WorldWideScience

Sample records for unique teaching tools

  1. Teaching Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punske, Lori, Comp.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews teaching materials for use in multicultural education. Materials described include posters, novels, picture books, toys, games, and curriculum packages. Topics include religious diversity, values, children's stories, bilingual literature, human rights, Native Americans, women's studies, multicultural art, immigrant students, gender equity,…

  2. Contingency diagrams as teaching tools

    OpenAIRE

    Mattaini, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Contingency diagrams are particularly effective teaching tools, because they provide a means for students to view the complexities of contingency networks present in natural and laboratory settings while displaying the elementary processes that constitute those networks. This paper sketches recent developments in this visualization technology and illustrates approaches for using contingency diagrams in teaching.

  3. Teaching Syllogistics Using E-learning Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Peter; Sandborg-Petersen, Ulrik; Thorvaldsen, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a study of various strategies for teaching syllogistics as part of a course in basic logic. It is a continuation of earlier studies involving practical experiments with students of Communication using the Syllog system, which makes it possible to develop e-learning tools and to do l...... involving different teaching methods will be compared.......This paper is a study of various strategies for teaching syllogistics as part of a course in basic logic. It is a continuation of earlier studies involving practical experiments with students of Communication using the Syllog system, which makes it possible to develop e-learning tools and to do...... learning analytics based on log-data. The aim of the present paper is to investigate whether the Syllog e-learning tools can be helpful in logic teaching in order to obtain a better understanding of logic and argumentation in general and syllogisms in particular. Four versions of a course in basic logic...

  4. Visualization Tools for Teaching Computer Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaohong; Vega, Percy; Qadah, Yaseen; Archer, Ricky; Yu, Huiming; Xu, Jinsheng

    2010-01-01

    Using animated visualization tools has been an important teaching approach in computer science education. We have developed three visualization and animation tools that demonstrate various information security concepts and actively engage learners. The information security concepts illustrated include: packet sniffer and related computer network…

  5. Rare Books As Teaching Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gino, M. C.; Wise, G.

    2003-05-01

    The use of historic science illustrations in the classroom offers unique opportunities to meet the National Science Standard that "students should develop understanding of science as a human endeavor, of the nature of scientific knowledge, and of historical perspectives" (Content Standard G, Science Education Standards, 1996, National Academy Press, Washington, DC). The Dudley Observatory has launched an effort to use its outstanding collection of rare astronomy books to meet this challenge. The example featured here is the illustration "Systema Solare et Planetarium" from the book Atlas novus coelestis (1742) by Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr (1671-1750). This illustration is significant in the evolution of astronomy because it is one of the first popular depictions of the solar system picturing the planets in their accurate relative sizes and providing numerical estimates of planetary and solar dimensions and distances. Perhaps at least as important, from the educational viewpoint, it is visually appealing, culturally intriguing and filled with puzzling items that might serve as the basis for inquiry-based learning. For example, why is the page sprinkled with what appear to be appeals to theology ("Ex His Creatorem") and expressions of wonder or even horror ("perceptum horridem")? Why does its map of the world depict California as an island? A structure for using this and other historic illustrations in the classroom might be based on the following general questions: What is the purpose of the illustration? What is included that a modern scientist might leave out, or left out that a modern scientist might include? How accurate are the quantitative results presented? How does the conceptual treatment resemble and differ from modern treatments? Viewing the heavens as an 18th century astronomer wanted his public to see them is an excellent approach to achieving the humanistic and historical perspective that the educational standard seeks.

  6. An easy teaching tool for holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslion, T; Escarguel, A

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of scientific outreach at the Maison des Sciences of Aix-Marseilles University, we created a teaching kit for holography that can be packed into a small case. It includes all the equipment required to produce holograms almost anywhere and has a simple optical assembly and very good vibration tolerance. The fundamental principles of holography and several applications are illustrated through simple experiments: reflection Denisyuk holograms, angular multiplexing, notch filters, holographic interferometry and diffraction holographic gratings. It is possible to use this tool for several purposes: science outreach, teaching for undergraduate and graduate students and continuing education. In this paper, we explain the basis of holography, how the kit works and indicate some applications and results that can be performed and obtained with it. (paper)

  7. Some Unique Characteristics of Television and Some Implications for Teaching and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, A. W.

    1981-01-01

    Argues that television has unique educational characteristics that separate it from other media and have implications for teaching and learning. Discussion of distributional and social, control, and symbolic (audiovisual) characteristics is based on published surveys and on research carried out at the Open University. Thirteen references are…

  8. Art: ally or tool in science teaching?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Cesar Ferreira

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We know that art and science have influenced one another over the centuries. As an example, in the nineteenth century, the poets of the Romantic movement portrayed in some of their most beautiful poems the anguish they felt facing the development of thermodynamics and the possibility of heat death of the universe. In recent years different methodological possibilities have been put in evidence in science education: experimenting with low cost materials, history of science, virtual environments, among others. We believe that the art in this process has played an important role, but still marginal, because, as well as science, it also produces knowledge about reality. However, their potential is perceived more as a tool for teaching rather than as an active participant in building relationships and about the nature of humankind.

  9. Linguistics deviation, a tool for teaching English grammar: evidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We have always advocated that those teaching the Use of English must seek out novel ways of teaching the grammar of English to take out the drudgery of the present approach. Here, we proposed using Linguistic deviation as a tool for teaching English grammar. This approach will produce students who are both strong in ...

  10. Solar-System Bodies as Teaching Tools in Fundamental Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genus, Amelia; Overduin, James

    2018-01-01

    We show how asteroids can be used as teaching tools in fundamental physics. Current gravitational theory assumes that all bodies fall with the same acceleration in the same gravitational field. But this assumption, known as the Equivalence Principle, is violated to some degree in nearly all theories that attempt to unify gravitation with the other fundamental forces of nature. In such theories, bodies with different compositions can fall at different rates, producing small non-Keplerian distortions in their orbits. We focus on the unique all-metal asteroid 16 Psyche as a test case. Using Kepler’s laws of planetary motion together with recent observational data on the orbital motions of Psyche and its neighbors, students are able to derive new constraints on current theories in fundamental physics. These constraints take on particular interest since NASA has just announced plans to visit Psyche in 2026.

  11. Making Research Fly in Schools: "Drosophila" as a Powerful Modern Tool for Teaching Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbottle, Jennifer; Strangward, Patrick; Alnuamaani, Catherine; Lawes, Surita; Patel, Sanjai; Prokop, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The "droso4schools" project aims to introduce the fruit fly "Drosophila" as a powerful modern teaching tool to convey curriculum-relevant specifications in biology lessons. Flies are easy and cheap to breed and have been at the forefront of biology research for a century, providing unique conceptual understanding of biology and…

  12. The neXtProt peptide uniqueness checker: a tool for the proteomics community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Mathieu; Gateau, Alain; Teixeira, Daniel; Michel, Pierre-André; Zahn-Zabal, Monique; Lane, Lydie

    2017-11-01

    The neXtProt peptide uniqueness checker allows scientists to define which peptides can be used to validate the existence of human proteins, i.e. map uniquely versus multiply to human protein sequences taking into account isobaric substitutions, alternative splicing and single amino acid variants. The pepx program is available at https://github.com/calipho-sib/pepx and can be launched from the command line or through a cgi web interface. Indexing requires a sequence file in FASTA format. The peptide uniqueness checker tool is freely available on the web at https://www.nextprot.org/tools/peptide-uniqueness-checker and from the neXtProt API at https://api.nextprot.org/. lydie.lane@sib.swiss. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. The teaching portfolio as a professional development tool for anaesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, N S

    2015-05-01

    A teaching portfolio (TP) is a document containing a factual description of a teacher's teaching strengths and accomplishments, allowing clinicians to display them for examination by others. The primary aim of a TP is to improve quality of teaching by providing a structure for self-reflection, which in turn aids professional development in medical education. Contents typically include a personal statement on teaching, an overview of teaching accomplishments and activities, feedback from colleagues and learners, a reflective component and some examples of teaching material. Electronic portfolios are more portable and flexible compared to paper portfolios. Clinicians gain the most benefit from a TP when it is used as a tool for self-reflection of their teaching practice and not merely as a list of activities and achievements. This article explains why and how anaesthetists might use a TP as a tool for professional development in medical education.

  14. Online Communication Tools in Biochemistry Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ferreira

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The  online  communication  tools  enable  new  ways  of  learning, especially  the  forums  in the context of online courses, and the understanding of interactions and collaborations in the  forums  can  improve  them.  The  study  aimed  to  analyze  the  online relationships,  as well  as  obtaining  evidence  of  the  use of  other  learning  tools in  a  biochemistry  subject, focusing on how students use the tool forum and its contribution to learning. The study was  carried  out  from  data  pre  and  post  course  questionnaires  as  well  as  log  of environment  access  and  discussion  forum.  The  forums  have  been  restructured  and systematized  for  analysis  and  creating  discursive  flows  between  statements.  The questionnaires showed the central role of forum and wiki for learning,  the importance of interactions, which was highlighted by the forum analysis. The results indicate that one of the ways to improve online biochemistry teaching is to stimulate interactive activities, participatory  moderation  and  pedagogical  support  by  tutors  and  mentors,  also encouraging  and  creating  strategies  to  collaboration  of  students  to  solve problems  and to collaborative knowledge construction.

  15. Sharpening a Tool for Teaching: The Zone of Proximal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wass, Rob; Golding, Clinton

    2014-01-01

    Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) provides an important understanding of learning, but its implications for teachers are often unclear or limited and could be further explored. We use conceptual analysis to sharpen the ZPD as a teaching tool, illustrated with examples from teaching critical thinking in zoology. Our conclusions are…

  16. Choosing Technology Tools to Meet Pronunciation Teaching and Learning Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Marla Tritch

    2018-01-01

    For decades, researchers and teachers have suggested ways to apply technology in teaching and learning pronunciation, and there are many useful tools that can be used for this purpose. However, many teachers feel unsure about how to teach pronunciation at all, and the idea of using computers, mobile devices, or other technology may make…

  17. Blended learning tools for teaching and training

    CERN Document Server

    Allan, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Offers a holistic blended learning approach, combining the best of traditional approaches to learning and teaching to make best use of the advantages of each while minimizing the disadvantages. It provides information professionals with a practical guide to the design and delivery of such training programmes.

  18. Clinical reasoning in nursing: teaching strategies and assessment tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emília Campos de Carvalho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To present the concept and development of teaching strategies and the assessment tools regarding clinical reasoning for accurate practice. Method: This is a theoretical reflection based on scientific studies. Results: Comprehension of the essential concepts of the thought process and its articulation with the different teaching strategies and the assessment tools which has allowed presenting ways to improve the process of diagnostic or therapeutic clinical reasoning. Conclusion: The use of new strategies and assessment tools should be encouraged in order to contribute to the development of skills that lead to safe and effective decision making.

  19. The production of audiovisual teaching tools in minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolerton, Sarah K; Hugh, Thomas J; Cosman, Peter H

    2012-01-01

    Audiovisual learning resources have become valuable adjuncts to formal teaching in surgical training. This report discusses the process and challenges of preparing an audiovisual teaching tool for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The relative value in surgical education and training, for both the creator and viewer are addressed. This audiovisual teaching resource was prepared as part of the Master of Surgery program at the University of Sydney, Australia. The different methods of video production used to create operative teaching tools are discussed. Collating and editing material for an audiovisual teaching resource can be a time-consuming and technically challenging process. However, quality learning resources can now be produced even with limited prior video editing experience. With minimal cost and suitable guidance to ensure clinically relevant content, most surgeons should be able to produce short, high-quality education videos of both open and minimally invasive surgery. Despite the challenges faced during production of audiovisual teaching tools, these resources are now relatively easy to produce using readily available software. These resources are particularly attractive to surgical trainees when real time operative footage is used. They serve as valuable adjuncts to formal teaching, particularly in the setting of minimally invasive surgery. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bedside teaching-making it an effective instructional tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ishtiaq Ali

    2014-01-01

    Bedside teaching is defined as any teaching in the presence of patient and is the core teaching strategy during the clinical years of a medical student. Although it is considered the most effective method to teach clinical and communication skills but its quality is deteriorating with the passage of time. The objective of this study is to explore faculty's perceptions about bedside teaching. This study was conducted in clinical disciplines of Ayub Medical College and hospital Abbottabad, Pakistan from January 2012 to July 2012. Pragmatic paradigm was selected to gather both quantitative and qualitative information. Data was collected sequentially to validate findings. Perceptions of all professors of clinical subjects about bed side teaching were recorded on a close-ended structured questionnaire. Then in-depth interviews were taken from 5 professors using an open ended questionnaire. Quantitative data was analysed using, SPSS-16. Qualitative research data was analysed through content analysis. Out of 20 professors of clinical departments 18 agreed to respond to the questionnaire assessing their perceptions about bed side teaching. Non-existence of bedside teaching curriculum, lack of discipline in students and faculty, lack of accountability, poor job satisfaction and low salary were identified as major factors responsible for decline in quality of bedside teaching. Most of them advocated that curriculum development, planning bedside teaching, implementation of discipline and accountability, improved job satisfaction and performance based promotions will improve quality of clinical teaching. Curriculum development for bedside teaching, institutional discipline, application of best planning strategies, performance based appraisal of faculty and good job satisfaction can make bedside teaching an effective instructional tool.

  1. Assembling a Case Study Tool Kit: 10 Tools for Teaching with Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme-Généreux, Annie

    2017-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. The author shares the strategies and tools that teachers can use to manage a case study classroom effectively.

  2. Material Teaching Aids: Enhancement Tool for Teaching Essay Writing in Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidelia, Okonkwo Adaobi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of material teaching aids as enhancement tool for teaching essay writing in secondary schools in Ebonyi State. A 4-point Likert-scale questionnaire was used as the instrument. A trial test was conducted and tested for reliability and a value of 0.75 was obtained from the test. The instrument was…

  3. Tips and Tools for Teaching Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, N. M.

    2011-10-01

    The poster will describe handson exercises with demonstrations, clicker questions and discussion to demonstrate how to help students understand planets on a deeper conceptual level. We'll also discuss ways to take the latest discoveries beyond "wow" and turn them into teachable moments. The goal is to give modern strategies for teaching planetary science, emphasizing physical concepts and comparative principles. All will be given digital copies of video clips, demonstration descriptions, clicker questions, web links and powerpoint slidesets on recent planetary science discoveries.

  4. The Crossword Puzzle as a Teaching Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossman, Edward K.

    1983-01-01

    In courses such as the history of psychology, it is necessary to learn a variety of relationships, events, and sequences, in addition to the task of having to pair certain key concepts with related names, e.g., phrenology--Hall. One tool useful in this type of learning is the crossword puzzle. (RM)

  5. AUGMENTED REALITY AS A TEACHING TOOL IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashko Rizov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development of the technology has influenced its inevitable entrance in the learning processes. Teachers are often challenged to use the appropriate educational technology in the process of teaching in order to ease the learning process of students. Introducing new technology in the teaching process should utilize the new technology in any possible way in order to assist the teacher in transferring the knowledge and assist the students in grasping that knowledge. This paper should emphasize the benefits of using augmented reality in higher education, by measuring outcomes of the students which used augmented reality as a teaching tool in the courses. Results from the survey imply that students show significantly improved results in increasing the interest, understanding and interiorizing the learning material. University teachers found that using augmented reality is significantly improving the learning process of students and their teaching process in a pedagogical and technical sense. 

  6. Unit testing as a teaching tool in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peláez Canek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unit testing in the programming world has had a profound impact in the way modern complex systems are developed. Many Open Source and Free Software projects encourage (and in some cases, mandate the use of unit tests for new code submissions, and many software companies around the world have incorporated unit testing as part of their standard developing practices. And although not all software engineers use them, very few (if at all object their use. However, there is almost no research available pertaining the use of unit tests as a teaching tool in introductory programming courses. I have been teaching introductory programming courses in the Computer Sciences program at the Sciences Faculty in the National Autonomous University of Mexico for almost ten years, and since 2013 I have been using unit testing as a teaching tool in those courses. The intent of this paper is to discuss the results of this experience.

  7. A Digital Tool Supporting Goal-Oriented Teaching in Classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten; Bundsgaard, Jeppe; Slot, Marie Falkesgaard

    2015-01-01

    and objectives for their teaching; these form a challenge and a basis for developing a digital tool for mediating between curriculum and pedagogical practice. The motivation for revising the national curriculum and developing digital tools that support teaching is partly based on evidence that the previous...... national curriculum was not used to any particular extent by teachers (Danish Evaluation Institute 2012). Hence, the curriculum has been rebuilt based on recent trends in school development and curriculum research suggesting the importance of a competence framework, learning goals, and the aggregation...... of classroom data for efficient teaching (Earl and Fullan 2003). Learning goals are supposed to support the students’ pace and sense of progression, inform classroom decisions, structure teachers’ planning, and support the dialogue between teachers, students, and parents (Hattie 2009). Based on these concerns...

  8. History of optics: a modern teaching tool

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez Moliní, Daniel; González Cano, Agustín; Díaz Herrera, Natalia; Llombart, N.; Alda, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The history of optics is a very rich field of science and it is possible to find many simple and significant examples of the application and success of the experimental method and therefore is a very good tool to transmit to the student the way science proceeds and to introduce the right spirit of critical analysis, building and testing of models, etc. Optical phenomena are specially well suited for this because in fact optical observations and experiments have made science advance in a cruci...

  9. Kite Aerial Photography (KAP) as a Tool for Field Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Kite aerial photography (KAP) is proposed as a creative tool for geography field teaching and as a medium to approach the complexity of readily available geodata. The method can be integrated as field experiment, surveying technique or group activity. The acquired aerial images can instantaneously be integrated in geographic information systems…

  10. Use of Software Tools in Teaching Relational Database Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, D. R.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of state-of-the-art software tools in teaching a graduate, advanced, relational database design course. Results indicated a positive student response to the prototype of expert systems software and a willingness to utilize this new technology both in their studies and in future work applications. (JKP)

  11. Bildung as a Powerful Tool in Modern University Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Mogens Noergaard

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we will demonstrate how powerful "Bildung" is as a tool in modern university teaching. The concept of "Bildung" was originally introduced by the German philosopher Immanuel Kant (Kant 1787, 1798, 1804) and the Prussian lawyer and politician Wilhelm von Humboldt (Humboldt 1792, Bohlin 2008). From 1810…

  12. Simulation Tools for Electrical Machines Modelling: Teaching and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Simulation tools are used both for research and teaching to allow a good comprehension of the systems under study before practical implementations. This paper illustrates the way MATLAB is used to model non-linearites in synchronous machine. The machine is modeled in rotor reference frame with currents as state ...

  13. The Natural Area: Teaching Tool and Community Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Roger M.; Grimm, Floyd M., III

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the properties desirable in a natural area to be used as a teaching tool in college courses such as general biology, botany, zoology, entomology, and ecology. Describes the use of a natural area at Harford Community College, Maryland, and outlines the community involvement in planning and utilizing the area. (JR)

  14. Analysis of Online Quizzes as a Teaching and Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Morera, Lorenzo; Arauzo-Azofra, Antonio; García-Hernández, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with the integrated use of online quizzes as a teaching and assessment tool in the general program of the subject Proyectos in the third course of Ingeniero Técnico en Informática de Gestión over five consecutive years. The research undertaken aimed to test quizzes effectiveness on student performance when used, not only as an…

  15. Content Maps: A Teaching and Assessment Tool for Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Phillip; Lehwald, Harry; Lee, Yun Soo

    2015-01-01

    Developing content knowledge in teachers presents a constant challenge for teacher educators. This article introduces a teaching and assessment tool called a "content map," which allows teacher educators, teachers, and coaches to conceptualize the scope, sequence, and relational characteristics of the content being taught. Content maps…

  16. Have Economic Educators Embraced Social Media as a Teaching Tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bahrani, Abdullah; Patel, Darshak; Sheridan, Brandon J.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the results of a study of the perceptions of a national sample of economics faculty members from various institutions regarding the use of social media as a teaching tool in and out of the economics classroom. In the past few years, social media has become globally popular, and its use is ubiquitous among…

  17. Web 2.0 Tools for Supporting Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Angelos; Theodostadou, Dimitra; Pappos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools provide enormous opportunities for teaching and learning, yet their application in education is still underdeveloped. What is more, it is no longer possible for teachers to ignore such a technological advance, while they are expected to provide students with opportunities to take control of their learning. However, teachers are still…

  18. Heuristic Diagrams as a Tool to Teach History of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamizo, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    The graphic organizer called here heuristic diagram as an improvement of Gowin's Vee heuristic is proposed as a tool to teach history of science. Heuristic diagrams have the purpose of helping students (or teachers, or researchers) to understand their own research considering that asks and problem-solving are central to scientific activity. The…

  19. Peer Observation of Teaching: A Practical Tool in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jeffrey A.

    2018-01-01

    There are limited viewpoints in the literature about peer observation of teaching in higher education and how it can be an effective tool to improve the quality of instruction in the classroom (Bell, 2001; Bell, 2005; Bell & Mladenovic, 2008; Brancato, 2003; Chism, 2007; Huston & Weaver, 2008; Shortland, 2004; Shortland, 2010; Smith,…

  20. Kite aerial photography (KAP) as a tool for field teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Kite aerial photography (KAP) is proposed as a creative tool for geography field teaching and as a medium to approach the complexity of readily available geodata. The method can be integrated as field experiment, surveying technique or group activity. The acquired aerial images can instantaneousl...... a new vantage point to the fieldwork experience....

  1. Tools for Teaching the "Digital Natives"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pals Svendsen, Lisbet; Mondahl, Margrethe

    2011-01-01

    University educators and researchers face new generations of “digitally native” students, who approach academic disciplines in novel ways, thus creating a changed university-learning environment that demands new ways of building knowledge in a bottom-up process. A case in point is the area...... that support social, collaborative processes that are fun, motivating and better support learning. The article therefore discusses collaborative and individualized learning processes and how social software platforms may better harness collective and personal knowledge in order to enhance learning outcome...... of corporate communication where we need new methods of approaching adult cultural/communicative learning since these integrated competences are much asked for in the business community. One way of approaching university pedagogy within these fields is asking whether social software could provide better tools...

  2. Tools for Teaching the Digital Natives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbet Pals Svendsen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available University educators and researchers face new generations of “digitally native” students, who approach academic disciplines in novel ways, thus creating a changed university-learning environment that demands new ways of building knowledge in a bottom-up process. A case in point is the area of corporate communication where we need new methods of approaching adult cultural/communicative learning since these integrated competences are much asked for in the business community. One way of approaching university pedagogy within these fields is asking whether social software could provide better tools that support social, collaborative processes that are fun, motivating and better support learning. The article therefore discusses collaborative and individualized learning processes and how social software platforms may better harness collective and personal knowledge in order to enhance learning outcome. The theoretical foundations of the article have been established at the crossroads between general learning theory, cultural/communicative learning theory and social media applications that facilitate collaborative, synchronous and interactive learning platforms. Data evaluation and comparisons in regard to learning outcomes are based on empirical data from two cases applying different learning platforms used in CBS programme courses involving culture and communication learning elements.

  3. Tools for Teaching the Digital Natives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbet Pals Svendsen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available University educators and researchers face new generations of “digitally native” students, who approach academic disciplines in novel ways, thus creating a changed university-learning environment that demands new ways of building knowledge in a bottom-up process. A case in point is the area of corporate communication where we need new methods of approaching adult cultural/communicative learning since these integrated competences are much asked for in the business community. One way of approaching university pedagogy within these fields is asking whether social software could provide better tools that support social, collaborative processes that are fun, motivating and better support learning. The article therefore discusses collaborative and individualized learning processes and how social software platforms may better harness collective and personal knowledge in order to enhance learning outcome. The theoretical foundations of the article have been established at the crossroads between general learning theory, cultural/communicative learning theory and social media applications that facilitate collaborative, synchronous and interactive learning platforms. Data evaluation and comparisons in regard to learning outcomes are based on empirical data from two cases applying different learning platforms used in CBS programme courses involving culture and communication learning elements.

  4. Teaching resources in speleology and karst: a valuable educational tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Waele Jo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing need in the speleological community of tools that make teaching of speleology and karst much easier. Despite the existence of a wide range of major academic textbooks, often the caver community has a difficult access to such material. Therefore, to fill this gap, the Italian Speleological Society, under the umbrella of the Union International de Spéléologie, has prepared a set of lectures, in a presentation format, on several topics including geology, physics, chemistry, hydrogeology, mineralogy, palaeontology, biology, microbiology, history, archaeology, artificial caves, documentation, etc. These lectures constitute the “Teaching Resources in Speleology and Karst”, available online. This educational tool, thanks to its easily manageable format, can constantly be updated and enriched with new contents and topics.

  5. INTERNET TOOLS IN EDUCATION AT DIFFERENT LEVELS OF TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Wójcicka-Migasiuk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern education opens up broad prospects for the use of the Internet and its applications. Global computer network helps us to cross all limits allowed for the development and transfer of knowledge and to stimulate and create personal skills. Time and distance are no longer an obstacle. Recently, it has also been popularized in the use of online tools for professional work and intellectual and to the education at all levels of education. In this way, teachers are able to adapt teaching tools to the students’ individual needs. Moreover, the aspects of graphical visualization can be more efficient and interesting for students from previously used resources. This paper presents various methods of the Internet in education, and in particular the use of software to solve advanced problems in the art, for example, to calculate transient states. These tools are not only used for training skills or to solve specific tasks but also to shape attitudes and social behavior.

  6. WEB 2.0 TOOLS FOR SUPPORTING TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelos KONSTANTINIDIS

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Web 2.0 tools provide enormous opportunities for teaching and learning, yet their application in education is still underdeveloped. What is more, it is no longer possible for teachers to ignore such a technological advance, while they are expected to provide students with opportunities to take control of their learning. However, teachers are still reluctant with technology integration. This paper introduces four Web 2.0 tools; Blogger, StripGenerator, Go!Animate, and Google Forms, that are free and easy to use, in an effort to motivate teachers with low technological skills in integrating them into their instruction practices. The aforementioned tools comprised the curriculum in a blended-learning professional development course for in-service teachers and attracted many favourable comments from the participants.

  7. An easy physics outreach and teaching tool for holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslion, T; Escarguel, A

    2013-01-01

    in the framework of scientific outreach at the 'Maison des Sciences' of the Aix-Marseilles University, we created a teaching kit for holography contained in a small case. It includes all the required equipment to produce holograms almost anywhere with a simple optical assembly with a very good vibration tolerance. The fundamental principles of holography and several applications are illustrated through simple experiments: reflection Denisyuk holograms, angular multiplexing, notch filters, holographic interferometry and diffraction holographic gratings. It is possible to use this tool for several purposes: science outreach, teaching for undergraduate and graduate students and continuing education. In this article, we explain the basis of holography, how the kit works, and give some applications and results that can be done with it.

  8. Uniqueness plots: A simple graphical tool for identifying poor peak fits in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Bhupinder; Diwan, Anubhav; Jain, Varun; Herrera-Gomez, Alberto; Terry, Jeff; Linford, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Uniqueness plots are introduced as a new tool for identifying poor XPS peak fits. • Uniqueness plots are demonstrated on real XPS data sets. • A horizontal line in a uniqueness plot indicates a poor fit, i.e., fit parameter correlation. • A parabolic shape in a uniqueness plot indicates that a fit may be appropriate. - Abstract: Peak fitting is an essential part of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) narrow scan analysis, and the Literature contains both good and bad examples of peak fitting. A common cause of poor peak fitting is the inclusion of too many fit parameters, often without a sound chemical and/or physical basis for them, and/or the failure to reasonably constrain them. Under these conditions, fit parameters are often correlated, and therefore lacking in statistical meaning. Here we introduce the uniqueness plot as a simple graphical tool for identifying bad peak fits in XPS, i.e., fit parameter correlation. These plots are widely used in spectroscopic ellipsometry. We illustrate uniqueness plots with two data sets: a C 1s narrow scan from ozone-treated carbon nanotube forests and an Si 2p narrow scan from an air-oxidized silicon wafer. For each fit, we consider different numbers of parameters and constraints on them. As expected, the uniqueness plots are parabolic when fewer fit parameters and/or more constraints are applied. However, they fan out and eventually become horizontal lines as more unconstrained parameters are included in the fits. Uniqueness plots are generated by plotting the chi squared (χ 2 ) value for a fit vs. a systematically varied value of a parameter in the fit. The Abbe criterion is also considered as a figure of merit for uniqueness plots in the Supporting Information. We recommend that uniqueness plots be used by XPS practitioners for identifying inappropriate peak fits.

  9. Uniqueness plots: A simple graphical tool for identifying poor peak fits in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Bhupinder; Diwan, Anubhav; Jain, Varun [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 84606 (United States); Herrera-Gomez, Alberto [CINVESTAV-Unidad Queretaro, Queretaro, 76230 (Mexico); Terry, Jeff [Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL, 60616 (United States); Linford, Matthew R., E-mail: mrlinford@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 84606 (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Uniqueness plots are introduced as a new tool for identifying poor XPS peak fits. • Uniqueness plots are demonstrated on real XPS data sets. • A horizontal line in a uniqueness plot indicates a poor fit, i.e., fit parameter correlation. • A parabolic shape in a uniqueness plot indicates that a fit may be appropriate. - Abstract: Peak fitting is an essential part of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) narrow scan analysis, and the Literature contains both good and bad examples of peak fitting. A common cause of poor peak fitting is the inclusion of too many fit parameters, often without a sound chemical and/or physical basis for them, and/or the failure to reasonably constrain them. Under these conditions, fit parameters are often correlated, and therefore lacking in statistical meaning. Here we introduce the uniqueness plot as a simple graphical tool for identifying bad peak fits in XPS, i.e., fit parameter correlation. These plots are widely used in spectroscopic ellipsometry. We illustrate uniqueness plots with two data sets: a C 1s narrow scan from ozone-treated carbon nanotube forests and an Si 2p narrow scan from an air-oxidized silicon wafer. For each fit, we consider different numbers of parameters and constraints on them. As expected, the uniqueness plots are parabolic when fewer fit parameters and/or more constraints are applied. However, they fan out and eventually become horizontal lines as more unconstrained parameters are included in the fits. Uniqueness plots are generated by plotting the chi squared (χ{sup 2}) value for a fit vs. a systematically varied value of a parameter in the fit. The Abbe criterion is also considered as a figure of merit for uniqueness plots in the Supporting Information. We recommend that uniqueness plots be used by XPS practitioners for identifying inappropriate peak fits.

  10. Pilot testing of a burn prevention teaching tool for Amish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieman, Mary T; Kagan, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Burn prevention education for Amish children is warranted as there are unique risks associated with the Amish lifestyle. Specific educational opportunities are related to scalds, ignition of clothing, and ignition of highly flammable materials. A culturally sensitive burn prevention teaching tool, consisting of a magnetic storyboard, burn safety curriculum, and tests, was developed with the cooperation of one Old Order Amish community. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of the tool in an Amish school. The teacher obtained parental permission and informed assent for the participation of the children. Pretesting was completed before the lessons began. The teacher told stories and arranged the magnets on the storyboard to show burn hazards involving lighters, stoves, kerosene heaters, gasoline-powered engines, and hot liquids used for canning, butchering, mopping, washing clothes, and making lye soap. The children were challenged to rearrange the pieces for a safer situation. Posttesting was performed 2 months after the pretest. Twenty-seven students (grades 1-8) participated. Tests were scored as a percentage of the 33 items answered correctly. The mean pretest score was 62 and the mean posttest score was 83. Statistical analysis using paired t-test demonstrated a highly significant improvement in test scores (P < .0001), with a power of more than 99%. This pilot study demonstrated that the burn prevention teaching tool was effective for improving knowledge in one classroom of Amish children. These results support expanded use and testing of this tool in other Amish schools.

  11. Building a Society of Solidarity through Critical Pedagogy: Group Teaching as a Social and Democratic Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakaki, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Against the menacing shadow of neoliberalism, which promotes individualism and competition, the author illustrates in this paper the need for group teaching. Group teaching as a method of instruction and learning fosters community bonds, solidarity, and is more effective teaching. Group teaching is a democratic tool necessary for society to…

  12. The hologram and its utilization as a physics teaching tool for physics teaching in engineering courses

    OpenAIRE

    Toledo, Rolando Serra; Cruz, Gilda Vega; Zaldo, Angel Ferrat; Lunazzi, José J.; Magalhães, Daniel S.F.

    2009-01-01

    With the emergence and development of the white-light holograms, new possibilities were created for its utilization as a teaching tool due to the characteristic of producing a three-dimensional image which constitutes an optical duplicate of the object. In this work the distinctive aspects of the hologram are described and its utilization is analyzed in engineering courses, through the design and construction of a Didactic Exhibition of Holography. Con el surgimiento de los hologramas reco...

  13. Immersive virtual reality as a teaching tool for neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepan, Katelyn; Zeiger, Joshua; Hanchuk, Stephanie; Del Signore, Anthony; Shrivastava, Raj; Govindaraj, Satish; Iloreta, Alfred

    2017-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer modeling and interactive virtual reality (VR) simulation are validated teaching techniques used throughout medical disciplines. Little objective data exists supporting its use in teaching clinical anatomy. Learner motivation is thought to limit the rate of utilization of such novel technologies. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness, satisfaction, and motivation associated with immersive VR simulation in teaching medical students neuroanatomy. Images of normal cerebral anatomy were reconstructed from human Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) computed tomography (CT) imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) into 3D VR formats compatible with the Oculus Rift VR System, a head-mounted display with tracking capabilities allowing for an immersive VR experience. The ventricular system and cerebral vasculature were highlighted and labeled to create a focused interactive model. We conducted a randomized controlled study with 66 medical students (33 in both the control and experimental groups). Pertinent neuroanatomical structures were studied using either online textbooks or the VR interactive model, respectively. We then evaluated the students' anatomy knowledge, educational experience, and motivation (using the Instructional Materials Motivation Survey [IMMS], a previously validated assessment). There was no significant difference in anatomy knowledge between the 2 groups on preintervention, postintervention, or retention quizzes. The VR group found the learning experience to be significantly more engaging, enjoyable, and useful (all p < 0.01) and scored significantly higher on the motivation assessment (p < 0.01). Immersive VR educational tools awarded a more positive learner experience and enhanced student motivation. However, the technology was equally as effective as the traditional text books in teaching neuroanatomy. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  14. An Instructional Feedback Technique for Teaching Project Management Tools Aligned with PMBOK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rafael Queiroz; von Wangenheim, Christiane Gresse; Hauck, Jean Carlo Rossa; Petri, Giani

    2017-01-01

    The management of contemporary software projects is unfeasible without the support of a Project Management (PM) tool. In order to enable the adoption of PM tools in practice, teaching its usage is important as part of computer education. Aiming at teaching PM tools, several approaches have been proposed, such as the development of educational PM…

  15. Online multiple intelligence teaching tools (On-MITT) for enhancing interpersonal teaching activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Siti Nurul Mahfuzah; Salam, Sazilah; Bakar, Norasiken; Sui, Linda Khoo Mei

    2014-07-01

    The theories of Multiple Intelligence (MI) used in this paper apply to students with interpersonal intelligence who is encouraged to work together in cooperative groups where interpersonal interaction is practiced. In this context, students used their knowledge and skills to help the group or partner to complete the tasks given. Students can interact with each other as they learn and the process of learning requires their verbal and non-verbal communication skills, co-operation and empathy in the group. Meanwhile educators can incorporate cooperative learning in groups in the classroom. On-MITT provides various tools to facilitate lecturers in preparing e-content that applies interpersonal intelligence. With minimal knowledge of Information and Technology (IT) skills, educators can produce creative and interesting teaching activities and teaching materials. The objective of this paper is to develop On-MITT prototype for interpersonal teaching activities. This paper addressed initial prototype of this study. An evaluation of On-MITT has been completed by 20 lecturers of Malaysian Polytechnics. Motivation Survey Questionnaire is used as the instrument to measure four motivation variables: ease of use, enjoyment, usefulness and self-confidence. Based on the findings, the On-MITT can facilitate educators to prepare teaching materials that are compatible for interpersonal learner.

  16. Uniqueness plots: A simple graphical tool for identifying poor peak fits in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupinder; Diwan, Anubhav; Jain, Varun; Herrera-Gomez, Alberto; Terry, Jeff; Linford, Matthew R.

    2016-11-01

    Peak fitting is an essential part of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) narrow scan analysis, and the Literature contains both good and bad examples of peak fitting. A common cause of poor peak fitting is the inclusion of too many fit parameters, often without a sound chemical and/or physical basis for them, and/or the failure to reasonably constrain them. Under these conditions, fit parameters are often correlated, and therefore lacking in statistical meaning. Here we introduce the uniqueness plot as a simple graphical tool for identifying bad peak fits in XPS, i.e., fit parameter correlation. These plots are widely used in spectroscopic ellipsometry. We illustrate uniqueness plots with two data sets: a C 1s narrow scan from ozone-treated carbon nanotube forests and an Si 2p narrow scan from an air-oxidized silicon wafer. For each fit, we consider different numbers of parameters and constraints on them. As expected, the uniqueness plots are parabolic when fewer fit parameters and/or more constraints are applied. However, they fan out and eventually become horizontal lines as more unconstrained parameters are included in the fits. Uniqueness plots are generated by plotting the chi squared (χ2) value for a fit vs. a systematically varied value of a parameter in the fit. The Abbe criterion is also considered as a figure of merit for uniqueness plots in the Supporting Information. We recommend that uniqueness plots be used by XPS practitioners for identifying inappropriate peak fits.

  17. Organophosphorus reagents in actinide separations: Unique tools for production, cleanup and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, K. L.

    2000-01-01

    Interactions of actinide ions with phosphate and organophosphorus reagents have figured prominently in nuclear science and technology, particularly in the hydrometallurgical processing of irradiated nuclear fuel. Actinide interactions with phosphorus-containing species impact all aspects from the stability of naturally occurring actinides in phosphate mineral phases through the application of the bismuth phosphate and PUREX processes for large-scale production of transuranic elements to the development of analytical separation and environment restoration processes based on new organophosphorus reagents. In this report, an overview of the unique role of organophosphorus compounds in actinide production, disposal, and environment restoration is presented. The broad utility of these reagents and their unique chemical properties is emphasized

  18. A Signal Detection Approach in a Multiple Cohort Study: Different Admission Tools Uniquely Select Different Successful Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda van Ooijen-van der Linden

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Using multiple admission tools in university admission procedures is common practice. This is particularly useful if different admission tools uniquely select different subgroups of students who will be successful in university programs. A signal-detection approach was used to investigate the accuracy of Secondary School grade point average (SSGPA, an admission test score (ACS, and a non-cognitive score (NCS in uniquely selecting successful students. This was done for three consecutive first year cohorts of a broad psychology program. Each applicant's score on SSGPA, ACS, or NCS alone—and on seven combinations of these scores, all considered separate “admission tools”—was compared at two different (medium and high cut-off scores (criterion levels. Each of the tools selected successful students who were not selected by any of the other tools. Both sensitivity and specificity were enhanced by implementing multiple tools. The signal-detection approach distinctively provided useful information for decisions on admission instruments and cut-off scores.

  19. Interactive simulations as teaching tools for engineering mechanics courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Victoria; Romero, Carlos; Martínez, Elvira; Flórez, Mercedes

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to gauge the effect of interactive simulations in class as an active teaching strategy for a mechanics course. Engineering analysis and design often use the properties of planar sections in calculations. In the stress analysis of a beam under bending and torsional loads, cross-sectional properties are used to determine stress and displacement distributions in the beam cross section. The centroid, moments and products of inertia of an area made up of several common shapes (rectangles usually) may thus be obtained by adding the moments of inertia of the component areas (U-shape, L-shape, C-shape, etc). This procedure is used to calculate the second moments of structural shapes in engineering practice because the determination of their moments of inertia is necessary for the design of structural components. This paper presents examples of interactive simulations developed for teaching the ‘Mechanics and mechanisms’ course at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain. The simulations focus on fundamental topics such as centroids, the properties of the moment of inertia, second moments of inertia with respect to two axes, principal moments of inertia and Mohr's Circle for plane stress, and were composed using Geogebra software. These learning tools feature animations, graphics and interactivity and were designed to encourage student participation and engagement in active learning activities, to effectively explain and illustrate course topics, and to build student problem-solving skills.

  20. Accounting Research as a didactic tool for a accounting teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Gisela Perez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a reflection about the importance of the research of accounting subjects in the professional accountants training, this importance is an attribute of research to increase the wealth of discipline under investigation, this can be converted into a skill and/or competence wich accountants are required to demonstrate in their professional practice.Furthermore, accounting is recognized by the authors as a science in constant development, being able to be investigated. This change in knowledge is an element that motivates professionals to be constantly updated, becoming this aspect (constant updating the skill and competence that research can bring to professional training in university classrooms.The reflection is based on the study of documents developed by prestigious authors in accounting theory, teaching and research.Therefore, this paper concludes that research is a useful tool for the professional accounting training, and rewards the important skills and competencies for professional practice; it can be conceived as well as a strategy for technical and educational activities that allows students to recreate knowledge, allowing future updates that will require their professional practice.Key words: Accounting research, university teaching, accounting education. 

  1. Interactive simulations as teaching tools for engineering mechanics courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, Victoria; Martínez, Elvira; Flórez, Mercedes; Romero, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to gauge the effect of interactive simulations in class as an active teaching strategy for a mechanics course. Engineering analysis and design often use the properties of planar sections in calculations. In the stress analysis of a beam under bending and torsional loads, cross-sectional properties are used to determine stress and displacement distributions in the beam cross section. The centroid, moments and products of inertia of an area made up of several common shapes (rectangles usually) may thus be obtained by adding the moments of inertia of the component areas (U-shape, L-shape, C-shape, etc). This procedure is used to calculate the second moments of structural shapes in engineering practice because the determination of their moments of inertia is necessary for the design of structural components. This paper presents examples of interactive simulations developed for teaching the ‘Mechanics and mechanisms’ course at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain. The simulations focus on fundamental topics such as centroids, the properties of the moment of inertia, second moments of inertia with respect to two axes, principal moments of inertia and Mohr's Circle for plane stress, and were composed using Geogebra software. These learning tools feature animations, graphics and interactivity and were designed to encourage student participation and engagement in active learning activities, to effectively explain and illustrate course topics, and to build student problem-solving skills. (paper)

  2. Heuristic Diagrams as a Tool to Teach History of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamizo, José A.

    2012-05-01

    The graphic organizer called here heuristic diagram as an improvement of Gowin's Vee heuristic is proposed as a tool to teach history of science. Heuristic diagrams have the purpose of helping students (or teachers, or researchers) to understand their own research considering that asks and problem-solving are central to scientific activity. The left side originally related in Gowin's Vee with philosophies, theories, models, laws or regularities now agrees with Toulmin's concepts (language, models as representation techniques and application procedures). Mexican science teachers without experience in science education research used the heuristic diagram to learn about the history of chemistry considering also in the left side two different historical times: past and present. Through a semantic differential scale teachers' attitude to the heuristic diagram was evaluated and its usefulness was demonstrated.

  3. Unique voices in harmony: Call-and-response to address race and physics teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Geraldine L.; White, Gary D.

    2017-09-01

    In the February 2016 issue of The Physics Teacher, we announced a call for papers on race and physics teaching. The response was muted at first, but has now grown to a respectable chorale-sized volume. As the manuscripts began to come in and the review process progressed, Geraldine Cochran graciously agreed to come on board as co-editor for this remarkable collection of papers, to be published throughout the fall of 2017 in TPT. Upon reviewing the original call and the responses from the physics community, the parallels between generating this collection and the grand call-and-response tradition became compelling. What follows is a conversation constructed by the co-editors that is intended to introduce the reader to the swell of voices that responded to the original call. The authors would like to thank Pam Aycock for providing many useful contributions to this editorial.

  4. The Effect of Using a Visual Representation Tool in a Teaching-Learning Sequence for Teaching Newton's Third Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinainen, Antti; Mäkynen, Asko; Nieminen, Pasi; Viiri, Jouni

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a research-based teaching-learning sequence (TLS) that focuses on the notion of interaction in teaching Newton's third law (N3 law) which is, as earlier studies have shown, a challenging topic for students to learn. The TLS made systematic use of a visual representation tool--an interaction diagram (ID)--highlighting…

  5. The L3+C detector, a unique tool-set to study cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adriani, O.; Akker, M. van den; Banerjee, S.; Baehr, J.; Betev, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bottai, S.; Bobbink, G.; Cartacci, A.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, G.; Chen, H.S.; Chiarusi, T.; Dai, C.J.; Ding, L.K.; Duran, I.; Faber, G.; Fay, J.; Grabosch, H.J.; Groenstege, H.; Guo, Y.N.; Gupta, S.; Haller, Ch.; Hayashi, Y.; He, Z.X.; Hebbeker, T.; Hofer, H.; Hoferjun, H.; Huo, A.X.; Ito, N.; Jing, C.L.; Jones, L.; Kantserov, V.; Kawakami, S.; Kittel, W.; Koenig, A.C.; Kok, E.; Korn, A.; Kuang, H.H.; Kuijpers, J.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lei, Y.; Leich, H.; Leiste, R.; Li, D.; Li, L.; Li, Z.C.; Liu, Z.A.; Liu, H.T.; Lohmann, W.; Lu, Y.S.; Ma, X.H.; Ma, Y.Q.; Mil, A. van; Monteleoni, B.; Nahnhauer, R.; Pauss, F.; Parriaud, J.-F.; Petersen, B.; Pohl, M.; Qing, C.R.; Ramelli, R.; Ravindran, K.C.; Rewiersma, P.; Rojkov, A.; Saidi, R.; Schmitt, V.; Schoeneich, B.; Schotanus, D.J.; Shen, C.Q.; Sulanke, H.; Tang, X.W.; Timmermans, C.; Tonwar, S.; Trowitzsch, G.; Unger, M.; Verkooijen, H.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, X.W.; Wang, Z.M.; Wijk, R. van; Wijnen, Th.A.M.; Wilkens, H.; Xu, Y.P.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, X.F.; Yao, Z.G.; Yu, Z.Q.; Zhang, S.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, Q.Q.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zwart, A.N.M.

    2002-01-01

    The L3 detector at the CERN electron-positron collider, LEP, has been employed for the study of cosmic ray muons. The muon spectrometer of L3 consists of a set of high-precision drift chambers installed inside a magnet with a volume of about 1000 m 3 and a field of 0.5 T. Muon momenta are measured with a resolution of a few percent at 50 GeV. The detector is located under 30 m of overburden. A scintillator air shower array of 54 m by 30 m is installed on the roof of the surface hall above L3 in order to estimate the energy and the core position of the shower associated with a sample of detected muons. Thanks to the unique properties of the L3+C detector, muon research topics relevant to various current problems in cosmic ray and particle astrophysics can be studied

  6. The L3+C detector, a unique tool-set to study cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O; Banerjee, S; Bähr, J; Betev, B L; Bourilkov, D; Bottai, S; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Cartacci, A M; Chemarin, M; Chen, G; Chen He Sheng; Chiarusi, T; Dai Chang Jiang; Ding, L K

    2002-01-01

    The L3 detector at the CERN electron-positron collider, LEP, has been employed for the study of cosmic ray muons. The muon spectrometer of L3 consists of a set of high-precision drift chambers installed inside a magnet with a volume of about 1000 m**3 and a field of 0.5 T. Muon momenta are measured with a resolution of a few percent at 50 GeV. The detector is located under 30 m of overburden. A scintillator air shower array of 54 m by 30 m is installed on the roof of the surface hall above L3 in order to estimate the energy and the core position of the shower associated with a sample of detected muons. Thanks to the unique properties of the L3+C detector, muon research topics relevant to various current problems in cosmic ray and particle astrophysics can be studied.

  7. C1 Polymerization: a unique tool towards polyethylene-based complex macromolecular architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, De

    2017-05-09

    The recent developments in organoborane initiated C1 polymerization (chain grows by one atom at a time) of ylides opens unique horizons towards well-defined/perfectly linear polymethylenes (equivalent to polyethylenes, PE) and PE-based complex macromolecular architectures. The general mechanism of C1 polymerization (polyhomologation) involves the formation of a Lewis complex between a methylide (monomer) and a borane (initiator), followed by migration/insertion of a methylene into the initiator and after oxidation/hydrolysis to afford OH-terminated polyethylenes. This review summarizes efforts towards conventional and newly discovered borane-initiators and ylides (monomers), as well as a combination of polyhomologation with other polymerization methods. Initial efforts dealing with C3 polymerization and the synthesis of the first C1/C3 copolymers are also given. Finally, some thoughts for the future of these polymerizations are presented.

  8. C1 Polymerization: a unique tool towards polyethylene-based complex macromolecular architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, De; Zhang, Zhen; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    The recent developments in organoborane initiated C1 polymerization (chain grows by one atom at a time) of ylides opens unique horizons towards well-defined/perfectly linear polymethylenes (equivalent to polyethylenes, PE) and PE-based complex macromolecular architectures. The general mechanism of C1 polymerization (polyhomologation) involves the formation of a Lewis complex between a methylide (monomer) and a borane (initiator), followed by migration/insertion of a methylene into the initiator and after oxidation/hydrolysis to afford OH-terminated polyethylenes. This review summarizes efforts towards conventional and newly discovered borane-initiators and ylides (monomers), as well as a combination of polyhomologation with other polymerization methods. Initial efforts dealing with C3 polymerization and the synthesis of the first C1/C3 copolymers are also given. Finally, some thoughts for the future of these polymerizations are presented.

  9. Frontal affinity chromatography: A unique research tool for biospecific interaction that promotes glycobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    KASAI, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Combination of bioaffinity and chromatography gave birth to affinity chromatography. A further combination with frontal analysis resulted in creation of frontal affinity chromatography (FAC). This new versatile research tool enabled detailed analysis of weak interactions that play essential roles in living systems, especially those between complex saccharides and saccharide-binding proteins. FAC now becomes the best method for the investigation of saccharide-binding proteins (lectins) from viewpoints of sensitivity, accuracy, and efficiency, and is contributing greatly to the development of glycobiology. It opened a door leading to deeper understanding of the significance of saccharide recognition in life. The theory is also concisely described. PMID:25169774

  10. The use of multiple tools for teaching medical biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sé, Alexandre B; Passos, Renato M; Ono, André H; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2008-03-01

    In this work, we describe the use of several strategies employing the philosophies of active learning and problem-based learning (PBL) that may be used to improve the teaching of metabolic biochemistry to medical and nutritional undergraduate students. The main activities are as follows: 1) a seminar/poster system in a mini-congress format (using topics of applied biochemistry); 2) a true/false applied biochemistry exam (written by peer tutors); 3) a 9-h exam on metabolism (based in real publications); 4) the Advanced Biochemistry course (directed to peer tutors, where students learn how to read and criticize real medical papers); 5) experiments about nutrition and metabolism, using students as volunteers, and about free radicals (real science for students); 6) the BioBio blog (taking advantage of the "web age," this enhances out of class exchanges of information between the professor, students, and peer tutors); 7) student lectures on public health issues and metabolic disorders directed to the community and lay people; and 8) the BioBio quiz show. The main objective of these activities is to provide students with a more practical and interesting approach to biochemistry, such as the application of theoretical knowledge to real situations (diseases, experiments, media information, and scientific discoveries). In addition, we emphasize the importance of peer tutor activities for optimized learning of both students and peer tutors, the importance of a closer interaction between students and teaching staff, and the necessity to initiate students precociously in two broad fields of medical activity: "real" basic science and contact with the public (also helping students--future doctors and nutritionists--to be able to communicate with lay people). Most activities were evaluated by the students through written questionnaires and informal conversations, along various semesters, indicating good acceptance and approval of these methods. Good student scores in the

  11. A novel teaching tool using dynamic cues improves visualisation of chest lesions by naive observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Ali, M. A.; Toomey, R. J.; Ryan, J. T.; Cuffe, F. C.; Brennan, P. C.

    2009-02-01

    Introduction Dynamic cueing is an effective way of stimulating perception of regions of interest within radiological images. This study explores the impact of a novel teaching tool using dynamic cueing for lesion detection on plain chest radiographs. Materials and methods Observer performance studies were carried out where 36 novices examined 30 chest images in random order. Half of these contained between one and three simulated pulmonary nodules. Three groups were investigated: A (control: no teaching tool), B (retested immediately after undergoing the teaching tool) and C (retested a week after undergoing the teaching tool). The teaching tool involved dynamically displaying the same images with and without lesions. Results were compared using Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC), sensitivity and specificity analyses. Results The second reading showed significantly greater area under the ROC curve (Az value) (pchest radiographs in the short term.

  12. Facilities as teaching tools: A transformative participatory professional development experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Eric A.

    Resource consumption continues to increase as the population grows. In order to secure a sustainable future, society must educate the next generation to become "sustainability natives." Schools play a pivotal role in educating a sustainability-literate society. However, a disconnect exists between the hidden curriculum of the built environment and the enacted curriculum. This study employs a transformative participatory professional development model to instruct teachers on how to use their school grounds as teaching tools for the purpose of helping students make explicit choices in energy consumption, materials use, and sustainable living. Incorporating a phenomenological perspective, this study considers the lived experience of two sustainability coordinators. Grounded theory provides an interpretational context for the participants' interactions with each other and the professional development process. Through a year long professional development experience - commencing with an intense, participatory two-day workshop -the participants discussed challenges they faced with integrating facilities into school curriculum and institutionalizing a culture of sustainability. Two major needs were identified in this study. For successful sustainability initiatives, a hybrid model that melds top-down and bottom-up approaches offers the requisite mix of administrative support, ground level buy-in, and excitement vis-a-vis sustainability. Second, related to this hybrid approach, K-12 sustainability coordinators ideally need administrative capabilities with access to decision making, while remaining connected to students in a meaningful way, either directly in the classroom, as a mentor, or through work with student groups and projects.

  13. Kirlian Photography as a Teaching Tool of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrel, Andy; Thacker, Beth Ann, , Dr.

    2002-10-01

    There are a number of groups across the country working on redesigning introductory physics courses by incorporating physics education research, modeling, and making the courses appeal to students in broader fields. We spent the summer exploring Kirlian photography, a subject that can be understood by students with a basic comprehension of electrostatics but is still questioned by many people in other fields. Kirlian photography's applications have captivated alternative medicine but still requires research from both physics and biology to understand if it has potential as medical tool. We used a simple setup to reproduce the physics that has been done to see if it could be used in an educational setting. I will demonstrate how Kirlian photography can be explained by physics but also how the topic still needs research to completely understand its possible biological applications. By incorporating such a topic into a curriculum, one is able to teach students to explore supposed supernatural phenomena scientifically and to promote research among undergraduate students.

  14. Peer review: a tool to enhance clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusic, Maryellen; Hageman, Heather; Zenni, Elisa

    2013-10-01

    The system used by academic health centres to evaluate teaching must be valued by the large number of faculty staff that teach in clinical settings. Peer review can be used to evaluate and enhance clinical teaching. The objective of this study was to determine the perceptions of clinical faculty about the effects of participating in peer review. Faculty members were observed teaching in a clinical setting by trained peer observers. Feedback was provided using a checklist of behaviours and descriptive comments. Afterwards, semi-structured interviews were conducted to assess the faculty member's perception about the process. Notes from the interviews were analysed using a grounded theory approach. The study was approved by the institutional review boards of all the institutions involved. Three themes emerged from the interviews with faculty members: (1) they found the process to be valuable - they received information that affirmed "good" teaching behaviours, and were prompted to be more focused on their teaching; (2) they were motivated to enhance their teaching by being more deliberate, interactive and learner-centred; and (3) they were inspired to explore other opportunities to improve their teaching skills. Peer review is a process that promotes the open discussion and exchange of ideas. This conversation advances clinical teaching skills and allows high-quality teaching behaviours to be strengthened. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Peer observation of teaching as a faculty development tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Peter B

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peer observation of Teaching involves observers providing descriptive feedback to their peers on learning and teaching practice as a means to improve quality of teaching. This study employed and assessed peer observation as a constructive, developmental process for members of a Pediatric Teaching Faculty. Methods This study describes how peer observation was implemented as part of a teaching faculty development program and how it was perceived by teachers. The PoT process was divided into 4 stages: pre-observation meeting, observation, post-observation feedback and reflection. Particular care was taken to ensure that teachers understood that the observation and feedback was a developmental and not an evaluative process. Twenty teachers had their teaching peer observed by trained Faculty members and gave an e-mail ‘sound-bite’ of their perceptions of the process. Teaching activities included lectures, problem-based learning, small group teaching, case-based teaching and ward-based teaching sessions. Results Teachers were given detailed verbal and written feedback based on the observer’s and students’ observations. Teachers’ perceptions were that PoT was useful and relevant to their teaching practice. Teachers valued receiving feedback and viewed PoT as an opportunity for insight and reflection. The process of PoT was viewed as non-threatening and teachers thought that PoT enhanced the quality of their teaching, promoted professional development and was critical for Faculty development. Conclusions This study demonstrated that PoT can be used in a constructive way to improve course content and delivery, to support and encourage medical teachers, and to reinforce good teaching.

  16. Teaching Students How to Integrate and Assess Social Networking Tools in Marketing Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Regina Pefanis; Harich, Katrin R.

    2013-01-01

    This research is based on two studies that focus on teaching students how to integrate and assess social networking tools in marketing communications. Study 1 examines how students in marketing classes utilize social networking tools and explores their attitudes regarding the use of such tools for marketing communications. Study 2 focuses on an…

  17. The Fact of IgnoranceRevisiting the Socratic Method as a Tool for Teaching Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking, while highly valued as an ability of health care providers, remains a skill that many educators find difficult to teach. This review provides an analysis examining why current methods of teaching critical thinking to health care students (primarily medical and pharmacy students) often fail and describes a premise and potential utility of the Socratic method as a tool to teach critical thinking in health care education. PMID:25258449

  18. The fact of ignorance: revisiting the Socratic method as a tool for teaching critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler, Douglas R; Romanelli, Frank

    2014-09-15

    Critical thinking, while highly valued as an ability of health care providers, remains a skill that many educators find difficult to teach. This review provides an analysis examining why current methods of teaching critical thinking to health care students (primarily medical and pharmacy students) often fail and describes a premise and potential utility of the Socratic method as a tool to teach critical thinking in health care education.

  19. Using Food as a Tool to Teach Science to 3rd Grade Students in Appalachian Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffrin, Melani W.; Hovland, Jana; Carraway-Stage, Virginia; McLeod, Sara; Duffrin, Christopher; Phillips, Sharon; Rivera, David; Saum, Diana; Johanson, George; Graham, Annette; Lee, Tammy; Bosse, Michael; Berryman, Darlene

    2010-01-01

    The Food, Math, and Science Teaching Enhancement Resource (FoodMASTER) Initiative is a compilation of programs aimed at using food as a tool to teach mathematics and science. In 2007 to 2008, a foods curriculum developed by professionals in nutrition and education was implemented in 10 3rd-grade classrooms in Appalachian Ohio; teachers in these…

  20. Evaluating the impact of digital tools to teach math and science in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Evaluating the impact of digital tools to teach math and science in Chile ... Caribbean countries fare poorly in international comparisons of learning assessments. ... to support governments grappling with intellectual property issues in an age of ...

  1. The Research-Teaching Nexus: Using a Construction Teaching Event as a Research Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas-Rubio, Maria del Mar; Ahearn, Alison; Ramos, Gonzalo; Popo-Ola, Sunday

    2016-01-01

    In principle, the research-teaching nexus should be seen as a two-way link, showing not only ways in which research supports teaching but also ways in which teaching supports research. In reality, the discussion has been limited almost entirely to the first of these practices. This paper presents a case study in which some student field-trip…

  2. Teaching Advanced Data Analysis Tools to High School Astronomy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David V.; Herring, Julie; Hintz, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    A major barrier to becoming an astronomer is learning how to analyze astronomical data, such as using photometry to compare the brightness of stars. Most fledgling astronomers learn observation, data reduction, and analysis skills through an upper division college class. If the same skills could be taught in an introductory high school astronomy class, then more students would have an opportunity to do authentic science earlier, with implications for how many choose to become astronomers. Several software tools have been developed that can analyze astronomical data ranging from fairly straightforward (AstroImageJ and DS9) to very complex (IRAF and DAOphot). During the summer of 2014, a study was undertaken at Brigham Young University through a Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program to evaluate the effectiveness and ease-of-use of these four software packages. Standard tasks tested included creating a false-color IR image using WISE data in DS9, Adobe Photoshop, and The Gimp; a multi-aperture analyses of variable stars over time using AstroImageJ; creating Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of stars using photometry at multiple wavelengths in AstroImageJ and DS9; and color-magnitude and hydrogen alpha index diagrams for open star clusters using IRAF and DAOphot. Tutorials were then written and combined with screen captures to teach high school astronomy students at Walden School of Liberal Arts in Provo, UT how to perform these same tasks. They analyzed image data using the four software packages, imported it into Microsoft Excel, and created charts using images from BYU's 36-inch telescope at their West Mountain Observatory. The students' attempts to complete these tasks were observed, mentoring was provided, and the students then reported on their experience through a self-reflection essay and concept test. Results indicate that high school astronomy students can successfully complete professional-level astronomy data analyses when given detailed

  3. Evaluation of The Virtual Cells Software: a Teaching Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.P. da Silva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies show that the use of games and interactive materials  at schools is a good educational strategy, motivating students to create mental  outlines and developing the reasoning and facilitating  the learn- ing. In this context, the Scientific Dissemination Coordination of the Center  for Structural Molecular Biotechnology  (CBME,  developed  a series of educational materials  destined  to the  elementary and high  schools,  universities  and  general  public.   Among  these,  we highlighted  the  Virtual  Cells soft- ware that was developed  with  the  aim of helping  in the  understanding of the  basic concepts  of cell types,  their  structures, organelles  and  specific functions.   Characterized by its  interactive  interface, this  software shows eukaryotes  and prokaryotes cells images, where organelles are shown as dynamic structures. In addition, it presents exercises in another  step that reinforce the comprehension  of Cy- tology.  A speaker  narrates the  resources  offered by the  program  and  the  necessary  steps  for its use. During  the  stage  of development of the  software,  students and  teachers of public and  private  high schools from Sao Carlos  city, Sao Paulo  State,  were invited  to register their  opinions  regarding  the language and content of the software in order to help us in the improvement of it.  After this stage, the Scientific Dissemination Coordination of CBME organized a series of workshops, where 120 individuals evaluated the software (students and teachers  of high school and others undergraduate students. For this evaluation, a questionnaire was elaborated based on the international current literature in the area of sciences teaching  and it was applied  after the interactive section with the software.  The analysis of the results demonstrated that most of the individuals  considered the software of easy

  4. Three-Dimensional Soil Landscape Modeling: A Potential Earth Science Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Brian M.; Manu, Andrew; Norton, Amy E.

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional visualization is helpful in understanding soils, and three dimensional (3-D) tools are gaining popularity in teaching earth sciences. Those tools are still somewhat underused in soil science, yet soil properties such as texture, color, and organic carbon content vary both vertically and horizontally across the landscape. These…

  5. Technology as Mediation Tool for Improving Teaching Profession in Higher Education Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinay-Gazi, Zehra; Altinay-Aksal, Fahriye

    2017-01-01

    Technology became a mediation tool for forming information and developing skills is teacher education programs of higher education institutions because technological tools can be used for self-reflection of prospective teachers' teaching performances. Practical implementation of teacher education programmes is a part of quality indicator in higher…

  6. Prolog as a Teaching Tool for Relational Database Interrogation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, P. A.; Samson, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    The use of the Prolog programing language is promoted as the language to use by anyone teaching a course in relational databases. A short introduction to Prolog is followed by a series of examples of queries. Several references are noted for anyone wishing to gain a deeper understanding. (MP)

  7. Developing Confidence in the Use of Digital Tools in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greener, Sue; Wakefield, Craig

    2015-01-01

    In this study Higher Education teachers were offered new mobile devices with very few conditions attached. The aim was to introduce staff to mobile technology and how it could be used to support teaching and learning within a small, interdisciplinary campus. The study hypothesized that by offering staff the simple incentive of new mobile devices…

  8. Cooperative Learning as a Tool To Teach Vertebrate Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, John L.; Perigo, Nan

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for teaching biology that includes more investigative exercises that foster an environment for cooperative learning in introductory laboratories that focus on vertebrates. Fosters collaborative learning by facilitating interaction between students as they become experts on their representative vertebrate structures. (SAH)

  9. The Use of Multiple Tools for Teaching Medical Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Se, Alexandre B.; Passos, Renato M.; Ono, Andre H.; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we describe the use of several strategies employing the philosophies of active learning and problem-based learning (PBL) that may be used to improve the teaching of metabolic biochemistry to medical and nutritional undergraduate students. The main activities are as follows: 1) a seminar/poster system in a mini-congress format (using…

  10. Teaching Style and Attitudes towards Facebook as an Educational Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Julie

    2014-01-01

    There is a distinct lack of research that has considered university staff use of and attitudes towards Facebook. The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of how teaching staff at one UK university use Facebook, and their attitudes towards Facebook and online professionalism, in terms of the student-staff relationship. An online survey…

  11. Teaching Gratitude: Tools for Inner Peace and Happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Cathleen

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to serve as a framework for lessons and experiences in grateful living. The objectives in teaching gratitude are to give children opportunities: (1) to create experiences that cultivate an awareness of abundance; (2) to experience and appreciate simple pleasures; (3) to understand how others contribute to a sense of…

  12. Teachers' Perception Regarding Facial Expressions as an Effective Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Muhammad Naeem; Iqbal, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    The major objective of the study was to explore teachers' perceptions about the importance of facial expression in the teaching-learning process. All the teachers of government secondary schools constituted the population of the study. A sample of 40 teachers, both male and female, in rural and urban areas of district Peshawar, were selected…

  13. Design and Implementation of a Tool for Teaching Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktepe, Mesut; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Discussion of the use of computers in education focuses on a graphics-based system for teaching the Pascal programing language for problem solving. Topics discussed include user interface; notification based systems; communication processes; object oriented programing; workstations; graphics architecture; and flowcharts. (18 references) (LRW)

  14. Basic Burns Management E-Learning: A New Teaching Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egro, Francesco M

    Burns teaching is organized only in a few medical schools in the United Kingdom. An e-learning tutorial was developed with the objective of incorporating burns teaching within the medical school curriculum. A 33-webpage e-learning was created, covering topics such as local and general response to burns, assessment of burns, first aid, primary and secondary survey, and referral guidelines. Medical student satisfaction was then evaluated using a 12-question feedback survey rated based on a Likert scale from 1 (very poor) to 5 (very good). The 12-question survey was completed by a total of 18 medical students ranging from second to fourth years (second = 17%, third = 22%, fourth = 61%). While only a couple of students had received prior burns teaching, 50% of the cohort had an interest to pursue surgery as a career. The majority of students (72%) would be interested to have an e-learning module on basic burns management in their medical curriculum. The means of all domains specific to the e-learning were rated as "good" or "very good." Students' rating for ease of use was 87%, usefulness was 88%, relevance to the medical curriculum was 90%, clarity and quality of content were 78% and 83%, respectively, design was 79%, and the overall satisfaction with this e-learning was 87%. The "Basic Burns Management" e-learning tutorial can provide an efficient and effective means of information delivery to medical students and junior doctors, allowing easy and fast incorporation of burns teaching within the medical curriculum and in other medical teaching settings.

  15. The Use of Video Games as a Teaching Tool to Improve Teaching-Learning: State of the Art Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angie Paola Roncancio-Ortiz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this new era of the 21st century when societies are constantly changing, education is the cornerstone to provide the people not only with the basic knowledge and tools, but also with the required skills for facing the challenges in a globalized world. Thus, video games have evolved from distractive activities, to more valuable tools. These tools can play a leading role in education-related processes, for example, supporting teaching tasks. The aim of this article is to present a state of art review on several particular experiences in which video games have been incorporated into teaching and learning activities. As a result, video games can be used as didactic mechanisms that help students, among other things, to solve learning problems, to improve motor and cognitive skills, and to foster creativity.

  16. Visualization in simulation tools: requirements and a tool specification to support the teaching of dynamic biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Katarina M; Haddow, Pauline C

    2011-08-01

    Simulation tools are playing an increasingly important role behind advances in the field of systems biology. However, the current generation of biological science students has either little or no experience with such tools. As such, this educational glitch is limiting both the potential use of such tools as well as the potential for tighter cooperation between the designers and users. Although some simulation tool producers encourage their use in teaching, little attempt has hitherto been made to analyze and discuss their suitability as an educational tool for noncomputing science students. In general, today's simulation tools assume that the user has a stronger mathematical and computing background than that which is found in most biological science curricula, thus making the introduction of such tools a considerable pedagogical challenge. This paper provides an evaluation of the pedagogical attributes of existing simulation tools for cell signal transduction based on Cognitive Load theory. Further, design recommendations for an improved educational simulation tool are provided. The study is based on simulation tools for cell signal transduction. However, the discussions are relevant to a broader biological simulation tool set.

  17. Deliberate teaching tools for clinical teaching encounters: A critical scoping review and thematic analysis to establish definitional clarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Navdeep S; Edwards, Morgan

    2018-04-27

    We conducted a scoping review of tools designed to add structure to clinical teaching, with a thematic analysis to establish definitional clarity. Six thousand and forty nine citations were screened, 434 reviewed for eligibility, and 230 identified as meeting study inclusion criteria. Eighty-nine names and 51 definitions were identified. Based on a post facto thematic analysis, we propose that these tools be named "deliberate teaching tools" (DTTs) and defined as "frameworks that enable clinicians to have a purposeful and considered approach to teaching encounters by incorporating elements identified with good teaching practice." We identified 46 DTTs in the literature, with 38 (82.6%) originally described for the medical setting. Forty justification articles consisted of 16 feedback surveys, 13 controlled trials, seven pre-post intervention studies with no control group, and four observation studies. Current evidence of efficacy is not entirely conclusive, and many studies contain methodology flaws. Forty-nine clarification articles comprised 12 systematic reviews and 37 narrative reviews. The most number of DTTs described by any review was four. A common design theme was identified in approximately three-quarters of DTTs. Applicability of DTTs to specific alternate settings should be considered in context, and appropriately designed justification studies are warranted to demonstrate efficacy.

  18. Online Language Teaching: Teacher Perceptions of Effective Communication Tools, Required Skills and Challenges of Online Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paepe, Liesbeth; Zhu, Chang; Depryck, Koen

    2018-01-01

    To date, teacher perceptions of online language teaching have attracted very little attention. However, these perceptions may influence decisions regarding instructional design, teaching practices and eventually the learning experience. Furthermore, teacher perceptions can contribute to the design of teacher training programs. This study provides…

  19. Digital teaching files – a useful teaching tool for the modern radiologist

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiologists have always collected copies of model examples and interesting cases encountered in daily practice to use for teaching purposes.1,2 A collection of teaching files is an important resource for medical education and the dissemination of knowledge in radiology. Furthermore, the presence of a radiological ...

  20. Can Anatomists Teach Living Anatomy Using Ultrasound as a Teaching Tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurjus, Rosalyn A.; Dimorier, Kathryn; Brown, Kirsten; Slaby, Frank; Shokoohi, Hamid; Boniface, Keith; Liu, Yiju Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of bedside ultrasound by an increasing number of medical specialties has created the need for more ultrasound exposure and teaching in medical school. Although there is a widespread support for more vertical integration of ultrasound teaching throughout the undergraduate curriculum, little is known about whether the quality of…

  1. An Observation Tool for EFL Reading Comprehension Teaching Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Nienke; de Bot, Kees; van de Grift, Wim; Jansen, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The present study addresses the validation process of an observation tool for measuring the range of processes in which a teacher is involved when helping secondary school EFL learners comprehend reading input and when facilitating meaningful language output. The observation tool will be used in a

  2. Tools for Assessing Readability of Statistics Teaching Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Lawrence; Wagler, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This article provides tools and rationale for instructors in math and science to make their assessment and curriculum materials (more) readable for students. The tools discussed (MSWord, LexTutor, Coh-Metrix TEA) are readily available linguistic analysis applications that are grounded in current linguistic theory, but present output that can…

  3. Scratch as a Computational Modelling Tool for Teaching Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Victor; Hernandez, Maria Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The Scratch online authoring tool, which features a simple programming language that has been adapted to primary and secondary students, is being used more and more in schools as it offers students and teachers the opportunity to use a tool to build scientific models and evaluate their behaviour, just as can be done with computational modelling…

  4. Making Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching Explicit: A Lesson Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Julia M.; Zavala, Maria del Rosario

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, there is a need for pedagogical tools that help teachers develop essential pedagogical content knowledge and practices to meet the mathematical education needs of a growing culturally and linguistically diverse student population. In this article, we introduce an innovative lesson analysis tool that focuses on integrating…

  5. Visual advertisements: a tool for English language teaching?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babocká Mária

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Advertising as one of the phenomena of modern times is often an inseparable, though undesirable part of our everyday lives. Current trends indicate that there are still more and more anglicisms, internationalisms, and particles of different cultures penetrating billboard advertisements in many towns and cities around the world, and Slovakia is no exception. The crucial question of this article is: How is it possible to use advertisements in English language teaching and learning? To answer this question, the examination is focused on: (1 defining the role and characteristic traits of advertisements; (2 searching for the linkage between the psychological principles of advertising and psychology of learning foreign languages; (3 the frequency of anglicisms and internationalisms in billboard advertisements in particular areas of selected Slovak cities; (4 concrete suggestions for teaching practice based on the previous findings.

  6. Teach, learn, and motivate: tools to reliability, availability, and maintainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, D.

    1986-01-01

    The recent introduction of performance-based training by the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) should not be a surprise to the nuclear industry. The recommended performance-based training method by INPO in one form or another addresses the techniques of teaching and sets the atmosphere for employee learning and motivation. The purpose of this paper is to explore the underlying concepts of why performance-based training yields such high results. The main emphasis will be on the general topics of teaching, learning, and student motivation as each applies to hands-on training. To support each of these topics, ancient philosophers' theories are presented. the intent is to show that hands-on performance-based training applies to engineers and other professional disciplines as well as technicians and operators

  7. Information Portals: A New Tool for Teaching Information Literacy Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Kolah, Debra; Fosmire, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Librarians at Rice and Purdue Universities created novel assignments to teach students important information literacy skills. The assignments required the students to use a third-party web site, PageFlakes and NetVibes, respectively, to create a dynamically updated portal to information they needed for their research and class projects. The use of off-the-shelf web 2.0 technology to enable students to discover the latest information in their subject areas of interest provides an engaging, han...

  8. THE USE OF MULTIPLE TOOLS FOR TEACHING MEDICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Sé, A.B.; Oxyradical Research Group, CEL, UnB; FM-UnB, Brasília, Brazil.; Passos, R.M.; Oxyradical Research Group, CEL, UnB; 2FM-UnB, Brasília, Brazil.; Rochadel, A.D; FM-UnB, Brasília, Brazil; Ono, A.H.; FM-UnB, Brasília, Brazil; Hermes-Lima, M.; Oxyradical Research Group, CEL, UnB

    2007-01-01

    The pros and cons of Problem Based Learning (PBL) have been extensivelydiscussed in the literature. We describe PBL-like strategies used at UnB (some ofthem since 1999) that may be useful elsewhere to improve undergraduatebiochemistry teaching with clinical applications. The main activities are: (i) aseminar/poster system, (ii) a true-or-false applied biochemistry exam (prepared bypeer tutors), (iii) a 9-hour-exam on metabolism (based in actual papers), (iv) anAdvanced Biochemistry course (di...

  9. Moodle as a teaching tools in mathematics - case study in Goce Delcev University, Stip

    OpenAIRE

    Atanasova-Pacemska, Tatjana; Pacemska, Sanja; Zlatanovska, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    During recent years, the teaching process at the University "Goce Delcev" Stip has been changing by usage of the e-learning methods. This paper compares the achievements of students in Math 1who use Moodle as a teaching tool with those who does not. Achievements of students are treated in the statistical program SPSS 17. We can conclude how e-learning impacts on the success of the students based on the results obtained.

  10. REVIEW ARTICLE Digital teaching files – a useful teaching tool for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    different sites is possible although less than ideal – radiographs need to be duplicated .... with the new system, leading to extra time, effort and cost to convert older cases. ... are designed for rendering teaching file creation on a local network.

  11. A novel educational tool for teaching ocular ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa MS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available MS Mustafa1, J Montgomery2, HR Atta11Department of Ophthalmology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, UK; 2Medi-CAL, College of Life Sciences and Medicine, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen, UKAbstract: Ocular ultrasound is now in increasing demand in routine ophthalmic clinical practice not only because it is noninvasive but also because of ever-advancing technology providing higher resolution imaging. It is however a difficult branch of ophthalmic investigations to grasp, as it requires a high skill level to interface with the technology and provide accurate interpretation of images for ophthalmic diagnosis and management. It is even more labor intensive to teach ocular ultrasound to another fellow clinician. One of the fundamental skills that proved difficult to learn and teach is the need for the examiner to “mentally convert” 2-dimensional B-scan images into 3-dimensional (3D interpretations. An additional challenge is the requirement to carry out this task in real time. We have developed a novel approach to teach ocular ultrasound by using a novel 3D ocular model. A 3D virtual model is built using widely available, open source, software. The model is then used to generate movie clips simulating different movements and orientations of the scanner head. Using Blender, Quicktime motion clips are choreographed and collated into interactive quizzes and other pertinent pedagogical media. The process involves scripting motion vectors, rotation, and tracking of both the virtual stereo camera and the model. The resulting sequence is then rendered for twinned right- and left-eye views. Finally, the twinned views are synchronized and combined in a format compatible with the stereo projection apparatus. This new model will help the student with spatial awareness and allow for assimilation of this awareness into clinical practice. It will also help with grasping the nomenclature used in ocular ultrasound as well as helping with localization of

  12. Tools and methods for teaching magnetic resonance concepts and techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars G.

    2012-01-01

    Teaching of MRI methodology can be challenging for teachers as well as students. To support student learning, two graphical simulators for exploration of basic magnetic resonance principles are here introduced. The first implements a simple compass needle analogy implemented for day one of NMR...... and MRI education. After a few minutes of use, any user with minimal experience of magnetism will be able to explain the basic magnetic resonance principle. A second piece of software, the Bloch Simulator, aims much further, as it can be used to demonstrate and explore a wide range of phenomena including...

  13. THE USE OF MULTIPLE TOOLS FOR TEACHING MEDICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Sé

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The pros and cons of Problem Based Learning (PBL have been extensivelydiscussed in the literature. We describe PBL-like strategies used at UnB (some ofthem since 1999 that may be useful elsewhere to improve undergraduatebiochemistry teaching with clinical applications. The main activities are: (i aseminar/poster system, (ii a true-or-false applied biochemistry exam (prepared bypeer tutors, (iii a 9-hour-exam on metabolism (based in actual papers, (iv anAdvanced Biochemistry course (directed to peer tutors, (v pizza-and-pasta (formetabolism teaching and free radicals (real science for students experiments,(vi the BioBio blog (http://www.biobio-unb.blogspot.com, (vii student lectures onhealth issues directed to the community, and (viii the BioBio Show. The mainobjective of these activities is providing students with a more practical andentertaining approach to biochemistry using philosophic PBL principles such asthe application of basic knowledge to real situations (diseases, experiments andscientific discoveries. We also emphasize (a the importance of peer-tutor activityfor optimized learning of students and peer tutors, (b the relevance of a closerinteraction between students and professors, and (c the necessity to initiatestudents precociously in actual basic/medical science and contact with the public.Most activities have been evaluated by the students through written questionnairesand informal conversations, for several semesters, indicating good acceptanceand approval of these methods.

  14. Teaching and Learning: Using Digital Tools for Progressive Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Rita B.; Petersson, Eva; Lewis Brooks, Anthony

    2008-01-01

      Non-biased assessment becomes a reality when Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is implemented as a pedagogical tool to augment teacher practice and student learning. This paper details a study that was undertaken at a secondary school in Lithuania involving four educators and 200...... in education to address future augmented teacher - students' liaisons....

  15. Evaluation of Adobe[R] Presenter as a Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Adobe[R] Presenter software provides educators with a tool to create narrated distance learning presentations. This article describes Adobe[R] Presenter's many features and explains which most strongly affect learning. Six Adobe[R] Presenter trainings were presented to 62 volunteers preparing to provide information at a public outreach event. One…

  16. The use of films as a teaching tool for the teaching-learning process in bioethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Maria Pereira Rates

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Identifying the contribution of using films in the process of teaching-learning in bioethics and verifying the facilities and difficulties in using this teaching resource. Methodology. A qualitative study analyzed from the Bardin referential. Semi-structured interviews were carried out, recorded, and transcribed in full. For definition of the sample was used the criteria of repetition. In total, participated in the study 21 students of Nursing and Biochemistry, members of a Center for Teaching and Research in Bioethics of a public federal university in the city of Divinópolis, Minas Gerais, Brazil. During the analysis of interviews, two thematic categories and two subcategories emerged. Results. In their responses, students indicated the importance of viewing the bioethical problem for the reflection and decision-making in professional practice. Many reported that from the experience in discussions of the films showed, were made changes in the ethical position. Conclusion: The use of films as a teaching resource contributes to the process of teaching-learning in bioethics for undergraduate students. The discussions of the films are stimulating and provide a space for reflection and dialogue on bioethical problems that students may encounter in their professional practice.

  17. JAPANESE LANGUAGE STUDENTS’ PERCEPTION OF USING ANIME AS A TEACHING TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee-Han Chan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies showed that interest in anime motivates students to learn the Japanese language and culture (Manion, 2005; Fukunaga, 2006; William, 2006. However, little has been written about the practical use of anime in a Japanese language classroom. By employing the method of classroom research, this study will try to narrow the gap between theory and practice of using anime as a teaching tool in the Japanese language classroom. This qualitative study will focus on discussing what the participants think about the use of anime as a teaching tool. A course named “Learning Japanese language and Culture through Anime” was planned and conducted in a public university in Malaysia. During the administration of the course, the data were collected via the participants’ learning diaries at 7 intervals and a group interview at the end of the semester. The findings presented from the data analysis on the participants' perception of the use of anime as a teaching tool include motivation, language and cultural awareness, critical thinking, sense of prejudice, and stereotypes. The findings reveal that giving a place for anime in the Japanese language classroom is like opening a new door for educators to connect with the students and deepen understanding about the students’ learning experiences of using anime as a language and culture learning tool. This is important to provide insightful ideas to the Japanese language educators regarding the option of using anime as a teaching tool.

  18. Tools to share good chairside teaching practice: a clinical scenario and appreciative questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, J; Wilson, J; Pugsley, L; Schofield, M

    2008-12-13

    This article provides a scenario for analysis of good chairside teaching practice to serve as a starting point for continued discussion in this complex field. Documented issues of good chairside teaching practice are cross-referenced to a clinical scenario with explanations in the form of a commentary. This provided the context for generating a set of questions that are provided as tools to support good chairside practice. These tools are designed to be used with 'Appreciative Inquiry', which claims that there is much to be gained by discovering where excellence is possible and elaborating upon this. Although this process can be carried out in single units or departments, it is proposed that collaboration between institutions would allow sharing of valuable innovations and greater understanding of educational training, production of good practice guidance and professional development of staff. This article is the third in a series of three and provides a scaffold for a scenario and questions to encourage collaboration in evolving and sharing good chairside teaching practice. The first article investigated the perceptions of stakeholders in chairside teaching at a single dental school and the second evaluated chairside teaching on a UK wide scale. A further accompanying article reviews some of the educational methodology and innovations in teaching and learning that may be applied to dentistry.

  19. Map as a tool for independent learning in geography teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Ljiljana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are different views on self-regulation in the learning process, how it has to be monitored, controlled, which are the circumstances and external factors that affect independent learning. Dominant are the opinions in which the self-regulation is treated as interaction of processes related to the personality, behavioural and contextual processes. Special attention has been given to motivational strategies and students’ desire to focus on goals. By enabling students to make decisions, set their own goals, make a choice, plan and organize activities, the development of self-learning and student autonomy is being encouraged. If students are given the opportunity of independent activities, effect of self-control in the process of learning and self-regulation becomes more pronounced. The paper will explain the factors that influence the process of self-learning that takes place in regular teaching with the help of map as the basic geographic media. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 17008

  20. In-Service Science Teachers' and the Use of Multimedia as a Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameyaw, Y.; Quansah, E.

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the attitudes of in-service teachers' towards the use of multimedia as a tool for science teaching in Junior High Schools in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana. The population sample consisted of 100 Junior High School (JHS) science teachers made up of 60 urban teachers and 40 rural teachers from three selected districts…

  1. Evaluation Tool for the Application of Discovery Teaching Method in the Greek Environmental School Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Greek school community emphasizes on the discovery direction of teaching methodology in the school Environmental Education (EE) in order to promote Education for the Sustainable Development (ESD). In ESD school projects the used methodology is experiential teamwork for inquiry based learning. The proposed tool checks whether and how a school…

  2. Blogs and Wikis as Instructional Tools: A Social Software Adaptation of Just-in-Time Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higdon, Jude; Topaz, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) methodology uses Web-based tools to gather student responses to questions on preclass reading assignments. However, the technological requirements of JiTT and the content-specific nature of the questions may prevent some instructors from implementing it. Our own JiTT implementation uses publicly and freely available…

  3. Teachers' Opinion Survey on the Use of ICT Tools to Support Attendance-Based Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Sanchez, Jose Juan; Aleman, Elena Chirino

    2011-01-01

    The present paper reports on the results obtained from a teachers' opinion survey on the use of ICT tools to support of attendance-based teaching. In order to carry out this study, it was necessary to design a questionnaire to collect data among all in-service teachers with access to the university virtual campus. The findings show that…

  4. iMindMap as an Innovative Tool in Teaching and Learning Accounting: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Jusoh, Wan Noor Hazlina; Ahmad, Suraya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the use of iMindMap software as an interactive tool in the teaching and learning method and also to be able to consider iMindMap as an alternative instrument in achieving the ultimate learning outcome. Design/Methodology/Approach: Out of 268 students of the management accounting at the University of…

  5. Tablet PC: A Preliminary Report on a Tool for Teaching Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgievski, Nicholas; Stroud, Robert; Truxaw, Mary; DeFranco, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This study examined students' perceptions of the Tablet PC as an instructional tool for teaching Calculus. A thirteen item survey was developed by the researchers and administered to 103 students in an introductory Calculus course at a large university in the Northeast of the United States. The purpose of this survey was to collect data regarding…

  6. Tool Support for Collaborative Teaching and Learning of Object-Oriented Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius; Ratzer, Anne Vinter

    2002-01-01

    Modeling is central to doing and learning object-oriented development. We present a new tool, Ideogramic UML, for gesture-based collaborative modeling with the Unified Modeling Language (UML), which can be used to collaboratively teach and learn modeling. Furthermore, we discuss how we have...

  7. Blood Glucose Monitoring as a Teaching Tool for Endocrinology: A New Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moats, Robert K., II

    2009-01-01

    The education of new allied health professionals and nurses in proper endocrine evaluation and care has become critical in recent years, especially considering the greatly increased prevalence of diabetes in adults and children. The evaluation of blood glucose levels in human volunteers over time is a powerful teaching tool for endocrinology that…

  8. Thematic Organizers as a Tool for Teaching from a Wholetheme Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iran-Nejad, Asghar

    Learning in the wholetheme approach is defined as reorganizing one's own intuitive knowledge base, as opposed to storing facts. This presentation discusses several thematic organizers to illustrate their role as a teaching tool in helping learners reorganize their own intuitive knowledge base. Intimately tied to the brain's ground-figure processes…

  9. Development and assessment of a new 3D neuroanatomy teaching tool for MRI training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapkin, Zachary A; Lindgren, Kristen A; Lopez, Michael J; Stabio, Maureen E

    2015-01-01

    A computerized three-dimensional (3D) neuroanatomy teaching tool was developed for training medical students to identify subcortical structures on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) series of the human brain. This program allows the user to transition rapidly between two-dimensional (2D) MRI slices, 3D object composites, and a combined model in which 3D objects are overlaid onto the 2D MRI slices, all while rotating the brain in any direction and advancing through coronal, sagittal, or axial planes. The efficacy of this tool was assessed by comparing scores from an MRI identification quiz and survey in two groups of first-year medical students. The first group was taught using this new 3D teaching tool, and the second group was taught the same content for the same amount of time but with traditional methods, including 2D images of brain MRI slices and 3D models from widely used textbooks and online sources. Students from the experimental group performed marginally better than the control group on overall test score (P = 0.07) and significantly better on test scores extracted from questions involving C-shaped internal brain structures (P teaching tool is an effective way to train medical students to read an MRI of the brain and is particularly effective for teaching C-shaped internal brain structures. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  10. Sims for Science: Powerful Tools to Support Inquiry-Based Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Katherine K.; Loeblein, Patricia J.; Dessau, Kathryn L.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2002, the PhET Interactive Simulations project at the University of Colorado has been working to provide learning tools for students and teachers. The project has developed over 85 interactive simulations--or sims--for teaching and learning science. Although these sims can be used in a variety of ways, they are specifically designed to make…

  11. Teachers' Perceptions of Esri Story Maps as Effective Teaching Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Caitlin; Mitchell, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The current study explores teachers' perceptions of Esri Story Maps as effective teaching tools. Story Maps are a relatively new web application created using Esri's cloud-based GIS platform, ArcGIS Online. They combine digitized, dynamic web maps with other story elements to help the creator effectively convey a message. The relative ease…

  12. Development and Assessment of a New 3D Neuroanatomy Teaching Tool for MRI Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapkin, Zachary A.; Lindgren, Kristen A.; Lopez, Michael J.; Stabio, Maureen E.

    2015-01-01

    A computerized three-dimensional (3D) neuroanatomy teaching tool was developed for training medical students to identify subcortical structures on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) series of the human brain. This program allows the user to transition rapidly between two-dimensional (2D) MRI slices, 3D object composites, and a combined model in…

  13. Grade Distribution Digests: A Novel Tool to Enhance Teaching and Student Learning in Laboratory Practicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Peter G.; Zareie, Reza; Kirkwood, Paul; Ludwig, Martha; Attwood, Paul V.

    2018-01-01

    Assessment is a central component of course curriculums and is used to certify student learning, but it can also be used as a tool to improve teaching and learning. Many laboratory courses are structured such that there is only a grade for a particular laboratory, which limits the insights that can be gained in student learning. We developed a…

  14. Perceptions of Pre-Service Teachers of Using Video Games as Teaching Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensiger, Joy

    2012-01-01

    Teachers' beliefs and perceptions are very critical to the integration of video games in the classrooms. This study was conducted to investigate the perceptions of pre-service teachers in using video games as one of their teaching tools. Along with this initial purpose, the intent was to understand the anticipated barriers involved in…

  15. Intimate Technology: A Tool for Teaching Anti-Racism in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, Anne C.; Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors introduce a new conceptual tool, intimate technology, to mobilize social work students' commitment to anti-racism. Intimate technology is marked by its emotional intensity and accessibility, and its effect of de-centering knowledge and authority. This teaching strategy integrates the modality of intimate technology via…

  16. Enhancing student motivation using LectureTools: A cloud-based teaching and learning platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. H. Patrio Chiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A cloud-based teaching and learning platform, LectureTools, was piloted at City University of Hong Kong in the 2012-13 academic year. LectureTools is an online platform that provides a suite of cloud-based teaching and learning applications. It combines the functions of interactive presentation, real-time student response system, student inquiry and online note-taking synchronised with the presentation slides, into one cloud-based platform. A comprehensive study investigated the effectiveness of the platform for enhancing student motivation among graduate (n=158 and undergraduate (n=96 students. Both groups of students reported enhanced motivation when using LectureTools. The scores on all six learning motivation scales of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire, a psychometric instrument based on the cognitive view of motivation, increased when students engaged with the tool in class. Those who used the tool scored significantly higher on intrinsic goal orientation than those who did not use the tool. The students’ quantitative feedback showed that they found the tool useful and that it improved their motivation. Qualitative feedback from the instructors indicated that the tool was useful for engaging passive students. They reported that the most useful function was the interactive online questions with real-time results, while the in-class student inquiry function was difficult to use in practice.

  17. The Effectiveness of Traditional and 21st Century Teaching Tools on Students' Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellflower, Julie V.

    Any student seeking a high school diploma from the public school system in one U.S. state must pass the state's high school graduation test. In 2009, only 88% of students at one high school in the state met the basic proficiency requirements on the science portion of the test. Because improved science education has been identified as an explicit national goal, the purpose of this mixed methods study was to determine whether traditional teaching tools (notes, lecture, and textbook) or 21st century teaching tools (online tutorials, video games, YouTube, and virtual labs) lead to greater gains in students' science learning. Bruner's constructivist and Bandura's social cognitive theories served as the foundations for the study. Quantitative research questions were used to investigate the relationship between the type of teaching tools used and student learning gains. Quantitative data from students' pre and posttests were collected and analyzed using a dependent samples t-test. Qualitative data were collected through a focus group interview and participant journals. Analysis of the qualitative data included coding the data and writing a descriptive narrative to convey the findings. Results showed no statistically significant differences in students' science achievement: both types of teaching tools led to student learning gains. As a result, an action plan was developed to assist science educators in the implementation of traditional and 21st century teaching tools that can be used to improve students' science learning. Implications for positive social change included providing science educators with a specific plan of action that will enhance students' science learning, thereby increasing science scores on the state and other high stakes tests.

  18. Soils in art as a teaching tool in soil science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, Rosa M.

    2017-04-01

    The representation of soils in the different artistic expressions occurs much less often than that of other naturalistic scientific disciplines, like botany or zoology, due to the minor perception of soils as a natural body since the humans started to express themselves through art. Nevertheless, painters, writers and even musicians and film directors have been forced to deal with soils in their works, as a component of the landscape and as the main actor of the various soil functions. Even if the artists are not aware of soils in the sense of soil science - a study object - their observation of nature invariably leads to express their properties, the problems due to their misuse or degradation and their management practices. These art works have a great value when teaching soil science to students, because the latter can learn to intepret and go beyond the artist's observation and therefore they can appreciate the perception of soils and soil properties along the history of humankind. Paintings from various periods can be used as exercises, mainly those depicting landscapes or agricultural works. Some examples are Dutch landscape painters, as Brueghel the Young showing detailed soil erosion features; or Wijnants (XVII century) depicting very clear podzols on sand dunes. Also the impressionists (Van Gogh, Cézanne, Gaugin), or the landscapes of the romantic nationalists (XIX- early XX century) show forest or agricultural soils that can be used either to deduce soil forming processes and describe horizons, or to discuss the effectivity of soil management practices (deforestation, burning, plowing, terracing). Also some pieces of literature can be used either for illustrating real soil landscapes and soil-water relationships (Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath") or in case of fiction literature, as exercice for soil mapping (Tolkien's Middle Earth in "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings"). Films as "The field" (Jim Sheridan, 1990) or "Corn Island" (George Ovasvili

  19. Attitudes of Health Professional Educators Toward the Use of Social Media as a Teaching Tool: Global Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningham, Lucy; Zou, Runyu; Huang, Jessica; O'Sullivan, Elizabeth; Last, Jason; Ho, Kendall

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of social media in health education has witnessed a revolution within the past decade. Students have already adopted social media informally to share information and supplement their lecture-based learning. Although studies show comparable efficacy and improved engagement when social media is used as a teaching tool, broad-based adoption has been slow and the data on barriers to uptake have not been well documented. Objective The objective of this study was to assess attitudes of health educators toward social media use in education, examine differences between faculty members who do and do not use social media in teaching practice, and determine contributing factors for an increase in the uptake of social media. Methods A cross-sectional Web-based survey was disseminated to the faculty of health professional education departments at 8 global institutions. Respondents were categorized based on the frequency of social media use in teaching as “users” and “nonusers.” Users sometimes, often, or always used social media, whereas nonusers never or rarely used social media. Results A total of 270 health educators (52.9%, n=143 users and 47.0%, n=127 nonusers) were included in the survey. Users and nonusers demonstrated significant differences on perceived barriers and potential benefits to the use of social media. Users were more motivated by learner satisfaction and deterred by lack of technology compatibility, whereas nonusers reported the need for departmental and skill development support. Both shared concerns of professionalism and lack of evidence showing enhanced learning. Conclusions The majority of educators are open-minded to incorporating social media into their teaching practice. However, both users and nonusers have unique perceived challenges and needs, and engaging them to adapt social media into their educational practice will require previously unreported approaches. Identification of these differences and areas of overlap

  20. Teaching Theory Construction With Initial Grounded Theory Tools: A Reflection on Lessons and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmaz, Kathy

    2015-12-01

    This article addresses criticisms of qualitative research for spawning studies that lack analytic development and theoretical import. It focuses on teaching initial grounded theory tools while interviewing, coding, and writing memos for the purpose of scaling up the analytic level of students' research and advancing theory construction. Adopting these tools can improve teaching qualitative methods at all levels although doctoral education is emphasized here. What teachers cover in qualitative methods courses matters. The pedagogy presented here requires a supportive environment and relies on demonstration, collective participation, measured tasks, progressive analytic complexity, and accountability. Lessons learned from using initial grounded theory tools are exemplified in a doctoral student's coding and memo-writing excerpts that demonstrate progressive analytic development. The conclusion calls for increasing the number and depth of qualitative methods courses and for creating a cadre of expert qualitative methodologists. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Evaluation of a simulation tool in ophthalmology: application in teaching funduscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joice Elise Androwiki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the Eye Retinopathy Trainer® as a teaching tool for direct ophthalmoscopy examination by comparing it with the traditional method using volunteers. Methods: Fourth year medical students received training in direct ophthalmoscopy using a simulation tool and human volunteers. Ninety students were randomized into a Simulation Group or a Control Group by the inclusion or absence of the simulation model in classroom practice. Differences between the groups were analyzed using unpaired Student’s t-test. Results: The Simulation Group was superior to the Control Group, with 51.06% successful in performing fundus examination in both the anatomical model simulation and the human model in comparison with 21.15% in the Control Group. Conclusion: The Eye Retinopathy Trainer® appears to be an effective teaching tool for practice and improvement of ophthalmologic examination among fourth year medical students.

  2. Webcams as a tool for teaching in Optometry training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargallo, A.; Arines, J.

    2015-04-01

    Clinical Optometry lab training is devoted to develop the students skills needed in eye healthcare professional practice. Nevertheless, students always find difficulties in the management of some optometric instruments and in the understanding of the evaluation techniques. Moreover, teachers also have problems in explaining the eye evaluation tests or making demonstrations of instruments handling. In order to facilitate the learning process, webcams adapted to the optometric devices represent a helpful and useful tool. In this work we present the use of webcams in some of the most common clinical test in Optometry as ocular refraction, colour vision test, eye health evaluation with slip-lamp, retinoscopy, ophthalmoscopy and contact lens fitting. Our experience shows that with this simple approach we can do things easier: show the instrument handling to all the students at the same time; take pictures or videos of different eye health conditions or exploratory routines for posterior visualization with all the students; recreate visual experience of the patient during optometric exam; simulate colour vision pathologies; increase the interactions between students allowing them to help and correct each other; and also record the final routine exam in order to make possible its revision with the students.

  3. Experimental evidence for the co-evolution of hominin tool-making teaching and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T J H; Uomini, N T; Rendell, L E; Chouinard-Thuly, L; Street, S E; Lewis, H M; Cross, C P; Evans, C; Kearney, R; de la Torre, I; Whiten, A; Laland, K N

    2015-01-13

    Hominin reliance on Oldowan stone tools-which appear from 2.5 mya and are believed to have been socially transmitted-has been hypothesized to have led to the evolution of teaching and language. Here we present an experiment investigating the efficacy of transmission of Oldowan tool-making skills along chains of adult human participants (N=184) using five different transmission mechanisms. Across six measures, transmission improves with teaching, and particularly with language, but not with imitation or emulation. Our results support the hypothesis that hominin reliance on stone tool-making generated selection for teaching and language, and imply that (i) low-fidelity social transmission, such as imitation/emulation, may have contributed to the ~700,000 year stasis of the Oldowan technocomplex, and (ii) teaching or proto-language may have been pre-requisites for the appearance of Acheulean technology. This work supports a gradual evolution of language, with simple symbolic communication preceding behavioural modernity by hundreds of thousands of years.

  4. Virtual reality: teaching tool of the twenty-first century?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, H; Vu, D

    1997-12-01

    Virtual reality (VR) is gaining recognition for its enormous educational potential. While not yet in the mainstream of academic medical training, many prototype and first-generation VR applications are emerging, with target audiences ranging from first- and second-year medical students to residents in advanced clinical training. Visualization tools that take advantage of VR technologies are being designed to provide engaging and intuitive environments for learning visually and spatially complex topics such as human anatomy, biochemistry, and molecular biology. These applications present dynamic, three-dimensional views of structures and their spatial relationships, enabling users to move beyond "real-world" experiences by interacting with or altering virtual objects in ways that would otherwise be difficult or impossible. VR-based procedural and surgical simulations, often compared with flight simulators in aviation, hold significant promise for revolutionizing medical training. Already a wide range of simulations, representing diverse content areas and utilizing a variety of implementation strategies, are either under development or in their early implementation stages. These new systems promise to make broad-based training experiences available for students at all levels, without the risks and ethical concerns typically associated with using animal and human subjects. Medical students could acquire proficiency and gain confidence in the ability to perform a wide variety of techniques long before they need to use them clinically. Surgical residents could rehearse and refine operative procedures, using an unlimited pool of virtual patients manifesting a wide range of anatomic variations, traumatic wounds, and disease states. Those simulated encounters, in combination with existing opportunities to work with real patients, could increase the depth and breadth of learners' exposure to medical problems, ensure uniformity of training experiences, and enhance the

  5. A Unique Sequence of Financial Accounting Courses Featuring Team Teaching, Linked Courses, Challenging Assignments, and Instruments for Evaluation and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, Heidemarie; Wilson, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Accounting at California State University Northridge (CSUN) has developed a unique sequence of courses designed to ensure that accounting students are trained not only in technical accounting, but also acquire critical thinking, research and communication skills. The courses have proven effective and have embedded assessment…

  6. Teledermatology as an educational tool for teaching dermatology to residents and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyers, Lindsay N; Schultz, Amanda; Baceviciene, Rasa; Blaney, Susan; Marvi, Natasha; Dellavalle, Robert P; Dunnick, Cory A

    2015-04-01

    Although teledermatology (TD) is regarded as a tool to improve patient access to specialty healthcare, little has been done to evaluate its role in medical education. We describe the TD program at the Denver (CO) Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and evaluate its use as an educational tool for teaching dermatology to dermatology residents and medical students. Dermatology residents manage TD consultations and review all cases with a faculty preceptor; medical students participate as observers when possible. This study assessed dermatology resident (n=14) and medical student (n=16) perceptions of TD and its usefulness in teaching six core clinical competencies. Both residents (79%) and medical students (88%) "strongly agree" or "agree" that TD is an important educational tool. In general, medical students were slightly more satisfied than residents across all of the core competencies assessed except for patient care. Medical students and residents were most satisfied with the competencies of practice-based learning and improvement and medical knowledge, whereas they were least satisfied with those of interpersonal and communication skills and professionalism. Overall, TD is valued as a teaching tool for dermatology in the areas of patient care, medical knowledge, practice-based learning and improvement, and systems-based practice.

  7. Clubes de Ciencia: Intensive science workshops in Mexico provide a unique opportunity for teaching, scientific and cultural exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bras, I.; Rosengard, S.; Estefania, M.; Jinich, A.

    2016-02-01

    Clubes de Ciencia, which translates to "Science Clubs" is an initiative started by a group of graduate students at Harvard University in 2014 to encourage scientific exchange between the US and Mexico. These science clubs are one-week long intensive workshops taught by graduate students and/or postdocs on a subject of their choice in six Mexican cities. Instructors apply to teach a workshop by sending a proposal to the organizing committee, who is looking for workshops that emphasize hands-on, practical ideas. The instructors, primarily graduate students in the US, are paired with local co-instructors who assist and often co-teach the workshop. Local student participants, who are in their last two years of high school and the first two years of college, are selected based on their interest and enthusiasm. Each class has about 15-20 students, so that the classroom setting is intimate and interactive Sponsors, who fund instructor stipends, class supplies and program development, include the Mexican department of energy (SENER), the Mexican national science foundation (CONACYT), Harvard and MIT. Host universities also provide space and resources. In this presentation we focus on clubs that were taught in January 2015 on ocean physics and July 2015 on ocean chemistry, both taught in Ensenada, Baja California at the national autonomous university. Both workshops included a combination of data analysis, lectures, experiments and computational modeling. The ocean physics class was also recorded intermittently and is being used as a test case for an online course. The format provided an intensive teaching and networking experience and could be interesting to implement in other contexts.

  8. Three dimensional ultrasound and hdlive technology as possible tools in teaching embryology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovici, Razvan; Pristavu, Anda; Sava, Anca

    2017-10-01

    Embryology is an important subject in order to gain an understanding of medicine and surgery; however, sometimes students find the subject difficult to grasp and apply to clinical practice. Modern imaging techniques can be useful aids in teaching and understanding embryology. Imaging techniques have very rapidly evolved over the last few years, advancing from two- to three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound. HDlive is an innovative ultrasound technique that generates near-realistic images of the human fetus. In order to evince the capabilities of 3D ultrasound and HDlive technology in teaching embryology, we evaluated using this technique the normal evolution of the embryo and fetus from the fifth to eleventh week of amenorrhea. Our conclusion is that by yielding clear and impressive images, 3D ultrasound and HDlive could be useful tools in teaching embryology to medical students. Clin. Anat. 30:953-957, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Coupling scanning tunneling microscope and supersonic molecular beams: a unique tool for in situ investigation of the morphology of activated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerieri, M; Reichelt, R; Savio, L; Vattuone, L; Rocca, M

    2012-09-01

    We report here on a new experimental apparatus combining a commercial low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with a supersonic molecular beam. This setup provides a unique tool for the in situ investigation of the topography of activated adsorption systems and opens thus new interesting perspectives. It has been tested towards the formation of the O/Ag(110) added rows reconstruction and of their hydroxylation, comparing data recorded upon O(2) exposure at thermal and hyperthermal energies.

  10. A method for creating teaching movie clips using screen recording software: usefulness of teaching movies as self-learning tools for medical students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Seong Su [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    I wanted to describe a method to create teaching movies with using screen recordings, and I wanted to see if self-learning movies are useful for medical students. Teaching movies were created by direct recording of the screen activity and voice narration during the interpretation of educational cases; we used a PACS system and screen recording software for the recording (CamStudio, Rendersoft, U.S.A.). The usefulness of teaching movies for seft-learning of abdominal CT anatomy was evacuated by the medical students. Creating teaching movie clips with using screen recording software was simple and easy. Survey responses were collected from 43 medical students. The contents of teaching movie was adequately understandable (52%) and useful for learning (47%). Only 23% students agreed the these movies helped motivated them to learn. Teaching movies were more useful than still photographs of the teaching image files. The students wanted teaching movies on the cross-sectional CT anatomy of different body regions (82%) and for understanding the radiological interpretation of various diseases (42%). Creating teaching movie by direct screen recording of a radiologist's interpretation process is easy and simple. The teaching video clips reveal a radiologist's interpretation process or the explanation of teaching cases with his/her own voice narration, and it is an effective self-learning tool for medical students and residents.

  11. A method for creating teaching movie clips using screen recording software: usefulness of teaching movies as self-learning tools for medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Seong Su

    2007-01-01

    I wanted to describe a method to create teaching movies with using screen recordings, and I wanted to see if self-learning movies are useful for medical students. Teaching movies were created by direct recording of the screen activity and voice narration during the interpretation of educational cases; we used a PACS system and screen recording software for the recording (CamStudio, Rendersoft, U.S.A.). The usefulness of teaching movies for seft-learning of abdominal CT anatomy was evacuated by the medical students. Creating teaching movie clips with using screen recording software was simple and easy. Survey responses were collected from 43 medical students. The contents of teaching movie was adequately understandable (52%) and useful for learning (47%). Only 23% students agreed the these movies helped motivated them to learn. Teaching movies were more useful than still photographs of the teaching image files. The students wanted teaching movies on the cross-sectional CT anatomy of different body regions (82%) and for understanding the radiological interpretation of various diseases (42%). Creating teaching movie by direct screen recording of a radiologist's interpretation process is easy and simple. The teaching video clips reveal a radiologist's interpretation process or the explanation of teaching cases with his/her own voice narration, and it is an effective self-learning tool for medical students and residents

  12. JAPANESE LANGUAGE STUDENTS’ PERCEPTION OF USING ANIME AS A TEACHING TOOL

    OpenAIRE

    Yee-Han Chan; Ngan-Ling Wong; Lee-Luan Ng

    2017-01-01

    Studies showed that interest in anime motivates students to learn the Japanese language and culture (Manion, 2005; Fukunaga, 2006; William, 2006). However, little has been written about the practical use of anime in a Japanese language classroom. By employing the method of classroom research, this study will try to narrow the gap between theory and practice of using anime as a teaching tool in the Japanese language classroom. This qualitative study will focus on discussing what the participan...

  13. Electronic keyboard instruments as a helping tool in the process of teaching music

    OpenAIRE

    Rosiński, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The following article shows the usage of new technology in the widely understood music teaching in schools of general profile. Innovative usage of electronic keyboard instruments in music lessons on a significant level expands children’s and teenagers’ musicality and music sensitivity, which was proven with research and observations. The usage of new tools by an educator will influence the quality of performed service so that they can meet the criteria that support the course of lesson. Ch...

  14. Teaching a Foreign Language to Deaf People via Vodcasting & Web 2.0 Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drigas, Athanasios; Vrettaros, John; Tagoulis, Alexandors; Kouremenos, Dimitris

    This paper presents the design and development of an e-learning course in teaching deaf people in a foreign language, whose first language is the sign language. The course is based in e-material, vodcasting and web 2.0 tools such as social networking and blog The course has been designed especially for deaf people and it is exploring the possibilities that e-learning material vodcasting and web 2.0 tools can offer to enhance the learning process and achieve more effective learning results.

  15. Using Simulation to Teach About Poverty in Nursing Education: A Review of Available Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Carol A; Evanson, Tracy A

    2016-01-01

    Poverty is one of the most significant social determinants of health, and as such, it is imperative that nurses have an understanding of the impact that living in poverty has upon one's life and health. A lack of such understanding will impede nurses from providing care that is patient centered, treats all patients fairly, and advocates for social justice. It is essential that nursing educators assure that poverty-related content and effective teaching strategies are used in nursing curricula in order to help students develop this understanding. Several poverty-simulation tools are available and may be able to assist with development of accurate knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Unfortunately, little evidence exists to evaluate most poverty simulation tools. This article will provide an introduction to several poverty-related simulation tools, discuss any related research that evaluates their effectiveness, and make recommendations for integration of such simulation tools into nursing curricula. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. "In Our Own Words": Creating Videos as Teaching and Learning Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norda Majekodunmi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Online videos, particularly those on YouTube, have proliferated on the internet; watching them has become part of our everyday activity. While libraries have often harnessed the power of videos to create their own promotional and informational videos, few have created their own teaching and learning tools beyond screencasting videos. In the summer of 2010, the authors, two librarians at York University, decided to work on a video project which culminated in a series of instructional videos entitled “Learning: In Our Own Words.” The purpose of the video project was twofold: to trace the “real” experience of incoming students and their development of academic literacies skills (research, writing and learning throughout their first year, and to create videos that librarians and other instructors could use as instructional tools to engage students in critical thinking and discussion. This paper outlines the authors’ experience filming the videos, creating a teaching guide, and screening the videos in the classroom. Lessons learned during this initiative are discussed in the hope that more libraries will develop videos as teaching and learning tools.

  17. Computer-aided tool for the teaching of relational algebra in data base courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Villalobos Murillo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the design and implementation of computer-aided tool called Relational Algebra Translator (RAT in data base courses, for the teaching of relational algebra. There was a problem when introducing the relational algebra topic in the course EIF 211 Design and Implementation of Databases, which belongs to the career of Engineering in Information Systems of the National University of Costa Rica, because students attending this course were lacking profound mathematical knowledge, which led to a learning problem, being this an important subject to understand what the data bases search and request do RAT comes along to enhance the teaching-learning process. It introduces the architectural and design principles required for its implementation, such as: the language symbol table, the gramatical rules and the basic algorithms that RAT uses to translate from relational algebra to SQL language. This tool has been used for one periods and has demonstrated to be effective in the learning-teaching process.  This urged investigators to publish it in the web site: www.slinfo.una.ac.cr in order for this tool to be used in other university courses.

  18. A Novel Teaching Tool Combined With Active-Learning to Teach Antimicrobial Spectrum Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Conan

    2017-03-25

    Objective. To design instructional methods that would promote long-term retention of knowledge of antimicrobial pharmacology, particularly the spectrum of activity for antimicrobial agents, in pharmacy students. Design. An active-learning approach was used to teach selected sessions in a required antimicrobial pharmacology course. Students were expected to review key concepts from the course reader prior to the in-class sessions. During class, brief concept reviews were followed by active-learning exercises, including a novel schematic method for learning antimicrobial spectrum of activity ("flower diagrams"). Assessment. At the beginning of the next quarter (approximately 10 weeks after the in-class sessions), 360 students (three yearly cohorts) completed a low-stakes multiple-choice examination on the concepts in antimicrobial spectrum of activity. When data for students was pooled across years, the mean number of correct items was 75.3% for the items that tested content delivered with the active-learning method vs 70.4% for items that tested content delivered via traditional lecture (mean difference 4.9%). Instructor ratings on student evaluations of the active-learning approach were high (mean scores 4.5-4.8 on a 5-point scale) and student comments were positive about the active-learning approach and flower diagrams. Conclusion. An active-learning approach led to modestly higher scores in a test of long-term retention of pharmacology knowledge and was well-received by students.

  19. CGUG: in silico proteome and genome parsing tool for the determination of "core" and unique genes in the analysis of genomes up to ca. 1.9 Mb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan Padmanabhan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses and small-genome bacteria (~2 megabases and smaller comprise a considerable population in the biosphere and are of interest to many researchers. These genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and require complementary computational tools to analyze. "CoreGenesUniqueGenes" (CGUG is an in silico genome data mining tool that determines a "core" set of genes from two to five organisms with genomes in this size range. Core and unique genes may reflect similar niches and needs, and may be used in classifying organisms. Findings CGUG is available at http://binf.gmu.edu/geneorder.html as a web-based on-the-fly tool that performs iterative BLASTP analyses using a reference genome and up to four query genomes to provide a table of genes common to these genomes. The result is an in silico display of genomes and their proteomes, allowing for further analysis. CGUG can be used for "genome annotation by homology", as demonstrated with Chlamydophila and Francisella genomes. Conclusion CGUG is used to reanalyze the ICTV-based classifications of bacteriophages, to reconfirm long-standing relationships and to explore new classifications. These genomes have been problematic in the past, due largely to horizontal gene transfers. CGUG is validated as a tool for reannotating small genome bacteria using more up-to-date annotations by similarity or homology. These serve as an entry point for wet-bench experiments to confirm the functions of these "hypothetical" and "unknown" proteins.

  20. Exploring the Relationship between Web 2.0 Tools Self-Efficacy and Teachers' Use of These Tools in Their Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, Riyadh

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between teachers' self-efficacy in using of Web 2.0 tools and some demographic variables, and their use of those tools in their teaching. The study data was collected from a random sample of public school teachers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The results showed a strong positive relationship…

  1. New tools for systematic evaluation of teaching qualities of medical faculty: results of an ongoing multi-center survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; Bos, Albert P.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Tools for the evaluation, improvement and promotion of the teaching excellence of faculty remain elusive in residency settings. This study investigates (i) the reliability and validity of the data yielded by using two new instruments for evaluating the teaching qualities of medical faculty, (ii) the

  2. New Tools for Systematic Evaluation of Teaching Qualities of Medical Faculty: Results of an Ongoing Multi-Center Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arah, O.A.; Hoekstra, J.B.L.; Bos, A.P.; Lombarts, K.M.J.M.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tools for the evaluation, improvement and promotion of the teaching excellence of faculty remain elusive in residency settings. This study investigates (i) the reliability and validity of the data yielded by using two new instruments for evaluating the teaching qualities of medical

  3. Systematic evaluation of the teaching qualities of Obstetrics and Gynecology faculty: reliability and validity of the SETQ tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leeuw, Renée; Lombarts, Kiki; Heineman, Maas Jan; Arah, Onyebuchi

    2011-01-01

    The importance of effective clinical teaching for the quality of future patient care is globally understood. Due to recent changes in graduate medical education, new tools are needed to provide faculty with reliable and individualized feedback on their teaching qualities. This study validates two

  4. Gesture and Body-Movement as Teaching and Learning Tools in the Classical Voice Lesson: A Survey into Current Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafisi, Julia

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the use of gesture and body-movement in the teaching of singing and reports on a survey amongst professional singing teachers in Germany regarding their use of gesture and body movement as pedagogic tools in their teaching. The nomenclature of gestures and movements used in the survey is based on a previous study by the…

  5. Teaching child psychiatric assessment skills: Using pediatric mental health screening tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, T M; Arthur, M E

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the workshop "Teaching Child Psychiatric Assessment Skills: Using Mental Health Screening Instruments," presented at the 35th Forum for Behavioral Sciences in Family Medicine on 20 September 2014. The goals of the presentation were (1) to teach family medicine behavioral health educators to use both general and problem-specific mental health screening tools (MHSTs) in their work with trainees to help satisfy the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandate for behavioral and mental health experience during family medicine residency, (2) to reflect on how MHSTs might be integrated into the flow of family medicine teaching practices, and (3) to exemplify how evidence-based methods of adult education might be used in teaching such content. One general MHST, the Pediatric Symptom Checklist-17 and one problem-specific MHST for each of the four commonest pediatric mental health issues: for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, the Vanderbilt; for Anxiety, the Screen for Childhood Anxiety-Related Emotional Disorders; for Depression, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 for teens; and for Aggression, the Retrospective-Modified Overt Aggression Scale, were practiced at least twice in the context of a clinical vignette. All of the selected MHSTs are free in the public domain and available for download from the website: www.CAPPCNY.org. Participants were asked to reflect on their own office practice characteristics and consider how MHSTs might be integrated into their systems of care. This workshop could be replicated by others wishing to teach the use of MHSTs in primary care settings or teaching programs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Impact of the Use of a Standardized Guidance Tool on the Development of a Teaching Philosophy in a Pharmacy Residency Teaching and Learning Curriculum Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesner, Amber R.; Jones, Ryan; Schultz, Karen; Johnson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a standardized reflection tool on the development of a teaching philosophy statement in a pharmacy residency teaching and learning curriculum program (RTLCP). Pharmacy residents participating in the RTLCP over a two-year period were surveyed using a pre/post method to assess perceptions of teaching philosophy development before and after using the tool. Responses were assessed using a 5-point Likert scale to indicate level of agreement with each statement. For analysis, responses were divided into high (strongly agree/agree) and low (neutral/disagree/strongly disagree) agreement. The level of agreement increased significantly for all items surveyed (p philosophy, and 96% responding that the resulting teaching philosophy statement fully reflected their views on teaching and learning. The standardized reflection tool developed at Shenandoah University assisted pharmacy residents enrolled in a teaching and learning curriculum program to draft a comprehensive teaching philosophy statement, and was well received by participants. PMID:28970382

  7. Artificial Neural Network approach to develop unique Classification and Raga identification tools for Pattern Recognition in Carnatic Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimani, P. K.; Parimala, Y. G.

    2011-12-01

    A unique approach has been developed to study patterns in ragas of Carnatic Classical music based on artificial neural networks. Ragas in Carnatic music which have found their roots in the Vedic period, have grown on a Scientific foundation over thousands of years. However owing to its vastness and complexities it has always been a challenge for scientists and musicologists to give an all encompassing perspective both qualitatively and quantitatively. Cognition, comprehension and perception of ragas in Indian classical music have always been the subject of intensive research, highly intriguing and many facets of these are hitherto not unravelled. This paper is an attempt to view the melakartha ragas with a cognitive perspective using artificial neural network based approach which has given raise to very interesting results. The 72 ragas of the melakartha system were defined through the combination of frequencies occurring in each of them. The data sets were trained using several neural networks. 100% accurate pattern recognition and classification was obtained using linear regression, TLRN, MLP and RBF networks. Performance of the different network topologies, by varying various network parameters, were compared. Linear regression was found to be the best performing network.

  8. SEVAQ: a unique multi-functional tool for assessing and improving the quality of e-courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schreurs

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available It is challenging to enhance quality of e-learning.We based the quality assessment on the EFQM and theKirkpatrick models. We built our own SEVAQ qualitymodel on which we based our multi-functional selfevaluationquestionnaire. We focused and limited ourselveson the valuable learners feedback. Our questionnaire isstructured around the 3 main criteria: the enablinglearning resources, learning processes and the learningresults. Questions are linked with their criteria andsubcriteria.The SEVAQ tool addresses the designer of the questionnaireas well as the learner, being the evaluator and so being theuser of the questionnaire. The designer selects on a flexibleway a set of relevant questions to be answered by thelearner. After finishing the questionnaire by the learner, thesystem analysis the results

  9. Incorporating technology-based learning tools into teaching and learning of optimization problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Irene

    2014-07-01

    The traditional approach of teaching optimization problems in calculus emphasizes more on teaching the students using analytical approach through a series of procedural steps. However, optimization normally involves problem solving in real life problems and most students fail to translate the problems into mathematic models and have difficulties to visualize the concept underlying. As an educator, it is essential to embed technology in suitable content areas to engage students in construction of meaningful learning by creating a technology-based learning environment. This paper presents the applications of technology-based learning tool in designing optimization learning activities with illustrative examples, as well as to address the challenges in the implementation of using technology in teaching and learning optimization. The suggestion activities in this paper allow flexibility for educator to modify their teaching strategy and apply technology to accommodate different level of studies for the topic of optimization. Hence, this provides great potential for a wide range of learners to enhance their understanding of the concept of optimization.

  10. Case-based debates: an innovative teaching tool in nephrology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Kenar D; Chawla, Arun; Shah, Hitesh H

    2012-01-01

    Medical educators have called for new teaching methods and materials that supplement the traditional lecture format, and education in a range of health professions, including medicine, nursing, and pharmacy, is using a game-based approach to teach learners. Here, we describe a novel teaching tool in a case-based debate using the game format. Two teams of first- and second-year nephrology fellows participated in a PowerPoint game-based debate about which tests to order to diagnose transplant-related case. Our pilot study assessed the participant acceptance of case-based debate sessions and rewards system, and participant perceptions of using this approach to teach fellows and residents the importance of each test ordered and its cost-effectiveness in medicine. Each test ordered requires an explanation and has a point value attached to it (based on relevance and cost of positive and negative test results). The team that comes up with the diagnosis with most points wins the game. A faculty member leads a short concluding discussion. Subjective evaluations found these case-based debates to be highly entertaining and thought-provoking and to enhance self-directed learning.

  11. Peer Observation and Evaluation Tool (POET: A Formative Peer Review Supporting Scholarly Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L. Crabtree

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Peer Observation and Evaluation Tool (POET is a valid and reliable measure developed for formative peer evaluation of pharmacy faculty. The authors replicated a study conducted on the POET in pharmacy in order to report the instrument’s validity and reliability in occupational therapy and to explore its potential as a formative teaching evaluation for occupational therapy educators. To verify item importance, seven participants from the faculty in an occupational therapy department rated each item. To establish inter-rater reliability, the participants evaluated one videotaped 55 min lecture. The POET was reliable with ICC at 0.93. There were high levels of agreement with the importance ratings among the participants with all scales. The POET appears to be a valid and reliable formative measure of teaching. At a time of significant change in the level of occupational therapy education, this measure may be an important support for scholarly teaching in two ways: First, this measure offers several opportunities to document the instructor’s strengths and, second, it offers the instructor suggestions about ways to improve teaching quality. Finally, the POET may facilitate faculty professional growth and development through systematic, strategic, and constructive peer review feedback.

  12. Evaluation of Brainstorming Session as a Teaching-learning Tool among Postgraduate Medical Biochemistry Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Binita; Jain, Anju; Koner, Bidhan Chandra

    2017-12-01

    The thrust for postgraduate teaching should be self-directed learning with equal participation by all students in academic discussions. Group discussions involve conduction of the discourse by a leader who guides the discussion as well as points out any wrong information. This discourages quieter students from participation with the fear of rebuke. Brainstorming is devoid of all such fallacies with no judgment and reprimand. The aim of this study was to use brainstorming as a teaching-learning tool among postgraduate students of medical biochemistry. The project was commenced after due approvals from the research and ethical committee. The participants were enrolled after informed consent and sensitization. All the pro forma and questionnaires were duly validated by experts. After piloting and incorporation of the suggestions for improvisation, the main sessions were planned and implemented. The response was judged by posttest scores and feedback forms. There was an improvement of understanding of the biochemical concepts as assessed by the posttest scores and solving of a similar clinical problem. The students expressed satisfaction with the conduction, timing, and discussion of the clinical problems. The drawbacks of traditional teaching as expressed during the feedback stage were also taken care of by the brainstorming sessions. Our project made the students and the faculty aware about the utility of brainstorming for teaching purposes in medical education which till now was considered efficacious only for troubleshooting in advertising and management institutions. The students were satisfied with this technique for understanding of biochemical concepts.

  13. Digital stethoscope as an innovative tool on the teaching of auscultatory skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco; Reis, Jader Costa dos; Simões, Luciana Silveira; Moura, Eduardo Cardoso de; Rodrigues, Gustavo Amarante; Athayde, Carolina Cunto de; Machado, Hugo Lima; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal

    2013-02-01

    Physical cardiovascular examination, particularly cardiac auscultation, is one of the most difficult clinical skills for students during their medical training. Studies suggest that the use of technologies such as digital stethoscope increase the accuracy of clinical examination, however, its impact on the teaching of cardiac auscultation for undergraduate students of medicine is not known. The objective is to demonstrate the usefulness of the digital stethoscope compared to traditional methods as a tool in the teaching of auscultatory skills. nterventional, longitudinal, controlled, unicenter and randomized study. Thirty-eight medicine students were enrolled for a cardiovascular semiology course lasting eight weeks. The course program included lectures and bedside practice in Cardiology wards. In the practical lessons, the students were randomized into two groups: 1) (n = 21) digital stethoscope (Littmann® Model 3200, 3M); and 2) (n = 17) conventional stethoscopes. A pre-training evaluation was conducted through a test using the software Heart Sounds®, which was repeated after the course. The average scores were compared by paired T test and unpaired T test. It is observed that, at the end of the course, there was a significantly greater improvement in the group that used the digital stethoscope (51.9%) compared to the group using the conventional stethoscope (29.5%). Short-term interventions for cardiac semiology teaching are able to contribute significantly to improving proficiency in the identification of heart sounds. The use of digital stethoscope proved to be a positive factor in teaching these skills.

  14. DIDACTIC MODEL AS AN EDUCATIONAL TOOL APPLIED IN TEACHING OF CELL ANATOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemisa Amorim da Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The didactic models have a prominent role in the chemical and physical education. However, the use of this tool is still little explored in science teaching. In this article, we present a didactic proposal based on the use of representational didactic models to complement the teaching of cellular anatomy. The methodology was tested and evaluated by students of the seventh grade of elementary school in a public school in Tefe, Amazonas. Structured questionnaires were used to assess the perception of knowledge about cellular anatomy, difficulties in understanding the concepts and the importance of using didactic models for learning. The percentage of correct answers in the pre-test ranged from 15% to 54%, while the post-test, this rate was much higher, between 77% to 100%. The percentage of inadequate responses in the pretest demonstrates that traditional teaching activities are not efficient for the promotion of long-term knowledge. In contrast, high levels of correct answers in the post-test suggest that the incorporation of leisure activity - able to arouse curiosity, interest and active participation of students - complements effectively the teaching of anatomy Mobile. With this activity we observed that the educational model is a feasible strategy for effective understanding of the cytological aspects of plant and animal cells. Keywords: Alternative methods; Elementary School; cell anatomy.

  15. ACTIVE METHODOLOGY AS A TEACHING AND PREPAREDNESS TOOL IN THE TECHNICAL COURSE OF LOGISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana ferreira de Vales

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available With the change of the profile of the student, the educational institutions are following new forms for teaching-learning; and within this scenario the Active Methodologies have a great role to provide students with autonomy. The article aims to present the use of Active Methodologies as a teaching and learning tool in the logistics technical course, using the methods Flipped Classroom and Problem-Based Learning (PBL, with the aim of showing the effectiveness of both methods in technical education. For the elaboration of this article the methods used were: bibliographic research and direct observation. The implementation of the Active Methodologies makes the students more interested in the course, besides being an excellent pedagogical resource and an additional motivation for the students.

  16. Teaching and Learning on Enzymes: The Need for New didactic tools

    OpenAIRE

    Luiele, M.L.; Programa de Bioquímica e Biofísica Celular, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ; Leles, J.; Programa de Bioquímica e Biofísica Celular, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ; Bianconi, M. L.; Programa de Bioquímica e Biofísica Celular, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ

    2005-01-01

    Enzymes  are biological catalysts essential  for vital  chemical reactions  in the  cell.  The proper  under- standing  of enzyme  functioning  is an  important step  to  learn  more about life, the  subject  study  of biology. However, without  the opportunity to use a laboratory, it is difficult to the student to visualize the enzyme function.  Our project  is based in the production of a didactic  tool in a CD-rom media to teach enzymes.  In this way, we intend  to teach enzymology in a ea...

  17. Accelerator system model (ASM): A unique tool in exploring accelerator driven transmutation technologies (ADTT) system trade space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, T.J.; Favale, A.J.; Berwald, D.H.; Burger, E.C.; Paulson, C.C.; Peacock, M.A.; Piaszczyk, C.M.; Piechowiak, E.M.; Rathke, J.W. [Northrop Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States). Advanced Technology and Development Center

    1997-09-01

    To aid in the development and optimization of emerging Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) concepts, the Northrop Grumman Corporation, working together with G.H. Gillespie Associates and Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a computational tool which combines both accelerator physics layout/analysis capabilities with engineering analysis capabilities to create a standardized platform to compare and contrast accelerator system configurations. In this context, the accelerator system configuration includes not only the accelerating structures, but also the major support systems such as the vacuum, thermal control, RF power, and cryogenic subsystem (if superconducting accelerator operation is investigated) as well as estimates of the costs for enclosures (accelerating tunnel and RF halls). This paper presents an overview of the Accelerator System Model (ASM) code flow, as well as a discussion of the data and analysis upon which it is based. Also presented is material which addresses the development of the evaluation criteria employed by this code including a presentation of the economic analysis methods, and a discussion of the cost database employed. The paper concludes with examples depicting completed and planned trade studies for both normal and superconducting accelerator applications. 8 figs.

  18. Teaching and Learning with ICT Tools: Issues and Challenges from Teachers’ Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Ghavifekr

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this digital era, ICT use in the classroom is important for giving students opportunities to learn and apply the required 21st century skills. Hence studying the issues and challenges related to ICT use in teaching and learning can assist teachers in overcoming the obstacles and become successful technology users.  Therefore, the main purpose of this study is to analyze teachers’ perceptions of the challenges faced in using ICT tools in classrooms. A quantitative research design was used to collect the data randomly from a sample of 100 secondary school teachers in the state of Melaka, Malaysia. Evidence has been collected through distribution of a modified‐ adopted survey questionnaire. Overall, the key issues and challenges found to be significant in using ICT tools by teachers were: limited accessibility and network connection, limited technical support, lack of effective training, limited time and lack of teachers’ competency. Moreover, the results from independent t‐ test show that use of ICT tools by male teachers (M =2.08, SD = .997 in the classroom is higher compared to female teachers (M = 2.04, SD = .992. It is hoped that the outcome of this research provides proper information and recommendation to those responsible for integrating new technologies into the school teaching and learning process.  

  19. Attitudes of Health Professional Educators Toward the Use of Social Media as a Teaching Tool: Global Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Karan; Henningham, Lucy; Zou, Runyu; Huang, Jessica; O'Sullivan, Elizabeth; Last, Jason; Ho, Kendall

    2017-08-04

    The use of social media in health education has witnessed a revolution within the past decade. Students have already adopted social media informally to share information and supplement their lecture-based learning. Although studies show comparable efficacy and improved engagement when social media is used as a teaching tool, broad-based adoption has been slow and the data on barriers to uptake have not been well documented. The objective of this study was to assess attitudes of health educators toward social media use in education, examine differences between faculty members who do and do not use social media in teaching practice, and determine contributing factors for an increase in the uptake of social media. A cross-sectional Web-based survey was disseminated to the faculty of health professional education departments at 8 global institutions. Respondents were categorized based on the frequency of social media use in teaching as "users" and "nonusers." Users sometimes, often, or always used social media, whereas nonusers never or rarely used social media. A total of 270 health educators (52.9%, n=143 users and 47.0%, n=127 nonusers) were included in the survey. Users and nonusers demonstrated significant differences on perceived barriers and potential benefits to the use of social media. Users were more motivated by learner satisfaction and deterred by lack of technology compatibility, whereas nonusers reported the need for departmental and skill development support. Both shared concerns of professionalism and lack of evidence showing enhanced learning. The majority of educators are open-minded to incorporating social media into their teaching practice. However, both users and nonusers have unique perceived challenges and needs, and engaging them to adapt social media into their educational practice will require previously unreported approaches. Identification of these differences and areas of overlap presents opportunities to determine a strategy to increase

  20. Tales from the front lines: the creative essay as a tool for teaching genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, K E; Hawley, R S

    1999-07-01

    In contrast to the more typical mock grant proposals or literature reviews, we describe the use of the creative essay as a novel tool for teaching human genetics at the college level. This method has worked well for both nonmajor and advanced courses for biology majors. The 10- to 15-page essay is written in storylike form and represents a student's response to the choice of 6-8 scenarios describing human beings coping with various genetic dilemmas. We have found this tool to be invaluable both in developing students' ability to express genetic concepts in lay terms and in promoting student awareness of genetic issues outside of the classroom. Examples from student essays are presented to illustrate these points, and guidelines are suggested regarding instructor expectations of student creativity and scientific accuracy. Methods of grading this assignment are also discussed.

  1. Perceptions of student nurses regarding the use of a popular autobiography as a teaching tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathibe, Lehlohonolo J

    2007-04-01

    Recent studies encourage educators in nursing to use innovative and non-traditional teaching methods, such as using popular movies, posters, portfolios and surfing the internet, to stimulate students' interest, participation and interaction to enhance academic performance as well as knowledge retention. In this, descriptive cross-sectional study, we used self-administered questionnaires with statements graded on 5-points Likert scale (quantitative measures) and open-ended questions (qualitative measures), to assess the feasibility and students' perceptions regarding the use of Lance Armstrong's autobiography of surviving against cancer as a teaching tool. At the beginning of the lecture copies of selected chapters from: "It's Not About the Bike; My Journey Back to Life" [Armstrong, L., Jenkins, S. 2001. It's Not About The Bike: My Journey Back To Life. Yellow Jersey Press, Random House (Pty) Limited, Great Britain], were given to students. Willing students were requested to read for the whole class while the lecturer interjected periodically to explain and expound on certain pharmacological concepts. Eighty percent (80%) of participants felt that the use of an autobiography stimulated their interesting in cancer drugs and 84% agreed/strongly agreed that it contributed to their knowledge of pharmacology. Using Lance Armstrong's autobiography of survival to teach cytotoxic drugs is a worthwhile and rewarding exercise from the student nurses' perspective.

  2. Cybertutor: um objeto de ensino na Dermatologia Cybertutor: a teaching tool in Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Soirefmann

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Foi desenvolvido um objeto de ensino em Dermatologia voltado para a graduação, que utiliza um web site interativo, o Cybertutor. Selecionaram-se casos clínicos didáticos, aulas teóricas e referências bibliográficas atualizadas. As fotografias das lesões foram obtidas pela seleção de pacientes atendidos no ambulatório de Dermatologia. Os temas das aulas se basearam no currículo vigente da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS. O Cybertutor é um objeto de ensino dinâmico, moderno e atual, que possibilita constante inovação.It was developed a teaching tool in Dermatology for undergraduate medical students, using an interactive website, the Cybertutor. Clinical cases, lectures and updated bibliography were selected. Photographies of dermatological lesions were taken from ambulatory patients. The topics of the lectures were based on the current curriculum of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. The Cybertutor is a dynamic and modern teaching tool, allowing constant innovation.

  3. Integrating Web-Based Teaching Tools into Large University Physics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toback, David; Mershin, Andreas; Novikova, Irina

    2005-12-01

    Teaching students in our large, introductory, calculus-based physics courses to be good problem-solvers is a difficult task. Not only must students be taught to understand and use the physics concepts in a problem, they must become adept at turning the physical quantities into symbolic variables, translating the problem into equations, and "turning the crank" on the mathematics to find both a closed-form solution and a numerical answer. Physics education research has shown that students' poor math skills and instructors' lack of pen-and-paper homework grading resources, two problems we face at our institution, can have a significant impact on problem-solving skill development.2-4 While Interactive Engagement methods appear to be the preferred mode of instruction,5 for practical reasons we have not been able to widely implement them. In this paper, we describe three Internet-based "teaching-while-quizzing" tools we have developed and how they have been integrated into our traditional lecture course in powerful but easy to incorporate ways.6 These are designed to remediate students' math deficiencies, automate homework grading, and guide study time toward problem solving. Our intent is for instructors who face similar obstacles to adopt these tools, which are available upon request.7

  4. Plutonium uniqueness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    A standard is suggested against which the putative uniqueness of plutonium may be tested. It is common folklore that plutonium is unique among the chemical elements because its four common oxidation states can coexist in the same solution. Whether this putative uniqueness appears only during transit to equilibrium, or only at equilibrium, or all of the time, is not generally made clear. But while the folklore may contain some truth, it cannot be put to test until some measure of 'uniqueness' is agreed upon so that quantitative comparisons are possible. One way of measuring uniqueness is as the magnitude of the product of the mole fractions of the element at equilibrium. A 'coexistence index' is defined and discussed. (author)

  5. Evaluating teaching methods: validation of an evaluation tool for hydrodissection and phacoemulsification portions of cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ronald J; McCannel, Colin A; Gordon, Lynn K; Hollander, David A; Giaconi, JoAnn A; Stelzner, Sadiqa K; Devgan, Uday; Bartlett, John; Mondino, Bartly J

    2014-09-01

    To develop and assess the validity of an evaluation tool to assess quantitatively the hydrodissection and phacoemulsification portions of cataract surgery performed by residents. Case series. Jules Stein Eye Institute, Olive View-UCLA Medical Center, and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA. The UCLA ophthalmology faculty members were surveyed and the literature was reviewed to develop a grading tool consisting of 15 questions to evaluate surgical technique, including questions from the Global Rating Assessment of Skills in Intraocular Surgery and from the International Council of Ophthalmology's Ophthalmology Surgical Competency Assessment Rubric. Video clips of the hydrodissection and phacoemulsification portions of cataract surgery performed by 1 postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) resident, 1 PGY3 resident, 2 PGY4 residents, and an advanced surgeon were independently graded in a masked fashion by an 8-member faculty panel. Eleven of the 15 questions had a significant association with surgical experience level (Pinstrument handling, flow of operation, and nucleus rotation. Nucleus cracking also had low variability. Less directly visible tasks, especially 3-dimensional tasks, had wider interobserver variability. Surgical performance can be validly measured using an evaluation tool. Improved videography and studies to identify the best questions for evaluating each step of cataract surgery may help ophthalmic educators more precisely measure training outcomes for improving teaching interventions. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. 3D Printing as a Didactic Tool for Teaching some Engineering and Design Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Blasnilo Rua Ramirez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: 3D printing can be used for a wide range of tasks such as the design and testing of prototypes and finished products in a shorter time. In mechanical engineering, prototype designs are continuously generated in academic class activities and final coursework projects by students and teachers. However, students show limitations while understanding the abstract concepts represented with such designs. Method: Firstly, a large scale 3D printer with improved technical specifications compared to traditional market options and similar price, was fabricated. By means of free software and hardware tools and easy-to-obtain alternative manufacturing materials, it was possible to decrease its manufacturing and operating costs. Then a set of study cases utilising the 3D printer in three different subject classes were designed and tested with two cohorts of students of Mechanical Engineering programme. Results: It was feasible to fabricate a cost-effective and practical 3D printer for constructing prototypes and pieces that benefit teaching and learning concepts in engineering and design areas. The experiments carried out in three subjects of engineering courses with second-year students, showed a similar trend of improving the average course grades, as it was observed in two cohorts in different terms. Conclusions: This type of low cost 3D printer obtained academic advantages as a didactic tool for the learning process in engineering and design subjects. Future work will consider applying this tool to other courses and subjects to further evaluate its convenience and effectivity.

  7. Twitter as a Tool for Teaching and Communicating Microbiology: The #microMOOCSEM Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio López-Goñi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Online social networks are increasingly used by the population on a daily basis. They are considered a powerful tool for science communication and their potential as educational tools is emerging. However, their usefulness in academic practice is still a matter of debate. Here, we present the results of our pioneering experience teaching a full Basic Microbiology course via Twitter (#microMOOCSEM, consisting of 28 lessons of 40-45 minutes duration each, at a tweet per minute rate during 10 weeks. Lessons were prepared by 30 different lecturers, covering most basic areas in Microbiology and some monographic topics of general interest (malaria, HIV, tuberculosis, etc.. Data analysis on the impact and acceptance of the course were largely affirmative, promoting a 330% enhancement in the followers and a >350-fold increase of the number of visits per month to the Twitter account of the host institution, the Spanish Society for Microbiology. Almost one third of the course followers were located overseas. Our study indicates that Massive Online Open Courses (MOOC via Twitter are highly dynamic, interactive, and accessible to great audiences, providing a valuable tool for social learning and communicating science. This strategy attracts the interest of students towards particular topics in the field, efficiently complementing customary academic activities, especially in multidisciplinary areas like Microbiology.

  8. MO-DE-BRA-02: SIMAC: A Simulation Tool for Teaching Linear Accelerator Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlone, M; Harnett, N [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Harris, W [Duke University Medical Physics Graduate Program, Durham NC (United States); Norrlinger, B [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); MacPherson, M [The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Lamey, M [Trillium Health Partners, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Oldham, M [Duke University Medical Medical Center, Durham NC (United States); Duke University Medical Physics Graduate Program, Durham NC (United States); Anderson, R

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The first goal of this work is to develop software that can simulate the physics of linear accelerators (linac). The second goal is to show that this simulation tool is effective in teaching linac physics to medical physicists and linac service engineers. Methods: Linacs were modeled using analytical expressions that can correctly describe the physical response of a linac to parameter changes in real time. These expressions were programmed with a graphical user interface in order to produce an environment similar to that of linac service mode. The software, “SIMAC”, has been used as a learning aid in a professional development course 3 times (2014 – 2016) as well as in a physics graduate program. Exercises were developed to supplement the didactic components of the courses consisting of activites designed to reinforce the concepts of beam loading; the effect of steering coil currents on beam symmetry; and the relationship between beam energy and flatness. Results: SIMAC was used to teach 35 professionals (medical physicists; regulators; service engineers; 1 week course) as well as 20 graduate students (1 month project). In the student evaluations, 85% of the students rated the effectiveness of SIMAC as very good or outstanding, and 70% rated the software as the most effective part of the courses. Exercise results were collected showing that 100% of the students were able to use the software correctly. In exercises involving gross changes to linac operating points (i.e. energy changes) the majority of students were able to correctly perform these beam adjustments. Conclusion: Software simulation(SIMAC), can be used to effectively teach linac physics. In short courses, students were able to correctly make gross parameter adjustments that typically require much longer training times using conventional training methods.

  9. MO-DE-BRA-02: SIMAC: A Simulation Tool for Teaching Linear Accelerator Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlone, M; Harnett, N; Harris, W; Norrlinger, B; MacPherson, M; Lamey, M; Oldham, M; Anderson, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The first goal of this work is to develop software that can simulate the physics of linear accelerators (linac). The second goal is to show that this simulation tool is effective in teaching linac physics to medical physicists and linac service engineers. Methods: Linacs were modeled using analytical expressions that can correctly describe the physical response of a linac to parameter changes in real time. These expressions were programmed with a graphical user interface in order to produce an environment similar to that of linac service mode. The software, “SIMAC”, has been used as a learning aid in a professional development course 3 times (2014 – 2016) as well as in a physics graduate program. Exercises were developed to supplement the didactic components of the courses consisting of activites designed to reinforce the concepts of beam loading; the effect of steering coil currents on beam symmetry; and the relationship between beam energy and flatness. Results: SIMAC was used to teach 35 professionals (medical physicists; regulators; service engineers; 1 week course) as well as 20 graduate students (1 month project). In the student evaluations, 85% of the students rated the effectiveness of SIMAC as very good or outstanding, and 70% rated the software as the most effective part of the courses. Exercise results were collected showing that 100% of the students were able to use the software correctly. In exercises involving gross changes to linac operating points (i.e. energy changes) the majority of students were able to correctly perform these beam adjustments. Conclusion: Software simulation(SIMAC), can be used to effectively teach linac physics. In short courses, students were able to correctly make gross parameter adjustments that typically require much longer training times using conventional training methods.

  10. Using food as a tool to teach science to 3 grade students in Appalachian Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffrin, Melani W; Hovland, Jana; Carraway-Stage, Virginia; McLeod, Sara; Duffrin, Christopher; Phillips, Sharon; Rivera, David; Saum, Diana; Johanson, George; Graham, Annette; Lee, Tammy; Bosse, Michael; Berryman, Darlene

    2010-04-01

    The Food, Math, and Science Teaching Enhancement Resource (FoodMASTER) Initiative is a compilation of programs aimed at using food as a tool to teach mathematics and science. In 2007-2008, a foods curriculum developed by professionals in nutrition and education was implemented in 10 3(rd)-grade classrooms in Appalachian Ohio; teachers in these classrooms implemented 45 hands-on foods activities that covered 10 food topics. Subjects included measurement; food safety; vegetables; fruits; milk and cheese; meat, poultry, and fish; eggs; fats; grains; and meal management. Students in four other classrooms served as the control group. Mainstream 3(rd)-grade students were targeted because of their receptiveness to the subject matter, science standards for upper elementary grades, and testing that the students would undergo in 4(th) grade. Teachers and students alike reported that the hands-on FoodMASTER curriculum experience was worthwhile and enjoyable. Our initial classroom observation indicated that the majority of students, girls and boys included, were very excited about the activities, became increasingly interested in the subject matter of food, and were able to conduct scientific observations.

  11. Understanding the mobile internet to develop the next generation of online medical teaching tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Tejas; Christiano, Cynthia; Ferris, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare providers (HCPs) use online medical information for self-directed learning and patient care. Recently, the mobile internet has emerged as a new platform for accessing medical information as it allows mobile devices to access online information in a manner compatible with their restricted storage. We investigated mobile internet usage parameters to direct the future development of mobile internet teaching websites. Nephrology On-Demand Mobile (NOD(M)) (http://www.nephrologyondemand.org) was made accessible to all mobile devices. From February 1 to December 31, 2010, HCP use of NOD(M) was tracked using code inserted into the root files. Nephrology On-Demand received 15,258 visits, of which approximately 10% were made to NOD(M), with the majority coming from the USA. Most access to NOD(M) was through the Apple iOS family of devices and cellular connections were the most frequently used. These findings provide a basis for the future development of mobile nephrology and medical teaching tools.

  12. Best practice strategies for effective use of questions as a teaching tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofade, Toyin; Elsner, Jamie; Haines, Stuart T

    2013-09-12

    Questions have long been used as a teaching tool by teachers and preceptors to assess students' knowledge, promote comprehension, and stimulate critical thinking. Well-crafted questions lead to new insights, generate discussion, and promote the comprehensive exploration of subject matter. Poorly constructed questions can stifle learning by creating confusion, intimidating students, and limiting creative thinking. Teachers most often ask lower-order, convergent questions that rely on students' factual recall of prior knowledge rather than asking higher-order, divergent questions that promote deep thinking, requiring students to analyze and evaluate concepts. This review summarizes the taxonomy of questions, provides strategies for formulating effective questions, and explores practical considerations to enhance student engagement and promote critical thinking. These concepts can be applied in the classroom and in experiential learning environments.

  13. Teaching Strategies to Apply in the Use of Technological Tools in Technical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Arranz García

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of new technologies in education area is changing the way of organizing the educational processes. Teachers are not unrelated to these changes and must employ new strategies to adapt their teaching methods to the new circumstances. One of these adaptations is framed in the virtual learning, where the learning management systems have been revealed as a very effective means within the learning process. In this paper we try to provide teachers in engineering schools how to use in an appropriate way the different technological tools that are present in a virtual platform. Thus, in the experimental framework we show the results outcomes in the analysis of two data samples obtained before and after the implementation of the European Higher Education Area, that would be extrapolated for its innovative application to the learning techniques.

  14. Developing and testing multimedia educational tools to teach Polar Sciences in the Italian school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macario, Maddalena; Cattadori, Matteo; Bianchi, Cristiana; Zattin, Massimiliano; Talarico, Franco Maria

    2013-04-01

    In the last few years science education moved forward rapidly by connecting the expertise and enthusiasm of polar educators worldwide. The interest in Polar Sciences determined the creation of a global professional network for those that educate in, for, and about the Polar Regions. In Italy, this cooperation is well represented by APECS-Italy, the Italian section of the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) that is composed by young researchers and teachers of the Italian School. The Polar Regions represent one of the best natural environments where students can investigate directly on global changes. In this sense, the working group UNICAMearth of the Geology Division of School of Science and Technology, University of Camerino (Italy), promotes the arrangement of instructional resources based on real data coming from the research world. Our project aims to develop innovative teaching resources and practices designed to bring the importance of the Polar Regions closer to home. Consequently, Polar Sciences could become a focus point in the new national school curricula, where Earth Sciences have to be thought and learnt in an integrated way together with other sciences. In particular, M. Macario is producing a teaching tool package, starting from a case study, which includes a dozen of full lesson plans based on multimedia tools (images, smart board lessons and videos of lab experiments) as well as on hands-on activities about polar issues and phenomena. Among the resources the teaching tool package is referring to, there is also an App for tablet named CLAST (CLimate in Antartica from Sediments and Tectonics). This App has been designed by a team made up of polar scientists belonging to the University of Siena and University of Padova, two science teachers of the Museo delle Scienze (MUSE) of Trento other than M. Macario. CLAST has been funded by two Research Projects, CLITEITAM ("CLImate-TEctonics Interactions along the TransAntarctic Mountains

  15. A teaching and communication tool based on DPSIR and LCIA indicator for marine eutrophication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosme, Nuno Miguel Dias; Olsen, Stig Irving

    The Drivers-Pressures-State-Impacts-Responses (DPSIR) is an adaptive environmental management approach that integrates environmental, social, and economic aspects into a common framework. Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) indicators aim at modelling the P-S-I components and provide background...... to understand D-R. The DPSIR approach was applied to the LCIA indicator for marine eutrophication to communicate sustainability assessment to graduate students. Broadly, this science-based educational example is useful to predict impacts, communicate knowledge, and support decisions. It assesses the high demand......, reduce P, and restore S. LCIA indicators also support a precautionary approach acting earlier on D-P and promoting sustainability. LCIA-based DPSIR seems a useful tool for sustainability teaching and communication purposes, bridging science and management while promoting a good conceptual understanding...

  16. The Teaching Practices Inventory: A New Tool for Characterizing College and University Teaching in Mathematics and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    We have created an inventory to characterize the teaching practices used in science and mathematics courses. This inventory can aid instructors and departments in reflecting on their teaching. It has been tested with several hundred university instructors and courses from mathematics and four science disciplines. Most instructors complete the inventory in 10 min or less, and the results allow meaningful comparisons of the teaching used for the different courses and instructors within a department and across different departments. We also show how the inventory results can be used to gauge the extent of use of research-based teaching practices, and we illustrate this with the inventory results for five departments. These results show the high degree of discrimination provided by the inventory, as well as its effectiveness in tracking the increase in the use of research-based teaching practices. PMID:25185237

  17. A simple teaching tool for training the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, Ingrid M; Riss, Paul A; Hanzal, Engelbert; Dungl, Andrea

    2007-09-01

    The pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POPQ) system is currently the most common and specific system describing different prolapse stages. Nevertheless, its use is not yet accepted worldwide in routine care. Our aim was to develop a simple teaching tool for the POPQ system capable of simulating different stages of uterovaginal prolapse for use in medical education with hands on training. We constructed a moveable and flexible tool with an inverted Santa Claus' cap, which simulated the vaginal cuff and the tassel at the end representing the cervix. A wooden embroidery frame fixed the cap and served as the hymen, the reference point for all measurements. Inside the cap, we sewed buttons to define the anatomic landmark points Aa and Ap located 3 cm distal from the frame. After explaining the device to the students, we used the three-by-three grid for recording the quantitative description of the pelvic organ support. First, each student had to demonstrate a specific prolapse with his cap device. Then, a prolapse was simulated on the cap, and the student had to take the relevant measurements and record them in the POPQ grid. The main training effect to understand the POPQ system seems to be the possibility for each trainee to simulate a three-dimensional prolapse with this flexible vagina model.

  18. Teaching Joint-Level Robot Programming with a New Robotics Software Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gonzalez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With the rising popularity of robotics in our modern world there is an increase in the number of engineering programs that offer the basic Introduction to Robotics course. This common introductory robotics course generally covers the fundamental theory of robotics including robot kinematics, dynamics, differential movements, trajectory planning and basic computer vision algorithms commonly used in the field of robotics. Joint programming, the task of writing a program that directly controls the robot’s joint motors, is an activity that involves robot kinematics, dynamics, and trajectory planning. In this paper, we introduce a new educational robotics tool developed for teaching joint programming. The tool allows the student to write a program in a modified C language that controls the movement of the arm by controlling the velocity of each joint motor. This is a very important activity in the robotics course and leads the student to gain knowledge of how to build a robotic arm controller. Sample assignments are presented for different levels of difficulty.

  19. Computer programing for geosciences: Teach your students how to make tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapenthin, Ronni

    2011-12-01

    When I announced my intention to pursue a Ph.D. in geophysics, some people gave me confused looks, because I was working on a master's degree in computer science at the time. My friends, like many incoming geoscience graduate students, have trouble linking these two fields. From my perspective, it is pretty straightforward: Much of geoscience evolves around novel analyses of large data sets that require custom tools—computer programs—to minimize the drudgery of manual data handling; other disciplines share this characteristic. While most faculty adapted to the need for tool development quite naturally, as they grew up around computer terminal interfaces, incoming graduate students lack intuitive understanding of programing concepts such as generalization and automation. I believe the major cause is the intuitive graphical user interfaces of modern operating systems and applications, which isolate the user from all technical details. Generally, current curricula do not recognize this gap between user and machine. For students to operate effectively, they require specialized courses teaching them the skills they need to make tools that operate on particular data sets and solve their specific problems. Courses in computer science departments are aimed at a different audience and are of limited help.

  20. A teaching skills assessment tool inspired by the Calgary-Cambridge model and the patient-centered approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Johanna; Lanier, Cédric; Perron, Noelle Junod; Nendaz, Mathieu; Clavet, Diane; Audétat, Marie-Claude

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a descriptive tool for peer review of clinical teaching skills. Two analogies framed our research: (1) between the patient-centered and the learner-centered approach; (2) between the structures of clinical encounters (Calgary-Cambridge communication model) and teaching sessions. During the course of one year, each step of the action research was carried out in collaboration with twelve clinical teachers from an outpatient general internal medicine clinic and with three experts in medical education. The content validation consisted of a literature review, expert opinion and the participatory research process. Interrater reliability was evaluated by three clinical teachers coding thirty audiotaped standardized learner-teacher interactions. This tool contains sixteen items covering the process and content of clinical supervisions. Descriptors define the expected teaching behaviors for three levels of competence. Interrater reliability was significant for eleven items (Kendall's coefficient pteaching skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Using WebQuest as a Universal Design for Learning Tool to Enhance Teaching and Learning in Teacher Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chien-Hui; Tzuo, Pei Wen; Komara, Cecile

    2011-01-01

    Developed by Dodge (1995), WebQuest is an inquiry-based teaching tool, in which students of all ages and levels participate in an authentic task that use pre-designed, pre-defined internet resources, though other print resources can also be used. Learners will put the focus on gathering, summarizing, synthesizing, and evaluating the information…

  2. Measuring Effectiveness of Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) Tools in Teaching School Children: A Case Study from Chattisgarh State, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, J. Durga Prasad; Singh, Raksha

    2011-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of Information Communication and Technology tools viz DLP (Distance Learning Projector) and Computer/Laptop in comparison with selected instructional media for teaching primary and secondary school pupils. It examined the effect of grade on the performance of the pupils taught with four…

  3. Tools or Crutches? Apparatus as a Sense-Making Aid in Mathematics Teaching with Children with Moderate Learning Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscardini, Lio

    2009-01-01

    This paper challenges a view of concrete materials as artifacts used within a rigid instructional sequence that particular children are perceived to require or not, as the case may be. Focussing on mathematics teaching, it contends that it is more useful to consider the function of these materials as "tools," artefacts used flexibly and…

  4. Use of the Emergency First Response Program as a Tool for Teaching English as a Foreign Language: A Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordice, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    This paper discussed both the theoretical and practical implications of using a first aid training course, specifically the Emergency First Response (EFR) program, as a tool for the teaching and practice of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). The conceptual origins of the idea are discusses through comparisons with theories of learning found in…

  5. Towards a Framework of Using Knowledge Tools for Teaching by Solving Problems in Technology-Enhanced Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostousov, Sergei; Kudryavtsev, Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Problem solving is a critical competency for modern world and also an effective way of learning. Education should not only transfer domain-specific knowledge to students, but also prepare them to solve real-life problems--to apply knowledge from one or several domains within specific situation. Problem solving as teaching tool is known for a long…

  6. LabView Based Nuclear Physics Laboratory experiments as a remote teaching and training tool for Latin American Educational Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo-Bohus, L.; Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Gonzalez, W.; Rangel, A.

    2007-01-01

    A virtual laboratory via internet to provide a highly iterative and powerful teaching tool for scientific and technical discipline is given. The experimenter takes advantage of a virtual laboratory and he can execute nuclear experiment at introductory level e.g. Gamma ray detection with Geiger-Mueller Counter at remote location using internet communication technology

  7. Access, Use and Perceptions of Teachers and Students towards Mobile Phones as a Tool for Teaching and Learning in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafyulilo, Ayoub

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the access, use and perceptions of teachers and students towards mobile phones as a tool for facilitating teaching and learning beyond the classroom walls. A total of 29 pre-service teachers and four college instructors from Dar es salaam University College of Education (DUCE) as well as 12 in-service teachers and 40 students…

  8. Students' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of the World Wide Web as a Research and Teaching Tool in Science Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wan; Gunstone, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the use of the World Wide Web (WWW) as a research and teaching tool in promoting self-directed learning groups of 15-year-old students. Discusses the perceptions of students of the effectiveness of the WWW in assisting them with the construction of knowledge on photosynthesis and respiration. (Contains 33 references.) (Author/YDS)

  9. Design of Smart Educational Robot as a Tool For Teaching Media Based on Contextual Teaching and Learning to Improve the Skill of Electrical Engineering Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhrie, M. S.; Basuki, I.; Asto, B. I. G. P.; Anifah, L.

    2018-04-01

    The development of robotics in Indonesia has been very encouraging. The barometer is the success of the Indonesian Robot Contest. The focus of research is a teaching module manufacturing, planning mechanical design, control system through microprocessor technology and maneuverability of the robot. Contextual Teaching and Learning (CTL) strategy is the concept of learning where the teacher brings the real world into the classroom and encourage students to make connections between knowledge possessed by its application in everyday life. This research the development model used is the 4-D model. This Model consists of four stages: Define Stage, Design Stage, Develop Stage, and Disseminate Stage. This research was conducted by applying the research design development with the aim to produce a tool of learning in the form of smart educational robot modules and kit based on Contextual Teaching and Learning at the Department of Electrical Engineering to improve the skills of the Electrical Engineering student. Socialization questionnaires showed that levels of the student majoring in electrical engineering competencies image currently only limited to conventional machines. The average assessment is 3.34 validator included in either category. Modules developed can give hope to the future are able to produce Intelligent Robot Tool for Teaching.

  10. Some personal notes on role plays as an excellent teaching tool : commentary on "using and developing role plays in teaching aimed at preparing for social responsibility".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Iris

    2013-12-01

    Role plays are extremely valuable tools to address different aspects of teaching social responsibility, because they allow students to "live through" complex ethical decision making dilemmas. While role plays are getting high marks from students because their entertainment value is high, their educational value depends on their closeness to students' work experience and the skills of the teacher in helping students comprehend the lessons they are meant to convey.

  11. [Peer teaching and peer assessment are appropriate tools in medical education in otorhinolaryngology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, M; Linke, J; Zahnert, T; Neudert, M

    2014-06-01

    The use of student tutors (peers) is an accepted method in medical education. In 2011, final year students of the otorhinolaryngology (ORL) department of the University Hospital in Dresden were appointed as peers for the clinical ORL examination. They assisted in the instruction of the clinical ORL examination (peer teaching, PT) and served as examiners (peer assessment, PA) in the final objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). The effect on the quality of education and examination was examined. 248 medical students (5(th) year) were divided in 2 groups. They were trained and finally examined in the standardized clinical ORL examination by peers and/or physicians. Group I (n=118) was exclusively trained and examined by physicians and group II (n=130) by peers and physicians. The results of the OSCE were stratified for the 2 groups and in group II for the subgroups according to the instructors' and examiners' qualification (peer or physician). The students evaluated the internship and the instructors' and examiners' quality with a validated questionnaire. In the OSCE, group I scored in the mean 59.9±4.9 points (max. 65). In group II the mean score was 58.3±4.3 points examined by the peers and 59.5±4.8 points for same performance assessed by the physicians. There were no statistical significant differences in the examination results when stratified for the instructors' and examiners' qualification. The evaluation results were consistently positive and identical when compared to the previous year without use of PT and PA and between the 2 groups and subgroups. When using a standardized clinical examination routine peers can be used for PT and PA to appropriate tools in student's medical education without any decrease in the teaching and examination quality. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. The teaching practices inventory: a new tool for characterizing college and university teaching in mathematics and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieman, Carl; Gilbert, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    We have created an inventory to characterize the teaching practices used in science and mathematics courses. This inventory can aid instructors and departments in reflecting on their teaching. It has been tested with several hundred university instructors and courses from mathematics and four science disciplines. Most instructors complete the inventory in 10 min or less, and the results allow meaningful comparisons of the teaching used for the different courses and instructors within a department and across different departments. We also show how the inventory results can be used to gauge the extent of use of research-based teaching practices, and we illustrate this with the inventory results for five departments. These results show the high degree of discrimination provided by the inventory, as well as its effectiveness in tracking the increase in the use of research-based teaching practices. © 2014 C. Wieman and S. Gilbert. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2014 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Folk Tale as a Tool for the Teaching of French Grammar: The Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apart from the use of songs, teaching aids and text books in a French language teaching class, folk tale could be used to teach grammar, composition or any aspect of the French language. It makes for easy understanding of the language and improves the students' fluency in class. Bruno sees it as an alphabet primer ...

  14. Early Clinical Exposure as a Learning Tool to Teach Neuroanatomy for First Year MBBS Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Maitreyee; Kar, Chinmaya; Roy, Hironmoy; Goyal, Parmod

    2017-12-01

    Early clinical exposure (ECE) is one of the important tools to teach basic science to the MBBS students. It is one form of vertical integration between basic science and clinical subjects. This study is an effort at exploring the use of ECE as a motivational tool toward better learning in neuroanatomy for first year MBBS students. This study aims to make the students interested and motivated to study neuroanatomy by using ECE as learning tool in neuroanatomy and to make the students enable to retain the knowledge of neuroanatomy more efficiently and correlate the knowledge of neuroanatomy with neuromedicine. This study was conducted in collaboration with the Departments of Anatomy, General Medicine and Medical Education Unit in the year 2016. This was cross-sectional study. One hundred and fifty students of 1 st Professional MBBS were subdivided into two groups. After preliminary classes on brain, brainstem, and spinal cord for both groups, conventional lecture classes were taken for Group A only on upper motor neuron (UMN) and lower motor neuron (LMN) paralysis, and only Group B visited General Medicine ward where HOD, General Medicine showed and examined patients of UMN paralysis and LMN paralysis, elicited different symptoms, and discussed different investigation. It was followed by assessment of all by problem-based multiple choice questions (MCQ) and short answer questions. Then, Group B attended lecture class on different cranial nerve palsy whereas Group A visited medicine ward. It was followed by assessment of both groups by problem-based MCQ and short answer questions. The performance was compared. Then, the feedback of the students on ECE was collected by means of reflection writing followed by administration of questionnaire. Then, the perception of teachers regarding ECE was recorded by focused group discussion. Student's t -test was used to compare the performance of both batches. Reflection writing and focus group discussion were analyzed

  15. Comparison of a Web-Based Teaching Tool and Traditional Didactic Learning for In Vitro Fertilization Patients: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vause, Tannys Dawn Reiko; Allison, David J; Vause, Tricia; Tekok-Kilic, Ayda; Ditor, David S; Min, Jason K

    2018-05-01

    The objective of this prospective RCT was to compare the efficacy of a web-based teaching tool to traditional didactic teaching in IVF patients. Forty women undergoing their first IVF cycle were randomly allocated to an interactive web-based teaching session or a nurse-led didactic teaching session. The primary outcome measure was participant knowledge regarding the IVF process, risks, and logistics assessed before and after the respective teaching session. Secondary outcomes included patient stress, assessed before and after the respective teaching session, and patient satisfaction, assessed following the respective teaching session and on the day of embryo transfer (following implementation of the teaching protocol). Both groups demonstrated similar and significant improvements in knowledge and stress after exposure to their respective teaching sessions. The web-based group was significantly more satisfied than the didactic teaching group. Web-based teaching was also shown to be equally effective for participants of high versus low income and education status for knowledge, stress, and satisfaction. This study provides preliminary support for the use of web-based teaching as an equally effective tool for increasing knowledge and reducing stress compared to traditional didactic teaching in IVF patients, with the added benefit of increased patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2018 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The use of drawing as an alternative assessment tool in biology teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, I.

    2018-05-01

    Science required the recording of data to build knowledge. The act of drawing an illustration is one of the oldest methods to record the data in science. Illustration in science provides information that the written word cannot, hence the old adage “A picture is worth a thousand words” is very important for studying science. Drawings an illustration is not only valuable for artists but also for scientists because some aspects of science process skills can also be developed through drawing. In terms of science teaching, applying the act of drawing can also be used as an assessment tool. In this study, we assessed drawing of human internal organs of 38 student teachers who enrolled human physiology course and its correlation to their final exam achievement. Guidance of biological drawing was employed to assess the quality, labelling, and annotations of the drawing. The finding of this study showed that there was a positive correlation between the quality of drawing and final exam achievement. It is suggested that using the method of drawing in combination with written responses assessment would provide a more complete information about student’s understanding of human internal organs.

  17. SOCIAL PROJECT IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHING AS A TOOL FOR EFFECTIVE MOTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлия Леонидовна Гончарова

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Subject and purpose of the researchThis paper describes an experiment on the use of social projects as a kind of extra-curricular collaboration in order to increase students' motivation to learn English, to overcome the psychological barrier of communication in a foreign language, and for the purpose of evaluating the skills of independent learning in the process of solving practical problems or tasks.Design of the experimentThe origin of the problem and the development of learning and cognitive activity during the preparation of students for the project is being described; the expected positive result and the organizational algorithm of the project are proposed.Progress and findingsA phased description of the work of students with emphasis on unexpected and interesting findings is presented; an evaluation system of the individual contribution of each of the students on the project and the ability to work on a team is offered.Practical implicationsConclusions are made about the relevance of the use of group projects in teaching foreign languages as an effective tool to stimulate learning motivation and overcoming socio-psychological and communication problems within the training group and the community as a whole.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-6-44

  18. Improving process of teaching students by means of methods and tools of knowledge management and e-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Banachowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of teaching students is of the greatest importance. It is important to study how to manage it to achieve the best advantages to the students and the university. The authors propose to apply the methods and tools of knowledge management and e-learning. The potential of knowledge management lies in the optimization of university processes, in introducing organizational learning and in helping to take well grounded decisions. The potential of e-learning lies in the improvement of the quality of education, in higher flexibility and adaptability of teaching process to the needs of individual students and in lowering the cost of education. The article shows how to apply e-portfolios and information systems to support the teaching process and knowledge management at academic institutions.

  19. Cross cultural variations in psychiatrists' perception of mental illness: A tool for teaching culture in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Jhilam; Gangadhar, B N; Keshavan, Matcheri

    2016-10-01

    A frequent debate in psychiatry is to what extent major psychiatric diagnoses are universal versus unique across cultures. We sought to identify cultural variations between psychiatrists' diagnostic practices of mental illness in Boston Massachusetts and Bangalore, India. We surveyed psychiatrists to identify differences in how frequently symptoms appear in major mental illness in two culturally and geographically different cities. Indian psychiatrists found somatic symptoms like pain, sleep and appetite to be significantly more important in depression and violent and aggressive behavior to be significantly more common in mania than did American psychiatrists. American psychiatrists found pessimism about the future to be more significant in depression and pressured speech and marked distractibility to be more significant in mania than among Indian psychiatrists. Both groups agreed the top four symptoms of psychosis were paranoia, lack of insight, delusions and auditory hallucinations and both groups agreed that visual hallucinations and motor peculiarities to be least significant. Despite a different set of resources, both groups noted similar barriers to mental health care access. However, American psychiatrists found substance abuse to be a significant barrier to care whereas Indian psychiatrists found embarrassing the family was a significant barrier to accessing care. Because psychiatrists see a large volume of individuals across different cultures, their collective perception of most common symptoms in psychiatric illness is a tool in finding cultural patterns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Systematic evaluation of the teaching qualities of Obstetrics and Gynecology faculty: reliability and validity of the SETQ tools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée van der Leeuw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The importance of effective clinical teaching for the quality of future patient care is globally understood. Due to recent changes in graduate medical education, new tools are needed to provide faculty with reliable and individualized feedback on their teaching qualities. This study validates two instruments underlying the System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ aimed at measuring and improving the teaching qualities of obstetrics and gynecology faculty. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This cross-sectional multi-center questionnaire study was set in seven general teaching hospitals and two academic medical centers in the Netherlands. Seventy-seven residents and 114 faculty were invited to complete the SETQ instruments in the duration of one month from September 2008 to September 2009. To assess reliability and validity of the instruments, we used exploratory factor analysis, inter-item correlation, reliability coefficient alpha and inter-scale correlations. We also compared composite scales from factor analysis to global ratings. Finally, the number of residents' evaluations needed per faculty for reliable assessments was calculated. A total of 613 evaluations were completed by 66 residents (85.7% response rate. 99 faculty (86.8% response rate participated in self-evaluation. Factor analysis yielded five scales with high reliability (Cronbach's alpha for residents' and faculty: learning climate (0.86 and 0.75, professional attitude (0.89 and 0.81, communication of learning goals (0.89 and 0.82, evaluation of residents (0.87 and 0.79 and feedback (0.87 and 0.86. Item-total, inter-scale and scale-global rating correlation coefficients were significant (P<0.01. Four to six residents' evaluations are needed per faculty (reliability coefficient 0.60-0.80. CONCLUSIONS: Both SETQ instruments were found reliable and valid for evaluating teaching qualities of obstetrics and gynecology faculty. Future research should examine improvement of

  1. Minecraft as a learning and teaching tool:designing integrated game experiences for formal and informal learning activities

    OpenAIRE

    Steinbeiss, G.-J. (Gregor-Jan)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Research has shown the educational benefits of using the video game Minecraft in areas such as sciences and educational purposes as a teaching tool to transfer knowledge. Most studies, however, address the issue from an external perspective, rather than a student-centred perspective by evaluation from the researchers’ or teachers’ perspectives. This leads to a gap of data from the participants’ perspective and its ...

  2. Role Playing in Online Education: A Teaching Tool to Enhance Student Engagement and Sustained Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Tisha

    2005-01-01

    As online education escalates, it is important for instructors to explore teaching techniques that engage students and enhance learning at a profound level. To achieve this goal, instructors must look at the primarily text-based environment of the online class not as a limitation, but as an opportunity. Attentive and highly personal teaching that…

  3. Effects of Using Online Tools in Improving Regulation of the Teaching-Learning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Jesus; Cano, Francisco; Justicia, Fernando; Pichardo, Maria del Carmen; Garcia-Berben, Ana Belen; Martinez-Vicente, Jose Manuel; Sander, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The current panorama of Higher Education reveals a need to improve teaching and learning processes taking place there. The rise of the information society transforms how we organize learning and transmit knowledge. On this account, teaching-learning processes must be enhanced, the role of teachers and students must be evaluated, and…

  4. [Improving the teaching quality by multiple tools and technology in oral histopathology experimental course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Wang, Li-Zhen; Hu, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Chun-Ye; Li, Jiang

    2017-04-01

    Oral histopathology is a course which needs to be combined with theory and practice closely. Experimental course plays an important role in teaching oral histopathology. Here, we aim to explore a series of effective measures to improve the teaching quality of experimental course and tried to train observation, thinking, analysis and problem solving skills of dental students. We re-edited and updated the experimental textbook "guidelines of experimental course of oral histopathology", and published the reference book for experimental course--"color pocket atlas of oral histopathology: experiment and diadactic teaching". The number of clinicopathological cases for presentation and class discussion was increased, and high-quality teaching slides were added and replaced the poor-quality or worn out slides. We established a variety of teaching methods based on the internet, which provided an environment of self-directed learning for dental students. Instead of simple slice-reading examination, a new evaluation system based on computer was established. The questionnaire survey showed that the students spoke positively on the teaching reform for experimental course. They thought that the reform played a significant role in enriching the teaching content, motivating learning interest and promoting self-study. Compared with traditional examination, computer-based examination showed a great advantage on mastering professional knowledge systematically and comprehensively. The measures adopted in our teaching reform not only effectively improve the teaching quality of experimental course of oral histopathology, but also help the students to have a clear, logical thinking when facing complicated diseases and have the ability to apply theoretical knowledge into clinical practice.

  5. New tools for systematic evaluation of teaching qualities of medical faculty: results of an ongoing multi-center survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyebuchi A Arah

    Full Text Available Tools for the evaluation, improvement and promotion of the teaching excellence of faculty remain elusive in residency settings. This study investigates (i the reliability and validity of the data yielded by using two new instruments for evaluating the teaching qualities of medical faculty, (ii the instruments' potential for differentiating between faculty, and (iii the number of residents' evaluations needed per faculty to reliably use the instruments.Multicenter cross-sectional survey among 546 residents and 629 medical faculty representing 29 medical (non-surgical specialty training programs in The Netherlands. Two instruments--one completed by residents and one by faculty--for measuring teaching qualities of faculty were developed. Statistical analyses included factor analysis, reliability and validity exploration using standard psychometric methods, calculation of the numbers of residents' evaluations needed per faculty to achieve reliable assessments and variance components and threshold analyses.A total of 403 (73.8% residents completed 3575 evaluations of 570 medical faculty while 494 (78.5% faculty self-evaluated. In both instruments five composite-scales of faculty teaching qualities were detected with high internal consistency and reliability: learning climate (Cronbach's alpha of 0.85 for residents' instrument, 0.71 for self-evaluation instrument, professional attitude and behavior (0.84/0.75, communication of goals (0.90/0.84, evaluation of residents (0.91/0.81, and feedback (0.91/0.85. Faculty tended to evaluate themselves higher than did the residents. Up to a third of the total variance in various teaching qualities can be attributed to between-faculty differences. Some seven residents' evaluations per faculty are needed for assessments to attain a reliability level of 0.90.The instruments for evaluating teaching qualities of medical faculty appear to yield reliable and valid data. They are feasible for use in medical residencies

  6. New tools for systematic evaluation of teaching qualities of medical faculty: results of an ongoing multi-center survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arah, Onyebuchi A; Hoekstra, Joost B L; Bos, Albert P; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2011-01-01

    Tools for the evaluation, improvement and promotion of the teaching excellence of faculty remain elusive in residency settings. This study investigates (i) the reliability and validity of the data yielded by using two new instruments for evaluating the teaching qualities of medical faculty, (ii) the instruments' potential for differentiating between faculty, and (iii) the number of residents' evaluations needed per faculty to reliably use the instruments. Multicenter cross-sectional survey among 546 residents and 629 medical faculty representing 29 medical (non-surgical) specialty training programs in The Netherlands. Two instruments--one completed by residents and one by faculty--for measuring teaching qualities of faculty were developed. Statistical analyses included factor analysis, reliability and validity exploration using standard psychometric methods, calculation of the numbers of residents' evaluations needed per faculty to achieve reliable assessments and variance components and threshold analyses. A total of 403 (73.8%) residents completed 3575 evaluations of 570 medical faculty while 494 (78.5%) faculty self-evaluated. In both instruments five composite-scales of faculty teaching qualities were detected with high internal consistency and reliability: learning climate (Cronbach's alpha of 0.85 for residents' instrument, 0.71 for self-evaluation instrument, professional attitude and behavior (0.84/0.75), communication of goals (0.90/0.84), evaluation of residents (0.91/0.81), and feedback (0.91/0.85). Faculty tended to evaluate themselves higher than did the residents. Up to a third of the total variance in various teaching qualities can be attributed to between-faculty differences. Some seven residents' evaluations per faculty are needed for assessments to attain a reliability level of 0.90. The instruments for evaluating teaching qualities of medical faculty appear to yield reliable and valid data. They are feasible for use in medical residencies, can

  7. Systematic evaluation of the teaching qualities of Obstetrics and Gynecology faculty: reliability and validity of the SETQ tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Leeuw, Renée; Lombarts, Kiki; Heineman, Maas Jan; Arah, Onyebuchi

    2011-05-03

    The importance of effective clinical teaching for the quality of future patient care is globally understood. Due to recent changes in graduate medical education, new tools are needed to provide faculty with reliable and individualized feedback on their teaching qualities. This study validates two instruments underlying the System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ) aimed at measuring and improving the teaching qualities of obstetrics and gynecology faculty. This cross-sectional multi-center questionnaire study was set in seven general teaching hospitals and two academic medical centers in the Netherlands. Seventy-seven residents and 114 faculty were invited to complete the SETQ instruments in the duration of one month from September 2008 to September 2009. To assess reliability and validity of the instruments, we used exploratory factor analysis, inter-item correlation, reliability coefficient alpha and inter-scale correlations. We also compared composite scales from factor analysis to global ratings. Finally, the number of residents' evaluations needed per faculty for reliable assessments was calculated. A total of 613 evaluations were completed by 66 residents (85.7% response rate). 99 faculty (86.8% response rate) participated in self-evaluation. Factor analysis yielded five scales with high reliability (Cronbach's alpha for residents' and faculty): learning climate (0.86 and 0.75), professional attitude (0.89 and 0.81), communication of learning goals (0.89 and 0.82), evaluation of residents (0.87 and 0.79) and feedback (0.87 and 0.86). Item-total, inter-scale and scale-global rating correlation coefficients were significant (Pteaching qualities of obstetrics and gynecology faculty. Future research should examine improvement of teaching qualities when using SETQ.

  8. Teaching and Learning on Enzymes: The Need for New didactic tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Luiele

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes  are biological catalysts essential  for vital  chemical reactions  in the  cell.  The proper  under- standing  of enzyme  functioning  is an  important step  to  learn  more about life, the  subject  study  of biology. However, without  the opportunity to use a laboratory, it is difficult to the student to visualize the enzyme function.  Our project  is based in the production of a didactic  tool in a CD-rom media to teach enzymes.  In this way, we intend  to teach enzymology in a easy, playful, and more comprehensive way than  usually  is done by lectures.  The CD-room will present three  main subjects:  (i Theoretical aspects of enzymes; (ii Experimental and Interactive; and (iii Applications.  The first part  will bring short  texts  on the  structure and  function  of enzymes as well as some of their  history.   There  will be also a interactive show of some structures of enzymes,  collected  at  the  Protein Data  Bank,  where important  residues  and  location  of the  active  site will be shown in evidence.   In the  second part  of the CD-rom,  the student will be able to choose from different conditions  (substrate or concentration, pH, and temperature to visualize the kinetics  of a reaction  in a virtual  spctrophotometer where the changes  in absorbance  with  time  will be based  on actual  experiments done at the laboratory. The kinetic data  bank  includes reaction with  chymotrypsin, trypsin, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and alkaline phosphatase. From the experiments it will be possible to show how the rate  of a reaction is measured,  and how the kinetic constants can be obtained. The interactive part will show schematics where the  conditions  can be changed  and  a cartoon  corresponding  to the  situation will be displayed and will change according to the movement of a cursor.  Part III will describe some applications of

  9. “Biotecnological War” - A Conceptual And Perceptual Assessment Tool For Teaching Biotechnology And Protein Chemistry For Undergraduate Students In Biological Sciences.

    OpenAIRE

    C. R. C. Cruz et al.

    2017-01-01

    "Biotecnological War" board game, a conceptual and perceptual assessment tool for biotechnology and protein chemistry teaching for undergraduate students in biological sciences and related areas. It is a proposal initially conceived as an alternative complementary tool for biochemistry teaching of proteins and peptides, challenging students, aiming to review concepts transmitted in classroom, stimulating diverse student’s abilities, such as their creativity, competitiveness and resource manag...

  10. The forensic autopsy as a teaching tool: Attitudes and perceptions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    known worldwide practice.[1,2] Autopsies are used for teaching anatomical and forensic pathology to under- and postgraduate students. Harris et al.[3] reported that general practitioners regard autopsies as 'being of benefit to education and ...

  11. BIOCHEMISTRY ACADEMIC MONITORING: IT’S INFLUENCE ON TEACHING BACKGROUND AS A TEACHING-LEARNING PRACTICE COMPLEMENT TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H.D. Ribeiro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring process is based on a strategy which propitiates interdisciplinary and gathering theory and practice, apart from teaching assistance, easing and increasing students learning, awakening the academic discipline’s interest and importance. The developed task held over the course of two academic consecutive semesters in 2014 on Biology Science Major at Federal University of Uberlândia had as a goal the use of diverse methodological alternatives in Biochemistry such as: basic bibliography’s comprehension support, approaching and integration mechanism from the content to learner’s reality, meetings to feedback pre-assessment valuation, constructive debates, conceptual issues and questioning in order to clarify any doubts from the content discussed, besides the supervisor’s assistance in practical classes. The resources used to this approach were the student’s analysis to monitoring, their performances on the subject and the approval, retention and evasion levels at the end of the semesters. The obtained results have shown a high level of approval on both semesters, combined to decreasing level of evasion and retention. It was possible to clarify that on the discipline´s development the increasing search for monitoring as much as the complexity´s raise from some contents as the interest and curiosity in knowing certain methods used in monitoring. Improving on student´s performance and arguing on written evaluation also were noticed. The obtained results also proved that diverse methodological alternatives in Biochemistry are potential strategies in maximizing the approval levels in that discipline and bring the student close to the content in a dynamic way, supporting to a better knowledge development in the subject. Monitoring can also be a mean to stimulate the interest in teaching.

  12. The effectiveness of digital microscopy as a teaching tool in medical laboratory science curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Demetra

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental component to the practice of Medical Laboratory Science (MLS) is the microscope. While traditional microscopy (TM) is gold standard, the high cost of maintenance has led to an increased demand for alternative methods, such as digital microscopy (DM). Slides embedded with blood specimens are converted into a digital form that can be run with computer driven software. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of digital microscopy as a teaching tool in the field of Medical Laboratory Science. Participants reviewed known study slides using both traditional and digital microscopy methods and were assessed using both methods. Participants were randomly divided into two groups. Group 1 performed TM as the primary method and DM as the alternate. Group 2 performed DM as the primary and TM as the alternate. Participants performed differentials with their primary method, were assessed with both methods, and then performed differentials with their alternate method. A detailed assessment rubric was created to determine the accuracy of student responses through comparison of clinical laboratory and instructor results. Student scores were reflected as a percentage correct from these methods. This assessment was done over two different classes. When comparing results between methods for each, independent of the primary method used, results were not statistically different. However, when comparing methods between groups, Group 1 (n = 11) (TM = 73.79% +/- 9.19, DM = 81.43% +/- 8.30; paired t10 = 0.182, p < 0.001) showed a significant difference from Group 2 (n = 14) (TM = 85.64% +/- 5.30, DM = 85.91% +/- 7.62; paired t13 = 3.647, p = 0.860). In the subsequent class, results between both groups (n = 13, n = 16, respectively) did not show any significant difference between groups (Group 1 TM = 86.38% +/- 8.17, Group 1 DM = 88.69% +/- 3.86; paired t12 = 1.253, p = 0.234; Group 2 TM = 86.75% +/- 5.37, Group 2 DM = 86.25% +/- 7.01, paired t15 = 0.280, p

  13. An atlas of artefacts: a teaching tool for scintillation camera quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busemann Sokole, E.; Graham, L.S.; Todd-Pokropek, A.; Wegst, A.; Robilotta, C.C.

    2002-01-01

    . Because subtle loss of image quality is difficult to detect in SPECT images, simulations have been included that demonstrate effects of sub-optimal calibrations (e.g. centre-of-rotation offset, non-uniformity) or sub-optimal clinical situations. Conclusions: This artefact atlas covers many different situations and variants that may be encountered. It is intended as a teaching tool to help identify artefacts in quality control and clinical images. Regular updates are essential. The IAEA intends to produce a hardcopy of this artefact atlas, and eventually make it available on CD-ROM. The author and editor (EBS) is indebted to all those who submitted images and contributed to the review process

  14. Personal experience narratives by students: a teaching-learning tool in bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Radhika H; Shukla, Radha; Gor, Alpa P; Ganguly, Barna

    2016-01-01

    The principles of bioethics have been identified as important requirements for training basic medical doctors. Till now, various modalities have been used for teaching bioethics, such as lectures, followed by a small case-based discussion, case vignettes or debates among students. For effective teaching-learning of bioethics, it is necessary to integrate theory and practice rather than merely teach theoretical constructs without helping the students translate those constructs into practice. Classroom teaching can focus on the theoretical knowledge of professional relationships, patient-doctor relationships, issues at the beginning and end of life, reproductive technologies, etc. However, a better learning environment can be created through an experiencebased approach to complement lectures and facilitate successful teaching. Engaging students in reflective dialogue with their peers would allow them to refine their ideas with respect to learning ethics. It can help in the development both of the cognitive and affective domains of the teaching of bioethics. Real-life narratives by the interns, when used as case or situation analysis models for a particular ethical issue, can enhance other students' insight and give them a moral boost. Doing this can change the classroom atmosphere, enhance motivation, improve the students' aptitude and improve their attitude towards learning bioethics. Involving the students in this manner can prove to be a sustainable way of achieving the goal of deep reflective learning of bioethics and can serve as a new technique for maintaining the interest of students as well as teachers.

  15. Information technology - a tool for development of the teaching process at the faculty of medicine, university of sarajevo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin

    2015-04-01

    Information Technologies, taking slow steps, have found its application in the teaching process of Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo. Online availability of the teaching content is mainly intended for users of the Bologna process. The aim was to present the level of use of information technologies at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo, comparing two systems, old system and the Bologna process, and to present new ways of improving the teaching process, using information technology. The study included the period from 2012 to 2014, and included 365 students from the old system and the Bologna Process. Study had prospective character. Students of the old system are older than students of the Bologna process. In both systems higher number of female students is significantly present. All students have their own computers, usually using the Office software package and web browsers. Visits of social networks were the most common reason for which they used computers. On question if they know to work with databases, 14.6% of students of the old system responded positively and 26.2% of students of the Bologna process answered the same. Students feel that working with databases is necessary to work in primary health care. On the question of the degree of computerization at the university, there were significant differences between the two systems (p process were more interested in the introduction of information technology, than students of old system. 68.7% of students of the Bologna process of generation 2013-2014, and 71.3% of generation 2014-2015, believed that the subject of Medical Informatics, the same or similar name, should be included in the new reform teaching process of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo. Information technologies can help the development of the teaching process, and represent attractive and accessible tool in the process of modernization and progress.

  16. The teacher and the use of technological tools of teaching-learning in Ecuadorian Basic Education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Nicolasa Tonato Becerra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The educational computer culture in Ecuador faces new challenges through the use of new teaching and learning methodology. Based on new challenges where the information that the student handles is reflected in the benefits of the use of technology, in this article we present an analysis based on the Strategies of Teaching - Learning towards Education and Good Living that interact in two ways. On the one hand, the right to education is an essential component of Good Living, since it allows the development of human potential, and as such, guarantees equal opportunities for all people, where the Constitution of the Republic of Ecuador, Organic Law of Intercultural Education and the Code of the Childhood, adolescence on the education and the challenges of the teacher, and its strategies of current teaching, at present we count on the aid of the technology so that the teacher can impart its knowledge of a Easy and effective way.

  17. Peer teaching as an educational tool in Pharmacy schools; fruitful or futile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburahma, Mona Hassan; Mohamed, Heba Moustafa

    2017-11-01

    In the past decade, various health care programs have implemented diverse types of peer-assisted learning (PAL) programs, in particularly peer teaching (PT), due to their reported benefits for students (both those undertaking teaching and those being taught), teachers, and educational institutes. Unfortunately, peer teaching is still under-recognized in pharmacy programs worldwide when compared to other health care programs. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the published literature centered on formal PT programs that are implemented in pharmacy schools. In addition, this review focuses on the methodologies adopted for peer teacher recruitment and training as well as the benefits gained by students (both those undertaking teaching and those being taught). The rationales behind PT implementation are recapitulated as well. Finally, a simple scheme for successful implementation of PT activity is provided to serve as a groundwork for educators. Pre-defined key terms were used to search for experimental peer teaching activities in pharmacy schools between January 2000 and June 2016. Titles were selected based on pre-set eligibility criteria. Only complete research articles with clear design and evaluation sections were included in this review. Studies about inter-professional peer teaching activities between pharmacy students and other healthcare professions were also included. Six relevant educational research articles containing peer teaching activities were included. A lot of variety exists between different pharmacy courses implementing PT, the format/setting of PT, how peer teachers are selected, and how training and evaluation are implemented. The studies reviewed confirmed that PT was well received by most of the students and had a positive impact on their learning outcome. These findings cannot be generalized due to the insufficient number of studies published beside their methodological limitations and inadequate descriptions of the PT format

  18. Using Case Study Videos as an Effective Active Learning Tool to Teach Software Development Best Practices (Invited Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil Acharya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental challenge to a solution to improve software quality is in the people and processes that develop software products. Imparting real world experiences in software development best practices to undergraduate students is often a challenge due to the lack of effective learning tools. This pedagogical requirement is important because graduates are expected to develop software that meets rigorous quality standards. Certain best practices are difficult to comprehend by course lectures alone and are enhanced with supplemental learning tools. Realizing the necessity of such teaching tools, we designed and developed six (6 delivery hours of case study videos for use in courses that impart knowledge on Software Verification & Validation (SV&V topics viz. requirements engineering, and software reviews. We see case study videos as an effective active learning tool in our flipped classroom approach. We present our design of the case study video in its generic components envisioning how it may be used in general. To evaluate our active learning tools we mapped the learning objectives of the case Study videos to the expected learning outcomes for ABET accreditation of an undergraduate engineering program. Our implementation has been disseminated to partner institutions. Results of delivery in a faculty workshop and in two different university courses are shared.

  19. Virtual tours as a new teaching tool in geoscience: an example from the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Antoine; Champagnac, Jean-Daniel; Nomade, Jérome

    2013-04-01

    Since almost two decades, numerical tools allowed to spread the science to the people at large, worldwide. Within a few minutes, it is now easy to find a detailed course on one technical or scientific topic. A teacher can lead students to online contents (created by his/her own or by others) to complement his/her own course, with videos, maps or any other content that would remain accessible for the students a long time after the course itself. In geosciences, many national and international institutions provide real time monitoring of the Earth (e.g. seismicity, climate, volcanisms...) and / or scientific content based on active research or more mature results. There is little doubt that this new scientific content is a great step forward for the students and the researchers alike. Geosciences (and especially geology), however, usually require field observations and in situ measurements, and a good student curriculum cannot be achieved without a significant amount of walking, observations, and questions answered on the field. We, as geologists, all experienced days and days of sun, dust and pouring rain... Most of the universities provide the students with field courses that allow them to (try to) apply what they have learnt in the universities' buildings. However, these few days (often reduced to cut the costs and fit teachers' schedules) may not be sufficient given the complexity of the area visited and the possible lack of some parts of the teacher's explanations for various reasons. It is therefore important to build a virtual suite to the field itself to provide a cost-free support available year round, to eventually achieve or complete the field course. The new images technologies now offer amazing visualization capabilities to "show" the field in an interactive fashion. For instance, a few tens of pictures taken with a good SRL camera equipped with an ultra wide angle lens permit to build a 360° panorama with no deformation of a point of interest. Moreover

  20. PORTAAL: A Classroom Observation Tool Assessing Evidence-Based Teaching Practices for Active Learning in Large Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Sarah L.; Converse, Mercedes; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that active learning works better than a completely passive lecture. Despite this evidence, adoption of these evidence-based teaching practices remains low. In this paper, we offer one tool to help faculty members implement active learning. This tool identifies 21 readily implemented elements that have been shown to…

  1. Student Perceptions of Instructional Tools in Programming Logic: A Comparison of Traditional versus Alice Teaching Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Leah

    2011-01-01

    This research investigates the implementation of the programming language Alice to teach computer programming logic to computer information systems students. Alice has been implemented in other university settings and has been reported to have many benefits including object-oriented concepts and an engaging and fun learning environment. In this…

  2. Mathematical Modelling and the Learning Trajectory: Tools to Support the Teaching of Linear Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárcamo Bahamonde, Andrea Dorila; Fortuny Aymemí, Josep Maria; Gómez i Urgellés, Joan Vicenç

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present a didactic proposal for teaching linear algebra based on two compatible theoretical models: emergent models and mathematical modelling. This proposal begins with a problematic situation related to the creation and use of secure passwords, which leads students toward the construction of the concepts of spanning set and…

  3. Teaching Advanced Concepts in Computer Networks: VNUML-UM Virtualization Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Pereniguez-Garcia, F.; Marin-Lopez, R.; Ruiz-Martinez, P. M.; Skarmeta-Gomez, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    In the teaching of computer networks the main problem that arises is the high price and limited number of network devices the students can work with in the laboratories. Nowadays, with virtualization we can overcome this limitation. In this paper, we present a methodology that allows students to learn advanced computer network concepts through…

  4. "Victor the Wild Boy" as a Teaching Tool for the History of Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The article describes an innovative technique for teaching the History of Psychology (HoP) using the story of Victor the "Wild Boy" of Aveyron. Students were given both a traditional history textbook and assignments, along with a novel on the life of Victor and a themed writing assignment. The goal was to elicit connections between…

  5. Tools of Inaction: The Impasse between Teaching Social Issues and Creating Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picower, Bree

    2015-01-01

    Within the field of teacher education, increased emphasis has been placed on social justice education (SJE). This qualitative study examined a group of beginning teachers who voluntarily participated in a social justice critical inquiry project (CIP). The findings indicate that while many of them were successful at teaching social issues, they…

  6. Connecting Theory and Practice: Preservice Teachers' Construction of Practical Tools for Teaching Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobbe, Tim; Ross, Dorene D.; Caron, D. Alvarez; Barko, Timothy; Busi, Rich

    2014-01-01

    The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) has called for changes in mathematics teaching from a procedural to conceptual focus since 1980, yet the way mathematics is taught in many classrooms continues to contradict the recommended practices. The pervasiveness of this challenge has led some educators to suggest changes in university…

  7. e-Portfolio as reflection tool during teaching practice: The interplay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strydom, SC, Dr

    2017-02-01

    Feb 1, 2017 ... attributes of students' training during school practicum as teachers at a South African ... effective teaching-learning atmosphere, in that it promotes new understandings in the use of ICT in the .... stitution benefits, whilst Boud, Keogh and Walker ..... English for example, very easy, very quick to define.

  8. A Visual Encapsulation of Adlerian Theory: A Tool for Teaching and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Cynthia J.

    2001-01-01

    A visual diagram is presented in this article to illustrate 6 key concepts of Adlerian theory discussed in corresponding narrative format. It is proposed that in an age of multimedia learning, a pictorial reference can enhance the teaching and learning of Adlerian theory, representing a commitment to humanistic education. (Contains 18 references.)…

  9. Teaching in the Digital Age: Smart Tools for Age 3 to Grade 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerling, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Integrate technology into your classroom and help children develop skills they need as they learn and grow. Technology is rapidly changing the ways we live our lives and interact with the world. It's also changing how you teach. Technology can enhance your classroom's complete curriculum and assessment and help you create and capture meaningful…

  10. Is Virtual Reality a Useful Tool in the Teaching of Physiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This opinion statement points out some of the considerations and pitfalls in using virtual reality computer programs in the teaching of life sciences. Emphasis is placed on the possibility of such programs leading to reductionist thinking including how reductionist thinking could foster the formation of misconceptions. Negative feedback is used as…

  11. Effective Teaching of the Physical Design of Integrated Circuits Using Educational Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Sicard, Etienne; Ben Dhia, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the strategies used for effective teaching and skill development in integrated circuit (IC) design using project-based learning (PBL) methodologies. It presents the contexts in which these strategies are applied to IC design courses at the University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia, and the National Institute of Applied…

  12. Gender-sensitive observations in public spaces as a teaching tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogleever Fortuijn, J.

    2009-01-01

    Public spaces can be seen as arenas where gendered social roles, relations and identities are (re)produced, represented and contested. Because of their (assumed) public character - crowded, open, accessible and visible - these spaces are extremely useful as «observatories» for teaching and learning

  13. Using a Teaching Philosophy Statement as a Professional Development Tool for Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caukin, Nancy G.; Brinthaupt, Thomas M.

    2017-01-01

    Most new teachers are expected to develop a teaching philosophy statement (TPS). In the present paper, we describe some of the major functions of a TPS and how it can be beneficial to the professional development of teacher candidates. We then describe a case example of a Residency I program and how the features of that program help teacher…

  14. A Heuristic Tool for Teaching Business Writing: Self-Assessment, Knowledge Transfer, and Writing Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Lorelei A.

    2013-01-01

    To teach effective business communication, instructors must target students’ current weaknesses in writing. One method for doing so is by assigning writing exercises. When used heuristically, writing exercises encourage students to practice self-assessment, self-evaluation, active learning, and knowledge transfer, all while reinforcing the basics…

  15. Morphing Images: A Potential Tool for Teaching Word Recognition to Children with Severe Learning Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, Kieron

    2005-01-01

    Children with severe learning difficulties who fail to begin word recognition can learn to recognise pictures and symbols relatively easily. However, finding an effective means of using pictures to teach word recognition has proved problematic. This research explores the use of morphing software to support the transition from picture to word…

  16. Teaching and Learning with ICT Tools: Issues and Challenges from Teachers' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavifekr, Simin; Kunjappan, Thanusha; Ramasamy, Logeswary; Anthony, Annreetha

    2016-01-01

    In this digital era, ICT use in the classroom is important for giving students opportunities to learn and apply the required 21st century skills. Hence studying the issues and challenges related to ICT use in teaching and learning can assist teachers in overcoming the obstacles and become successful technology users. Therefore, the main purpose of…

  17. The Periodic Table as a Tool for Teaching the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Erin E.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2008-01-01

    Teaching the connectedness of relationships among elements in the Periodic Table is often an overwhelming task, and can result in shallow student understanding. This article contains a series of activities that evoke student prior knowledge about classification, leads them to discover periodicity and other relationships among the characteristics…

  18. Teaching and Learning about Economics and Business Using Web GIS Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerski, Joseph J.

    2017-01-01

    Teaching about economics and business has a long tradition in geography. Planning the optimal site for a business or service in a community; examining the demographics and behavior of a certain target market; studying supply chain management to build a specific product such as a mobile phone or a piece of furniture; and examining median income by…

  19. Developing and Testing EVALOE: A Tool for Assessing Spoken Language Teaching and Learning in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gràcia, Marta; Vega, Fàtima; Galván-Bovaira, Maria José

    2015-01-01

    Broadly speaking, the teaching of spoken language in Spanish schools has not been approached in a systematic way. Changes in school practices are needed in order to allow all children to become competent speakers and to understand and construct oral texts that are appropriate in different contexts and for different audiences both inside and…

  20. Teaching Tool for a Control Systems Laboratory Using a Quadrotor as a Plant in MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Subhan; Jaffery, Mujtaba Hussain; Hanif, Athar; Asif, Muhammad Rizwan

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a MATLAB-based application to teach the guidance, navigation, and control concepts of a quadrotor to undergraduate students, using a graphical user interface (GUI) and 3-D animations. The Simulink quadrotor model is controlled by a proportional integral derivative controller and a linear quadratic regulator controller. The GUI…

  1. Using Environmental Science as a Motivational Tool to Teach Physics to Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Hauke C.

    2010-01-01

    A traditional physical science course was transformed into an environmental physical science course to teach physics to non-science majors. The objective of the new course was to improve the learning of basic physics principles by applying them to current issues of interest. A new curriculum was developed with new labs, homework assignments,…

  2. Reflective Journal Writing as a Tool to Teach Aspects of Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-karasneh, Samih M.

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses the impact of a constructivist approach to learning in Jordan, where a traditional context of passive/receptive philosophy of teaching prevails. Student teachers were introduced to journal writing. It was expected that their experiences with journal writing would afford them a better understanding of how it would affect their…

  3. Development and use of an application as a tool in biochemistry teaching: carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayra Rodrigues de Alcântara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to produce an app with information contextualized and creative on the biomolecules: carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids for can be used as a support tool to professor of biochemistry, biology and science. The research was divided into three stages: the first stage questionnaires were applied to verify the level of knowledge of participants; the second stage was the preparation of the app and, after contact of the students with the app, the same questionnaire was completed again to verify the effectiveness of the methodology; the third stage was to analyze the result.. The application has ratings of biomolecules, definitions, functions and curiosities to the peoples to use the app and can relate biochemistry with their daily lives. The BQB Tech application was efficient to be used as tools in biochemistry teaching.

  4. Teacher collaboration and elementary science teaching: Using action research as a tool for instructional leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sara Hayes

    The primary purpose of this action research study was to explore an elementary science program and find ways to support science education as an administrator of an elementary school. The study took place in a large suburban school system in the southeastern United States. Seven teachers at a small rural school volunteered to participate in the study. Each participant became an active member of the research by determining what changes needed to take place and implementing the lessons in science. The study was also focused on teacher collaboration and how it influenced the science instruction. The data collected included two interviews, ten observations of science lessons, the implementation of four science units, and informal notes from planning sessions over a five month period. The questions that guided this study focused on how teachers prepare to teach science through active learning and how instruction shifts due to teacher collaboration. Teachers were interviewed at the beginning of the study to gain the perceptions of the participants in the areas of (a) planning, (b) active learning, (c) collaboration, and (d) teaching science lessons. The teachers and principal then formed a research team that determined the barriers to teaching science according to the Standards, designed units of study using active learning strategies, and worked collaboratively to implement the units of study. The action research project reviewed the National Science Education Standards, the theory of constructivism, active learning and teacher collaboration as they relate to the actions taken by a group of teachers in an elementary school. The evidence from this study showed that by working together collaboratively and overcoming the barriers to teaching science actively, teachers feel more confident and knowledgeable about teaching the concepts.

  5. Web-based teaching tool incorporating peer assessment and self-assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEvoy, Fintan; McEvoy, Peter M.; Svalastoga, Eiliv L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Our objective was to create an electronic learning tool that incorporates the pedagogic advantages of peer assessment and self-assessment into report-generating skills. CONCLUSION. The tool was created using Web programming software. It was tested with 12 veterinary students and provided...... peer-peer and tutor-student interactions that supported learning. The tool is suited for training any professional concerned with the interpretation of images, particularly resident radiologists....

  6. THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS WITH MEDIATING TOOLS: MOODLE WITH GEOGEBRA AND WEBQUEST FOR THE LEARNING OF MATHEMATICAL KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Aluizio Reali

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Much has been thought through about how to make the teaching and learning of scientific content more significant in order to collaborate with education. In this sense, it is up to the teacher to know aspects of human behavior to mediate and facilitate the interpretation of incoming information to students so that this information is transformed into knowledge. Therefore, the educator has seen its role as a transmitter of information turning into a facilitator of the transformation of this information into knowledge, a process that depends on both the teacher and the student. Thus, this work presents some aspects related to the teaching and learning of mathematics, highlighting the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs as mediating and helpful tools of learning. It also presents a virtual learning environment, Moodle, which comprehends Geogebra software, presented in a WebQuest so that together they may be used in the future for the teaching and learning of mathematics in Ourinhos- Fatec Technology College, São Paulo- - Brazil. It is expected, by means of this work, to contribute to discussions and reflections on some emblematic issues of this new practice and mode, as well as disseminate and encourage the use of Geogebra application.

  7. The effectiveness of annotated (vs. non-annotated) digital pathology slides as a teaching tool during dermatology and pathology residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsch, Amanda F; Espiritu, Baltazar; Groth, John; Hutchens, Kelli A

    2014-06-01

    With today's technology, paraffin-embedded, hematoxylin & eosin-stained pathology slides can be scanned to generate high quality virtual slides. Using proprietary software, digital images can also be annotated with arrows, circles and boxes to highlight certain diagnostic features. Previous studies assessing digital microscopy as a teaching tool did not involve the annotation of digital images. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of annotated digital pathology slides versus non-annotated digital pathology slides as a teaching tool during dermatology and pathology residencies. A study group composed of 31 dermatology and pathology residents was asked to complete an online pre-quiz consisting of 20 multiple choice style questions, each associated with a static digital pathology image. After completion, participants were given access to an online tutorial composed of digitally annotated pathology slides and subsequently asked to complete a post-quiz. A control group of 12 residents completed a non-annotated version of the tutorial. Nearly all participants in the study group improved their quiz score, with an average improvement of 17%, versus only 3% (P = 0.005) in the control group. These results support the notion that annotated digital pathology slides are superior to non-annotated slides for the purpose of resident education. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Exploring Just-in-Time Teaching 3D Development as a Tool for Enhancing Knowledge and Understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morag C.E. McFadyen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The integumentary system (skin is the first line of defence in the body and part of the innate immune system. Within first year modules on Pharmaceutical Biology and Integrative Physiology in the Masters of Pharmacy degree at Robert Gordon University (RGU several software tools were used to support both lecture and coursework material for the immune and integumentary systems. However, students had difficulty visualizing the various layers of the skin and how they become affected by different skin lesions. As a response to these identified learning difficulties, a just-in-time teaching 3-Dimensional elearning object was developed using free-to-use 3D CAD packages alongside common elearning software. The outcome was a virtualised human arm equipped to illustrate and label primary or secondary skin lesions whilst allowing spatial manipulation of the arm. This allowed students to manipulate and identify the specific skin layers involved. Evaluation of student engagement and learning was favourable, with students reflecting that they had a better understanding of the topic. Initial findings from this study highlight the benefits of quick, low-cost 3D production processes as just-in-time teaching elearning tools that have a positive impact on students’ performance.

  9. Teaching Bioinformatics and Neuroinformatics by Using Free Web-Based Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisham, William; Schottler, Natalie A.; Valli-Marill, Joanne; Beck, Lisa; Beatty, Jackson

    2010-01-01

    This completely computer-based module's purpose is to introduce students to bioinformatics resources. We present an easy-to-adopt module that weaves together several important bioinformatic tools so students can grasp how these tools are used in answering research questions. Students integrate information gathered from websites dealing with…

  10. How useful are the strategic tools we teach in business schools?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, R.; Paroutis, S.; Blettner, D.P.

    2013-01-01

    Strategic tools are indispensible for business and competitive analysis. Yet we know very little about managers' internal logic as they put these tools into practical use. We situate our study in a business school context using action learning prior to the manifestation of practice to complement our

  11. Applying New Diabetes Teaching Tools in Health-Related Extension Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenci, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    In response to the emerging global diabetes epidemic, health educators are searching for new and better education tools to help people make positive behavior changes to successfully prevent or manage diabetes. Conversation Maps[R] are new learner-driven education tools that have been developed to empower individuals to improve their health…

  12. Teaching-Learning Process by Synchronic Communication Tools: The Elluminate Live Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santovena-Casal, Sonia Ma

    2012-01-01

    When integrating a new online tool in university educational system, it is necessary to know its features, applications and functions in depth, advantages and disadvantages, and the results obtained when it has been used by other educational institutions. Synchronous communication tool, "Elluminate Live" can be integrated into a virtual platform…

  13. PORTAAL: A Classroom Observation Tool Assessing Evidence-Based Teaching Practices for Active Learning in Large Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Classes

    OpenAIRE

    Eddy, Sarah L.; Converse, Mercedes; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that active learning works better than a completely passive lecture. Despite this evidence, adoption of these evidence-based teaching practices remains low. In this paper, we offer one tool to help faculty members implement active learning. This tool identifies 21 readily implemented elements that have been shown to increase student outcomes related to achievement, logic development, or other relevant learning goals with college-age students. Thus, this tool both c...

  14. The body and playfulness: promising tools for teaching and learning mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Rodríguez Manosalva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper will analyze the importance of playfulness as an instrument for learning mathematics, taking into account that the body allows to develop not only motor skills but also intellectual faculties involving high levels of abstraction, such as mathematical operations like addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. The methodology used was action research, through interviews to students, parents and teachers, as well as the systematization of experiences in the classroom by means of a field diary. It was found that traditional –tedious- teaching does not allow students to realize the importance of learning mathematics. It is concluded that it is necessary for the teachers to implement strategies that link playfulness and the body, in order to improve teaching-learning processes, which allows that mathematics do not be considered as something far from reality, but that be granted the status of a knowledge that improves the processes of understanding and reflection, facilitating the solution of practical problems.

  15. Using publicly available internet tools to teach patent research and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Tanev, Stoyan

    2013-01-01

    The management of Intellectual property rights is becoming increasingly important in the 21st century knowledge society. Patents are especially important for engineering design and R&D teams. However, there is a lack of educational resources in this area. There is an increasing need to enhance...... efficiency is especially important within the context of the economic challenges which are drastically limiting the financial resources of all universities. In a previous contribution presented at the ICEIRD 2012 conference we have discussed our finding that technology entrepreneurs in general are interested...... in more education on the patent system [1]. In this paper we will examine the current literature addressing the subject of teaching patent development to engineering students and entrepreneurs. The review will primarily focus on literature that supports the teaching of patents to engineering students...

  16. Digital storytelling as a tool for teaching: Perceptions of pre-service teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantyclaire A. Tiba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that teachers are reluctant to use technology despite the South African (SA government’s huge expenditure on technological equipment. This might be the result of teachers being unable to select appropriate technology that will yield positive learning outcomes as well as being ill-equipped to integrate technology into their pedagogy. To this end, pre-service teachers at a University were trained on how to integrate digital storytelling (DST effectively into their teaching. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the potential benefits of DST for teaching and learning and to determine factors that may prevent pre-service teachers’ uptake of DST during in-service practice. This is a qualitative study in which fifty pre-service teachers were divided into five groups for focus group interviews. Data were analysed, and the results show that pre- service teachers perceived DST to be beneficial in the classroom as it has the potential to (i motivate and engage learners, (ii promote voice/self-expression, and (iii promote collaborative learning and acquisition of multiple skills. Pre-service teachers are of the opinion that a lack of resources, self-confidence and time owing to restrictive curricula may prevent uptake of DST during in-service teaching. It was recommended that school stakeholders create a balance between intrinsic and extrinsic factors that will promote the adoption and integration of DST into teaching. Also, the education institution concerned strives to balance all three strands of knowledge: technology, pedagogy and content.

  17. Digital storytelling as a tool for teaching: Perceptions of pre-service teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tiba

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that teachers are reluctant to use technology despite the South African (SA government’s huge expenditure on technological equipment. This might be the result of teachers being unable to select appropriate technology that will yield positive learning outcomes as well as being ill-equipped to integrate technology into their pedagogy. To this end, pre-service teachers at a University were trained on how to integrate digital storytelling (DST effectively into their teaching. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the potential benefits of DST for teaching and learning and to determine factors that may prevent pre-service teachers’ uptake of DST during in-service practice. This is a qualitative study in which fifty pre-service teachers were divided into five groups for focus group interviews. Data were analysed, and the results show that pre- service teachers perceived DST to be beneficial in the classroom as it has the potential to (i motivate and engage learners, (ii promote voice/self-expression, and (iii promote collaborative learning and acquisition of multiple skills. Pre-service teachers are of the opinion that a lack of resources, self-confidence and time owing to restrictive curricula may prevent uptake of DST during in-service teaching. It was recommended that school stakeholders create a balance between intrinsic and extrinsic factors that will promote the adoption and integration of DST into teaching. Also, the education institution concerned strives to balance all three strands of knowledge: technology, pedagogy and content.

  18. UBIQUITOUS, FREE, AND EFFICIENT ONLINE COLLABORATION TOOLS FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jace HARGIS

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of free, online tools that make collaboration effective, efficient, and engaging. Each tool is available world-wide wherever there is access to the internet. These tools help create a more collaborative environment because they allow for voice, video, text, simultaneous editing, and immediate feedback. The tools presented are easy to use, user friendly, and have online support available if needed. Methods for using the tools are suggested, and examples of how they have been used by the authors are discussed. Professional presentations, instructional activities, meetings, and preparing manuscripts or other collaborative documents can all be developed in collaborative online meetings using Skype, Google tools including Talk, Chat, Calendar, Docs, and Notebooks, and Second Life. These may also be used to enhance education in distance learning or on campus classes. The features, functionality, and intuitive ease of use promote collaborative efforts, increasing the effective and efficient use of time while decreasing costs. Hyperlinks are provided for tools so users can determine technology specifications, download necessary files, learn more about their capabilities, and locate help or support information.

  19. Campaign Documentaries: Behind-the-Scenes Perspectives Make Useful Teaching Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfford, David

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, independent filmmakers have produced insightful documentaries of high profile political campaigns with behind-the-scenes footage. These documentaries offer inside looks and unique perspectives on electoral politics. This campaign season, consider "The War Room"; "A Perfect Candidate"; "Journeys With George;" "Chisholm '72";…

  20. “ Metabolic Ride” - One Concept Evaluation Tool For Metabolic Biochemistry Teaching For Graduate Students In Biological Sciences And Related Areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Gaeta et al.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry subject in general has a high degree of difficulty and complexity. Therefore, application of playful and creative games as teaching methodology has spread in various disciplines of life sciences. "METABOLIC RIDE" board game is a conceptual and perceptual evaluation tool for metabolic biochemistry teaching, aiming to review concepts transmitted in classroom, promoting a competitive challenge to students without denying tools that are at their disposal, stimulating their skills. OBJECTIVES. Correlate metabolic routes importance and their interconnections to establish that metabolic pathways are interconnected, such as a railway map. MATERIAL AND METHODS. This game was developed based on a board game Ticket to Ride. Players purchase enzyme cards, which must be used to claim metabolic routes. The goal is to complete the route previously drawn to earn points and the player who builds the longest continuous route will also earn bonus points. In each turn, players can: buy more card, claim a route or pick up additional destination tickets. The game should be played in groups of 5 to 6 students in 6 to 8 groups. Previously there will be theoretical classes. The activity was designed to last 4 hours. Use of didatic books and internet by players are encouraged. RESULTS. This game proved to be an excellent tool for student’s complementary evaluation, which stimulated teamwork and competitiveness within classroom, which allowed to analyze student’s perception regarding metabolic subjects. On the other hand, for teacher and students participating in compulsory traineeship program this game demonstrated to students new ways to approach complex subjects in biochemistry using creativity. CONCLUSION: Overall, students had a good impression of “Metabolic Ride” game since it helped to secure and administer metabolism subject in a competitive and team work way.

  1. Presenting Fake Figures: A Tool to Teach Effective Scientific Figure Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica A. Segarra

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available As trained scientists, we become adept not only at analyzing and understanding figures in the scientific literature, but also at designing figures to effectively represent our own data and findings. As educators, we strive to pass on these skills to our students, some of whom will ultimately become scientists themselves. Conveying the principles of effective figure design can be challenging, particularly when students have had little exposure to the process of reading scientific literature, much less writing a piece of scientific literature. Improvisational activities in the classroom reinforce teaching goals such as spontaneity, risk-taking, creativity, communication skills, team-building, and critical thinking (2. Indeed, improv training for scientists is becoming more common, helping scientists to communicate more spontaneously about their work and connect with their audience (1. In this article, we present an improvisational game that can aid in the teaching of effective scientific figure design. This “Present-a-Fake-Figure Exercise” is applicable to both the classroom and laboratory settings. In this learning activity, students improvise presenting fake scientific figures to an audience of their peers. These fake figures are prepared beforehand by the instructor and exemplify the do’s and don’ts of scientific figure design. Some of the learning outcomes of the activity include (1 identifying what makes a scientific figure cohesive, easy to analyze, and reader-friendly, and (2 identifying strategies that are useful in the design of a multi-panel figure to convey a scientific story.

  2. ESHOPPS: A COMPUTATIONAL TOOL TO AID THE TEACHING OF SHORTEST PATH ALGORITHMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. de A. LIMA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of a computational tool called EShoPPS – Environment for Shortest Path Problem Solving, which is used to assist students in understanding the working of Dijkstra, Greedy search and A*(star algorithms is presented in this paper. Such algorithms are commonly taught in graduate and undergraduate courses of Engineering and Informatics and are used for solving many optimization problems that can be characterized as Shortest Path Problem. The EShoPPS is an interactive tool that allows students to create a graph representing the problem and also helps in developing their knowledge of each specific algorithm. Experiments performed with 155 students of undergraduate and graduate courses such as Industrial Engineering, Computer Science and Information Systems have shown that by using the EShoPPS tool students were able to improve their interpretation of investigated algorithms.

  3. Development of a teaching tool for women with a gynecologic malignancy undergoing minimally invasive robotic-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglia, Luisa Luciani; Drummond, Nancy; Purden, Margaret A

    2011-08-01

    Women undergoing minimally invasive robotic-assisted surgery for a gynecologic malignancy have many questions and concerns related to the cancer diagnosis and surgery. The provision of information enhances coping with such illness-related challenges. A lack of print materials for these patients prompted the creation of a written teaching tool to improve informational support. A booklet was developed using guidelines for the design of effective patient education materials, including an iterative process of collaboration with healthcare providers and women who had undergone robotic-assisted surgery, as well as attention to readability. The 52-page booklet covers the trajectory of the woman's experience and includes the physical, psychosocial, and sexual aspects of recovery.

  4. Experimental activities in the early years of elementary school: a methodological tool for construction of the teaching-learning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana de Souza Lima

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on the early years of elementary school, this study evaluated the impact of experimental activities based in the scientific method and preconceptions on the learning and memorization of concepts and phenomena associated with the fermentation process. The different activities were carried out through an experimental course (20hs, with students of elementary school from school municipal Diacono Joao Luiz Pozzobon, Santa Maria-RS. The research involved 20 students, with 6 and 7 old years. The evaluation was performed by comparing the interview responses made before the course (pre-test and after the course (post-test. The post-tests were applied at the end of the experimental course, and after 6 and 12 months. The experimental activities facilitated the acquisition and retention of new concepts. The data show that "experimental activities" can be used by teachers in early grades as a methodological tool to complement the teaching-learning process.

  5. A New Roman World: Using Virtual Reality Technology as a Critical Teaching Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Elaine W.; Levis, Marc R.

    The purpose of this study is to examine how technology, namely virtual reality (VR), can be developed as a critical pedagogical tool. More specifically, the study explores whether the use of VR can challenge the traditional lecture format and make the classroom a more student-centered environment. In this instance, VR is defined as a set of…

  6. Science Teaching Orientations and Technology-Enhanced Tools for Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Todd; Longhurst, Max; Duffy, Aaron M.; Wolf, Paul G.; Shelton, Brett E.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examines teacher orientations and technology-enhanced tools for student learning within a science literacy framework. Data for this study came from a group of 10 eighth grade science teachers. Each of these teachers was a participant in a professional development (PD) project focused on reformed and technology-enhanced…

  7. An Entrepreneurial Learning Exercise as a Pedagogical Tool for Teaching CSR: A Peruvian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Vanina A.; Prialé, María Angela; Fuchs, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory cross-sectional study of the value of an entrepreneurial learning exercise as a tool for examining the entrepreneurship dimension of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The study used grounded theory to analyse diaries kept by graduate (MBA) students during the "20 Nuevos Soles Project". From the…

  8. Design of Mobile e-Books as a Teaching Tool for Diabetes Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sophie Huey-Ming

    2017-01-01

    To facilitate people with diabetes adopting information technologies, a tool of mobile eHealth education for diabetes was described in this paper, presenting the validity of mobile eBook for diabetes educators. This paper describes the design concepts and validity of this mobile eBook for diabetes educators delivering diabetes electronic…

  9. e-Portfolio as reflection tool during teaching practice: The interplay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focuses on an e-portfolio pilot initiative at the Faculty of Education ... expectations of an e-portfolio aligns with the current practices and attributes ... will impact the potential success of the integration of e-portfolios as reflective tools.

  10. Teacher-Perceived Adequacy of Tools and Equipment Available to Teach Agricultural Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbins, O. P.; Anderson, Ryan G.; Paulsen, Thomas H.; Wells, Trent

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural mechanics is an important component of a well-rounded school-based agricultural education (SBAE) program. Within agricultural mechanics courses lies a plethora of topics and skills to be covered. Adequate tools and equipment are vital in preparing students to fill an expanding, 21st century workforce. The issue of inadequate teaching…

  11. Using a Self-Administered Visual Basic Software Tool To Teach Psychological Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Harold R.; Sullivan, Amie K.; Schoeny, Zahrl G.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces LearningLinks, a Visual Basic software tool that allows teachers to create individualized learning modules that use constructivist and behavioral learning principles. Describes field testing of undergraduates at the University of Virginia that tested a module designed to improve understanding of the psychological concepts of…

  12. Facebook as an Online Teaching Tool: Effects on Student Participation, Learning, and Overall Course Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Melinda; Hurt, Nicole E.; Larson, Lincoln R.; Prevost, Luanna

    2016-01-01

    Online discussions are widely viewed as a valuable tool for encouraging student engagement and promoting interaction with course material outside of the traditional classroom. Strategies for conducting online discussions vary and are not confined to traditional, university-sponsored learning management systems (LMS). Social media platforms such as…

  13. The Human Rights Key: An innovative tool for teaching health and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I propose the Human Rights Key as a useful visual communication tool to guide students in connecting their classroom learning with the reality of local, regional and international health and human rights issues. As an OER with a Creative Commons licence, the Key is available online for both educators and students to use ...

  14. A Case Study of Instructor Scaffolding Using Web 2.0 Tools to Teach Social Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, Catherine E.; Alam, Sultana Lubna

    2014-01-01

    In the 21st century, also known as the digital era, higher education needs to face the changing technological contexts and to adopt pedagogies and tools for more engaging forms of learning. Despite much publicized enthusiasm about new media and its role in transforming learning in ways aligned with advances and contemporary socio-cultural…

  15. Use of Synchronous Online Tools in Private English Language Teaching in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Like many other industries, private tutoring is now being transformed by the growth of information and communication technologies (ICT). An increasing number of educational entrepreneurs in different countries are incorporating Internet tools in their professional practice. While the popularity of online tutoring in countries with widespread…

  16. Teaching structure: student use of software tools for understanding macromolecular structure in an undergraduate biochemistry course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaswal, Sheila S; O'Hara, Patricia B; Williamson, Patrick L; Springer, Amy L

    2013-01-01

    Because understanding the structure of biological macromolecules is critical to understanding their function, students of biochemistry should become familiar not only with viewing, but also with generating and manipulating structural representations. We report a strategy from a one-semester undergraduate biochemistry course to integrate use of structural representation tools into both laboratory and homework activities. First, early in the course we introduce the use of readily available open-source software for visualizing protein structure, coincident with modules on amino acid and peptide bond properties. Second, we use these same software tools in lectures and incorporate images and other structure representations in homework tasks. Third, we require a capstone project in which teams of students examine a protein-nucleic acid complex and then use the software tools to illustrate for their classmates the salient features of the structure, relating how the structure helps explain biological function. To ensure engagement with a range of software and database features, we generated a detailed template file that can be used to explore any structure, and that guides students through specific applications of many of the software tools. In presentations, students demonstrate that they are successfully interpreting structural information, and using representations to illustrate particular points relevant to function. Thus, over the semester students integrate information about structural features of biological macromolecules into the larger discussion of the chemical basis of function. Together these assignments provide an accessible introduction to structural representation tools, allowing students to add these methods to their biochemical toolboxes early in their scientific development. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. An Interactive Computer Tool for Teaching About Desalination and Managing Water Demand in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolkowska, J. R.; Reyes, R.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an interactive tool to geospatially and temporally analyze desalination developments and trends in the US in the time span 1950-2013, its current contribution to satisfying water demands and its future potentials. The computer tool is open access and can be used by any user with Internet connection, thus facilitating interactive learning about water resources. The tool can also be used by stakeholders and policy makers for decision-making support and with designing sustainable water management strategies. Desalination technology has been acknowledged as a solution to a sustainable water demand management stemming from many sectors, including municipalities, industry, agriculture, power generation, and other users. Desalination has been applied successfully in the US and many countries around the world since 1950s. As of 2013, around 1,336 desalination plants were operating in the US alone, with a daily production capacity of 2 BGD (billion gallons per day) (GWI, 2013). Despite a steady increase in the number of new desalination plants and growing production capacity, in many regions, the costs of desalination are still prohibitive. At the same time, the technology offers a tremendous potential for `enormous supply expansion that exceeds all likely demands' (Chowdhury et al., 2013). The model and tool are based on data from Global Water Intelligence (GWI, 2013). The analysis shows that more than 90% of all the plants in the US are small-scale plants with the capacity below 4.31 MGD. Most of the plants (and especially larger plants) are located on the US East Coast, as well as in California, Texas, Oklahoma, and Florida. The models and the tool provide information about economic feasibility of potential new desalination plants based on the access to feed water, energy sources, water demand, and experiences of other plants in that region.

  18. Experimental stations as a tool to teach soil science at the University of Valencia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi

    2010-05-01

    This paper shows the strategies used at the University of Valencia (Department of Geography. Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Group) to teach soil science at the Geography and Enviromental Science Degrees. The use of the Montesa and El Teularet research stations contribute with a better knowledge on soil science for the students as they can see the measurements carried out in the field. Students visit the stations and contribute to measurements and sampling every season. The use of meteorological stations, erosion plots, soil moisture and soil temperatures probes, and sampling give the students the chances to understand the theoretical approach they use to have. This presentation will show how the students evolve, and how their knowledge in soil science is improved.

  19. PADLET AND OTHER INFORMATION COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY TOOLS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Borisovna Lysunets

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the necessity of the computerization of the education sphere. Information Communication Technology (ICT tools and services of Google, blended learning techniques help to enhance autonomous education and answer the training needs of future specia-lists. The paper describes the Padlet (Google application and provides with its practical usage in language classroom. The authors come to the following conclusions: improving Internet and computer technology competence through mastering various Internet tools and applications can be traced. Besides, the introduction of IT into traditional classroom intensifies the process of cognitive development and mental activities, forming the high level of students’ motivation and interest. For students the usage of IT proves the positive dynamics of their accomplishments in the field of selecting, organizing and dealing with information provided in various forms. It enhances students’ opportunities in creating, designing and performing their works and achievements.

  20. An educational tool for teaching medication history taking to pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Karen R; Elliott, Jennifer; Stanton, Melonie L; Doty, Randell

    2013-06-12

    To implement and evaluate the use of a situated-learning experience to prepare second-year pharmacy students to conduct medication history interviews in preparation for introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPE) at ambulatory clinic sites. Second-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students (n=200) used the Medication Mysteries Infinite Case Tool, a game-like educational tool in which groups of 3 students assumed the roles of pharmacist, patient, and observer and rolled a die and drew cards to determine the drugs, patient personality, medication problems, and other variables that guided a medication history taking session. After the laboratory session, faculty members assessed students' medication history-taking skills. One hundred sixteen (58%) and 78 (39%) of 200 students achieved excellence or competence, respectively, on the final assessment. Two weeks after the assessment, 53 of 200 (26.5%) students completed a survey instrument. The respondents indicated that their self-confidence in conducting medical history taking significantly improved following completion of the learning experience. Using the Medication Mysteries Infinite Case Tool increased students' confidence and skills in conducting medication history taking prior to their clinical IPPE experience.

  1. Interactive NMR: A Simulation Based Teaching Tool for Fundamentals to Applications with Tangible Analogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesse-Nascimento, Sarah; Bridger, Joshua; Brown, Keith; Westervelt, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Interactive computer simulations increase students' understanding of difficult concepts and their ability to explain complex ideas. We created a module of eight interactive programs and accompanying lesson plans for teaching the fundamental concepts of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) that we call interactive NMR (iNMR). We begin with an analogy between nuclear spins and metronomes to start to build intuition about the dynamics of spins in a magnetic field. We continue to explain T1, T2, and pulse sequences with the metronome analogy. The final three programs are used to introduce and explain the Magnetic Resonance Switch, a recent diagnostic technique based on NMR. A modern relevant application is useful to generate interest in the topic and confidence in the students' ability to apply their knowledge. The iNMR module was incorporated into a high school AP physics class. In a preliminary evaluation of implementation, students expressed enthusiasm and demonstrated enhanced understanding of the material relative to the previous year. Funded by NSF PHY-0646094 grant.

  2. Wormholes in spacetime and their use for interstellar travel: A tool for teaching general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.S.; Thorne, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    Rapid interstellar travel by means of spacetime wormholes is described in a way that is useful for teaching elementary general relativity. The description touches base with Carl Sagan's novel Contact, which, unlike most science fiction novels, treats such travel in a manner that accords with the best 1986 knowledge of the laws of physics. Many objections are given against the use of black holes or Schwarzschild wormholes for rapid interstellar travel. A new class of solutions of the Einstein field equations is presented, which describe wormholes that, in principle, could be traversed by human beings. It is essential in these solutions that the wormhole possess a throat at which there is no horizon; and this property, together with the Einstein field equations, places an extreme constraint on the material that generates the wormhole's spacetime curvature: In the wormhole's throat that material must possess a radial tension tau 0 with the enormous magnitude tau 0 ∼ (pressure at the center of the most massive of neutron stars) x (20 km) 2 /(circumference of throat) 2 . Moreover, this tension must exceed the material's density of mass-energy, rho 0 c 2 . No known material has this tau 0 >rho 0 c 2 property, and such material would violate all the ''energy conditions'' that underlie some deeply cherished theorems in general relativity. However, it is not possible today to rule out firmly the existence of such material; and quantum field theory gives tantalizing hints that such material might, in fact, be possible

  3. Online Teaching Tool for Sinus Surgery: Trends toward Mobile and Global Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George K. Koch DMD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective Online resources may provide an ideal forum for expert presentation of surgical techniques. The purpose of this study was to investigate utilization patterns of a sinus surgery website, SinusVideos.com , to gain insight into the needs of viewers. Study Design Retrospective analysis. Setting Surgical teaching website. Subjects and Methods The website’s anonymized analytic database was queried from 2009 to 2014. Quantified data included user demographics, geographic location, viewing device, page visits, and time spent on the website. Results A total of 428,691 website pages were viewed during the study period. Growth in viewership was observed each successive year since the site was launched. The mean time spent viewing webpages was 96.1 seconds for desktop computer users, 98.0 for tablet users, and 103.8 for mobile users. The percentage of mobile devices used to view the site increased significantly between 2009 and 2014 (2.1% vs 25.4%, respectively; P < .0001. The website’s viewership expanded globally, with a significant increase in site views from outside North America over this same period (18.4% vs 51.7%, P < .0001. Conclusion The observed increase in global participation and mobile device usage may reflect new areas of growth for surgical education.

  4. The lived experience of violence: using storytelling as a teaching tool with middle school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, Gretchen D

    2004-04-01

    This qualitative study explored 8th-grade students' responses to hearing stories about the lived experience of violence. A convenience sample of 13 students attending health education classes at a public middle school was used. After hearing each story, students answered a series of questions using the process of free writing. Free writing is a technique that allows students to explore their thoughts and reactions while promoting critical thinking. Student free writing samples were analyzed using a process of constant comparison. Three themes emerged from the data: (a) students gain insights into the realities of violence through hearing these stories, (b) students respond on an emotional level to both the stories and the storytellers, and (c) students respond positively to and are engaged by these stories. The findings lend support to the use of storytelling in teaching youth about violence. School nurses can develop and implement violence prevention education programs using the storytelling model, seek grant and community support for such programs, and conduct further research into the use of the storytelling model.

  5. Evaluation of a multimedia online tool for teaching bronchial hygiene to physical therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cibele C B Marques da; Toledo, Sonia L P; Silveira, Paulo S P; Carvalho, Celso R F

    2012-01-01

    Advances in information technology have been widely used in teaching health care professionals. The use of multimedia resources may be important for clinical learning and we are not aware of previous reports using such technology in respiratory physical therapy education. Our approach was to evaluate a conventional bronchial hygiene techniques (BHTs) course with an interactive online environment, including multimedia resources. Previous developed audiovisual support material comprised: physiology, physiopathology and BHTs, accessible to students through the Internet in conjunction with BHTs classes. Two groups of students were compared and both attended regular classes: the on-line group (n=8) received access to online resources, while the control group (n=8) received conventional written material. Student's performance was evaluated before and after the course. A preliminary test (score 0 to 10) was applied before the beginning of the course, showing that the initial knowledge of both groups was comparable [online, 6.75 (SD=0.88) vs. control, 6.125 (SD=1.35); p>0.05]. Two weeks after the end of the course, a second test showed that the online group performed significantly better than the control group [respectively, 7.75 (SD=1.28) vs. 5.93 (SD=0.72); p>0.05]. The use of a multimedia online resource had a positive impact on student's learning in respiratory therapy field in which instrumental and manual resources are often used and can be explored using this technology.

  6. Transesophageal echocardiography simulation is an effective tool in teaching psychomotor skills to novice echocardiographers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohmer, Benjamin; Hudson, Christopher; Hudson, Jordan; Posner, Glenn D; Naik, Viren

    2014-03-01

    Performance of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) requires the psychomotor ability to obtain interpretable echocardiographic images. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a simulation-based curriculum in which a TEE simulator is used to teach the psychomotor skills to novice echocardiographers and to compare instructor-guided with self-directed online delivery of the curriculum. After institutional review board approval, subjects inexperienced in TEE completed an online review of TEE material prior to a baseline pre-test of TEE psychomotor skills using the simulator. Subjects were randomized to two groups. The first group received an instructor-guided lesson of TEE psychomotor skills with the simulator. The second group received a self-directed slide presentation of TEE psychomotor skills with the simulator. Both lessons delivered identical information. Following their respective training sessions, all subjects performed a post-test of their TEE psychomotor skills using the simulator. Two assessors rated the TEE performances using a validated scoring system for acquisition of images. Pre-test TEE simulator scores were similar between the two instruction groups (9.0 vs 5.0; P = 0.28). The scores in both groups improved significantly following training, regardless of the method of instruction (P psychomotor skills. There was no difference in improvement between the different modalities of instruction. Further research will examine the need for a faculty resource for a curriculum in which a simulator is used as an adjunct.

  7. Simulator program as a form of implementation of electronic teaching tools for self-study of foreign students at the stage of pre-university training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriy O. Savel'ev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Questions of empowerment the organization of classroom and extracurricular self-study of foreign students at the stage of pre-university training through the implementation of electronic teaching tools as a component of computer training facilities in educational process are considered. Classification of modern electronic teaching tools as a component of computer hardware training, developed on the basis of modern information and communication technologies is offered. Version of program-simulator "Introductory course" is offered. The program is created by means of WEB-programming and uses training material of introductory course. Introductory course is one of the most important elements of teaching of scientific style of speech within the language training for the foreign students at the preparatory faculty.

  8. Tools for enhancing motivation in teaching climate change and impacts for students in forest- and environmental engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálos, Borbála

    2017-04-01

    Climate change is observed to have severe impacts on forest ecosystems. Ongoing research projects are dealing with the complex analysis of the causes of the health status decline and mortality of the vulnerable tree species. In the Carpathian Basin, recurrent long lasting drought periods and heatwaves of the last decades initiated the sequence of abiotic and biotic impacts in the beech and oak forests. Threatening extreme events are very likely to occur more frequent under changing climate conditions until the end of the 21st century. Therefore adaptation strategies and renewed regulations of the tree species selection are necessary. Learning material of forest education needs to be continuously updated with the new aspects and results of recent research and forest management planning. Therefore ideas and tools have been developed for teaching climate change impacts for students in forest- and environmental engineering. Using examples from world sport championships (e.g. losers and winners of climate change) these tools are applied to communicate the basic research questions in an easily understandable way as well as to motivate students and raise their awareness for the complex processes of forest - climate interactions. By the application of the developed examples for motivation, the key competences and learning outcomes can be the following: • students get an insight into the observed and projected tendencies of climate extremes; • they get an impression on the complexity of the climate change related damage chains; • they will be able to identify the climatic drivers of forest decline and mortality; • with the skill of critical thinking they will be able to evaluate the ecological role of forests that are already affected and that could be affected by the consequences of changing climate conditions; • they recognize the importance and urgency of the appropriate decisions in forestry and nature conservation. Keywords: climate change impacts, forest

  9. An intelligent pedagogic tool for teaching the operators of PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, B.; Guillermard, M.

    1990-01-01

    A tool was developed for assisting the instruction of the operators of a PWR type nuclear power plant. For achieving the objectives, an expert system and a simulator were combined. The main objective of the system is to improve the work of the operators in performing remedial actions in case of accident. The simulator applies two IBM PC AT3 and a MC 680 20 microprocessor. The use and the validation of the expert system are presented. The perspectives for the system, implanted on the Tricastin nuclear power plant, are analyzed [fr

  10. New Tools in an Old Trade: Teachers Talk About Use of the Internet in the Teaching of French as a Second or Foreign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Presents findings of a study of teachers' beliefs about teaching and learning French as a second or foreign language using the Internet. An international, online discussion list and an open-ended questionnaire provided an opportunity for teachers to talk about their experiences with the new tools of the Internet. Challenges related to the teaching…

  11. An Examination of the Changes in Science Teaching Orientations and Technology-Enhanced Tools for Student Learning in the Context of Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Todd; Zuwallack, Rebecca; Longhurst, Max; Shelton, Brett E.; Wolf, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    This research examines how science teaching orientations and beliefs about technology-enhanced tools change over time in professional development (PD). The primary data sources for this study came from learning journals of 8 eighth grade science teachers at the beginning and conclusion of a year of PD. Based on the analysis completed, Information…

  12. The Current Use of Web 2.0 Tools in University Teaching from the Perspective of Faculty Members at the College of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdelrahman M.; AbdelAlmuniem, Arwa; Almabhouh, Ahmed A.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the current status of using Web 2.0 tools in university teaching by the faculty members of the College of Education at Sudan University of Science and Technology. The study used a descriptive analytical method based on the use of questionnaires and interviews. The questionnaire was administered to a sample of 40…

  13. Do You Talk to Your Teacher with that Mouth? "F*ck: A Documentary" and Profanity as a Teaching Tool in the Communication Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobre-Denton, Miriam; Simonis, Jana

    2012-01-01

    The infamous word "fuck" has become one of the most powerful words in the English language. The current research project explores the relationship between language and cultural norms in the university classroom through an analysis of the use of a documentary film on the word "fuck" as a teaching tool in intercultural communication classes. For the…

  14. Students' Perceptions about the Use of Educational Games as a Tool for Teaching the Periodic Table of Elements at the High School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Mariscal, Antonio Joaquín; Oliva-Martínez, Jose´ María; Gil, M. L. Almoraima

    2015-01-01

    The study reported here was conducted to investigate the perceptions of high school students on the use of educational games as a tool for teaching the periodic table of elements in a chemistry class in Spain. The 127 students who participated in this study came from six different classes in grade 10 (15-16 years old). The students' perceptions of…

  15. Assessing the Success Rate of Students Using a Learning Management System Together with a Collaborative Tool in Web-Based Teaching of Programming Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavus, Nadire; Ibrahim, Dogan

    2007-01-01

    The development of collaborative studies in learning has led to a renewed interest in the field of Web-based education. In this experimental study a highly interactive and collaborative virtual teaching environment has been created by supporting Moodle LMS with collaborative learning tool GREWPtool. The aim of this experimental study has been to…

  16. An improved Michelson interferometer: smoothing out the rough spots for a more effective teaching tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Clarke K.

    2017-08-01

    The Michelson interferometer is a classic tool for demonstrating the wave nature of light, and it is a cornerstone of the optics curriculum. But many students' experiences with this device are higher in frustration than they are in learning. That situation motivated an effort to make aligning the tool less a test of a visual acuity and patience, and more of an introduction to optics phenomena and optical engineering. Key improvements included an added beam-splitter to accommodate multiple observers, a modified telescope to quickly and reliably obtain parallel mirrors, and a series of increasing spectral-width light sources to obtain equal path lengths. This greatly improved students' chances of success, as defined by achieving "white light fringes". When presenting these new features to the students, high importance is placed on understanding why alignment was so difficult with the original design, and why the changes made alignment easier. By exposing the rationale behind the improvements, students can observe the process of problem-solving in an optical engineering scenario. Equally important is the demonstration that solutions can be devised or adapted based on the parts at hand, and that implementations only achieve a highly "polished' state after several design iterations.

  17. Twitter as a teaching tool in the Social Sciences faculties. A case study from the Economic History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misael Arturo López Zapico

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 127 701 USAL 5 1 827 14.0 Normal 0 21 false false false ES JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:ES; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} The increasing use of social networking among university students ease the way for teachers to use these kinds of tools towards achieving the objectives set in the European Higher Education Area. In this sense, Twitter appears as a highly versatile learning tool that perfectly fits with the skill-based education approach, as evidenced by the literature. This paper describes the methodology, as well as, discusses the results of three experiments that took place during the 2011-2012 Academic Year at the School of Economics and Business of the University of Oviedo. Twitter was used during those experiments to debate the today’s economic crisis. The indicators obtained are used to conclude that microblogging services are a proper tool not only for teaching Economic History but also for doing so for any Social Sciences.

  18. How to build and teach with QuakeCaster: an earthquake demonstration and exploration tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Kelsey; Stein, Ross S.

    2015-01-01

    QuakeCaster is an interactive, hands-on teaching model that simulates earthquakes and their interactions along a plate-boundary fault. QuakeCaster contains the minimum number of physical processes needed to demonstrate most observable earthquake features. A winch to steadily reel in a line simulates the steady plate tectonic motions far from the plate boundaries. A granite slider in frictional contact with a nonskid rock-like surface simulates a fault at a plate boundary. A rubber band connecting the line to the slider simulates the elastic character of the Earth’s crust. By stacking and unstacking sliders and cranking in the winch, one can see the results of changing the shear stress and the clamping stress on a fault. By placing sliders in series with rubber bands between them, one can simulate the interaction of earthquakes along a fault, such as cascading or toggling shocks. By inserting a load scale into the line, one can measure the stress acting on the fault throughout the earthquake cycle. As observed for real earthquakes, QuakeCaster events are not periodic, time-predictable, or slip-predictable. QuakeCaster produces rare but unreliable “foreshocks.” When fault gouge builds up, the friction goes to zero and fault creep is seen without large quakes. QuakeCaster events produce very small amounts of fault gouge that strongly alter its behavior, resulting in smaller, more frequent shocks as the gouge accumulates. QuakeCaster is designed so that students or audience members can operate it and record its output. With a stopwatch and ruler one can measure and plot the timing, slip distance, and force results of simulated earthquakes. People of all ages can use the QuakeCaster model to explore hypotheses about earthquake occurrence. QuakeCaster takes several days and about $500.00 in materials to build.

  19. Teaching Spatial Thinking in Undergraduate Geology Courses Using Tools and Strategies from Cognitive Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormand, C. J.; Shipley, T. F.; Dutrow, B. L.; Goodwin, L. B.; Hickson, T. A.; Tikoff, B.; Atit, K.; Gagnier, K. M.; Resnick, I.

    2015-12-01

    Spatial visualization is an essential skill in the STEM disciplines, including the geological sciences. Undergraduate students, including geoscience majors in upper-level courses, bring a wide range of spatial skill levels to the classroom. Students with weak spatial skills may struggle to understand fundamental concepts and to solve geological problems with a spatial component. However, spatial thinking skills are malleable. Using strategies that have emerged from cognitive science research, we developed a set of curricular materials that improve undergraduate geology majors' abilities to reason about 3D concepts and to solve spatially complex geological problems. Cognitive science research on spatial thinking demonstrates that predictive sketching, making visual comparisons, gesturing, and the use of analogy can be used to develop students' spatial thinking skills. We conducted a three-year study of the efficacy of these strategies in strengthening the spatial skills of students in core geology courses at three universities. Our methodology is a quasi-experimental quantitative design, utilizing pre- and post-tests of spatial thinking skills, assessments of spatial problem-solving skills, and a control group comprised of students not exposed to our new curricular materials. Students taught using the new curricular materials show improvement in spatial thinking skills. Further analysis of our data, to be completed prior to AGU, will answer additional questions about the relationship between spatial skills and academic performance, spatial skills and gender, spatial skills and confidence, and the impact of our curricular materials on students who are struggling academically. Teaching spatial thinking in the context of discipline-based exercises has the potential to transform undergraduate education in the geological sciences by removing one significant barrier to success.

  20. The polygonal model: A simple representation of biomolecules as a tool for teaching metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafe, Carlos Francisco Sampaio; Bispo, Jose Ailton Conceição; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo

    2018-01-01

    Metabolism involves numerous reactions and organic compounds that the student must master to understand adequately the processes involved. Part of biochemical learning should include some knowledge of the structure of biomolecules, although the acquisition of such knowledge can be time-consuming and may require significant effort from the student. In this report, we describe the "polygonal model" as a new means of graphically representing biomolecules. This model is based on the use of geometric figures such as open triangles, squares, and circles to represent hydroxyl, carbonyl, and carboxyl groups, respectively. The usefulness of the polygonal model was assessed by undergraduate students in a classroom activity that consisted of "transforming" molecules from Fischer models to polygonal models and vice and versa. The survey was applied to 135 undergraduate Biology and Nursing students. Students found the model easy to use and we noted that it allowed identification of students' misconceptions in basic concepts of organic chemistry, such as in stereochemistry and organic groups that could then be corrected. The students considered the polygonal model easier and faster for representing molecules than Fischer representations, without loss of information. These findings indicate that the polygonal model can facilitate the teaching of metabolism when the structures of biomolecules are discussed. Overall, the polygonal model promoted contact with chemical structures, e.g. through drawing activities, and encouraged student-student dialog, thereby facilitating biochemical learning. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 46(1):66-75, 2018. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. ERTS-A data as a teaching and research tool in the Department of Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grybeck, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 prints have been used extensively in a geology of Alaska class to give a basic framework of the geology of the state. In addition, they have been intermittantly used in such diverse classes as: (1) Economic Geology (e.g. the Sn-bearing granites of the Seward Peninsula are particularly noticeable due to their wide contact metamorphic aureoles.) (2) A canned geology of Alaska lecture which has been given to two different introductory geology courses. (3) Structural Geology (e.g. the Fairweather and Denali faults are striking obvious). It was found most convenient for larger classes to prepare 35mm slides of the ERTS-1 prints that are used in conjunction with slides of the topographic and geologic maps at about the same scale. Thus the emphasis has been in integration of the ERTS-1 material into existing courses. As such, the ERTS-1 data has provided a unique and striking viewpoint that never fails to initiate favorable comment. In addition, prints have been examined by numerous researchers to develop a regional, integrated overview of such varied topics as regional geology to a background for local geologic mapping to studies of ore deposits and to the definition of a formation to be studied in detail at its type locality.

  2. MoManI: a tool to facilitate research, analysis, and teaching of computer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, Mark; Pelakauskas, Martynas; Almulla, Youssef; Tkaczyk, Alan H.; Zepeda, Eduardo

    2017-04-01

    Allocating limited resource efficiently is a task to which efficient planning and policy design aspires. This may be a non-trivial task. For example, the seventh sustainable development goal (SDG) of Agenda 2030 is to provide access to affordable sustainable energy to all. On the one hand, energy is required to realise almost all other SDGs. (A clinic requires electricity for fridges to store vaccines for maternal health, irrigate agriculture requires energy to pump water to crops in dry periods etc.) On the other hand, the energy system is non-trivial. It requires the mapping of resource, its conversion into useable energy and then into machines that we use to meet our needs. That requires new tools that draw from standard techniques, best-in-class models and allow the analyst to develop new models. Thus we present the Model Management Infrastructure (MoManI). MoManI is used to develop, manage, run, store input and results data for linear programming models. MoManI, is a browser-based open source interface for systems modelling. It is available to various user audiences, from policy makers and planners through to academics. For example, we implement the Open Source energy Modelling System (OSeMOSYS) in MoManI. OSeMOSYS is a specialized energy model generator. A typical OSeMOSYS model would represent the current energy system of a country, region or city; in it, equations and constraints are specified; and calibrated to a base year. From that future technologies and policy options are represented. From those scenarios are designed and run. Efficient allocation of energy resource and expenditure on technology is calculated. Finally, results are visualized. At present this is done in relatively rigid interfaces or via (for some) cumbersome text files. Implementing and operating OSeMOSYS in MoManI shortens the learning curve and reduces phobia associated with the complexity of computer modelling, thereby supporting effective capacity building activities. The novel

  3. Reading comprehension as an alternative tool for teaching science and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H. R.

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, the vast amount of information originated in the production of knowledge and its applications, has highlighted the importance of being independent readers, critics, and able to interpret written material circulating referred to scientific and technological issues, that invade the people's daily life. Moreover, in the last stage of education system of all future citizens of the country, the results of many diagnoses have highlighted the difficulties of young students to understand the texts related to science and technology. However, simultaneously with these weaknesses, students permanently express the need to relate science and technology to everyday life, and are interested in the discussion of the news related to atomic energy spread by the mass media. This duality lack of interest in reading vs interest in knowledge in certain subjects, is what has been taken into account when proposing this pedagogical approach that simultaneously involves several aspects. From the need to find a trigger for the treatment of a particular issue, to familiarization of students with the vocabulary and methodology of science ill the debate on the characteristics of specific technological applications of nuclear technology. Considering particularly the last of these factors, since 2011 has been developed in Jose Maria Paz School of Cordoba, Reading Comprehension Experience, using texts with scientific and technological contents published by Institute for Energy and Development (IEDS) of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) in Knowledge Leaves Series, as a methodological tool, to bring students to the physics of the atom and matter. The reading strategy used is based on the hypothesis of the type of questions being asked about the contents, can help students to develop reading strategies for comprehension and thus contribute positively to his learning. With this proposal it has been observed an increased on student interest in learning natural science

  4. Digital Storytelling as a Pedagogical Tool within a Didactic Sequence in Foreign Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Reyes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital storytelling constitutes a pedagogical tool for teachers to work on differentlinguistic skills while generating students’ interest and attention. This studyanalyses the usefulness of including digital storytelling within a didactic sequencein order to work on linguistic routines such as greetings and leave-takings inEnglish as a foreign language. To this aim, we have worked with first yearstudents in the Faculty of Education at the Universitat de València to improve theirability to adapt their language skills to specific situations within common dailyinteraction. We have designed a didactic sequence consisting of differentworkshops that have been put into practice in class. The sequence ends with afinal project in which students are expected to produce their own digital stories,showing thus what they have learnt. This final production has highlighted a clearimprovement in the use of linguistic routines, as well as in the use of morecomplex structures and of varied expressions used to open and close aconversation.

  5. INTERACTIONS: DESIGN, IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A COMPUTATIONAL TOOL FOR TEACHING INTERMOLECULAR FORCES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Geraldo Barbosa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intermolecular forces are a useful concept that can explain the attraction between particulate matter as well as numerous phenomena in our lives such as viscosity, solubility, drug interactions, and dyeing of fibers. However, studies show that students have difficulty understanding this important concept, which has led us to develop a free educational software in English and Portuguese. The software can be used interactively by teachers and students, thus facilitating better understanding. Professors and students, both graduate and undergraduate, were questioned about the software quality and its intuitiveness of use, facility of navigation, and pedagogical application using a Likert scale. The results led to the conclusion that the developed computer application can be characterized as an auxiliary tool to assist teachers in their lectures and students in their learning process of intermolecular forces.

  6. Online Embryology teaching using learning management systems appears to be a successful additional learning tool among Egyptian medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Neklawy, Ahmed Farid

    2017-11-01

    Although the traditional didactic lecture is considered to be efficient for presenting information and providing explanations, it usually does not provide adequate time for deeper learning activities. So, traditional lecture is one of the most widely criticized educational methods. Virtual learning environment (VLE) is a specially designed environment that facilitates teachers' management of educational courses for their students, using computer hardware and software, which involves distance learning. In this study, we evaluated the experiment of online teaching of General Embryology for Egyptian undergraduate medical students using WizIQ learning management system. A total of 100 students were invited to submit an online survey at the end of the course to evaluate delivery of instruction, creation of an environment that supported learning, and administrative issues. Most of the students reported that they were strongly satisfied with the efficacy of the instructional methods and were strongly satisfied with the degree of clarity of the course material. They strongly accepted the page format and design of the virtual classroom and strongly agreed that the learning environment supported the learning procedure. The item of easy logging into the virtual classroom had aberrant variable responses; it recorded the lowest mean response; this variation in responses was due to technical factors as the students used different devices with different speeds of internet connections. Ninety percent of students have strongly recommended the course attendance for their fellow students. These results demonstrate that online Anatomy teaching using learning management systems appears to be a successful additional learning tool among Egyptian medical students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. “METABOLIC RIDE” a conceptual evaluation tool for metabolic biochemistry teaching for graduate and postgraduate students in biological sciences and related areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Hessel Gaeta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry as a discipline have a high degree of difficulty. Otherwise, application of creative games as teaching methodology has spread in various disciplines. "METABOLIC RIDE" board game is a conceptual and perceptual evaluation tool for biochemistry teaching, aiming to review concepts transmitted in classroom, promoting a competitive challenge to students without denying tools that are at their disposal, stimulating their skills such as their creativity. Further, it makes possible to correlate metabolic routes and their interconnections to establish that metabolic pathways are not separated, such as a railway map. In addition, this game proved to be an excellent tool for student’s complementary evaluation, which allowed to analyze the student’s perception and thus realize that when properly stimulated some groups could show a great productive and creative capacity. However, this game demonstrated to students new ways to approach complex subjects in biochemistry using creativity.

  8. Solving ordinary differential equations by electrical analogy: a multidisciplinary teaching tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Perez, J. F.; Conesa, M.; Alhama, I.

    2016-11-01

    Ordinary differential equations are the mathematical formulation for a great variety of problems in science and engineering, and frequently, two different problems are equivalent from a mathematical point of view when they are formulated by the same equations. Students acquire the knowledge of how to solve these equations (at least some types of them) using protocols and strict algorithms of mathematical calculation without thinking about the meaning of the equation. The aim of this work is that students learn to design network models or circuits in this way; with simple knowledge of them, students can establish the association of electric circuits and differential equations and their equivalences, from a formal point of view, that allows them to associate knowledge of two disciplines and promote the use of this interdisciplinary approach to address complex problems. Therefore, they learn to use a multidisciplinary tool that allows them to solve these kinds of equations, even students of first course of engineering, whatever the order, grade or type of non-linearity. This methodology has been implemented in numerous final degree projects in engineering and science, e.g., chemical engineering, building engineering, industrial engineering, mechanical engineering, architecture, etc. Applications are presented to illustrate the subject of this manuscript.

  9. 3D printing technology as innovative tool for math and geometry teaching applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huleihil, M.

    2017-01-01

    The industrial revolution and automation of production processes have changed the face of the world. Three dimensional (3D) printing has the potential to revolutionize manufacturing and further change methods of production toward allowing in increasing number of people to produce products at home. According to a recent OECD (see Backer [1]) publication, “…tapping into the next industrial revolution requires actions on many levels and in many different areas. In particular, unlocking the potential of emerging and enabling technologies requires policy development along a number of fronts, from commercialization to regulation and the supply of skills through education.” In this paper we discuss the role of schools and their responsibility to act as quickly as possible to design a plan of action that will prepare the future citizens to deal with this new reality. This requires planning of action in different directions and on different planes, such as labs, teachers, and curricula. 3D printing requires higher levels of thinking, innovation and creativity. It has the power to develop human imagination and give students the opportunity to visualize numbers, two- dimensional shapes, and three-dimensional objects. The combination of thinking, design, and production has immense power to increase motivation and satisfaction, with a highly probable increase in a student’s math and geometry achievements. The CAD system includes a measure tool which enables and alternative way for calculating properties of the objects under consideration and allows development of reflection and critical thinking. The research method was based on comparison between a reference group and a test group; it was found that intervention significantly improved the reflection abilities of 6th grade students in mathematics.

  10. Efficacy of MedMyst: an Internet Teaching Tool for Middle School Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Leslie M; Moreno, Janette; Estrera, Vicky; Lane, David

    2004-05-01

    Can web-based technology be used to effectively introduce or reinforce aspects of microbiology to middle school students? This central hypothesis examines whether brief exposure to a web adventure format containing virtual lab experiments and computer games within an engaging story line can impact student learning. An episodic adventure series, MedMyst (http://medmyst.rice.edu), focuses on infectious diseases and the microbes that cause them. The website is not intended to replace classroom instruction, but rather to engage students in problem-solving activities not likely to be encountered elsewhere. It also provides scientists with a resource to introduce microbiology to adolescent audiences through outreach activities. In the online adventure, the player (student) enters a futuristic world in which he or she becomes a "Reconstructor," a member of an elite team charged with preventing the spread of infectious disease. The series consists of three "missions," each lasting approximately 30 to 40 minutes and designed to address a limited set of learning objectives. Middle school students participated in the creation of the characters and the stylized design through focus groups. Classroom teachers oversaw the alignment of the web adventure objectives with the National Science Content Standards. Scientists and clinicians reviewed the web adventure for content and accuracy. A field test involving over 700 students from nine different schools assessed the knowledge gains attributable to playing MedMyst. Gain scores from pretest to posttest indicated that middle school students retained important information by interacting with the online material for as little as 30 minutes per adventure; however, gains for high school students were less persuasive, perhaps indicating a different learning tool or content is required for this age audience.

  11. Efficacy of MedMyst: an Internet Teaching Tool for Middle School Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Miller

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Can web-based technology be used to effectively introduce or reinforce aspects of microbiology to middle school students? This central hypothesis examines whether brief exposure to a web adventure format containing virtual lab experiments and computer games within an engaging story line can impact student learning. An episodic adventure series, MedMyst (http://medmyst.rice.edu, focuses on infectious diseases and the microbes that cause them. The website is not intended to replace classroom instruction, but rather to engage students in problem-solving activities not likely to be encountered elsewhere. It also provides scientists with a resource to introduce microbiology to adolescent audiences through outreach activities. In the online adventure, the player (student enters a futuristic world in which he or she becomes a “Reconstructor,” a member of an elite team charged with preventing the spread of infectious disease. The series consists of three “missions,” each lasting approximately 30 to 40 minutes and designed to address a limited set of learning objectives. Middle school students participated in the creation of the characters and the stylized design through focus groups. Classroom teachers oversaw the alignment of the web adventure objectives with the National Science Content Standards. Scientists and clinicians reviewed the web adventure for content and accuracy. A field test involving over 700 students from nine different schools assessed the knowledge gains attributable to playing MedMyst. Gain scores from pretest to posttest indicated that middle school students retained important information by interacting with the online material for as little as 30 minutes per adventure; however, gains for high school students were less persuasive, perhaps indicating a different learning tool or content is required for this age audience.

  12. Teaching methods in PE teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Šekeljić, Goran V.; Stamatović, Milovan V.

    2016-01-01

    The methods used in teaching physical education, as well as in every other very specific teaching area, have their own uniqueness and enormous importance in teaching. In the last fifty years literature showed many different methods systematized by several different criteria. Some were just taken from general didactics, some were tailored to the needs of physical education classes, and a few new ones were discovered. The special value of this work is that the existing methods are supplemented ...

  13. Developing a User-Centred Planning Tool for Young Adults with Development Disorders: A Research-Based Teaching Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribu, Kirsten; Patel, Tulpesh

    2016-01-01

    People with development disorders, for instance autism, need structured plans to help create predictability in their daily lives. Digital plans can facilitate enhanced independency, learning, and quality of life, but existing apps are largely general purpose and lack the flexibility required by this specific but heterogeneous user group. Universal design is both a goal and a process and should be based on a holistic approach and user-centered design, interacting with the users in all stages of the development process. At Oslo and Akershus University College (HiOA) we conducted a research-based teaching project in co-operation with the Department of Neuro-habilitation at Oslo University Hospital (OUS) with two employees acting as project managers and students as developers. Three groups of Computer Science bachelor students developed digital prototypes for a planning tool for young adults with pervasive development disorders, who live either with their families or in supervised residences, and do not receive extensive public services. The students conducted the initial planning phase of the software development process, focusing on prototyping the system requirements, whilst a professional software company programmed the end solution. The goal of the project was to develop flexible and adaptive user-oriented and user-specific app solutions for tablets that can aid this diverse user group in structuring daily life, whereby, for example, photos of objects and places known to the individual user replace general pictures or drawings, and checklists can be elaborate or sparse as necessary. The three student groups worked independently of each other and created interactive working prototypes based on tests, observations and short interviews with end users (both administrators and residents) and regular user feedback from the project managers. Three very different solutions were developed that were of high enough quality that an external software company were able to

  14. Relationships between teaching faculty and teaching librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    Every librarian who teaches in an academic library setting understands the complexities involved in partnering with teaching faculty. Relationships Between Teaching Faculty and Teaching Librarians recounts the efforts of librarians and faculty working together in disciplines across the board to create and sustain connections crucial to the success of library instruction. This unique collection of essays examines various types of partnerships between librarians and faculty (networking, coordination, and collaboration) and addresses the big issues involved, including teaching within an academic

  15. Empirical links between instruction with teaching tools and the hierarchical model of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation in a Korean college tennis class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Myoungjin; Kwon, Sungho

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the sequential process (i.e., social factors→mediators→motivation→consequences) underlying the Hierarchical Model of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation at the contextual level in instruction using three teaching tools, modified balls, a high net, and colored balls and cones in a college-level tennis class in South Korea. 126 students enrolled in a 15-week tennis class participated in the study. The results indicate that the three teaching tools positively affected students' perceived competence, with perceived competence's beta on intrinsic motivation equal to 0.45. Intrinsic motivation was found to reduce negative affect further by -0.33, thereby demonstrating the sequential process of the Hierarchical Model of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation.

  16. The Use of Online Quizlet.com Resource Tools to Support Native English Speaking Students of Engineering and Medical Departments in Accelerated RFL Teaching and Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Kh.E. Ismailova; K. Gleason; E.A. Provotorova; P.G. Matukhin

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a description of the methodology and some results of the application of tools of the language learning support portal Quizlet.com to improve the effectiveness of the accelerated development of the basic communicative skills in Russian as a foreign language (RFL) for the group of the English-speaking students who arrived to study in Russia engineering, medicine and other areas. The application of the development is the basics of Russian teaching and learning in the classroom...

  17. The Use of Online Quizlet.com Resource Tools to Support Native English Speaking Students of Engineering and Medical Departments in Accelerated RFL Teaching and Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Ismailova , Kh ,; Gleason , K ,; Provotorova , P ,; Matukhin , P ,

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The paper presents a description of the methodology and some results of the application of tools of the language learning support portal Quizlet.com to improve the effectiveness of the accelerated development of the basic communicative skills in Russian as a foreign language (RFL) for the group of the English-speaking students who arrived to study in Russia engineering, medicine and other areas. The application of the development is the basics of Russian teaching and l...

  18. A Microsoft Excel interface for rhyolite-MELTS: a tool for research and teaching of magma properties and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualda, G. A.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    The thermodynamic modeling software MELTS (and its derivatives) is a powerful and much utilized tool for investigating crystallization and melting in natural magmatic systems. Rhyolite-MELTS (Gualda et al. 2012, J. Petrol. 53:875-890) is a recent recalibration of MELTS aimed at better capturing the evolution of magmas present in the upper crust (up to ~400 MPa pressure). Currently, most users of rhyolite-MELTS rely on a graphical user interface (GUI), which can be run on UNIX/LINUX and Mac OS X computers. While the interface is powerful and flexible, it can be somewhat cumbersome for the novice and the output is in the form of text files that need to be processed offline. This situation is probably the main reason why MELTS - despite great potential - has not been used more frequently for teaching purposes. We are currently developing an alternative GUI for rhyolite-MELTS using web services consumed by a VBA backend in Microsoft Excel©. The goal is to create a much more interactive tool, that is easy to use that can be made available to a widespread audience, and that will be useful for both research and teaching. The interface is contained within a macro-enabled workbook, which includes editable cells where the user can insert the model input information. Interface buttons initiate computations that are executed on a central server at OFM Research in Seattle (WA). Results of simple calculations are shown immediately within the interface itself. For instance, a user can very rapidly determine the temperature at which a magma of a given composition is completely molten (i.e. find the liquidus); or determine which phases are present, in what abundances, their compositions, and their physical properties (e.g. density, viscosity) at any given combination of temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity. We expect that using the interface in this mode will greatly facilitate building intuition about magmas and their properties. It is also possible to combine a sequence of

  19. REPRESENTATION OF ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORKS IN THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS: POTENTIALY OF VIRTUAL GROUPS AS TOOLS FOR TEACHING- LEARNING IN HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Victor Ribeiro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available One tool that has been in evidence, especially among young people, is Facebook. It can be classified as a synchronous communication tool that allows communities of people with similar interests to discuss and exchange experiences in real time, promoting the sharing of information and the creation of collective knowledge, even if they being in different parts of the globe. In this paper we show that Facebook can be used as an educational tool to aid the work done in the classroom and the impact of creating closed groups in online social networking for educational purposes. The survey was conducted with a group of students at a private school in Bauru/SP. We investigated the interaction profile of students with a closed group created on Facebook and through a questionnaire analyzed whether students use virtual environments for personal or educational. The survey reveals students perceptions about relevant aspects and the potential use of this tool as teaching-learning strategy.

  20. Computer model for the cardiovascular system: development of an e-learning tool for teaching of medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Roy Warriner

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study combined themes in cardiovascular modelling, clinical cardiology and e-learning to create an on-line environment that would assist undergraduate medical students in understanding key physiological and pathophysiological processes in the cardiovascular system. Methods An interactive on-line environment was developed incorporating a lumped-parameter mathematical model of the human cardiovascular system. The model outputs were used to characterise the progression of key disease processes and allowed students to classify disease severity with the aim of improving their understanding of abnormal physiology in a clinical context. Access to the on-line environment was offered to students at all stages of undergraduate training as an adjunct to routine lectures and tutorials in cardiac pathophysiology. Student feedback was collected on this novel on-line material in the course of routine audits of teaching delivery. Results Medical students, irrespective of their stage of undergraduate training, reported that they found the models and the environment interesting and a positive experience. After exposure to the environment, there was a statistically significant improvement in student performance on a series of 6 questions based on cardiovascular medicine, with a 33% and 22% increase in the number of questions answered correctly, p < 0.0001 and p < 0.001 respectively. Conclusions Considerable improvement was found in students’ knowledge and understanding during assessment after exposure to the e-learning environment. Opportunities exist for development of similar environments in other fields of medicine, refinement of the existing environment and further engagement with student cohorts. This work combines some exciting and developing fields in medical education, but routine adoption of these types of tool will be possible only with the engagement of all stake-holders, from educationalists, clinicians, modellers to

  1. Computer model for the cardiovascular system: development of an e-learning tool for teaching of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warriner, David Roy; Bayley, Martin; Shi, Yubing; Lawford, Patricia Victoria; Narracott, Andrew; Fenner, John

    2017-11-21

    This study combined themes in cardiovascular modelling, clinical cardiology and e-learning to create an on-line environment that would assist undergraduate medical students in understanding key physiological and pathophysiological processes in the cardiovascular system. An interactive on-line environment was developed incorporating a lumped-parameter mathematical model of the human cardiovascular system. The model outputs were used to characterise the progression of key disease processes and allowed students to classify disease severity with the aim of improving their understanding of abnormal physiology in a clinical context. Access to the on-line environment was offered to students at all stages of undergraduate training as an adjunct to routine lectures and tutorials in cardiac pathophysiology. Student feedback was collected on this novel on-line material in the course of routine audits of teaching delivery. Medical students, irrespective of their stage of undergraduate training, reported that they found the models and the environment interesting and a positive experience. After exposure to the environment, there was a statistically significant improvement in student performance on a series of 6 questions based on cardiovascular medicine, with a 33% and 22% increase in the number of questions answered correctly, p < 0.0001 and p < 0.001 respectively. Considerable improvement was found in students' knowledge and understanding during assessment after exposure to the e-learning environment. Opportunities exist for development of similar environments in other fields of medicine, refinement of the existing environment and further engagement with student cohorts. This work combines some exciting and developing fields in medical education, but routine adoption of these types of tool will be possible only with the engagement of all stake-holders, from educationalists, clinicians, modellers to, most importantly, medical students.

  2. Enhancing STEM Education through Cubesats: Using Satellite Integration as a Teaching Tool at a Non-Tech School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, S.; Cotten, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    University-based satellite programs have been successfully used as a platform for teaching STEM related fields, bringing tremendous benefits to graduate and undergraduate education. Considering their infrastructure and curricula, tech schools have traditionally been considered logical candidates for hosting such programs. More recently, with the dissemination of small satellites initiatives, non-tech schools have been presented the opportunity of developing satellite design and implementation programs. This work reports on the experiences and challenges associated with implementing a satellite program at the University of Georgia (UGA), a non-tech university. With funding from the Air Force Research Laboratory's (AFRL) University Nanosat Program (UNP) and NASA's Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP) a team of undergraduates at UGA has recently been tasked with building two small satellites and helping to create a Small Satellite Research Laboratory (SSRL) at the university. Unique features of the satellite program at UGA include its team of students from a broad range of backgrounds and departments (Engineering, Computer Science, Art, Business, and Geography) and the previous exposure of many of these students to synergistic technologies, including arduino and unmanned aerial systems. We show how informal exposure to those technologies and willingness of students to focus on areas outside of their field of study can benefit from the implementation of satellite programs. In this regard, we report on methods and techniques used to find and recruit driven and knowledgeable students to work in a high paced field such as satellite system integration. We show how students and faculty from multiple departments have collaborated to reach a common, far reaching goal and describe our proposed methods to evaluate and measure educational goals based around SSRL and its projects. We also present the challenges associated with the lack of a developed engineering

  3. The map: An essential tool in the teaching-learning process of the Marxism-Leninism and History curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montero, Martiza Isabel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the use of maps in teaching Geography by a sample of professor at “José Marti” College of Education. A systematic use of maps constitutes one of the major problems in the teaching-learning process in the Marxism-Leninism and History Curriculum. Likewise, it has been identify as a shortcoming in graduates and in-service trainees. It would be recommendable to highlight the value and importance of maps in teaching, consequently a number of suggestions are given to lead, reflection and discussion by the teacher’s.

  4. Design of Intelligent Robot as A Tool for Teaching Media Based on Computer Interactive Learning and Computer Assisted Learning to Improve the Skill of University Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhrie, M. S.; Basuki, I.; Asto B, I. G. P.; Anifah, L.

    2018-01-01

    The focus of the research is the teaching module which incorporates manufacturing, planning mechanical designing, controlling system through microprocessor technology and maneuverability of the robot. Computer interactive and computer-assisted learning is strategies that emphasize the use of computers and learning aids (computer assisted learning) in teaching and learning activity. This research applied the 4-D model research and development. The model is suggested by Thiagarajan, et.al (1974). 4-D Model consists of four stages: Define Stage, Design Stage, Develop Stage, and Disseminate Stage. This research was conducted by applying the research design development with an objective to produce a tool of learning in the form of intelligent robot modules and kit based on Computer Interactive Learning and Computer Assisted Learning. From the data of the Indonesia Robot Contest during the period of 2009-2015, it can be seen that the modules that have been developed confirm the fourth stage of the research methods of development; disseminate method. The modules which have been developed for students guide students to produce Intelligent Robot Tool for Teaching Based on Computer Interactive Learning and Computer Assisted Learning. Results of students’ responses also showed a positive feedback to relate to the module of robotics and computer-based interactive learning.

  5. Measurement Instrument for Scientific Teaching (MIST): A Tool to Measure the Frequencies of Research-Based Teaching Practices in Undergraduate Science Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Mary F; Knight, Jennifer K; Couch, Brian A

    2017-01-01

    The Scientific Teaching (ST) pedagogical framework provides various approaches for science instructors to teach in a way that more closely emulates how science is practiced by actively and inclusively engaging students in their own learning and by making instructional decisions based on student performance data. Fully understanding the impact of ST requires having mechanisms to quantify its implementation. While many useful instruments exist to document teaching practices, these instruments only partially align with the range of practices specified by ST, as described in a recently published taxonomy. Here, we describe the development, validation, and implementation of the Measurement Instrument for Scientific Teaching (MIST), a survey derived from the ST taxonomy and designed to gauge the frequencies of ST practices in undergraduate science courses. MIST showed acceptable validity and reliability based on results from 7767 students in 87 courses at nine institutions. We used factor analyses to identify eight subcategories of ST practices and used these categories to develop a short version of the instrument amenable to joint administration with other research instruments. We further discuss how MIST can be used by instructors, departments, researchers, and professional development programs to quantify and track changes in ST practices. © 2017 M. F. Durham et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  6. Digital teaching tools and global learning communities [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5la

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Williams

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, we started a project to support the teaching and learning of university-level plant sciences, called Teaching Tools in Plant Biology. Articles in this series are published by the plant science journal, The Plant Cell (published by the American Society of Plant Biologists. Five years on, we investigated how the published materials are being used through an analysis of the Google Analytics pageviews distribution and through a user survey. Our results suggest that this project has had a broad, global impact in supporting higher education, and also that the materials are used differently by individuals in terms of their role (instructor, independent learner, student and geographical location. We also report on our ongoing efforts to develop a global learning community that encourages discussion and resource sharing.

  7. Teach Astronomy: An Educational Resource for Formal and Informal Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, Chris David

    2018-01-01

    Teach Astronomy is an educational resource, available in the form of a user-friendly, platform-agnostic website. Ideal for college-level, introductory astronomy courses, Teach Astronomy can be a valuable reference for astronomers at all levels, especially informal learners. Over the past year, multiple changes have been made to the infrastructure behind Teach Astronomy to provide high availability to our tens of thousands of monthly, unique users, as well as fostering in new features. Teach Astronomy contains interactive tools which supplement the free textbook, such as a Quiz Tool with real-time feedback. The site also provides a searchable collection of Chris Impey’s responses to questions frequently asked by our users. The developers and educators behind Teach Astronomy are working to create an environment which encourages astronomy students of all levels to continue to increase their knowledge and help others learn.

  8. Unique Path Partitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bessenrodt, Christine; Olsson, Jørn Børling; Sellers, James A.

    2013-01-01

    We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions.......We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions....

  9. Epithelioid schwannoma of the skin displaying unique histopathological features: a teaching case giving rise to diagnostic difficulties on a morphological examination of a resected specimen, with a brief literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Sohsuke; Kirishima, Mari; Hiraki, Tsubasa; Higashi, Michiyo; Hatanaka, Kazuhito; Tanimoto, Akihide

    2017-01-19

    Epithelioid schwannoma as a rare variant poses a challenge to all pathologists, as this uncommon entity is extremely difficult to conclusively diagnose by morphological analyses on a resected sample alone owing to its unique histopathological features. However, few papers have described the detailed clinicopathological characteristics of epithelioid schwannoma. A 65-year-old female presented with a history of a flat and slightly elevated firm and tan plaque accompanied by occasional tenderness, measuring 10 × 8 mm, in the right joint of her hand 1 year before resection. A gross examination of a locally resected specimen revealed an encapsulated nodular lesion, yellow-whitish in color, partly filled with blood. A microscopic examination showed that the tumor predominantly consisted of a solid proliferation of epithelioid cells having mildly enlarged and round to partially spindled nuclei and abundant vacuolated or clear cytoplasm with very few mitotic figures and modest nuclear size variation, associated with focal hyalinized, cystic and hemorrhagic degeneration. This well-demarcated tumor was surrounded by dense, hyalinized and layered fibrocollagenous stroma. Immunohistochemically, these tumor cells were diffusely positive for S-100 protein and had a very low MIB-1 labeling index, and type IV collagen was strongly reactive with reduplicated basal lamina of them. We ultimately made a diagnosis of cutaneous epithelioid schwannoma. We should be aware that, since pathologists might misinterpret epithelioid schwannoma as other soft tissue tumors, including its malignant counterpart, a wide panel of immunohistochemical antibodies can be powerful supplementary tools for identifying a very rare entity of conventional schwannoma.

  10. The analysis of mass and energy transfer from a surface by means of a physical model conceived as a teaching tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peressotti, A.; Zerbi, G.; Delle Vedove, G.; Ham, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    A physical model representing an evapotranspirating field on a scale 1:100 is described. The model, having a moderate cost, was devised as a teaching tool for agronomy and agrometeorology classes; it permits the measurement and the continuous monitoring of the parameters involved in mass and energy transfer over an evaporating surface (radiation, turbulence, temperature of the air and of the surface, heat fluxes, vapor pressure gradients). The physical characteristics of the surface can be changed to simulate different situations of a cultivated field. The surface resistance is calculated by the measurement of the Bowen ratio and directly from the measurement of the surface temperature [it

  11. Effectiveness of Student-Generated Video as a Teaching Tool for an Instrumental Technique in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeremy T.; Box, Melinda C.; Eguren, Kristen E.; Parker, Thomas A.; Saraldi-Gallardo, Victoria M.; Wolfe, Michael I.; Gallardo-Williams, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    Multimedia instruction has been shown to serve as an effective learning aid for chemistry students. In this study, the viability of student-generated video instruction for organic chemistry laboratory techniques and procedure was examined and its effectiveness compared to instruction provided by a teaching assistant (TA) was evaluated. After…

  12. Using Innovative Tools to Teach Computer Application to Business Students--A Hawthorne Effect or Successful Implementation Here to Stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zeenath Reza

    2014-01-01

    A year after the primary study that tested the impact of introducing blended learning and guided discovery to help teach computer application to business students, this paper looks into the continued success of using guided discovery and blended learning with learning management system in and out of classrooms to enhance student learning.…

  13. The Prevalence of the Use of Music as a Teaching Tool among Selected American Classroom Educators: A Preliminary Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, Janice L.; Wayman, John B.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of music education in American schools is well established, with 93% of Americans agreeing that music should be a part of a well-rounded education (Harris, 2005). Students preparing to teach in the elementary classroom (elementary education majors) in American colleges and universities typically take a music class (sometimes two) as…

  14. Analysing the Opportunities and Challenges to Use of Information and Communication Technology Tools in Teaching-Learning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastjerdi, Negin Barat

    2016-01-01

    The research aims at the evaluation of ICT use in teaching-learning process to the students of Isfahan elementary schools. The method of this research is descriptive-surveying. The statistical population of the study was all teachers of Isfahan elementary schools. The sample size was determined 350 persons that selected through cluster sampling…

  15. Exploring the Possibility of Using Humanoid Robots as Instructional Tools for Teaching a Second Language in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Lee, Jih-Hsien; Chao, Po-Yao; Wang, Chin-Yeh; Chen, Gwo-Dong

    2010-01-01

    As robot technologies develop, many researchers have tried to use robots to support education. Studies have shown that robots can help students develop problem-solving abilities and learn computer programming, mathematics, and science. However, few studies discuss the use of robots to facilitate the teaching of second languages. We discuss whether…

  16. Triatominae Biochemistry Goes to School: Evaluation of a Novel Tool for Teaching Basic Biochemical Concepts of Chagas Disease Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Leonardo Rodrigues; de Oliveria Cudischevitch, Cecília; Carneiro, Alan Brito; Macedo, Gustavo Bartholomeu; Lannes, Denise; da Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate a new approach to teaching the basic biochemistry mechanisms that regulate the biology of Triatominae, major vectors of "Trypanosoma cruzi," the causative agent of Chagas disease. We have designed and used a comic book, "Carlos Chagas: 100 years after a hero's discovery" containing scientific information obtained by…

  17. Textbook to Reality: Using Corporate Earnings Reports as an Effective Teaching Tool for a Business Capstone Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Manzoor E.

    2016-01-01

    Business curriculums in many universities now include a senior Capstone course that integrates topics or materials from all business areas. This capstone course is designed to teach the skills of strategic thinking and analysis rather than mere facts or concepts. With that goal in mind, the ideal course is structured in such a way so that students…

  18. Uniqueness in time measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzen, P.

    1981-01-01

    According to P. Janich a clock is defined as an apparatus in which a point ( hand ) is moving uniformly on a straight line ( path ). For the definition of uniformly first the scaling (as a constant ratio of velocities) is defined without clocks. Thereafter the uniqueness of the time measurement can be proved using the prove of scaling of all clocks. But the uniqueness can be defined without scaling, as it is pointed out here. (orig.) [de

  19. Integrative activities content (aic: an auxiliary tool for the teaching of Biochemistry in the course of biological sciences at UFRN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. D. Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There are constant changes in the development of science, technology, politics, culture and society; the need for change is also evident in the training of teachers. The ease of access to information makes us realize that traditional teaching needs to be updated.The increasing demotivation of students,followed by high reprobation rates, has become a real challenge to the teaching practice.The objective of this work was to awaken in students enrolled in the discipline of MOLECULAR DIVERSITY (MD, a required curricular component in the Course of Biological Sciences at UFRN, an interest in studying the chemistry and functions of biomolecules, better relating the two to each other, and the content already studied in the course, in order to improve the teaching-learning process. This work was developed in a tutoring project registered at PROGRAD/UFRN. This discipline, MD, addresses chemical and structural features of the main organic molecules.The methodology focused on applying problem integrators called INTEGRATIVE ACTIVITIES OF CONTENT. This refers specifically to the application of problems that integrate the topics taught in the discipline, and also those administered in the disciplines processed in parallel, or even in previous semesters. In this way students realize that molecules relate and interact in all bodies; this gives rise to life through metabolism. The discipline is expected to promote meaningful and inter-related learning. We obtained the following results: greater participation and involvement of students in answering the questions posed; greater interest in the discipline;positive changes regarding the number of students who dropped the class, and in reprobation;and greater integration between teachers, students, and teaching assistants. The methodology used in this work was extremely important to achieve the proposed objectives, helping to facilitate the process of teaching-learning, as also to important relate content.

  20. [Performance-related middle management in medical teaching. Attractiveness of incentive tools from the perspective of the teachers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, M; Pieper, M; Sadlo, M; Reipen, J; Heussen, N

    2008-08-01

    German medical schools are increasingly challenged by the competition for public funds and talented students. Therefore. many curriculum planners, deans and school administrators plan to implement a systematic and comprehensive awarding system for good teaching. The OBJECTIVE of this study was to elaborate which specific incentives would be most effective to increase the motivation and enthusiasm for teaching among basic scientists as well as residents and attendings involved in medical education. In addition, a cost-effective model should be developed, which could be used as an adjustable blue-print for an awarding system. Based on literature search, existing approaches to rewards and incentives for medical teachers were analysed by an interdisciplinary committee in coordination with the members' department heads. According to german teaching methods and available resources, a catalogue of specific incentives has been designed and ranked by a representative sample of 200 medical teachers / faculty at two universities. Thus, a variety of favourite rewarding instruments could be elaborated, which were preferred by teachers in theoretical versus clinical disciplines. The majority of the medical teachers prefer heterogeneously monetary incentives and additional protected time, followed by career-effective incentives (tenure & promotion). The discussion reflects on a transferable catalogue of different rewarding instruments, including a cost-/benefit-analysis and prerequisite students' evaluation data. A single alteration of departmental teaching budgets does not seem to be sufficient. It seems rather advisable, also to strive for a variety of different incentives on a level that predominantly affects individual teaching personnel. Even with comparatively small amounts of money, significant effects on teachers' motivation can be achieved.

  1. Using the stress and adversity inventory as a teaching tool leads to significant learning gains in two courses on stress and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavich, George M; Toussaint, Loren

    2014-10-01

    The ability to measure cumulative stress exposure is important for research and teaching in stress and health, but until recently, no structured system has existed for assessing exposure to stress over the lifespan. Here, we report the results of two experimental studies that examined the pedagogical efficacy of using an automated system for assessing life stress, called the Stress and Adversity Inventory (STRAIN), for teaching courses on stress and health. In Study 1, a randomized, wait-list controlled experiment was conducted with 20 college students to test whether the STRAIN, coupled with a related lecture and discussion, promoted learning about stress and health. Results showed that this experiential lesson led to significant learning gains. To disentangle the effects of completing the STRAIN from participating in the lecture and discussion, we subsequently conducted Study 2 on 144 students using a 2 (STRAIN versus control activity) by 2 (STRAIN-specific lecture versus general stress lecture) repeated-measures design. Although the STRAIN-specific lecture was sufficient for promoting learning, completing the STRAIN also generated significant learning gains when paired with only the general stress lecture. Together, these studies suggest that the STRAIN is an effective tool for promoting experiential learning and teaching students about stress and health. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Literacy Tools in the Classroom: Teaching through Critical Inquiry, Grades 5-12. Language and Literacy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Richard; Campano, Gerald; Edmiston, Brian; Borgmann, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    This innovative resource describes how teachers can help students employ "literacy tools" across the curriculum to foster learning. The authors demonstrate how literacy tools such as narratives, question-asking, spoken-word poetry, drama, writing, digital communication, images, and video encourage critical inquiry in the 5-12 classroom. The book…

  3. The use of games and computer simulation as a learning tool: paper airplanes championship and Hydrodynamic teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericarla de Jesus Souza

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a Physics teaching research using as teaching-learning technique a didactic sequence constructed from educational games, experimental activities and computational simulations. The content covered in this work is hydrodynamics and its application in the physical concepts involved in airplane flight. Learning content is reinforced through the use of computer simulation using the software Modellus. The students' evaluation was made with the use of educational games: crosswords, word searches and games of the seven errors. The assessment was carried out through the application of questions that evaluated the students' alternative conceptions. The theoretical framework is based on the theory of mental models of John-Laird and in the theory of meaningful learning of Ausubel. So, the evaluations of previous knowledge of the students were made through evaluation of test type questionnaire.

  4. The Use of Online Quizlet.com Resource Tools to Support Native English Speaking Students of Engineering and Medical Departments in Accelerated RFL Teaching and Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh.E. Ismailova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a description of the methodology and some results of the application of tools of the language learning support portal Quizlet.com to improve the effectiveness of the accelerated development of the basic communicative skills in Russian as a foreign language (RFL for the group of the English-speaking students who arrived to study in Russia engineering, medicine and other areas. The application of the development is the basics of Russian teaching and learning in the classroom as well as in the mode of self-education and out-of-classroom events. Special attention is paid to the use of cloud-based tools to organize and conduct extracurricular activities. Particularly in the promising subject connected with the use of 3D printers for the solution of engineering problems of prosthetics of the lost bodies of animals and birds on the example of the Toucan key restoration. Analysis of the results of the use of flash cards, tests, and group games showed the promise of using the sets of Quizlet.com tools for accelerated assimilation of the native English speaking students in the area of General and special RFL vocabulary, as well as students showed that in a short time they can get and develop their basic skills of listening, reading and writing in Russian communication when Quizlet tools being used in different modes.

  5. “Biotecnological War” - A Conceptual And Perceptual Assessment Tool For Teaching Biotechnology And Protein Chemistry For Undergraduate Students In Biological Sciences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. C. Cruz et al.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available "Biotecnological War" board game, a conceptual and perceptual assessment tool for biotechnology and protein chemistry teaching for undergraduate students in biological sciences and related areas. It is a proposal initially conceived as an alternative complementary tool for biochemistry teaching of proteins and peptides, challenging students, aiming to review concepts transmitted in classroom, stimulating diverse student’s abilities, such as their creativity, competitiveness and resource management. OBJECTIVES. Correlate biochemistry importance of proteins and peptides with the development of new products. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Firstly, theoretical-practical classes were given with seminars to be presented by the groups, including topics that will be addressed in game. Groups of 5 students, with previously viewed themes drawn a goal to be achieved. There are two drawn goals variations: Academic or Commercial. Board is divided into provinces, which must be bought with an initial resource to complete the goal. Before the beginning each group will have 15 minutes to plan their actions. The objective is to develop the entire objective drawn with appropriate methodology, having at least 1 territory in each province. RESULTS. This game proved to be an excellent tool for complementary evaluation of students, which stimulated teamwork and a strong competitive spirit within classroom, which allowed to analyze students' perception regarding the protein subject and team work. On the other hand, for teacher and students participating in compulsory traineeship program this game demonstrated new ways to approach complex subjects in biochemistry using creativity with the development of new activities such as this board game. CONCLUSION: Overall, students had a good impression of “Biotecnological war” game since it helped to secure and administer the protein and peptides biochemical subject in a competitive and team work way.

  6. LACO-Wiki: A land cover validation tool and a new, innovative teaching resource for remote sensing and the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Linda; Perger, Christoph; Dresel, Christopher; Hofer, Martin; Weichselbaum, Juergen; Mondel, Thomas; Steffen, Fritz

    2016-04-01

    The validation of land cover products is an important step in the workflow of generating a land cover map from remotely-sensed imagery. Many students of remote sensing will be given exercises on classifying a land cover map followed by the validation process. Many algorithms exist for classification, embedded within proprietary image processing software or increasingly as open source tools. However, there is little standardization for land cover validation, nor a set of open tools available for implementing this process. The LACO-Wiki tool was developed as a way of filling this gap, bringing together standardized land cover validation methods and workflows into a single portal. This includes the storage and management of land cover maps and validation data; step-by-step instructions to guide users through the validation process; sound sampling designs; an easy-to-use environment for validation sample interpretation; and the generation of accuracy reports based on the validation process. The tool was developed for a range of users including producers of land cover maps, researchers, teachers and students. The use of such a tool could be embedded within the curriculum of remote sensing courses at a university level but is simple enough for use by students aged 13-18. A beta version of the tool is available for testing at: http://www.laco-wiki.net.

  7. From Classroom Teaching to Remote Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Ole; Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2000-01-01

    for teaching purpose on the Internet. It is also described how courses in the two different teaching environments can be maintained in one place. More professional teaching tools are available on the market, but the methods described in this paper are based on Luvit[1], an open low-cost web-based teaching tool...... and at the same time easy to learn and use by both developer and students. Two in-house project groups have tested the project work with success after a short learning period. 35 remote students under Open Education in Multimedia Industrial Information Technology (MII) are using the Luvit[1] tool and the methods...

  8. Addressing climate and energy misconceptions - teaching tools offered by the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A. U.; Ledley, T. S.; Kirk, K. B.; Grogan, M.; McCaffrey, M. S.; Buhr, S. M.; Manduca, C. A.; Fox, S.; Niepold, F.; Howell, C.; Lynds, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    Despite a prevalence of peer-reviewed scientific research and high-level reports by intergovernmental agencies (e.g., IPCC) that document changes in our climate and consequences for human societies, the public discourse regards these topics as controversial and sensitive. The chasm between scientific-based understanding of climate systems and public understanding can most easily be addressed via high quality, science-based education on these topics. Well-trained and confident educators are required to provide this education. However, climate science and energy awareness are complex topics that are rapidly evolving and have a great potential for controversy. Furthermore, the interdisciplinary nature of climate science further increases the difficulty for teachers to stay abreast of the science and the policy. Research has shown that students and educators alike hold misconceptions about the climate system in general and the causes and effects of climate change in particular. The NSF-funded CLEAN Pathway (http://cleanet.org) as part of the National Science Digital Library (http://www.nsdl.org) strives to address these needs and help educators address misconceptions by providing high quality learning resources and professional development opportunities to support educators of grade levels 6 through 16. The materials focus on teaching climate science and energy use. The scope and framework of the CLEAN Pathway is defined by the Essential Principles of Climate Science (CCSP, 2009) and the Energy Literacy Principles recently developed by the Department of Energy. Following this literacy-based approach, CLEAN helps with developing mental models to address misconceptions around climate science and energy awareness through a number of different avenues. These are: 1) Professional development opportunities for educators - interactive webinars for secondary teachers and virtual workshops for college faculty, 2) A collection of scientifically and pedagogically reviewed, high

  9. Pathology informatics fellowship retreats: The use of interactive scenarios and case studies as pathology informatics teaching tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy E Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Last year, our pathology informatics fellowship added informatics-based interactive case studies to its existing educational platform of operational and research rotations, clinical conferences, a common core curriculum with an accompanying didactic course, and national meetings. Methods: The structure of the informatics case studies was based on the traditional business school case study format. Three different formats were used, varying in length from short, 15-minute scenarios to more formal multiple hour-long case studies. Case studies were presented over the course of three retreats (Fall 2011, Winter 2012, and Spring 2012 and involved both local and visiting faculty and fellows. Results: Both faculty and fellows found the case studies and the retreats educational, valuable, and enjoyable. From this positive feedback, we plan to incorporate the retreats in future academic years as an educational component of our fellowship program. Conclusions: Interactive case studies appear to be valuable in teaching several aspects of pathology informatics that are difficult to teach in more traditional venues (rotations and didactic class sessions. Case studies have become an important component of our fellowship′s educational platform.

  10. Triatominae biochemistry goes to school: evaluation of a novel tool for teaching basic biochemical concepts of Chagas disease vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Leonardo Rodrigues; Cudischevitch, Cecília de Oliveira; Carneiro, Alan Brito; Macedo, Gustavo Bartholomeu; Lannes, Denise; Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso da

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate a new approach to teaching the basic biochemistry mechanisms that regulate the biology of Triatominae, major vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. We have designed and used a comic book, "Carlos Chagas: 100 years after a hero's discovery" containing scientific information obtained by seven distinguished contemporary Brazilian researchers working with Triatominaes. Students (22) in the seventh grade of a public elementary school received the comic book. The study was then followed up by the use of Concept Maps elaborated by the students. Six Concept Maps elaborated by the students before the introduction of the comic book received an average score of 7. Scores rose to an average of 45 after the introduction of the comic book. This result suggests that a more attractive content can greatly improve the knowledge and conceptual understanding among students not previously exposed to insect biochemistry. In conclusion, this study illustrates an alternative to current strategies of teaching about the transmission of neglected diseases. It also promotes the diffusion of the scientific knowledge produced by Brazilian researchers that may stimulate students to choose a scientific career. © 2014 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Use of clinical practice as a motivating tool of radioprotection teaching and radiopharmacology in early semesters of pharmacy course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrighetto, Daniela; Lüdke, Everton

    2014-01-01

    The research teaching methods aimed at the success of the higher education student in pharmacology and medicine courses in technical expertise in the fields of radiological protection, radiopharmacology and interventional radiology is extremely important in view of the progress of these sectors. The objective of this work is to propose a methodological sequence of teaching work with first-year students of pharmacy and medicine courses within a biophysical discipline where the integrated knowledge to clinical practice can be used for this purpose. The methodology was to assess individual learning of a group of N = 49 students of the first half in the age group of 17-19 years through conceptual acquisition by the traditional method of 'blackboard and chalk' and developed method that includes four pedagogical moments focused on the area health. An analysis of the evaluation student performance through Variance Analysis of a pathway showed improved scores with respect to the performance of application issues of knowledge concerning radiation protection and biological mechanisms of radiation with respect to the method of 'blackboard and chalk' with p < 0.05. Therefore, work with students with respect to the content in the form of six steps of clinical interest are a promising technique for radiation protection education in the early grades of college courses with experimental effectiveness

  12. Production and use of plastinated anatomical specimens as teaching and learning tools in veterinary gross anatomy in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda Mohamed

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Veterinary Anatomy is considered as the backbone subject in the veterinary medicine program. Formalized specimens were not very much accepted by the veterinary students due to their wetness, bad smell and potential harmful effects. Plastination has evolved as a new technique for prolonged preservation of specimens by replacing the water and fat by a curable plastic polymer. Material and methods: The process of plastination involved fixation, dehydration, impregnation and curing. The plastinated specimens were used for teaching and learning of veterinary gross anatomy courses for veterinary students. Results: Plastinated specimens were appreciated by the staff and students as they were odorless, non-toxic and durable, needed less space for storage and they were used in teaching the veterinary anatomy courses. Plastinated specimens were used for studying not only in the dissection hall but also in the lecture room, both individually and in groups. Conclusion: The plastinated specimens were excellent for demonstration but they could not completely replace the traditional dissection because students learn best by exploratory and hands-on dissection. Moreover, the wet specimens provided a more accurate visual representation of the body parts and skills to aid in dealing with actual clinical cases in the future. Therefore, the plastinated and wet specimens were used simultaneously depending on the topic being taught at the time. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2018; 5(1.000: 44-52

  13. Pathology informatics fellowship retreats: The use of interactive scenarios and case studies as pathology informatics teaching tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roy E; McClintock, David S; Balis, Ulysses J; Baron, Jason M; Becich, Michael J; Beckwith, Bruce A; Brodsky, Victor B; Carter, Alexis B; Dighe, Anand S; Haghighi, Mehrvash; Hipp, Jason D; Henricks, Walter H; Kim, Jiyeon Y; Klepseis, Veronica E; Kuo, Frank C; Lane, William J; Levy, Bruce P; Onozato, Maristela L; Park, Seung L; Sinard, John H; Tuthill, Mark J; Gilbertson, John R

    2012-01-01

    Last year, our pathology informatics fellowship added informatics-based interactive case studies to its existing educational platform of operational and research rotations, clinical conferences, a common core curriculum with an accompanying didactic course, and national meetings. The structure of the informatics case studies was based on the traditional business school case study format. Three different formats were used, varying in length from short, 15-minute scenarios to more formal multiple hour-long case studies. Case studies were presented over the course of three retreats (Fall 2011, Winter 2012, and Spring 2012) and involved both local and visiting faculty and fellows. Both faculty and fellows found the case studies and the retreats educational, valuable, and enjoyable. From this positive feedback, we plan to incorporate the retreats in future academic years as an educational component of our fellowship program. Interactive case studies appear to be valuable in teaching several aspects of pathology informatics that are difficult to teach in more traditional venues (rotations and didactic class sessions). Case studies have become an important component of our fellowship's educational platform.

  14. Lattices with unique complements

    CERN Document Server

    Saliĭ, V N

    1988-01-01

    The class of uniquely complemented lattices properly contains all Boolean lattices. However, no explicit example of a non-Boolean lattice of this class has been found. In addition, the question of whether this class contains any complete non-Boolean lattices remains unanswered. This book focuses on these classical problems of lattice theory and the various attempts to solve them. Requiring no specialized knowledge, the book is directed at researchers and students interested in general algebra and mathematical logic.

  15. Students' views on the impact of peer physical examination and palpation as a pedagogic tool for teaching and learning living human anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnah, Tudor I; de Bere, Sam Regan; Collett, Tracey

    2011-01-01

    Modern medical education teaching and learning approaches now lay emphasis on students acquiring knowledge, skills and attitudes relevant to medical practice. To explore students' perceived impacts of using hands-on approaches involving peer/life model physical examination and palpation in teaching and learning living human anatomy on their practice of physical examination of real patients. This study used exploratory focus groups and a questionnaire survey of years 3-5 medical students. The focus group discussions revealed new insights into the positive impacts of the hands-on approaches on students' clinical skills and professional attitudes when dealing with patients. Students' exposure to the hands-on approaches helped them to feel comfortable with therapeutically touching unclothed patients' bodies and physically examining them in the clinical environment. At least 60% of the questionnaire survey respondents agreed with the focus group participants on this view. Over 75% also agreed that the hands-on experiences helped them develop good professional attitudes in their encounter with patients. This study highlights the perceived educational value of the hands-on approaches as a pedagogic tool with a positive impact on students' clinical skills and professional attitudes that helps in easing their transition into clinical practice.

  16. Undergraduate teaching modules featuring geodesy data applied to critical social topics (GETSI: GEodetic Tools for Societal Issues)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt-Sitaula, B. A.; Walker, B.; Douglas, B. J.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Miller, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    The GETSI project, funded by NSF TUES, is developing and disseminating teaching and learning materials that feature geodesy data applied to critical societal issues such as climate change, water resource management, and natural hazards (serc.carleton.edu/getsi). It is collaborative between UNAVCO (NSF's geodetic facility), Mt San Antonio College, and Indiana University. GETSI was initiated after requests by geoscience faculty for geodetic teaching resources for introductory and majors-level students. Full modules take two weeks but module subsets can also be used. Modules are developed and tested by two co-authors and also tested in a third classroom. GETSI is working in partnership with the Science Education Resource Center's (SERC) InTeGrate project on the development, assessment, and dissemination to ensure compatibility with the growing number of resources for geoscience education. Two GETSI modules are being published in October 2015. "Ice mass and sea level changes" includes geodetic data from GRACE, satellite altimetry, and GPS time series. "Imaging Active Tectonics" has students analyzing InSAR and LiDAR data to assess infrastructure earthquake vulnerability. Another three modules are in testing during fall 2015 and will be published in 2016. "Surface process hazards" investigates mass wasting hazard and risk using LiDAR data. "Water resources and geodesy" uses GRACE, vertical GPS, and reflection GPS data to have students investigating droughts in California and the High Great Plains. "GPS, strain, and earthquakes" helps students learn about infinitesimal and coseismic strain through analysis of horizontal GPS data and includes an extension module on the Napa 2014 earthquake. In addition to teaching resources, the GETSI project is compiling recommendations on successful development of geodesy curricula. The chief recommendations so far are the critical importance of including scientific experts in the authorship team and investing significant resources in

  17. Mentored peer review of standardized manuscripts as a teaching tool for residents: a pilot randomized controlled multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Victoria S S; Strowd, Roy E; Aragón-García, Rebeca; Moon, Yeseon Park; Ford, Blair; Haut, Sheryl R; Kass, Joseph S; London, Zachary N; Mays, MaryAnn; Milligan, Tracey A; Price, Raymond S; Reynolds, Patrick S; Selwa, Linda M; Spencer, David C; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing need for peer reviewers as the scientific literature grows. Formal education in biostatistics and research methodology during residency training is lacking. In this pilot study, we addressed these issues by evaluating a novel method of teaching residents about biostatistics and research methodology using peer review of standardized manuscripts. We hypothesized that mentored peer review would improve resident knowledge and perception of these concepts more than non-mentored peer review, while improving review quality. A partially blinded, randomized, controlled multi-center study was performed. Seventy-eight neurology residents from nine US neurology programs were randomized to receive mentoring from a local faculty member or not. Within a year, residents reviewed a baseline manuscript and four subsequent manuscripts, all with introduced errors designed to teach fundamental review concepts. In the mentored group, mentors discussed completed reviews with residents. Primary outcome measure was change in knowledge score between pre- and post-tests, measuring epidemiology and biostatistics knowledge. Secondary outcome measures included level of confidence in the use and interpretation of statistical concepts before and after intervention, and RQI score for baseline and final manuscripts. Sixty-four residents (82%) completed initial review with gradual decline in completion on subsequent reviews. Change in primary outcome, the difference between pre- and post-test knowledge scores, did not differ between mentored (-8.5%) and non-mentored (-13.9%) residents ( p  = 0.48). Significant differences in secondary outcomes (using 5-point Likert scale, 5 = strongly agree) included mentored residents reporting enhanced understanding of research methodology (3.69 vs 2.61; p  = 0.001), understanding of manuscripts (3.73 vs 2.87; p  = 0.006), and application of study results to clinical practice (3.65 vs 2.78; p  = 0.005) compared to non

  18. Laboratory preparation questionnaires as a tool for the implementation of the Just in Time Teaching in the Physics I laboratories: Research training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, David A.; Sanchez, Melba J.; Forero, Oscar M.

    2017-06-01

    The implementation of the JiTT (Just in Time Teaching) strategy is presented to increase the previous preparation of students enrolled in the subject Physics Laboratory I offered at the Industrial University of Santander (UIS), Colombia. In this study, a laboratory preparation questionnaire (CPL) was applied as a tool for the implementation of JiTT combined with elements of mediated learning. It was found that the CPL allows to improve the students’ experience regarding the preparation of the laboratory and the development of the experimental session. These questionnaires were implemented in an academic manager (Moodle) and a web application (lab.ciencias.uis.edu.co) was used to publish the contents essential for the preparation of the student before each practical session. The most significant result was that the students performed the experimental session with the basic knowledge to improve their learning experience.

  19. Recontextualising Cellular Respiration : Designing an learning-and-teaching strategy for developing biological concepts as flexible tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierdsma, M.D.M.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis reports on a design-research study on recontextualising biological concepts. The term ‘recontextualising’ is based in socio-cultural activity theory and was proposed by van Oers in 1998 as a change of perspective on the idea of knowledge-transfer. Within this view concepts are tools to

  20. Beyond Jeopardy and Lectures: Using "Microsoft PowerPoint" as a Game Design Tool to Teach Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siko, Jason; Barbour, Michael; Toker, Sacip

    2011-01-01

    To date, research involving homemade PowerPoint games as an instructional tool has not shown statistically significant gains in student performance. This paper examines the results of a study comparing the performance of students in a high school chemistry course who created homemade PowerPoint games as a test review with the students who used a…

  1. Generation Y, Learner Autonomy and the Potential of Web 2.0 Tools for Language Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Liam

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the development of learner autonomy and the application of Web 2.0 tools in the language classroom. Design/methodology/approach: The approach taken is that of qualitative action research within an explicit theoretical framework and the data were collected via surveys and…

  2. Phylogenetic Reconstruction as a Broadly Applicable Teaching Tool in the Biology Classroom: The Value of Data in Estimating Likely Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julius, Matthew L.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.

    2006-01-01

    This laboratory exercise introduces students to a fundamental tool in evolutionary biology--phylogenetic inference. Students are required to create a data set via observation and through mining preexisting data sets. These student data sets are then used to develop and compare competing hypotheses of vertebrate phylogeny. The exercise uses readily…

  3. Mapas conceituais: estratégia de ensino/aprendizagem e ferramenta avaliativa Conceptual maps: teaching and learning strategies and an evaluative tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Aparecida de Souza

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente ensaio tem por objetivo apresentar uma reflexão sobre as potencia lidades do mapa conceitual como estratégia de ensino/aprendizagem e ferramenta ava liativa. Revisitar o referencial teórico relativo à temática possibilitou contemplar a utili dade do mapa conceitual sob diferentes perspectivas: daquele que ensina e daquele que aprende. Valer-se dos mapas conceituais como estratégias de ensino/aprendizagem, também e concomitantemente como ferramenta avaliativa, é criar possibilidades para a organiza ção do conhecimento pela promoção de experiências educativas que provoquem não somen te reflexão, busca de compreensão e processamento profundo da informação, mas tam bém o desenvolvimento da autorregulação, da metacognição e do aprender a aprenderThis essay has the purpose of reflecting upon the potential benefits of con ceptual map as teaching and learning strategies and an evaluative tool. To revisit the the oretical framework of this theme made it possible to analyze the utility of conceptual map under different perspectives: the teachers´ and the students´. It became clear that the use of conceptual map as teaching and learning strategies, as well as an evaluative tool, leads to knowledge organization by means of promotion of learning experiences which not only generate reflection, comprehension and deep processing of information, but also contributes to the development of metacognition, self-regulation and learning to learn processes

  4. Use of tablet (iPad®) as a tool for teaching anesthesiology in an orthopedic rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Pedro Paulo; Hawrylyshyn, Kathryn Ashley; Macario, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare scores on house staff evaluations of "overall teaching quality" during a rotation in anesthesia for orthopedics in the first six months (n=11 residents were provided with curriculum in a printed binder) and in the final six months (n=9 residents were provided with the same curriculum in a tablet computer (iPad, Apple®, Inc, Cupertino, Ca)). At the beginning of the two-week rotation, the resident was given an iPad containing: a syllabus with daily reading assignments, rotation objectives according to the ACGME core competencies, and journal articles. Prior to the study, these curriculum materials had been distributed in a printed binder. The iPad also provided peer reviewed internet sites and direct access to online textbooks, but was not linked to the electronic medical record. At the end of the rotation, residents anonymously answered questions to evaluate the rotation on an ordinal scale from 1 (unsatisfactory) to 5 (outstanding). All residents were unaware that the data would be analyzed retrospectively for this study. The mean global rating of the rotation as assessed by "overall teaching quality of this rotation" increased from 4.09 (N=11 evaluations before intervention, SD 0.83, median 4, range 3-5) to 4.89 (N=9 evaluations after intervention, SD 0.33, median 5, range 4-5) p=0.04. Residents responded favorably to the introduction of an innovative iPad based curriculum for the orthopedic anesthesia rotation. More studies are needed to show how such mobile computing technologies can enhance learning, especially since residents work at multiple locations, have duty hour limits, and the need to document resident learning in six ACGME core competencies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. WEB-QUESTS IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDYING AND TEACHING AS A VALUABLE RESOURCE AND EFFECTIVE TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Pererva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This paper is a study of innovative methods of learning and teaching English with the help of Internet resources and students motivation to seek the necessary information at homework. Methodology. The main principle of the Web-Quest as a type of English language teaching is to motivate students. For example, by participation in the Web-Quest students, who were unsure of their knowledge, become more confident. Having clear goals and objectives, using computer skills, motivated young people more actively acts as a confident user of English. Findings. According to the technology of We-Quests students were asked to create one or more projects directly related to the successful execution of the work. It is a significant result of all the hard work of students, and it is the subject of evaluation. Evaluation is an essential component of Web-Quest or any other project, and from this point of view, the criteria should be clear and accessible to students from the very beginning. These instructions can and should be changed in order to differentiate and provide an oral presentation and written work. Originality. Basically, Web-Quests are mini-projects in which a higher percentage of the material obtained from the Internet. They can be created by teachers or students, depending on the type of training work. The author detailed the increase of possibilities in the search of Internet projects with other creative types of student work. They may include: review of the literature, essay writing, discussion of read works and other. Practical value. The paper confirmed that the roles and tasks, reflecting the real world, invites to cooperate, stimulate and train the thinking process at a higher level. That is why the use of Web-Quests can improve the language skills of the educational process (reading for information extraction, detailed reading, negotiations, oral and written communication, and other.

  6. PORTAAL: A Classroom Observation Tool Assessing Evidence-Based Teaching Practices for Active Learning in Large Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Sarah L; Converse, Mercedes; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that active learning works better than a completely passive lecture. Despite this evidence, adoption of these evidence-based teaching practices remains low. In this paper, we offer one tool to help faculty members implement active learning. This tool identifies 21 readily implemented elements that have been shown to increase student outcomes related to achievement, logic development, or other relevant learning goals with college-age students. Thus, this tool both clarifies the research-supported elements of best practices for instructor implementation of active learning in the classroom setting and measures instructors' alignment with these practices. We describe how we reviewed the discipline-based education research literature to identify best practices in active learning for adult learners in the classroom and used these results to develop an observation tool (Practical Observation Rubric To Assess Active Learning, or PORTAAL) that documents the extent to which instructors incorporate these practices into their classrooms. We then use PORTAAL to explore the classroom practices of 25 introductory biology instructors who employ some form of active learning. Overall, PORTAAL documents how well aligned classrooms are with research-supported best practices for active learning and provides specific feedback and guidance to instructors to allow them to identify what they do well and what could be improved. © 2015 S. L. Eddy et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  7. Is Life Unique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Is life physicochemically unique? No. Is life unique? Yes. Life manifests innumerable formalisms that cannot be generated or explained by physicodynamics alone. Life pursues thousands of biofunctional goals, not the least of which is staying alive. Neither physicodynamics, nor evolution, pursue goals. Life is largely directed by linear digital programming and by the Prescriptive Information (PI) instantiated particularly into physicodynamically indeterminate nucleotide sequencing. Epigenomic controls only compound the sophistication of these formalisms. Life employs representationalism through the use of symbol systems. Life manifests autonomy, homeostasis far from equilibrium in the harshest of environments, positive and negative feedback mechanisms, prevention and correction of its own errors, and organization of its components into Sustained Functional Systems (SFS). Chance and necessity—heat agitation and the cause-and-effect determinism of nature’s orderliness—cannot spawn formalisms such as mathematics, language, symbol systems, coding, decoding, logic, organization (not to be confused with mere self-ordering), integration of circuits, computational success, and the pursuit of functionality. All of these characteristics of life are formal, not physical. PMID:25382119

  8. American Association of Orthodontists Foundation Craniofacial Growth Legacy Collection: Overview of a powerful tool for orthodontic research and teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Sheldon; Curry, Sean

    2015-08-01

    This article reports on the current status of the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation (AAOF) Craniofacial Growth Legacy Collection--an AAOF-supported multi-institutional project that uses the Internet and cloud computing to collect and share craniofacial images and data for orthodontic research and education. The project gives investigators and clinicians all over the world online access to longitudinal information on craniofacial development in untreated children with malocclusions of various types. It also is a unique source of control samples for testing the validity of consensually accepted beliefs about the effects of orthodontic treatment or of failure to treat. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of difficult concepts in the interpretation of musculoskeletal radiographs using a web-based learning/teaching tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunn, Heidi; Nunn, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To identify which aspects of musculoskeletal radiograph image interpretation users of a web-based learning resource found to be most difficult. Method: The resource provides modular online training, based on twelve musculoskeletal anatomical and pathological areas. At the end of each module is a multiple choice self-test, which users can utilize to consolidate their learning. There are 217 questions within the tests. The results for all questions answered on or before 1st February 2011 were analyzed, and the lowest scoring 25% of questions subsequently reviewed. A low-scoring question implies that the subject was difficult. Results: Users provided a total of 117,097 answers. The range of scores provided by the test questions varied significantly (P < 0.0001), from 15.8% to 93.8%. Topics appearing in the lowest quartile were analyzed in detail. They included interpretation of paediatric radiographs, the Salter-Harris classification, soft-tissue signs and the identification of multiple injuries. The lowest scoring modules were the shoulder and ankle. Conclusion: The results of this study will help to guide educators both within radiography and other health professions in providing more targeted teaching in musculoskeletal image interpretation.

  10. Use of a wiki as an interactive teaching tool in pathology residency education: Experience with a genomics, research, and informatics in pathology course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The need for informatics and genomics training in pathology is critical, yet limited resources for such training are available. In this study we sought to critically test the hypothesis that the incorporation of a wiki (a collaborative writing and publication tool with roots in "Web 2.0" in a combined informatics and genomics course could both (1 serve as an interactive, collaborative educational resource and reference and (2 actively engage trainees by requiring the creation and sharing of educational materials. Materials and Methods: A 2-week full-time course at our institution covering genomics, research, and pathology informatics (GRIP was taught by 36 faculty to 18 second- and third-year pathology residents. The course content included didactic lectures and hands-on demonstrations of technology (e.g., whole-slide scanning, telepathology, and statistics software. Attendees were given pre- and posttests. Residents were trained to use wiki technology (MediaWiki and requested to construct a wiki about the GRIP course by writing comprehensive online review articles on assigned lectures. To gauge effectiveness, pretest and posttest scores for our course were compared with scores from the previous 7 years from the predecessor course (limited to informatics given at our institution that did not utilize wikis. Results: Residents constructed 59 peer-reviewed collaborative wiki articles. This group showed a 25% improvement (standard deviation 12% in test scores, which was greater than the 16% delta recorded in the prior 7 years of our predecessor course (P = 0.006. Conclusions: Our use of wiki technology provided a wiki containing high-quality content that will form the basis of future pathology informatics and genomics courses and proved to be an effective teaching tool, as evidenced by the significant rise in our resident posttest scores. Data from this project provide support for the notion that active participation in content creation

  11. VIRLAB: teaching tool for photovoltaic systems technology; VIRLAB: ferramenta de ensino para a tecnologia de sistemas fotovoltaicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Rita Maria B.; Holanda, Edgney Sarvio O.; Antunes, Fernando Luiz M.; Carvalho, Paulo Cesar M. de [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica

    2004-07-01

    This work concerns about the use of the Internet as a tool of information and formation to researchers and planners in Photovoltaic (PV) systems. The setup is based on a computer device with a data acquisition system that is capable to simulate the performance of a PV module, through software and a data acquisition system, and show measurements in Internet. Being a flexible system, and having a friendly interface with the user, and having an easy operation for showing measurements in very short intervals, it making possible to give knowledge of students, through the internet, in a way to apply the theory about PV systems in a practical virtual laboratory. (author)

  12. Application of Education Information Management Support Tools in the Promotion of Teaching/Learning and Management of Students' Performance in Federal Universities in the South-South Zone of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwuo, S. O.; Enefaa, Bestman Briggs Anthonia

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the application of education information management support tools in the promotion of teaching/learning and management of students' performance in federal universities in the South-South zone of Nigeria. Two research questions and two null hypotheses guided the study. The study adopted a descriptive survey design. The…

  13. Promoting Students' Problem Solving Skills and Knowledge of STEM Concepts in a Data-Rich Learning Environment: Using Online Data as a Tool for Teaching about Renewable Energy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurmond, Brandi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to compare a data-rich learning (DRL) environment that utilized online data as a tool for teaching about renewable energy technologies (RET) to a lecture-based learning environment to determine the impact of the learning environment on students' knowledge of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) concepts related…

  14. “Turn Your Cell Phones on”: Mobile Phone Polling as a Tool for Teaching Information Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Burkhardt

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available While mobile technologies are ubiquitous among students and increasingly used in many aspects of libraries, they have yet to gain traction in information literacy instruction. Librarians at Champlain College piloted mobile phone polling in a first-year classroom as a less expensive and more versatile alternative to clickers. By utilizing a technology that virtually all students have in their pockets librarians found that it increased engagement from previous iterations of the session. In addition, by asking poll questions about students’ experiences, librarians were able to facilitate in-depth inquiry into information literacy topics. Ultimately, from direct experience in over 30 different classes, we found that mobile phone polling is a useful tool for any librarian to have in their pedagogical toolbox.

  15. [Distance education: use of the WebCT as a support tool for teaching intravenous therapy in nursing undergraduate programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Denise Costa; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli

    2003-01-01

    This investigation focused on a learning environment via internet, through which Intravenous Therapy (IVT) was taught. Due to its complexity, Intravenous Therapy was chosen against numerous subjects to be taught through an e-learning environment, by comprising both technical procedures and conceptual aspects that can be discussed through a virtual learning environment. The objectives of this study were to develop educational material about Intravenous Therapy to guide students through the learning related to intravenous therapy, to have the related educational material evaluated by experts, and to evaluate the students' use of this material, considering difficulties and/or advantages, participation/interaction in this environment, and usability of its tools. The interface used for the internet-based training program was WebCT.

  16. Synergies between Science and Policy and the Use of New Teaching Tools in the Academic and Professional Development Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokova, E.

    2015-01-01

    The James Martin Center for Non-proliferation Studies (CNS) at the Monterey Institute of International Studies has been providing academic coursework and professional development training in nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear safeguards and security issues to graduate students and professionals for over two decades. Since 2011, the CNS also managers the Vienna Center for Disarmament and Non-Proliferation (VCDNP) in Vienna, Austria, an international non-governmental organization established at the initiative of the Austria Foreign Ministry. The VCDNP offers professional development courses on nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament to diplomats and other practitioners, primarily from the developing countries, as well as conducts a variety of awareness and outreach programmes. International safeguards and non-proliferation verification feature prominently in the CNS and VCDNP educational and training programmes. The Centers offer cutting edge courses and programmes that prepare specialists with relevant competences and skills for a range of the safeguards-related jobs, particularly in the area of open source information analysis. These programmes utilize both traditional and new tools and methods, offer curricula that combine science and policy, encourage regular interaction with the IAEA experts, other practitioners, as well as academic and professional networks. The proposed paper will offer an overview of best practices and lessons learned from key programmes and tools used by CNS and VCDNP in education and training, with particular attention paid to the use of negotiation simulations, on-line courses and modules, and virtual reality simulations. The paper will examine the role of internships, on-the-job training, academic and professional exchanges and discuss the role of partnerships among different stakeholders, including in training specialists from developing and newcomer countries. (author)

  17. Teaching Astronomy with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Carmen; Impey, Chris David; Wenger, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Students today are expected to have access to computers and the Internet. Students young and old, in school and out of school, are interested in learning about astronomy, and have computers to use for this. Teach Astronomy is a website with a comprehensive digital astronomy textbook freely available to students and educators. In addition to the textbook, there are astronomy Wikipedia articles, image archives from Astronomy Picture of the Day and AstroPix, and video lectures covering all topics of astronomy. Teach Astronomy has a unique search tool called the wikimap that can be used to search through all of the resources on the site. Astronomy: State of the Art (ASOTA) is a massive, open, online course (MOOC). Over 18,000 students have enrolled over the past year and half. This MOOC has been presented in various forms. First, only to students on the web, with content released weekly on host site Udemy. Then to university students who met formally in the classroom for educational activities, but were also expected to watch lectures online on their own time. Presently, it is available online for students to go at their own pace. In the future it will be available in an extended format on a new host site, Coursera. ASOTA instructors use social media to interact with students. Students ask questions via the course host site, Udemy. Live question and answer sessions are conducted using Google Hangouts on Air, and interesting and relevant astronomy news, or supplementary educational content is shared via the ASOTA Facebook page. Teaching on the Internet may seem impersonal and impractical, but by learning to use all of these tools, instructors have the ability to interact with students, and keep them engaged.

  18. Introducing "SandRA": Visual Representation of the Research-Teaching Nexus as a Tool in the Dissemination of a New Research Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Pauline; Stoakes, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    The "research-teaching nexus" has been the subject of much recent debate, yet little attention has been paid to institutional initiatives to promote and encourage the integration of teaching and research. This article presents a novel diagrammatical representation of the relationship between research and teaching which was developed to aid the…

  19. Gender, ethnicity and teaching evaluations : Evidence from mixed teaching teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Wagner (Natascha); M. Rieger (Matthias); K.J. Voorvelt (Katherine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper studies the effect of teacher gender and ethnicity on student evaluations of teaching quality at university. We analyze a unique data-set featuring mixed teaching teams and a diverse, multicultural, multi-ethnic group of students and teachers. Co-teaching allows us to study

  20. ACTIVE TEACHING-LEARNING METHODOLOGY TO APPROACH CARBOHYDRATE AND LIPID METABOLISM: An interdisciplinary strategy that involved the Moodle tool in the development of Problem Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M.P. Borges

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Highlight the relevance of topics studied for professional practice and associate approaches provided by different areas of knowledge are pointed as essential aspects for significant learning. Contextualize the study of metabolic pathways, linking the clinical use and expanding the vision with the approach of cellular and molecular biology discipline was the motivation for the development of the strategy described and evaluated here. In this work, starting from the concept of active methodology of teaching and learning was developed a methodological strategy to approach the carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. This strategy included: questioning the content through the clinical case study on diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolemia, individual and collective study in the external space the classroom with the help of Moodle tool, classroom discussion accompanied by the teacher, preparation of seminar, evaluation of the content through individual written test and evaluation of the method. Analysis of student involvement with method indicates an average frequency of 98% in the practical class of Biochemistry discipline, effective participation in the preparation of seminars, an increase of 2 points in average of individual written evaluation. As for the fact that the cases were studied in two curricular components, the answers show that 92% of students feel more compression. Only 6% of students think  unnecessary to interdisciplinary approach. As for the different steps of the method, the answers show that 99% of students consider how relevant the initial self-study and discussions in class. However, only 50% of students appreciated the use of Moodle tool. Thus, student responses indicated the perception of the effectiveness of the method for their ability to: stimulate interest in learning, stimulate the search for answers through research and the building of learning.

  1. Estetoscópio digital como ferramenta inovadora no ensino da ausculta cardíaca Digital stethoscope as an innovative tool on the teaching of auscultatory skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Tinoco Mesquita

    2013-02-01

    accuracy of clinical examination, however, its impact on the teaching of cardiac auscultation for undergraduate students of medicine is not known. The objective is to demonstrate the usefulness of the digital stethoscope compared to traditional methods as a tool in the teaching of auscultatory skills. nterventional, longitudinal, controlled, unicenter and randomized study. Thirty-eight medicine students were enrolled for a cardiovascular semiology course lasting eight weeks. The course program included lectures and bedside practice in Cardiology wards. In the practical lessons, the students were randomized into two groups: 1 (n = 21 digital stethoscope (Littmann® Model 3200, 3M; and 2 (n = 17 conventional stethoscopes. A pre-training evaluation was conducted through a test using the software Heart Sounds®, which was repeated after the course. The average scores were compared by paired T test and unpaired T test. It is observed that, at the end of the course, there was a significantly greater improvement in the group that used the digital stethoscope (51.9% compared to the group using the conventional stethoscope (29.5%. Short-term interventions for cardiac semiology teaching are able to contribute significantly to improving proficiency in the identification of heart sounds. The use of digital stethoscope proved to be a positive factor in teaching these skills.

  2. NASA's "Eyes On The Solar System:" A Real-time, 3D-Interactive Tool to Teach the Wonder of Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, K.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is using video game technology to immerse students, the general public and mission personnel in our solar system and beyond. "Eyes on the Solar System," a cross-platform, real-time, 3D-interactive application that can run on-line or as a stand-alone "video game," is of particular interest to educators looking for inviting tools to capture students interest in a format they like and understand. (eyes.nasa.gov). It gives users an extraordinary view of our solar system by virtually transporting them across space and time to make first-person observations of spacecraft, planetary bodies and NASA/ESA missions in action. Key scientific results illustrated with video presentations, supporting imagery and web links are imbedded contextually into the solar system. Educators who want an interactive, game-based approach to engage students in learning Planetary Science will see how "Eyes" can be effectively used to teach its principles to grades 3 through 14.The presentation will include a detailed demonstration of the software along with a description/demonstration of how this technology is being adapted for education. There will also be a preview of coming attractions. This work is being conducted by the Visualization Technology Applications and Development Group at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the same team responsible for "Eyes on the Earth 3D," and "Eyes on Exoplanets," which can be viewed at eyes.nasa.gov/earth and eyes.nasa.gov/exoplanets.

  3. Acceptance of Moodle as a Teaching/Learning Tool by the Faculty of the Department of Information Studies at Sultan Qaboos University, Oman based on UTAUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Saleem Naifa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to explore the acceptance of Moodle as a teaching and learning tool by the faculty of the Department of Information Studies (IS at Sultan Qaboos University (SQU in the Sultanate of Oman. The researchers employed the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT to examine the effects of performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence and facilitating conditions on the behav-ioural intention of SQU faculty members to employ Moodle in their instruction. Data were collected by the interview method. Results showed the emergence of two faculty groups: one uses Moodle and one does not use Moodle. In group that uses Moodle, performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions and behavioural intention are positively related, thereby influencing the faculty members’use behavior. In addition to the aforementioned UTAUT constructs, four additional factors affect Moodle’s adoption. These moderators are gender, age, experience and the voluntariness of use, amongst which gender exhibits the least influence on Moodle adoption. That is, male and female faculty generally both use the learning platform. Although some members of the group that does not use Moodle exhibit optimistic performance expectancy for technology, the overall perception in this regard for Moodle is negative. The other UTAUT constructs exert no influence on this group’s adoption of the learning platform.

  4. Cancer: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A to Z › Cancer › Unique to Older Adults Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Unique ... group with other older people with the same type of cancer. Researchers have found that support groups ...

  5. The use of simulation in teaching the basic sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Martin P

    2013-12-01

    To assess the current use of simulation in medical education, specifically, the teaching of the basic sciences to accomplish the goal of improved integration. Simulation is increasingly being used by the institutions to teach the basic sciences. Preliminary data suggest that it is an effective tool with increased retention and learner satisfaction. Medical education is undergoing tremendous change. One of the directions of that change is increasing integration of the basic and clinical sciences to improve the efficiency and quality of medical education, and ultimately to improve the patient care. Integration is thought to improve the understanding of basic science conceptual knowledge and to better prepare the learners for clinical practice. Simulation because of its unique effects on learning is currently being successfully used by many institutions as a means to produce that integration through its use in the teaching of the basic sciences. Preliminary data indicate that simulation is an effective tool for basic science education and garners high learner satisfaction.

  6. "C.R.E.A.T.E."-ing Unique Primary-Source Research Paper Assignments for a Pleasure and Pain Course Teaching Neuroscientific Principles in a Large General Education Undergraduate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Richard J; Rotella, Francis M; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Coke, Tricia; Olsson, Kerstin; Barrientos, Alicia; Blachorsky, Lauren; Warshaw, Deena; Buras, Agata; Sanchez, Ciara M; Azad, Raihana; Stellar, James R

    2016-01-01

    A large (250 registrants) General Education lecture course, Pleasure and Pain, presented basic neuroscience principles as they related to animal and human models of pleasure and pain by weaving basic findings related to food and drug addiction and analgesic states with human studies examining empathy, social neuroscience and neuroeconomics. In its first four years, the course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page review of three unique peer-reviewed research articles. Although well-registered and well-received, 18% of the students received Incomplete grades, primarily due to failing to submit the paper that went largely unresolved and eventually resulted in a failing grade. To rectify this issue, a modified version of the C.R.E.A.T.E. (Consider, Read, Elucidate hypotheses, Analyze and interpret data, Think of the next Experiment) method replaced the paper with eight structured assignments focusing on an initial general-topic article, the introduction-methods, and results-discussion of each of three related peer-review neuroscience-related articles, and a final summary. Compliance in completing these assignments was very high, resulting in only 11 INC grades out of 228 students. Thus, use of the C.R.E.A.T.E. method reduced the percentage of problematic INC grades from 18% to 4.8%, a 73% decline, without changing the overall grade distribution. Other analyses suggested the students achieved a deeper understanding of the scientific process using the C.R.E.A.T.E. method relative to the original term paper assignment.

  7. “C.R.E.A.T.E.”-ing Unique Primary-Source Research Paper Assignments for a Pleasure and Pain Course Teaching Neuroscientific Principles in a Large General Education Undergraduate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Richard J.; Rotella, Francis M.; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Coke, Tricia; Olsson, Kerstin; Barrientos, Alicia; Blachorsky, Lauren; Warshaw, Deena; Buras, Agata; Sanchez, Ciara M.; Azad, Raihana; Stellar, James R.

    2016-01-01

    A large (250 registrants) General Education lecture course, Pleasure and Pain, presented basic neuroscience principles as they related to animal and human models of pleasure and pain by weaving basic findings related to food and drug addiction and analgesic states with human studies examining empathy, social neuroscience and neuroeconomics. In its first four years, the course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page review of three unique peer-reviewed research articles. Although well-registered and well-received, 18% of the students received Incomplete grades, primarily due to failing to submit the paper that went largely unresolved and eventually resulted in a failing grade. To rectify this issue, a modified version of the C.R.E.A.T.E. (Consider, Read, Elucidate hypotheses, Analyze and interpret data, Think of the next Experiment) method replaced the paper with eight structured assignments focusing on an initial general-topic article, the introduction-methods, and results-discussion of each of three related peer-review neuroscience-related articles, and a final summary. Compliance in completing these assignments was very high, resulting in only 11 INC grades out of 228 students. Thus, use of the C.R.E.A.T.E. method reduced the percentage of problematic INC grades from 18% to 4.8%, a 73% decline, without changing the overall grade distribution. Other analyses suggested the students achieved a deeper understanding of the scientific process using the C.R.E.A.T.E. method relative to the original term paper assignment. PMID:27385918

  8. Gender, ethnicity and teaching evaluations : Evidence from mixed teaching teams

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Natascha; Rieger, Matthias; Voorvelt, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper studies the effect of teacher gender and ethnicity on student evaluations of teaching quality at university. We analyze a unique data-set featuring mixed teaching teams and a diverse, multicultural, multi-ethnic group of students and teachers. Co-teaching allows us to study the impact of teacher gender and ethnicity on students’ evaluations of teaching exploiting within course variation in an empirical model with course-year fixed effects. We document a negative effect ...

  9. How to teach mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Krantz, Steven G

    2015-01-01

    This third edition is a lively and provocative tract on how to teach mathematics in today's new world of online learning tools and innovative teaching devices. The author guides the reader through the joys and pitfalls of interacting with modern undergraduates-telling you very explicitly what to do and what not to do. This third edition has been streamlined from the second edition, but still includes the nuts and bolts of good teaching, discussing material related to new developments in teaching methodology and technique, as well as adding an entire new chapter on online teaching methods.

  10. Teaching artfully

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution I address the challenges and rewards that are brought by teaching creatively in higher education. By looking auto-ethnographically at my own practice as educator at undergraduate and graduate programs in Denmark, I describe a number of creative educational tools: metaphor-bui......) critical and original thinking. The aspiration of the present contribution is to disseminate my thoughts, reflections, experiences and engage in a conversation with a scholarly field, to whom academia is much more than logical-verbal transmission of knowledge.......In this contribution I address the challenges and rewards that are brought by teaching creatively in higher education. By looking auto-ethnographically at my own practice as educator at undergraduate and graduate programs in Denmark, I describe a number of creative educational tools: metaphor...

  11. Integrating the hospital library with patient care, teaching and research: model and Web 2.0 tools to create a social and collaborative community of clinical research in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Blanca San José; Garcia Carretero, Rafael; Varela Entrecanales, Manuel; Pozuelo, Paz Martin

    2010-09-01

    Research in hospital settings faces several difficulties. Information technologies and certain Web 2.0 tools may provide new models to tackle these problems, allowing for a collaborative approach and bridging the gap between clinical practice, teaching and research. We aim to gather a community of researchers involved in the development of a network of learning and investigation resources in a hospital setting. A multi-disciplinary work group analysed the needs of the research community. We studied the opportunities provided by Web 2.0 tools and finally we defined the spaces that would be developed, describing their elements, members and different access levels. WIKINVESTIGACION is a collaborative web space with the aim of integrating the management of all the hospital's teaching and research resources. It is composed of five spaces, with different access privileges. The spaces are: Research Group Space 'wiki for each individual research group', Learning Resources Centre devoted to the Library, News Space, Forum and Repositories. The Internet, and most notably the Web 2.0 movement, is introducing some overwhelming changes in our society. Research and teaching in the hospital setting will join this current and take advantage of these tools to socialise and improve knowledge management.

  12. The Relationship Between the Managerial Skills and Results of “Performance Evaluation “Tool Among Nursing Managers in Teaching Hospitals of Iran University of Medical Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isfahani, Haleh Mousavi; Aryankhesal, Aidin; Haghani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Performance of different organizations, such as hospitals is mainly influenced by their managers’ performance. Nursing managers have an important role in hospital performance and their managerial skills can improve the quality of the services. Hence, the present study was conducted in order to assess the relationship between the managerial skills and the results of their performance evaluation in Teaching Hospitals of Iran University of Medical Science in 2013. The research used the cross sectional method in 2013. It was done by distributing a managerial skills assessment questionnaire, with close-ended questions in 5 choice Likert scale, among 181 managers and head nurses of hospitals of Iran university of Medical Sciences; among which 131 answered the questions. Another data collection tools was a forms to record evaluation marks from the personnel records. We used Pearson and Spearman correlation tests and SPSS for analysis and description (frequency, mean and standard deviation). Results showed that the managerial skills of the nursing mangers were fair (2.57 out of 5) and the results of the performance evaluation were in a good condition (98.44). The mangers’ evaluation results and the managerial skills scores were not in a meaningful correlation (r=0.047 np=0.856). The research showed no correlation between different domains of managerial skills and the performance evaluation marks: decision making skills (r=0.074 and p=0.399), leadership (correlation coefficient 0.028 and p=0.654), motivation (correlation coefficient 0.118 and p=0.163), communication (correlation coefficient 0.116 and p=0.122), systematic thinking (correlation coefficient 0.028 and p=0.828), time management (correlation coefficient 0.077 and p=0.401) and strategic thinking (correlation coefficient 0.041 and p=0.756). Lack of any correlation and relation between managers’ managerial skills and their performance evaluation results shows need to a fundamental revision at managers

  13. Perspectives on learning, learning to teach and teaching elementary science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraamidou, Lucy

    The framework that characterizes this work is that of elementary teachers' learning and development. Specifically, the ways in which prospective and beginning teachers' develop pedagogical content knowledge for teaching science in light of current recommendations for reform emphasizing teaching and learning science as inquiry are explored. Within this theme, the focus is on three core areas: (a) the use of technology tools (i.e., web-based portfolios) in support of learning to teach science at the elementary level; (b) beginning teachers' specialized knowledge for giving priority to evidence in science teaching; and (c) the applications of perspectives associated with elementary teachers' learning to teach science in Cyprus, where I was born and raised. The first manuscript describes a study aimed at exploring the influence of web-based portfolios and a specific task in support of learning to teach science within the context of a Professional Development School program. The task required prospective teachers to articulate their personal philosophies about teaching and learning science in the form of claims, evidence and justifications in a web-based forum. The findings of this qualitative case study revealed the participants' developing understandings about learning and teaching science, which included emphasizing a student-centered approach, connecting physical engagement of children with conceptual aspects of learning, becoming attentive to what teachers can do to support children's learning, and focusing on teaching science as inquiry. The way the task was organized and the fact that the web-based forum provided the ability to keep multiple versions of their philosophies gave prospective teachers the advantage of examining how their philosophies were changing over time, which supported a continuous engagement in metacognition, self-reflection and self-evaluation. The purpose of the study reported in the second manuscript was to examine the nature of a first

  14. The Teaching of Mathematics in Secondary Schools as a Tool for Self-Reliance and Re-Branding Process in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonah, Tali D.; Caleb, Mbwas .L.; Stephen, Abe A.

    2012-01-01

    Mathematics teaching is an interaction between the teacher and the learners that leads to acquisition of desirable mathematical knowledge, ideas and skills necessary for applicability in our everyday life. This paper therefore looks at the concept of self-reliance, the concept of mathematics teaching, problems and prospects of mathematics teaching…

  15. Tools and their uses

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    Teaches names, general uses, and correct operation of all basic hand and power tools, fasteners, and measuring devices you are likely to need. Also, grinding, metal cutting, soldering, and more. 329 illustrations.

  16. The application of network teaching in applied optics teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huifu; Piao, Mingxu; Li, Lin; Liu, Dongmei

    2017-08-01

    Network technology has become a creative tool of changing human productivity, the rapid development of it has brought profound changes to our learning, working and life. Network technology has many advantages such as rich contents, various forms, convenient retrieval, timely communication and efficient combination of resources. Network information resources have become the new education resources, get more and more application in the education, has now become the teaching and learning tools. Network teaching enriches the teaching contents, changes teaching process from the traditional knowledge explanation into the new teaching process by establishing situation, independence and cooperation in the network technology platform. The teacher's role has shifted from teaching in classroom to how to guide students to learn better. Network environment only provides a good platform for the teaching, we can get a better teaching effect only by constantly improve the teaching content. Changchun university of science and technology introduced a BB teaching platform, on the platform, the whole optical classroom teaching and the classroom teaching can be improved. Teachers make assignments online, students learn independently offline or the group learned cooperatively, this expands the time and space of teaching. Teachers use hypertext form related knowledge of applied optics, rich cases and learning resources, set up the network interactive platform, homework submission system, message board, etc. The teaching platform simulated the learning interest of students and strengthens the interaction in the teaching.

  17. Uniquely Strongly Clean Group Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XIU-LAN

    2012-01-01

    A ring R is called clean if every element is the sum of an idempotent and a unit,and R is called uniquely strongly clean (USC for short) if every element is uniquely the sum of an idempotent and a unit that commute.In this article,some conditions on a ring R and a group G such that RG is clean are given.It is also shown that if G is a locally finite group,then the group ring RG is USC if and only if R is USC,and G is a 2-group.The left uniquely exchange group ring,as a middle ring of the uniquely clean ring and the USC ring,does not possess this property,and so does the uniquely exchange group ring.

  18. Using the World Wide Web as a Teaching Tool: Analyzing Images of Aging and the Visual Needs of an Aging Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobi, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of Web site images of aging to identify positive and negative representations can help teach students about social perceptions of older adults. Another learning experience involves consideration of the needs of older adults in Web site design. (SK)

  19. The relationship between the managerial skills and results of "performance evaluation "tool among nursing managers in teaching hospitals of Iran University of Medical Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isfahani, Haleh Mousavi; Aryankhesal, Aidin; Haghani, Hamid

    2014-09-25

    Performance of different organizations, such as hospitals is mainly influenced by their managers' performance. Nursing managers have an important role in hospital performance and their managerial skills can improve the quality of the services. Hence, the present study was conducted in order to assess the relationship between the managerial skills and the results of their performance evaluation in Teaching Hospitals of Iran University of Medical Science in 2013. The research used the cross sectional method in 2013. It was done by distributing a managerial skills assessment questionnaire, with close-ended questions in 5 choice Likert scale, among 181 managers and head nurses of hospitals of Iran university of Medical Sciences; among which 131 answered the questions. Another data collection tools was a forms to record evaluation marks from the personnel records. We used Pearson and Spearman correlation tests and SPSS for analysis and description (frequency, mean and standard deviation). Results showed that the managerial skills of the nursing mangers were fair (2.57 out of 5) and the results of the performance evaluation were in a good condition (98.44). The mangers' evaluation results and the managerial skills scores were not in a meaningful correlation (r=0.047 np=0.856). The research showed no correlation between different domains of managerial skills and the performance evaluation marks: decision making skills (r=0.074 and p=0.399), leadership (correlation coefficient 0.028 and p=0.654), motivation (correlation coefficient 0.118 and p=0.163), communication  (correlation coefficient 0.116 and p=0.122), systematic thinking  (correlation coefficient 0.028 and p=0.828), time management (correlation coefficient 0.077 and p=0.401) and strategic thinking  (correlation coefficient 0.041 and p=0.756). Lack of any correlation and relation between managers' managerial skills and their performance evaluation results shows need to a fundamental revision at managers

  20. El Teatro Social como herramienta docente para el desarrollo de competencias interculturales = The Social Theater as a teaching tool for the development of intercultural competences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Cárdenas-Rodríguez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: El presente artículo recoge el proceso de implementación del Teatro Social como metodología participativa para el desarrollo de competencias interculturales en el ámbito universitario. A su vez, presentamos los resultados de la evaluación llevada a cabo a través del cuestionario y del grupo de discusión, para determinar si se han alcanzado los objetivos propuestos. Los resultados nos muestran que el Teatro Social fomenta las competencias interculturales, desarrolla en el alumnado una actitud crítica ante las desigualdades sociales, favorece la empatía, la sensibilidad, la escucha activa, la comunicación verbal y no verbal, y a la vez crea conciencia social tanto en los/as actores/actrices como en los/as espectadores/as. Es importante llevar a cabo metodologías docentes que fomenten la creatividad y conviertan al alumnado en agentes de cambio, y el Teatro Social es una herramienta pedagógica que favorece la participación social a partir de experiencias vividas por el alumnado en primera persona.Abstract: This article presents the process of implementing Social Theater as a participatory methodology for the development of intercultural competences in the University. We present the results of the evaluation carried out through the questionnaire and the discussion group, in order to determine if the proposed objectives have been achieved. The results show that Social Theater foment intercultural competences, develops in students a critical attitude to social inequalities, favors empathy, sensitivity, active listening, verbal and non-verbal communication, and at the same time creates social conscience in the actors and actresses as in the spectators. It is important to carry out teaching methodologies that foment creativity and convert students to agents of change, and Social Theater is a pedagogical tool that favors social participation based on experiences lived by students in first person. 

  1. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  2. A student-centered approach for developing active learning: the construction of physical models as a teaching tool in medical physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende-Filho, Flávio Moura; da Fonseca, Lucas José Sá; Nunes-Souza, Valéria; Guedes, Glaucevane da Silva; Rabelo, Luiza Antas

    2014-09-15

    Teaching physiology, a complex and constantly evolving subject, is not a simple task. A considerable body of knowledge about cognitive processes and teaching and learning methods has accumulated over the years, helping teachers to determine the most efficient way to teach, and highlighting student's active participation as a means to improve learning outcomes. In this context, this paper describes and qualitatively analyzes an experience of a student-centered teaching-learning methodology based on the construction of physiological-physical models, focusing on their possible application in the practice of teaching physiology. After having Physiology classes and revising the literature, students, divided in small groups, built physiological-physical models predominantly using low-cost materials, for studying different topics in Physiology. Groups were followed by monitors and guided by teachers during the whole process, finally presenting the results in a Symposium on Integrative Physiology. Along the proposed activities, students were capable of efficiently creating physiological-physical models (118 in total) highly representative of different physiological processes. The implementation of the proposal indicated that students successfully achieved active learning and meaningful learning in Physiology while addressing multiple learning styles. The proposed method has proved to be an attractive, accessible and relatively simple approach to facilitate the physiology teaching-learning process, while facing difficulties imposed by recent requirements, especially those relating to the use of experimental animals and professional training guidelines. Finally, students' active participation in the production of knowledge may result in a holistic education, and possibly, better professional practices.

  3. An Assessment Tool to Detect Unique Characteristics of Cognitive Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    http://mhealth.amegroups.com/article/view/11037 4. Steeg Morris , D., Lathan, C., Weissfeld, L, Lacy, T., & Resnick, H. R. (2016, August). Trial...platform for assessing brain health. MHealth, 2(7). Retrieved from http://mhealth.amegroups.com/article/view/11037 4. Steeg Morris , D., Lathan, C...0141) DELIVERABLES All deliverables will be submitted on Tuesday May 16, 2017 via FedEx on a CD, tracking number is 7791 5006 0944. The items

  4. Diabetes: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Urinary Incontinence Related Documents PDF Choosing Wisely: Diabetes Tests and Treatments Download Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Diabetes Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ...

  5. Teaching Speech Acts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teaching Speech Acts

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I argue that pragmatic ability must become part of what we teach in the classroom if we are to realize the goals of communicative competence for our students. I review the research on pragmatics, especially those articles that point to the effectiveness of teaching pragmatics in an explicit manner, and those that posit methods for teaching. I also note two areas of scholarship that address classroom needs—the use of authentic data and appropriate assessment tools. The essay concludes with a summary of my own experience teaching speech acts in an advanced-level Portuguese class.

  6. The transformation of science and mathematics content knowledge into teaching content by university faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Natalie P.

    knowledge from an expert centered perspective to a student centric view. Follow-up interviews of twenty faculty yielded a wide variety of insights into the complicated method of deconstructing expert science and mathematics content. The interviews revealed a major disconnect between education research and researchers and the science and mathematics content experts who teach. There is a pervasive disregard for science and mathematics education and training. Faculty members find little to no support for teaching. Though 81% obtained their Ph.D. with the intent to enter an academic setting, pedagogical training was non-existent or limited, both prior to and after obtaining faculty positions. Experience alone did not account for confidence or ability to successfully teach. Faculty that were able to 'think like a student' and view their material from a student's perspective' seemed to be the most confident and flexible in their teaching methods. Grading and having an open and interactive teaching style, being on the 'side of the students' also seemed to allow faculty to connect more deeply with the students and learn about common misconceptions and difficulties. Though most faculty claimed to not teach as they were taught and not recall having specific content difficulties, this essential interaction with many students facilitated a shift in thinking about their content. This shift allowed for a reversal from teacher centered classrooms to student centered. Multiple issues arise when teaching at a traditional larger lecture style found in the majority of universities science and mathematics courses that constrain and provide unique teaching challenges. Many faculty have developed unique tools to incorporate successful teaching strategies, such as daily pre-quizzes and smart-phone questioning as well as small group work, computer posted guides, strategic class breaks, and limiting lecture style in favor of a more active engaged classroom. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  7. The liberal illusion of uniqueness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Chadly; West, Tessa V; Schmitt, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    In two studies, we demonstrated that liberals underestimate their similarity to other liberals (i.e., display truly false uniqueness), whereas moderates and conservatives overestimate their similarity to other moderates and conservatives (i.e., display truly false consensus; Studies 1 and 2). We further demonstrated that a fundamental difference between liberals and conservatives in the motivation to feel unique explains this ideological distinction in the accuracy of estimating similarity (Study 2). Implications of the accuracy of consensus estimates for mobilizing liberal and conservative political movements are discussed.

  8. Evolution of a Unique Systems Engineering Capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert M. Caliva; James A. Murphy; Kyle B. Oswald

    2011-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering laboratory dedicated to supporting U.S. Department of Energy missions in nuclear and energy research, science, and national security. The INL’s Systems Engineering organization supports all of the various programs under this wide array of missions. As with any multifaceted organization, strategic planning is essential to establishing a consistent culture and a value discipline throughout all levels of the enterprise. While an organization can pursue operational excellence, product leadership or customer intimacy, it is extremely difficult to excel or achieve best-in-class at all three. In fact, trying to do so has resulted in the demise of a number of organizations given the very intricate balancing act that is necessary. The INL’s Systems Engineering Department has chosen to focus on customer intimacy where the customer’s needs are first and foremost and a more total solution is the goal. Frequently a total solution requires the employment of specialized tools to manage system complexity. However, it is only after understanding customer needs that tool selection and use would be pursued. This results in using both commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and, in some cases, requires internal development of specialized tools. This paper describes how a unique systems engineering capability, through the development of customized tools, evolved as a result of this customer-focused culture. It also addresses the need for a common information model or analysis framework and presents an overview of the tools developed to manage and display relationships between entities, support trade studies through the application of utility theory, and facilitate the development of a technology roadmap to manage system risk and uncertainty.

  9. A Case Study of Using Online Communities and Virtual Environment in Massively Multiplayer Role Playing Games (MMORPGs) as a Learning and Teaching Tool for Second Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongmee, Isara; Strachan, Rebecca; Pickard, Alison; Montgomery, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games (MMORPGs) create large virtual communities. Online gaming shows potential not just for entertaining, but also in education. This research investigates the use of commercial MMORPGs to support second language teaching. MMORPGs offer virtual safe spaces in which students can communicate by using their…

  10. Investigating Quantum Mechanical Tunneling at the Nanoscale via Analogy: Development and Assessment of a Teaching Tool for Upper-Division Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Marc N.; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel educational activity designed to teach quantum mechanical tunneling to upper-division undergraduate students in the context of nanochemistry. The activity is based on a theoretical framework for analogy and is split into three parts that are linked pedagogically through the framework: classical ball-and-ramp system, tunneling…

  11. Critical literacy: a cross-curricular tool-and-result in the teaching-learning activity Letramento Crítico: uma ferramenta-e-resultado transcurricular na atividade de ensino-aprendizagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela B. Cavenaghi T. Lessa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the importance of critical literacy as cross curricular tool-and-result in the teaching learning activity. Based on the Socio-Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (Vygotsky, 1934; Leontiev, 1977, it discusses a teacher continuous education intervention program aimed at the teaching-learning of different subject areas mediated by different genres (Bakhtin, 1953. Teachers' tasks, which really simultaneously develop critical understanding and an engagement with area contents in a non-segmented format, are analyzed and seem to indicate a view of literacy as tool-and-result in students' transformational actions.Este artigo discute a importância do letramento crítico como uma ferramenta-e-resultado transcurricular no ensino da atividade de leitura. Baseado na Teoria da Atividade Sócio-Histórico-Cultural (Vygotsky, 1934; Leontiev, 1977, apresenta um programa intervencionista de formação contínua de professores cujo foco é o ensino-aprendizagem de diferentes disciplinas mediadas por gêneros diferentes (Bakhtin, 1953. As tarefas criadas pelos professores, realmente pautadas simultaneamente por compreensão critica e por compromisso com conteúdos das áreas considerados de forma não segmentada, são analisadas e parecem apontar para uma visão de letramento como instrumento-e-resultado para a possível ação transformadora dos alunos.

  12. Too Cool for School? No Way! Using the TPACK Framework: You Can Have Your Hot Tools and Teach with Them, Too

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Punya; Koehler, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    This is the age of cool tools. Facebook, iPhone, Flickr, blogs, cloud computing, Smart Boards, YouTube, Google Earth, and GPS are just a few examples of new technologies that bombard people from all directions. As individuals people see a new technology and can appreciate its coolness, but as educators they wonder how these tools can be used for…

  13. Kosovo case: A unique arbitrariness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakarada Radmila

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The end of Cold war, contrary to expectations has brought new conflicts and forms of violence, new divisions and new relativizations of the international legal order. Taking as an example the endeavors to resolve the Kosovo conflict, the author attempts to indicate the broader implications of the international efforts to constitute an independent state on part of the territory of an existing sovereign state. The arguments used to justify the redefinition of the borders of the Serbian state without its consent, the moral, democratic, peace arguments, are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the argument that Kosovo is a unique case and therefore unique rules should be applied. The author seeks to understand the deeper significance of these efforts, concluding that dismantling the present international legal order is not only a potential danger but a possible aim.

  14. Uniqueness theorems in linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Knops, Robin John

    1971-01-01

    The classical result for uniqueness in elasticity theory is due to Kirchhoff. It states that the standard mixed boundary value problem for a homogeneous isotropic linear elastic material in equilibrium and occupying a bounded three-dimensional region of space possesses at most one solution in the classical sense, provided the Lame and shear moduli, A and J1 respectively, obey the inequalities (3 A + 2 J1) > 0 and J1>O. In linear elastodynamics the analogous result, due to Neumann, is that the initial-mixed boundary value problem possesses at most one solution provided the elastic moduli satisfy the same set of inequalities as in Kirchhoffs theorem. Most standard textbooks on the linear theory of elasticity mention only these two classical criteria for uniqueness and neglect altogether the abundant literature which has appeared since the original publications of Kirchhoff. To remedy this deficiency it seems appropriate to attempt a coherent description ofthe various contributions made to the study of uniquenes...

  15. Portrayal of negative qualities in a doctor as a potential teaching tool in medical ethics and humanism: Journey to the End of Night by Louis-Ferdinand Celine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, G

    2006-02-01

    Fictional stories about physicians and patients are increasingly used as a powerful teaching resource for medical students. Very often, but not exclusively, stories of physicians as positive role models are selected to teach students virtues and ethical values. Negative role models are rarely used and if so, physicians are rather described as medical quacks in such fiction then exhibiting primarily a corrupted character. I suggest that a fictional story that presents exclusively a negative role model of a physician could also be a valuable, admittedly difficult, teaching resource to demonstrate the consequences of absolute loss of ethical standards and virtues in physicians. A not widely known example of this genre is Louis-Ferdinand Céline's (1894-1961) novel Voyage au bout de la nuit (Journey to the End of the Night), published in 1932. Having a strong autobiographical background, the novel described the adventures of the medicine student, Ferdinand Bardamu, during the first world war, in the African colonies as a trader, in the United States of America as factory worker, and later after finishing his education, as a doctor for the poor. Unfortunately, Dr Bardamu develops an unprofessional, even criminal behaviour, and may serve as a negative role model for the virtues of physicians. This article will familiarise the reader with the novel and its physician author.

  16. Virtual Reality Educational Tool for Human Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izard, Santiago González; Juanes Méndez, Juan A; Palomera, Pablo Ruisoto

    2017-05-01

    Virtual Reality is becoming widespread in our society within very different areas, from industry to entertainment. It has many advantages in education as well, since it allows visualizing almost any object or going anywhere in a unique way. We will be focusing on medical education, and more specifically anatomy, where its use is especially interesting because it allows studying any structure of the human body by placing the user inside each one. By allowing virtual immersion in a body structure such as the interior of the cranium, stereoscopic vision goggles make these innovative teaching technologies a powerful tool for training in all areas of health sciences. The aim of this study is to illustrate the teaching potential of applying Virtual Reality in the field of human anatomy, where it can be used as a tool for education in medicine. A Virtual Reality Software was developed as an educational tool. This technological procedure is based entirely on software which will run in stereoscopic goggles to give users the sensation of being in a virtual environment, clearly showing the different bones and foramina which make up the cranium, and accompanied by audio explanations. Throughout the results the structure of the cranium is described in detailed from both inside and out. Importance of an exhaustive morphological knowledge of cranial fossae is further discussed. Application for the design of microsurgery is also commented.

  17. Teaching Web Security Using Portable Virtual Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Chiou; Tao, Lixin

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a tool called Secure WEb dEvelopment Teaching (SWEET) to introduce security concepts and practices for web application development. This tool provides introductory tutorials, teaching modules utilizing virtualized hands-on exercises, and project ideas in web application security. In addition, the tool provides pre-configured…

  18. Teachers’ Views on ICT as a Tool in English Teaching for Students with Dyslexia : An interview study with English teachers in grades 7-9

    OpenAIRE

    Kjellin Ifverson, Ebba

    2016-01-01

    Information and communications technology (ICT) is a broad concept, which is often discussed in relation to the development of education. More specially, ICT can be seen as a tool to help teachers individualize students’ education. Students who have literacy difficulties, such as dyslexia, are in constant need of new techniques to help them learn and new tools to make their educational development easier. The aim of this thesis is to show what views teachers have regarding using ICT in Englis...

  19. The Uniqueness of Milton Friedman

    OpenAIRE

    J. Daniel Hammond

    2013-01-01

    That there is no Milton Friedman today is not a mystery; the mystery is how Milton Friedman could have been. The facts of Friedman’s biography make him unique among twentieth-century public figures. He had extensive knowledge and expertise in mathematics and statistics. Yet he became a critic of ‘formal’ theory, exemplified by mathematical economics, that failed to engage with real-world facts and data, and of econometric modeling that presumed more knowledge of economic structure than Friedm...

  20. Unique Features of Halophilic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Tokunaga, Masao

    2017-01-01

    Proteins from moderate and extreme halophiles have unique characteristics. They are highly acidic and hydrophilic, similar to intrinsically disordered proteins. These characteristics make the halophilic proteins soluble in water and fold reversibly. In addition to reversible folding, the rate of refolding of halophilic proteins from denatured structure is generally slow, often taking several days, for example, for extremely halophilic proteins. This slow folding rate makes the halophilic proteins a novel model system for folding mechanism analysis. High solubility and reversible folding also make the halophilic proteins excellent fusion partners for soluble expression of recombinant proteins.

  1. A unique gesture of sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, T.

    1985-01-01

    The Atoms for Peace program was a unique gesture of sharing on the part of the leading industrialized nation, and has very few parallels in modern history. The author says one of the major advantages of the program for developing nations was the much needed stimulation of their indigenous science and technology efforts and the awakening of their governments to the multifaceted benefits of atomic energy. The author discusses how the program benefited Pakistan in the production of electrical energy and in the application of nuclear techniques in the fields of agriculture and medicine, which help to alleviate hunger and combat disease

  2. Detecting beer intake by unique metabolite patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde; Jensen, Morten Georg; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of health related effects of beer intake is hampered by the lack of accurate tools for assessing intakes (biomarkers). Therefore, we identified plasma and urine metabolites associated with recent beer intake by untargeted metabolomics and established a characteristic metabolite pattern...... representing raw materials and beer production as a qualitative biomarker of beer intake. In a randomized, crossover, single-blinded meal study (MSt1) 18 participants were given one at a time four different test beverages: strong, regular and non-alcoholic beers and a soft drink. Four participants were...... assigned to have two additional beers (MSt2). In addition to plasma and urine samples, test beverages, wort and hops extract were analyzed by UPLC-QTOF. A unique metabolite pattern reflecting beer metabolome, including metabolites derived from beer raw material (i.e. N-methyl tyramine sulfate and the sum...

  3. Coach assessment tool

    OpenAIRE

    Härkönen, Niko; Klicznik, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The Coach Assessment Tool was created to assist coaches of all sports for their own development. The starting point to develop the tool is the fact that coaching clinics solely focus on the technical and tactial skills of the sport. The education for coaches is lacking to teach the importance of the coach´s behavior towards their athletes. The question is how to teach properly the task in hand to increase the athlete´s performance considering the coach´s behavior. Nevertheless,...

  4. Unique Features of Mobile Commerce

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Xiaojun; IIJIMA Junichi; HO Sho

    2004-01-01

    While the market potentials and impacts of web-based e-commerce are still in the ascendant, the advances in wireless technologies and mobile networks have brought about a new business opportunity and research attention, what is termed mobile commerce. Commonly, mobile commerce is considered to be another new application of existing web-based e-commerce onto wireless networks, but as an independent business area, mobile commerce has its own advantages and challenges as opposed to traditional e-commerce applications. This paper focuses on exploring the unique features of mobile commerce as. Compared with traditional e-commerce. Also, there are still some limitations arisen in m-commerce in contrast to web-based e-commerce. Finally, current state of mobile commerce in Japan is presented in brief, with an introduction of several cases involving mobile commerce applications in today 's marketplace.

  5. Unique features of space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on space reactors that are designed to meet a unique set of requirements; they must be sufficiently compact to be launched in a rocket to their operational location, operate for many years without maintenance and servicing, operate in extreme environments, and reject heat by radiation to space. To meet these restrictions, operating temperatures are much greater than in terrestrial power plants, and the reactors tend to have a fast neutron spectrum. Currently, a new generation of space reactor power plants is being developed. The major effort is in the SP-100 program, where the power plant is being designed for seven years of full power, and no maintenance operation at a reactor outlet operating temperature of 1350 K

  6. The Uniqueness of Islamic Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan YILMAZ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper examines the main reasons behind why Islamic culture is different than other cultures. In the introduction part of the paper, the usage area of the words culture and civilization were tackled. In the first part of the paper, an evaluation of the uniqueness of Islamic culture was made and examples about this were given. In the second part of the paper, evaluations about how Islamic culture has struggled with modernization and secularization and how it has shaped itself as a result of this were made. In the third part of the paper, the situation in which Islamic civilization has regressed against the Western civilization causing emerging arguments and the current situation in Islamic civilization have been addressed by making evaluations on culture and civilization. In the final part, evaluations on thesis this paper has used were made.

  7. Detecting Beer Intake by Unique Metabolite Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde; Jensen, Morten Georg; Meier, Sebastian; Bech, Lene; Lund, Erik; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2016-12-02

    Evaluation of the health related effects of beer intake is hampered by the lack of accurate tools for assessing intakes (biomarkers). Therefore, we identified plasma and urine metabolites associated with recent beer intake by untargeted metabolomics and established a characteristic metabolite pattern representing raw materials and beer production as a qualitative biomarker of beer intake. In a randomized, crossover, single-blinded meal study (MSt1), 18 participants were given, one at a time, four different test beverages: strong, regular, and nonalcoholic beers and a soft drink. Four participants were assigned to have two additional beers (MSt2). In addition to plasma and urine samples, test beverages, wort, and hops extract were analyzed by UPLC-QTOF. A unique metabolite pattern reflecting beer metabolome, including metabolites derived from beer raw material (i.e., N-methyl tyramine sulfate and the sum of iso-α-acids and tricyclohumols) and the production process (i.e., pyro-glutamyl proline and 2-ethyl malate), was selected to establish a compliance biomarker model for detection of beer intake based on MSt1. The model predicted the MSt2 samples collected before and up to 12 h after beer intake correctly (AUC = 1). A biomarker model including four metabolites representing both beer raw materials and production steps provided a specific and accurate tool for measurement of beer consumption.

  8. Uniqueness of inverse scattering problem in local quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: schroer@cbpf.br

    2001-06-01

    It is shown that the a Bisognano-Wichmann-Unruh inspired formulation of local quantum physics which starts from wedge-localized algebras, leads to a uniqueness proof for the scattering problem. The important mathematical tool is the thermal KMS aspect of localization and its strengthening by the requirement of crossing symmetry for generalized formfactors. (author)

  9. RUCS: Rapid identification of PCR primers for unique core sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Hasman, Henrik; Westh, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Designing PCR primers to target a specific selection of whole genome sequenced strains can be a long, arduous, and sometimes impractical task. Such tasks would benefit greatly from an automated tool to both identify unique targets, and to validate the vast number of potential primer pairs...... for the targets in silico . Here we present RUCS, a program that will find PCR primer pairs and probes for the unique core sequences of a positive genome dataset complement to a negative genome dataset. The resulting primer pairs and probes are in addition to simple selection also validated through a complex...... in silico PCR simulation. We compared our method, which identifies the unique core sequences, against an existing tool called ssGeneFinder, and found that our method was 6.5-20 times more sensitive. We used RUCS to design primer pairs that would target a set of genomes known to contain the mcr-1 colistin...

  10. General informatics teaching with B-Learning teaching model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen The Dung

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Blended learning (B-learning, a combination of face-to-face teaching and E-learning-supported-teaching in an online course, and Information and Communication Technology (ICT tools have been studied in recent years. In addition, the use of this teaching model is effective in teaching and learning conditions in which some certain subjects are appropriate for the specific teaching context. As it has been a matter of concern of the universities in Vietnam today, deep studies related to this topic is crucial to be conducted. In this article, the process of developing online courses and organizing teaching for the General Informatics subject for first-year students at the Hue University of Education with B-learning teaching model will be presented. The combination of 60% face-to-face and 40% online learning.

  11. Teaching the Principles of Economics

    OpenAIRE

    N. Gregory Mankiw

    1998-01-01

    In this brief essay, I describe my approach to the principles course. I emphasize three themes. First, in teaching microeconomics, the tools of welfare economics should play a larger role than they have in the past. Second, in teaching macroeconomics, classical ideas should play a larger role than they have in the past. Third, in teaching all parts of the course, we instructors should be sure to stress the important principles and be careful not to overwhelm students with an excess of details.

  12. Activating Teaching for Quality Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2013-01-01

    Activating teaching is an educational concept which is based on active participation of students in the study process. It is becoming an alternative to more typical approach where the teacher will just lecture and the students will take notes. The study described in this paper considers student...... activating teaching methods focusing on those based on knowledge dissemination. The practical aspects of the implemented teaching method are considered, and employed assessment methods and tools are discussed....

  13. Using Video Analysis, Microcomputer-Based Laboratories (MBL’s and Educational Simulations as Pedagogical Tools in Revolutionizing Inquiry Science Teaching and Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay B. Gregorio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available La main á la pâte is an inquiry-based science education programme founded in 1996 by Georges Charpak, Pierre Lena, Yves Quere and the French Académie des Sciences with the support of the Ministry of Education. The operation of the program primarily aims to revitalize and expand science teaching and learning in primary education by implementing an inquiry process that combines spontaneous exploration through varied prediction, experimentation, observation and argumentation. As a recognized program of innovation in science, La main á la pâte has gained global visibility and transcended across cultural backgrounds. The strength of the program is founded on continuous educational collaboration and innovative projects among pioneering institutions and educators for more than a decade.

  14. The Use of Computer-Assisted Instruction as an Instructional Tool to Teach Social Stories to Individuals Who Have Been Diagnosed on the Autism Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanette Edeiken-Cooperman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the use of computer-assisted instruction (CAI to teach Social Stories as a method of positively affecting the social understanding and behaviors of learners who have been diagnosed on the autism spectrum. As the diagnosis rate for those with ASD continues to rise along with the practice of including these learners in the general education environment, there is an increasing need to identify evidence-based practices that focus on the acquisition and remediation of social-communication skills, social skills, and social competence. A variety of strategies have been developed and implemented to remediate deficits in these areas. The use of CAI is an approach that has been proven to accommodate both the needs and the visual learning styles of these learners.

  15. A time-efficient web-based teaching tool to improve medical knowledge and decrease ABIM failure rate in select residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Sean M; Qureshi, Waqas; Morse, William; Baker-Genaw, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    The American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) exam's pass rate is considered a quality measure of a residency program, yet few interventions have shown benefit in reducing the failure rate. We developed a web-based Directed Reading (DR) program with an aim to increase medical knowledge and reduce ABIM exam failure rate. Internal medicine residents at our academic medical center with In-Training Examination (ITE) scores ≤ 35 th percentile from 2007 to 2013 were enrolled in DR. The program matches residents to reading assignments based on their own ITE-failed educational objectives and provides direct electronic feedback from their teaching physicians. ABIM exam pass rates were analyzed across various groups between 2002 and 2013 to examine the effect of the DR program on residents with ITE scores ≤ 35 percentile pre- (2002-2006) and post-intervention (2007-2013). A time commitment survey was also given to physicians and DR residents at the end of the study. Residents who never scored ≤ 35 percentile on ITE were the most likely to pass the ABIM exam on first attempt regardless of time period. For those who ever scored ≤ 35 percentile on ITE, 91.9% of residents who participated in DR passed the ABIM exam on first attempt vs 85.2% of their counterparts pre-intervention (p ITE were more likely to fail ABIM exam on first attempt, those who participated in the DR program were less likely to fail than the historical control counterparts. The web-based teaching method required little time commitment by faculty.

  16. Management Tools in Engineering Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, M.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a teaching model that applies management tools such as delegation, total quality management, time management, teamwork, and Deming rules. Promotes the advantages of efficiency, reporting, independent scheduling, and quality. (SK)

  17. Teaching Bioethics in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Joana; Gomes, Carlos Costa; Jácomo, António; Pereira, Sandra Martins

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The Bioethics Teaching in Secondary Education (Project BEST) aims to promote the teaching of bioethics in secondary schools. This paper describes the development and implementation of the programme in Portugal. Design: Programme development involved two main tasks: (1) using the learning tools previously developed by the US Northwest…

  18. A Methodology for Teaching Industrial Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Gemma

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a way of teaching industrial ecology (IE) and to show some tools that may help for the IE teaching. Design/methodology/approach: In the paper, the development of lectures, practical lessons and projects on real industrial ecosystems are described. Also the teaching materials used are described. Findings: The presented…

  19. Teaching and Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Diana

    2015-01-01

    "Teaching and Learning Strategies" is a practical guide for pre-service teachers who know and understand the content of the curriculum and are looking for additional tools to teach it effectively. This book will help students to develop a comprehensive knowledge of teaching and learning strategies, which is essential in ensuring lessons…

  20. Peer Observation of Teaching: A Decoupled Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, John Martyn; D'Artrey, Meriel; Rowe, Deborah-Anne

    2011-01-01

    This article details the findings of research into the academic teaching staff experience of peer observation of their teaching practice. Peer observation is commonly used as a tool to enhance a teacher's continuing professional development. Research participants acknowledged its ability to help develop their teaching practice, but they also…

  1. Hypercard Another Computer Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geske, Joel

    1991-01-01

    Describes "Hypercard," a computer application package usable in all three modes of instructional computing: tutor, tool, and tutee. Suggests using Hypercard in scholastic journalism programs to teach such topics as news, headlines, design, photography, and advertising. Argues that the ability to access, organize, manipulate, and comprehend…

  2. Teaching leadership in trauma resuscitation: Immediate feedback from a real-time, competency-based evaluation tool shows long-term improvement in resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Shea C; Heffernan, Daithi S; Connolly, Michael D; Stephen, Andrew H; Leuckel, Stephanie N; Harrington, David T; Machan, Jason T; Adams, Charles A; Cioffi, William G

    2016-10-01

    Limited data exist on how to develop resident leadership and communication skills during actual trauma resuscitations. An evaluation tool was developed to grade senior resident performance as the team leader during full-trauma-team activations. Thirty actions that demonstrated the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies were graded on a Likert scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (exceptional). These actions were grouped by their respective core competencies on 5 × 7-inch index cards. In Phase 1, baseline performance scores were obtained. In Phase 2, trauma-focused communication in-services were conducted early in the academic year, and immediate, personalized feedback sessions were performed after resuscitations based on the evaluation tool. In Phase 3, residents received only evaluation-based feedback following resuscitations. In Phase 1 (October 2009 to April 2010), 27 evaluations were performed on 10 residents. In Phase 2 (April 2010 to October 2010), 28 evaluations were performed on nine residents. In Phase 3 (October 2010 to January 2012), 44 evaluations were performed on 13 residents. Total scores improved significantly between Phases 1 and 2 (p = 0.003) and remained elevated throughout Phase 3. When analyzing performance by competency, significant improvement between Phases 1 and 2 (p competencies (patient care, knowledge, system-based practice, practice-based learning) with the exception of "communication and professionalism" (p = 0.56). Statistically similar scores were observed between Phases 2 and 3 in all competencies with the exception of "medical knowledge," which showed ongoing significant improvement (p = 0.003). Directed resident feedback sessions utilizing data from a real-time, competency-based evaluation tool have allowed us to improve our residents' abilities to lead trauma resuscitations over a 30-month period. Given pressures to maximize clinical educational opportunities among work-hour constraints, such a model may help

  3. Radiology education 2.0--on the cusp of change: part 2. eBooks; file sharing and synchronization tools; websites/teaching files; reference management tools and note taking applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Puneet; Dhand, Sabeen; Lackey, Amanda E; Pandey, Tarun; Moshiri, Mariam; Jambhekar, Kedar

    2013-03-01

    Increasing use of smartphones and handheld computers is accompanied by a rapid growth in the other related industries. Electronic books have revolutionized the centuries-old conventional books and magazines markets and have simplified publishing by reducing the cost and processing time required to create and distribute any given book. We are now able to read, review, store, and share various types of documents via several electronic tools, many of which are available free of charge. Additionally, this electronic revolution has resulted in an explosion of readily available Internet-based educational resources for the residents and has paved the path for educators to reach out to a larger and more diverse student population. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. El portafolio digital como herramienta didáctica: una evaluación crítica de fortalezas y debilidades = The digital portfolio as a teaching tool: a critical evaluation of its strengths and weaknesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Moreno-Fernández

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Se presenta un estudio exploratorio sobre el uso del portafolio digital como herramienta educativa. La experiencia se centró en valorar las debilidades, amenazas, fortalezas y oportunidades de esta herramienta a partir de las apreciaciones de los participantes. De igual modo, se pretende conocer hasta qué punto su utilización potencia habilidades y competencias relevantes en el Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior, tanto a nivel individual como grupal. Para ello, se llevó a cabo un estudio de naturaleza descriptiva a través de la técnica de la encuesta (cuestionario. Los resultados muestran que se trata de una herramienta de aprendizaje valorada positivamente que favorece cuestiones como la accesibilidad al aprendizaje cooperativo o el ahorro económico y medioambiental. A partir de estas valoraciones concluimos que el portafolio digital contribuye al proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje, favoreciendo que el alumnado sea consciente de éste, y acercándole progresivamente a un aprendizaje más autónomo y responsable.Abstract: An exploratory study on the use of the digital portfolio as an educational tool is presented. The experience focused on assessing the weaknesses, threats, strengths and opportunities of this tool based on the participants' assessments. Likewise, it seeks to know to what extent its use enhances skills and competences relevant in the European Higher Education Area, both individually and as a group. To do this, we conducted a study of descriptive nature through technical survey (questionnaire. The results show that this is a positively valued learning tool that favors issues such as accessibility to cooperative learning or economic and environmental cost savings without printing paper. We conclude therefore that the digital portfolio contributes to the process of teaching and learning, encouraging the students to be aware of this, and progressively bringing you to a more autonomous and responsible learning.

  5. Using Rock Music as a Teaching-Learning Tool* Uso de la música rock como herramienta de enseñanza-aprendizaje

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Morales Neisa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of rock music in English teaching-learning contexts gains relevance as many of the people involved in them listen to this kind of music. The integration of rock music into language learning can be done if the music is treated as class material, taking into account that it requires previous and careful preparation. In this article I will show my experience working with two students in classes in which the materials were based on the lyrics of rock songs. The motivations, reflections, information collected and findings made during the process compose the following article in which rock music and learning are the central characters of a research study carried out with two adult students.El uso de la música rock en el contexto de la enseñanza y aprendizaje del inglés cobra relevancia dado que muchas personas involucradas en el proceso escuchan esta clase de música. La integración de este tipo de material en la enseñanza de lenguas es posible si la música se presenta como material de clase, teniendo en cuenta que requiere preparación previa y cuidadosa. En este artículo deseo compartir la experiencia de trabajar con dos estudiantes en clases cuyos materiales se basaron principalmente en letras de canciones de rock. Las motivaciones, reflexiones, información recolectada y hallazgos durante el proceso se incluyen en este artículo en el cual la música rock y el aprendizaje son los protagonistas principales de un estudio realizado con dos adultos.

  6. Teaching ethics using popular songs: feeling and thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mathúna, Dónal P

    2008-01-01

    A connection has long been made between music and moral education. Recent discussions have focused on concerns that certain lyrics can lead to acceptance of violence, suicide, inappropriate views of women, and other unethical behaviour. Debate over whether such connections exist at least illustrates that popular songs engage listeners with ethical issues; this arises from the unique blend of emotional and cognitive reactions to music. And while the emotional side of ethics has received less attention than other aspects of ethics, it is important and music can be a powerful and unique tool to introduce the emotional aspects of ethics. Music appeals to almost everyone. Throughout history songs have rallied people to action and drawn people into deeper reflection. Music engages our emotions, our imagination and our intellect. Students already spend many hours listening to songs, some of which address ethical issues; it is thus an ideal pedagogic aid in teaching subjects like ethics. This article will discuss how carefully selected songs can encourage thoughtful reflection and critical thinking about ethical issues: a number of specific examples will be described, along with a discussion of the general practicalities of using popular songs in teaching ethics and a demonstration of how students learn to listen critically and actively reflect on the ethical messages they receive. The enjoyment of music helps to engage students with ethics and its relevance for their lives and careers. This article aims to share some of the excitement and enthusiasm that popular songs have brought to my teaching of ethics.

  7. Application of Motivation in English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱瀚

    2006-01-01

    Teacher's words are not only a tool in teaching, but also an important resource of the language input for student at the same time.So it plays a very important role in the whole process of the teaching organization.The quantity and quality of teacher's words would directly affect the course.Moreover, motivation can usually bring much advantage to teaching.This thesis introduces the application of motivation in English teaching.

  8. Der Fragebogen "SFDP26-German": Ein verlässliches Instrument zur Evaluation des klinischen Unterrichts? [The Questionnaire "SFDP26-German": a reliable tool for evaluation of clinical teaching?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iblher, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aims: Evaluation of the effectiveness of clinical teaching is an important contribution for the quality control of medical teaching. This should be evaluated using a reliable instrument in order to be able to both gauge the status quo and the effects of instruction. In the Stanford Faculty Development Program (SFDP, seven categories have proven to be appropriate: Since 1998, the SFDP26 questionnaire has established itself as an evaluation tool in English speaking countries. To date there is no equivalent German-language questionnaire available which evaluates the overall effectiveness of teaching.Question: Methods: 19 anaesthetists (7 female, 12 male from the University of Lübeck were evaluated at the end of a teaching seminar on emergency medical care using SFDP-German. The sample consisted of 173 medical students (119 female (68.8% and 54 male (31.2%, mostly from the fifth semester (6.6% and sixth semester (80.3%. The mean age of the students was 23±3 years. Results: The discriminatory power of all items ranged between good and excellent (r=0.48-0.75. All subscales displayed good internal consistency (α=0.69-0.92 and significant positive inter-scale correlations (r=0.40-0.70. The subscales and “overall effectiveness of teaching” showed significant correlation, with the highest correlation for the subscale “communication of goals (p< 0.001; r = 0.61.Conclusion: The analysis of SFDP26-German confirms high internal consistency. Future research should investigate the effectiveness of the individual categories on the overall effectiveness of teaching and validate according to external criteria. [german] Zielsetzung: Die Evaluation klinischer Lehrkompetenz ist ein wichtiger Beitrag zur Qualitätssicherung medizinischer Lehrveranstaltungen. Die Evaluation sollte mit einem verlässlichen Instrument durchgeführt werden, um Status quo sowie Effekte von medizindidaktischen Schulungsmaßnahmen beurteilen zu können. Im

  9. Heart Failure: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Z › Heart Failure › Unique to Older Adults Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Unique ... will suffer from depression at some point. This type of severe depression is more serious than the ...

  10. Computational topology and the Unique Games Conjecture

    OpenAIRE

    Grochow, Joshua A.; Tucker-Foltz, Jamie

    2018-01-01

    Covering spaces of graphs have long been useful for studying expanders (as "graph lifts") and unique games (as the "label-extended graph"). In this paper we advocate for the thesis that there is a much deeper relationship between computational topology and the Unique Games Conjecture. Our starting point is Linial's 2005 observation that the only known problems whose inapproximability is equivalent to the Unique Games Conjecture - Unique Games and Max-2Lin - are instances of Maximum Section of...

  11. Machine Tool Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A NASA-developed software package has played a part in technical education of students who major in Mechanical Engineering Technology at William Rainey Harper College. Professor Hack has been using (APT) Automatically Programmed Tool Software since 1969 in his CAD/CAM Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing curriculum. Professor Hack teaches the use of APT programming languages for control of metal cutting machines. Machine tool instructions are geometry definitions written in APT Language to constitute a "part program." The part program is processed by the machine tool. CAD/CAM students go from writing a program to cutting steel in the course of a semester.

  12. Ferramenta de autoria multimídia para ensino de língua estrangeira em ambiente multiagente Multimedia authorship tool for the teaching of foreign languages in a multi-agent environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adroaldo Guimarães Rossetti

    2009-04-01

    affecting the other activities they develop in their daily lives. The objective of the present paper is to introduce a multimedia authorship tool for the teaching of a foreign language, which is continually available on the Internet and therefore accessible from any place at any time. The toll will be built based on a multi-agent architecture constituting a shared environment similar to people's cooperation, fulfilling effectively the task of teaching. The languages, initially English and French, will comprise three modules: basic, intermediate and advanced. After being available on the Web, the tool will be validated by user criticism during a period from six to twelve months, and will be periodically assessed by the managers of the program. The tool will afford access to effective learning of foreign languages to anyone interested, according to their potentiality, interests, and time available.

  13. SING FACEBOOK AS A TEACHING TOOL IN TEACHING FRENCH: EXAMPLE OF UNIVERSITY OF MERSIN / UTILISATION DE FACEBOOK COMME OUTIL DIDACTIQUE EN ENSEIGNEMENT DU FRANÇAIS: EXEMPLE D’UNIVERSITE DE MERSIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdinç ASLAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is performed to show the effects of Facebook in French language instruction as a tool. It seeks to analyze the activities of using Facebook in a position of learning French. To conduct this study, we set up a Facebook group with 23 students in French Preparatory Program and three teachers who lead the program in the Department of Translation and Interpreting, Faculty of Letters and Sciences, University of Mersin, in the study period 2014-2015 fall semester. This closed group, teachers shared topics of their courses, images, writings, videos and they want their students to answer to their questions in the group. The students are also participated to the activities making comments under the sharing, giving answers to asked questions, making themselves sharing on this platform. The course announcements were also shared in the group. Moreover, in the current application portion exemplary, extracts the students' work were made anonymous to protect the right to privacy. For the protection of the names and photos profiles have hidden. In the period of the application, the observation technique was used. At the end of the application a student survey was submitted as part of the copy of this study. For the analysis of survey data the content analysis technique was used.

  14. Teaching earth science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha, Tau Rho; Diggles, Michael F.

    1998-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains 17 teaching tools: 16 interactive HyperCard 'stacks' and a printable model. They are separated into the following categories: Geologic Processes, Earthquakes and Faulting, and Map Projections and Globes. A 'navigation' stack, Earth Science, is provided as a 'launching' place from which to access all of the other stacks. You can also open the HyperCard Stacks folder and launch any of the 16 stacks yourself. In addition, a 17th tool, Earth and Tectonic Globes, is provided as a printable document. Each of the tools can be copied onto a 1.4-MB floppy disk and distributed freely.

  15. Teaching Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtchinova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Ekaterina Nemtchinova's book "Teaching Listening" explores different approaches to teaching listening in second language classrooms. Presenting up-to-date research and theoretical issues associated with second language listening, Nemtchinova explains how these new findings inform everyday teaching and offers practical suggestions…

  16. Using humour in teaching English as a foreign language at more advanced levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodanović-Stankić Diana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The unique properties of humour make it a valuable tool in the process of teaching and acquiring English as a foreign language, especially when more advanced courses at the university level are concerned. In the first place, using humour based on language play (involving different aspects of linguistic structure in a variety of teaching materials can be very beneficial to helping students improve their ability with language structures. Moreover, it is important that students develop an awareness of humour that is related to culture in order to achieve better command of English. In order to determine the effect humour has on students’ level of attainment, a small-scale study was conducted at the English Department, University of Novi Sad in the course Integrated Language Skills. In the study, humour was used both as a tool, to improve the learning environment, and as a resource for teaching new vocabulary or revising grammatical structures. The results of the study indicate that humour can be applied to teaching a foreign language and improving students’ proficiency level. Moreover, using humour both as a tool and as a resource affected students’ motivation and willingness to study.

  17. Teaching Geographic Field Methods Using Paleoecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Megan K.

    2014-01-01

    Field-based undergraduate geography courses provide numerous pedagogical benefits including an opportunity for students to acquire employable skills in an applied context. This article presents one unique approach to teaching geographic field methods using paleoecological research. The goals of this course are to teach students key geographic…

  18. Synthetic Biology of Cyanobacteria: Unique Challenges and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertram M Berla

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic organisms, and especially cyanobacteria, hold great promise as sources of renewably-produced fuels, bulk and specialty chemicals, and nutritional products. Synthetic biology tools can help unlock cyanobacteria’s potential for these functions, but unfortunately tool development for these organisms has lagged behind that for S. cerevisiae and E. coli. While these organisms may in many cases be more difficult to work with as ‘chassis’ strains for synthetic biology than certain heterotrophs, the unique advantages of autotrophs in biotechnology applications as well as the scientific importance of improved understanding of photosynthesis warrant the development of these systems into something akin to a ‘green E. coli’. In this review, we highlight unique challenges and opportunities for development of synthetic biology approaches in cyanobacteria. We review classical and recently developed methods for constructing targeted mutants in various cyanobacterial strains, and offer perspective on what genetic tools might most greatly expand the ability to engineer new functions in such strains. Similarly, we review what genetic parts are most needed for the development of cyanobacterial synthetic biology. Finally, we highlight recent methods to construct genome-scale models of cyanobacterial metabolism and to use those models to measure properties of autotrophic metabolism. Throughout this paper, we discuss some of the unique challenges of a diurnal, autotrophic lifestyle along with how the development of synthetic biology and biotechnology in cyanobacteria must fit within those constraints.

  19. Utilización de las TIC por el profesorado universitario como recurso didáctico Study on the Use of ICTs as Teaching Tools by University Instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonsoles Guerra Liaño

    2010-10-01

    objectives of the project aim to describe, through an exploratory study, the methodological situation in which our universities are highlighting their strengths and weaknesses based on the premises of the European Higher Education to suggest some strategies in order to facilitate the necessary adaptation. The methodology followed by implementing a questionnaire focused on concrete analysis of the dimension of the Information Technologies and Communication Technologies (ICT reflects the view of university teachers and through the analysis of results allows confirming the need for adaptation by the universities for the implementation, with guarantees of the mentioned education reform. This article also presents several conclusions and suggestions for educational improvement focused on teaching and methodological training in the use of teaching tools that can promote the suggestions provided by the European Higher Education using ICT, as for example those offered by Web 2.0.

  20. Teaching Chemical Engineers about Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Daniel E.; Hoy, Mary; Rathman, James F.; Rohdieck, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at The Ohio State University in collaboration with the University Center for the Advancement of Teaching developed the Chemical Engineering Mentored Teaching Experience. The Mentored Teaching Experience is an elective for Ph.D. students interested in pursuing faculty careers. Participants are…

  1. Teaching Morally and Teaching Morality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenstermacher, Gary D.; Osguthorpe, Richard D.; Sanger, Matthew N.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors introduce what they believe is an important distinction between teaching morality and teaching morally. In P-12 schools, the moral education debate often focuses on character education programs or other moral curricula. Such programs and curricula are championed as a means of teaching morality and transmitting moral…

  2. Resistance to change in language teaching: some African case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The conviction with which teachers justify their traditional styles of teaching suggests that they do not teach without deliberation. This presentation looks in some detail at two investigations that serve as case studies for this phenomenon. Is resistance to change in language teaching unique to the African continent? It appears ...

  3. Teaching Philosophies Guiding Sexuality Instruction in US Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Laurie M.; Eastman-Mueller, Heather P.; Oswalt, Sara B.; Nevers, Joleen M.

    2017-01-01

    Teaching philosophies are central to the approach of pedagogical strategies but there has been little examination of discipline-specific teaching philosophies. This study addresses a significant gap in the literature by discussing the teaching philosophies of 122 instructors of sexuality courses. Sexuality education is unique compared to most…

  4. Cadavers Can Be Useful in Teaching Anatomy in College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stencel, John; Moore, John

    1989-01-01

    Presents information on student interest, teaching problems, and learning outcomes regarding the use of cadavers as a teaching tool. Provides a list of Illinois Community Colleges using cadavers and a student questionnaire. (RT)

  5. What's in Your Teaching Toolbox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mormer, Elaine

    2018-02-01

    Educators are faced with an array of tools available to enhance learning outcomes in the classroom and clinic. These tools range from those that are very simple to those that are sufficiently complex to require an investment in learning time. This article summarizes a collection of teaching tools, ordered by the time involved in learning proficient use. Simple tools described include specific online blogs providing support for faculty and student writing and a simple method to capture and download videos from YouTube for classroom use. More complex tools described include a Web-based application for custom-created animated videos and an interactive audience polling system. Readers are encouraged to reflect on the tools most appropriate for use in their own teaching toolbox by considering the requisite time to proficiency and suitability to address desired learner outcomes.

  6. Learning to teach inquiry with ICT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Trinh-Ba; van den Berg, Ed; Ellermeijer, Ton; Beishuizen, Jos

    2018-01-01

    Research has shown that the objectives for laboratory teaching—just as with other teaching methods—are often not achieved and that many laboratory sessions are ineffective and yet expensive in terms of pupil and teacher time, and facilities. There are several reasons for this, but one reason is that instructions for many lab activities are too prescriptive and leave too little room for thinking and creativity of pupils. Even though this problem had been pointed out already in the early 1980s, it has persisted to this day. Additionally, ICT tools such as data logging, video measurement, and modelling have been available to secondary schools for decades. These tools provide unique opportunities for authentic investigations at the secondary school level. However, even friendly software might require considerable instruction and reinforce a prescriptive approach. Therefore, we developed a course for pre-service and in-service teachers to learn to apply ICT tools in a minds-on and inquiry way. The short course (1 ECTS  =  28 study hours) described in this article was tried out in three different countries (the Netherlands, Slovakia, Vietnam) and improved through different cycles of iterative development. Its pedagogical principles were validated through research and may be applicable and useful in other areas of teacher education and professional development.

  7. Unique Physician Identification Number (UPIN) Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Unique Physician Identification Number (UPIN) Directory contains selected information on physicians, doctors of Osteopathy, limited licensed practitioners and...

  8. Innovating EFL Teaching in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Theron, Ed.; Herder, Steven, Ed.; Adamson, John, Ed.; Brown, Philip Shigeo, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This collection offers a distinctly Asian voice for English language education and addresses some of the unique needs of Asian learners in EFL contexts. Teachers and researchers from nine Asian countries present some of the most current and innovative research in five distinct and fascinating areas of EFL teaching and learning. This book is…

  9. Teaching with technology: free Web resources for teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Diane M; Smith-Stoner, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the department editor examines how nurse educators can use Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, collaborative writing tools; social networking, and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. In this article, the department editor and her coauthor describe free Web-based resources that can be used to support teaching and learning.

  10. Measuring teaching effectiveness--or not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Graham P

    2013-01-01

    Faculty in the present-day academic medicine environment are expected to perform multiple functions, notably, the provision of high-quality teaching to the medical professionals of tomorrow. However, evaluating the effectiveness of this teaching is particularly difficult. Student evaluations of teaching, despite their many flaws, are widely used as a convenient tool to measure teaching effectiveness. Administrators continue to routinely use student evaluation of teaching surveys in faculty retention/promotion and merit pay decisions. This practice should be reevaluated since it may have unintended consequences, such as grade inflation and content debasement, and may contribute to faculty leaving the institution and even the profession. A more valid, reliable, and formative protocol for the evaluation of genuine teaching effectiveness needs to be developed as a matter of some urgency. In this review, alternatives to the student evaluation of teaching are explored to better measure true teaching effectiveness.

  11. Innovations in teaching plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, G L

    2003-01-01

    The teaching environment for plant pathology is changing in both positive and negative ways. Teaching expectations are increasing and resources are decreasing, but recent educational research and instructional technology offer new approaches to meet these challenges. Plant pathologists are teaching courses that may attract new students to the discipline or at least improve agricultural awareness. The Internet offers rapid access to information and images for both students and instructors. Instructional technology provides new tools for classroom presentations, communication with students, reaching new audiences, and distance learning, but using these new tools to enhance learning requires skilled and creative instructors. In the past, many plant pathology instructors worked in relative isolation, but new communication technologies and publishing opportunities for teaching scholarship should improve the sharing of instructional resources and methods.

  12. Teaching about the Earth Online: Faculty-Sourced Guidance from InTeGrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaris, J. R.; Bralower, T. J.; Anbar, A. D.; Leinbach, A.

    2017-12-01

    Teaching online is growing in acceptance within the higher education community and its accessibility creates an opportunity to reach students from diverse backgrounds with geoscience content. There is a need to develop best practices for teaching about Earth online as new technologies, pedagogical approaches, and teaching materials that incorporate societal issues and data emerge. In response to this need, the InTeGrate: Teaching about Earth for a Sustainable Future project convened a workshop of interdisciplinary faculty who teach about the Earth online, in a variety of contexts, to develop consensus best-practices, collect online resources, and develop teaching materials to share with the rest of the community. Workshop participants generated five broad categories of guidance for faculty teaching online: develop communication and a sense of community among class participants, stimulate student engagement, develop activity frameworks that scale with class size, include information literacy in the curriculum explicitly, and employ effective management and assessment techniques. Many of the best practices highlighted by the group are not unique to teaching online, but teaching online rather than face-to-face affects how they are or can be implemented. The suite of webpages developed from this work showcase specific strategies in each area, underpinned by examples drawn from the experiences of the participants. This resource can provide a wealth of advice for faculty seeking help for teaching online. Faculty can also provide feedback on the strategies and add their own experiences to the collection. Participants also worked together in teams to develop new or revise existing teaching resources to make available via the InTeGrate website. In addition, they shared insights about online resources they use in their teaching and class management and developed plans for an online repository for next-generation, interactive educational materials and tools for creating them

  13. Uniqueness of time-independent electromagnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Per W.

    1974-01-01

    As a comment on a recent paper by Steele, a more general uniqueness theorem for time-independent fields is mentioned. ©1974 American Institute of Physics......As a comment on a recent paper by Steele, a more general uniqueness theorem for time-independent fields is mentioned. ©1974 American Institute of Physics...

  14. Unique specification of Yang-Mills solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, W.B.; Joseph, D.W.; Morgan, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    Screened time-independent cylindrically-symmetric solutions of Yang-Mills equations are given which show that the source does not uniquely determine the field. However, these particular solutions suggest a natural way of uniquely specifying solutions in terms of a physical realization of a symmetry group. (orig.)

  15. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  16. Teaching with Rosy

    CERN Multimedia

    1981-01-01

    The 'Rosy' system was developed at CERN around 1981 mainly as a teaching tool to educate engineers and technicians to the usage of microprocessors, which were then just appearing on the market. The system was roughly as powerful as an early AppleII computer, but it had a set of open interfaces to provide read-out and control of physics experiments. About 100 boxes were produced, and used also outside CERN.

  17. Flexible and efficient genome tiling design with penalized uniqueness score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Yang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a powerful tool in whole genome analysis, tiling array has been widely used in the answering of many genomic questions. Now it could also serve as a capture device for the library preparation in the popular high throughput sequencing experiments. Thus, a flexible and efficient tiling array design approach is still needed and could assist in various types and scales of transcriptomic experiment. Results In this paper, we address issues and challenges in designing probes suitable for tiling array applications and targeted sequencing. In particular, we define the penalized uniqueness score, which serves as a controlling criterion to eliminate potential cross-hybridization, and a flexible tiling array design pipeline. Unlike BLAST or simple suffix array based methods, computing and using our uniqueness measurement can be more efficient for large scale design and require less memory. The parameters provided could assist in various types of genomic tiling task. In addition, using both commercial array data and experiment data we show, unlike previously claimed, that palindromic sequence exhibiting relatively lower uniqueness. Conclusions Our proposed penalized uniqueness score could serve as a better indicator for cross hybridization with higher sensitivity and specificity, giving more control of expected array quality. The flexible tiling design algorithm incorporating the penalized uniqueness score was shown to give higher coverage and resolution. The package to calculate the penalized uniqueness score and the described probe selection algorithm are implemented as a Perl program, which is freely available at http://www1.fbn-dummerstorf.de/en/forschung/fbs/fb3/paper/2012-yang-1/OTAD.v1.1.tar.gz.

  18. Teaching Note: Intimacy Timelines as a Tool for Teaching Feminism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Lindsay

    2017-01-01

    This essay will describe one activity that the author uses in her human sexuality course to illustrate how patriarchal systems have affected the experiences of females and males across the sexual lifespan. Through this fairly simple and straightforward activity students are able to utilize common experiences and knowledge of real-world issues and…

  19. Journaling: An Underutilized School Counseling Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyromski, Brett

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of journaling as a therapeutic and teaching tool is well documented. However, specific examples of school counselors utilizing journaling as a therapeutic tool are sparse. Existing school counseling literature was reviewed and journaling as an educational and therapeutic tool was explored and related to the school counseling…

  20. Incorporating Local Culture in English Teaching Material for Undergraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wijaya Mahardika I Gusti Ngurah Agung

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the incorporation of local cultural material in a teaching material developed for the students of the Hinduism Education Department of IHDN Denpasar. Teaching material plays an important part in teaching learning process, yet inappropriate teaching materials may become more harmful than useful. The unique nature of the HED students warranted the need for a tailor-made teaching material. The study found that the use of culturally familiar materials is beneficial for the students learning process. The result of the study also highlighted students’ needs and prior knowledge as the main factors to be considered when developing teaching material.