes such as membrane fusion, membrane trafficking, pore formation as well as membrane interactions at a molecular level.

  20. Progress and challenges of carbon nanotube membrane in water treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jieun

    2016-05-25

    The potential of the carbon nanotube (CNT) membrane has been highly strengthened in water treatment during the last decade. According to works published up to now, the unique and excellent characteristics of CNT outperformed conventional polymer membranes. Such achievements of CNT membranes are greatly dependent on their fabrication methods. Further, the intrinsic properties of CNT could be a critical factor of applicability to membrane processes. This article provides an explicit and systematic review of the progress of CNT membranes addressing the current epidemic—whether (i) the CNT membranes could tackle current challenges in the pressure- or thermally driven membrane processes and (ii) CNT hybrid nanocomposite as a new generation of materials could complement current CNT-enhanced membrane. © 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  1. Desalination by biomimetic aquaporin membranes: Review of status and prospects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, C.Y.; Zhao, Y.; Wang, R.

    2013-01-01

    Based on their unique combination of offering high water permeability and high solute rejection aquaporin proteins have attracted considerable interest over the last years as functional building blocks of biomimetic membranes for water desalination and reuse. The purpose of this review is to prov......Based on their unique combination of offering high water permeability and high solute rejection aquaporin proteins have attracted considerable interest over the last years as functional building blocks of biomimetic membranes for water desalination and reuse. The purpose of this review...... is to provide an overview of the properties of aquaporins, their preparation and characterization. We discuss the challenges in exploiting the remarkable properties of aquaporin proteins for membrane separation processes and we present various attempts to construct aquaporin in membranes for desalination......; including an overview of our own recent developments in aquaporin-based membranes. Finally we outline future prospects of aquaporin based biomimetic membrane for desalination and water reuse....

  2. Microporous Inorganic Membranes as Proton Exchange Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vichi, F.M. Tejedor-Tejedor, M.I. Anderson, Marc A

    2002-08-28

    Porous oxide electrolyte membranes provide an alternative approach to fabricating proton exchange membrane fuel cells based on inorganic materials. This study focused on elucidating the properties of these inorganic membranes that make them good electrolyte materials in membrane electrode assemblies; in particular, we investigated several properties that affect the nature of proton conductivity in these membranes. This report discusses our findings on the effect of variables such as site density, amount of surface protonation and surface modification on the proton conductivity of membranes with a fixed pore structure under selected conditions. Proton conductivities of these inorganic membranes are similar to conductivities of nafion, the polymeric membrane most commonly used in low temperature fuel cells.

  3. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Are membranes really necessary?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davila, M.; Kassab, G.; Klapwijk, A.; Lier, van J.B.

    2008-01-01

    Membranes themselves represent a significant cost for the full scale application of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR). The possibility of operating an AnMBR with a self-forming dynamic membrane generated by the substances present in the reactor liquor would translate into an important saving. A

  4. Amygdalar enlargement associated with unique perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Tomoki; Konishi, Seiki; Jimura, Koji; Chikazoe, Junichi; Nakamura, Noriko; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    Interference by amygdalar activity in perceptual processes has been reported in many previous studies. Consistent with these reports, previous clinical studies have shown amygdalar volume change in multiple types of psychotic disease presenting with unusual perception. However, the relationship between variation in amygdalar volume in the normal population and the tendency toward unusual or unique perception has never been investigated. To address this issue, we defined an index to represent the tendency toward unique perception using ambiguous stimuli: subjects were instructed to state what the figures looked like to them, and "unique responses" were defined depending on the appearance frequency of the same responses in an age- and gender-matched control group. The index was defined as the ratio of unique responses to total responses per subject. We obtained structural brain images and values of the index from sixty-eight normal subjects. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed a positive correlation between amygdalar volume and the index. Since previous reports have indicated that unique responses were observed at higher frequency in the artistic population than in the nonartistic normal population, this positive correlation suggests that amygdalar enlargement in the normal population might be related to creative mental activity.

  5. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes...... controlled by membrane structure, permeability and curvature as well as membrane proteins by using a wide range of biochemical, biophysical and microscopic techniques. This review gives an overview of some currently used model biomembrane systems. We will also discuss some key membrane protein properties...... that are relevant for protein-membrane interactions in terms of protein structure and how it is affected by membrane composition, phase behavior and curvature....

  6. Erythrocyte membrane proteins and membrane skeleton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yiqin; LIU Junfan

    2007-01-01

    Considerable advances in the research field of erythrocyte membrane were achieved in the recent two decades.New findings in the structure-function correlation and interactions of erythrocyte membrane proteins have attracted extensive attention.Interesting progress was also made in the molecular pathogenesis of erythrocyte membrane disorders.Advances in the composition,function and interaction of erythrocyte membrane proteins,erythrocyte membrane skeleton,and relevant diseases are briefly described and summarized here on the basis of domestic and world literatures.

  7. Existence and Uniqueness in Shape from Shading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓雁萍; 李价谷

    1997-01-01

    For the image of a smooth surface object fully contained within the field of view and illuminated in and arbitrary direction,this paper discusses the existence and uniqueness o the conditions for solving a shape-from-shading problem under the conditions that the Fourier series expansion of the image intensity contains only zero and first order terms in a polar coordinate system.Three theorems are established,one for the existence and two for the uniqueness of z-axis symmetric shape from shading.

  8. Changes in membrane lipids and carotenoids during light acclimation in a marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Olimpio Montero; Alberto Sánchez-Guijo; Luis M Lubián; Gonzalo Martínez-Rodríguez

    2012-09-01

    Time course of carotenoid and membrane lipid variation during high light (HL) acclimation (about 85 mol m−2 s−1), after transfer from low light (LL) (5–10 μmol m−2 s−1), was determined in a marine Synechococcus strain. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to diode array detector (DAD) or electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used for compound separation and detection. Myxoxanthophyll rose within a time interval of 8 h to 24 h after the onset of exposure to HL. -carotene content started to decrease after 4 h of the onset of exposure to HL. Zeaxanthin content rose with exposure to HL, but it was only significant after 24 h of exposure. Carotenoid changes are in agreement with a coordinated activity of the enzymes of the myxoxanthophyll biosynthetic pathway, with no rate-limiting intermediate steps. Lipid analysis showed all species with a C18:3/C16:0 composition increased their content, the changes of PG(18:3/16:0) and MGDG(18:3/16:0) being primarily significant. Major lipid changes were also found to occur within 24 h. These changes might suggest reduction and reorganization of the thylakoid membrane structure. Hypotheses are also drawn on the role played by lipid molecule shape and their possible effect in membrane fluidity and protein accommodation.

  9. Uniqueness vs non-uniqueness in complete connections with modified majority rules

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, J. C. A.; Friedli, S.

    2013-01-01

    We take a closer look at a class of chains with complete connections introduced by Berger, Hoffman and Sidoravicius. Besides giving a sharper description of the uniqueness and non-uniqueness regimes, we show that if the pure majority rule used to fix the dependence on the past is replaced with a function that is Lipschitz at the origin, then uniqueness always holds, even with arbitrarily slow decaying variation.

  10. Single particle analysis of thylakoid proteins from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Synechocystis 6803 : Localization of the CupA subunit of NDH-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folea, I. Mihaela; Zhang, Pengpeng; Nowaczyk, Marc M.; Ogawa, Teruo; Aro, Eva-Marl; Boekema, Egbert J.; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2008-01-01

    The larger protein complexes of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic membrane of Thermosynechoccus elongatus and Synechocystis 6803 were studied by single particle electron microscopy after detergent solubilization, without any purification steps. Besides the "standard" L-shaped NDH-1L complex, related

  11. Single particle analysis of thylakoid proteins from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Synechocystis 6803 : Localization of the CupA subunit of NDH-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folea, I. Mihaela; Zhang, Pengpeng; Nowaczyk, Marc M.; Ogawa, Teruo; Aro, Eva-Marl; Boekema, Egbert J.; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2008-01-01

    The larger protein complexes of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic membrane of Thermosynechoccus elongatus and Synechocystis 6803 were studied by single particle electron microscopy after detergent solubilization, without any purification steps. Besides the "standard" L-shaped NDH-1L complex, related

  12. In a unique position or squeezed out?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Christensen, Inge

    2009-01-01

    language, they experience that their patients disappear, they are seldom involved, and they lack knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: GPs have few experiences with YA cancer patients, but they have a potentially unique role in general primary cancer care if they develop their vocational vocabulary, relate more...

  13. Uniqueness of meromorphic functions concerning differential polynomials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Lei

    2007-01-01

    Based on a unicity theorem for entire funcitions concerning differential polynomials proposed by M. L. Fang and W. Hong, we studied the uniqueness problem of two meromorphic functions whose differential polynomials share the same 1-point by proving two theorems and their related lemmas. The results extend and improve given by Fang and Hong's theorem.

  14. LCA – Unique and Controversial Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This session will focus on case studies and applications that have a unique or controversial aspect. Some of the most recent topics that seem to have significant interest include: LCA-based product declarations, LCA-based standards, LCA-based labels, alternative energy, agricul...

  15. Marketing the Uniqueness of Small Towns. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Douglas; Hogg, David H.

    The key to marketing a town is determining and promoting the town's "differential advantage" or uniqueness that would make people want to visit or live there. Exercises to help communities gain important insights into the town's competitive edge include a brainstorming session with knowledgeable community members, a visitor questionnaire, a…

  16. The Uniqueness of Speech among Motor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Ray

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers evidence that the speech muscles are unique in their genetic, developmental, functional and phenotypical properties. The literature was reviewed using PubMed, ScienceDirect, ComDisDome and other literature-retrieval systems to identify studies reporting on the craniofacial and laryngeal muscles. Particular emphasis was given…

  17. Multicultural Poetry: Voices Unique, yet Universal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webre, Elizabeth C.

    As teachers gravitate more and more to the use of literature and strive to include a range of cultural experiences in their classrooms, the use of poetry from various cultural groups should be considered. Poetry is a very real means of having children see themselves and others as being both unique and yet the same. In considering poetry across…

  18. Tulane Student Designs Unique Learning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    A Louisiana architect has created plans for a unique supplementary learning environment consisting of five circular buildings featuring a planetarium, an indoor display of small animals in their native habitat, an indoor pond, a library, a media center, and an auditorium. (Author/MLF)

  19. Art Libraries: Creating Access to Unique Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Art libraries face similar issues to other types of libraries during the digital transition but have unique twists driven by the needs of their collections. Art library information seekers may possess a sense of what an art library is: a library, set apart, to support the study of art and art history. For art libraries, it is the collection,…

  20. UNIQUENESS OF DIFFERENCE POLYNOMIALS OF MEROMORPHIC FUNCTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘永; 祁晓光

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the uniqueness problems of difference polynomials of meromorphic functions and obtain some results which can be viewed as discrete analogues of the results given by Shibazaki. Some examples are given to show the results in this article are best possible.

  1. Unique characteristics of Geneva apple rootstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Geneva® apple rootstock breeding program has been operating since the early 1970’s. It is a unique program in that it had access to important germplasm resources that later became the USDA ARS apple collection in Geneva, NY. This genetic diversity allowed for the achievement of one of the proj...

  2. Unraveling the evolution of uniquely human cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Evan L

    2016-06-07

    A satisfactory account of human cognitive evolution will explain not only the psychological mechanisms that make our species unique, but also how, when, and why these traits evolved. To date, researchers have made substantial progress toward defining uniquely human aspects of cognition, but considerably less effort has been devoted to questions about the evolutionary processes through which these traits have arisen. In this article, I aim to link these complementary aims by synthesizing recent advances in our understanding of what makes human cognition unique, with theory and data regarding the processes of cognitive evolution. I review evidence that uniquely human cognition depends on synergism between both representational and motivational factors and is unlikely to be accounted for by changes to any singular cognitive system. I argue that, whereas no nonhuman animal possesses the full constellation of traits that define the human mind, homologies and analogies of critical aspects of human psychology can be found in diverse nonhuman taxa. I suggest that phylogenetic approaches to the study of animal cognition-which can address questions about the selective pressures and proximate mechanisms driving cognitive change-have the potential to yield important insights regarding the processes through which the human cognitive phenotype evolved.

  3. Uniqueness and Zeros of -Shift Difference Polynomials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kai Liu; Xin-Ling Liu; Ting-Bin Cao

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the zero distributions of -shift difference polynomials of meromorphic functions with zero order, and obtain two theorems that extend the classical Hayman results on the zeros of differential polynomials to -shift difference polynomials. We also investigate the uniqueness problem of -shift difference polynomials that share a common value.

  4. Endomembrane Cation Transporters and Membrane Trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, Heven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics

    2017-04-01

    fertilization. Based on localization and mutant analyses, we conclude that CHXs modulate the ion balance, pH or both in micro-regions of endoplasmic reticulum, endosomes and prevacuolar compartment (PVC), and so influence membrane trafficking and signaling resulting in proper osmoregulation in guard cells and seed formation. We also demonstrated for the first time that AtKEA2 associates with chloroplasts, especially at the two poles of developing plastids. These results show that AtKEA1 and AtKEA2 transporters in specific microdomains of the inner envelope link local osmotic, ionic, and pH homeostasis to plastid division and thylakoid membrane formation. The first 3-D structure model of AtCHX was generated, and architecture-directed mutagenesis identified critical residues of the transport core giving insights to the transport mode of this family. Thus we have revealed for the first time crucial roles of an unknown K+/H+ transport family on plant growth (KEA), gas exchange, pollen cell wall, and different phases of reproduction (CHXs). The dynamic endomembrane of plant cells is integral to cytokinesis, cell expansion, defense, and cell wall formation, thus these studies are directly relevant to the mission of the Department of Energy and to a better understanding of determinants for enhancing plant biomass and plant tolerance to abiotic stress.

  5. Magnetically controlled permeability membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-10-31

    A bioactive material delivery system can include a thermoresponsive polymer membrane and nanowires distributed within the thermoresponsive polymer membrane. Magnetic activation of a thermoresponsive polymer membrane can take place via altering the magnetization or dimensions of nanowires dispersed or ordered within the membrane matrix.

  6. Compositional asynchronous membrane systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cosmin Bonchis; Cornel Izbasa; Gabriel Ciobanu

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithmic way of building complex membrane systems by coupling elementary membranes. Its application seems particularly valuable in the case of asynchronous membrane systems, since the resulting membrane system remains asynchronous. The composition method is based on a handshake mechanism implemented by using antiport rules and promoters.

  7. Composite sensor membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arun; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Yue, Min

    2008-03-18

    A sensor may include a membrane to deflect in response to a change in surface stress, where a layer on the membrane is to couple one or more probe molecules with the membrane. The membrane may deflect when a target molecule reacts with one or more probe molecules.

  8. Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Simulations of Anionic Archaeal Tetraether Lipid Membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Felipe Pineda De Castro

    Full Text Available In contrast to the majority of organisms that have cells bound by di-ester phospholipids, archaeal membranes consist of di- and tetraether phospholipids. Originating from organisms that withstand harsh conditions (e.g., low pH and a wide range of temperatures such membranes have physical properties that make them attractive materials for biological research and biotechnological applications. We developed force-field parameters based on the widely used Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF to enable the study of anionic tetraether membranes of the model archaean Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by computer simulations. The simulations reveal that the physical properties of these unique membranes depend on the number of cyclopentane rings included in each lipid unit, and on the size of cations that are used to ensure charge neutrality. This suggests that the biophysical properties of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells depend not only on the compositions of their membranes but also on the media in which they grow.

  9. Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Simulations of Anionic Archaeal Tetraether Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda De Castro, Luis Felipe; Dopson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the majority of organisms that have cells bound by di-ester phospholipids, archaeal membranes consist of di- and tetraether phospholipids. Originating from organisms that withstand harsh conditions (e.g., low pH and a wide range of temperatures) such membranes have physical properties that make them attractive materials for biological research and biotechnological applications. We developed force-field parameters based on the widely used Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF) to enable the study of anionic tetraether membranes of the model archaean Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by computer simulations. The simulations reveal that the physical properties of these unique membranes depend on the number of cyclopentane rings included in each lipid unit, and on the size of cations that are used to ensure charge neutrality. This suggests that the biophysical properties of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells depend not only on the compositions of their membranes but also on the media in which they grow. PMID:27167213

  10. Surface modification of titanium membrane by chemical vapor deposition and its electrochemical self-cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. W.; Li, J. X.; Gao, C. Y.; Chang, M.

    2011-10-01

    Membrane separation is applied widely in many fields, while concentration polarization and membrane fouling, limiting its promotion and application greatly, are the bottlenecks in membrane application. Among which, membrane fouling is irreversible, membrane must be periodically cleaned or even replaced to restore permeability. Membrane cleaning has become one of the key issues in membrane separation areas. Considering incomparable electrochemical advantages of boron-doped diamond (BDD) film electrode over conventional electrode, a new composite membrane Ti/BDD, made by depositing CVD (chemical vapor deposition) boron-doped diamond film on titanium(Ti) membrane to modify porous titanium surface, that can be cleaned electrochemically is proposed. Feasibility of its preparation and application is discussed in this paper. Results shows that based on the unique electrochemical properties of diamond, cleaning level of this composite Ti/BDD membrane is significantly increased, making membrane life and efficiency improved prominently.

  11. On the biogenesis of myelin membranes : Sorting, trafficking and cell polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baron, Wia; Hoekstra, Dick

    2010-01-01

    In the central nervous system, a multilayered membrane layer known as the myelin sheath enwraps axons, and is required for optimal saltatory signal conductance. The sheath develops from membrane processes that extend from the plasma membrane of oligodendrocytes and displays a unique lipid and protei

  12. Cell membrane-camouflaged nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Brian T; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-12-28

    Nanoparticles can preferentially accumulate at sites of action and hold great promise to improve the therapeutic index of many drugs. While conventional methods of nanocarrier-mediated drug delivery have focused on primarily synthetic approaches, engineering strategies that combine synthetic nanoparticles with natural biomaterials have recently gained much attention. In particular, cell membrane-camouflaged nanoparticles are a new class of biomimetic nanoparticles that combine the unique functionalities of cellular membranes and engineering versatility of synthetic nanomaterials for effective delivery of therapeutic agents. Herein, we report on the recent progress on cell membrane-coated nanoparticles for drug delivery. In particular, we highlight three areas: (i) prolonging systemic circulation via cell membrane coating, (ii) cell-specific targeting via cell membrane coating, and (iii) applications of cell membrane coating for drug delivery. The cell membrane-camouflaged nanoparticle platform has emerged as a novel delivery strategy with the potential to improve the therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of a variety of diseases.

  13. Unique device identification system. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to establish a system to adequately identify devices through distribution and use. This rule requires the label of medical devices to include a unique device identifier (UDI), except where the rule provides for an exception or alternative placement. The labeler must submit product information concerning devices to FDA's Global Unique Device Identification Database (GUDID), unless subject to an exception or alternative. The system established by this rule requires the label and device package of each medical device to include a UDI and requires that each UDI be provided in a plain-text version and in a form that uses automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) technology. The UDI will be required to be directly marked on the device itself if the device is intended to be used more than once and intended to be reprocessed before each use.

  14. Unique Astrophysics in the Lyman Ultraviolet

    CERN Document Server

    Tumlinson, Jason; Kriss, Gerard; France, Kevin; McCandliss, Stephan; Sembach, Ken; Fox, Andrew; Tripp, Todd; Jenkins, Edward; Beasley, Matthew; Danforth, Charles; Shull, Michael; Stocke, John; Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, Christopher; Froning, Cynthia; Green, James; Oliveira, Cristina; Fullerton, Alex; Blair, Bill; Kruk, Jeff; Sonneborn, George; Penton, Steven; Wakker, Bart; Prochaska, Xavier; Vallerga, John; Scowen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is unique and groundbreaking science to be done with a new generation of UV spectrographs that cover wavelengths in the "Lyman Ultraviolet" (LUV; 912 - 1216 Ang). There is no astrophysical basis for truncating spectroscopic wavelength coverage anywhere between the atmospheric cutoff (3100 Ang) and the Lyman limit (912 Ang); the usual reasons this happens are all technical. The unique science available in the LUV includes critical problems in astrophysics ranging from the habitability of exoplanets to the reionization of the IGM. Crucially, the local Universe (z <= 0.1) is entirely closed to many key physical diagnostics without access to the LUV. These compelling scientific problems require overcoming these technical barriers so that future UV spectrographs can extend coverage to the Lyman limit at 912 Ang.

  15. Multiple floating metatarsals: a unique injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trikha Vivek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Concomitant dislocation of the tar-sometatarsal and metatarsophalangeal joints of foot is an extremely rare injury. Such injuries presenting in a single or adjacent dual rays have been described in few cases previously. We describe such an injury in adjacent three metatarsals of a polytrauma patient. These injuries are likely to be missed in the initial assessment of a polytrauma patient. These patients are at risk of an overlooked diagnosis but the consequences of missing this type of injury may be Vivek Trikha*, Tarun Goyal, Amit K Agarwal quite severe. This case is presented in view of its unique-ness along with possible mechanism of injury, the sequence of reduction and follow-up. Knowledge of such injury and its proper management may be useful to the trauma surgeons. Key words: Metatarsal bones; Metatarsophalangeal joint; Wounds and injuries

  16. Theory of uniqueness of Indian Caste System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kumar

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Classical studies on pre-modern Indian social structure have suggested apparent differences between the Indian caste system and social stratification as one can discern in other parts of the world. However, one needs to question such dogmatic assertions that such vast differences really existed. An endeavor is made in this research paper to reflect on the nature of caste hierarchy in pre-modern India. The caste system forms the significant basis of pre-modern Indian social structure. Early writers conceived the caste system of pre-modern India as something unique to India. An attempt is made to question this application of theory of uniqueness in the case of India.

  17. Theory of uniqueness of Indian Caste System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kumar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Classical studies on pre-modern Indian social structure have suggested apparent differences between the Indian caste system and social stratification as one can discern in other parts of the world. However, one needs to question such dogmatic assertions that such vast differences really existed. An endeavor is made in this research paper to reflect on the nature of caste hierarchy in pre-modern India. The caste system forms the significant basis of pre-modern Indian social structure. Early writers conceived the caste system of pre-modern India as something unique to India. An attempt is made to question this application of theory of uniqueness in the case of India.

  18. Uniqueness of entire functions concerning weighted sharing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yao-qiang; MA Chao-wei

    2007-01-01

    The uniqueness problem of entire functions concerning weighted sharing was discussed, and the following theorem was proved. Let f and g be two non-constant entire functions, m, n and k three positive integers, and n>2k+4. If Em(1,(f n)(k))= Em(1,(gn)(k)), then either f (z)=c1ecz and g(z)= c2e-cz, or f =tg, where c, c1 and c2 are three constants satisfying (-1)k(c1c2)n(nc)2k=1, and t is a constant satisfying t n=1. The theorem generalizes the result of Fang [Fang ML, Uniqueness and value sharing of entire functions, Computer & Mathematics with Applications, 2002, 44: 823-831].

  19. Light-harvesting Complexes (LHCs) Cluster Spontaneously in Membrane Environment Leading to Shortening of Their Excited State Lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, Alberto; Gruber, J Michael; Dietzel, Lars; Stuart, Marc C A; van Grondelle, Rienk; Croce, Roberta

    2016-08-05

    The light reactions of photosynthesis, which include light-harvesting and charge separation, take place in the amphiphilic environment of the thylakoid membrane. The light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) is the main responsible for light absorption in plants and green algae and is involved in photoprotective mechanisms that regulate the amount of excited states in the membrane. The dual function of LHCII has been extensively studied in detergent micelles, but recent results have indicated that the properties of this complex differ in a lipid environment. In this work we checked these suggestions by studying LHCII in liposomes. By combining bulk and single molecule measurements, we monitored the fluorescence characteristics of liposomes containing single complexes up to densely packed proteoliposomes. We show that the natural lipid environment per se does not alter the properties of LHCII, which for single complexes remain very similar to that in detergent. However, we show that LHCII has the strong tendency to cluster in the membrane and that protein interactions and the extent of crowding modulate the lifetimes of the excited state in the membrane. Finally, the presence of LHCII monomers at low concentrations of complexes per liposome is discussed.

  20. Metalworking Techniques Unlock a Unique Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Approached by West Hartford, Connecticut-based Abbot Ball Company, Glenn Research Center agreed to test an intriguing alloy called Nitinol 60 that had been largely unused for a half century. Using powdered metallurgy, the partners developed a method for manufacturing and working with the material, which Abbott Ball has now commercialized. Nitinol 60 provides a unique combination of qualities that make it an excellent material for ball bearings, among other applications.

  1. Mushrooms—Biologically Distinct and Nutritionally Unique

    OpenAIRE

    Feeney, Mary Jo; Miller, Amy Myrdal; Roupas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mushrooms are fungi, biologically distinct from plant- and animal-derived foods (fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, protein [meat, fish, poultry, legumes, nuts, and seeds]) that comprise the US Department of Agriculture food patterns operationalized by consumer-focused MyPlate messages. Although mushrooms provide nutrients found in these food groups, they also have a unique nutrient profile. Classified into food grouping systems by their use as a vegetable, mushrooms’ increasing use in main e...

  2. A unique case of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Khizar

    2009-01-01

    An 18-year-old Asian girl was referred to the nephrology unit with rapidly progressive renal failure. At the age of 15 she was diagnosed as having systemic lupus erythematosus but had defaulted treatment. Her renal functions improved with cyclophosphamide pulse treatment but she continued to have central nervous system vasculitis, gastrointestinal vasculitis and opportunistic infections making her a unique and challenging case of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  3. Uniqueness from locality and BCFW shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Rodina, Laurentiu

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a BCFW shift which can be used to recursively build the full Yang-Mills amplitude as a function of polarization vectors. Furthermore, in line with the recent results of arXiv:1612.02797, we conjecture that the Yang-Mills scattering amplitude is uniquely fixed by locality and demanding the usual asymptotic behavior under a sufficient number of shifts. Unitarity therefore emerges from locality and constructability. We prove this statement at the leading order in the soft expansion.

  4. N-terminal processing of membrane-targeted MnSOD and formation of multiple active superoxide dismutase dimers in the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Prashanth S; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree K

    2013-10-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 expresses a 30 kDa manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) comprising a hydrophobic region (signal peptide + linker peptide) attached to a catalytic unit. Bioinformatics predicted cleavage of the signal peptide at (25)CQPQ by signal peptidase and of the linker peptide by an Arg-C-like protease at the Arg52/Arg59 residue. The three predicted forms of MnSOD were immunodetected in Anabaena, with the 30 kDa MnSOD found exclusively in the membrane and the shorter 27 and 24 kDa forms found both in the membrane and soluble fractions. The corresponding sodA gene was truncated for (a) the first eight residues, or, (b) the signal peptide, or (c) the entire hydrophobic region, or (d) the Arg52/Arg59 residues were modified to serine. Overexpression of these MnSOD variants in recombinant Anabaena strains revealed that (a) the 30 kDa membrane-targeted MnSOD was cleaved by membrane-localized signal peptidase either during or after its transport through the membrane to release the 27 kDa form, either in the cytosol or in the periplasmic/thylakoid lumen, (b) the 27 kDa form was further cleaved to the 24 kDa form by Arg-C-like protease, both in the cytosol and in the periplasmic/thylakoid lumen, (c) deletion of signal peptide localized the MnSOD forms in the cytosol, and (d) alteration of the signal/linker peptide cleavage sites interfered with MnSOD localization and processing. Homo/heterodimerization of the 24 and 27 kDa forms of MnSOD and the cytosolic iron-dependent SOD results in multiple SOD activities, from a single MnSOD gene (sodA), in different cellular compartments of Anabaena.

  5. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Zapata, Felipe; Dillion, Paul; Castillo, Juan; Vonau, Walter; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Frodge, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    A document describes a sheet membrane spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME), which allows for the use of one common water tank that can supply cooling water to the astronaut and to the evaporator. Test data showed that heat rejection performance dropped only 6 percent after being subjected to highly contaminated water. It also exhibited robustness with respect to freezing and Martian atmospheric simulation testing. Water was allowed to freeze in the water channels during testing that simulated a water loop failure and vapor backpressure valve failure. Upon closing the backpressure valve and energizing the pump, the ice eventually thawed and water began to flow with no apparent damage to the sheet membrane. The membrane evaporator also serves to de-gas the water loop from entrained gases, thereby eliminating the need for special degassing equipment such as is needed by the current spacesuit system. As water flows through the three annular water channels, water evaporates with the vapor flowing across the hydrophobic, porous sheet membrane to the vacuum side of the membrane. The rate at which water evaporates, and therefore, the rate at which the flowing water is cooled, is a function of the difference between the water saturation pressure on the water side of the membrane, and the pressure on the vacuum side of the membrane. The primary theory is that the hydrophobic sheet membrane retains water, but permits vapor pass-through when the vapor side pressure is less than the water saturation pressure. This results in evaporative cooling of the remaining water.

  6. Membrane targeting of MnSOD is essential for oxidative stress tolerance of nitrogen-fixing cultures of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Prashanth S; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-07-01

    The nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena PCC7120 encodes for a membrane-targeted 30 kDa Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and a cytosolic FeSOD. The MnSOD is post-translationally processed to 27 and 24 kDa forms in the cytosol and periplasm/thylakoid lumen. The extent of cleavage of signal and linker peptides at the N-terminus is dependent on the availability of combined nitrogen during growth. While the 24 and 27 kDa forms are present in near equal proportions under nitrogen-fixing conditions, the 24 kDa form is predominant under nitrogen-supplemented conditions. Individual contribution of these forms of MnSOD to total oxidative stress tolerance was analysed using recombinant Anabaena strains overexpressing either different molecular forms of MnSOD or MnSOD defective in the cleavage of signal/linker peptide. Targeting of MnSOD to the membrane and subsequent cleavage to release both the 24 and 27 kDa forms was essential for oxidative stress tolerance under nitrogen-fixing conditions. On the other hand, the cleavage of linker peptide was absolutely essential and the release of cytosolic 24 kDa form of MnSOD was obligatory for developing oxidative stress tolerance under nitrogen-supplemented conditions. Thus, a single MnSOD caters to the reduction of superoxide radical in both cytosol and thylakoid lumen/periplasm irrespective of the N-status of growth by regulating its cleavage. This is the first report on the physiological advantage of membrane-targeting and processing of MnSOD in either bacteria or plants. The higher oxidative stress tolerance offered by the cytosolic form of MnSOD has possibly resulted in retention of only the cytosolic form in bacterial non-nitrogen-fixers during evolution.

  7. Membrane Automata with Priorities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luděk Cienciala; Lucie Ciencialová

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the one-way P automata with priorities are introduced. Such automata are P systemshere the membranes are only allowed to consume objects from parent membranes, under the given conditions. The result of computation of these systems is the set of multiset sequences consumed by skin membrane intc the system. The rules associated in some order with each membrane cannot modify any objects, they can only move them through membrane. We show that P automata with priorities and two membranes can accept every recursively enumerated language.

  8. Regenerable Polyelectrolyte Membrane for Ultimate Fouling Control in Forward Osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yan; Zheng, Sunxiang; Finnerty, Casey; Lee, Michael J; Mi, Baoxia

    2017-03-21

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using regenerable polyelectrolyte membranes to ultimately control the irreversible membrane fouling in a forward osmosis (FO) process. The regenerable membrane was fabricated by assembling multiple polyethylenimine (PEI) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) bilayers on a polydopamine-functionalized polysulfone support. The resulting membrane exhibited higher water flux and lower solute flux in FO mode (with the active layer facing feed solution) than in PRO mode (with the active layer facing draw solution) using trisodium citrate as draw solute, most likely due to the unique swelling behavior of the polyelectrolyte membrane. Membrane regeneration was conducted by first dissembling the existing PEI-PAA bilayers using strong acid and then reassembling fresh PEI-PAA bilayers on the membrane support. It was found that, after the acid treatment, the first covalently bonded PEI layer and some realigned PAA remained on the membrane support, acting as a beneficial barrier that prevented the acid-foulant mixture from penetrating into the porous support during acid treatment. The water and solute flux of the regenerated membrane was very similar to that of the original membrane regardless of alginate fouling, suggesting an ultimate solution to eliminating the irreversible membrane fouling in an FO process. With a procedure similar to the typical membrane cleaning protocol, in situ membrane regeneration is not expected to noticeably increase the membrane operational burden but can satisfactorily avoid the expensive replacement of the entire membrane module after irreversible fouling, thereby hopefully reducing the overall cost of the membrane-based water-treatment system.

  9. Stationary Black Holes: Uniqueness and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr T. Chruściel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of known black-hole solutions to the stationary Einstein equations has been steadily increasing, sometimes in unexpected ways. In particular, it has turned out that not all black-hole-equilibrium configurations are characterized by their mass, angular momentum and global charges. Moreover, the high degree of symmetry displayed by vacuum and electro vacuum black-hole spacetimes ceases to exist in self-gravitating non-linear field theories. This text aims to review some developments in the subject and to discuss them in light of the uniqueness theorem for the Einstein-Maxwell system.

  10. Stationary Black Holes: Uniqueness and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heusler Markus

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of known black hole solutions to the stationary Einstein equations has increased in an unexpected way during the last decade. In particular, it has turned out that not all black hole equilibrium configurations are characterized by their mass, angular momentum and global charges. Moreover, the high degree of symmetry displayed by vacuum and electro-vacuum black hole space-times ceases to exist in self-gravitating non-linear field theories. This text aims to review some of the recent developments and to discuss them in the light of the uniqueness theorem for the Einstein-Maxwell system.

  11. Unique double recurrence of cerebral arteriovenous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagm, Alhusain; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Ichinose, Shunsuke; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Surgically treated patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are considered cured when the postoperative angiogram proves complete resection. However, despite no residual nidus or early draining vein on postoperative angiogram, rare instances of AVM recurrence have been reported in adults. In this paper, the authors present a case of a 24-year-old woman with asymptomatic double recurrence of her cerebral AVM after angiographically proven complete resection. To the authors' knowledge, this patient represents the first case with double de novo asymptomatic recurrence of Spetzler-Martin grade I AVM. Also, she represents the first case with unique AVM criteria in each recurrence.

  12. A unique variation of superficial palmar arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiji PJ

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a unique variation in the arterial pattern of superficial palmar arch in which it was completed by one of the large terminal branches of radial artery. The origin of the arteria radialis indicis was also peculiar that it was arising from the communicating branch of the radial artery and further reinforced by the first dorsal metacarpal artery that joined it after reaching the volar aspect. Pertinent anatomical knowledge regarding the variations of the palmar arch is significant for the purposes of microvascular repairs and re-implantations.

  13. Type III factors with unique Cartan decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Houdayer, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    We prove that for any free ergodic nonsingular nonamenable action \\Gamma\\ \\actson (X,\\mu) of all \\Gamma\\ in a large class of groups including all hyperbolic groups, the associated group measure space factor $L^\\infty(X) \\rtimes \\Gamma$ has L^\\infty(X) as its unique Cartan subalgebra, up to unitary conjugacy. This generalizes the probability measure preserving case that was established in [PV12]. We also prove primeness and indecomposability results for such crossed products, for the corresponding orbit equivalence relations and for arbitrary amalgamated free products $M_1 *_B M_2$ over a subalgebra B of type I.

  14. Uniqueness of Centauro-type events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augusto, C.R.A.; Barroso, S.L.C.; Beggio, P.C.; Carvalho, A.O. de; Menon, M.J.; Navia, C.E.; Oliveira, R. de; Shibuya, E.H

    2003-07-01

    Analysis to discriminate Centauro events from normal events is made without previous identification of secondary emitted particles. For this purpose their energy and derived quantities like distance from the center of momenta it were mainly used. As a result we found in a sample of (280+87) experimental events only 3 were compatible with 5 Centauro events, but none of them dad a high content of hadrons, characteristic of Centauro events. With this result we are confident about the uniqueness of Centauro events, especially for two events that have vertex directly determined. Comparing with some interaction models features we depict a possible scenario to explain Centauro events.

  15. Uniqueness of the Trautman-Bondi mass

    CERN Document Server

    Chrúsciel, P T; MacCallum, M A H; Chru\\'sciel, Piotr T.; Jezierski, Jacek; Callum, Malcolm A.H. Mac

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that the only functionals, within a natural class, which are monotonic in time for all solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations admitting a smooth ``piece'' of conformal null infinity Scri, are those depending on the metric only through a specific combination of the Bondi `mass aspect' and other next--to--leading order terms in the metric. Under the extra condition of passive BMS invariance, the unique such functional (up to a multiplicative factor) is the Trautman--Bondi energy. It is also shown that this energy remains well-defined for a wide class of `polyhomogeneous' metrics.

  16. Unique supply function equilibrium with capacity constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, Paer [Department of Economics, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 513, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2008-01-15

    Consider a market where producers submit supply functions to a procurement auction with uncertain demand, e.g. an electricity auction. In the Supply Function Equilibrium (SFE), every firm commits to the supply function that maximises expected profit in the one-shot game given the supply functions of competitors. A basic weakness of the SFE is the presence of multiple equilibria. This paper shows that with (i) symmetric producers, (ii) perfectly inelastic demand, (iii) a price cap, and (iv) capacity constraints that bind with a positive probability, there exists a unique, symmetric SFE. (author)

  17. [Celiac disease: an unique autoinmune model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo Sáez, Luis Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Celiac disease is a unique autoimmune disorder, because the environmental precipitant factor is known. It is gluten, the major storage protein of wheat and similar grains. Originally was considered a rare malabsorption syndrome of childhood, but nowadays is recognized a common condition, that affects to 1% of the general population, all over the world', involves to all different races, may be diagnosed at any age, and affects to many organ systems. Therapy for the disease is a gluten-free-diet that must be strict and long-term. This diet cause a total recovery clinical and analytical, with excellent quality of life of patients.

  18. Uniqueness, Self belonging and Intercourse in Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsh, Dr. Marvin / E.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript has ensued from my past studies in biochemistry (PhD, CUNY 1986) and my current endeavors in graduate study in philosophy and anthropology. The current research project began during my period as a graduate student in biochemistry with a professor of classical genetics comment that DNA was unique in the physical world. The paradox presented to relate this notion to existing natural law lead me to evolve and communicate a view that the world itself is a special case of a general...

  19. Composite zeolite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Thoma, Steven G.; Ashley, Carol S.; Reed, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of composite zeolite membranes and synthesis techniques therefor has been invented. These membranes are essentially defect-free, and exhibit large levels of transmembrane flux and of chemical and isotopic selectivity.

  20. Oxygen transport membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof.......The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof....

  1. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  2. Solvent resistant nanofiltration membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Dutczak, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes preparation and characterization of membranes for organic solvent filtration (OSF). The main aim was developing membranes for solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) with molecular weight cut-off below 500 g mol-1.

  3. Transmembrane Signalling: Membrane messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockroft, Scott L.

    2017-05-01

    Life has evolved elaborate means of communicating essential chemical information across cell membranes. Inspired by biology, two new artificial mechanisms have now been developed that use synthetic messenger molecules to relay chemical signals into or across lipid membranes.

  4. Ionene membrane battery separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moacanin, J.; Tom, H. Y.

    1969-01-01

    Ionic transport characteristics of ionenes, insoluble membranes from soluble polyelectrolyte compositions, are studied for possible application in a battery separator. Effectiveness of the thin film of separator membrane essentially determines battery lifetime.

  5. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  6. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles unique cost estimating requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, P.; Apgar, H.; Stukes, S.; Sterk, S.

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), also referred to as drones, are aerial platforms that fly without a human pilot onboard. UAVs are controlled autonomously by a computer in the vehicle or under the remote control of a pilot stationed at a fixed ground location. There are a wide variety of drone shapes, sizes, configurations, complexities, and characteristics. Use of these devices by the Department of Defense (DoD), NASA, civil and commercial organizations continues to grow. UAVs are commonly used for intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (ISR). They are also use for combat operations, and civil applications, such as firefighting, non-military security work, surveillance of infrastructure (e.g. pipelines, power lines and country borders). UAVs are often preferred for missions that require sustained persistence (over 4 hours in duration), or are “ too dangerous, dull or dirty” for manned aircraft. Moreover, they can offer significant acquisition and operations cost savings over traditional manned aircraft. Because of these unique characteristics and missions, UAV estimates require some unique estimating methods. This paper describes a framework for estimating UAV systems total ownership cost including hardware components, software design, and operations. The challenge of collecting data, testing the sensitivities of cost drivers, and creating cost estimating relationships (CERs) for each key work breakdown structure (WBS) element is discussed. The autonomous operation of UAVs is especially challenging from a software perspective.

  7. Event Segmentation Ability Uniquely Predicts Event Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Jesse Q.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Hambrick, David Z.; Zacks, Rose T.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Bailey, Heather R.; Eisenberg, Michelle L.; Beck, Taylor M.

    2013-01-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79 years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan. PMID:23942350

  8. Astronomy Outreach for Large and Unique Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, D.; Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Kendall, J. S.; Dugan, C.

    2013-04-01

    In this session, we discuss different approaches to reaching large audiences. In addition to star parties and astronomy events, the audiences for some of the events include music concerts or festivals, sick children and their families, minority communities, American Indian reservations, and tourist sites such as the National Mall. The goal is to bring science directly to the public—to people who attend astronomy events and to people who do not come to star parties, science museums, or science festivals. These programs allow the entire community to participate in astronomy activities to enhance the public appreciation of science. These programs attract large enthusiastic crowds often with young children participating in these family learning experiences. The public will become more informed, educated, and inspired about astronomy and will also be provided with information that will allow them to continue to learn after this outreach activity. Large and unique audiences often have common problems, and their solutions and the lessons learned will be presented. Interaction with the participants in this session will provide important community feedback used to improve astronomy outreach for large and unique audiences. New ways to expand astronomy outreach to new large audiences will be discussed.

  9. An experiment on Lowest Unique Integer Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashi; Hanaki, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally study Lowest Unique Integer Games (LUIGs) to determine if and how subjects self-organize into different behavioral classes. In a LUIG, N(≥ 3) players submit a positive integer up to M and the player choosing the smallest number not chosen by anyone else wins. LUIGs are simplified versions of real systems such as Lowest/Highest Unique Bid Auctions that have been attracting attention from scholars, yet experimental studies are scarce. Furthermore, LUIGs offer insights into choice patterns that can shed light on the alleviation of congestion problems. Here, we consider four LUIGs with N = { 3 , 4 } and M = { 3 , 4 } . We find that (a) choices made by more than 1/3 of subjects were not significantly different from what a symmetric mixed-strategy Nash equilibrium (MSE) predicts; however, (b) subjects who behaved significantly differently from what the MSE predicts won the game more frequently. What distinguishes subjects was their tendencies to change their choices following losses.

  10. Nano-hardness and elastic modulus of anodic aluminium oxide based Poly (2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate composite membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérrard Eddy Jai Poinern

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we determine the elastic and hardness properties of electrochemically engineered porous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO membranes and AAO membranes infiltrated with Poly (2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate to form a unique biologically compatible AAO/polymer composite. The electrochemically-synthesised membranes have a nanometre scale porous oxide structure with a mean pore diameter of 100 nm. The membranes were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy before and after polymer infiltration. The polymer treated and untreated membranes were then examined using the nano-indentation technique to measure the hardness and subsequently determine the membrane elasticity.

  11. Different proteolipid protein mutants exhibit unique metabolic defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Hüttemann

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available PMD (Pelizaeus–Merzbacher disease, a CNS (central nervous system disease characterized by shortened lifespan and severe neural dysfunction, is caused by mutations of the PLP1 (X-linked myelin proteolipid protein gene. The majority of human PLP1 mutations are caused by duplications; almost all others are caused by missense mutations. The cellular events leading to the phenotype are unknown. The same mutations in non-humans make them ideal models to study the mechanisms that cause neurological sequelae. In the present study we show that mice with Plp1 duplications (Plp1tg have major mitochondrial deficits with a 50% reduction in ATP, a drastically reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and increased numbers of mitochondria. In contrast, the jp (jimpy mouse with a Plp1 missense mutation exhibits normal mitochondrial function. We show that PLP in the Plp1tg mice and in Plp1-transfected cells is targeted to mitochondria. PLP has motifs permissive for insertion into mitochondria and deletions near its N-terminus prevent its co-localization to mitochondria. These novel data show that Plp1 missense mutations and duplications of the native Plp1 gene initiate uniquely different cellular responses.

  12. The Feat of Packaging Eight Unique Genome Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Giese

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses (IAVs harbor a segmented RNA genome that is organized into eight distinct viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP complexes. Although a segmented genome may be a major advantage to adapt to new host environments, it comes at the cost of a highly sophisticated genome packaging mechanism. Newly synthesized vRNPs conquer the cellular endosomal recycling machinery to access the viral budding site at the plasma membrane. Genome packaging sequences unique to each RNA genome segment are thought to be key determinants ensuring the assembly and incorporation of eight distinct vRNPs into progeny viral particles. Recent studies using advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques suggest the formation of vRNP sub-bundles (comprising less than eight vRNPs during their transport on recycling endosomes. The formation of such sub-bundles might be required for efficient packaging of a bundle of eight different genomes segments at the budding site, further highlighting the complexity of IAV genome packaging.

  13. Membrane contactor applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, R.; Feron, P.H.M.; Jansen, A.

    2008-01-01

    In a membrane contactor the membrane separation is completely integrated with an extraction or absorption operation in order to exploit the benefits of both technologies fully. Membrane contactor applications that have been developed can be found in both water and gas treatment. Several recently dev

  14. On "spinning" membrane models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.; Sezgin, E.; Townsend, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Several alternative actions for a bosonic membrane have recently been proposed. We show that a linearly realized locally world-volume-supersymmetric (spinning membrane) extension of any of these actions implies an analogous extension of the standard Dirac membrane action. We further show that a

  15. Rigid proteins and softening of biological membranes-with application to HIV-induced cell membrane softening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Himani; Zelisko, Matthew; Liu, Liping; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-05-06

    A key step in the HIV-infection process is the fusion of the virion membrane with the target cell membrane and the concomitant transfer of the viral RNA. Experimental evidence suggests that the fusion is preceded by considerable elastic softening of the cell membranes due to the insertion of fusion peptide in the membrane. What are the mechanisms underpinning the elastic softening of the membrane upon peptide insertion? A broader question may be posed: insertion of rigid proteins in soft membranes ought to stiffen the membranes not soften them. However, experimental observations perplexingly appear to show that rigid proteins may either soften or harden membranes even though conventional wisdom only suggests stiffening. In this work, we argue that regarding proteins as merely non-specific rigid inclusions is flawed, and each protein has a unique mechanical signature dictated by its specific interfacial coupling to the surrounding membrane. Predicated on this hypothesis, we have carried out atomistic simulations to investigate peptide-membrane interactions. Together with a continuum model, we reconcile contrasting experimental data in the literature including the case of HIV-fusion peptide induced softening. We conclude that the structural rearrangements of the lipids around the inclusions cause the softening or stiffening of the biological membranes.

  16. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube (CNT Composite Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Losic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are attractive approach for designing of new membranes for advanced molecular separation because of their unique transport properties and ability to mimic biological protein channels. In this work the synthetic approach for fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs composite membranes is presented. The method is based on growth of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT using chemical vapour deposition (CVD on the template of nanoporous alumina (PA membranes. The influence of experimental conditions including carbon precursor, temperature, deposition time, and PA template on CNT growth process and quality of fabricated membranes was investigated. The synthesis of CNT/PA composites with controllable nanotube dimensions such as diameters (30–150 nm, and thickness (5–100 µm, was demonstrated. The chemical composition and morphological characteristics of fabricated CNT/PA composite membranes were investigated by various characterisation techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and x-ray diffraction (XRD. Transport properties of prepared membranes were explored by diffusion of dye (Rose Bengal used as model of hydrophilic transport molecule.

  17. Plasma membrane domains enriched in cortical endoplasmic reticulum function as membrane protein trafficking hubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Philip D; Haberkorn, Christopher J; Weigel, Aubrey V; Higgins, Jenny L; Akin, Elizabeth J; Kennedy, Matthew J; Krapf, Diego; Tamkun, Michael M

    2013-09-01

    In mammalian cells, the cortical endoplasmic reticulum (cER) is a network of tubules and cisterns that lie in close apposition to the plasma membrane (PM). We provide evidence that PM domains enriched in underlying cER function as trafficking hubs for insertion and removal of PM proteins in HEK 293 cells. By simultaneously visualizing cER and various transmembrane protein cargoes with total internal reflectance fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate that the majority of exocytotic delivery events for a recycled membrane protein or for a membrane protein being delivered to the PM for the first time occur at regions enriched in cER. Likewise, we observed recurring clathrin clusters and functional endocytosis of PM proteins preferentially at the cER-enriched regions. Thus the cER network serves to organize the molecular machinery for both insertion and removal of cell surface proteins, highlighting a novel role for these unique cellular microdomains in membrane trafficking.

  18. The core and unique proteins of haloarchaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capes Melinda D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the first genome of a halophilic archaeon was sequenced in 2000, biologists have been advancing the understanding of genomic characteristics that allow for survival in the harsh natural environments of these organisms. An increase in protein acidity and GC-bias in the genome have been implicated as factors in tolerance to extreme salinity, desiccation, and high solar radiation. However, few previous attempts have been made to identify novel genes that would permit survival in such extreme conditions. Results With the recent release of several new complete haloarchaeal genome sequences, we have conducted a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis focusing on the identification of unique haloarchaeal conserved proteins that likely play key roles in environmental adaptation. Using bioinformatic methods, we have clustered 31,312 predicted proteins from nine haloarchaeal genomes into 4,455 haloarchaeal orthologous groups (HOGs. We assigned likely functions by association with established COG and KOG databases in NCBI. After identifying homologs in four additional haloarchaeal genomes, we determined that there were 784 core haloarchaeal protein clusters (cHOGs, of which 83 clusters were found primarily in haloarchaea. Further analysis found that 55 clusters were truly unique (tucHOGs to haloarchaea and qualify as signature proteins while 28 were nearly unique (nucHOGs, the vast majority of which were coded for on the haloarchaeal chromosomes. Of the signature proteins, only one example with any predicted function, Ral, involved in desiccation/radiation tolerance in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, was identified. Among the core clusters, 33% was predicted to function in metabolism, 25% in information transfer and storage, 10% in cell processes and signaling, and 22% belong to poorly characterized or general function groups. Conclusion Our studies have established conserved groups of nearly 800 protein clusters present in all

  19. Tracking membrane protein association in model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Reffay

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue.We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well.After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 A, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the

  20. The Tat system of Gram-positive bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goosens, Vivianne J.; Monteferrante, Carmine G.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2014-01-01

    The twin-arginine protein translocation (Tat) system has a unique ability to translocate folded and co-factor-containing proteins across lipid bilayers. The Tat pathway is present in bacteria, archaea and in the thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts and, depending on the organism and environmental con

  1. Conditional and Unique Coloring of Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, P Venkata Subba

    2011-01-01

    For integers $k, r > 0$, a conditional $(k,r)$-coloring of a graph $G$ is a proper $k$-coloring of the vertices of $G$ such that every vertex $v$ of degree $d(v)$ in $G$ is adjacent to at least $\\min\\{r, d(v)\\}$ differently colored vertices. Given $r$, the smallest integer $k$ for which $G$ has a conditional $(k,r)$-coloring is called the $r$th order conditional chromatic number $\\chi_r(G)$ of $G$. We give results (exact values or bounds for $\\chi_r(G)$, depending on $r$) related to the conditional coloring of some graphs. We introduce \\emph{unique conditional colorability} and give some related results. (Keywords. cartesian product of graphs; conditional chromatic number; gear graph; join of graphs.)

  2. Developing innovative programs for unique student populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, D A; Caruso, J; Chauncey, D M

    1994-12-01

    Optometric education has been faced with ever-increasing expectations. These include the ability to educate students and practitioners to care for new patient populations, deal with more diverse and complex clinical problems, to be significant participants in the research community and to fulfill leadership positions within the profession. To fulfill this expectation, schools and colleges need to diversify their program offerings to attract and educate unique student populations who come from diverse backgrounds and bring a range of pre-existing knowledge and skills. This paper provides an overview of The New England College of Optometry's efforts in this area and two programs, the "Advanced Standing International Program" and the "Accelerated Doctor of Optometry Degree Program," are examined in detail. An emphasis is placed on outcomes assessment to ensure the programs are fulfilling their purpose and the results of a retrospective analysis of the two programs is provided.

  3. Computational Transition at the Uniqueness Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Sly, Allan

    2010-01-01

    The hardcore model is a model of lattice gas systems which has received much attention in statistical physics, probability theory and theoretical computer science. It is the probability distribution over independent sets $I$ of a graph weighted proportionally to $\\lambda^{|I|}$ with fugacity parameter $\\lambda$. We prove that at the uniqueness threshold of the hardcore model on the $d$-regular tree, approximating the partition function becomes computationally hard on graphs of maximum degree $d$. Specifically, we show that unless NP$=$RP there is no polynomial time approximation scheme for the partition function (the sum of such weighted independent sets) on graphs of maximum degree $d$ for fugacity $\\lambda_c(d) 0$. Weitz produced an FPTAS for approximating the partition function when $0<\\lambda < \\lambda_c(d)$ so this result demonstrates that the computational threshold exactly coincides with the statistical physics phase transition thus confirming the main conjecture of [28]. We further analyze the s...

  4. Organizing the spatially and temporally unique hydrosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghuijs, Wouter

    2016-04-01

    Growing anthropogenic activity is quickly changing the hydrosphere. Panta Rhei calls for improved understanding of changing hydrosphere dynamics in their connection with human systems. I argue that progress within the Panta Rhei initiative is strongly limited by the absence of hydrological principles that help to organise our spatially and temporally unique hydrosphere; without guiding principles (e.g. classification systems) hydrology will continue to be a case study dominated science that will have a hard time to efficiently improve understanding, estimation and prediction of human affected systems. Exposing such organising principles should not be considered as a step backwards into the recent PUB decade. Instead, it should be regarded as an exciting scientific challenge that is becoming increasingly relevant now the hydrosphere is quickly changing.

  5. Multiple floating metatarsals: a unique injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vivek Trikha; Tarun Goyal; Amit K Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Concomitant dislocation of the tarsometatarsal and metatarsophalangeal joints of foot is an extremely rare injury.Such injuries presenting in a single or adjacent dual rays have been described in few cases previously.We describe such an injury in adjacent three metatarsals of a polytrauma patient.These injuries are likely to be missed in the initial assessment of a polytrauma patient.These patients are at risk of an overlooked diagnosis but the consequences of missing this type of injury may be quite severe.This case is presented in view of its uniqueness along with possible mechanism of injury,the sequence of reduction and follow-up.Knowledge of such injury and its proper management may be useful to the trauma surgeons.

  6. Hue discrimination, unique hues and naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachy, Romain; Dias, Jérôme; Alleysson, David; Bonnardel, Valérie

    2012-02-01

    The hue discrimination curve (HDC) that characterizes performances over the entire hue circle was determined by using sinusoidally modulated spectral power distributions of 1.5 c/300 nm with fixed amplitude and twelve reference phases. To investigate relationship between hue discrimination and appearance, observers further performed a free color naming and unique hue tasks. The HDC consistently displayed two minima and two maxima; discrimination is optimal at the yellow/orange and blue/magenta boundaries and pessimal in green and in the extra-spectral magenta colors. A linear model based on Müller zone theory correctly predicts a periodical profile but with a phase-opponency (minima/maxima at 180° apart) which is inconsistent with the empirical HDC's profile.

  7. Injectable hydrogels as unique biomedical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin; Ding, Jiandong

    2008-08-01

    A concentrated fish soup could be gelled in the winter and re-solled upon heating. In contrast, some synthetic copolymers exhibit an inverse sol-gel transition with spontaneous physical gelation upon heating instead of cooling. If the transition in water takes place below the body temperature and the chemicals are biocompatible and biodegradable, such gelling behavior makes the associated physical gels injectable biomaterials with unique applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering etc. Various therapeutic agents or cells can be entrapped in situ and form a depot merely by a syringe injection of their aqueous solutions at target sites with minimal invasiveness and pain. This tutorial review summarizes and comments on this soft matter, especially thermogelling poly(ethylene glycol)-(biodegradable polyester) block copolymers. The main types of injectable hydrogels are also briefly introduced, including both physical gels and chemical gels.

  8. Fullerenes as unique nanopharmaceuticals for disease treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As unique nanoparticles,fullerenes have attracted much attention due to their unparalleled physical,chemical and biological properties.Various functionalized fullerenes with OH,NH2,COOH,and peptide modifications were developed.It summarized the biological activities of fullerenes derivatives in cancer therapy with high efficiency and low toxicity,as reactive oxygen species scavenger and lipid peroxidation inhibitor,to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus and to suppress bacteria and microbial at low concentration.In addition,the mechanism for fullerene to enter cells and biodistribution of fullerene in vivo was also discussed.This research focuses on the current understanding of fullerenes-based nanomaterials in the potential clinical application as well as biological mechanism of fullerenes and its derivatives in disease therapy.

  9. Detecting beer intake by unique metabolite patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde; Jensen, Morten Georg; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of health related effects of beer intake is hampered by the lack of accurate tools for assessing intakes (biomarkers). Therefore, we identified plasma and urine metabolites associated with recent beer intake by untargeted metabolomics and established a characteristic metabolite pattern...... representing raw materials and beer production as a qualitative biomarker of beer intake. In a randomized, crossover, single-blinded meal study (MSt1) 18 participants were given one at a time four different test beverages: strong, regular and non-alcoholic beers and a soft drink. Four participants were...... assigned to have two additional beers (MSt2). In addition to plasma and urine samples, test beverages, wort and hops extract were analyzed by UPLC-QTOF. A unique metabolite pattern reflecting beer metabolome, including metabolites derived from beer raw material (i.e. N-methyl tyramine sulfate and the sum...

  10. Separation membrane development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.W. [Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A ceramic membrane has been developed to separate hydrogen from other gases. The method used is a sol-gel process. A thin layer of dense ceramic material is coated on a coarse ceramic filter substrate. The pore size distribution in the thin layer is controlled by a densification of the coating materials by heat treatment. The membrane has been tested by permeation measurement of the hydrogen and other gases. Selectivity of the membrane has been achieved to separate hydrogen from carbon monoxide. The permeation rate of hydrogen through the ceramic membrane was about 20 times larger than Pd-Ag membrane.

  11. Structure and function of PspA and Vipp1 N-terminal peptides: Insights into the membrane stress sensing and mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Christopher; Jovanovic, Goran; Wallace, B A; Ces, Oscar; Buck, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The phage shock protein (Psp) response maintains integrity of the inner membrane (IM) in response to extracytoplasmic stress conditions and is widely distributed amongst enterobacteria. Its central component PspA, a member of the IM30 peripheral membrane protein family, acts as a major effector of the system through its direct association with the IM. Under non-stress conditions PspA also negatively regulates its own expression via direct interaction with the AAA+ ATPase PspF. PspA has a counterpart in cyanobacteria called Vipp1, which is implicated in protection of the thylakoid membranes. PspA's and Vipp1's conserved N-terminal regions contain a putative amphipathic helix a (AHa) required for membrane binding. An adjacent amphipathic helix b (AHb) in PspA is required for imposing negative control upon PspF. Here, purified peptides derived from the putative AH regions of PspA and Vipp1 were used to directly probe their effector and regulatory functions. We observed direct membrane-binding of AHa derived peptides and an accompanying change in secondary structure from unstructured to alpha-helical establishing them as bona fide membrane-sensing AH's. The peptide-binding specificities and their effects on membrane stability depend on membrane anionic lipid content and stored curvature elastic stress, in agreement with full length PspA and Vipp1 protein functionalities. AHb of PspA inhibited the ATPase activity of PspF demonstrating its direct regulatory role. These findings provide new insight into the membrane binding and function of PspA and Vipp1 and establish that synthetic peptides can be used to probe the structure-function of the IM30 protein family. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A water membrane evaporator (WME) has been conceived and tested as an alternative to the contamination-sensitive and corrosion-prone evaporators currently used for dissipating heat from space vehicles. The WME consists mainly of the following components: An outer stainless-steel screen that provides structural support for the components mentioned next; Inside and in contact with the stainless-steel screen, a hydrophobic membrane that is permeable to water vapor; Inside and in contact with the hydrophobic membrane, a hydrophilic membrane that transports the liquid feedwater to the inner surface of the hydrophobic membrane; Inside and in contact with the hydrophilic membrane, an annular array of tubes through which flows the spacecraft coolant carrying the heat to be dissipated; and An inner exclusion tube that limits the volume of feedwater in the WME. In operation, a pressurized feedwater reservoir is connected to the volume between the exclusion tube and the coolant tubes. Feedwater fills the volume, saturates the hydrophilic membrane, and is retained by the hydrophobic membrane. The outside of the WME is exposed to space vacuum. Heat from the spacecraft coolant is conducted through the tube walls and the water-saturated hydrophilic membrane to the liquid/vapor interface at the hydrophobic membrane, causing water to evaporate to space. Makeup water flows into the hydrophilic membrane through gaps between the coolant tubes.

  13. Émission de photons uniques par un atome unique piégé

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darquié, B.; Beugnon, J.; Jones, M. P. A.; Dingjan, J.; Sortais, Y.; Browaeys, A.; Messin, G.; Grangier, P.

    2006-10-01

    En illuminant un atome unique piégé dans une pince optique de taille micrométrique à l'aide d'impulsions lumineuses résonantes d'une durée de 4 ns, nous avons réalisé une source efficace de photons uniques déclenchés, de polarisation bien définie. Nous avons mesuré la fonction d'autocorrélation temporelle en intensité qui met en évidence un dégroupement de photons presque parfait. Une telle source de photons uniques de haut flux possède des applications potentielles pour le traitement de l'information quantique.

  14. Biomimetic membranes for sensor and separation applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    massive transport of matter in and out the cell. Nature has elegantly met this challenge by developing membranes in the form of lipid bilayers in which specialized and highly efficient transport proteins are incorporated. This raises the question: is it possible to mimic biological membranes and create...... membrane-based sensor and/or separation devices? In the development of biomimetic sensor/separation technology, both channels (ion and water channels) and carriers (transporters) are important. Generally, each class of transport proteins conducts specific molecular species in and out of the cell while...... generally have a lower turnover but are capable of transport against gradients. For both classes of proteins, their unique flux-properties make them interesting as candidates in biomimetic sensor/separation devices. An ideal sensor/separation device requires the supporting biomimetic matrix to be virtually...

  15. MapA, an iron-regulated, cytoplasmic membrane protein in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, R; Troyan, T; Sherman, D; Sherman, L A

    1994-08-01

    Growth of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 in iron-deficient media leads to the accumulation of an approximately 34-kDa protein. The gene encoding this protein, mapA (membrane-associated protein A), has been cloned and sequenced (GenBank accession number, L01621). The mapA transcript is not detectable in normally grown cultures but is stably accumulated by cells grown in iron-deficient media. However, the promoter sequence for this gene does not resemble other bacterial iron-regulated promoters described to date. The carboxyl-terminal region of the derived amino acid sequence of MapA resembles bacterial proteins involved in iron acquisition, whereas the amino-terminal end of MapA has a high degree of amino acid identity with the abundant, chloroplast envelope protein E37. An approach employing improved cellular fractionation techniques as well as electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry was essential in localizing MapA protein to the cytoplasmic membrane of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942. When these cells were grown under iron-deficient conditions, a significant fraction of MapA could also be localized to the thylakoid membranes.

  16. 14 CFR 221.203 - Unique rule numbers required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unique rule numbers required. 221.203... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS TARIFFS Electronically Filed Tariffs § 221.203 Unique rule numbers required... bear a unique rule number. (b) The unique rule numbers for the fares specified in this section shall...

  17. Physiological functions of Atg6/Beclin 1:a unique autophagy-related protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Cao; Daniel J Klionsky

    2007-01-01

    The most striking morphological feature of eukaryotic cells is the presence of various membrane-enclosed compart-ments.These compartments,including organelles and transient transport intermediates,are not static.Rather,dynamicexchange of proteins and membrane is needed to maintain cellular homeostasis.One of the most dramatic examples ofmembrane mobilization is seen during the process of macroautophagy.Macroautophagy is the primary cellular pathwayfor degradation of long-lived proteins and organelles.In response to environmental cues,such as starvation or othertypes of stress,the cell produces a unique membrane structure,the phagophore.The phagophore sequesters cytoplasmas it forms a double-membrane cytosolic vesicle,an autophagosome.Upon completion,the autophagosome fuses with alysosome or a vacuole in yeast,which delivers hyrdrolases that break down the inner autophagosome membrane along withits cargo,and the resulting macromolecules are released back into the cytosol for reuse.Autophagy is therefore a recyclingprocess,allowing cells to survive periods of nutrient limitation;however,it has a wider physiological role,participating indevelopment and aging,and also in protection against pathogen invasion,cancer and certain neurodegenerative diseases.Inmany cases,the role of autophagy is identified through studies of an autophagy-related protein,Atg6/Beclin 1.This proteiniS part of a lipid kinase complex,and recent studies suggest that it plays a central role in coordinating the cytoprotectivefunction of autophagy and in opposing the cellular death process ofapoptosis.Here,we summarize our current knowledgeof Atg6/Beclin 1 in different model organisms and its unique function in the cell.

  18. Probing cellular behaviors through nanopatterned chitosan membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yao Yang, Chun-Yen Sung, Hung-Hsun Shuai, Chao-Min Cheng and J Andrew Yeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a high-throughput method for developing physically modified chitosan membranes to probe the cellular behavior of MDCK epithelial cells and HIG-82 fibroblasts adhered onto these modified membranes. To prepare chitosan membranes with micro/nanoscaled features, we have demonstrated an easy-to-handle, facile approach that could be easily integrated with IC-based manufacturing processes with mass production potential. These physically modified chitosan membranes were observed by scanning electron microscopy to gain a better understanding of chitosan membrane surface morphology. After MDCK cells and HIG-82 fibroblasts were cultured on these modified chitosan membranes for various culture durations (i.e. 1, 2, 4, 12 and 24 h, they were investigated to decipher cellular behavior. We found that both cells preferred to adhere onto a flat surface rather than on a nanopatterned surface. However, most (> 80% of the MDCK cells showed rounded morphology and would suspend in the cultured medium instead of adhering onto the planar surface of negatively nanopatterned chitosan membranes. This means different cell types (e.g. fibroblasts versus epithelia showed distinct capabilities/preferences of adherence for materials of varying surface roughness. We also showed that chitosan membranes could be re-used at least nine times without significant contamination and would provide us consistency for probing cell–material interactions by permitting reuse of the same substrate. We believe these results would provide us better insight into cellular behavior, specifically, microscopic properties and characteristics of cells grown under unique, nanopatterned cell-interface conditions.

  19. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become

  20. Salt shock-inducible Photosystem I cyclic electron transfer in Synechocystis PCC6803 relies on binding of ferredoxin : NADP(+) reductase to the thylakoid membranes via its CpcD phycobilisome-linker homologous N-terminal domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thor, JJ; Jeanjean, R; Havaux, M; Sjollema, KA; Joset, F; Hellingwerf, KJ; Matthijs, HCP

    2000-01-01

    Relative to ferredoxin:NADP(+) reductase (FNR) from chloroplasts, the comparable enzyme in cyanobacteria contains an additional 9 kDa domain at its amino-terninus, The domain is homologous to the phycocyanin associated linker polypeptide CpcD of the light harvesting phycobilisome antennae. The pheno

  1. 具异型胞蓝细菌Anabaena sp. PCC 71 20 质膜和%Isolation of Plasma and Thylakoid Membranes from the Heterocystous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李斌; 徐冬一; 赵进东

    2001-01-01

    利用水溶性多聚体双相法分离蓝细菌Anabaena sp. PCC 7120质膜和类囊体膜两种膜系统.吸收光谱分析表明,质膜相和类囊体膜相的主要色素分别为类胡萝卜素和叶绿素.SDS_ 凝胶电泳显示这两种膜系统蛋白组成有很大差别.这种分离方法容易操作,对研究蓝细菌的膜蛋白和膜脂非常有用.

  2. Salt shock-inducible Photosystem I cyclic electron transfer in Synechocystis PCC6803 relies on binding of ferredoxin : NADP(+) reductase to the thylakoid membranes via its CpcD phycobilisome-linker homologous N-terminal domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thor, JJ; Jeanjean, R; Havaux, M; Sjollema, KA; Joset, F; Hellingwerf, KJ; Matthijs, HCP

    2000-01-01

    Relative to ferredoxin:NADP(+) reductase (FNR) from chloroplasts, the comparable enzyme in cyanobacteria contains an additional 9 kDa domain at its amino-terninus, The domain is homologous to the phycocyanin associated linker polypeptide CpcD of the light harvesting phycobilisome antennae. The pheno

  3. Polyvinylidenefluoride/carbon nanotubes mixed matrix membranes with tailored properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontananova, Enrica; Grosso, Valentina; Aljlil, Saad A.; Bahattab, Mohammed A.; Vuono, Danilo; Di Profio, Gianluca; Drioli, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    Membrane operations are promising tools for efficient and environmentally friendly separations. However, the development of advanced membranes with tailored properties is a key issue to be addressed in order to better exploit the potentialities of membrane-based separations. An important approach toward this aim is the development of mixed matrix membranes in which an organic and an inorganic phase coexist in order to have synergic effects on membrane properties. The peculiar properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) such as high electrical and thermal conductivity, high strength and unique transport properties, has motivated a considerable effort to produce CNT-polymer composites in order to engineer membrane properties. In this work the roughness, wettability, morphology, crystalline phase and pore size of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) membranes were tailored working on the membrane preparation conditions, as well as, by blending the polymer with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). A study on the effect of concentration of the polymer, use of pore forming additives, type and concentration of MWCNTs (pristine and functionalized), was carried out. The results highlighted interesting relationships between membrane microstructure and composition, as well as, MWCNTs distribution, on transport and wettability properties, in the perspectives of a more efficient application of PVDF membranes in liquid phase separations.

  4. Alpbach Summer School - a unique learning experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, K.; Aulinas, J.; Clifford, D.; Krejci, D.; Topham, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Alpbach Summer School is a ten-day program that provides a unique opportunity for young european science and engineering students, both undergraduate and graduate, to learn how to approach the entire design process of a space mission. The theme of the 2010 Summer School was "New Space Missions to Understand Climate Change", a current, challenging, very broad and complex topic. The program was established more than 35 years ago and is organised in two interrelated parts: a series of lectures held by renowned experts in the field (in the case of this specific year, climate change and space engineering experts) that provides a technical and scientific background for the workshops that follow, the core of the Summer School. For the workshops the students are split into four international, interdisciplinary teams of about 15 students. In 2010 every team had to complete a number of tasks, four in total: (1) identify climate change research gaps and design a space mission that has not yet been flown or proposed, (2) define the science objectives and requirements of the mission, (3) design a spacecraft that meets the mission requirements, which includes spacecraft design and construction, payload definition, orbit calculations, but also the satellite launch, operation and mission costs and (4) write up a short mission proposal and present the results to an expert review panel. Achieving these tasks in only a few days in a multicultural, interdisciplinary team represents a major challenge for all participants and provides an excellent practical learning experience. Over the course of the program, students do not just learn facts about climate change and space engineering, but scientists also learn from engineers and engineers from scientists. The participants have to deepen their knowledge in an often unfamiliar field, develop organisational and team-work skills and work under pressure. Moreover, teams are supported by team and roving tutors and get the opportunity to

  5. A Variational Approach to Particles in Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Charles M.; Gräser, Carsten; Hobbs, Graham; Kornhuber, Ralf; Wolf, Maren-Wanda

    2016-11-01

    A variety of models for the membrane-mediated interaction of particles in lipid membranes, mostly well-established in theoretical physics, is reviewed from a mathematical perspective. We provide mathematically consistent formulations in a variational framework, relate apparently different modelling approaches in terms of successive approximation, and investigate existence and uniqueness. Numerical computations illustrate that the new variational formulations are directly accessible to effective numerical methods.

  6. Emulsification using microporous membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran T. Vladisavljević

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Membrane emulsification is a process of injecting a pure dispersed phase or pre-emulsion through a microporous membrane into the continuous phase. As a result of the immiscibility of the two phases, droplets of the dispersed phase are formed at the outlets of membrane pores. The droplets formed in the process are removed from the membrane surface by applying cross-flow or stirring of the continuous phase or using a dynamic (rotating or vibrating membrane. The most commonly used membrane for emulsification is the Shirasu Porous Glass (SPG membrane, fabricated through spinodal decomposition in a melt consisting of Japanese volcanic ash (Shirasu, boric acid and calcium carbonate. Microsieve membranes are increasingly popular as an alternative to highly tortuous glass and ceramic membranes. Microsieves are usually fabricated from nickel by photolithography and electroplating or they can be manufactured from silicon nitride via Reactive Ion Etching (RIE. An advantage of microsieves compared to the SPG membrane is in much higher transmembrane fluxes and higher tolerance to fouling by the emulsion ingredients due to the existence of short, straight through pores. Unlike conventional emulsification devices such as high-pressure valve homogenisers and rotor-stator devices, membrane emulsification devices permit a precise control over the mean pore size over a wide range and during the process insignificant amount of energy is dissipated as heat. The drop size is primarily determined by the pore size, but it depends also on other parameters, such as membrane wettability, emulsion formulation, shear stress on the membrane surface, transmembrane pressure, etc.

  7. The AD: The unique anti-accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    Slide show by Maximilien Brice. Voice (French only): Jacques Fichet. Content: Paola Catapano, Django Manglunki, CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Unlike other machines whose performance is measured in terms of energy records, AD's uniqueness resides in the fact that it can very effectively decelerate beams. At the hearth of antimatter production at CERN, the AD is making headlines in the world's press. This provides an excellent opportunity for us to retrace its history in images.   var flash_video_player=get_video_player_path(); insert_player_for_external('Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083-0753-kbps-480x360-25-fps-audio-64-kbps-44-kHz-stereo', 'mms://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083-0480-kbps-384x288-25-fps-audio-128-kbps-48-kHz-stereo.wmv', 'false', 480, 360, 'http://mediaarchive.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083-posterframe-480x360-at-5-percent.jpg', '1357551', true, '');  

  8. Arachnoiditis ossificans and syringomyelia: A unique presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalak, Charles F.; Opalak, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arachnoiditis ossificans (AO) is a rare disorder that was differentiated from leptomeningeal calcification by Kaufman and Dunsmore in 1971. It generally presents with progressive lower extremity myelopathy. Though the underlying etiology has yet to be fully described, it has been associated with various predisposing factors including vascular malformations, previous intradural surgery, myelograms, and adhesive arachnoiditis. Associated conditions include syringomyelia and arachnoid cyst. The preferred diagnostic method is noncontrast computed tomography (CT). Surgical intervention is still controversial and can include decompression and duroplasty or durotomy. Case Description: The authors report the case of a 62-year-old male with a history of paraplegia who presented with a urinary tract infection and dysautonomia. His past surgical history was notable for a C4–C6 anterior fusion and an intrathecal phenol injection for spasticity. A magnetic resonance image (MR) also demonstrated a T6-conus syringx. At surgery, there was significant ossification of the arachnoid/dura, which was removed. After a drain was placed in the syrinx, there was a significant neurologic improvement. Conclusion: This case demonstrates a unique presentation of AO and highlights the need for CT imaging when a noncommunicating syringx is identified. In addition, surgical decompression can achieve good results when AO is associated with concurrent compressive lesions. PMID:26693389

  9. Unique type of isolated cardiac valvular amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reehana Salma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid deposition in heart is a common occurrence in systemic amyloidosis. But localised valvular amyloid deposits are very uncommon. It was only in 1922 that the cases of valvular amyloidosis were reported. Then in 1980, Goffin et al reported another type of valvular amyloidosis, which he called the dystrophic valvular amyloidosis. We report a case of aortic valve amyloidosis which is different from the yet described valvular amyloidosis. Case presentation A 72 years old gentleman underwent urgent aortic valve replacement. Intraoperatively, a lesion was found attached to the inferior surface of his bicuspid aortic valve. Histopathology examination of the valve revealed that the lesion contained amyloid deposits, identified as AL amyloidosis. The serum amyloid A protein (SAP scan was normal and showed no evidence of systemic amyloidosis. The ECG and echocardiogram were not consistent with cardiac amyloidosis. Conclusion Two major types of cardiac amyloidosis have been described in literature: primary-myelomatous type (occurs with systemic amyolidosis, and senile type(s. Recently, a localised cardiac dystrophic valvular amyloidosis has been described. In all previously reported cases, there was a strong association of localised valvular amyloidosis with calcific deposits. Ours is a unique case which differs from the previously reported cases of localised valvular amyloidosis. In this case, the lesion was not associated with any scar tissue. Also there was no calcific deposit found. This may well be a yet unknown type of isolated valvular amyloidosis.

  10. Unique Ganglioside Recognition Strategies for Clostridial Neurotoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Marc A.; Fu, Zhuji; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Baldwin, Michael R. (MCW); (UMC)

    2012-03-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin are the causative agents of the paralytic diseases botulism and tetanus, respectively. The potency of the clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) relies primarily on their highly specific binding to nerve terminals and cleavage of SNARE proteins. Although individual CNTs utilize distinct proteins for entry, they share common ganglioside co-receptors. Here, we report the crystal structure of the BoNT/F receptor-binding domain in complex with the sugar moiety of ganglioside GD1a. GD1a binds in a shallow groove formed by the conserved peptide motif E ... H ... SXWY ... G, with additional stabilizing interactions provided by two arginine residues. Comparative analysis of BoNT/F with other CNTs revealed several differences in the interactions of each toxin with ganglioside. Notably, exchange of BoNT/F His-1241 with the corresponding lysine residue of BoNT/E resulted in increased affinity for GD1a and conferred the ability to bind ganglioside GM1a. Conversely, BoNT/E was not able to bind GM1a, demonstrating a discrete mechanism of ganglioside recognition. These findings provide a structural basis for ganglioside binding among the CNTs and show that individual toxins utilize unique ganglioside recognition strategies.

  11. Unique biosynthesis of sesquarterpenes (C35 terpenes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    To the best of my knowledge, only 19 cyclic and 8 linear C35 terpenes have been identified to date, and no family name was assigned to this terpene class until recently. In 2011, it was proposed that these C35 terpenes should be called sesquarterpenes. This review highlights the biosynthesis of two kinds of sesquarterpenes (C35 terpenes) that are produced via cyclization of a linear C35 isoprenoid in Bacillus and Mycobacterium species. In Bacillus species, a new type of terpene cyclase that has no sequence homology with any known terpene synthases, as well as a bifunctional terpene cyclase that biosynthesizes two classes of cyclic terpenes with different numbers of carbons as natural products, have been identified. On the other hand, in Mycobacterium species, the first bifunctional Z-prenyltransferase has been found, but a novel terpene cyclase and a unique polyprenyl reductase remain unidentified. The identification of novel enzyme types should lead to the discovery of many homologous enzymes and their products including novel natural compounds. On the other hand, many enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of natural products have low substrate specificities in vitro. Therefore, to find novel natural products present in organisms, the multifunctionality of enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of natural products should be analyzed.

  12. Condition evaluation of a unique mining site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Junsheng; Chen Frank Y.; Ma Yan; Zhang Siya

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the existing conditions and the stability of a mining site in which the unique features of seismicity, mining activity, hydrological conditions, geological con-ditions, environmental conditions, and future development plans were considered. In particular, the potential subsidence locations near the proposed construction site, the effects of mining boundary profile, and the influence scope of the mining activity on the neighboring areas were investigated using the finite element method. The study results indicate:(1) the overlying sandstone layer to the coal layer is the key to the stability of the mining roof; (2) the broken boundary has the most effect, followed by the arc boundary and linear boundary; (3) the safe distance from the mining boundary should be at least 400 m if the proposed structure is to be built near an active mining site. Other relevant engineering rec-ommendations are also proposed. The concluded results from this study may serve as a guide to other similar sites in the world.

  13. Proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Taro; Nagai, Yuhei; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kimura, Katsuki; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the details of proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) treating real municipal wastewater were investigated. Two separate pilot-scale MBRs were continuously operated under significantly different operating conditions; one MBR was a submerged type whereas the other was a side-stream type. The submerged and side-stream MBRs were operated for 20 and 10 days, respectively. At the end of continuous operation, the foulants were extracted from the fouled membranes. The proteins contained in the extracted foulants were enriched by using the combination of crude concentration with an ultrafiltration membrane and trichloroacetic acid precipitation, and then separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). The N-terminal amino acid sequencing analysis of the proteins which formed intensive spots on the 2D-PAGE gels allowed us to partially identify one protein (OmpA family protein originated from genus Brevundimonas or Riemerella anatipestifer) from the foulant obtained from the submerged MBR, and two proteins (OprD and OprF originated from genus Pseudomonas) from that obtained from the side-stream MBR. Despite the significant difference in operating conditions of the two MBRs, all proteins identified in this study belong to β-barrel protein. These findings strongly suggest the importance of β-barrel proteins in developing membrane fouling in MBRs.

  14. Chelating polymeric membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2015-01-22

    The present application offers a solution to the current problems associated with recovery and recycling of precious metals from scrap material, discard articles, and other items comprising one or more precious metals. The solution is premised on a microporous chelating polymeric membrane. Embodiments include, but are not limited to, microporous chelating polymeric membranes, device comprising the membranes, and methods of using and making the same.

  15. Polyarylether composition and membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Joyce; Brunelle, Daniel Joseph; Harmon, Marianne Elisabeth; Moore, David Roger; Stone, Joshua James; Zhou, Hongyi; Suriano, Joseph Anthony

    2010-11-09

    A composition including a polyarylether copolymer is provided. The copolymer includes a polyarylether backbone; and a sulfonated oligomeric group bonded to the polyarylether suitable for use as a cation conducting membrane. Method of bonding a sulfonated oligomeric group to the polyarylether backbone to form a polyarylether copolymer. The membrane may be formed from the polyarylether copolymer composition. The chain length of the sulfonated oligomeric group may be controlled to affect or control the ion conductivity of the membrane.

  16. Membrane binding domains

    OpenAIRE

    Hurley, James H.

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic signaling and trafficking proteins are rich in modular domains that bind cell membranes. These binding events are tightly regulated in space and time. The structural, biochemical, and biophysical mechanisms for targeting have been worked out for many families of membrane binding domains. This review takes a comparative view of seven major classes of membrane binding domains, the C1, C2, PH, FYVE, PX, ENTH, and BAR domains. These domains use a combination of specific headgroup inter...

  17. Applications of membrane computing

    CERN Document Server

    Ciobanu, Gabriel; Păun, Gheorghe

    2006-01-01

    Membrane computing is a branch of natural computing which investigates computing models abstracted from the structure and functioning of living cells and from their interactions in tissues or higher-order biological structures. The models considered, called membrane systems (P systems), are parallel, distributed computing models, processing multisets of symbols in cell-like compartmental architectures. In many applications membrane systems have considerable advantages - among these are their inherently discrete nature, parallelism, transparency, scalability and nondeterminism. In dedicated cha

  18. Evolution of a Unique Systems Engineering Capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert M. Caliva; James A. Murphy; Kyle B. Oswald

    2011-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering laboratory dedicated to supporting U.S. Department of Energy missions in nuclear and energy research, science, and national security. The INL’s Systems Engineering organization supports all of the various programs under this wide array of missions. As with any multifaceted organization, strategic planning is essential to establishing a consistent culture and a value discipline throughout all levels of the enterprise. While an organization can pursue operational excellence, product leadership or customer intimacy, it is extremely difficult to excel or achieve best-in-class at all three. In fact, trying to do so has resulted in the demise of a number of organizations given the very intricate balancing act that is necessary. The INL’s Systems Engineering Department has chosen to focus on customer intimacy where the customer’s needs are first and foremost and a more total solution is the goal. Frequently a total solution requires the employment of specialized tools to manage system complexity. However, it is only after understanding customer needs that tool selection and use would be pursued. This results in using both commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and, in some cases, requires internal development of specialized tools. This paper describes how a unique systems engineering capability, through the development of customized tools, evolved as a result of this customer-focused culture. It also addresses the need for a common information model or analysis framework and presents an overview of the tools developed to manage and display relationships between entities, support trade studies through the application of utility theory, and facilitate the development of a technology roadmap to manage system risk and uncertainty.

  19. Some unique superconductive Properties of Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K. A.

    2013-04-01

    Copper oxides are the only materials that show transition temperatures, Tc, above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen, with a maximum Tmc of 162 K under pressure. Their structure is layered, with one to several CuO2 planes, and upon hole doping, their transition temperature follows a dome-shaped curve with a maximum at Tmc. In the underdoped regime, i.e., below Tmc, a pseudogap T* is found, with T* always being larger than Tc, a property unique to the copper oxides [1]. In the superconducting state, Cooper pairs (two holes with antiparallel spins) are formed that exhibit coherence lengths on the order of a lattice distance in the CuO2 plane and one order of magnitude less perpendicular to it. Their macroscopic wave function is parallel to the CuO2 plane near 100% d at their surface, but only 75% d and 25 % s in the bulk, and near 100% s perpendicular to the plane in YBCO. There are two gaps with the same Tc [2]. As function of doping, the oxygen isotope effect is novel and can be quantitatively accounted for by a two-band vibronic theory [3] near Tmc, and underdoped below it till Tc = 0 with by a formula valid for (bi)polarons [4]. These cuprates are intrinsically heterogeneous in a dynamic way. In terms of quasiparticles, Jahn-Teller bipolarons are present at low doping, and aggregate upon cooling [1], so that probably ramified clusters and/or stripes are formed, leading over to a more Fermi-liquid-type behavior at large carrier concentrations above Tmc.

  20. Gas separation membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, William J.

    1979-01-01

    A dry, fabric supported, polymeric gas separation membrane, such as cellulose acetate, is prepared by casting a solution of the polymer onto a shrinkable fabric preferably formed of synthetic polymers such as polyester or polyamide filaments before washing, stretching or calendering (so called griege goods). The supported membrane is then subjected to gelling, annealing, and drying by solvent exchange. During the processing steps, both the fabric support and the membrane shrink a preselected, controlled amount which prevents curling, wrinkling or cracking of the membrane in flat form or when spirally wound into a gas separation element.

  1. Anion exchange membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  2. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, P.

    2016-07-26

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane\\'s water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. A membrane-bound vertebrate globin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Blank

    Full Text Available The family of vertebrate globins includes hemoglobin, myoglobin, and other O(2-binding proteins of yet unclear functions. Among these, globin X is restricted to fish and amphibians. Zebrafish (Danio rerio globin X is expressed at low levels in neurons of the central nervous system and appears to be associated with the sensory system. The protein harbors a unique N-terminal extension with putative N-myristoylation and S-palmitoylation sites, suggesting membrane-association. Intracellular localization and transport of globin X was studied in 3T3 cells employing green fluorescence protein fusion constructs. Both myristoylation and palmitoylation sites are required for correct targeting and membrane localization of globin X. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a vertebrate globin has been identified as component of the cell membrane. Globin X has a hexacoordinate binding scheme and displays cooperative O(2 binding with a variable affinity (P(50∼1.3-12.5 torr, depending on buffer conditions. A respiratory function of globin X is unlikely, but analogous to some prokaryotic membrane-globins it may either protect the lipids in cell membrane from oxidation or may act as a redox-sensing or signaling protein.

  4. How a membrane agent buys goods in a membrane store

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rudolf Freund; Marion Oswald; Thomas Schirk

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we consider a specific model of membrane systems, i.e. membrane systems with attributes. In these systems, the information is placed at the membranes in form of attributes, no objects are considered inside the membranes except for other membranes. The membrane system with attributes evolves according to rules that compute new values for the attributes from the attributes assigned to the membranes involved in the rule. The model of membrane systems with attributes allows us to specify business transactions in a precise way and to simulate different models for such transactions with a suitable tool for membrane systems with attributes.

  5. The Einstein constraints: uniqueness and non-uniqueness in the conformal thin sandwich approach

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgarte, T W; Pfeiffer, H P; Baumgarte, Thomas W.; Murchadha, Niall \\'{O}; Pfeiffer, Harald P.

    2006-01-01

    We study the appearance of multiple solutions to certain decompositions of Einstein's constraint equations. Pfeiffer and York recently reported the existence of two branches of solutions for identical background data in the extended conformal thin-sandwich decomposition. We show that the Hamiltonian constraint alone, when expressed in a certain way, admits two branches of solutions with properties very similar to those found by Pfeiffer and York. We construct these two branches analytically for a constant-density star in spherical symmetry, but argue that this behavior is more general. In the case of the Hamiltonian constraint this non-uniqueness is well known to be related to the sign of one particular term, and we argue that the extended conformal thin-sandwich equations contain a similar term that causes the breakdown of uniqueness.

  6. X-ray structure, thermodynamics, elastic properties and MD simulations of cardiolipin/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine mixed membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boscia, Alexander L.; Treece, Bradley W.; Mohammadyani, Dariush

    2014-01-01

    Cardiolipins (CLs) are important biologically for their unique role in biomembranes that couple phosphorylation and electron transport like bacterial plasma membranes, chromatophores, chloroplasts and mitochondria. CLs are often tightly coupled to proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation. T...

  7. Magnetic apatite for structural insights on the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanca, Sarmiza E; Müller, Robert; Dellith, Jan; Nietzsche, Sandor; Stöckel, Stephan; Biskup, Christoph; Deckert, Volker; Krafft, Christoph; Popp, Jürgen; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-01-21

    The iron oxide-hydroxyapatite (FeOxHA) nanoparticles reported here differ from those reported before by their advantage of homogeneity and simple preparation; moreover, the presence of carboxymethyldextran (CMD), together with hydroxyapatite (HA), allows access to the cellular membrane, which makes our magnetic apatite unique. These nanoparticles combine magnetic behavior, Raman label ability and the property of interaction with the cellular membrane; they therefore represent an interesting material for structural differentiation of the cell membrane. It was observed by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy that FeOxHA adheres to the plasma membrane and does not penetrate the membrane. These insights make the nanoparticles a promising material for magnetic cell sorting, e.g. in microfluidic device applications.

  8. Magnetic apatite for structural insights on the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanca, Sarmiza E.; Müller, Robert; Dellith, Jan; Nietzsche, Sandor; Stöckel, Stephan; Biskup, Christoph; Deckert, Volker; Krafft, Christoph; Popp, Jürgen; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The iron oxide-hydroxyapatite (FeOxHA) nanoparticles reported here differ from those reported before by their advantage of homogeneity and simple preparation; moreover, the presence of carboxymethyldextran (CMD), together with hydroxyapatite (HA), allows access to the cellular membrane, which makes our magnetic apatite unique. These nanoparticles combine magnetic behavior, Raman label ability and the property of interaction with the cellular membrane; they therefore represent an interesting material for structural differentiation of the cell membrane. It was observed by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy that FeOxHA adheres to the plasma membrane and does not penetrate the membrane. These insights make the nanoparticles a promising material for magnetic cell sorting, e.g. in microfluidic device applications.

  9. Characterizing the unique photochemical environment in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Gu, D.; Zhao, C.; Huey, L. G.; Stickel, R.; Liao, J.

    2010-12-01

    Recent observational evidence suggests that the atmospheric chemical system over China could be more complex than expected, possibly as a result of the rapid increasing anthropogenic emissions. During the CAREBeijing-2007 Experiment in August of 2007, up to 14 ppbv of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN, CH3C(O)OONO2) and 4.5 ppbv of glyoxal (CHOCHO) were observed, among the highest levels observed in the world in recent years. Elevated nitrous acid (HNO2) (~1.0 ppbv on average) was also observed in the early afternoon despite of the moderate amount of its precursors, i.e. nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO + NO2). We employ a 1-D photochemical model (REAM) to analyze the observations. The results indicate that reactive aromatics are the dominating source of PAN (55%-75%) and glyoxal (90%), and methylglyoxal is the major precursor of peroxy acetyl radical (50%). Downward transport from boundary layer is found to contribute ~50% of the PAN observed at surface. Photolysis of HNO2 is by far the largest primary OH source (more than 50%) throughout the daytime, and yet the fast formation rate of HNO2 inferred from the observations could not be explained by current known mechanisms. Detailed photochemical analysis is conducted to understand the controlling factors for O3 formation. O3 formation chemistry is strongly affected by aromatics and HNO2. By providing a large primary OH source, HNO2 leads to ~25% enhancement of the average O3 production rate, and aromatics contribute ~40% by serving as a major source of RO2 and HO2 radicals. Due to the large abundance of reactive hydrocarbons, O3 formation is generally NOx limited, although the sensitivity is low that a 50% reduction of NOx could only result in less than 25% reduction of the O3 production rate. Future research targeting HNO2 formation mechanism and emission sources of aromatics is necessary for better understanding the unique photochemical environment in China under significant anthropogenic impacts and the regional pollution

  10. Trienoic fatty acids and plant tolerance of temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Routaboul Jean-Marc

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The biophysical reactions of light harvesting and electron transport during photosynthesis take place in a uniquely constructed bilayer, the thylakoid. In all photosynthetic eukaryotes, the complement of atypical glycerolipid molecules that form the foundation of this membrane are characterised by sugar head-groups and a very high level of unsaturation in the fatty acids that occupy the central portion of the thylakoid bilayer. alpha-linolenic (18:3 or a combination of 18:3 and hexadecatrienoic (16:3 acids typically account for approximately two-thirds of all thylakoid membrane fatty acids and over 90% of the fatty acids of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol, the major thylakoid lipid [1, 2]. The occurrence of trienoic fatty acids as a major component of the thylakoid membrane is especially remarkable since these fatty acids form highly reactive targets for active oxygen species and free radicals, which are often the by-products of oxygenic photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is one of the most temperature-sensitive functions of plant [3, 4]. There remains a widespread belief that these trienoic fatty acids might have some crucial role in plants to be of such universal occurrence, especially in photosynthesis tolerance of temperature [5].

  11. Fabrication of Greener Membranes from Ionic Liquid Solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, DooLi

    2017-06-01

    Membrane technology plays a crucial role in different separation processes such as biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and food industries, drinking water supply, and wastewater treatment. However, there is a growing concern that solvents commonly used for membrane fabrication, such as dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethylacetamide (DMAc), and 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), are toxic to the environment and human health. To explore the possibility of substituting these toxic solvents by less toxic or safer solvents, polymers commonly used for membrane fabrication, such as polyacrylonitrile (PAN), cellulose acetate (CA), polyethersulfone (PES), and poly(ether imide sulfone) (EXTEMTM), were dissolved in ionic liquids. Flat sheet and hollow fiber membranes were then fabricated. The thermodynamics of the polymer solutions, the kinetics of phase inversion and other factors, which resulted in significant differences in the membrane structure, compared to those of membranes fabricated from more toxic solvents, were investigated. Higher water permeance with smaller pores, unique and uniform morphologies, and narrower pore size distribution, were observed in the ionic liquid-based membranes. Furthermore, comparable performance on separation of peptides and proteins with various molecular weights was achieved with the membranes fabricated from ionic liquid solutions. In summary, we propose less hazardous polymer solutions to the environment, which can be used for the membrane fabrication with better performance and more regular morphology.

  12. SEVERAL UNIQUENESS THEOREMS OF ALGEBROID FUNCTIONS ON ANNULI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang TAN

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the uniqueness problem of algebroid functions on an-nuli, we get several uniqueness theorems of algebroid functions on annuli, which extend the Nevanlinna value distribution theory for algebroid functions on annuli.

  13. Existence and uniqueness of positive eigenfunctions for certain eigenvalue systems

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Ru-Ying; Yang, Yi-Min

    2004-01-01

    The existence and uniqueness of eigenvalues and positive eigenfunctions for some quasilinear elliptic systems are considered. Some necessary and sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence and uniqueness of eigenvalues and positive eigenfunctions are given.

  14. EXISTENCE AND UNIQUENESS OF POSITIVE EIGENVALUES FOR CERTAIN EIGENVALUE SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Ruying; QIN Yuchun

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we consider certain eigenvalue systems.Imposing some reasonable hypotheses, we prove that theeigenvalue system has a unique eigenvalue with positiveeigenfunctions, and that the eigenfunction is unique upto a scalar multiple.

  15. Uniqueness Problems for Meromorphic Functions that Share Three Values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJian-ping

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigate the uniqueness problems for meromorphic functions that share three values CM and proves a uniqueness theorem on this topic which can be used to improve some previous related results.

  16. Gas separations using ceramic membranes. Final report, September 1988--February 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C.L.; Wu, J.C.S.; Gallaher, G.R.; Smith, G.W.; Flowers, D.L.; Gerdes, T.E.; Liu, P.K.T.

    1993-02-01

    This study covers a comprehensive evaluation of existing ceramic membranes for high temperature gas separations. Methodology has been established for microporous characterization stability and gas separation efficiency. A mathematical model was developed to predict gas separations with existing membranes. Silica and zeolitic modifications of existing membranes were pursued to enhance its separation efficiency. Some of which demonstrate unique separations properties. Use of the dense-silica membranes for hydrogen enrichment was identified as a promising candidate for future development. In addition, the decomposition of trace ammonia contaminant via a catalytic membrane reactor appears feasible. A further economic analysis is required to assess its commercial viability.

  17. Plasma membrane ATPases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmgren, Michael Broberg; Bækgaard, Lone; Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    2011-01-01

    The plasma membrane separates the cellular contents from the surrounding environment. Nutrients must enter through the plasma membrane in order to reach the cell interior, and toxic metabolites and several ions leave the cell by traveling across the same barrier. Biological pumps in the plasma me...

  18. Thin supported silica membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zivkovic, Tijana

    2007-01-01

    This thesis discusses several transport-related aspects relevant for the application of thin supported silica membranes for gas separation and nanofiltration. The influence of support geometry on overall membrane performance is investigated. Planar (i.e., flat plate), tubular, and multichannel suppo

  19. Membrane capacitive deionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Wal, van der A.

    2010-01-01

    Membrane capacitive deionization (MCDI) is an ion-removal process based on applying an electrical potential difference across an aqueous solution which flows in between oppositely placed porous electrodes, in front of which ion-exchange membranes are positioned. Due to the applied potential, ions ar

  20. Plant ABC transporters enable many unique aspects of a terrestrial plant's lifestyle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, Jae-Ung; Song, Won-Yong; Hong, Daewoong

    2016-01-01

    processes and functions necessary for life on dry land. These results suggest that ABC transporters multiplied during evolution and assumed novel functions that allowed plants to adapt to terrestrial environmental conditions. Examining the literature on plant ABC transporters from this viewpoint led us......Terrestrial plants have two to four times more ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter genes than other organisms, including their ancestral microalgae. Recent studies found that plants harboring mutations in these transporters exhibit dramatic phenotypes, many of which are related to developmental...... to propose that diverse ABC transporters enabled many unique and essential aspects of a terrestrial plant's lifestyle, by transporting various compounds across specific membranes of the plant....

  1. A Matriptase-Prostasin Reciprocal Zymogen Activation Complex with Unique Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Stine; Uzzun Sales, Katiuchia; Godiksen, Sine

    2013-01-01

    and prostasin form a reciprocal zymogen activation complex with unique features. Prostasin serves as a critical co-factor for matriptase activation. Unexpectedly, however, prostasin-induced matriptase activation requires neither prostasin zymogen conversion nor prostasin catalytic activity. Prostasin zymogen...... conversion to active prostasin is dependent on matriptase but does not require matriptase zymogen conversion. Consistent with these findings, wild type prostasin, activation cleavage site-mutated prostasin, and catalytically inactive prostasin all were biologically active in vivo when overexpressed...... observations regarding these two membrane-anchored serine proteases and their downstream targets....

  2. Sordarin, an antifungal agent with a unique mode of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The sordarin family of compounds, characterized by a unique tetracyclic diterpene core including a norbornene system, inhibits protein synthesis in fungi by stabilizing the ribosome/EF2 complex. This mode of action is in contrast to typical antifungals, which target the cell membrane. This unusual bioactivity makes sordarin a promising candidate for the development of new fungicidal agents, and provided the motivation for extensive research. Three total syntheses (by the Kato, Mander and Narasaka groups, modifications of the glycosyl unit, and changes to the diterpene core (Cuevas and Ciufolini models will also be discussed in this review.

  3. Unique expression patterns of multiple key genes associated with the evolution of mammalian flight

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Bats are the only mammals capable of true flight. Critical adaptations for flight include a pair of dramatically elongated hands with broad wing membranes. To study the molecular mechanisms of bat wing evolution, we perform genomewide mRNA sequencing and in situ hybridization for embryonic bat limbs. We identify seven key genes that display unique expression patterns in embryonic bat wings and feet, compared with mouse fore- and hindlimbs. The expression of all 5′HoxD genes (Hoxd9–13) and Tbx...

  4. Membrane projection lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Davids, Paul S; Resnick, Paul J; Draper, Bruce L

    2015-03-17

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a three dimensional manufacturing technique for application with semiconductor technologies. A membrane layer can be formed over a cavity. An opening can be formed in the membrane such that the membrane can act as a mask layer to the underlying wall surfaces and bottom surface of the cavity. A beam to facilitate an operation comprising any of implantation, etching or deposition can be directed through the opening onto the underlying surface, with the opening acting as a mask to control the area of the underlying surfaces on which any of implantation occurs, material is removed, and/or material is deposited. The membrane can be removed, a new membrane placed over the cavity and a new opening formed to facilitate another implantation, etching, or deposition operation. By changing the direction of the beam different wall/bottom surfaces can be utilized to form a plurality of structures.

  5. Ion-conducting membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard L.; Chen, Qingmei; Liu, Zengcai; Kutz, Robert

    2016-06-21

    An ion conducting polymeric composition mixture comprises a copolymer of styrene and vinylbenzyl-R.sub.s. R.sub.s is selected from the group consisting of imidazoliums and pyridiniums. The composition contains 10%-90% by weight of vinylbenzyl-R.sub.s. The composition can further comprise a polyolefin comprising substituted polyolefins, a polymer comprising cyclic amine groups, a polymer comprising at least one of a phenylene group and a phenyl group, a polyamide, and/or the reaction product of a constituent having two carbon-carbon double bonds. The composition can be in the form of a membrane. In a preferred embodiment, the membrane is a Helper Membrane that increases the faradaic efficiency of an electrochemical cell into which the membrane is incorporated, and also allows product formation at lower voltages than in cells without the Helper Membrane.

  6. Ion-conducting membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard I.; Chen, Qingmei; Liu, Zengcai; Kutz, Robert

    2017-02-28

    An ion conducting polymeric composition mixture comprises a copolymer of styrene and vinylbenzyl-R.sub.s. R.sub.s is selected from the group consisting of imidazoliums, pyridiniums, pyrazoliums, pyrrolidiniums, pyrroliums, pyrimidiums, piperidiniums, indoliums, and triaziniums. The composition contains 10%-90% by weight of vinylbenzyl-R.sub.s. The composition can further comprise a polyolefin comprising substituted polyolefins, a polymer comprising cyclic amine groups, a polymer comprising at least one of a phenylene group and a phenyl group, a polyamide, and/or the reaction product of a constituent having two carbon-carbon double bonds. The composition can be in the form of a membrane. In a preferred embodiment, the membrane is a Helper Membrane that increases the faradaic efficiency of an electrochemical cell into which the membrane is incorporated, and also allows product formation at lower voltages than in cells without the Helper Membrane.

  7. ROSAT Discovers Unique, Distant Cluster of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Brightest X-ray Cluster Acts as Strong Gravitational Lens Based on exciting new data obtained with the ROSAT X-ray satellite and a ground-based telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, a team of European astronomers [2] has just discovered a very distant cluster of galaxies with unique properties. It emits the strongest X-ray emission of any cluster ever observed by ROSAT and is accompanied by two extraordinarily luminous arcs that represent the gravitationally deflected images of even more distant objects. The combination of these unusual characteristics makes this cluster, now known as RXJ1347.5-1145, a most interesting object for further cosmological studies. DISCOVERY AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS This strange cluster of galaxies was discovered during the All Sky Survey with the ROSAT X-ray satellite as a moderately intense X-ray source in the constellation of Virgo. It could not be identified with any already known object and additional ground-based observations were therefore soon after performed with the Max-Planck-Society/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla observatory in Chile. These observations took place within a large--scale redshift survey of X-ray clusters of galaxies detected by the ROSAT All Sky Survey, a so-called ``ESO Key Programme'' led by astronomers from the Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik and the Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera. The main aim of this programme is to identify cluster X-ray sources, to determine the distance to the X-ray emitting clusters and to investigate their overall properties. These observations permitted to measure the redshift of the RXJ1347.5-1145 cluster as z = 0.45, i.e. it moves away from us with a velocity (about 106,000 km/sec) equal to about one-third of the velocity of light. This is an effect of the general expansion of the universe and it allows to determine the distance as about 5,000 million light-years (assuming a Hubble constant of 75 km/sec/Mpc). In other words, we see these

  8. NOVEL INORGANIC MEMBRANES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry Y.S. Lin

    2003-02-01

    We studied feasibility of two types of dense inorganic membranes which are fundamentally different from those porous inorganic membranes reported in the literature for separation of carbon dioxide from gas streams at high temperatures. The first is a symmetric, dense membrane made of Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and the second is a dual-phase metal-carbonate membrane. We have identified a unique CO{sub 2} sorption/desorption mechanism on lithium zirconate. Considering the all obtained data, we proposed a double layer model to describe the CO{sub 2} sorption/desorption behavior of lithium zirconate. In the model, final product after CO{sub 2} sorption is a particle which consists of a ZrO{sub 2} core inside and a Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} shell. The understanding of CO{sub 2} sorption mechanisms suggests a means to improve CO{sub 2} sorption rate on this group of oxides. It also leads to the conclusion that lithium zirconate is not a suitable material for the proposed dense ceramic membrane for CO{sub 2} separation. Following the second concept of dense membrane for CO{sub 2} separation, we succeeded in preparing the hermetic (gas-tight) dense inorganic membrane consisting of a porous metal phase and a molten carbonate phase. The metal phase not only provides the mechanical support but also is electronically conducting, reducing the overall mass transfer resistance for CO{sub 2} permeation through the membrane. Permeation data showed that nitrogen or helium is not permeable through these membranes (only CO{sub 2}, with O{sub 2}, can permeate through the membrane based on the transport mechanism). This dual-phase membrane may offer promising properties for applications in membrane processes for separation of CO{sub 2} from flue (or coal gasification gas) at high temperatures (350-550 C).

  9. On the Uniqueness of the Canonical Polyadic Decomposition of third-order tensors --- Part II: Uniqueness of the overall decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Domanov, Ignat; De Lathauwer, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Canonical Polyadic (also known as Candecomp/Parafac) Decomposition (CPD) of a higher-order tensor is decomposition in a minimal number of rank-1 tensors. In Part I, we gave an overview of existing results concerning uniqueness and presented new, relaxed, conditions that guarantee uniqueness of one factor matrix. In Part II we use these results for establishing overall CPD uniqueness in cases where none of the factor matrices has full column rank. We obtain uniqueness conditions involving Khat...

  10. Intraductal membranous fat necrosis in a fibroadenoma of breast: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, John D

    2014-09-01

    Membranous fat necrosis is an unusual type of fat necrosis occurring in the breast and normally involves the parenchyma. This report describes an apparently unique intraductal focus in a fibroadenoma following prior needling. Displacement of fatty tissue in the form of membranous fat necrosis within ducts could be added to the list of histological features following core biopsy.

  11. Weak polyelectrolyte multilayers as tunable membranes for solvent resistant nanofiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilyas, Shazia; Joseph, Nithya; Szymczyk, Anthony; Volodin, Alexander; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Vos, de Wiebe M.; Vankelecom, Ivo F.J.

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript encompasses the investigation into the solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) performance of multilayer membranes prepared from weak polyelectrolytes. These weak polyelectrolytes are unique in that the charge density is not fixed and depends on the coating pH, adding an extra variab

  12. Comparative Genomic Analysis Revealed a Gene for Monoglucosyldiacylglycerol Synthase, an Enzyme for Photosynthetic Membrane Lipid Synthesis in Cyanobacteria1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awai, Koichiro; Kakimoto, Takatoshi; Awai, Chie; Kaneko, Takakazu; Nakamura, Yuki; Takamiya, Ken-ichiro; Wada, Hajime; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have a thylakoid lipid composition very similar to that of plant chloroplasts, yet cyanobacteria are proposed to synthesize monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), a major membrane polar lipid in photosynthetic membranes, by a different pathway. In addition, plant MGDG synthase has been cloned, but no ortholog has been reported in cyanobacterial genomes. We report here identification of the gene for monoglucosyldiacylglycerol (MGlcDG) synthase, which catalyzes the first step of galactolipid synthesis in cyanobacteria. Using comparative genomic analysis, candidates for the gene were selected based on the criteria that the enzyme activity is conserved between two species of cyanobacteria (unicellular [Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803] and filamentous [Anabaena sp. PCC 7120]), and we assumed three characteristics of the enzyme; namely, it harbors a glycosyltransferase motif, falls into a category of genes with unknown function, and shares significant similarity in amino acid sequence between these two cyanobacteria. By a motif search of all genes of Synechocystis, BLAST searches, and similarity searches between these two cyanobacteria, we identified four candidates for the enzyme that have all the characteristics we predicted. When expressed in Escherichia coli, one of the Synechocystis candidate proteins showed MGlcDG synthase activity in a UDP-glucose-dependent manner. The ortholog in Anabaena also showed the same activity. The enzyme was predicted to require a divalent cation for its activity, and this was confirmed by biochemical analysis. The MGlcDG synthase and the plant MGDG synthase shared low similarity, supporting the presumption that cyanobacteria and plants utilize different pathways to synthesize MGDG. PMID:16714404

  13. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequier, Laurance; Horton, Stephen B; McMullan, D Michael; Bartlett, Robert H

    2013-06-01

    The extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit is made of a number of components that have been customized to provide adequate tissue oxygen delivery in patients with severe cardiac and/or respiratory failure for a prolonged period of time (days to weeks). A standard extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit consists of a mechanical blood pump, gas-exchange device, and a heat exchanger all connected together with circuit tubing. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuits can vary from simple to complex and may include a variety of blood flow and pressure monitors, continuous oxyhemoglobin saturation monitors, circuit access sites, and a bridge connecting the venous access and arterial infusion limbs of the circuit. Significant technical advancements have been made in the equipment available for short- and long-term extracorporeal membrane oxygenation applications. Contemporary extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuits have greater biocompatibility and allow for more prolonged cardiopulmonary support time while minimizing the procedure-related complications of bleeding, thrombosis, and other physiologic derangements, which were so common with the early application of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Modern era extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuitry and components are simpler, safer, more compact, and can be used across a wide variety of patient sizes from neonates to adults.

  14. Ordered ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.A.; Hill, C.G. Jr.; Zeltner, W.A.

    1991-10-01

    Ceramic membranes have been formed from colloidal sols coated on porous clay supports. These supported membranes have been characterized in terms of their permeabilities and permselectivities to various aqueous test solutions. The thermal stabilities and pore structures of these membranes have been characterized by preparing unsupported membranes of the correpsonding material and performing N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and X-ray diffraction studies on these membranes. To date, membranes have been prepared from a variety of oxides, including TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as Zr-, Fe-, and Nb-doped TiO{sub 2}. In many of these membranes pore diameters are less than 2 nm, while in others the pore diameters are between 3 and 5 nm. Procedures for fabricating porous clay supports with reproducible permeabilities for pure water are also discussed. 30 refs., 59 figs., 22 tabs.

  15. Lipid-protein interactions in plasma membranes of fiber cells isolated from the human eye lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2014-03-01

    The protein content in human lens membranes is extremely high, increases with age, and is higher in the nucleus as compared with the cortex, which should strongly affect the organization and properties of the lipid bilayer portion of intact membranes. To assess these effects, the intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes isolated from human lenses from 41- to 60-year-old donors were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labeling methods. Results were compared with those obtained for lens lipid membranes prepared from total lipid extracts from human eyes of the same age group [Mainali, L., Raguz, M., O'Brien, W. J., and Subczynski, W. K. (2013) Biochim. Biophys. Acta]. Differences were considered to be mainly due to the effect of membrane proteins. The lipid-bilayer portions of intact membranes were significantly less fluid than lipid bilayers of lens lipid membranes, prepared without proteins. The intact membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments termed the bulk lipid domain, boundary lipid domain, and trapped lipid domain. However, the cholesterol bilayer domain, which was detected in cortical and nuclear lens lipid membranes, was not detected in intact membranes. The relative amounts of bulk and trapped lipids were evaluated. The amount of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins was greater in nuclear membranes than in cortical membranes. Thus, it is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes is greater than that of cortical membranes. Also the permeability coefficients for oxygen measured in domains of nuclear membranes were significantly lower than appropriate coefficients measured in cortical membranes. Relationships between the organization of lipids into lipid domains in fiber cells plasma membranes and the organization of membrane proteins are discussed.

  16. CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J. Stepan; Bradley G. Stevens; Melanie D. Hetland

    1999-10-01

    The overall project consists of several integrated research phases related to the applicability, continued development, demonstration, and commercialization of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration process. Work performed during this reporting period consisted of Phase 2 evaluation of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration technology and Phase 3, Technology Partnering. During Phase 1 testing conducted at the EERC using the SpinTek ST-IIL unit operating on a surrogate tank waste, a solids cake developed on the membrane surface. The solids cake was observed where linear membrane velocities were less than 17.5 ft/s and reduced the unobstructed membrane surface area up to 25%, reducing overall filtration performance. The primary goal of the Phase 2 research effort was to enhance filtration performance through the development and testing of alternative turbulence promoter designs. The turbulence promoters were designed to generate a shear force across the entire membrane surface sufficient to maintain a self-cleaning membrane capability and improve filtration efficiency and long-term performance. Specific Phase 2 research activities included the following: System modifications to accommodate an 11-in.-diameter, two-disk rotating membrane assembly; Development and fabrication of alternative turbulence promoter designs; Testing and evaluation of the existing and alternative turbulence promoters under selected operating conditions using a statistically designed test matrix; and Data reduction and analysis; The objective of Phase 3 research was to demonstrate the effectiveness of SpinTek's centrifugal membrane filtration as a pretreatment to remove suspended solids from a liquid waste upstream of 3M's WWL cartridge technology for the selective removal of technetium (Tc).

  17. Electrochemically switchable polypyrrole coated membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidlich, Claudia, E-mail: weidlich@dechema.d [DECHEMA e.V., Karl-Winnacker-Institut, Theodor-Heuss-Allee 25, D-60486 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Mangold, Klaus-Michael [DECHEMA e.V., Karl-Winnacker-Institut, Theodor-Heuss-Allee 25, D-60486 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-04-01

    A method for coating membranes with polypyrrole (PPy) has been developed. Different membranes, such as microfiltration as well as ion exchanger membranes have been coated with PPy to yield electrical conductivity of the membranes. The coated membranes have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy and their permeability and permselectivity have been tested. The results show that PPy can be tailored as cation or anion exchanger and its porosity can be controlled to avoid any impairment of the membrane by the polymer layer. These PPy coated membranes can be applied as electrochemically switchable, functionalised membranes with controllabel and variable separation properties.

  18. Nanoengineered membrane electrode assembly interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A

    2013-08-06

    A membrane electrode structure suitable for use in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) that comprises membrane-affixed metal nanoparticles whose formation is controlled by a photochemical process that controls deposition of the metal nanoparticles using a photocatalyst integrated with a polymer electrolyte membrane, such as an ionomer membrane. Impregnation of the polymer membrane with the photocatalyst prior to metal deposition greatly reduces the required amount of metal precursor in the deposition reaction solution by restricting metal reduction substantially to the formation of metal nanoparticles affixed on or near the surface of the polymer membrane with minimal formation of metallic particles not directly associated with the membrane.

  19. HUMAN AMNIOTIC MEMBRANE GRAFTING: A BOON IN OCULAR CHEMICAL INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashikala

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Amniotic membrane is the innermost layer of the f etal membranes. It has a stromal matrix, a collagen layer, and an overlying basement membrane with a single layer of epithelium. (1 Amniotic membrane has unique properties including an ti-adhesive effects, bacterio-static properties, wound protection, pain redu ction, and epithelialisation effects. Another characteristic of amniotic membrane is the lack of imunogenicity. (2 Amniotic membranes have been used as a dressing to promote he aling of chronic ulcers of the leg and as a biological dressing for burned skin and skin woun ds. (3, 4 It has also been used in surgical reconstruction of artificial vagina, for repairing o mphaloceles, and to prevent tissue adhesion in surgeries of the abdomen, head, or pelvis. (5, 6 Amniotic membrane has been successfully used in ocular conditions like persistent epithelial defects (7, pterygium, (8 Symblepharon (9 and for ocular surface reconstruction. (10, 11 The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of cryo- preserved Human amniotic membrane graft( HAMT, with or without limbal autograft transplantation (LAT in patients with previous and fr esh chemical eye injuries respectively. Institutional ethical committee approval was obtained .

  20. Cholesterol-dependent thermotropic behavior and organization of neuronal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S Thirupathi; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Mallesham, K; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-11-01

    The composition of neuronal membranes is unique with diverse lipid composition due to evolutionary requirement. The organization and dynamics of neuronal membranes are crucial for efficient functioning of neuronal receptors. We have previously established hippocampal membranes as a convenient natural source for exploring lipid-protein interactions, and organization of neuronal receptors. Keeping in mind the pathophysiological role of neuronal cholesterol, in this work, we used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to explore thermotropic phase behavior and organization (thickness) of hippocampal membranes under conditions of varying cholesterol content. Our results show that the apparent phase transition temperature of hippocampal membranes displays characteristic linear dependence on membrane cholesterol content. These results are in contrast to earlier results with binary lipid mixtures containing cholesterol where phase transition temperature was found to be not significantly dependent on cholesterol concentration. Interestingly, SAXS data showed that hippocampal membrane thickness remained more or less invariant, irrespective of cholesterol content. We believe that these results constitute one of the early reports on the thermotropic phase behavior and organizational characterization of hippocampal membranes under varying cholesterol content. These results could have implications in the functioning of neuronal receptors in healthy and diseased states. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional polyelectrolyte multilayer membranes for water purification applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, Bijay P., E-mail: bijayptripathi@yahoo.com [Department of Nanostructured Materials, Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden, Hohe Str. 6, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Dubey, Nidhi C. [Department of Nanostructured Materials, Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden, Hohe Str. 6, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Department of Chemistry, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Stamm, M., E-mail: stamm@ipfdd.de [Department of Nanostructured Materials, Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden, Hohe Str. 6, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Department of Chemistry, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► LBL film on the surface and in to the pores was prepared via flow through method. ► The membranes showed high rejection of Congo Red with sufficiently high flux. ► High antifouling ability in terms of both organic and bio fouling was observed. -- Abstract: A diverse set of supported multilayer assemblies with controllable surface charge, hydrophilicity, and permeability to water and solute was fabricated by pressure driven permeation of poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) solution through poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) track-etched membranes. The polyelectrolyte multilayer fabrication was confirmed by means of FTIR, SEM, AFM, ellipsometry, zetapotential, and contact angle characterization. The prepared membranes were characterized in terms of their pure water permeability, flux recovery, and resistance to organic and biofouling properties. The antifouling behavior of the membranes was assessed in terms of protein adsorption and antibacterial behavior. Finally, the membranes were tested for rejection of selected water soluble dyes to establish their usefulness for organic contaminant removal from water. The membranes were highly selective and capable of nearly complete rejection of congo red with sufficiently high fluxes. The feasibility of regenerating the prepared membranes fouled by protein was also demonstrated and good flux recovery was obtained. In summary, the multilayer approach to surface and pore modification was shown to enable the design of membranes with the unique combination of desirable separation characteristics, regenerability of the separation layer, and antifouling behavior.

  2. Nanocomposite Electrospun Nanofiber Membranes for Environmental Remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Homaeigohar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapid worldwide industrialization and population growth is going to lead to an extensive environmental pollution. Therefore, so many people are currently suffering from the water shortage induced by the respective pollution, as well as poor air quality and a huge fund is wasted in the world each year due to the relevant problems. Environmental remediation necessitates implementation of novel materials and technologies, which are cost and energy efficient. Nanomaterials, with their unique chemical and physical properties, are an optimum solution. Accordingly, there is a strong motivation in seeking nano-based approaches for alleviation of environmental problems in an energy efficient, thereby, inexpensive manner. Thanks to a high porosity and surface area presenting an extraordinary permeability (thereby an energy efficiency and selectivity, respectively, nanofibrous membranes are a desirable candidate. Their functionality and applicability is even promoted when adopting a nanocomposite strategy. In this case, specific nanofillers, such as metal oxides, carbon nanotubes, precious metals, and smart biological agents, are incorporated either during electrospinning or in the post-processing. Moreover, to meet operational requirements, e.g., to enhance mechanical stability, decrease of pressure drop, etc., nanofibrous membranes are backed by a microfibrous non-woven forming a hybrid membrane. The novel generation of nanocomposite/hybrid nanofibrous membranes can perform extraordinarily well in environmental remediation and control. This reality justifies authoring of this review paper.

  3. Hydrogen transport membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  4. Synthesis of zeolite membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Haiyang; ZHANG Baoquan; Y. S. Lin; LI Yongdan

    2004-01-01

    Zeolite membranes offer great application potentials in membrane separation and/or reaction due to their excellent separation performance and catalytic ability. Up to present, various synthesis methods of zeolite membranes have been developed, including embedded method,in-situ hydrothermal synthesis method, and secondary growth method etc. Compared with the in-situ hydrothermal synthesis method, the secondary growth method possesses a variety of advantages such as easier operation, higher controllability in crystal orientation, microstructure and film thickness, leading to much better reproducibility. This review provides a concise summary and analysis of various synthesis methods reported in the literature. In particular, the secondary growth method was discussed in detail in terms of crystal orientation, defects and crystal grain layers. Some critical issues were also highlighted, which were conducive to the improvement in the synthesis technology of zeolite membranes.

  5. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will focus on the development and application of nonporous high gas flux perfluoro membranes with high temperature rating and excellent chemical resistance.

  6. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    be provided by microscopy-related techniques. In this chapter, I will attempt to summarize representative examples concerning how microscopy (which provides information on membrane lateral organization by direct visualization) and spectroscopy techniques (which provides information about molecular interaction...

  7. Gel layer formation on membranes in Membrane Bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Brink, P.F.H.

    2014-01-01

    The widespread application of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for municipal wastewater treatment is hampered by membrane fouling. Fouling increases energy demand, reduces process performance and creates the need for more frequent (chemical) membrane cleaning or replacement. Membrane fouling in MBRs is k

  8. Impact on floating membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenberghe, Nicolas; Duchemin, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    When impacted by a rigid object, a thin elastic membrane with negligible bending rigidity floating on a liquid pool deforms. Two axisymmetric waves radiating from the impact point propagate. In the first place, a longitudinal wave front -- associated with in-plane deformation of the membrane and traveling at constant speed -- separates an outward stress free domain with a stretched but flat domain. Then, in the stretched domain a dispersive transverse wave travels at a wave speed that depends...

  9. Criticality in Plasma Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machta, Benjamin; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Sethna, James; Veatch, Sarah

    2011-03-01

    We are motivated by recent observations of micron-sized critical fluctuations in the 2d Ising Universality class in plasma membrane vesicles that are isolated from cortical cytoskeleton. We construct a minimal model of the plasma membrane's interaction with intact cytoskeleton which explains why large scale phase separation has not been observed in Vivo. In addition, we use analytical techniques from conformal field theory and numerical simulations to investigate the form of effective forces mediated by the membrane's proximity to criticality. We show that the range of this force is maximized near a critical point and we quantify its usefulness in mediating communication using techniques from information theory. Finally we use theoretical techniques from statistical physics in conjunction with Monte-Carlo simulations to understand how criticality can be used to increase the efficiency of membrane bound receptor mediated signaling. We expect that this sort of analysis will be broadly useful in understanding and quantifying the role of lipid ``rafts'' in a wide variety of membrane bound processes. Generally, we demonstrate that critical fluctuations provide a physical mechanism to organize and spatially segregate membrane components by providing channels for interaction over relatively large distances.

  10. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  11. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  12. Development of hydrophilic GO-ZnO/PES membranes for treatment of pharmaceutical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlangu, O T; Nackaerts, R; Mamba, B B; Verliefde, A R D

    2017-07-01

    Membrane application in water reclamation is challenged by fouling which deteriorates membrane performance in terms of permeate flux and solute rejection. Several studies focusing on antifouling membranes incorporated with nanoparticles have been carried out, but these membranes are not yet a viable solution due to their high energy requirements and inability to completely remove or degrade trace organic compounds (TOrCs). Therefore, this study aims at fabricating polyethersulfone (PES) membranes for treatment of pharmaceutical wastewater by using a unique membrane synthesis approach. PES membranes were synthesised by casting two different solutions before coagulation. Therefore, the synthesis technique was called 'double-casting phase inversion'. The membranes were impregnated with nanohybrid graphene oxide-zinc oxide (GO-ZnO) to increase their hydrophilicity, rejection of pharmaceuticals (by decreasing membrane-solute hydrophobic interactions), resistance to organic fouling and photodegradation properties. The addition of GO-ZnO increased membrane hydrophilicity and pure water permeability. The rejection of TOrCs and anti-fouling properties were also improved due to a reduction in membrane-solute and membrane-foulant hydrophobic interactions, respectively. In addition to improved TOrC rejection properties and resistance to fouling, GO-ZnO/PES membranes degraded Brilliant Black.

  13. Membrane development in purple photosynthetic bacteria in response to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederman, Robert A

    2013-10-01

    Studies on membrane development in purple bacteria during adaptation to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension are reviewed. Anoxygenic phototrophic such as the purple α-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides have served as simple, dynamic, and experimentally accessible model organisms for studies of the photosynthetic apparatus. A major landmark in photosynthesis research, which dramatically illustrates this point, was provided by the determination of the X-ray structure of the reaction center (RC) in Blastochloris viridis (Deisenhofer and Michel, EMBO J 8:2149-2170, 1989), once it was realized that this represented the general structure for the photosystem II RC present in all oxygenic phototrophs. This seminal advance, together with a considerable body of subsequent research on the light-harvesting (LH) and electron transfer components of the photosynthetic apparatus has provided a firm basis for the current understanding of how phototrophs acclimate to alterations in light intensity and quality. Oxygenic phototrophs adapt to these changes by extensive thylakoid membrane remodeling, which results in a dramatic supramolecular reordering to assure that an appropriate flow of quinone redox species occurs within the membrane bilayer for efficient and rapid electron transfer. Despite the high level of photosynthetic unit organization in Rba. sphaeroides as observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence induction/relaxation measurements have demonstrated that the addition of the peripheral LH2 antenna complex in cells adapting to low-intensity illumination results in a slowing of the rate of electron transfer turnover by the RC of up to an order of magnitude. This is ascribed to constraints in quinone redox species diffusion between the RC and cytochrome bc1 complexes arising from the increased packing density as the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) bilayer becomes crowded with LH2 rings. In addition to downshifts in light intensity as a paradigm

  14. Specific interaction of postsynaptic densities with membrane rafts isolated from synaptic plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Yao, Wei-Dong; Suzuki, Tatsuo

    2013-06-01

    Postsynaptic membrane rafts are believed to play important roles in synaptic signaling, plasticity, and maintenance. We recently demonstrated the presence, at the electron microscopic level, of complexes consisting of membrane rafts and postsynaptic densities (PSDs) in detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) prepared from synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) ( Suzuki et al., 2011 , J Neurochem, 119, 64-77). To further explore these complexes, here we investigated the nature of the binding between purified SPM-DRMs and PSDs in vitro. In binding experiments, we used SPM-DRMs prepared after treating SPMs with n-octyl-β-d-glucoside, because at concentrations of 1.0% or higher it completely separates SPM-DRMs and PSDs, providing substantially PSD-free unique SPM-DRMs as well as DRM-free PSDs. PSD binding to PSD-free DRMs was identified by mass spectrometry, Western blotting, and electron microscopy. PSD proteins were not incorporated into SPMs, and significantly less PSD proteins were incorporated into DRMs prepared from liver membranes, providing in vitro evidence that binding of PSDs to DRMs is specific and suggestion of the presence of specific interacting molecules. These specific interactions may have important roles in synaptic development, function, and plasticity in vivo. In addition, the binding system we developed may be a good tool to search for binding molecules and binding mechanisms between PSDs and rafts.

  15. Liberated PKA Catalytic Subunits Associate with the Membrane via Myristoylation to Preferentially Phosphorylate Membrane Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillo, Shane E; Xiong, Wei-Hong; Takahashi, Maho; Miao, Sheng; Andrade, Adriana L; Fortin, Dale A; Yang, Guang; Qin, Maozhen; Smoody, Barbara F; Stork, Philip J S; Zhong, Haining

    2017-04-18

    Protein kinase A (PKA) has diverse functions in neurons. At rest, the subcellular localization of PKA is controlled by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). However, the dynamics of PKA upon activation remain poorly understood. Here, we report that elevation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in neuronal dendrites causes a significant percentage of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKA-C) molecules to be released from the regulatory subunit (PKA-R). Liberated PKA-C becomes associated with the membrane via N-terminal myristoylation. This membrane association does not require the interaction between PKA-R and AKAPs. It slows the mobility of PKA-C and enriches kinase activity on the membrane. Membrane-residing PKA substrates are preferentially phosphorylated compared to cytosolic substrates. Finally, the myristoylation of PKA-C is critical for normal synaptic function and plasticity. We propose that activation-dependent association of PKA-C renders the membrane a unique PKA-signaling compartment. Constrained mobility of PKA-C may synergize with AKAP anchoring to determine specific PKA function in neurons. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inverse colloidal crystal membranes for hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Anh T; Wang, Xinying; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil; Yu, Bing; Yuan, Hua; Cong, Hailin; Luo, Yongli; Tang, Jianguo

    2015-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has gained interest due to its excellent performance in the purification of humanized monoclonal antibodies. The membrane material used in hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has typically been commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride. In this contribution, newly developed inverse colloidal crystal membranes that have uniform pores, high porosity and, therefore, high surface area for protein binding are used as hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography membranes for humanized monoclonal antibody immunoglobulin G purification. The capacity of the inverse colloidal crystal membranes developed here is up to ten times greater than commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride membranes with a similar pore size. This work highlights the importance of developing uniform pore size high porosity membranes in order to maximize the capacity of hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Fabrication of electrospun nanofibrous membranes for membrane distillation application

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2013-02-01

    Nanofibrous membranes of Matrimid have been successfully fabricated using an electrospinning technique under optimized conditions. Nanofibrous membranes are found to be highly hydrophobic with a high water contact angle of 130°. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and pore size distribution analysis revealed the big pore size structure of electrospun membranes to be greater than 2 μm and the pore size distribution is found to be narrow. Flat sheet Matrimid membranes were fabricated via casting followed by phase inversion. The morphology, pore size distribution, and water contact angle were measured and compared with the electrospun membranes. Both membranes fabricated by electrospinning and phase inversion techniques were tested in a direct contact membrane distillation process. Electrospun membranes showed high water vapor flux of 56 kg/m2-h, which is very high compared to the casted membrane as well as most of the fabricated and commercially available highly hydrophobic membranes. ©2013 Desalination Publications.

  18. Uniqueness of the differential Mueller matrix of uniform homogeneous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlaminck, Vincent; Ossikovski, Razvigor

    2014-06-01

    We show that the differential matrix of a uniform homogeneous medium containing birefringence may not be uniquely determined from its Mueller matrix, resulting in the potential existence of an infinite set of elementary polarization properties parameterized by an integer parameter. The uniqueness depends on the symmetry properties of a special differential matrix derived from the eigenvalue decomposition of the Mueller matrix. The conditions for the uniqueness of the differential matrix are identified, physically discussed, and illustrated in examples from the literature.

  19. Existence and uniqueness theorem for ODE: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Poria, Swarup; Dhiman, Aman

    2016-01-01

    The study of existence and uniqueness of solutions became important due to the lack of general formula for solving nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Compact form of existence and uniqueness theory appeared nearly 200 years after the development of the theory of differential equation. In the article, we shall discuss briefly the differences between linear and nonlinear first order ODE in context of existence and uniqueness of solutions. Special emphasis is given on the Lipschit...

  20. Biomimetic membranes and methods of making biomimetic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, Susan; Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, David Michael; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Yang, Shaorong

    2016-11-08

    The present disclosure is directed to biomimetic membranes and methods of manufacturing such membranes that include structural features that mimic the structures of cellular membrane channels and produce membrane designs capable of high selectivity and high permeability or adsorptivity. The membrane structure, material and chemistry can be selected to perform liquid separations, gas separation and capture, ion transport and adsorption for a variety of applications.

  1. Fractal reconstruction of rough membrane surface related with membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meijia; Chen, Jianrong; Ma, Yuanjun; Shen, Liguo; He, Yiming; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, fractal reconstruction of rough membrane surface with a modified Weierstrass-Mandelbrot (WM) function was conducted. The topography of rough membrane surface was measured by an atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the results showed that the membrane surface was isotropous. Accordingly, the fractal dimension and roughness of membrane surface were calculated by the power spectrum method. The rough membrane surface was reconstructed on the MATLAB platform with the parameter values acquired from raw AFM data. The reconstructed membrane was much similar to the real membrane morphology measured by AFM. The parameters (including average roughness and root mean square (RMS) roughness) associated with membrane morphology for the model and real membrane were calculated, and a good match of roughness parameters between the reconstructed surface and real membrane was found, indicating the feasibility of the new developed method. The reconstructed membrane surface can be potentially used for interaction energy evaluation.

  2. Theorems on Positive Data: On the Uniqueness of NMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Laurberg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the conditions for which nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF is unique and introduce several theorems which can determine whether the decomposition is in fact unique or not. The theorems are illustrated by several examples showing the use of the theorems and their limitations. We have shown that corruption of a unique NMF matrix by additive noise leads to a noisy estimation of the noise-free unique solution. Finally, we use a stochastic view of NMF to analyze which characterization of the underlying model will result in an NMF with small estimation errors.

  3. Membrane binding properties of EBV gp110 C-terminal domain; evidences for structural transition in the membrane environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Jean; Seo, Min-Duk; Lee, Suk Kyeong; Lee, Bong Jin

    2008-09-30

    Gp110 of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) mainly localizes on nuclear/ER membranes and plays a role in the assembly of EBV nucleocapsid. The C-terminal tail domain (gp110 CTD) is essential for the function of gp110 and the nuclear/ER membranes localization of gp110 is ruled by its C-terminal unique nuclear localization signal (NLS), consecutive four arginines. In the present study, the structural properties of gp110 CTD in membrane mimics were investigated using CD, size-exclusion chromatography, and NMR, to elucidate the effect of membrane environment on the structural transition and to compare the structural feature of the protein in the solution state with that of the membrane-bound form. CD and NMR analysis showed that gp110 CTD in a buffer solution appears to adopt a stable folding intermediate which lacks compactness, and a highly helical structure is formed only in membrane environments. The helical content of gp110 CTD was significantly affected by the negative charge as well as the size of membrane mimics. Based on the elution profiles of the size-exclusion chromatography, we found that gp110 CTD intrinsically forms a trimer, revealing that a trimerization region may exist in the C-terminal domain of gp110 like the ectodomain of gp110. The mutation of NLS (RRRR) to RTTR does not affect the overall structure of gp110 CTD in membrane mimics, while the helical propensity in a buffer solution was slightly different between the wild-type and the mutant proteins. This result suggests that not only the helicity induced in membrane environment but also the local structure around NLS may be related to trafficking to the nuclear membrane. More detailed structural difference between the wild-type and the mutant in membrane environment was examined using synthetic two peptides including the wild-type NLS and the mutant NLS.

  4. Membrane biology: fission behind BARs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haucke, Volker

    2012-06-05

    Membrane bending is accomplished in part by amphipathic helix insertion into the bilayer and the assembly of BAR domain scaffolds preparing the membrane for fission. Two recent studies highlight the roles of amphipathic helices and BAR scaffolds in membrane fission and establish the structural basis of membrane bending by the N-BAR protein endophilin.

  5. A carbon nanotube wall membrane for water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeongho; Baek, Youngbin; Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong; Lee, Hong H; Yoon, Jeyong; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2015-05-14

    Various forms of carbon nanotubes have been utilized in water treatment applications. The unique characteristics of carbon nanotubes, however, have not been fully exploited for such applications. Here we exploit the characteristics and corresponding attributes of carbon nanotubes to develop a millimetre-thick ultrafiltration membrane that can provide a water permeability that approaches 30,000 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1), compared with the best water permeability of 2,400 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) reported for carbon nanotube membranes. The developed membrane consists only of vertically aligned carbon nanotube walls that provide 6-nm-wide inner pores and 7-nm-wide outer pores that form between the walls of the carbon nanotubes when the carbon nanotube forest is densified. The experimental results reveal that the permeance increases as the pore size decreases. The carbon nanotube walls of the membrane are observed to impede bacterial adhesion and resist biofilm formation.

  6. Metal-organic frameworks for membrane-based separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Michael S.; Moreton, Jessica C.; Benz, Lauren; Cohen, Seth M.

    2016-12-01

    As research into metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) enters its third decade, efforts are naturally shifting from fundamental studies to applications, utilizing the unique features of these materials. Engineered forms of MOFs, such as membranes and films, are being investigated to transform laboratory-synthesized MOF powders to industrially viable products for separations, chemical sensors and catalysts. Following encouraging demonstrations of gas separations using MOF-based membranes, liquid-phase separations are now being explored in an effort to build effective membranes for these settings. In this Review, we highlight MOF applications that are in their nascent stages, specifically liquid-phase separations using MOF-based mixed-matrix membranes. We also highlight the analytical techniques that provide important insights into these materials, particularly at surfaces and interfaces, to better understand MOFs and their interactions with other materials, which will ultimately lead to their use in advanced technologies.

  7. Ternary structure reveals mechanism of a membrane diacylglycerol kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dianfan; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Keogh, Aaron; Vogeley, Lutz; Howe, Nicole; Lyons, Joseph A.; Aragao, David; Fromme, Petra; Fromme, Raimund; Basu, Shibom; Grotjohann, Ingo; Kupitz, Christopher; Rendek, Kimberley; Weierstall, Uwe; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Wei; Bandaru, Sateesh; English, Niall J.; Gati, Cornelius; Barty, Anton; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Chapman, Henry N.; Diederichs, Kay; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Marvin Seibert, M.; Caffrey, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase catalyses the ATP-dependent conversion of diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli. The small size of this integral membrane trimer, which has 121 residues per subunit, means that available protein must be used economically to craft three catalytic and substrate-binding sites centred about the membrane/cytosol interface. How nature has accomplished this extraordinary feat is revealed here in a crystal structure of the kinase captured as a ternary complex with bound lipid substrate and an ATP analogue. Residues, identified as essential for activity by mutagenesis, decorate the active site and are rationalized by the ternary structure. The γ-phosphate of the ATP analogue is positioned for direct transfer to the primary hydroxyl of the lipid whose acyl chain is in the membrane. A catalytic mechanism for this unique enzyme is proposed. The active site architecture shows clear evidence of having arisen by convergent evolution.

  8. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-11-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the current research, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature in air. Based on these measurements, the charge carrier concentration, net acceptor dopant concentration, activation energy of conduction and mobility were estimated. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature have been completed and reported previously. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affects the mechanical properties. To study the effect of temperature on the membranes when exposed to an inert environment, the membranes (LAFT and Dual phase) were heat treated at 1000 C in air and N{sub 2} atmosphere and hardness and fracture toughness of the membranes were studied after the treatment. The indentation method was used to find the fracture toughness and the effect of the heat treatment on the mechanical properties of the membranes. Further results on the investigation of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appears to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model will serve to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

  9. Evolutionary origins of membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkidjanian, Armen Y.; Galperin, Michael Y.

    Although the genes that encode membrane proteins make about 30% of the sequenced genomes, the evolution of membrane proteins and their origins are still poorly understood. Here we address this topic by taking a closer look at those membrane proteins the ancestors of which were present in the Last Universal Common Ancestor, and in particular, the F/V-type rotating ATPases. Reconstruction of their evolutionary history provides hints for understanding not only the origin of membrane proteins, but also of membranes themselves. We argue that the evolution of biological membranes could occur as a process of coevolution of lipid bilayers and membrane proteins, where the increase in the ion-tightness of the membrane bilayer may have been accompanied by a transition from amphiphilic, pore-forming membrane proteins to highly hydrophobic integral membrane complexes.

  10. Electrical properties of polar membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Mosgaard, Lars D; Heimburg, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes are capacitors that can be charged by applying a field across the membrane. The charges on the capacitor exert a force on the membrane that leads to electrostriction, i.e. a thinning of the membrane. Since the force is quadratic in voltage, negative and positive voltage have an identical influence on the physics of symmetric membranes. However, this is not the case for a membrane with an asymmetry leading to a permanent electric polarization. Positive and negative voltages of identical magnitude lead to different properties. Such an asymmetry can originate from a lipid composition that is different on the two monolayers of the membrane, or from membrane curvature. The latter effect is called 'flexoelectricity'. As a consequence of permanent polarization, the membrane capacitor is discharged at a voltage different from zero. This leads to interesting electrical phenomena such as outward or inward rectification of membrane permeability. Here, we introduce a generalized theoretical framework...

  11. Designing mimics of membrane active proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgolastra, Federica; Deronde, Brittany M; Sarapas, Joel M; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory N

    2013-12-17

    As a semipermeable barrier that controls the flux of biomolecules in and out the cell, the plasma membrane is critical in cell function and survival. Many proteins interact with the plasma membrane and modulate its physiology. Within this large landscape of membrane-active molecules, researchers have focused significant attention on two specific classes of peptides, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), because of their unique properties. In this Account, we describe our efforts over the last decade to build and understand synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides (SMAMPs). These endeavors represent one specific example of a much larger effort to understand how synthetic molecules interact with and manipulate the plasma membrane. Using both defined molecular weight oligomers and easier to produce, but heterogeneous, polymers, we have generated scaffolds with biological potency exceeding that of the natural analogues. One of these compounds has progressed through a phase II clinical trial for pan-staph infections. Modern biophysical assays have highlighted the interplay between the synthetic scaffold and lipid composition: a negative Gaussian curvature is required both for pore formation and for the initiation of endosome creation. Although work remains to better resolve the complexity of this interplay between lipids, other bilayer components, and the scaffolds, significant new insights have been discovered. These results point to the importance of considering the various aspects of permeation and how these are related to "pore formation". More recently, our efforts have expanded toward protein transduction domains, or mimics of cell penetrating peptides. Using a combination of unique molecular scaffolds and guanidinium-rich side chains, we have produced an array of polymers with robust membrane (and delivery) activity. In this new area, researchers are just beginning to understand the fundamental interactions between these new

  12. The Potential of α-Spinasterol to Mimic the Membrane Properties of Natural Cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralampiev, Ivan; Scheidt, Holger A; Huster, Daniel; Müller, Peter

    2017-08-22

    Sterols play a unique role for the structural and dynamical organization of membranes. The current study reports data on the membrane properties of the phytosterol (3β,5α,22E)-stigmasta-7,22-dien-3-β-ol (α-spinasterol), which represents an important component of argan oil and have not been investigated so far in molecular detail. In particular, the impact of α-spinasterol on the structure and organization of lipid membranes was investigated and compared with those of cholesterol. Various membrane parameters such as the molecular packing of the phospholipid fatty acyl chains, the membrane permeability toward polar molecules, and the formation of lateral membrane domains were studied. The experiments were performed on lipid vesicles using methods of NMR spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. The results show that α-spinasterol resembles the membrane behavior of cholesterol to some degree.

  13. Ionic liquid-based materials: a platform to design engineered CO2 separation membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, Liliana C; Marrucho, Isabel M

    2016-05-21

    During the past decade, significant advances in ionic liquid-based materials for the development of CO2 separation membranes have been accomplished. This review presents a perspective on different strategies that use ionic liquid-based materials as a unique tuneable platform to design task-specific advanced materials for CO2 separation membranes. Based on compilation and analysis of the data hitherto reported, we provide a judicious assessment of the CO2 separation efficiency of different membranes, and highlight breakthroughs and key challenges in this field. In particular, configurations such as supported ionic liquid membranes, polymer/ionic liquid composite membranes, gelled ionic liquid membranes and poly(ionic liquid)-based membranes are detailed, discussed and evaluated in terms of their efficiency, which is attributed to their chemical and structural features. Finally, an integrated perspective on technology, economy and sustainability is provided.

  14. Genome comparison without alignment using shortest unique substrings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Möller Friedrich

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence comparison by alignment is a fundamental tool of molecular biology. In this paper we show how a number of sequence comparison tasks, including the detection of unique genomic regions, can be accomplished efficiently without an alignment step. Our procedure for nucleotide sequence comparison is based on shortest unique substrings. These are substrings which occur only once within the sequence or set of sequences analysed and which cannot be further reduced in length without losing the property of uniqueness. Such substrings can be detected using generalized suffix trees. Results We find that the shortest unique substrings in Caenorhabditis elegans, human and mouse are no longer than 11 bp in the autosomes of these organisms. In mouse and human these unique substrings are significantly clustered in upstream regions of known genes. Moreover, the probability of finding such short unique substrings in the genomes of human or mouse by chance is extremely small. We derive an analytical expression for the null distribution of shortest unique substrings, given the GC-content of the query sequences. Furthermore, we apply our method to rapidly detect unique genomic regions in the genome of Staphylococcus aureus strain MSSA476 compared to four other staphylococcal genomes. Conclusion We combine a method to rapidly search for shortest unique substrings in DNA sequences and a derivation of their null distribution. We show that unique regions in an arbitrary sample of genomes can be efficiently detected with this method. The corresponding programs shustring (SHortest Unique subSTRING and shulen are written in C and available at http://adenine.biz.fh-weihenstephan.de/shustring/.

  15. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstad, Astrid; Rasmussen, Knut Einar; Parmer, Marthe Petrine

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports development of a new approach towards analytical liquid-liquid-liquid membrane extraction termed parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction. A donor plate and acceptor plate create a sandwich, in which each sample (human plasma) and acceptor solution is separated by an arti...... by an artificial liquid membrane. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction is a modification of hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction, where the hollow fibers are replaced by flat membranes in a 96-well plate format....

  16. Surface glycosylation of polymeric membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI ZhengWei; WAN LingShu; XU ZhiKang

    2008-01-01

    Surface glycosylation of polymeric membranes has been inspired by the structure of natural biomembranes. It refers to that glycosyl groups are introduced onto the membrane surface by various strategies, which combine the separation function of the membrane with the biological function of the saccharides in one system. In this review, progress in the surface glycosylation of polymeric membranes is highlighted in two aspects, i.e. the glycosylation methods and the potential applications of the surface-glycosylated membranes.

  17. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become m

  18. Physics of biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.

    The biological membrane is a complex system consisting of an aqueous biomolecular planar aggregate of predominantly lipid and protein molecules. At physiological temperatures, the membrane may be considered a thin (˜50Å) slab of anisotropic fluid characterized by a high lateral mobility of the various molecular components. A substantial fraction of biological activity takes place in association with membranes. As a very lively piece of condensed matter, the biological membrane is a challenging research topic for both the experimental and theoretical physicists who are facing a number of fundamental physical problems including molecular self-organization, macromolecular structure and dynamics, inter-macromolecular interactions, structure-function relationships, transport of energy and matter, and interfacial forces. This paper will present a brief review of recent theoretical and experimental progress on such problems, with special emphasis on lipid bilayer structure and dynamics, lipid phase transitions, lipid-protein and lipid-cholesterol interactions, intermembrane forces, and the physical constraints imposed on biomembrane function and evolution. The paper advocates the dual point of view that there are a number of interesting physics problems in membranology and, at the same time, that the physical properties of biomembranes are important regulators of membrane function.

  19. Recent advances on polymeric membranes for membrane reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Buonomenna, M. G.

    2012-06-24

    Membrane reactors are generally applied in high temperature reactions (>400 °C). In the field of fine chemical synthesis, however, much milder conditions are generally applicable and polymeric membranes were applied without their damage. The successful use of membranes in membrane reactors is primary the result of two developments concerning: (i) membrane materials and (ii) membrane structures. The selection of a suited material and preparation technique depends on the application the membrane is to be used in. In this chapter a review of up to date literature about polymers and configuration catalyst/ membranes used in some recent polymeric membrane reactors is given. The new emerging concept of polymeric microcapsules as catalytic microreactors has been proposed. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers. All rights reserved.

  20. Uniqueness and existence for bounded boundary value problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehme, J.; Lanz, A.

    2006-01-01

    The existence and uniqueness of solutions for the boundary value problems with general linear point evaluation boundary conditions is established. We assume that f is bounded and that there is uniqueness on a homogeneous problem and on the linear variational problems. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All righ

  1. Existence and Uniqueness of Solution to ODEs: Lipschitz Continuity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swarup Poria; Aman Dhiman

    2017-05-01

    The study of existence and uniqueness of solution of ordinarydifferential equation (ODE) became important due to the lack ofgeneral formula for solving nonlinear ODEs. In this article, weshall discuss briefly about the existence and uniqueness of solutionof a first order ODE. A special emphasis is given on theLipschitz continuous functions in the discussion.

  2. Theorems on Positive Data: On the Uniqueness of NMF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauerberg, Hans; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Pumbley, Mark;

    2008-01-01

    have shown that corruption of a unique NMF matrix by additive noise leads to a noisy estimation of the noise-free unique solution. Finally, we use a stochastic view of NMF to analyze which characterization of the underlying model will result in an NMF with small estimation errors....

  3. Morphological Awareness Uniquely Predicts Young Children's Chinese Character Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride-Chang, Catherine; Shu, Hua; Zhou, Aibao; Wat, Chun Pong; Wagner, Richard K.

    2003-01-01

    Two unique measures of morphological awareness were orally administered to kindergarten and 2nd-grade Hong Kong Chinese children. Both tasks of morphological awareness predicted unique variance in Chinese character recognition in these children, after controlling for age, phonological awareness, speeded naming, speed of processing, and vocabulary.…

  4. Can facial uniqueness be inferred from impostor scores?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutta, A.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    2013-01-01

    In Biometrics, facial uniqueness is commonly inferred from impostor similarity scores. In this paper, we show that such uniqueness measures are highly unstable in the presence of image quality variations like pose, noise and blur. We also experimentally demonstrate the instability of a recently

  5. Unique Protein Signature of Circulating Microparticles in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer; Iversen, Line V

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the unique qualities of proteins associated with circulating subcellular material in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with healthy controls and patients with other chronic autoimmune diseases.......To characterize the unique qualities of proteins associated with circulating subcellular material in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with healthy controls and patients with other chronic autoimmune diseases....

  6. Uniqueness of limiting solution to a strongly competing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avetik Arakelyan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We prove a uniqueness for the positive solution to a strongly competing system of Lotka-Volterra type problem in the limiting configuration, when the competition rate tends to infinity. We give an alternate proof of uniqueness based on properties of limiting solutions.

  7. The Uniqueness of Optimal Solution for Linear Programming Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QuanlingWei; HongYan; JunWang

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates an old problem in operations research, the uniqueness of the optimal solution to a linear programming problem. We discuss the problem on a general polyhedron, give some equivalent conditions for uniqueness testing. In addition, we discuss the implementation issues for linear programming based decision making procedures,which motivated this research.

  8. Recent Advances in Pd-Based Membranes for Membrane Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arratibel Plazaola, Alba; Pacheco Tanaka, David Alfredo; Van Sint Annaland, Martin; Gallucci, Fausto

    2017-01-01

    Palladium-based membranes for hydrogen separation have been studied by several research groups during the last 40 years. Much effort has been dedicated to improving the hydrogen flux of these membranes employing different alloys, supports, deposition/production techniques, etc. High flux and cheap membranes, yet stable at different operating conditions are required for their exploitation at industrial scale. The integration of membranes in multifunctional reactors (membrane reactors) poses additional demands on the membranes as interactions at different levels between the catalyst and the membrane surface can occur. Particularly, when employing the membranes in fluidized bed reactors, the selective layer should be resistant to or protected against erosion. In this review we will also describe a novel kind of membranes, the pore-filled type membranes prepared by Pacheco Tanaka and coworkers that represent a possible solution to integrate thin selective membranes into membrane reactors while protecting the selective layer. This work is focused on recent advances on metallic supports, materials used as an intermetallic diffusion layer when metallic supports are used and the most recent advances on Pd-based composite membranes. Particular attention is paid to improvements on sulfur resistance of Pd based membranes, resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and stability at high temperature.

  9. Recent Advances in Pd-Based Membranes for Membrane Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Arratibel Plazaola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium-based membranes for hydrogen separation have been studied by several research groups during the last 40 years. Much effort has been dedicated to improving the hydrogen flux of these membranes employing different alloys, supports, deposition/production techniques, etc. High flux and cheap membranes, yet stable at different operating conditions are required for their exploitation at industrial scale. The integration of membranes in multifunctional reactors (membrane reactors poses additional demands on the membranes as interactions at different levels between the catalyst and the membrane surface can occur. Particularly, when employing the membranes in fluidized bed reactors, the selective layer should be resistant to or protected against erosion. In this review we will also describe a novel kind of membranes, the pore-filled type membranes prepared by Pacheco Tanaka and coworkers that represent a possible solution to integrate thin selective membranes into membrane reactors while protecting the selective layer. This work is focused on recent advances on metallic supports, materials used as an intermetallic diffusion layer when metallic supports are used and the most recent advances on Pd-based composite membranes. Particular attention is paid to improvements on sulfur resistance of Pd based membranes, resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and stability at high temperature.

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies as Probes for Unique Antigens in Secretory Cells of Mixed Exocrine Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basbaum, C. B.; Mann, J. K.; Chow, A. W.; Finkbeiner, W. E.

    1984-07-01

    In the past, it has been difficult to identify the secretory product and control mechanisms associated with individual cell types making up mixed exocrine organs. This report establishes the feasibility of using immunological methods to characterize both the biochemical constituents and regulatory mechanisms associated with secretory cells in the trachea. Monoclonal antibodies directed against components of tracheal mucus were produced by immunizing mice with dialyzed, desiccated secretions harvested from tracheal organ culture. An immunofluorescence assay revealed that of the total 337 hybridomas screened, 100 produced antibodies recognizing goblet cell granules; 64, gland cell granules; and 3, antigen confined to the ciliated apical surface of the epithelium. The tracheal goblet cell antibody described in this report was strongly cross-reactive with intestinal goblet cells, as well as with a subpopulation of submandibular gland cells, but not with cells of Brunner's glands or the ciliated cell apical membrane. The serous cell antibody was not cross-reactive with goblet, Brunner's gland, or submandibular cells, or the ciliated cell apical membrane. The antibody directed against the apical membrane of ciliated cells did not cross-react with gland or goblet cells or the apical membrane of epithelial cells in the duodenum. Monoclonal antibodies, therefore, represent probes by which products unique to specific cells or parts of cells in the trachea can be distinguished. The antibodies, when used in enzyme immunoassays, can be used to quantitatively monitor secretion by individual cell types under a variety of physiological and pathological conditions. They also provide the means for purification and characterization of cell-specific products by immunoaffinity chromatography.

  11. Coating nanoparticles with cell membranes for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery allows drug molecules to preferentially accumulate at the sites of action and thus holds great promise to improve therapeutic index. Among various drug-targeting approaches, nanoparticle-based delivery systems offer some unique strengths and have achieved exciting preclinical and clinical results. Herein, we aim to provide a review on the recent development of cell membrane-coated nanoparticle system, a new class of biomimetic nanoparticles that combine both the functionalities of cellular membranes and the engineering flexibility of synthetic nanomaterials for effective drug delivery and novel therapeutics. This review is particularly focused on novel designs of cell membrane-coated nanoparticles as well as their underlying principles that facilitate the purpose of drug targeting. Three specific areas are highlighted, including: (i) cell membrane coating to prolong nanoparticle circulation, (ii) cell membrane coating to achieve cell-specific targeting and (iii) cell membrane coating for immune system targeting. Overall, cell membrane-coated nanoparticles have emerged as a novel class of targeted nanotherapeutics with strong potentials to improve on drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy for treatment of various diseases.

  12. Fabrication of thermo-responsive microfluidic membrane using photopolymerization patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyejeong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-11-01

    The programmed manipulation of responsive functional hydrogels is receiving large attention because of its unique functions and wide range of engineering applications. In this study, we developed an innovative stomata-inspired membrane (SIM) by fabricating a temperature-responsive hydrogel with a simple, cost effective, and high-throughput photopolymerization patterning process. Polymerization-induced diffusion on the macro-scale surface gives rise to form a multi-parted polymer membrane with fine pores by simple UV irradiation. After heating the SIM, the less deformable thick frame supports the whole structure, and the highly deformable thin base regulates the size of pores. The morphological configuration of the SIM can be easily changed by varying the solution composition or selecting a suitable photomask with different pattern. The developed SIM has the special sensing-to-actuation functions of stimuli-responsive hydrogels. This membrane with temperature-responsive pores would be potentially utilized in numerous practical applications, such as filter membranes with self-adjustable pores, membrane-based sensors, membrane-based actuators, and multi-functional membranes etc. This study was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) and funded by the Korean government (MSIP) (Grant No. 2008-0061991).

  13. Deashing of coal liquids with ceramic membrane microfiltration and diafiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, B.; Goldsmith, R. [CeraMem Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Removal of mineral matter from liquid hydrocarbons derived from the direct liquefaction of coal is required for product acceptability. Current methods include critical solvent deashing (Rose{sup {reg_sign}} process from Kerr-McGee) and filtration (U.S. Filter leaf filter as used by British Coal). These methods produce ash reject streams containing up to 15% of the liquid hydrocarbon product. Consequently, CeraMem proposed the use of low cost, ceramic crossflow membranes for the filtration of coal liquids bottoms to remove mineral matter and subsequent diafiltration (analogous to cake washing in dead-ended filtration) for the removal of coal liquid from the solids stream. The use of these ceramic crossflow membranes overcomes the limitations of traditional polymeric crossflow membranes by having the ability to operate at elevated temperature and to withstand prolonged exposure to hydrocarbon and solvent media. In addition, CeraMem`s membrane filters are significantly less expensive than competitive ceramic membranes due to their unique construction. With these ceramic membrane filters, it may be possible to reduce the product losses associated with traditional deashing processes at an economically attractive cost. The performance of these ceramic membrane microfilters is discussed.

  14. [Amniotic membrane in conjunctivoplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoila, O; Lacramioara, Totu; Mihu, D

    2012-01-01

    The basic principles of conjunctival reconstruction are similar in all pathologies that inflict conjunctival tissue loss. Large conjunctival defects are difficult to treat, with little conjunctival reserve that can be used to close the defect. The study had the objective to find alternatives to conjunctival autograft. Frozen amniotic membrane was investigated. From 27 cases, 22 cases were reconstructed using amniotic membrane alone, but in 5 cases conjunctival autograft was also needed. Bulbar conjunctiva was reconstructed in 23 cases, of which 19 with pterygium, 3 with conjunctival tumors, one operatory plague. Fornix reconstruction was carried out in 4 cases, one tumor and 3 symblepharons (2 after conjunctival burns and one pemfigus). The rate of pterygium recurrence was 7,14%. Amniotic membrane can heal large defects of the conjunctiva, either bulbar or forniceal.

  15. Impact on floating membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Vandenberghe, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    When impacted by a rigid object, a thin elastic membrane with negligible bending rigidity floating on a liquid pool deforms. Two axisymmetric waves radiating from the impact point propagate. In the first place, a longitudinal wave front -- associated with in-plane deformation of the membrane and traveling at constant speed -- separates an outward stress free domain with a stretched but flat domain. Then, in the stretched domain a dispersive transverse wave travels at a wave speed that depends on the local stretching rate. We study the dynamics of this fluid-body system and we show that the wave dynamics is similar to the capillary waves that propagate at a liquid-gas interface but with a surface tension coefficient that depends on impact speed. We emphasize the role of the stretching in the membrane in the wave dynamics but also in the development of a buckling instability that give rise to radial wrinkles.

  16. Highly Selective H2 Separation Zeolite Membranes for Coal Gasification Membrane Reactor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei Hong; Richard D. Noble; John L. Falconer

    2006-09-24

    Zeolite membranes are thermally, chemically, and mechanically stable. They also have tunable molecular sieving and catalytic ability. These unique properties make zeolite membrane an excellent candidate for use in catalytic membrane reactor applications related to coal conversion and gasification, which need high temperature and high pressure range separation in chemically challenging environment where existing technologies are inefficient or unable to operate. Small pore, good quality, and thin zeolite membranes are needed for highly selective H{sub 2} separation from other light gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO). However, zeolite membranes have not been successful for H{sub 2} separation from light gases because the zeolite pores are either too big or the membranes have a large number of defects. The objective of this study is to develop zeolite membranes that are more suitable for H{sub 2} separation. In an effort to tune the size of zeolite pores and/or to decrease the number of defects, medium-pore zeolite B-ZSM-5 (MFI) membranes were synthesized and silylated. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 crystals reduced MFI-zeolite pore volume, but had little effect on CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 membranes increased H{sub 2} selectivity both in single component and in mixtures with CO{sub 2}CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, or N2. Single gas and binary mixtures of H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} were separated through silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes at feed pressures up to 1.7 MPa and temperatures up to 773 K. For one BZSM-5 membrane after silylation, the H2/CO{sub 2} separation selectivity at 473 K increased from 1.4 to 37, whereas the H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation selectivity increased from 1.6 to 33. Hydrogen permeance through a silylated B-ZSM-5 membrane was activated, but the CO{sub 2} and CH4 permeances decreased slightly with temperature in both single gas and in mixtures. Therefore, the H{sub 2} permeance and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and H{sup 2} /CH{sub 4

  17. Effect of membrane curvature on lateral distribution of membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Several membrane proteins exhibit interesting shapes that increases their preference for certain membrane curvatures. Both peripheral and transmembrane proteins are tested with respect to their affinity for a spectrum of high membrane curvatures. We generate high membrane curvatures by pulling...... membrane tubes out of Giant Unilamellar lipid Vesicles (GUVs). The tube diameter can be tuned by aspirating the GUV into a micropipette for controlling the membrane tension. By using fluorescently labled proteins we have shown that sorting of proteins like e.g. FBAR onto tubes is significantly increased...

  18. Membrane accessibility of glutathione

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Alvaro; Eljack, Nasma D; Sani, Marc-Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of the ion pumping activity of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase is crucial to the survival of animal cells. Recent evidence has suggested that the activity of the enzyme could be controlled by glutathionylation of cysteine residue 45 of the β-subunit. Crystal structures so far available indicate...... that this cysteine is in a transmembrane domain of the protein. Here we have analysed via fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy as well as molecular dynamics simulations whether glutathione is able to penetrate into the interior of a lipid membrane. No evidence for any penetration of glutathione into the membrane...

  19. Reference: 757 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of prothylakoids and transition into mature thylakoid stacks. The AtTerC gene encodes an integral membrane ...nt chloroplasts lacked thylakoids, did not have grana stacks, and showed numerous globular structures of var

  20. Membrane adsorber for endotoxin removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Moita de Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The surface of flat-sheet nylon membranes was modified using bisoxirane as the spacer and polyvinyl alcohol as the coating polymer. The amino acid histidine was explored as a ligand for endotoxins, aiming at its application for endotoxin removal from aqueous solutions. Characterization of the membrane adsorber, analysis of the depyrogenation procedures and the evaluation of endotoxin removal efficiency in static mode are discussed. Ligand density of the membranes was around 7 mg/g dry membrane, allowing removal of up to 65% of the endotoxins. The performance of the membrane adsorber prepared using nylon coated with polyvinyl alcohol and containing histidine as the ligand proved superior to other membrane adsorbers reported in the literature. The lack of endotoxin adsorption on nylon membranes without histidine confirmed that endotoxin removal was due to the presence of the ligand at the membrane surface. Modified membranes were highly stable, exhibiting a lifespan of approximately thirty months.