WorldWideScience

Sample records for unique teaching tools

  1. Tulane Student Designs Unique Learning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    A Louisiana architect has created plans for a unique supplementary learning environment consisting of five circular buildings featuring a planetarium, an indoor display of small animals in their native habitat, an indoor pond, a library, a media center, and an auditorium. (Author/MLF)

  2. Twin studies: A unique epidemiological tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monalisha Sahu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Twin studies are a special type of epidemiological studies designed to measure the contribution of genetics as opposed to the environment, to a given trait. Despite the facts that the classical twin studies are still being guided by assumptions made back in the 1920s and that the inherent limitation lies in the study design itself, the results suggested by earlier twin studies have often been confirmed by molecular genetic studies later. Use of twin registries and various innovative yet complex software packages such as the (SAS and their extensions (e.g., SAS PROC GENMOD and SAS PROC PHREG has increased the potential of this epidemiological tool toward contributing significantly to the field of genetics and other life sciences.

  3. Autism Teaching Tool

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    CERN pattern recognition technologies transferred to Austistic children learning tool. The state of the art of pattern recognition technology developed at CERN for High Energy Physics are transferred to Computer Vision domain and are used to develop a new

  4. Teaching Syllogistics Using E-learning Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Peter; Sandborg-Petersen, Ulrik; Thorvaldsen, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a study of various strategies for teaching syllogistics as part of a course in basic logic. It is a continuation of earlier studies involving practical experiments with students of Communication using the Syllog system, which makes it possible to develop e-learning tools and to do...... learning analytics based on log-data. The aim of the present paper is to investigate whether the Syllog e-learning tools can be helpful in logic teaching in order to obtain a better understanding of logic and argumentation in general and syllogisms in particular. Four versions of a course in basic logic...... involving different teaching methods will be compared....

  5. Online Algebraic Tools for Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Terri L.

    2011-01-01

    Many free online tools exist to complement algebraic instruction at the middle school level. This article presents findings that analyzed the features of algebraic tools to support learning. The findings can help teachers select appropriate tools to facilitate specific topics. (Contains 1 table and 4 figures.)

  6. Teaching Syllogistics Using E-learning Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Peter; Sandborg-Petersen, Ulrik; Thorvaldsen, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a study of various strategies for teaching syllogistics as part of a course in basic logic. It is a continuation of earlier studies involving practical experiments with students of Communication using the Syllog system, which makes it possible to develop e-learning tools and to do l...... involving different teaching methods will be compared.......This paper is a study of various strategies for teaching syllogistics as part of a course in basic logic. It is a continuation of earlier studies involving practical experiments with students of Communication using the Syllog system, which makes it possible to develop e-learning tools and to do...... learning analytics based on log-data. The aim of the present paper is to investigate whether the Syllog e-learning tools can be helpful in logic teaching in order to obtain a better understanding of logic and argumentation in general and syllogisms in particular. Four versions of a course in basic logic...

  7. Visualization Tools for Teaching Computer Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaohong; Vega, Percy; Qadah, Yaseen; Archer, Ricky; Yu, Huiming; Xu, Jinsheng

    2010-01-01

    Using animated visualization tools has been an important teaching approach in computer science education. We have developed three visualization and animation tools that demonstrate various information security concepts and actively engage learners. The information security concepts illustrated include: packet sniffer and related computer network…

  8. Quebec: A Unique North American ESL Teaching Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Jacquelyn

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) in Quebec at the elementary and secondary levels. Highlights the educational system and second language requirements, educational reform, and professionals and parents advancing ESL instruction. (Author/VWL)

  9. [Interactive tools to standardize semiology teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Alejandro; Vargas, Bryan; González, Vicente; Reyes, Ignacio; Sarfatis, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    The learning process for medical semiology depends on multidisciplinary teaching activities, including simulation tools. These tools should achieve a standardization level aiming at a same level of basic knowledge in each student. To evaluate an interactive online semiology learning tool. An interactive online learning method for medical semiology was developed. It focused mainly on physical examination and incorporated audiovisual and self-explanatory elements, to strengthen the acquisition of skills and basic knowledge for each standardized clinical learning simulation session. Subsequently, a satisfaction survey was conducted. Also the performance of students in a clinical examination was compared with that of students of the previous year. Student satisfaction was outstanding, and there was a significant improvement in the performance on the final exam. The use of interactive self-learning online content for medical semiology provides an effective tool to improve student learning.

  10. Digital teaching tools and global learning communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mary; Lockhart, Patti; Martin, Cathie

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, we started a project to support the teaching and learning of university-level plant sciences, called Teaching Tools in Plant Biology. Articles in this series are published by the plant science journal, The Plant Cell (published by the American Society of Plant Biologists). Five years on, we investigated how the published materials are being used through an analysis of the Google Analytics pageviews distribution and through a user survey. Our results suggest that this project has had a broad, global impact in supporting higher education, and also that the materials are used differently by individuals in terms of their role (instructor, independent learner, student) and geographical location. We also report on our ongoing efforts to develop a global learning community that encourages discussion and resource sharing.

  11. Personal narrative as a teaching tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legere, Lyn; Nemec, Patricia B; Swarbrick, Margaret

    2013-12-01

    Recovery-oriented service systems explicitly value including people with lived experiences of a mental and substance use diagnosis in the design, delivery, and evaluation of those services. Including first-person accounts as part of the education and training of service providers "demonstrates" recovery is possible, promotes empathy, offers insights into the lives of service users, and models a person-centered, person-first approach. More important, it serves as a visual and experiential example of the collegial relationships required for services that are truly recovery-oriented. This column provides recommendations for carefully planning in-person personal narratives as an effective teaching tool.

  12. The neXtProt peptide uniqueness checker: a tool for the proteomics community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Mathieu; Gateau, Alain; Teixeira, Daniel; Michel, Pierre-André; Zahn-Zabal, Monique; Lane, Lydie

    2017-05-17

    The neXtProt peptide uniqueness checker allows scientists to define which peptides can be used to validate the existence of human proteins, i.e. map uniquely versus multiply to human protein sequences taking into account isobaric substitutions, alternative splicing and single amino acid variants. The pepx program is available at https://github.com/calipho-sib/pepx and can be launched from the command line or through a cgi web interface. Indexing requires a sequence file in FASTA format. The peptide uniqueness checker tool is freely available on the web at https://www.nextprot.org/tools/peptide-uniqueness-checker and from the neXtProt API at https://api.nextprot.org /. lydie.lane@sib.swiss.

  13. Physics Teaching: Mathematics as an Epistemological Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneubil, Fabiana B.; Robilotta, Manoel R.

    2015-07-01

    We study the interconnection between Physics and Mathematics in concrete instances, departing from the usual expression for the Coulomb electric field, produced by a point-like charge. It is scrutinized by means of six epistemology-intensive questions and radical answers are proposed, intended to widen one's understanding of the subject. Our interventions act along two complementary directions. One of them regards ontology, since questions induce one to look closely at the electric charge, from different perspectives, promoting reflections about its nature and reinforcing the corresponding concept. Formal manipulations rely on the identification of concepts with symbols, and the other direction concerns the spatial extension of mathematical structures. Our questions and their somewhat unusual answers help disclosing information which is not present in many textbooks, and show that Mathematics can be used as an efficient epistemological tool in Physics teaching.

  14. Interactive Teaching Tools for Spatial Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Bowman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The statistical analysis of data which is measured over a spatial region is well established as a scientific tool which makes considerable contributions to a wide variety of application areas. Further development of these tools also remains a central part of the research scene in statistics. However, understanding of the concepts involved often benefits from an intuitive and experimental approach, as well as a formal description of models and methods. This paper describes software which is intended to assist in this understanding. The role of simulation is advocated, in order to explain the meaning of spatial correlation and to interpret the parameters involved in standard models. Realistic scenarios where decisions on the locations of sampling points in a spatial setting are required are also described. Students are provided with a variety of sampling strategies and invited to select the most appropriate one in two different settings. One involves water sampling in the lagoon of the Mururoa Atoll while the other involves sea bed sampling in a Scottish firth. Once a student has decided on a sampling strategy, simulated data are provided for further analysis. This extends the range of teaching activity from the analysis of data collected by others to involvement in data collection and the need to grapple with issues of design. It is argued that this approach has significant benefits in learning.

  15. Problems in Choosing Tools and Methods for Teaching Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitkute-Adžgauskiene, Davia; Vidžiunas, Antanas

    2012-01-01

    The paper analyses the problems in selecting and integrating tools for delivering basic programming knowledge at the university level. Discussion and analysis of teaching the programming disciplines, the main principles of study programme design, requirements for teaching tools, methods and corresponding languages is presented, based on literature…

  16. The teaching portfolio as a professional development tool for anaesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, N S

    2015-05-01

    A teaching portfolio (TP) is a document containing a factual description of a teacher's teaching strengths and accomplishments, allowing clinicians to display them for examination by others. The primary aim of a TP is to improve quality of teaching by providing a structure for self-reflection, which in turn aids professional development in medical education. Contents typically include a personal statement on teaching, an overview of teaching accomplishments and activities, feedback from colleagues and learners, a reflective component and some examples of teaching material. Electronic portfolios are more portable and flexible compared to paper portfolios. Clinicians gain the most benefit from a TP when it is used as a tool for self-reflection of their teaching practice and not merely as a list of activities and achievements. This article explains why and how anaesthetists might use a TP as a tool for professional development in medical education.

  17. History of optics: a modern teaching tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, D.; Gonzalez-Cano, A.; Diaz-Herrera, N.; Llombart, N.; Alda, J.

    2012-10-01

    The history of optics is a very rich field of science and it is possible to find many simple and significant examples of the application and success of the experimental method and therefore is a very good tool to transmit to the student the way science proceeds and to introduce the right spirit of critical analysis, building and testing of models, etc. Optical phenomena are specially well suited for this because in fact optical observations and experiments have made science advance in a crucial way in many different periods of history, because they are in many cases quite visual, quite simple in concept and it is very easy to produce experimental setups in classrooms. Also, the intrinsic multidisciplinary character of Optics, which is a subject that has historically influenced in a notorious way fields as art, philosophy, religion and cultural and social studies in general, provide a very wide frame that permits to apply these examples to many different auditories. We present here some reflections about the role that history of optics can play in teaching and show some real examples of its application during the many years that we have been employing it in the context of the Optics School of the Complutense University of Madrid, Spain.

  18. Online Communication Tools in Biochemistry Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ferreira

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The  online  communication  tools  enable  new  ways  of  learning, especially  the  forums  in the context of online courses, and the understanding of interactions and collaborations in the  forums  can  improve  them.  The  study  aimed  to  analyze  the  online relationships,  as well  as  obtaining  evidence  of  the  use of  other  learning  tools in  a  biochemistry  subject, focusing on how students use the tool forum and its contribution to learning. The study was  carried  out  from  data  pre  and  post  course  questionnaires  as  well  as  log  of environment  access  and  discussion  forum.  The  forums  have  been  restructured  and systematized  for  analysis  and  creating  discursive  flows  between  statements.  The questionnaires showed the central role of forum and wiki for learning,  the importance of interactions, which was highlighted by the forum analysis. The results indicate that one of the ways to improve online biochemistry teaching is to stimulate interactive activities, participatory  moderation  and  pedagogical  support  by  tutors  and  mentors,  also encouraging  and  creating  strategies  to  collaboration  of  students  to  solve problems  and to collaborative knowledge construction.

  19. A Digital Tool Supporting Goal-Oriented Teaching in Classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten; Bundsgaard, Jeppe; Slot, Marie Falkesgaard;

    2015-01-01

    and objectives for their teaching; these form a challenge and a basis for developing a digital tool for mediating between curriculum and pedagogical practice. The motivation for revising the national curriculum and developing digital tools that support teaching is partly based on evidence that the previous......his paper presents a newly developed tool for supporting goal-oriented teaching and develops a framework for discussing design intentions when developing such tools. The tool was developed in relation to a recent curriculum reform for the Danish primary and lower secondary school system, which...... transformed the national curriculum into a number of competences that were further divided into pairs of knowledge and skills. Together with this curriculum reform, there is a government initiative to promote goal-oriented teaching and a complementary need to support teachers’ more concrete plans...

  20. CCMC: Serving research and space weather communities with unique space weather services, innovative tools and resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihua; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Maddox, Marlo

    2015-04-01

    With the addition of Space Weather Research Center (a sub-team within CCMC) in 2010 to address NASA’s own space weather needs, CCMC has become a unique entity that not only facilitates research through providing access to the state-of-the-art space science and space weather models, but also plays a critical role in providing unique space weather services to NASA robotic missions, developing innovative tools and transitioning research to operations via user feedback. With scientists, forecasters and software developers working together within one team, through close and direct connection with space weather customers and trusted relationship with model developers, CCMC is flexible, nimble and effective to meet customer needs. In this presentation, we highlight a few unique aspects of CCMC/SWRC’s space weather services, such as addressing space weather throughout the solar system, pushing the frontier of space weather forecasting via the ensemble approach, providing direct personnel and tool support for spacecraft anomaly resolution, prompting development of multi-purpose tools and knowledge bases, and educating and engaging the next generation of space weather scientists.

  1. Clinical reasoning in nursing: teaching strategies and assessment tools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emília Campos de Carvalho; Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira-Kumakura; Sheila Coelho Ramalho Vasconcelos Morais

    2017-01-01

    Results: Comprehension of the essential concepts of the thought process and its articulation with the different teaching strategies and the assessment tools which has allowed presenting ways to improve...

  2. Teachers' Influence on Integration of Tools into Mathematics Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesildere, Sibel

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the process through which three pre-service teachers learn to use mathematical tools; it also looks at pre-service teachers' instrumentation of tools into mathematics teaching. Three pre-service teachers were studying at a primary mathematics teacher training program at Dokuz Eylul University in Turkey. During an eight-week…

  3. Clinical reasoning in nursing: teaching strategies and assessment tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emília Campos de Carvalho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To present the concept and development of teaching strategies and the assessment tools regarding clinical reasoning for accurate practice. Method: This is a theoretical reflection based on scientific studies. Results: Comprehension of the essential concepts of the thought process and its articulation with the different teaching strategies and the assessment tools which has allowed presenting ways to improve the process of diagnostic or therapeutic clinical reasoning. Conclusion: The use of new strategies and assessment tools should be encouraged in order to contribute to the development of skills that lead to safe and effective decision making.

  4. Developing Free and Open Source Interactive Teaching Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E.

    2016-12-01

    Online learning has become an embedded component of education, but existing resources are often provided as institution-hosted content management systems (that may or may not be closed source). Creating interactive online applets to enhance student education is an alternative to these limited-customization systems that can be accomplished on a small budget. This presentation will break down the anatomy of author-developed online teaching tools created with open source packages to provide a survey of the development tools utilized—from the underlying website framework to interfacing with the scientific data. The availability of hosting and maintaining interactive teaching tools, whether static or dynamic, on no- or low-cost platforms will also be discussed. By constructing an interactive teaching tool from the ground up, scientists and educators are afforded complete flexibility and creativity in the design.

  5. The production of audiovisual teaching tools in minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolerton, Sarah K; Hugh, Thomas J; Cosman, Peter H

    2012-01-01

    Audiovisual learning resources have become valuable adjuncts to formal teaching in surgical training. This report discusses the process and challenges of preparing an audiovisual teaching tool for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The relative value in surgical education and training, for both the creator and viewer are addressed. This audiovisual teaching resource was prepared as part of the Master of Surgery program at the University of Sydney, Australia. The different methods of video production used to create operative teaching tools are discussed. Collating and editing material for an audiovisual teaching resource can be a time-consuming and technically challenging process. However, quality learning resources can now be produced even with limited prior video editing experience. With minimal cost and suitable guidance to ensure clinically relevant content, most surgeons should be able to produce short, high-quality education videos of both open and minimally invasive surgery. Despite the challenges faced during production of audiovisual teaching tools, these resources are now relatively easy to produce using readily available software. These resources are particularly attractive to surgical trainees when real time operative footage is used. They serve as valuable adjuncts to formal teaching, particularly in the setting of minimally invasive surgery. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Children as Storytellers: Teaching the Basic Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Martha; Weiss, Mitch

    1993-01-01

    Explains how to teach children to be storytellers, including retelling stories, choosing the story, learning the story, voice factors, facial expressions, audience participation, and stage fright. A sidebar lists sources for stories that are suitable for young children to retell. (LRW)

  7. Focus issue: teaching tools and learning opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Nancy R

    2010-01-01

    Science Signaling provides authoring experience for students and resources for educators. Students experience the writing and revision process involved in authoring short commentary articles that are published in the Journal Club section. By publishing peer-reviewed teaching materials, Science Signaling provides instructors with feedback that improves their materials and an outlet to share their tips and techniques and digital resources with other teachers.

  8. Blended learning tools for teaching and training

    CERN Document Server

    Allan, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Offers a holistic blended learning approach, combining the best of traditional approaches to learning and teaching to make best use of the advantages of each while minimizing the disadvantages. It provides information professionals with a practical guide to the design and delivery of such training programmes.

  9. Rethinking Tools for Training Teaching Assistants

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    The ability to categorize problems is a measure of expertise in a domain. In order to help students learn effectively, instructors and teaching assistants (TAs) should have pedagogical content knowledge. They must be aware of the prior knowledge of students they are teaching, consider the difficulty of the problems from students' perspective and design instruction that builds on what students already know. Here, we discuss the response of graduate students enrolled in a TA training course to categorization tasks in which they were asked to group problems based upon similarity of solution first from their own perspective, and later from the perspective of introductory physics students. Many graduate students performed an expert-like categorization of introductory physics problems. However, when asked to categorize the same problems from the perspective of introductory students, many graduate students expressed dismay, claiming that the task was impossible, pointless and had no relevance to their TA duties. We ...

  10. Remote Sensing of Tolkien's Middle Earth: A Unique Interactive Application of Earth System Observational Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almberg, L. D.; Dean, K.; Foster, R.; Kalbfleisch, D.; Peirce, M.; Simmons, T.

    2004-12-01

    The power of remote sensing tools were combined with the creativity of bright young minds and the magic of J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle Earth to provide a unique educational opportunity. Four students, age 12 to 15, were introduced to the basics of space-based Earth observation tools and aerial photography interpretation during the 10-day Alaska Summer Research Academy at the University of Alaska Fairbanks June 9-18, 2004. The students created an interactive map of Tolkein's Middle Earth by selecting aerial photographs, Landsat and FLIR images to represent areas of the Hobbits' journey as described in the popular Lord of the Rings books and films. Ground truthing excursions were made in the Alaskan interior to determine if the regions selected from the images and photographs indeed fit with Tolkein's descriptions. The students presented their final results to their peers in a morning news format, following the flight of the Hobbits across the landscape in their quest to destroy the One Ring.

  11. Crank Astronomy as a Teaching Tool. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgman, William T.; Young, C.; Robbins, S.

    2014-01-01

    Many astronomers - and indeed, scientists in general - have dealt with them: You receive one or more emails from intense individuals who insist that your interpretation of any data is wrong and THEIR idea is Truth (with a capitol "T"). The person contacting you might have some scientific background, or none at all. You might respond to the individual, trying to be helpful, perhaps pointing out some misinterpretation they have of your results, or a fatal flaw their idea. They respond with accusations of ignorance, incompetence and conspiracies, and it goes rapidly downhill from there. While most scientists consider these individuals - some of whom are part of more organized groups with various non-scientific agendas - as a nuisance, it might be better to regard them as an opportunity to improve classroom teaching. A surprising number of the claims from these individuals can be addressed at the level of introductory physics or other science classes. They provide simple examples of hypotheses that do not work making them valuable for teaching science and critical thinking. These skills are important for any member of the scientifically literate public and are imperative for any scientist. We present some crank astronomy claims with a focus on heliophysics which are suitable for actual analysis by students with undergraduate-level physics background. The analyses may also be suitable for high school physics classes. We also encourage educators interested in using examples of where people go wrong in their thinking to use these as teachable examples. Some lessons, writing assignments, or extra credit can be assigned to students to require them to use both critical thinking and the information learned in class to counter these kinds of claims. In doing so, one not only encourages the development of a student's critical thinking that will serve them in any field, but the student is also better prepared when they will face similar types of claims in the future.

  12. Development of a burn prevention teaching tool for Amish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieman, Mary T; Kagan, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Although there are inherent risks for burn injury associated with the Amish lifestyle, burn prevention is not taught in Amish schools. The purpose of this study was to develop a burn prevention teaching tool for Amish children. An anonymous parental survey was designed to explore the content and acceptability of a teaching tool within an Old Order Amish community. After institutional review board approval, the Amish teacher distributed surveys to 16 families of the 30 children attending the one-room school. Fourteen (88%) of the families responded to identify these burn risks in and around their homes, barns, and shops: lighters, wood and coal stoves, kerosene heaters, gasoline-powered engines, and hot liquids used for canning, butchering, mopping, washing clothes, and making lye soap. All respondents were in favor of teaching familiar safety precautions, fire escape plans, burn first aid, and emergency care to the children. There was some minor objection to more modern devices such as bath tub thermometers (25%), fire extinguishers (19%), and smoke detectors (6%). The teacher was interested in a magnetic teaching board depicting Amish children and typical objects in their home environment. Movable pieces could afford the opportunity to identify hazards and to rearrange them for a safer situation. This survey served to introduce burn prevention to one Amish community and to develop an appropriate teaching tool for the school. It is anticipated that community participation would support its acceptance and eventual utilization within this tenaciously traditional culture.

  13. Teaching teamworks with Internet collaborative tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos IGLESIAS ALONSO

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an innovative educational experience developed during the past academic year, 2010-2011, in the framework of ARCE (Association of Education Centres of the Ministry of Education. Experience has allowed the formation of an educational group formed by three schools of secondary education and geographically distant from three different regions: the CIFP Juan de Colonia from Castilla y León, IES Virgen de la Esperanza from Andalucia and Extremadura IES from Extremadura. The information and communication technologies (ICTs have become an essential tool in education today and should be applied to all players in the field of education: students, teachers and families. This experience focuses on teachers’ fundamental role in education and specifically in the use of collaborative tools on their part to develop a common project. The use of these collaborative tools, such as a wiki, has allowed on one hand to carry out the activities that are part of the project and to monitor the project status at any time, the enabling each center to know, in real time, the status, and the difficulties encountered in the activities. The accomplishment of a joint project among several schools allows the exchange of experiences to know the educational practices that are carried out in other schools, in other regions, thus enriching the educational process of the center itself and therefore the education that students receive.

  14. A Digital Tool Supporting Goal-Oriented Teaching in Classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten; Bundsgaard, Jeppe; Slot, Marie Falkesgaard

    2015-01-01

    transformed the national curriculum into a number of competences that were further divided into pairs of knowledge and skills. Together with this curriculum reform, there is a government initiative to promote goal-oriented teaching and a complementary need to support teachers’ more concrete plans...... and objectives for their teaching; these form a challenge and a basis for developing a digital tool for mediating between curriculum and pedagogical practice. The motivation for revising the national curriculum and developing digital tools that support teaching is partly based on evidence that the previous...... national curriculum was not used to any particular extent by teachers (Danish Evaluation Institute 2012). Hence, the curriculum has been rebuilt based on recent trends in school development and curriculum research suggesting the importance of a competence framework, learning goals, and the aggregation...

  15. Unit testing as a teaching tool in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peláez Canek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unit testing in the programming world has had a profound impact in the way modern complex systems are developed. Many Open Source and Free Software projects encourage (and in some cases, mandate the use of unit tests for new code submissions, and many software companies around the world have incorporated unit testing as part of their standard developing practices. And although not all software engineers use them, very few (if at all object their use. However, there is almost no research available pertaining the use of unit tests as a teaching tool in introductory programming courses. I have been teaching introductory programming courses in the Computer Sciences program at the Sciences Faculty in the National Autonomous University of Mexico for almost ten years, and since 2013 I have been using unit testing as a teaching tool in those courses. The intent of this paper is to discuss the results of this experience.

  16. Codeswitching as a Tool in Teaching Italian in Malta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauci, Hertian; Camilleri Grima, Antoinette

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of teacher codeswitching in the teaching of Italian in Malta. The analysis of teacher codeswitching shows that the learners' first language (L1), Maltese, is used as a pedagogical tool to enhance language learning. Teachers frequently resort to Maltese to provide more learner-friendly explanations of…

  17. "Caenorhabditis Elegans" as an Undergraduate Educational Tool for Teaching RNAi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Janet; Krichevsky, Alexander; Leheste, Joerg R.; Moloney, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Discovery of RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) is widely recognized as one of the most significant molecular biology breakthroughs in the past 10 years. There is a need for science educators to develop teaching tools and laboratory activities that demonstrate the power of this new technology and help students to better understand the RNAi process.…

  18. Web 2.0 Tools for Supporting Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Angelos; Theodostadou, Dimitra; Pappos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools provide enormous opportunities for teaching and learning, yet their application in education is still underdeveloped. What is more, it is no longer possible for teachers to ignore such a technological advance, while they are expected to provide students with opportunities to take control of their learning. However, teachers are still…

  19. Use of Software Tools in Teaching Relational Database Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, D. R.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of state-of-the-art software tools in teaching a graduate, advanced, relational database design course. Results indicated a positive student response to the prototype of expert systems software and a willingness to utilize this new technology both in their studies and in future work applications. (JKP)

  20. Heuristic Diagrams as a Tool to Teach History of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamizo, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    The graphic organizer called here heuristic diagram as an improvement of Gowin's Vee heuristic is proposed as a tool to teach history of science. Heuristic diagrams have the purpose of helping students (or teachers, or researchers) to understand their own research considering that asks and problem-solving are central to scientific activity. The…

  1. Have Economic Educators Embraced Social Media as a Teaching Tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bahrani, Abdullah; Patel, Darshak; Sheridan, Brandon J.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the results of a study of the perceptions of a national sample of economics faculty members from various institutions regarding the use of social media as a teaching tool in and out of the economics classroom. In the past few years, social media has become globally popular, and its use is ubiquitous among…

  2. Heuristic Diagrams as a Tool to Teach History of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamizo, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    The graphic organizer called here heuristic diagram as an improvement of Gowin's Vee heuristic is proposed as a tool to teach history of science. Heuristic diagrams have the purpose of helping students (or teachers, or researchers) to understand their own research considering that asks and problem-solving are central to scientific activity. The…

  3. Teaching by Design: Tools and Techniques to Improve Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and other state standards have challenged teachers to rethink how they plan units and design their assignments within constraints of time and increasingly diverse classrooms. This article describes the author's efforts to create a coherent, useable set of tools to make his teaching at the unit and daily…

  4. Analysis of Online Quizzes as a Teaching and Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Morera, Lorenzo; Arauzo-Azofra, Antonio; García-Hernández, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with the integrated use of online quizzes as a teaching and assessment tool in the general program of the subject Proyectos in the third course of Ingeniero Técnico en Informática de Gestión over five consecutive years. The research undertaken aimed to test quizzes effectiveness on student performance when used, not only as an…

  5. Kite Aerial Photography (KAP) as a Tool for Field Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Kite aerial photography (KAP) is proposed as a creative tool for geography field teaching and as a medium to approach the complexity of readily available geodata. The method can be integrated as field experiment, surveying technique or group activity. The acquired aerial images can instantaneously be integrated in geographic information systems…

  6. Teaching by Design: Tools and Techniques to Improve Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and other state standards have challenged teachers to rethink how they plan units and design their assignments within constraints of time and increasingly diverse classrooms. This article describes the author's efforts to create a coherent, useable set of tools to make his teaching at the unit and daily…

  7. Bildung as a Powerful Tool in Modern University Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Mogens Noergaard

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we will demonstrate how powerful "Bildung" is as a tool in modern university teaching. The concept of "Bildung" was originally introduced by the German philosopher Immanuel Kant (Kant 1787, 1798, 1804) and the Prussian lawyer and politician Wilhelm von Humboldt (Humboldt 1792, Bohlin 2008). From 1810 "Bildung" was a key concept in…

  8. Kite Aerial Photography (KAP) as a Tool for Field Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Kite aerial photography (KAP) is proposed as a creative tool for geography field teaching and as a medium to approach the complexity of readily available geodata. The method can be integrated as field experiment, surveying technique or group activity. The acquired aerial images can instantaneously be integrated in geographic information systems…

  9. Wearable technology: using Google Glass as a teaching tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Hui Min; Gajendragadkar, Parag Ravindra; Bokhari, Awais

    2015-05-12

    Wearable technology holds great promise in revolutionising healthcare delivery. The benefits can also be seen in medical education and delivering healthcare in remote places. We report the use of Google Glass technology as a teaching tool in broadcasting a procedure onto a mobile phone as a viewer, replacing expensive and often cumbersome existing equipment.

  10. Have Economic Educators Embraced Social Media as a Teaching Tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bahrani, Abdullah; Patel, Darshak; Sheridan, Brandon J.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the results of a study of the perceptions of a national sample of economics faculty members from various institutions regarding the use of social media as a teaching tool in and out of the economics classroom. In the past few years, social media has become globally popular, and its use is ubiquitous among…

  11. AUGMENTED REALITY AS A TEACHING TOOL IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashko Rizov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development of the technology has influenced its inevitable entrance in the learning processes. Teachers are often challenged to use the appropriate educational technology in the process of teaching in order to ease the learning process of students. Introducing new technology in the teaching process should utilize the new technology in any possible way in order to assist the teacher in transferring the knowledge and assist the students in grasping that knowledge. This paper should emphasize the benefits of using augmented reality in higher education, by measuring outcomes of the students which used augmented reality as a teaching tool in the courses. Results from the survey imply that students show significantly improved results in increasing the interest, understanding and interiorizing the learning material. University teachers found that using augmented reality is significantly improving the learning process of students and their teaching process in a pedagogical and technical sense. 

  12. Tools for Teaching the "Digital Natives"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pals Svendsen, Lisbet; Mondahl, Margrethe

    2011-01-01

    of corporate communication where we need new methods of approaching adult cultural/communicative learning since these integrated competences are much asked for in the business community. One way of approaching university pedagogy within these fields is asking whether social software could provide better tools....... The theoretical foundations of the article have been established at the crossroads between general learning theory, cultural/communicative learning theory and social media applications that facilitate collaborative, synchronous and interactive learning platforms. Data evaluation and comparisons in regard...... to learning outcomes are based on empirical data from two cases applying different learning platforms used in CBS programme courses involving culture and communication learning elements....

  13. Tools for Teaching the "Digital Natives"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pals Svendsen, Lisbet; Mondahl, Margrethe

    2011-01-01

    University educators and researchers face new generations of “digitally native” students, who approach academic disciplines in novel ways, thus creating a changed university-learning environment that demands new ways of building knowledge in a bottom-up process. A case in point is the area...... of corporate communication where we need new methods of approaching adult cultural/communicative learning since these integrated competences are much asked for in the business community. One way of approaching university pedagogy within these fields is asking whether social software could provide better tools...

  14. Tools for Teaching the Digital Natives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbet Pals Svendsen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available University educators and researchers face new generations of “digitally native” students, who approach academic disciplines in novel ways, thus creating a changed university-learning environment that demands new ways of building knowledge in a bottom-up process. A case in point is the area of corporate communication where we need new methods of approaching adult cultural/communicative learning since these integrated competences are much asked for in the business community. One way of approaching university pedagogy within these fields is asking whether social software could provide better tools that support social, collaborative processes that are fun, motivating and better support learning. The article therefore discusses collaborative and individualized learning processes and how social software platforms may better harness collective and personal knowledge in order to enhance learning outcome. The theoretical foundations of the article have been established at the crossroads between general learning theory, cultural/communicative learning theory and social media applications that facilitate collaborative, synchronous and interactive learning platforms. Data evaluation and comparisons in regard to learning outcomes are based on empirical data from two cases applying different learning platforms used in CBS programme courses involving culture and communication learning elements.

  15. Tools for Teaching the Digital Natives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbet Pals Svendsen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available University educators and researchers face new generations of “digitally native” students, who approach academic disciplines in novel ways, thus creating a changed university-learning environment that demands new ways of building knowledge in a bottom-up process. A case in point is the area of corporate communication where we need new methods of approaching adult cultural/communicative learning since these integrated competences are much asked for in the business community. One way of approaching university pedagogy within these fields is asking whether social software could provide better tools that support social, collaborative processes that are fun, motivating and better support learning. The article therefore discusses collaborative and individualized learning processes and how social software platforms may better harness collective and personal knowledge in order to enhance learning outcome. The theoretical foundations of the article have been established at the crossroads between general learning theory, cultural/communicative learning theory and social media applications that facilitate collaborative, synchronous and interactive learning platforms. Data evaluation and comparisons in regard to learning outcomes are based on empirical data from two cases applying different learning platforms used in CBS programme courses involving culture and communication learning elements.

  16. Kite aerial photography (KAP) as a tool for field teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Kite aerial photography (KAP) is proposed as a creative tool for geography field teaching and as a medium to approach the complexity of readily available geodata. The method can be integrated as field experiment, surveying technique or group activity. The acquired aerial images can instantaneously...... be integrated in geographic information systems and used for reflection and discussion. The use of KAP in field teaching aims at conveying spatial perception and observational skills in real environments to later enable students to interpret remotely sensed data from a nadir perspective. KAP thus allows adding...

  17. Teaching resources in speleology and karst: a valuable educational tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Waele Jo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing need in the speleological community of tools that make teaching of speleology and karst much easier. Despite the existence of a wide range of major academic textbooks, often the caver community has a difficult access to such material. Therefore, to fill this gap, the Italian Speleological Society, under the umbrella of the Union International de Spéléologie, has prepared a set of lectures, in a presentation format, on several topics including geology, physics, chemistry, hydrogeology, mineralogy, palaeontology, biology, microbiology, history, archaeology, artificial caves, documentation, etc. These lectures constitute the “Teaching Resources in Speleology and Karst”, available online. This educational tool, thanks to its easily manageable format, can constantly be updated and enriched with new contents and topics.

  18. Uniqueness plots: A simple graphical tool for identifying poor peak fits in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Bhupinder; Diwan, Anubhav; Jain, Varun [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 84606 (United States); Herrera-Gomez, Alberto [CINVESTAV-Unidad Queretaro, Queretaro, 76230 (Mexico); Terry, Jeff [Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL, 60616 (United States); Linford, Matthew R., E-mail: mrlinford@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 84606 (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Uniqueness plots are introduced as a new tool for identifying poor XPS peak fits. • Uniqueness plots are demonstrated on real XPS data sets. • A horizontal line in a uniqueness plot indicates a poor fit, i.e., fit parameter correlation. • A parabolic shape in a uniqueness plot indicates that a fit may be appropriate. - Abstract: Peak fitting is an essential part of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) narrow scan analysis, and the Literature contains both good and bad examples of peak fitting. A common cause of poor peak fitting is the inclusion of too many fit parameters, often without a sound chemical and/or physical basis for them, and/or the failure to reasonably constrain them. Under these conditions, fit parameters are often correlated, and therefore lacking in statistical meaning. Here we introduce the uniqueness plot as a simple graphical tool for identifying bad peak fits in XPS, i.e., fit parameter correlation. These plots are widely used in spectroscopic ellipsometry. We illustrate uniqueness plots with two data sets: a C 1s narrow scan from ozone-treated carbon nanotube forests and an Si 2p narrow scan from an air-oxidized silicon wafer. For each fit, we consider different numbers of parameters and constraints on them. As expected, the uniqueness plots are parabolic when fewer fit parameters and/or more constraints are applied. However, they fan out and eventually become horizontal lines as more unconstrained parameters are included in the fits. Uniqueness plots are generated by plotting the chi squared (χ{sup 2}) value for a fit vs. a systematically varied value of a parameter in the fit. The Abbe criterion is also considered as a figure of merit for uniqueness plots in the Supporting Information. We recommend that uniqueness plots be used by XPS practitioners for identifying inappropriate peak fits.

  19. WEB 2.0 TOOLS FOR SUPPORTING TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelos KONSTANTINIDIS

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Web 2.0 tools provide enormous opportunities for teaching and learning, yet their application in education is still underdeveloped. What is more, it is no longer possible for teachers to ignore such a technological advance, while they are expected to provide students with opportunities to take control of their learning. However, teachers are still reluctant with technology integration. This paper introduces four Web 2.0 tools; Blogger, StripGenerator, Go!Animate, and Google Forms, that are free and easy to use, in an effort to motivate teachers with low technological skills in integrating them into their instruction practices. The aforementioned tools comprised the curriculum in a blended-learning professional development course for in-service teachers and attracted many favourable comments from the participants.

  20. Pilot testing of a burn prevention teaching tool for Amish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieman, Mary T; Kagan, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Burn prevention education for Amish children is warranted as there are unique risks associated with the Amish lifestyle. Specific educational opportunities are related to scalds, ignition of clothing, and ignition of highly flammable materials. A culturally sensitive burn prevention teaching tool, consisting of a magnetic storyboard, burn safety curriculum, and tests, was developed with the cooperation of one Old Order Amish community. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of the tool in an Amish school. The teacher obtained parental permission and informed assent for the participation of the children. Pretesting was completed before the lessons began. The teacher told stories and arranged the magnets on the storyboard to show burn hazards involving lighters, stoves, kerosene heaters, gasoline-powered engines, and hot liquids used for canning, butchering, mopping, washing clothes, and making lye soap. The children were challenged to rearrange the pieces for a safer situation. Posttesting was performed 2 months after the pretest. Twenty-seven students (grades 1-8) participated. Tests were scored as a percentage of the 33 items answered correctly. The mean pretest score was 62 and the mean posttest score was 83. Statistical analysis using paired t-test demonstrated a highly significant improvement in test scores (P < .0001), with a power of more than 99%. This pilot study demonstrated that the burn prevention teaching tool was effective for improving knowledge in one classroom of Amish children. These results support expanded use and testing of this tool in other Amish schools.

  1. Tools and Techniques to Teach Earth Sciences to Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, R.; Dicelis, G.; Molina, E. C.

    2010-12-01

    This study aims to identify the tools available to disseminate the Earth sciences to young people in Brazil and to propose new techniques that may help in the teaching of such subjects. The use of scientific dissemination can be a great tool for the consolidation of a scientific culture, especially for a public of young students. The starting point of this study is an important characteristic that is present in virtually all the children: curiosity. The young public tries to understand how the world is and how it works. The use of scientific dissemination and some educational experiences have shown that these students have a great ability to learn and deal with various topics within the Earth Sciences. Another relevant point is the possibility to show that the Earth sciences, e.g., geophysics, oceanography, meteorology, geology and geography, can be an educational attractive option. Several ways of disseminating Earth sciences are commonly used with the purpose of attracting and mainly teaching these subjects, such as websites, interactive museums and cultural and educational spaces. The objectives of this work are: i) Investigate the role of science centers as motivators in disseminating the scientific knowledge by examining the communication resources that are being employed, the acceptance, reaction, and interest of children to these means, and ii) From this analysis, to list suggestions of contents and new tools that could be used for obtaining better results.

  2. Clinical reasoning in nursing: teaching strategies and assessment tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Emília Campos de; Oliveira-Kumakura, Ana Railka de Souza; Morais, Sheila Coelho Ramalho Vasconcelos

    2017-01-01

    To present the concept and development of teaching strategies and the assessment tools regarding clinical reasoning for accurate practice. This is a theoretical reflection based on scientific studies. Comprehension of the essential concepts of the thought process and its articulation with the different teaching strategies and the assessment tools which has allowed presenting ways to improve the process of diagnostic or therapeutic clinical reasoning. The use of new strategies and assessment tools should be encouraged in order to contribute to the development of skills that lead to safe and effective decision making. Apresentar o conceito de raciocínio clínico, seu desenvolvimento, as estratégias para seu ensino e os instrumentos de avaliação para uma prática acurada. Trata-se de uma reflexão teórica fundamentada em estudos científicos. A compreensão dos conceitos essenciais do processo de pensamento e sua articulação com as diferentes estratégias de ensino e com os instrumentos de avaliação permitiram exemplificar meios de aprimorar o processo de raciocínio clínico diagnóstico ou terapêutico. A utilização de novas estratégias e instrumentos de avaliação deve ser estimulado para contribuir com o desenvolvimento das habilidades que culminam na tomada de decisão segura e eficaz.

  3. Building a Society of Solidarity through Critical Pedagogy: Group Teaching as a Social and Democratic Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakaki, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Against the menacing shadow of neoliberalism, which promotes individualism and competition, the author illustrates in this paper the need for group teaching. Group teaching as a method of instruction and learning fosters community bonds, solidarity, and is more effective teaching. Group teaching is a democratic tool necessary for society to…

  4. Assessing and Managing Caregiver Stress: Development of a Teaching Tool for Medical Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famakinwa, Abisola; Fabiny, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Forty medical residents from major teaching hospitals in Boston, Massachusetts, participated in small group teaching sessions about caregiver stress. A teaching tool was developed that included a teaching handout, interactive cases, standard instruments for assessing caregiver stress, peer-reviewed articles about caregiving, and a list of…

  5. Efficient and Playful Tools to Teach Unix to New Students

    CERN Document Server

    Moy, Matthieu

    2011-01-01

    Teaching Unix to new students is a common tasks in many higher schools. This paper presents an approach to such course where the students progress autonomously with the help of the teacher. The traditional textbook is complemented with a wiki, and the main thread of the course is a game, in the form of a treasure hunt. The course finishes with a lab exam, where students have to perform practical manipulations similar to the ones performed during the treasure hunt. The exam is graded fully automatically. This paper discusses the motivations and advantages of the approach, and gives an overall view of the tools we developed. The tools are available from the web, and open-source, hence re-usable outside the Ensimag.

  6. Uniqueness plots: A simple graphical tool for identifying poor peak fits in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupinder; Diwan, Anubhav; Jain, Varun; Herrera-Gomez, Alberto; Terry, Jeff; Linford, Matthew R.

    2016-11-01

    Peak fitting is an essential part of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) narrow scan analysis, and the Literature contains both good and bad examples of peak fitting. A common cause of poor peak fitting is the inclusion of too many fit parameters, often without a sound chemical and/or physical basis for them, and/or the failure to reasonably constrain them. Under these conditions, fit parameters are often correlated, and therefore lacking in statistical meaning. Here we introduce the uniqueness plot as a simple graphical tool for identifying bad peak fits in XPS, i.e., fit parameter correlation. These plots are widely used in spectroscopic ellipsometry. We illustrate uniqueness plots with two data sets: a C 1s narrow scan from ozone-treated carbon nanotube forests and an Si 2p narrow scan from an air-oxidized silicon wafer. For each fit, we consider different numbers of parameters and constraints on them. As expected, the uniqueness plots are parabolic when fewer fit parameters and/or more constraints are applied. However, they fan out and eventually become horizontal lines as more unconstrained parameters are included in the fits. Uniqueness plots are generated by plotting the chi squared (χ2) value for a fit vs. a systematically varied value of a parameter in the fit. The Abbe criterion is also considered as a figure of merit for uniqueness plots in the Supporting Information. We recommend that uniqueness plots be used by XPS practitioners for identifying inappropriate peak fits.

  7. Case based learning as an innovative teaching tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopinder Kaur

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The challenges faced by the medical education are similar across the globe. The learning process is problematic with large classes and most of the curriculum time spent on traditional subject oriented didactic lectures during first and second professional, while teaching basic and paraclinical subjects. Various teaching methods were used to make the subjects more interesting, this study was done to determine the perception of case based learning (CBL and to evaluate its effect in pharmacology among second year students undergoing graduation in Bachelor of Dental Surgery. The perception of student response was collected by questionnaire and records. Data obtained were analyzed statically using paired t test. 86% students (28% strongly agrees and 58% agrees felt that CBL stimulated their desire to learn and 71% felt that it helps them to solve clinical situation in a better way. 92% felt they were motivated to learn pharmacology. Attendance record of the students improved and number of pharmacology book issued from the central library was increased during the CBL period. The Mean test score obtained by the students before CBL was 7.172 ± 2.268, which was increased significantly to 9.195 ± 3.799. The overall goal of this study is to introduce CBL as an innovative teaching tool. This would help the students to develop clinical decision making skill and link pharmacology to clinical practice in a better way during the start of their carrier. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 395-398

  8. Organophosphorus reagents in actinide separations: Unique tools for production, cleanup and disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K. L.

    2000-01-12

    Interactions of actinide ions with phosphate and organophosphorus reagents have figured prominently in nuclear science and technology, particularly in the hydrometallurgical processing of irradiated nuclear fuel. Actinide interactions with phosphorus-containing species impact all aspects from the stability of naturally occurring actinides in phosphate mineral phases through the application of the bismuth phosphate and PUREX processes for large-scale production of transuranic elements to the development of analytical separation and environment restoration processes based on new organophosphorus reagents. In this report, an overview of the unique role of organophosphorus compounds in actinide production, disposal, and environment restoration is presented. The broad utility of these reagents and their unique chemical properties is emphasized.

  9. Discovery Bottles: A Unique Inexpensive Tool for the K-2 Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Sandy

    2008-01-01

    Discover discovery bottles! These wide-mouth plastic containers of any size filled with objects of different kinds can be terrific tools for science explorations and a great way to cultivate science minds in a K-2 science classroom. In addition, the author has found them to be a useful, inexpensive, and engaging way to help students develop skills…

  10. The L3+C detector, a unique tool-set to study cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriani, O.; Akker, M. van den; Banerjee, S.; Baehr, J.; Betev, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bottai, S.; Bobbink, G.; Cartacci, A.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, G.; Chen, H.S.; Chiarusi, T.; Dai, C.J.; Ding, L.K.; Duran, I.; Faber, G.; Fay, J.; Grabosch, H.J.; Groenstege, H.; Guo, Y.N.; Gupta, S.; Haller, Ch.; Hayashi, Y.; He, Z.X.; Hebbeker, T.; Hofer, H.; Hoferjun, H.; Huo, A.X.; Ito, N.; Jing, C.L.; Jones, L.; Kantserov, V.; Kawakami, S.; Kittel, W.; Koenig, A.C.; Kok, E.; Korn, A.; Kuang, H.H.; Kuijpers, J.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Le Coultre, P. E-mail: pierre.le.coultre@cern.ch; Lei, Y.; Leich, H.; Leiste, R.; Li, D.; Li, L.; Li, Z.C.; Liu, Z.A.; Liu, H.T.; Lohmann, W.; Lu, Y.S.; Ma, X.H.; Ma, Y.Q.; Mil, A. van; Monteleoni, B.; Nahnhauer, R.; Pauss, F.; Parriaud, J.-F.; Petersen, B.; Pohl, M.; Qing, C.R.; Ramelli, R.; Ravindran, K.C.; Rewiersma, P.; Rojkov, A.; Saidi, R.; Schmitt, V.; Schoeneich, B.; Schotanus, D.J.; Shen, C.Q.; Sulanke, H.; Tang, X.W.; Timmermans, C.; Tonwar, S.; Trowitzsch, G.; Unger, M.; Verkooijen, H.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, X.W.; Wang, Z.M.; Wijk, R. van; Wijnen, Th.A.M.; Wilkens, H.; Xu, Y.P.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, X.F.; Yao, Z.G.; Yu, Z.Q.; Zhang, S.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, Q.Q.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zwart, A.N.M

    2002-08-01

    The L3 detector at the CERN electron-positron collider, LEP, has been employed for the study of cosmic ray muons. The muon spectrometer of L3 consists of a set of high-precision drift chambers installed inside a magnet with a volume of about 1000 m{sup 3} and a field of 0.5 T. Muon momenta are measured with a resolution of a few percent at 50 GeV. The detector is located under 30 m of overburden. A scintillator air shower array of 54 m by 30 m is installed on the roof of the surface hall above L3 in order to estimate the energy and the core position of the shower associated with a sample of detected muons. Thanks to the unique properties of the L3+C detector, muon research topics relevant to various current problems in cosmic ray and particle astrophysics can be studied.

  11. C1 Polymerization: a unique tool towards polyethylene-based complex macromolecular architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, De

    2017-05-09

    The recent developments in organoborane initiated C1 polymerization (chain grows by one atom at a time) of ylides opens unique horizons towards well-defined/perfectly linear polymethylenes (equivalent to polyethylenes, PE) and PE-based complex macromolecular architectures. The general mechanism of C1 polymerization (polyhomologation) involves the formation of a Lewis complex between a methylide (monomer) and a borane (initiator), followed by migration/insertion of a methylene into the initiator and after oxidation/hydrolysis to afford OH-terminated polyethylenes. This review summarizes efforts towards conventional and newly discovered borane-initiators and ylides (monomers), as well as a combination of polyhomologation with other polymerization methods. Initial efforts dealing with C3 polymerization and the synthesis of the first C1/C3 copolymers are also given. Finally, some thoughts for the future of these polymerizations are presented.

  12. Frontal affinity chromatography: A unique research tool for biospecific interaction that promotes glycobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    KASAI, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Combination of bioaffinity and chromatography gave birth to affinity chromatography. A further combination with frontal analysis resulted in creation of frontal affinity chromatography (FAC). This new versatile research tool enabled detailed analysis of weak interactions that play essential roles in living systems, especially those between complex saccharides and saccharide-binding proteins. FAC now becomes the best method for the investigation of saccharide-binding proteins (lectins) from viewpoints of sensitivity, accuracy, and efficiency, and is contributing greatly to the development of glycobiology. It opened a door leading to deeper understanding of the significance of saccharide recognition in life. The theory is also concisely described. PMID:25169774

  13. Heuristic Diagrams as a Tool to Teach History of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamizo, José A.

    2012-05-01

    The graphic organizer called here heuristic diagram as an improvement of Gowin's Vee heuristic is proposed as a tool to teach history of science. Heuristic diagrams have the purpose of helping students (or teachers, or researchers) to understand their own research considering that asks and problem-solving are central to scientific activity. The left side originally related in Gowin's Vee with philosophies, theories, models, laws or regularities now agrees with Toulmin's concepts (language, models as representation techniques and application procedures). Mexican science teachers without experience in science education research used the heuristic diagram to learn about the history of chemistry considering also in the left side two different historical times: past and present. Through a semantic differential scale teachers' attitude to the heuristic diagram was evaluated and its usefulness was demonstrated.

  14. Accounting Research as a didactic tool for a accounting teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Gisela Perez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a reflection about the importance of the research of accounting subjects in the professional accountants training, this importance is an attribute of research to increase the wealth of discipline under investigation, this can be converted into a skill and/or competence wich accountants are required to demonstrate in their professional practice.Furthermore, accounting is recognized by the authors as a science in constant development, being able to be investigated. This change in knowledge is an element that motivates professionals to be constantly updated, becoming this aspect (constant updating the skill and competence that research can bring to professional training in university classrooms.The reflection is based on the study of documents developed by prestigious authors in accounting theory, teaching and research.Therefore, this paper concludes that research is a useful tool for the professional accounting training, and rewards the important skills and competencies for professional practice; it can be conceived as well as a strategy for technical and educational activities that allows students to recreate knowledge, allowing future updates that will require their professional practice.Key words: Accounting research, university teaching, accounting education. 

  15. Interactive simulations as teaching tools for engineering mechanics courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Victoria; Romero, Carlos; Martínez, Elvira; Flórez, Mercedes

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to gauge the effect of interactive simulations in class as an active teaching strategy for a mechanics course. Engineering analysis and design often use the properties of planar sections in calculations. In the stress analysis of a beam under bending and torsional loads, cross-sectional properties are used to determine stress and displacement distributions in the beam cross section. The centroid, moments and products of inertia of an area made up of several common shapes (rectangles usually) may thus be obtained by adding the moments of inertia of the component areas (U-shape, L-shape, C-shape, etc). This procedure is used to calculate the second moments of structural shapes in engineering practice because the determination of their moments of inertia is necessary for the design of structural components. This paper presents examples of interactive simulations developed for teaching the ‘Mechanics and mechanisms’ course at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain. The simulations focus on fundamental topics such as centroids, the properties of the moment of inertia, second moments of inertia with respect to two axes, principal moments of inertia and Mohr's Circle for plane stress, and were composed using Geogebra software. These learning tools feature animations, graphics and interactivity and were designed to encourage student participation and engagement in active learning activities, to effectively explain and illustrate course topics, and to build student problem-solving skills.

  16. Wiki as a tool for microbiology teaching, learning and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio-Maia, B; Maia, J S; Leitão, S; Amaral, M; Vieira-Marques, P

    2014-05-01

    Evidence suggests that cooperative learning and peer-assessment fosters students' ability to work with others and may lead to better cognitive outcomes and higher achievement. This work aimed to assess the use of an online collaborative tool for the teaching/learning and assessment of Microbiology. A total of 144 students were grouped and assigned to create wiki entries as well as to peer review wikis created by colleagues (peer-assessment process) using the Wiki module from Moodle Virtual Learning Environment (MVLE). MVLE actions log was used for tracking students' activity. The number of student's actions within wiki did not present a strong correlation with wiki scores, so it should not be used as a heavy evaluation parameter. The amount of work developed between members of the same group differed significantly, suggesting that final scores should be attributed individually. When peer-assessment process was implemented, the number of editing actions increased, suggesting that the peer-assessment strategy encourages the development of a better work. The vast majority of students execute the work in the last 10% of the period assigned for task development, which can be counter-productive for a truly collaborative work. Wiki revealed to be a useful tool for Microbiology teaching/learning and assessment, promoting collaborative work, promoting virtual mobility and facilitating the real-time monitoring of the students' work. This pedagogical project promoted also the involvement of students in their assessment process, encouraging their critical sense and quest for Excellency. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Online multiple intelligence teaching tools (On-MITT) for enhancing interpersonal teaching activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Siti Nurul Mahfuzah; Salam, Sazilah; Bakar, Norasiken; Sui, Linda Khoo Mei

    2014-07-01

    The theories of Multiple Intelligence (MI) used in this paper apply to students with interpersonal intelligence who is encouraged to work together in cooperative groups where interpersonal interaction is practiced. In this context, students used their knowledge and skills to help the group or partner to complete the tasks given. Students can interact with each other as they learn and the process of learning requires their verbal and non-verbal communication skills, co-operation and empathy in the group. Meanwhile educators can incorporate cooperative learning in groups in the classroom. On-MITT provides various tools to facilitate lecturers in preparing e-content that applies interpersonal intelligence. With minimal knowledge of Information and Technology (IT) skills, educators can produce creative and interesting teaching activities and teaching materials. The objective of this paper is to develop On-MITT prototype for interpersonal teaching activities. This paper addressed initial prototype of this study. An evaluation of On-MITT has been completed by 20 lecturers of Malaysian Polytechnics. Motivation Survey Questionnaire is used as the instrument to measure four motivation variables: ease of use, enjoyment, usefulness and self-confidence. Based on the findings, the On-MITT can facilitate educators to prepare teaching materials that are compatible for interpersonal learner.

  18. Distributing Sloan Digital Sky Survey Plates and Posters as Interactive Teaching Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Danielle; Meredith, Kate; Masters, Karen; MacDonald, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of aluminum spectroscopic plug plates from the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys await second lives as teaching tools in the Plates for Education program. Educators from formal and informal settings around the globe can take part in this program, which was launched in August of 2015. As part of this EPO effort, educators are provided with a plate, a corresponding poster, and educational materials (through the voyages.sdss.org website). Each plug plate represents the spectroscopic targets from a unique three-degree section of the sky. The poster displays the optical image associated with the target area. Together with the SkyServer Plate Browser and Navigate tools, students can locate individual objects, examine spectra, and pursue their own studies. As of September 2015, forty-five plates and posters had been distributed to teachers during professional development workshops. Follow-up research will be conducted to determine how effective the plates and posters are in teaching students about astronomy and the SDSS data. Materials and outlines for conducting professional development workshops are available to SDSS collaborators interested in hosting their own educational events.

  19. Heavy ion microprobes: a unique tool for bystander research and other radiobiological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, K. O.; Fournier, C.; Taucher-Scholz, G.

    2008-07-01

    The risk assessment for low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation has been challenged by a growing body of experimental evidence showing that non-irradiated bystander cells can receive signals from irradiated cells to elicit a variety of cellular responses. These may be significant for radiation protection but also for radiation therapy using heavy ions. Charged particle microbeams for radiobiological application provide a unique means to address these issues by allowing the precise irradiation of single cells with a counted numbers of ions. Here, we focus specifically on heavy ion microbeam facilities currently in use for biological purposes, describing their technical features and biological results. Typically, ion species up to argon are used for targeted biological irradiation at the vertically collimated microbeam at JAEA (Takasaki, Japan). At the SNAKE microprobe in Munich, mostly oxygen ions have been used in a horizontal focused beam line for cell targeting. At GSI (Darmstadt), a horizontal microprobe with a focused beam for defined targeting using ion species up to uranium is operational. The visualization of DNA damage response proteins relocalizing to defined sites of ion traversal has been accomplished at the three heavy ion microbeam facilities described above and is used to study mechanistic aspects of heavy ion effects. However, bystander studies have constituted the main focus of biological applications. While for cell inactivation and effects on cell cycle progression a response of non-targeted cells has been described at JAEA and GSI, respectively, in part controversial results have been obtained for the induction of DNA damage measured by double-strand formation or at the cytogenetic level. The results emphasize the influence of the cellular environment, and standardization of experimental conditions for cellular studies at different facilities as well as the investigation of bystander effects in tissue will be the aims of future

  20. A capstone teaching project for undergraduate nursing students: development of a visual teaching-learning tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Carol D

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an original teaching-learning capstone project designed to promote active learning by senior nursing students as they transition to professional practice. The centerpiece of the capstone experience is the creation of a three-dimensional educational tool called a Visual Project, which addresses the learning needs of patients, their families, or the nursing staff. Students create their project during the spring semester of their senior year, when they are paired with an experienced, baccalaureate-prepared nurse preceptor. Students present their projects to both the nursing unit in which they worked and the faculty and students of the nursing school. Students consistently express a sense of accomplishment when they present their projects and recognize that they themselves have undergone the same teaching-learning process that was the focus of their project.

  1. Experience of Integrating Various Technological Tools into the Study and Future Teaching of Mathematics Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorev, Dvora; Gurevich-Leibman, Irina

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents our experience of integrating technological tools into our mathematics teaching (in both disciplinary and didactic courses) for student-teachers. In the first cycle of our study, a variety of technological tools were used (e.g., dynamic software, hypertexts, video and applets) in teaching two disciplinary mathematics courses.…

  2. Developments of the teaching material and the teaching tool Structure and Performance of the handmade Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    竹下, 俊治; 向, 平和

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, five types of handmade microscopes were developed for the basic tool of the biology class. They were the paste lens type, the glass bead type, the marble-magnifier type, the loupe-loupe type and the paper craft type. Most of the materials of these microscopes were able to obtain from the Do-it-yourself stores or the miscellaneous daily goods stores. The processes of making microscopes are effective teaching materials for understanding about structure and function of the ...

  3. The Effect of Using a Visual Representation Tool in a Teaching-Learning Sequence for Teaching Newton's Third Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinainen, Antti; Mäkynen, Asko; Nieminen, Pasi; Viiri, Jouni

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a research-based teaching-learning sequence (TLS) that focuses on the notion of interaction in teaching Newton's third law (N3 law) which is, as earlier studies have shown, a challenging topic for students to learn. The TLS made systematic use of a visual representation tool--an interaction diagram (ID)--highlighting…

  4. The use of multiple tools for teaching medical biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sé, Alexandre B; Passos, Renato M; Ono, André H; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2008-03-01

    In this work, we describe the use of several strategies employing the philosophies of active learning and problem-based learning (PBL) that may be used to improve the teaching of metabolic biochemistry to medical and nutritional undergraduate students. The main activities are as follows: 1) a seminar/poster system in a mini-congress format (using topics of applied biochemistry); 2) a true/false applied biochemistry exam (written by peer tutors); 3) a 9-h exam on metabolism (based in real publications); 4) the Advanced Biochemistry course (directed to peer tutors, where students learn how to read and criticize real medical papers); 5) experiments about nutrition and metabolism, using students as volunteers, and about free radicals (real science for students); 6) the BioBio blog (taking advantage of the "web age," this enhances out of class exchanges of information between the professor, students, and peer tutors); 7) student lectures on public health issues and metabolic disorders directed to the community and lay people; and 8) the BioBio quiz show. The main objective of these activities is to provide students with a more practical and interesting approach to biochemistry, such as the application of theoretical knowledge to real situations (diseases, experiments, media information, and scientific discoveries). In addition, we emphasize the importance of peer tutor activities for optimized learning of both students and peer tutors, the importance of a closer interaction between students and teaching staff, and the necessity to initiate students precociously in two broad fields of medical activity: "real" basic science and contact with the public (also helping students--future doctors and nutritionists--to be able to communicate with lay people). Most activities were evaluated by the students through written questionnaires and informal conversations, along various semesters, indicating good acceptance and approval of these methods. Good student scores in the

  5. A novel three-dimensional tool for teaching human neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez, Maureen E; Lindgren, Kristen A; Bergethon, Peter R

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) visualization of neuroanatomy can be challenging for medical students. This knowledge is essential in order for students to correlate cross-sectional neuroanatomy and whole brain specimens within neuroscience curricula and to interpret clinical and radiological information as clinicians or researchers. This study implemented and evaluated a new tool for teaching 3D neuroanatomy to first-year medical students at Boston University School of Medicine. Students were randomized into experimental and control classrooms. All students were taught neuroanatomy according to traditional 2D methods. Then, during laboratory review, the experimental group constructed 3D color-coded physical models of the periventricular structures, while the control group re-examined 2D brain cross-sections. At the end of the course, 2D and 3D spatial relationships of the brain and preferred learning styles were assessed in both groups. The overall quiz scores for the experimental group were significantly higher than the control group (t(85) = 2.02, P higher in the experimental group (F₁(,)₈₅ = 5.48, P = 0.02). When surveyed, 84% of students recommended repeating the 3D activity for future laboratories, and this preference was equally distributed across preferred learning styles (χ² = 0.14, n.s.). Our results suggest that our 3D physical modeling activity is an effective method for teaching spatial relationships of brain anatomy and will better prepare students for visualization of 3D neuroanatomy, a skill essential for higher education in neuroscience, neurology, and neurosurgery. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Anatomists.

  6. The Quantum Atomic Model "Electronium": A Successful Teaching Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Marion; Niedderer, Hans; Scott, Philip; Leach, John

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the quantum atomic model Electronium. Outlines the Bremen teaching approach in which this model is used, and analyzes the learning of two students as they progress through the teaching unit. (Author/MM)

  7. Facilities as teaching tools: A transformative participatory professional development experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Eric A.

    Resource consumption continues to increase as the population grows. In order to secure a sustainable future, society must educate the next generation to become "sustainability natives." Schools play a pivotal role in educating a sustainability-literate society. However, a disconnect exists between the hidden curriculum of the built environment and the enacted curriculum. This study employs a transformative participatory professional development model to instruct teachers on how to use their school grounds as teaching tools for the purpose of helping students make explicit choices in energy consumption, materials use, and sustainable living. Incorporating a phenomenological perspective, this study considers the lived experience of two sustainability coordinators. Grounded theory provides an interpretational context for the participants' interactions with each other and the professional development process. Through a year long professional development experience - commencing with an intense, participatory two-day workshop -the participants discussed challenges they faced with integrating facilities into school curriculum and institutionalizing a culture of sustainability. Two major needs were identified in this study. For successful sustainability initiatives, a hybrid model that melds top-down and bottom-up approaches offers the requisite mix of administrative support, ground level buy-in, and excitement vis-a-vis sustainability. Second, related to this hybrid approach, K-12 sustainability coordinators ideally need administrative capabilities with access to decision making, while remaining connected to students in a meaningful way, either directly in the classroom, as a mentor, or through work with student groups and projects.

  8. Unique voices in harmony: Call-and-response to address race and physics teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Geraldine L.; White, Gary D.

    2017-09-01

    In the February 2016 issue of The Physics Teacher, we announced a call for papers on race and physics teaching. The response was muted at first, but has now grown to a respectable chorale-sized volume. As the manuscripts began to come in and the review process progressed, Geraldine Cochran graciously agreed to come on board as co-editor for this remarkable collection of papers, to be published throughout the fall of 2017 in TPT. Upon reviewing the original call and the responses from the physics community, the parallels between generating this collection and the grand call-and-response tradition became compelling. What follows is a conversation constructed by the co-editors that is intended to introduce the reader to the swell of voices that responded to the original call. The authors would like to thank Pam Aycock for providing many useful contributions to this editorial.

  9. Teaching Students How to Integrate and Assess Social Networking Tools in Marketing Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Regina Pefanis; Harich, Katrin R.

    2013-01-01

    This research is based on two studies that focus on teaching students how to integrate and assess social networking tools in marketing communications. Study 1 examines how students in marketing classes utilize social networking tools and explores their attitudes regarding the use of such tools for marketing communications. Study 2 focuses on an…

  10. Teaching Students How to Integrate and Assess Social Networking Tools in Marketing Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Regina Pefanis; Harich, Katrin R.

    2013-01-01

    This research is based on two studies that focus on teaching students how to integrate and assess social networking tools in marketing communications. Study 1 examines how students in marketing classes utilize social networking tools and explores their attitudes regarding the use of such tools for marketing communications. Study 2 focuses on an…

  11. Peer observation of teaching as a faculty development tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Peter B

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peer observation of Teaching involves observers providing descriptive feedback to their peers on learning and teaching practice as a means to improve quality of teaching. This study employed and assessed peer observation as a constructive, developmental process for members of a Pediatric Teaching Faculty. Methods This study describes how peer observation was implemented as part of a teaching faculty development program and how it was perceived by teachers. The PoT process was divided into 4 stages: pre-observation meeting, observation, post-observation feedback and reflection. Particular care was taken to ensure that teachers understood that the observation and feedback was a developmental and not an evaluative process. Twenty teachers had their teaching peer observed by trained Faculty members and gave an e-mail ‘sound-bite’ of their perceptions of the process. Teaching activities included lectures, problem-based learning, small group teaching, case-based teaching and ward-based teaching sessions. Results Teachers were given detailed verbal and written feedback based on the observer’s and students’ observations. Teachers’ perceptions were that PoT was useful and relevant to their teaching practice. Teachers valued receiving feedback and viewed PoT as an opportunity for insight and reflection. The process of PoT was viewed as non-threatening and teachers thought that PoT enhanced the quality of their teaching, promoted professional development and was critical for Faculty development. Conclusions This study demonstrated that PoT can be used in a constructive way to improve course content and delivery, to support and encourage medical teachers, and to reinforce good teaching.

  12. Journal Clubs as Teaching Tools for Geriatric Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aza Abdulla FRCP

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has accumulated in support of the role of Journal Clubs (JC as an effective educational tool especially in promoting critical appraisal skills, and improving knowledge of epidemiology and biostatistics. However, the educational underpinnings that inform the process and explain how learning occurs within the context of JCs have not been investigated. We conducted a qualitative study among the members of the geriatric JC to better understand the process of learning in a JC setting. We employed a two-step methodology starting with a nominal group technique and followed by one to one semi-structured interviews. The members of the JC were in various stages of their medical training, as well as attending physicians (consultants. This study confirms that the JC in geriatrics provides significant learning through its unique style. The JC may be envisaged as a community of practice offering learning experience even for senior physicians. The learning that occurs is enhanced by relating the content to real life clinical cases and through promoting group interaction, discussion and dialogue. The attending physicians added to the learning process by helping to link pieces of information together and demonstrating its relevance to clinical practice.

  13. Gel Scramble: An E-Tool for Teaching Molecular Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisham, William; Keller, Lani; Schottler, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    In this completely digital teaching module, students interpret the results of two separate procedures: a restriction endonuclease digestion, and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The first consists of matching restriction endonuclease digest protocols with images obtained from stained agarose gels. Students are given the sequence of six plasmid cDNAs, characteristics of the plasmid vector, and the endonuclease digest protocols, which specify the enzyme(s) used. Students calculate the expected lengths of digestion products using this information and free tools available on the web. Students learn how to read gels and then match their predicted fragment lengths to the digital images obtained from the gel electrophoresis of the cDNA digest. In the PCR experiment, students are given six cDNA sequences and six sets of primers. By querying NCBI BLAST, students can match the PCR fragments to the lengths of the predicted in silico PCR products. The ruse posed to students is that the gels were inadvertently mislabeled during processing. Although students know the experimental details, they do not know which gel goes with a given restriction endonuclease digest or PCR—they must deduce the answers. Because the gel images are from actual students’ experiments, the data sometimes result from mishandling/mislabeling or faulty protocol execution. The most challenging part of the exercise is to explain these errors. This latter aspect requires students to use critical thinking skills to explain aberrant outcomes. This entire exercise is available in a digital format and downloadable for free at http://mdcune.psych.ucla.edu/modules/gel. PMID:26240527

  14. How To Teach Common Characteristics of Machine Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanas, H. C.

    1970-01-01

    Organizes machine tools and machine operations into commonalities in order to help the student visualize and distinguish the common characteristics which exist between machine tools and operations. (GR)

  15. Teaching English as a Foreign Language: tools and resources for the modern TEFL teacher

    OpenAIRE

    Celia Morales Palma

    2016-01-01

    Teaching a foreign language is a tricky business, and it is not as straightforward as one could suspect. Even though you will be teaching something you have learnt during a life time, the way of teaching and the cultural differences you may encounter will make this a very tough task. In this article, useful tools and resources are presented. The aim is for this article to serve as a guide for new teachers of English as a Foreign Language (TEFL)

  16. The fact of ignorance: revisiting the Socratic method as a tool for teaching critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler, Douglas R; Romanelli, Frank

    2014-09-15

    Critical thinking, while highly valued as an ability of health care providers, remains a skill that many educators find difficult to teach. This review provides an analysis examining why current methods of teaching critical thinking to health care students (primarily medical and pharmacy students) often fail and describes a premise and potential utility of the Socratic method as a tool to teach critical thinking in health care education.

  17. Sharing Assumptions and Negotiating Boundaries: Coauthorship as a Tool for Teaching and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Cynthia J.; McCarthy, Mary-Claire; Briley, Bonnie L.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a tool for teaching and learning that helps develop needed communication and negotiation competencies in future administrators: coauthorship, or collaborative writing. Specifically, describes the use of coauthorship in two different educational leadership classes. (EV)

  18. Literary Fiction as a Tool for Teaching Social Theory and Critical Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christina D.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, I discuss the possibilities that emerge from using literary fiction as a tool for teaching social theory and critical consciousness. Focusing on data from a social theory course I taught in fall 2007, along with my experiences teaching social theory, I evaluate the utility of utilizing literary fiction in the social theory…

  19. Literary Fiction as a Tool for Teaching Social Theory and Critical Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christina D.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, I discuss the possibilities that emerge from using literary fiction as a tool for teaching social theory and critical consciousness. Focusing on data from a social theory course I taught in fall 2007, along with my experiences teaching social theory, I evaluate the utility of utilizing literary fiction in the social theory…

  20. Using Food as a Tool to Teach Science to 3rd Grade Students in Appalachian Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffrin, Melani W.; Hovland, Jana; Carraway-Stage, Virginia; McLeod, Sara; Duffrin, Christopher; Phillips, Sharon; Rivera, David; Saum, Diana; Johanson, George; Graham, Annette; Lee, Tammy; Bosse, Michael; Berryman, Darlene

    2010-01-01

    The Food, Math, and Science Teaching Enhancement Resource (FoodMASTER) Initiative is a compilation of programs aimed at using food as a tool to teach mathematics and science. In 2007 to 2008, a foods curriculum developed by professionals in nutrition and education was implemented in 10 3rd-grade classrooms in Appalachian Ohio; teachers in these…

  1. The Use of Cartoons as a Teaching Tool in Middle School Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hoyun

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on examining the use of mathematical cartoons as a teaching tool in middle school mathematics classroom. A mixed methods research design was used to answer how the use of cartoon activities affects teacher and student perceptions of teaching and learning and student intrinsic motivation, interest, and mathematics anxiety…

  2. Web-based simulation: a tool for teaching critical care nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Sayonara de Fatima Faria; Marin,Heimar de Fatima

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop, to implement and to evaluate a web-based simulation for critical care nursing, as a tool for teaching nursing students at the undergraduate level. An adapted methodology was used to develop teaching material in a web-based learning environment, consisting of three evaluation phases (ergonomic, pedagogical and usability), carried out by web-designers/programmers, nursing teachers/nurses, and undergraduate nursing students. The research tools used w...

  3. Establishing a Web-Based DICOM Teaching File Authoring Tool Using Open-Source Public Software

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Wen-Jeng; Yang, Chung-Yi; Liu, Kao-Lang; Liu, Hon-Man; Ching, Yu-Tai; Chen, Shyh-Jye

    2005-01-01

    Online teaching files are an important source of educational and referential materials in the radiology community. The commonly used Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) file format of the radiology community is not natively supported by common Web browsers. The ability of the Web server to convert and parse DICOM is important when the DICOM-converting tools are not available. In this paper, we describe our approach to develop a Web-based teaching file authoring tool. Our se...

  4. The importance of showing technological tools (like Cmap Tools to future teachers to improve their teaching practice in school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio CRISOL MOYA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Concept maps have proved to be an efficient tool for learning (Novak & Gowin, 1984 but also without the pretext of making a classification, one could say that has also been found useful to: identify students’ prior knowledge, summarizing what has been learned, note taking, help in the study, plan, build scaffolding for understanding, strengthen educational experiences, improve conditions for effective learning, promote critical thinking, support cooperation and collaboration, organize content (Cañas & Badilla, 2005; Coffey et al., 2003. In this study, we show the opinions concerning the use of Cmap Tools as a tool for making concept maps for their future practice as teachers in primary education, students of second year of teaching at the University of Granada. The research was based on the quantitative perspective, being the instrument used, a questionnaire released by one hand, the students’ opinion on the use of the methodology used: group activity and selfemployment, and the application of the tool Cmap Tools, and collect other personal and academic satisfaction of students involved in this experience. As for the extracted views emphasized that although student teachers feel that using technology in their classes, can be a strategy that promotes the teaching and learning, as claimed on this experience, it is true that students who do not coexist think so, hence it is necessary to strengthen this small percentage use of technological tools in teaching.

  5. Teaching Advanced Data Analysis Tools to High School Astronomy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David V.; Herring, Julie; Hintz, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    A major barrier to becoming an astronomer is learning how to analyze astronomical data, such as using photometry to compare the brightness of stars. Most fledgling astronomers learn observation, data reduction, and analysis skills through an upper division college class. If the same skills could be taught in an introductory high school astronomy class, then more students would have an opportunity to do authentic science earlier, with implications for how many choose to become astronomers. Several software tools have been developed that can analyze astronomical data ranging from fairly straightforward (AstroImageJ and DS9) to very complex (IRAF and DAOphot). During the summer of 2014, a study was undertaken at Brigham Young University through a Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program to evaluate the effectiveness and ease-of-use of these four software packages. Standard tasks tested included creating a false-color IR image using WISE data in DS9, Adobe Photoshop, and The Gimp; a multi-aperture analyses of variable stars over time using AstroImageJ; creating Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of stars using photometry at multiple wavelengths in AstroImageJ and DS9; and color-magnitude and hydrogen alpha index diagrams for open star clusters using IRAF and DAOphot. Tutorials were then written and combined with screen captures to teach high school astronomy students at Walden School of Liberal Arts in Provo, UT how to perform these same tasks. They analyzed image data using the four software packages, imported it into Microsoft Excel, and created charts using images from BYU's 36-inch telescope at their West Mountain Observatory. The students' attempts to complete these tasks were observed, mentoring was provided, and the students then reported on their experience through a self-reflection essay and concept test. Results indicate that high school astronomy students can successfully complete professional-level astronomy data analyses when given detailed

  6. Visualization in simulation tools: requirements and a tool specification to support the teaching of dynamic biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Katarina M; Haddow, Pauline C

    2011-08-01

    Simulation tools are playing an increasingly important role behind advances in the field of systems biology. However, the current generation of biological science students has either little or no experience with such tools. As such, this educational glitch is limiting both the potential use of such tools as well as the potential for tighter cooperation between the designers and users. Although some simulation tool producers encourage their use in teaching, little attempt has hitherto been made to analyze and discuss their suitability as an educational tool for noncomputing science students. In general, today's simulation tools assume that the user has a stronger mathematical and computing background than that which is found in most biological science curricula, thus making the introduction of such tools a considerable pedagogical challenge. This paper provides an evaluation of the pedagogical attributes of existing simulation tools for cell signal transduction based on Cognitive Load theory. Further, design recommendations for an improved educational simulation tool are provided. The study is based on simulation tools for cell signal transduction. However, the discussions are relevant to a broader biological simulation tool set.

  7. Technology as Mediation Tool for Improving Teaching Profession in Higher Education Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinay-Gazi, Zehra; Altinay-Aksal, Fahriye

    2017-01-01

    Technology became a mediation tool for forming information and developing skills is teacher education programs of higher education institutions because technological tools can be used for self-reflection of prospective teachers' teaching performances. Practical implementation of teacher education programmes is a part of quality indicator in higher…

  8. Three-Dimensional Soil Landscape Modeling: A Potential Earth Science Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Brian M.; Manu, Andrew; Norton, Amy E.

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional visualization is helpful in understanding soils, and three dimensional (3-D) tools are gaining popularity in teaching earth sciences. Those tools are still somewhat underused in soil science, yet soil properties such as texture, color, and organic carbon content vary both vertically and horizontally across the landscape. These…

  9. Multicenter testing of a burn prevention teaching tool for Amish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieman, Mary T; Kagan, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Burn prevention is not taught in Amish schools despite significant cultural risks for burn injuries related to scalds, ignition of clothing, and ignition of highly flammable materials. A culturally appropriate and acceptable burn prevention teaching tool was previously developed and pilot-tested in one Amish school. The purpose of this study was to perform further evaluation of this burn prevention teaching tool for Amish children. Following institutional review board approval, private schools were recruited via invitation in Amish newsletters. A teaching tool, which includes a magnetic story board, burn safety curriculum, and test questions, was provided to each school. Teachers obtained parental permission and informed assent for the children to participate. Teaching was guided by the curriculum and involved arranging magnetic pieces to illustrate and tell stories about burn hazards. The children were challenged to rearrange the magnets for a safer situation. Pretests and posttests were used to capture baseline knowledge and measure improvement. Scores were expressed as a percentage of the 33 test items answered correctly. Teachers provided recommendations and a written evaluation of the tool's usefulness. The participants were 294 students from 15 private Amish schools across eight states. Test scores were significantly improved by the lessons, without regard to gender or grade groups. Teachers valued the tool and recommended no changes. This multicenter study demonstrated that a culturally appropriate burn prevention teaching tool was highly effective for improving burn prevention knowledge among Amish school children. These results support expansion of burn prevention education to other Amish communities.

  10. Unique ion filter: a data reduction tool for GC/MS data preprocessing prior to chemometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adutwum, L A; Harynuk, J J

    2014-08-01

    Using raw GC/MS data as the X-block for chemometric modeling has the potential to provide better classification models for complex samples when compared to using the total ion current (TIC), extracted ion chromatograms/profiles (EIC/EIP), or integrated peak tables. However, the abundance of raw GC/MS data necessitates some form of data reduction/feature selection to remove the variables containing primarily noise from the data set. Several algorithms for feature selection exist; however, due to the extreme number of variables (10(6)-10(8) variables per chromatogram), the feature selection time can be prolonged and computationally expensive. Herein, we present a new prefilter for automated data reduction of GC/MS data prior to feature selection. This tool, termed unique ion filter (UIF), is a module that can be added after chromatographic alignment and prior to any subsequent feature selection algorithm. The UIF objectively reduces the number of irrelevant or redundant variables in raw GC/MS data, while preserving potentially relevant analytical information. In the m/z dimension, data are reduced from a full spectrum to a handful of unique ions for each chromatographic peak. In the time dimension, data are reduced to only a handful of scans around each peak apex. UIF was applied to a data set of GC/MS data for a variety of gasoline samples to be classified using partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) according to octane rating. It was also applied to a series of chromatograms from casework fire debris analysis to be classified on the basis of whether or not signatures of gasoline were detected. By reducing the overall population of candidate variables subjected to subsequent variable selection, the UIF reduced the total feature selection time for which a perfect classification of all validation data was achieved from 373 to 9 min (98% reduction in computing time). Additionally, the significant reduction in included variables resulted in a concomitant

  11. Body painting as a tool in clinical anatomy teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMenamin, Paul G

    2008-01-01

    The teaching of human anatomy has had to respond to significant changes in medical curricula, and it behooves anatomists to devise alternative strategies to effectively facilitate learning of the discipline by medical students in an integrated, applied, relevant, and contextual framework. In many medical schools, the lack of cadaver dissection as the primary method of learning is driving changes to more varied and novel learning and teaching methodologies. The present article describes the introduction and evaluation of a range of body painting exercises in a medical curriculum. Body painting was introduced into integrated clinical skills teaching sessions which included clinically important aspects of respiratory system, musculoskeletal system, and topics in regional anatomy including head and neck. Nontoxic body paints, easels, a mixture of brush sizes, and anatomical images were supplied. Students were allowed between 20 and 40 min to complete body painting tasks, in which they were encouraged to alternate between painting and acting as a model. Students were encouraged to use life-like rendering and coloration where appropriate. Evaluation of these sessions was performed at the end of the semester as part of a larger evaluation process. The kinesthetic nature and active participation together with the powerful visual images of underlying anatomy appear to contribute to the value of body painting as a teaching exercise. In addition, it may have the added bonus of helping break down apprehension regarding peer-peer examination. Some practical advice on introducing this method of teaching in medical curricula based on the outcomes of the evaluation is given. On the basis of our experience and student feedback, we strongly advocate the use of body painting as an adjunct to surface anatomy and clinical skills teaching classes.

  12. Evaluation of The Virtual Cells Software: a Teaching Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.P. da Silva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies show that the use of games and interactive materials  at schools is a good educational strategy, motivating students to create mental  outlines and developing the reasoning and facilitating  the learn- ing. In this context, the Scientific Dissemination Coordination of the Center  for Structural Molecular Biotechnology  (CBME,  developed  a series of educational materials  destined  to the  elementary and high  schools,  universities  and  general  public.   Among  these,  we highlighted  the  Virtual  Cells soft- ware that was developed  with  the  aim of helping  in the  understanding of the  basic concepts  of cell types,  their  structures, organelles  and  specific functions.   Characterized by its  interactive  interface, this  software shows eukaryotes  and prokaryotes cells images, where organelles are shown as dynamic structures. In addition, it presents exercises in another  step that reinforce the comprehension  of Cy- tology.  A speaker  narrates the  resources  offered by the  program  and  the  necessary  steps  for its use. During  the  stage  of development of the  software,  students and  teachers of public and  private  high schools from Sao Carlos  city, Sao Paulo  State,  were invited  to register their  opinions  regarding  the language and content of the software in order to help us in the improvement of it.  After this stage, the Scientific Dissemination Coordination of CBME organized a series of workshops, where 120 individuals evaluated the software (students and teachers  of high school and others undergraduate students. For this evaluation, a questionnaire was elaborated based on the international current literature in the area of sciences teaching  and it was applied  after the interactive section with the software.  The analysis of the results demonstrated that most of the individuals  considered the software of easy

  13. Cooperative Learning as a Tool To Teach Vertebrate Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, John L.; Perigo, Nan

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for teaching biology that includes more investigative exercises that foster an environment for cooperative learning in introductory laboratories that focus on vertebrates. Fosters collaborative learning by facilitating interaction between students as they become experts on their representative vertebrate structures. (SAH)

  14. Prolog as a Teaching Tool for Relational Database Interrogation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, P. A.; Samson, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    The use of the Prolog programing language is promoted as the language to use by anyone teaching a course in relational databases. A short introduction to Prolog is followed by a series of examples of queries. Several references are noted for anyone wishing to gain a deeper understanding. (MP)

  15. Microsoft Excel as a Tool for Teaching Basic Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, C. Bruce; Meehan, Anita M.

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the use of Microsoft Excel in introductory statistics courses. Discusses the benefits of using a spreadsheet application for teaching statistics and why Excel is a good choice. Examines student reactions to Excel in introductory statistics courses using a survey method. (CMK)

  16. Teachers' Perception Regarding Facial Expressions as an Effective Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Muhammad Naeem; Iqbal, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    The major objective of the study was to explore teachers' perceptions about the importance of facial expression in the teaching-learning process. All the teachers of government secondary schools constituted the population of the study. A sample of 40 teachers, both male and female, in rural and urban areas of district Peshawar, were selected…

  17. Teaching Gratitude: Tools for Inner Peace and Happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Cathleen

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to serve as a framework for lessons and experiences in grateful living. The objectives in teaching gratitude are to give children opportunities: (1) to create experiences that cultivate an awareness of abundance; (2) to experience and appreciate simple pleasures; (3) to understand how others contribute to a sense of…

  18. Developing Evaluative Tool for Online Learning and Teaching Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksal, Fahriye A.

    2011-01-01

    The research study aims to underline the development of a new scale on online learning and teaching process based on factor analysis. Further to this, the research study resulted in acceptable scale which embraces social interaction role, interaction behaviour, barriers, capacity for interaction, group interaction as sub-categories to evaluate…

  19. Body Painting as a Tool in Clinical Anatomy Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMenamin, Paul G.

    2008-01-01

    The teaching of human anatomy has had to respond to significant changes in medical curricula, and it behooves anatomists to devise alternative strategies to effectively facilitate learning of the discipline by medical students in an integrated, applied, relevant, and contextual framework. In many medical schools, the lack of cadaver dissection as…

  20. Games as teaching tools in a surgical residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meterissian, Sarkis; Liberman, Moishe; McLeod, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Didactic lectures have been the mainstay of core teaching in the surgical residency program at our school. Our concerns about the educational impact of these passive activities led us to consider more interactive teaching approaches. We developed an interactive games-based approach to learning. One set of games was labeled "Who wants to be a Surgeon" (WS) and the other was called "Senior Face-off" (SF). We evaluated the impact of this innovation using an end-of-year questionnaire. Enjoyment, teaching quality and preference over lectures were high for both games. However, the WS sparked interest significantly more in junior residents (4.3 +/- 0.21 vs 3.3 +/- 0.31, p = 0.015) and senior residents found both games more stressful than did junior residents (WS: 2.88 +/- 0.32 vs 2.00 +/- 0.21, p = 0.038, and SF: 3.54 +/- 0.29 vs 1.80 +/- 0.33, p = 0.001). This innovative teaching technique promoted learner interest and was regarded as a worthwhile educational activity. Games with a competitive emphasis may unduly stress senior residents.

  1. Tools and methods for teaching magnetic resonance concepts and techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, L.G.

    2012-01-01

    Teaching of MRI methodology can be challenging for teachers as well as students. To support student learning, two graphical simulators for exploration of basic magnetic resonance principles are here introduced. The first implements a simple compass needle analogy implemented for day one of NMR...

  2. Computers as Teaching Tools: Some Examples and Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beins, Bernard C.

    The use of computers in the classroom has been touted as an important innovation in education. This article features some recently developed software for use in teaching psychology and different approaches to classroom computer use. Uses of software packages for psychological research designs are included as are applications and limitations of…

  3. Teaching Style and Attitudes towards Facebook as an Educational Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Julie

    2014-01-01

    There is a distinct lack of research that has considered university staff use of and attitudes towards Facebook. The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of how teaching staff at one UK university use Facebook, and their attitudes towards Facebook and online professionalism, in terms of the student-staff relationship. An online survey…

  4. Cooperative Learning as a Tool To Teach Vertebrate Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, John L.; Perigo, Nan

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for teaching biology that includes more investigative exercises that foster an environment for cooperative learning in introductory laboratories that focus on vertebrates. Fosters collaborative learning by facilitating interaction between students as they become experts on their representative vertebrate structures. (SAH)

  5. Teaching Style and Attitudes towards Facebook as an Educational Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Julie

    2014-01-01

    There is a distinct lack of research that has considered university staff use of and attitudes towards Facebook. The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of how teaching staff at one UK university use Facebook, and their attitudes towards Facebook and online professionalism, in terms of the student-staff relationship. An online survey…

  6. Immersive virtual reality as a teaching tool for neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepan, Katelyn; Zeiger, Joshua; Hanchuk, Stephanie; Del Signore, Anthony; Shrivastava, Raj; Govindaraj, Satish; Iloreta, Alfred

    2017-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer modeling and interactive virtual reality (VR) simulation are validated teaching techniques used throughout medical disciplines. Little objective data exists supporting its use in teaching clinical anatomy. Learner motivation is thought to limit the rate of utilization of such novel technologies. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness, satisfaction, and motivation associated with immersive VR simulation in teaching medical students neuroanatomy. Images of normal cerebral anatomy were reconstructed from human Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) computed tomography (CT) imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) into 3D VR formats compatible with the Oculus Rift VR System, a head-mounted display with tracking capabilities allowing for an immersive VR experience. The ventricular system and cerebral vasculature were highlighted and labeled to create a focused interactive model. We conducted a randomized controlled study with 66 medical students (33 in both the control and experimental groups). Pertinent neuroanatomical structures were studied using either online textbooks or the VR interactive model, respectively. We then evaluated the students' anatomy knowledge, educational experience, and motivation (using the Instructional Materials Motivation Survey [IMMS], a previously validated assessment). There was no significant difference in anatomy knowledge between the 2 groups on preintervention, postintervention, or retention quizzes. The VR group found the learning experience to be significantly more engaging, enjoyable, and useful (all p teaching neuroanatomy. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  7. Going Online with Protocols: New Tools for Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Joseph P.; Zydney, Janet Mannheimer; Dichter, Alan; McDonald, Elizabeth C.

    2012-01-01

    Many users of the popular professional development book, "The Power of Protocols," discovered that protocols are also very useful for online teaching. This new book, by three of the same authors, focuses on using protocols to enhance learning with their students in multiple environments including online--a growing sector of the educational world.…

  8. Tools for Assessing Readability of Statistics Teaching Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Lawrence; Wagler, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This article provides tools and rationale for instructors in math and science to make their assessment and curriculum materials (more) readable for students. The tools discussed (MSWord, LexTutor, Coh-Metrix TEA) are readily available linguistic analysis applications that are grounded in current linguistic theory, but present output that can…

  9. An Observation Tool for EFL Reading Comprehension Teaching Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Nienke; de Bot, Kees; van de Grift, Wim; Jansen, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The present study addresses the validation process of an observation tool for measuring the range of processes in which a teacher is involved when helping secondary school EFL learners comprehend reading input and when facilitating meaningful language output. The observation tool will be used in a p

  10. Scratch as a Computational Modelling Tool for Teaching Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Victor; Hernandez, Maria Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The Scratch online authoring tool, which features a simple programming language that has been adapted to primary and secondary students, is being used more and more in schools as it offers students and teachers the opportunity to use a tool to build scientific models and evaluate their behaviour, just as can be done with computational modelling…

  11. An Observation Tool for EFL Reading Comprehension Teaching Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Nienke; de Bot, Kees; van de Grift, Wim; Jansen, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The present study addresses the validation process of an observation tool for measuring the range of processes in which a teacher is involved when helping secondary school EFL learners comprehend reading input and when facilitating meaningful language output. The observation tool will be used in a

  12. Scratch as a Computational Modelling Tool for Teaching Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Victor; Hernandez, Maria Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The Scratch online authoring tool, which features a simple programming language that has been adapted to primary and secondary students, is being used more and more in schools as it offers students and teachers the opportunity to use a tool to build scientific models and evaluate their behaviour, just as can be done with computational modelling…

  13. Making Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching Explicit: A Lesson Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Julia M.; Zavala, Maria del Rosario

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, there is a need for pedagogical tools that help teachers develop essential pedagogical content knowledge and practices to meet the mathematical education needs of a growing culturally and linguistically diverse student population. In this article, we introduce an innovative lesson analysis tool that focuses on integrating…

  14. Making Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching Explicit: A Lesson Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Julia M.; Zavala, Maria del Rosario

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, there is a need for pedagogical tools that help teachers develop essential pedagogical content knowledge and practices to meet the mathematical education needs of a growing culturally and linguistically diverse student population. In this article, we introduce an innovative lesson analysis tool that focuses on integrating…

  15. Tools for Assessing Readability of Statistics Teaching Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Lawrence; Wagler, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This article provides tools and rationale for instructors in math and science to make their assessment and curriculum materials (more) readable for students. The tools discussed (MSWord, LexTutor, Coh-Metrix TEA) are readily available linguistic analysis applications that are grounded in current linguistic theory, but present output that can…

  16. Basic Burns Management E-Learning: A New Teaching Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egro, Francesco M

    2016-11-11

    Burns teaching is organized only in a few medical schools in the United Kingdom. An e-learning tutorial was developed with the objective of incorporating burns teaching within the medical school curriculum. A 33-webpage e-learning was created, covering topics such as local and general response to burns, assessment of burns, first aid, primary and secondary survey, and referral guidelines. Medical student satisfaction was then evaluated using a 12-question feedback survey rated based on a Likert scale from 1 (very poor) to 5 (very good). The 12-question survey was completed by a total of 18 medical students ranging from second to fourth years (second = 17%, third = 22%, fourth = 61%). While only a couple of students had received prior burns teaching, 50% of the cohort had an interest to pursue surgery as a career. The majority of students (72%) would be interested to have an e-learning module on basic burns management in their medical curriculum. The means of all domains specific to the e-learning were rated as "good" or "very good." Students' rating for ease of use was 87%, usefulness was 88%, relevance to the medical curriculum was 90%, clarity and quality of content were 78% and 83%, respectively, design was 79%, and the overall satisfaction with this e-learning was 87%. The "Basic Burns Management" e-learning tutorial can provide an efficient and effective means of information delivery to medical students and junior doctors, allowing easy and fast incorporation of burns teaching within the medical curriculum and in other medical teaching settings.

  17. The Use of Video Games as a Teaching Tool to Improve Teaching-Learning: State of the Art Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angie Paola Roncancio-Ortiz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this new era of the 21st century when societies are constantly changing, education is the cornerstone to provide the people not only with the basic knowledge and tools, but also with the required skills for facing the challenges in a globalized world. Thus, video games have evolved from distractive activities, to more valuable tools. These tools can play a leading role in education-related processes, for example, supporting teaching tasks. The aim of this article is to present a state of art review on several particular experiences in which video games have been incorporated into teaching and learning activities. As a result, video games can be used as didactic mechanisms that help students, among other things, to solve learning problems, to improve motor and cognitive skills, and to foster creativity.

  18. Scratch as a computational modelling tool for teaching physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Victor; Hernandez, Maria Isabel

    2015-05-01

    The Scratch online authoring tool, which features a simple programming language that has been adapted to primary and secondary students, is being used more and more in schools as it offers students and teachers the opportunity to use a tool to build scientific models and evaluate their behaviour, just as can be done with computational modelling programs. In this article, we briefly discuss why Scratch could be a useful tool for computational modelling in the primary or secondary physics classroom, and we present practical examples of how it can be used to build a model.

  19. Visual advertisements: a tool for English language teaching?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babocká Mária

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Advertising as one of the phenomena of modern times is often an inseparable, though undesirable part of our everyday lives. Current trends indicate that there are still more and more anglicisms, internationalisms, and particles of different cultures penetrating billboard advertisements in many towns and cities around the world, and Slovakia is no exception. The crucial question of this article is: How is it possible to use advertisements in English language teaching and learning? To answer this question, the examination is focused on: (1 defining the role and characteristic traits of advertisements; (2 searching for the linkage between the psychological principles of advertising and psychology of learning foreign languages; (3 the frequency of anglicisms and internationalisms in billboard advertisements in particular areas of selected Slovak cities; (4 concrete suggestions for teaching practice based on the previous findings.

  20. Teaching Pharmacology in 2010--new knowledge, new tools, new attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Ian

    2003-11-01

    Changes in pharmacology teaching are being driven by various pressures. These originate: from changes in the discipline itself; from government; from professional bodies; from students; from changes in teaching styles and opportunities; from academic staff; from ethical/animal rights considerations; from employers and from higher education institutions. These changes will require an alteration in the knowledge, skills and attitudes of academic pharmacologists as much as they will require changes in the way teaching is delivered and learning is facilitated. Pharmacology courses will be provided in a changed environment and must prepare students to work in a changed discipline as well as being appropriate for students who will take employment in non-pharmacology areas. Change is likely to centre around the curriculum, problem based learning, simulated practicals, peer assessment, use of the internet, information technology and interactive computer based learning, virtual learning environments and integrated medical courses. The most effective strategy to achieve the necessary changes is likely to involve collaboration between pharmacology teachers on a global scale and a general consciousness among current academic pharmacologists that we need to ensure tomorrow's academics are well prepared for the changed environment in which they will have to work.

  1. Tool Support for Collaborative Teaching and Learning of Object-Oriented Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius; Ratzer, Anne Vinter

    2002-01-01

    Modeling is central to doing and learning object-oriented development. We present a new tool, Ideogramic UML, for gesture-based collaborative modeling with the Unified Modeling Language (UML), which can be used to collaboratively teach and learn modeling. Furthermore, we discuss how we have...... effectively used Ideogramic UML to teach object-oriented modeling and the UML to groups of students using the UML for project assignments....

  2. END-USER TRAINING ON DIGITAL TEACHING TOOLS: REACTION, LEARNING, BEHAVIOR, RESULTS, AND MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave E. Marcial

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The newly developed digital teaching tools, namely mobile class record application and portable learning management system were launched and distributed. This paper measures the evaluation rating of the region-wide end-user training on the classroom use and integration of the two digital teaching tools. A total of 74 trainees in Central Visayas, Philippines were trained. Using the New World Kirkpatrick Model, the trainees evaluated the training regarding reaction, learning, behavior, results, and management. The data show that the trainees rated the training with an overall mean of 3.70 described as “strongly agree.” The result implies that the end-user training on digital teaching tools is very successful and excellent.

  3. Female Teachers’ Perception of Reflective Teaching as a Teacher Development Tool in the Saudi Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Shukri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Teacher development in the EFL context has been well-established in Western educational institutions. However, although there are some limited studies in the Middle East, it is still under-researched in Saudi Arabia. This study investigates the EFL teachers’ perceptions of reflective teaching as a tool for teacher development and its challenges in higher education in Saudi Arabia. It also aims to raise teachers’ awareness of the importance of teacher development and its empowering impact in meeting their students’ needs. Based on a review of previous studies, the present study hypothesized a significant relevance between reflective teaching practice and the promotion of professional development. A structured questionnaire is used as a quantitative methodology followed by qualitative analysis of the findings. The findings support the hypothesis in which the participants’ views revealed a strong relationship between reflective teaching and professionalism in teaching. Finally, further recommendations that suggest methods of reflective teaching are proposed. 

  4. Teaching Spanish as a foreign language: tools and resources for the modern ELE teacher

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Teaching a foreign language is a tricky business, and it is not as straightforward as one could suspect. Even though you will be teaching something you have learnt during a life time, the way of teaching and the cultural differences you may encounter will make this a very tough task. In this article, useful tools and resources are presented. The aim is for this article to serve as a guide for new teachers of ELE (Español como Lengua Extranjera, Spanish as a foreign language). 

  5. Goal-Setting as a Teaching and Evaluation Tool in Student Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofer, Gillian

    1981-01-01

    Analyzes 399 stated goals of participants in four separate student-teaching seminars. Evaluation revealed a correspondence with Snyder and Anderson's seven subsystems of teacher proficiency. Goal-setting assignments before student teaching experience, a follow-up self-evaluation, and analysis appear to have value for student growth and department…

  6. A novel educational tool for teaching ocular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Ms; Montgomery, J; Atta, Hr

    2011-01-01

    Ocular ultrasound is now in increasing demand in routine ophthalmic clinical practice not only because it is noninvasive but also because of ever-advancing technology providing higher resolution imaging. It is however a difficult branch of ophthalmic investigations to grasp, as it requires a high skill level to interface with the technology and provide accurate interpretation of images for ophthalmic diagnosis and management. It is even more labor intensive to teach ocular ultrasound to another fellow clinician. One of the fundamental skills that proved difficult to learn and teach is the need for the examiner to "mentally convert" 2-dimensional B-scan images into 3-dimensional (3D) interpretations. An additional challenge is the requirement to carry out this task in real time. We have developed a novel approach to teach ocular ultrasound by using a novel 3D ocular model. A 3D virtual model is built using widely available, open source, software. The model is then used to generate movie clips simulating different movements and orientations of the scanner head. Using Blender, Quicktime motion clips are choreographed and collated into interactive quizzes and other pertinent pedagogical media. The process involves scripting motion vectors, rotation, and tracking of both the virtual stereo camera and the model. The resulting sequence is then rendered for twinned right- and left-eye views. Finally, the twinned views are synchronized and combined in a format compatible with the stereo projection apparatus. This new model will help the student with spatial awareness and allow for assimilation of this awareness into clinical practice. It will also help with grasping the nomenclature used in ocular ultrasound as well as helping with localization of lesions and obtaining the best possible images for echographic diagnosis, accurate measurements, and reporting.

  7. A Digital Tool Supporting Goal-Oriented Teaching in Classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten; Bundsgaard, Jeppe; Slot, Marie Falkesgaard

    2015-01-01

    of classroom data for efficient teaching (Earl and Fullan 2003). Learning goals are supposed to support the students’ pace and sense of progression, inform classroom decisions, structure teachers’ planning, and support the dialogue between teachers, students, and parents (Hattie 2009). Based on these concerns......, we have developed a technology called “The Goal Arrow.” The Goal Arrow aims to support teachers in creating lesson plans, setting associated situated learning objectives, relating these to the national curriculum, and specifying indicators of learning and progression. The objectives and specific...

  8. A novel educational tool for teaching ocular ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa MS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available MS Mustafa1, J Montgomery2, HR Atta11Department of Ophthalmology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, UK; 2Medi-CAL, College of Life Sciences and Medicine, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen, UKAbstract: Ocular ultrasound is now in increasing demand in routine ophthalmic clinical practice not only because it is noninvasive but also because of ever-advancing technology providing higher resolution imaging. It is however a difficult branch of ophthalmic investigations to grasp, as it requires a high skill level to interface with the technology and provide accurate interpretation of images for ophthalmic diagnosis and management. It is even more labor intensive to teach ocular ultrasound to another fellow clinician. One of the fundamental skills that proved difficult to learn and teach is the need for the examiner to “mentally convert” 2-dimensional B-scan images into 3-dimensional (3D interpretations. An additional challenge is the requirement to carry out this task in real time. We have developed a novel approach to teach ocular ultrasound by using a novel 3D ocular model. A 3D virtual model is built using widely available, open source, software. The model is then used to generate movie clips simulating different movements and orientations of the scanner head. Using Blender, Quicktime motion clips are choreographed and collated into interactive quizzes and other pertinent pedagogical media. The process involves scripting motion vectors, rotation, and tracking of both the virtual stereo camera and the model. The resulting sequence is then rendered for twinned right- and left-eye views. Finally, the twinned views are synchronized and combined in a format compatible with the stereo projection apparatus. This new model will help the student with spatial awareness and allow for assimilation of this awareness into clinical practice. It will also help with grasping the nomenclature used in ocular ultrasound as well as helping with localization of

  9. Tools and methods for teaching magnetic resonance concepts and techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars G.

    2012-01-01

    Teaching of MRI methodology can be challenging for teachers as well as students. To support student learning, two graphical simulators for exploration of basic magnetic resonance principles are here introduced. The first implements a simple compass needle analogy implemented for day one of NMR an...... RF interactions, relaxation, weighting, echoes, imaging principles and more. Both simulators run in almost any browser without installation of software, but are also freely available for download. Example uses are documented in a series of short videos available on YouTube....

  10. BRB-ArrayTools Data Archive for Human Cancer Gene Expression: A Unique and Efficient Data Sharing Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Simon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The explosion of available microarray data on human cancer increases the urgency for developing methods for effectively sharing this data among clinical cancer investigators. Lack of a smooth interface between the databases and statistical analysis tools limits the potential benefits of sharing the publicly available microarray data. To facilitate the efficient sharing and use of publicly available microarray data among cancer investigators, we have built a BRB-ArrayTools Data Archive including over one hundred human cancer microarray projects for 28 cancer types. Expression array data and clinical descriptors have been imported into BRB-ArrayTools and are stored as BRB-ArrayTools project folders on the archive. The data archive can be accessed from: http://linus.nci.nih.gov/~brb/DataArchive.html Our BRB-ArrayTools data archive and GEO importer represent ongoing efforts to provide effective tools for efficiently sharing and utilizing human cancer microarray data.

  11. THE USE OF MULTIPLE TOOLS FOR TEACHING MEDICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Sé

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The pros and cons of Problem Based Learning (PBL have been extensivelydiscussed in the literature. We describe PBL-like strategies used at UnB (some ofthem since 1999 that may be useful elsewhere to improve undergraduatebiochemistry teaching with clinical applications. The main activities are: (i aseminar/poster system, (ii a true-or-false applied biochemistry exam (prepared bypeer tutors, (iii a 9-hour-exam on metabolism (based in actual papers, (iv anAdvanced Biochemistry course (directed to peer tutors, (v pizza-and-pasta (formetabolism teaching and free radicals (real science for students experiments,(vi the BioBio blog (http://www.biobio-unb.blogspot.com, (vii student lectures onhealth issues directed to the community, and (viii the BioBio Show. The mainobjective of these activities is providing students with a more practical andentertaining approach to biochemistry using philosophic PBL principles such asthe application of basic knowledge to real situations (diseases, experiments andscientific discoveries. We also emphasize (a the importance of peer-tutor activityfor optimized learning of students and peer tutors, (b the relevance of a closerinteraction between students and professors, and (c the necessity to initiatestudents precociously in actual basic/medical science and contact with the public.Most activities have been evaluated by the students through written questionnairesand informal conversations, for several semesters, indicating good acceptanceand approval of these methods.

  12. Strategies for Using Repetition as a Powerful Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, Kirt

    2011-01-01

    Brain research indicates that repetition is of vital importance in the learning process. Repetition is an especially useful tool in the area of music education. The success of repetition can be enhanced by accurate and timely feedback. From "simple repetition" to "repetition with the addition or subtraction of degrees of freedom," there are many…

  13. Metaphors & Analogies: Power Tools for Teaching Any Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormeli, Rick

    2009-01-01

    Metaphors and analogies are more than figurative language suitable only for English classes and standardized test questions. They are "power tools" that can electrify learning in every subject and at all grade levels. Metaphors show students how to make connections between the concrete and the abstract, prior knowledge and unfamiliar concepts, and…

  14. Evaluation of Adobe[R] Presenter as a Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Adobe[R] Presenter software provides educators with a tool to create narrated distance learning presentations. This article describes Adobe[R] Presenter's many features and explains which most strongly affect learning. Six Adobe[R] Presenter trainings were presented to 62 volunteers preparing to provide information at a public outreach event. One…

  15. Strategies for Using Repetition as a Powerful Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, Kirt

    2011-01-01

    Brain research indicates that repetition is of vital importance in the learning process. Repetition is an especially useful tool in the area of music education. The success of repetition can be enhanced by accurate and timely feedback. From "simple repetition" to "repetition with the addition or subtraction of degrees of freedom," there are many…

  16. Modulated Chlorophyll "a" Fluorescence: A Tool for Teaching Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques da Silva, Jorge; Bernardes da Silva, Anabela; Padua, Mario

    2007-01-01

    "In vivo" chlorophyll "a" fluorescence is a key technique in photosynthesis research. The recent release of a low cost, commercial, modulated fluorometer enables this powerful technology to be used in education. Modulated chlorophyll a fluorescence measurement "in vivo" is here proposed as a tool to demonstrate basic…

  17. Evaluation of Adobe[R] Presenter as a Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Adobe[R] Presenter software provides educators with a tool to create narrated distance learning presentations. This article describes Adobe[R] Presenter's many features and explains which most strongly affect learning. Six Adobe[R] Presenter trainings were presented to 62 volunteers preparing to provide information at a public outreach event. One…

  18. Modulated Chlorophyll "a" Fluorescence: A Tool for Teaching Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques da Silva, Jorge; Bernardes da Silva, Anabela; Padua, Mario

    2007-01-01

    "In vivo" chlorophyll "a" fluorescence is a key technique in photosynthesis research. The recent release of a low cost, commercial, modulated fluorometer enables this powerful technology to be used in education. Modulated chlorophyll a fluorescence measurement "in vivo" is here proposed as a tool to demonstrate basic photosynthesis phenomena to…

  19. EVALUATING TEACHING PERFORMANCE. FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE USING STATISTICAL TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARE CODRUTA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The teaching performance is influenced firstly by the quality of the educational system. The universities are trying to raise the expectations regarding the methods used for evaluating the teaching quality. In order for the results to be as much as credible the evaluation must defer to the existing theory and to follow the standardized procedures, starting from some basic principles. The most used framework is represented by the 3P model which contains three parts: 1. The input (factors that come under the students and the professor 2. The learning process (activities focused on learning, teaching methods, practical ability, individual study 3. The outcome (the output of the learning process.This study presents some results of a questionnaire based on the existing economic theory and applied to a sample of master business students from Romania. The students were asked to give grades from 1 to 5 to several aspects related to the educational process. These aspects took into consideration the following: if the didactic activity was interesting for the students/ the relationship between the objectives of the course and the activity evolved/ the clarity of the presentations/ the degree of students' participation required by the teacher/ the methods and materials used/ the availability of the teacher. The average grade is 4.39, indicating a very high level of satisfaction, taking into account that the grades ranged from 1 to 5. For 50% of the students, the average grade was below 4.53, while for the other half it was above the specified value. But one has to see the value returned for the majority of the students. The mode equals 5, meaning that most of the students involved in the analyzed programme are extremely satisfied with the quality of the educational process. With a significance value Sig. = 0.004 /_ 0.01, we can state that there is correlation between the level of satisfaction expressed by the average grade and the number of classes missed

  20. Teaching methods and an outcome tool for measuring cultural sensitivity in undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kathleen H; Hood, Lucy J

    2007-01-01

    A major challenge facing the nursing profession is to educate and assist nurses to develop the skills to provide culturally relevant care. This article describes one school's multicultural curriculum for baccalaureate nursing students and a tool to measure changes in behaviors and attitudes. The article presents the psychometric properties of the Cross-Cultural Evaluation Tool that yields a cross-cultural interaction score. Successful teaching strategies are presented that are substantiated by increased student cross-cultural interaction score scores.

  1. Online tools for teaching evidence-based veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Michael; Crabb, Nicholas P; Moore, Lynda J; Reyher, Kristen K; Baillie, Sarah; Eisler, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) is of interest and relevance to veterinary practitioners. Consequently, veterinary schools take responsibility for teaching students how to appraise scientific articles and for equipping them with the skills needed to obtain and evaluate the best evidence and to apply this approach to their own cases. As part of our farm animal clinical rotation, we train students in qualitative and quantitative EBVM methods using an e-learning environment, online teaching materials, a wiki (a Web site that allows its users to edit its content via a Web browser), and face-to-face tutorials that support learning. Students working in small groups use a wiki to record details of the history, clinical presentation, diagnostic tests, herd data, and management plans for their chosen farm animal clinical cases. Using a standardized patient, intervention, comparison, and outcome (PICO) format, each group formulates a patient question based on either a proposed intervention or diagnostic procedure for the case and conducts an online scientific literature database search. The students appraise the articles retrieved using EBVM approaches and record the information in the wiki. The summation of this body of work, the group's critically appraised topic (CAT), includes the original PICO, a standardized table of the scientific evidence for the effectiveness of the intervention or diagnostic procedure, a summary statement in the form of a clinical bottom line, and their reflections upon the CAT. At the end of the rotation, students take part in a structured "CAT Club" where they present and discuss their findings with fellow students and clinicians.

  2. Montecarlo Techniques as a tool for teaching statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Bueno, FM Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Probability Theory and Statistics are two of the most useful mathematical fields, and also two of the most difficult to learn. In other science fields, as Physics, experimentation is an useful tool to develop students intuition, but the application of this tool to Statistics is much more difficult. In this paper we show how Monte Carlo techniques can be used to perform numerical experiments, by the use of pseudorandom numbers, and how these experiments can help to the understanding of Statistics and Physics. Monte Carlo techniques are broadly used in scientific research, but they are learnt usually in very specific curses of higher education. By the use of computer simulation these techniques can also be taught at elementary school and they can help to understand and visualise concepts as variance, mean or a probability distribution function. Finally, the use of new technologies, as Javascript and HTML is discussed.

  3. Can anatomists teach living anatomy using ultrasound as a teaching tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurjus, Rosalyn A; Dimorier, Kathryn; Brown, Kirsten; Slaby, Frank; Shokoohi, Hamid; Boniface, Keith; Liu, Yiju Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of bedside ultrasound by an increasing number of medical specialties has created the need for more ultrasound exposure and teaching in medical school. Although there is a widespread support for more vertical integration of ultrasound teaching throughout the undergraduate curriculum, little is known about whether the quality of ultrasound teaching differs if performed by anatomists or clinicians. The purpose of this study is to compare medical students' evaluation of ultrasound anatomy teaching by clinicians and anatomists. Hands-on interactive ultrasound sessions were scheduled as part of the gross anatomy course following principles of adult learning and instructional design. Seven teachers (three anatomists and four clinicians) taught in each session. Before each session, anatomists were trained in ultrasound by clinicians. Students were divided into groups, rotated teachers between sessions, and completed evaluations. Results indicated students perceived the two groups as comparable for all factors except for knowledge organization and the helpfulness of ultrasound for understanding anatomy (P teach living anatomy using ultrasound with minimal training as well as clinicians, and encourage the teaching of living anatomy by anatomists in human anatomy courses using ultrasound. Repeating this study at a multicenter level is currently being considered to further validate our conclusion. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  4. Development and Assessment of a New 3D Neuroanatomy Teaching Tool for MRI Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapkin, Zachary A.; Lindgren, Kristen A.; Lopez, Michael J.; Stabio, Maureen E.

    2015-01-01

    A computerized three-dimensional (3D) neuroanatomy teaching tool was developed for training medical students to identify subcortical structures on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) series of the human brain. This program allows the user to transition rapidly between two-dimensional (2D) MRI slices, 3D object composites, and a combined model in…

  5. Intimate Technology: A Tool for Teaching Anti-Racism in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, Anne C.; Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors introduce a new conceptual tool, intimate technology, to mobilize social work students' commitment to anti-racism. Intimate technology is marked by its emotional intensity and accessibility, and its effect of de-centering knowledge and authority. This teaching strategy integrates the modality of intimate technology via…

  6. Using the "Mary Tyler Moore Show" as a Feminist Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jule, Allyson

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the use of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" as a teaching tool used with a group of final-year undergraduate students who gathered together last academic year (2007-8) to explore Women in Leadership, as part of a Communications course. The research focus was: How can the use of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" (a 1970-7 American…

  7. The Use of Collaboration Tools when Teaching with Learning Content Management Systems (LCMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mncube-Barnes, Fatima Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether faculty members utilized collaboration tools within Desire2Learn Inc., in accordance with Chickering and Gamson's (1987) "Seven Principles of Good Practice: A Framework for Evaluating Effective Teaching in Undergraduate Education." The population for this study was faculty members at…

  8. Database as a Tool for Promoting Research Activities in the Classroom: An Example in Teaching Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degl'Innocenti, Riccardo; Ferraris, Maria

    1988-01-01

    Describes Datamondo, an instructional package that introduces the use of a newspaper database in humanities teaching at the secondary level in Italy. The effectiveness of the package in developing basic linguistic skills and as a research tool is evaluated. (8 references) (Author/CLB)

  9. Electronic implementation of national nursing standards--NANDA, NOC and NIC as an effective teaching tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Sharon K; Smith, Kevin F; Flowers, Laura

    2004-01-01

    With the increased interest in evidence-based medicine, Internet access and the growing emphasis on national standards, there is an increased challenge for teaching institutions and nursing services to teach and implement standards. At the same time, electronic clinical documentation tools have started to become a common format for recording nursing notes. The major aim of this paper is to ascertain and assess the availability of clinical nursing tools based on the NANDA, NOC and NIC standards. Faculty at 20 large nursing schools and directors of nursing at 20 hospitals were interviewed regarding the use of nursing standards in clinical documentation packages, not only for teaching purposes but also for use in hospital-based systems to ensure patient safety. A survey tool was utilized that covered questions regarding what nursing standards are being taught in the nursing schools, what standards are encouraged by the hospitals, and teaching initiatives that include clinical documentation tools. Information was collected on how utilizing these standards in a clinical or hospital setting can improve the overall quality of care. Analysis included univariate and bivariate analysis. The consensus between both groups was that the NANDA, NOC and NIC national standards are the most widely taught and utilized. In addition, a training initiative was identified within a large university where a clinical documentation system based on these standards was developed utilizing handheld devices.

  10. Blood Glucose Monitoring as a Teaching Tool for Endocrinology: A New Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moats, Robert K., II

    2009-01-01

    The education of new allied health professionals and nurses in proper endocrine evaluation and care has become critical in recent years, especially considering the greatly increased prevalence of diabetes in adults and children. The evaluation of blood glucose levels in human volunteers over time is a powerful teaching tool for endocrinology that…

  11. Reach for Reference. BrainPOP--A Teaching Tool Library Media Specialists Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safford, Barbara Ripp

    2005-01-01

    This column describes a new teaching tool, BrainPOP, which is a database that blurs the distinction between classroom and library media center. This collection of more than 300 short, concept-based, animated movies is intended primarily for use by teachers in classroom instruction. It is reminiscent of the single-concept film cartridges that used…

  12. Tablet PC: A Preliminary Report on a Tool for Teaching Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgievski, Nicholas; Stroud, Robert; Truxaw, Mary; DeFranco, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This study examined students' perceptions of the Tablet PC as an instructional tool for teaching Calculus. A thirteen item survey was developed by the researchers and administered to 103 students in an introductory Calculus course at a large university in the Northeast of the United States. The purpose of this survey was to collect data regarding…

  13. Perceptions of Pre-Service Teachers of Using Video Games as Teaching Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensiger, Joy

    2012-01-01

    Teachers' beliefs and perceptions are very critical to the integration of video games in the classrooms. This study was conducted to investigate the perceptions of pre-service teachers in using video games as one of their teaching tools. Along with this initial purpose, the intent was to understand the anticipated barriers involved in…

  14. Gesture as a Tool of Communication in the Teaching of Singing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafsi, Julia

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the use of gesture as a pedagogic tool in the one-to-one singing lesson. A brief overview of the main approaches of vocal pedagogy exhibits the longstanding dispute between advocates of a purely factual teaching style and defenders of a more imaginative one and shows that imagery and metaphors have long played a role in…

  15. Project-Based Teaching-Learning Computer-Aided Engineering Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, J. A.; Relvas, C.; Moreira, R.

    2004-01-01

    Computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, computer-aided analysis, reverse engineering and rapid prototyping are tools that play an important key role within product design. These are areas of technical knowledge that must be part of engineering and industrial design courses' curricula. This paper describes our teaching experience of…

  16. iMindMap as an Innovative Tool in Teaching and Learning Accounting: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Jusoh, Wan Noor Hazlina; Ahmad, Suraya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the use of iMindMap software as an interactive tool in the teaching and learning method and also to be able to consider iMindMap as an alternative instrument in achieving the ultimate learning outcome. Design/Methodology/Approach: Out of 268 students of the management accounting at the University of…

  17. Class Blogs as a Teaching Tool to Promote Writing and Student Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Miriam; Longnecker, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Blogs are a useful teaching tool for improving student writing and increasing class interaction. However, most studies have looked at individual blogs rather than blogs maintained by a whole class. We introduced assignments involving participation in class blogs to four science communication classes with enrolments of between 15 and 36 students.…

  18. Teachers' Opinion Survey on the Use of ICT Tools to Support Attendance-Based Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Sanchez, Jose Juan; Aleman, Elena Chirino

    2011-01-01

    The present paper reports on the results obtained from a teachers' opinion survey on the use of ICT tools to support of attendance-based teaching. In order to carry out this study, it was necessary to design a questionnaire to collect data among all in-service teachers with access to the university virtual campus. The findings show that…

  19. iMindMap as an Innovative Tool in Teaching and Learning Accounting: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Jusoh, Wan Noor Hazlina; Ahmad, Suraya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the use of iMindMap software as an interactive tool in the teaching and learning method and also to be able to consider iMindMap as an alternative instrument in achieving the ultimate learning outcome. Design/Methodology/Approach: Out of 268 students of the management accounting at the University of…

  20. Teachers' Opinion Survey on the Use of ICT Tools to Support Attendance-Based Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Sanchez, Jose Juan; Aleman, Elena Chirino

    2011-01-01

    The present paper reports on the results obtained from a teachers' opinion survey on the use of ICT tools to support of attendance-based teaching. In order to carry out this study, it was necessary to design a questionnaire to collect data among all in-service teachers with access to the university virtual campus. The findings show that…

  1. Using the "Mary Tyler Moore Show" as a Feminist Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jule, Allyson

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the use of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" as a teaching tool used with a group of final-year undergraduate students who gathered together last academic year (2007-8) to explore Women in Leadership, as part of a Communications course. The research focus was: How can the use of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" (a…

  2. Enhancing student motivation using LectureTools: A cloud-based teaching and learning platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. H. Patrio Chiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A cloud-based teaching and learning platform, LectureTools, was piloted at City University of Hong Kong in the 2012-13 academic year. LectureTools is an online platform that provides a suite of cloud-based teaching and learning applications. It combines the functions of interactive presentation, real-time student response system, student inquiry and online note-taking synchronised with the presentation slides, into one cloud-based platform. A comprehensive study investigated the effectiveness of the platform for enhancing student motivation among graduate (n=158 and undergraduate (n=96 students. Both groups of students reported enhanced motivation when using LectureTools. The scores on all six learning motivation scales of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire, a psychometric instrument based on the cognitive view of motivation, increased when students engaged with the tool in class. Those who used the tool scored significantly higher on intrinsic goal orientation than those who did not use the tool. The students’ quantitative feedback showed that they found the tool useful and that it improved their motivation. Qualitative feedback from the instructors indicated that the tool was useful for engaging passive students. They reported that the most useful function was the interactive online questions with real-time results, while the in-class student inquiry function was difficult to use in practice.

  3. Engaging racial autoethnography as a teaching tool for womanist inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Janette Y; Mackin, Melissa A Lehan; Oldenburg, Angela M

    2008-01-01

    Racial autobiography, self-narratives on how one learned about the idea of race, has been underutilized as a tool to familiarize and orient students in the process of critical inquiry for nursing research. The aims of this article are to explore how racial autoethnography: (1) repositions students to effect an epistemological change, (2) challenges dominant ideology, and (3) functions as a link between the student and critical theories for use in nursing research. Students engage in and share reflective narrative about a variety of instructional materials used in the course. Reflective narratives are presented in a framework that addresses white racial identity development.

  4. Teaching and Learning: Using Digital Tools for Progressive Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Rita B.; Petersson, Eva; Lewis Brooks, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    pupils between 14 and 18 years of age. Both teachers and pupils reported the positive benefits from use of a computer-based test (CBT) strategy. Multiple practices of learning and a shift from individual to collaborative learning combined to indicate three notable changes resulting from the strategy: (1......  Non-biased assessment becomes a reality when Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is implemented as a pedagogical tool to augment teacher practice and student learning. This paper details a study that was undertaken at a secondary school in Lithuania involving four educators and 200...

  5. Teaching and Learning: Using Digital Tools for Progressive Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Rita B.; Petersson, Eva; Lewis Brooks, Anthony

    2008-01-01

      Non-biased assessment becomes a reality when Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is implemented as a pedagogical tool to augment teacher practice and student learning. This paper details a study that was undertaken at a secondary school in Lithuania involving four educators and 200......) a change from an individual to a collaborative responsibility of assessment, (2) a change from an individual to a collective knowledge shaping, and (3) a change from a possibly weighted evaluation to a defined non-biased assessment outcome. Results from the study point to the potentials from CBT applied...... in education to address future augmented teacher - students' liaisons....

  6. Teaching ethics and technology with Agora, an electronic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Burg, Simone; van de Poel, Ibo

    2005-04-01

    Courses on ethics and technology have become compulsory for many students at the three Dutch technical universities during the past few years. During this time, teachers have faced a number of didactic problems, which are partly due to a growing number of students. In order to deal with these challenges, teachers in ethics at the three technical universities in the Netherlands--in Delft, Eindhoven and Twente--have developed a web-based computer program called Agora (see www.ethicsandtechnology.com). This program enables students to exercise their ethical understanding and skills extensively. The program makes it possible for students to participate actively in moral reflection and reasoning, and to develop the moral competencies that are needed in their later professional practice. The developers of the program have tried to avoid two traps. Firstly, they rejected, from the outset, a cookbook style of dealing with ethical problems that applied ethics is often taken to be and, secondly, they wanted to design a flexible program that respects the student's as well as the teacher's creativity, and that tries to engage students in moral reflection. Agora meets these requirements. The program offers possibilities that extend beyond the requirements that are usually accepted for case-exercises in applied ethics, and that have been realised in several other computer models for teaching ethics. In this article, we describe the main considerations in the development of Agora and the features of the resulting program.

  7. The use of films as a teaching tool for the teaching-learning process in bioethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Maria Pereira Rates

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Identifying the contribution of using films in the process of teaching-learning in bioethics and verifying the facilities and difficulties in using this teaching resource. Methodology. A qualitative study analyzed from the Bardin referential. Semi-structured interviews were carried out, recorded, and transcribed in full. For definition of the sample was used the criteria of repetition. In total, participated in the study 21 students of Nursing and Biochemistry, members of a Center for Teaching and Research in Bioethics of a public federal university in the city of Divinópolis, Minas Gerais, Brazil. During the analysis of interviews, two thematic categories and two subcategories emerged. Results. In their responses, students indicated the importance of viewing the bioethical problem for the reflection and decision-making in professional practice. Many reported that from the experience in discussions of the films showed, were made changes in the ethical position. Conclusion: The use of films as a teaching resource contributes to the process of teaching-learning in bioethics for undergraduate students. The discussions of the films are stimulating and provide a space for reflection and dialogue on bioethical problems that students may encounter in their professional practice.

  8. The Effectiveness of Traditional and 21st Century Teaching Tools on Students' Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellflower, Julie V.

    Any student seeking a high school diploma from the public school system in one U.S. state must pass the state's high school graduation test. In 2009, only 88% of students at one high school in the state met the basic proficiency requirements on the science portion of the test. Because improved science education has been identified as an explicit national goal, the purpose of this mixed methods study was to determine whether traditional teaching tools (notes, lecture, and textbook) or 21st century teaching tools (online tutorials, video games, YouTube, and virtual labs) lead to greater gains in students' science learning. Bruner's constructivist and Bandura's social cognitive theories served as the foundations for the study. Quantitative research questions were used to investigate the relationship between the type of teaching tools used and student learning gains. Quantitative data from students' pre and posttests were collected and analyzed using a dependent samples t-test. Qualitative data were collected through a focus group interview and participant journals. Analysis of the qualitative data included coding the data and writing a descriptive narrative to convey the findings. Results showed no statistically significant differences in students' science achievement: both types of teaching tools led to student learning gains. As a result, an action plan was developed to assist science educators in the implementation of traditional and 21st century teaching tools that can be used to improve students' science learning. Implications for positive social change included providing science educators with a specific plan of action that will enhance students' science learning, thereby increasing science scores on the state and other high stakes tests.

  9. Evaluation of a simulation tool in ophthalmology: application in teaching funduscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joice Elise Androwiki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the Eye Retinopathy Trainer® as a teaching tool for direct ophthalmoscopy examination by comparing it with the traditional method using volunteers. Methods: Fourth year medical students received training in direct ophthalmoscopy using a simulation tool and human volunteers. Ninety students were randomized into a Simulation Group or a Control Group by the inclusion or absence of the simulation model in classroom practice. Differences between the groups were analyzed using unpaired Student’s t-test. Results: The Simulation Group was superior to the Control Group, with 51.06% successful in performing fundus examination in both the anatomical model simulation and the human model in comparison with 21.15% in the Control Group. Conclusion: The Eye Retinopathy Trainer® appears to be an effective teaching tool for practice and improvement of ophthalmologic examination among fourth year medical students.

  10. Experience of integrating various technological tools into the study and future teaching of mathematics education students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorev, Dvora; Gurevich-Leibman, Irina

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents our experience of integrating technological tools into our mathematics teaching (in both disciplinary and didactic courses) for student-teachers. In the first cycle of our study, a variety of technological tools were used (e.g., dynamic software, hypertexts, video and applets) in teaching two disciplinary mathematics courses. We found that the tool most preferred by the students was dynamic software, while the applets were almost neglected. In the next cycle, we focused on using various applets in both disciplinary and didactic mathematics courses. We found that if the assignments were applet-oriented, i.e., adjusted to the chosen applet, or vice versa - the applet was chosen appropriately to suit the given assignment - then the students were able to make use of applets in an effective way. Furthermore, the students came to see the potential of applets for improving learning.

  11. Teaching Theory Construction With Initial Grounded Theory Tools: A Reflection on Lessons and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmaz, Kathy

    2015-12-01

    This article addresses criticisms of qualitative research for spawning studies that lack analytic development and theoretical import. It focuses on teaching initial grounded theory tools while interviewing, coding, and writing memos for the purpose of scaling up the analytic level of students' research and advancing theory construction. Adopting these tools can improve teaching qualitative methods at all levels although doctoral education is emphasized here. What teachers cover in qualitative methods courses matters. The pedagogy presented here requires a supportive environment and relies on demonstration, collective participation, measured tasks, progressive analytic complexity, and accountability. Lessons learned from using initial grounded theory tools are exemplified in a doctoral student's coding and memo-writing excerpts that demonstrate progressive analytic development. The conclusion calls for increasing the number and depth of qualitative methods courses and for creating a cadre of expert qualitative methodologists.

  12. Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox: tools to teach altimetry for ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmorduc, Vinca; Benveniste, Jerome; Bronner, Emilie; Niemeijer, Sander; Lucas, Bruno Manuel; Dinardo, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is an "all-altimeter" collection of tools, tutorials and documents designed to facilitate the use of radar altimetry data, including the next mission to be launched, CryoSat. It has been available from April 2007, and had been demonstrated during training courses and scientific meetings. More than 2000 people downloaded it (January 2013), with many "newcomers" to altimetry among them. Users' feedbacks, developments in altimetry, and practice, showed that new interesting features could be added. Some have been added and/or improved in version 2 and 3. Others are in discussion for the future, including addition of the future Sentinel-3. The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is able: - to read most distributed radar altimetry data, including the one from future missions like Saral, - to perform some processing, data editing and statistic, - and to visualize the results. It can be used at several levels/several ways, including as an educational tool, with the graphical user interface As part of the Toolbox, a Radar Altimetry Tutorial gives general information about altimetry, the technique involved and its applications, as well as an overview of past, present and future missions, including information on how to access data and additional software and documentation. It also presents a series of data use cases, covering all uses of altimetry over ocean, cryosphere and land, showing the basic methods for some of the most frequent manners of using altimetry data. Example from education uses will be presented, and feedback from those who used it as such will be most welcome. BRAT is developed under contract with ESA and CNES. It is available at http://www.altimetry.info and http://earth.esa.int/brat/

  13. Attitudes of Health Professional Educators Toward the Use of Social Media as a Teaching Tool: Global Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Karan; Henningham, Lucy; Zou, Runyu; Huang, Jessica; O'Sullivan, Elizabeth; Last, Jason; Ho, Kendall

    2017-08-04

    The use of social media in health education has witnessed a revolution within the past decade. Students have already adopted social media informally to share information and supplement their lecture-based learning. Although studies show comparable efficacy and improved engagement when social media is used as a teaching tool, broad-based adoption has been slow and the data on barriers to uptake have not been well documented. The objective of this study was to assess attitudes of health educators toward social media use in education, examine differences between faculty members who do and do not use social media in teaching practice, and determine contributing factors for an increase in the uptake of social media. A cross-sectional Web-based survey was disseminated to the faculty of health professional education departments at 8 global institutions. Respondents were categorized based on the frequency of social media use in teaching as "users" and "nonusers." Users sometimes, often, or always used social media, whereas nonusers never or rarely used social media. A total of 270 health educators (52.9%, n=143 users and 47.0%, n=127 nonusers) were included in the survey. Users and nonusers demonstrated significant differences on perceived barriers and potential benefits to the use of social media. Users were more motivated by learner satisfaction and deterred by lack of technology compatibility, whereas nonusers reported the need for departmental and skill development support. Both shared concerns of professionalism and lack of evidence showing enhanced learning. The majority of educators are open-minded to incorporating social media into their teaching practice. However, both users and nonusers have unique perceived challenges and needs, and engaging them to adapt social media into their educational practice will require previously unreported approaches. Identification of these differences and areas of overlap presents opportunities to determine a strategy to increase

  14. Soils in art as a teaching tool in soil science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, Rosa M.

    2017-04-01

    The representation of soils in the different artistic expressions occurs much less often than that of other naturalistic scientific disciplines, like botany or zoology, due to the minor perception of soils as a natural body since the humans started to express themselves through art. Nevertheless, painters, writers and even musicians and film directors have been forced to deal with soils in their works, as a component of the landscape and as the main actor of the various soil functions. Even if the artists are not aware of soils in the sense of soil science - a study object - their observation of nature invariably leads to express their properties, the problems due to their misuse or degradation and their management practices. These art works have a great value when teaching soil science to students, because the latter can learn to intepret and go beyond the artist's observation and therefore they can appreciate the perception of soils and soil properties along the history of humankind. Paintings from various periods can be used as exercises, mainly those depicting landscapes or agricultural works. Some examples are Dutch landscape painters, as Brueghel the Young showing detailed soil erosion features; or Wijnants (XVII century) depicting very clear podzols on sand dunes. Also the impressionists (Van Gogh, Cézanne, Gaugin), or the landscapes of the romantic nationalists (XIX- early XX century) show forest or agricultural soils that can be used either to deduce soil forming processes and describe horizons, or to discuss the effectivity of soil management practices (deforestation, burning, plowing, terracing). Also some pieces of literature can be used either for illustrating real soil landscapes and soil-water relationships (Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath") or in case of fiction literature, as exercice for soil mapping (Tolkien's Middle Earth in "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings"). Films as "The field" (Jim Sheridan, 1990) or "Corn Island" (George Ovasvili

  15. Cartoons as a Teaching Tool: A Research on Turkish Language Grammar Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Havva

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of teaching by utilizing cartoons on student success in the Turkish language courses in primary school secondary level students. Working group of the study consists of 54 students studying in primary state school in Sakarya province Hendek district. In the study, the "Rule and Concept Test on…

  16. Experimental evidence for the co-evolution of hominin tool-making teaching and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T J H; Uomini, N T; Rendell, L E; Chouinard-Thuly, L; Street, S E; Lewis, H M; Cross, C P; Evans, C; Kearney, R; de la Torre, I; Whiten, A; Laland, K N

    2015-01-13

    Hominin reliance on Oldowan stone tools-which appear from 2.5 mya and are believed to have been socially transmitted-has been hypothesized to have led to the evolution of teaching and language. Here we present an experiment investigating the efficacy of transmission of Oldowan tool-making skills along chains of adult human participants (N=184) using five different transmission mechanisms. Across six measures, transmission improves with teaching, and particularly with language, but not with imitation or emulation. Our results support the hypothesis that hominin reliance on stone tool-making generated selection for teaching and language, and imply that (i) low-fidelity social transmission, such as imitation/emulation, may have contributed to the ~700,000 year stasis of the Oldowan technocomplex, and (ii) teaching or proto-language may have been pre-requisites for the appearance of Acheulean technology. This work supports a gradual evolution of language, with simple symbolic communication preceding behavioural modernity by hundreds of thousands of years.

  17. Webcams as a tool for teaching in Optometry training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargallo, A.; Arines, J.

    2015-04-01

    Clinical Optometry lab training is devoted to develop the students skills needed in eye healthcare professional practice. Nevertheless, students always find difficulties in the management of some optometric instruments and in the understanding of the evaluation techniques. Moreover, teachers also have problems in explaining the eye evaluation tests or making demonstrations of instruments handling. In order to facilitate the learning process, webcams adapted to the optometric devices represent a helpful and useful tool. In this work we present the use of webcams in some of the most common clinical test in Optometry as ocular refraction, colour vision test, eye health evaluation with slip-lamp, retinoscopy, ophthalmoscopy and contact lens fitting. Our experience shows that with this simple approach we can do things easier: show the instrument handling to all the students at the same time; take pictures or videos of different eye health conditions or exploratory routines for posterior visualization with all the students; recreate visual experience of the patient during optometric exam; simulate colour vision pathologies; increase the interactions between students allowing them to help and correct each other; and also record the final routine exam in order to make possible its revision with the students.

  18. CGUG: in silico proteome and genome parsing tool for the determination of "core" and unique genes in the analysis of genomes up to ca. 1.9 Mb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan Padmanabhan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses and small-genome bacteria (~2 megabases and smaller comprise a considerable population in the biosphere and are of interest to many researchers. These genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and require complementary computational tools to analyze. "CoreGenesUniqueGenes" (CGUG is an in silico genome data mining tool that determines a "core" set of genes from two to five organisms with genomes in this size range. Core and unique genes may reflect similar niches and needs, and may be used in classifying organisms. Findings CGUG is available at http://binf.gmu.edu/geneorder.html as a web-based on-the-fly tool that performs iterative BLASTP analyses using a reference genome and up to four query genomes to provide a table of genes common to these genomes. The result is an in silico display of genomes and their proteomes, allowing for further analysis. CGUG can be used for "genome annotation by homology", as demonstrated with Chlamydophila and Francisella genomes. Conclusion CGUG is used to reanalyze the ICTV-based classifications of bacteriophages, to reconfirm long-standing relationships and to explore new classifications. These genomes have been problematic in the past, due largely to horizontal gene transfers. CGUG is validated as a tool for reannotating small genome bacteria using more up-to-date annotations by similarity or homology. These serve as an entry point for wet-bench experiments to confirm the functions of these "hypothetical" and "unknown" proteins.

  19. Web-based simulation: a tool for teaching critical care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Sayonara de Fatima Faria; Marin, Heimar de Fatima

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop, to implement and to evaluate a web-based simulation for critical care nursing, as a tool for teaching nursing students at the undergraduate level. An adapted methodology was used to develop teaching material in a web-based learning environment, consisting of three evaluation phases (ergonomic, pedagogical and usability), carried out by web-designers/programmers, nursing teachers/nurses, and undergraduate nursing students. The research tools used were three different evaluation forms, based on a five-point Likert scale, which were applied after using the simulation. The results garnered from the forms show positive analyses in every evaluation, with special emphasis on the encouragement of learning in the pedagogical evaluation period. In the usability evaluation, the highlight was on the students' satisfaction in using the environment and how easy it was to navigate. This shows the feasibility of using this simulation to improve the learning process.

  20. Using Simulation to Teach About Poverty in Nursing Education: A Review of Available Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Carol A; Evanson, Tracy A

    2016-01-01

    Poverty is one of the most significant social determinants of health, and as such, it is imperative that nurses have an understanding of the impact that living in poverty has upon one's life and health. A lack of such understanding will impede nurses from providing care that is patient centered, treats all patients fairly, and advocates for social justice. It is essential that nursing educators assure that poverty-related content and effective teaching strategies are used in nursing curricula in order to help students develop this understanding. Several poverty-simulation tools are available and may be able to assist with development of accurate knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Unfortunately, little evidence exists to evaluate most poverty simulation tools. This article will provide an introduction to several poverty-related simulation tools, discuss any related research that evaluates their effectiveness, and make recommendations for integration of such simulation tools into nursing curricula.

  1. Teaching a Foreign Language to Deaf People via Vodcasting & Web 2.0 Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drigas, Athanasios; Vrettaros, John; Tagoulis, Alexandors; Kouremenos, Dimitris

    This paper presents the design and development of an e-learning course in teaching deaf people in a foreign language, whose first language is the sign language. The course is based in e-material, vodcasting and web 2.0 tools such as social networking and blog The course has been designed especially for deaf people and it is exploring the possibilities that e-learning material vodcasting and web 2.0 tools can offer to enhance the learning process and achieve more effective learning results.

  2. PsychoGeography as Teaching Tool: Troubled Travels Through an Experimental First-Year Seminar

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This article is a critical reflection on the effectiveness of an experimental teaching tool for the college classroom. In an experimental seminar, students are asked to wander around—across campus, in the city of the college, in their respective hometowns, and in shopping malls. By describing and theorizing their own experiences in “travelogues” students draw attention to highly political and often contentious issues, i.e., questions of class, social position, gender, race, agency, and the bo...

  3. Poster and model competition: a novel interest-generating teaching tool in the subject of pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lois James Samuel

    2014-08-01

    Conclusions: The poster model competition did generate an interest in the topic. The students had a new avenue to express themselves and in the process gain more knowledge in an enjoyable manner. Learning is facilitated when students themselves play an important role in the learning process. Poster-model competition can be incorporated as a teaching-learning tool to encourage and motivate students who lack intrinsic motivation. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(4.000: 649-655

  4. "In Our Own Words": Creating Videos as Teaching and Learning Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norda Majekodunmi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Online videos, particularly those on YouTube, have proliferated on the internet; watching them has become part of our everyday activity. While libraries have often harnessed the power of videos to create their own promotional and informational videos, few have created their own teaching and learning tools beyond screencasting videos. In the summer of 2010, the authors, two librarians at York University, decided to work on a video project which culminated in a series of instructional videos entitled “Learning: In Our Own Words.” The purpose of the video project was twofold: to trace the “real” experience of incoming students and their development of academic literacies skills (research, writing and learning throughout their first year, and to create videos that librarians and other instructors could use as instructional tools to engage students in critical thinking and discussion. This paper outlines the authors’ experience filming the videos, creating a teaching guide, and screening the videos in the classroom. Lessons learned during this initiative are discussed in the hope that more libraries will develop videos as teaching and learning tools.

  5. SEVAQ: a unique multi-functional tool for assessing and improving the quality of e-courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schreurs

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available It is challenging to enhance quality of e-learning.We based the quality assessment on the EFQM and theKirkpatrick models. We built our own SEVAQ qualitymodel on which we based our multi-functional selfevaluationquestionnaire. We focused and limited ourselveson the valuable learners feedback. Our questionnaire isstructured around the 3 main criteria: the enablinglearning resources, learning processes and the learningresults. Questions are linked with their criteria andsubcriteria.The SEVAQ tool addresses the designer of the questionnaireas well as the learner, being the evaluator and so being theuser of the questionnaire. The designer selects on a flexibleway a set of relevant questions to be answered by thelearner. After finishing the questionnaire by the learner, thesystem analysis the results

  6. CRISPR multitargeter: a web tool to find common and unique CRISPR single guide RNA targets in a set of similar sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V Prykhozhij

    Full Text Available Genome engineering has been revolutionized by the discovery of clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR and CRISPR-associated system genes (Cas in bacteria. The type IIB Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR/Cas9 system functions in many species and additional types of CRISPR/Cas systems are under development. In the type II system, expression of CRISPR single guide RNA (sgRNA targeting a defined sequence and Cas9 generates a sequence-specific nuclease inducing small deletions or insertions. Moreover, knock-in of large DNA inserts has been shown at the sites targeted by sgRNAs and Cas9. Several tools are available for designing sgRNAs that target unique locations in the genome. However, the ability to find sgRNA targets common to several similar sequences or, by contrast, unique to each of these sequences, would also be advantageous. To provide such a tool for several types of CRISPR/Cas system and many species, we developed the CRISPR MultiTargeter software. Similar DNA sequences in question are duplicated genes and sets of exons of different transcripts of a gene. Thus, we implemented a basic sgRNA target search of input sequences for single-sgRNA and two-sgRNA/Cas9 nickase targeting, as well as common and unique sgRNA target searches in 1 a set of input sequences; 2 a set of similar genes or transcripts; or 3 transcripts a single gene. We demonstrate potential uses of the program by identifying unique isoform-specific sgRNA sites in 71% of zebrafish alternative transcripts and common sgRNA target sites in approximately 40% of zebrafish duplicated gene pairs. The design of unique targets in alternative exons is helpful because it will facilitate functional genomic studies of transcript isoforms. Similarly, its application to duplicated genes may simplify multi-gene mutational targeting experiments. Overall, this program provides a unique interface that will enhance use of CRISPR/Cas technology.

  7. CRISPR multitargeter: a web tool to find common and unique CRISPR single guide RNA targets in a set of similar sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Rajan, Vinothkumar; Gaston, Daniel; Berman, Jason N

    2015-01-01

    Genome engineering has been revolutionized by the discovery of clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated system genes (Cas) in bacteria. The type IIB Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR/Cas9 system functions in many species and additional types of CRISPR/Cas systems are under development. In the type II system, expression of CRISPR single guide RNA (sgRNA) targeting a defined sequence and Cas9 generates a sequence-specific nuclease inducing small deletions or insertions. Moreover, knock-in of large DNA inserts has been shown at the sites targeted by sgRNAs and Cas9. Several tools are available for designing sgRNAs that target unique locations in the genome. However, the ability to find sgRNA targets common to several similar sequences or, by contrast, unique to each of these sequences, would also be advantageous. To provide such a tool for several types of CRISPR/Cas system and many species, we developed the CRISPR MultiTargeter software. Similar DNA sequences in question are duplicated genes and sets of exons of different transcripts of a gene. Thus, we implemented a basic sgRNA target search of input sequences for single-sgRNA and two-sgRNA/Cas9 nickase targeting, as well as common and unique sgRNA target searches in 1) a set of input sequences; 2) a set of similar genes or transcripts; or 3) transcripts a single gene. We demonstrate potential uses of the program by identifying unique isoform-specific sgRNA sites in 71% of zebrafish alternative transcripts and common sgRNA target sites in approximately 40% of zebrafish duplicated gene pairs. The design of unique targets in alternative exons is helpful because it will facilitate functional genomic studies of transcript isoforms. Similarly, its application to duplicated genes may simplify multi-gene mutational targeting experiments. Overall, this program provides a unique interface that will enhance use of CRISPR/Cas technology.

  8. A method for creating teaching movie clips using screen recording software: usefulness of teaching movies as self-learning tools for medical students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Seong Su [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    I wanted to describe a method to create teaching movies with using screen recordings, and I wanted to see if self-learning movies are useful for medical students. Teaching movies were created by direct recording of the screen activity and voice narration during the interpretation of educational cases; we used a PACS system and screen recording software for the recording (CamStudio, Rendersoft, U.S.A.). The usefulness of teaching movies for seft-learning of abdominal CT anatomy was evacuated by the medical students. Creating teaching movie clips with using screen recording software was simple and easy. Survey responses were collected from 43 medical students. The contents of teaching movie was adequately understandable (52%) and useful for learning (47%). Only 23% students agreed the these movies helped motivated them to learn. Teaching movies were more useful than still photographs of the teaching image files. The students wanted teaching movies on the cross-sectional CT anatomy of different body regions (82%) and for understanding the radiological interpretation of various diseases (42%). Creating teaching movie by direct screen recording of a radiologist's interpretation process is easy and simple. The teaching video clips reveal a radiologist's interpretation process or the explanation of teaching cases with his/her own voice narration, and it is an effective self-learning tool for medical students and residents.

  9. A Practitioner Model of the Use of Computer-Based Tools and Resources to Support Mathematics Teaching and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthven, Kenneth; Hennessy, Sara

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes the pedagogical ideas underpinning teachers' accounts of the successful use of computer-based tools and resources to support the teaching and learning of mathematics. Organizes central themes to form a pedagogical model capable of informing the use of such technologies in classroom teaching and generating theoretical conjectures for…

  10. A Unique Sequence of Financial Accounting Courses Featuring Team Teaching, Linked Courses, Challenging Assignments, and Instruments for Evaluation and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, Heidemarie; Wilson, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Accounting at California State University Northridge (CSUN) has developed a unique sequence of courses designed to ensure that accounting students are trained not only in technical accounting, but also acquire critical thinking, research and communication skills. The courses have proven effective and have embedded assessment…

  11. A Unique Sequence of Financial Accounting Courses Featuring Team Teaching, Linked Courses, Challenging Assignments, and Instruments for Evaluation and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, Heidemarie; Wilson, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Accounting at California State University Northridge (CSUN) has developed a unique sequence of courses designed to ensure that accounting students are trained not only in technical accounting, but also acquire critical thinking, research and communication skills. The courses have proven effective and have embedded assessment…

  12. Teaching child psychiatric assessment skills: Using pediatric mental health screening tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, T M; Arthur, M E

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the workshop "Teaching Child Psychiatric Assessment Skills: Using Mental Health Screening Instruments," presented at the 35th Forum for Behavioral Sciences in Family Medicine on 20 September 2014. The goals of the presentation were (1) to teach family medicine behavioral health educators to use both general and problem-specific mental health screening tools (MHSTs) in their work with trainees to help satisfy the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandate for behavioral and mental health experience during family medicine residency, (2) to reflect on how MHSTs might be integrated into the flow of family medicine teaching practices, and (3) to exemplify how evidence-based methods of adult education might be used in teaching such content. One general MHST, the Pediatric Symptom Checklist-17 and one problem-specific MHST for each of the four commonest pediatric mental health issues: for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, the Vanderbilt; for Anxiety, the Screen for Childhood Anxiety-Related Emotional Disorders; for Depression, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 for teens; and for Aggression, the Retrospective-Modified Overt Aggression Scale, were practiced at least twice in the context of a clinical vignette. All of the selected MHSTs are free in the public domain and available for download from the website: www.CAPPCNY.org. Participants were asked to reflect on their own office practice characteristics and consider how MHSTs might be integrated into their systems of care. This workshop could be replicated by others wishing to teach the use of MHSTs in primary care settings or teaching programs.

  13. Peer Observation and Evaluation Tool (POET: A Formative Peer Review Supporting Scholarly Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L. Crabtree

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Peer Observation and Evaluation Tool (POET is a valid and reliable measure developed for formative peer evaluation of pharmacy faculty. The authors replicated a study conducted on the POET in pharmacy in order to report the instrument’s validity and reliability in occupational therapy and to explore its potential as a formative teaching evaluation for occupational therapy educators. To verify item importance, seven participants from the faculty in an occupational therapy department rated each item. To establish inter-rater reliability, the participants evaluated one videotaped 55 min lecture. The POET was reliable with ICC at 0.93. There were high levels of agreement with the importance ratings among the participants with all scales. The POET appears to be a valid and reliable formative measure of teaching. At a time of significant change in the level of occupational therapy education, this measure may be an important support for scholarly teaching in two ways: First, this measure offers several opportunities to document the instructor’s strengths and, second, it offers the instructor suggestions about ways to improve teaching quality. Finally, the POET may facilitate faculty professional growth and development through systematic, strategic, and constructive peer review feedback.

  14. Digital stethoscope as an innovative tool on the teaching of auscultatory skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco; Reis, Jader Costa dos; Simões, Luciana Silveira; Moura, Eduardo Cardoso de; Rodrigues, Gustavo Amarante; Athayde, Carolina Cunto de; Machado, Hugo Lima; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal

    2013-02-01

    Physical cardiovascular examination, particularly cardiac auscultation, is one of the most difficult clinical skills for students during their medical training. Studies suggest that the use of technologies such as digital stethoscope increase the accuracy of clinical examination, however, its impact on the teaching of cardiac auscultation for undergraduate students of medicine is not known. The objective is to demonstrate the usefulness of the digital stethoscope compared to traditional methods as a tool in the teaching of auscultatory skills. nterventional, longitudinal, controlled, unicenter and randomized study. Thirty-eight medicine students were enrolled for a cardiovascular semiology course lasting eight weeks. The course program included lectures and bedside practice in Cardiology wards. In the practical lessons, the students were randomized into two groups: 1) (n = 21) digital stethoscope (Littmann® Model 3200, 3M); and 2) (n = 17) conventional stethoscopes. A pre-training evaluation was conducted through a test using the software Heart Sounds®, which was repeated after the course. The average scores were compared by paired T test and unpaired T test. It is observed that, at the end of the course, there was a significantly greater improvement in the group that used the digital stethoscope (51.9%) compared to the group using the conventional stethoscope (29.5%). Short-term interventions for cardiac semiology teaching are able to contribute significantly to improving proficiency in the identification of heart sounds. The use of digital stethoscope proved to be a positive factor in teaching these skills.

  15. Clubes de Ciencia: Intensive science workshops in Mexico provide a unique opportunity for teaching, scientific and cultural exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bras, I.; Rosengard, S.; Estefania, M.; Jinich, A.

    2016-02-01

    Clubes de Ciencia, which translates to "Science Clubs" is an initiative started by a group of graduate students at Harvard University in 2014 to encourage scientific exchange between the US and Mexico. These science clubs are one-week long intensive workshops taught by graduate students and/or postdocs on a subject of their choice in six Mexican cities. Instructors apply to teach a workshop by sending a proposal to the organizing committee, who is looking for workshops that emphasize hands-on, practical ideas. The instructors, primarily graduate students in the US, are paired with local co-instructors who assist and often co-teach the workshop. Local student participants, who are in their last two years of high school and the first two years of college, are selected based on their interest and enthusiasm. Each class has about 15-20 students, so that the classroom setting is intimate and interactive Sponsors, who fund instructor stipends, class supplies and program development, include the Mexican department of energy (SENER), the Mexican national science foundation (CONACYT), Harvard and MIT. Host universities also provide space and resources. In this presentation we focus on clubs that were taught in January 2015 on ocean physics and July 2015 on ocean chemistry, both taught in Ensenada, Baja California at the national autonomous university. Both workshops included a combination of data analysis, lectures, experiments and computational modeling. The ocean physics class was also recorded intermittently and is being used as a test case for an online course. The format provided an intensive teaching and networking experience and could be interesting to implement in other contexts.

  16. Teaching-learning sequences: aims and tools for science education research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méheut, Martine; Psillos, Dimitris

    2004-05-01

    One notable line of inquiry, aspects of which date back to the early 1980s, involves the design and implementation not of long-term curricula, but of topic-oriented sequences for teaching science. One distinguishing characteristic of a teaching-learning sequence (TLS) is its inclusion in a gradual research-based volutionary process aiming at interlacing the scientific and the student perspective. In the present paper, which is introductory to the special issue, we attempt to serve a double purpose: on the one hand, we provide an overview of developments and trends with regard to TLSs and their classroom validation, discussing empirical studies, theoretical proposals, methodological tools and approaches to describing the design of these sequences in ordinary language, while on the other the paper serves as an introduction to this volume, making it easier for the reader to apprehend the processes of development and validation of research on TLSs.

  17. Teaching and Learning with ICT Tools: Issues and Challenges from Teachers’ Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Ghavifekr

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this digital era, ICT use in the classroom is important for giving students opportunities to learn and apply the required 21st century skills. Hence studying the issues and challenges related to ICT use in teaching and learning can assist teachers in overcoming the obstacles and become successful technology users.  Therefore, the main purpose of this study is to analyze teachers’ perceptions of the challenges faced in using ICT tools in classrooms. A quantitative research design was used to collect the data randomly from a sample of 100 secondary school teachers in the state of Melaka, Malaysia. Evidence has been collected through distribution of a modified‐ adopted survey questionnaire. Overall, the key issues and challenges found to be significant in using ICT tools by teachers were: limited accessibility and network connection, limited technical support, lack of effective training, limited time and lack of teachers’ competency. Moreover, the results from independent t‐ test show that use of ICT tools by male teachers (M =2.08, SD = .997 in the classroom is higher compared to female teachers (M = 2.04, SD = .992. It is hoped that the outcome of this research provides proper information and recommendation to those responsible for integrating new technologies into the school teaching and learning process.  

  18. ‘It’s a unique role!’ Perspectives on tutor attributes and expertise in distance language teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Shelley

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the background to, and progress on, a project based on work carried out at the Open University UK (OUUK. The aim of the project is to articulate the attributes and expertise required by tutors of languages in distance education. A review of the literature on the roles and competencies required for tutors operating at a distance indicates that the specific context of language teaching has received relatively little attention from researchers in the field. There has, however, been considerable interest in the skills and attributes necessary for face-to-face language teaching in the classroom, which is outlined here. Issues of definition and research perspective are discussed, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various research approaches. The different stages and outcomes of the collaborative project are described in detail, demonstrating how the unfolding research design allowed opportunities for consultation, reflection, and responsive changes. The next stages of consultation are outlined, together with implications for the on-going professional development of tutors.

  19. Future of ICT as a Pedagogical Tool in ESL Teaching and Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melor Md Yunus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of Information and Communication Technology (ICT in education has provided more variation in the process of teaching and learning. The function of ICT in systematic teaching and learning in English as a Second Language (ESL classroom is to achieve the objectives of language teaching and learning. The aim of this study is twofold: (i to investigate how secondary school English teachers perceive the future of ICT as a pedagogical tool and (ii to discover what they think the impact of ICT will be on the future of the teachers. This study is a qualitative research in nature because a semi-structured interview was used to examine the teachers’ perceptions of the future of ICT as a pedagogical tool and the impact of ICT on the future of the teachers. Overall, a total of 25 secondary school English teachers were interviewed. The teachers were pragmatically and purposively selected from four different areas of Malaysia, 8 teachers from Tawau, 7 teachers from Alor Setar, 6 teachers from Tuanku Jaafar and 4 teachers from Kuala Lumpur, respectively. The interviewees were selected based on three criteria which are the willingness to participate and cooperate, capability of giving effective responses to the interview questions and lastly having teaching experience of at least 1 year. The findings of the study showed that ICT has the potential to give great impact on the future of teachers in terms of the role of the teacher, the methods of instruction and the methods of assessment. It was also concluded that, in the future, the role of the teacher will be changed from the sole knowledge provider to a facilitator or moderator; the methods of instruction will be changed from conventional discussions in the classroom to the use of online forums with the students; and the medium of assessment will be changed from printed ones to e-assessment.

  20. Practice teaching: An inquiry into the experiences in developing an evaluation tool used in classroom observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Lin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper preparation prior to practice teachers’ actual internship is deemed as an important part of the teacher development program. This presentation depicts the summary and findings of a semester-long action research study with 19 practice teachers (PT undertaken in the fall semester of 2013. After finishing all their required credits, PTs needed to prepare themselves for their upcoming internship. In order to help make their internship fruitful and be able to learn as much as possible from their teacher mentor, an internship preparation course designed as an action research was created to support PTs in being able to determine specific classroom observation skills. Within the course, PTs were separated into 4 groups and tasked with organizing all the previous theories learned from other courses in order to determine the key features of a good classroom teacher. Afterwards, the researchers oriented the PTs with the problem-based learning (PBL approach in creating a list of key features of a good classroom teacher. After a month of preparation, PTs were then assigned to undergo two months of classroom observations in a nearby elementary school. In addition, the PTs needed to do two practice teaching sessions before the end of the observation period. During the classroom observations and practice teaching, the PTs used their list of key features of a good classroom teacher to evaluate each other. Pre-post conferences were accomplished before and after each practice teaching session. Researcher observations, interview, and PTs’ reflection logs were later collected and analyzed. Results indicate that PTs claimed that they are able to learn more within a PBL approach in developing an evaluation tool used in classroom observation as compared to the typical classroom discussion type setup. In sum, the process of classroom lectures presented in tandem with actual classroom observations and practice teaching has led to the enrichment of their

  1. [Endoscopy training by using ex vivo and simulators: a new teaching tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artifon, Everson L A; Tchekmedyian, Asadur J; Fernandes, Kaie; Artifon, Aline N; Fonseca, Alvaro; Otoch, Jose P

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the traditional teaching model of gastrointestinal endoscopy has been based on the teacher-student tutorial method based on theoretical models. Today, simulators have the advantages of virtual reality. The handling apparatus is similar to that used in clinical practice; it is safe, which allows unlimited use, cost-effective for institutions and with superior performance over other training models. Besides, biological simulators are a viable, accessible and affordable tool to simulate gastrointestinal lesions, allowing training in endoscopy with a high degree of similarity in the endoscopic appearance. In this review, we analyze both models, showing its advantages for the training of the endoscopist of the times.

  2. Killing two birds with one stone: Model plant systems as a tool to teach the fundamental concepts of gene expression while analyzing biological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarevitch, Irina; Martinez-Vaz, Betsy

    2017-01-01

    Plants are ideal systems to teach core biology concepts due to their unique physiological and developmental features. Advances in DNA sequencing technology and genomics have allowed scientists to generate genome sequences and transcriptomics data for numerous model plant species. This information is publicly available and presents a valuable tool to introduce undergraduate students to the fundamental concepts of gene expression in the context of modern quantitative biology and bioinformatics. Modern biology classrooms must provide authentic research experiences to allow developing core competencies such as scientific inquiry, critical interpretation of experimental results, and quantitative analyses of large dataset using computational approaches. Recent educational research has shown that undergraduate students struggle when connecting gene expression concepts to classic genetics, phenotypic analyses, and overall flow of biological information in living organisms, suggesting that novel approaches are necessary to enhance learning of gene expression and regulation. This review describes different strategies and resources available to instructors willing to incorporate authentic research experiences, genomic tools, and bioinformatics analyses when teaching transcriptional regulation and gene expression in undergraduate courses. A variety of laboratory exercises and pedagogy materials developed to teach gene expression using plants are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Relationship between nursing students' preference for types of teaching materials and learning effects of self-learning tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Yasuko; Yamashita, Masako; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Maeda, Jukai; Aida, Kyouko; Kanai-Pak, Masako; Huang, Zhifeng; Nagata, Ayanori; Ogata, Taiki; Kuwahara, Noriaki; Ota, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between learning effects of the self-learning tool for nursing students and types of teaching materials. Ten nursing students were asked to perform transfer a patient from bed to wheelchair after watching the demo video and practicing 20 minutes. The students' performance was evaluated before and after practicing. The students were also asked to choose teaching materials that would be developed in the future. Out of nine teaching materials, the students chose seven of them. Correspondence analysis was conducted between the results of the evaluation of students' transfer technique and their preference of teaching materials. The results indicated that there was no relationship between the preference of teaching materials and the scores of transfer techniques. The authors concluded that the self-learning was not affected by the preference of teaching materials.

  4. Using publicly available internet tools to teach patent research and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Tanev, Stoyan

    2013-01-01

    The management of Intellectual property rights is becoming increasingly important in the 21st century knowledge society. Patents are especially important for engineering design and R&D teams. However, there is a lack of educational resources in this area. There is an increasing need to enhance...... efficiency is especially important within the context of the economic challenges which are drastically limiting the financial resources of all universities. In a previous contribution presented at the ICEIRD 2012 conference we have discussed our finding that technology entrepreneurs in general are interested....... With the advancement of the internet a number of patent offices are offering online tools that can be utilized in the teaching of the patent system, we will provide a review and analysis of these tools resulting in a suggestion for a patent course syllabus corresponding to an average student workload of 5 ECTS....

  5. Perceptions of student nurses regarding the use of a popular autobiography as a teaching tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathibe, Lehlohonolo J

    2007-04-01

    Recent studies encourage educators in nursing to use innovative and non-traditional teaching methods, such as using popular movies, posters, portfolios and surfing the internet, to stimulate students' interest, participation and interaction to enhance academic performance as well as knowledge retention. In this, descriptive cross-sectional study, we used self-administered questionnaires with statements graded on 5-points Likert scale (quantitative measures) and open-ended questions (qualitative measures), to assess the feasibility and students' perceptions regarding the use of Lance Armstrong's autobiography of surviving against cancer as a teaching tool. At the beginning of the lecture copies of selected chapters from: "It's Not About the Bike; My Journey Back to Life" [Armstrong, L., Jenkins, S. 2001. It's Not About The Bike: My Journey Back To Life. Yellow Jersey Press, Random House (Pty) Limited, Great Britain], were given to students. Willing students were requested to read for the whole class while the lecturer interjected periodically to explain and expound on certain pharmacological concepts. Eighty percent (80%) of participants felt that the use of an autobiography stimulated their interesting in cancer drugs and 84% agreed/strongly agreed that it contributed to their knowledge of pharmacology. Using Lance Armstrong's autobiography of survival to teach cytotoxic drugs is a worthwhile and rewarding exercise from the student nurses' perspective.

  6. Teaching to Learn: iPads as Tools for Transforming Physics Student Roles

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson-Dykstra, Susan; Otero, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Students who serve as Learning Assistants (LAs) and have the opportunity to teach the content they are learning, while also studying effective teaching pedagogy, have demonstrated achievement gains in advanced content courses and positive shifts in attitudes about learning science [V. Otero, S. Pollock & N. Finkelstein, Amer J Physics 78, 11 (2010)]. Although the LA experience is also valuable for high school students, the tight schedule and credit requirements of advanced high school students limit opportunities for implementing traditional LA programs at the high school level. In order to provide high school physics students with an LA-like experience, iPads were used as tools for students to synthesize screencast video tutorials for students to access, review and evaluate. The iPads were utilized in a one-to-one tablet-to-student environment throughout the course of an entire school year. This research investigates the impact of a one-to-one iPad environment and the use of iPads to create teaching-to-l...

  7. Growth and maturation in the zebrafish, Danio rerio: a staging tool for teaching and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleman, Corinna; Holtzman, Nathalia G

    2014-08-01

    Zebrafish have been increasingly used as a teaching tool to enhance the learning of many biological concepts from genetics, development, and behavior to the understanding of the local watershed. Traditionally, in both research and teaching, zebrafish work has focused on embryonic stages; however, later stages, from larval through adulthood, are increasingly being examined. Defining developmental stages based on age is a problematic way to assess maturity, because many environmental factors, such as temperature, population density, and water quality, impact growth and maturation. Fish length and characterization of key external morphological traits are considered better markers for maturation state. While a number of staging series exist for zebrafish, here we present a simplified normalization table of post-embryonic maturation well suited to both educational and research use. Specifically, we utilize fish size and four easily identified external morphological traits (pigment pattern, tail fin, anal fin, and dorsal fin morphology) to describe three larval stages, a juvenile stage, and an adult stage. These simplified maturation standards will be a useful tool for both educational and research protocols.

  8. Including and teaching blind children in ordinary classrooms Teaching tools teachers use and their influence on the inclusion of blind children ordinary classrooms in a primary school

    OpenAIRE

    Niwagaba, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    The study aims to investigate what teaching tools do teachers use and how do these tools influence on the inclusion of blind children in ordinary classrooms in a primary school. The study used qualitative approach and Interview method with teachers from one primary school. In depth interviews were chosen as the main instrument of data collection. Purposeful sampling and qualitative analysis was used in exploring and investigating the phenomenon of the study. Three special needs teachers for t...

  9. Twitter as a Tool for Teaching and Communicating Microbiology: The #microMOOCSEM Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio López-Goñi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Online social networks are increasingly used by the population on a daily basis. They are considered a powerful tool for science communication and their potential as educational tools is emerging. However, their usefulness in academic practice is still a matter of debate. Here, we present the results of our pioneering experience teaching a full Basic Microbiology course via Twitter (#microMOOCSEM, consisting of 28 lessons of 40-45 minutes duration each, at a tweet per minute rate during 10 weeks. Lessons were prepared by 30 different lecturers, covering most basic areas in Microbiology and some monographic topics of general interest (malaria, HIV, tuberculosis, etc.. Data analysis on the impact and acceptance of the course were largely affirmative, promoting a 330% enhancement in the followers and a >350-fold increase of the number of visits per month to the Twitter account of the host institution, the Spanish Society for Microbiology. Almost one third of the course followers were located overseas. Our study indicates that Massive Online Open Courses (MOOC via Twitter are highly dynamic, interactive, and accessible to great audiences, providing a valuable tool for social learning and communicating science. This strategy attracts the interest of students towards particular topics in the field, efficiently complementing customary academic activities, especially in multidisciplinary areas like Microbiology.

  10. An Interactive Teaching – Learning Tool for Underprivileged Children in Rural Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Vignesh Ramamoorthy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In a country like India, there are children who starve for food, water and cannot spend time for studying and they have to work hard, to get one meal a day. The dropouts in schools are high because of various reasons. Education is not at affordable cost, government must bring some schemes. 80% schools suffer from shortage of teachers, infrastructural gaps and several habitations. There are also frequent allegations of government schools being riddled with absenteeism and mismanagement and appointments are based on political convenience. Despite the allure of free lunch-food in the government schools, many parents send their children to private schools. As a result, proponents of low cost private schools, critiqued government schools as being poor value for money. Furthermore, many international schools with most modern Information Communication Technology (ICT tools are mushrooming even in remote villages because the rural elites who are able to afford school fees in a country where large number of families live in absolute poverty. The major objective of this paper is to develop an interactive teaching-learning tool with multimedia applications for underprivileged children in rural schools. This tool will help the rural school children to have quality education at an affordable cost.

  11. Teaching Strategies to Apply in the Use of Technological Tools in Technical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Arranz García

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of new technologies in education area is changing the way of organizing the educational processes. Teachers are not unrelated to these changes and must employ new strategies to adapt their teaching methods to the new circumstances. One of these adaptations is framed in the virtual learning, where the learning management systems have been revealed as a very effective means within the learning process. In this paper we try to provide teachers in engineering schools how to use in an appropriate way the different technological tools that are present in a virtual platform. Thus, in the experimental framework we show the results outcomes in the analysis of two data samples obtained before and after the implementation of the European Higher Education Area, that would be extrapolated for its innovative application to the learning techniques.

  12. Essays on Eclipses, Transits and Occultations as Teaching Tools in the Introductory Astronomy College Course

    CERN Document Server

    Dcruz, Noella L

    2014-01-01

    We occasionally include projects in our learner-centered introductory astronomy college course to enable non-science major students explore some astronomical concepts in more detail than otherwise. Such projects also highlight ongoing or upcoming astronomical events. We hope that students will feel more interested in astronomy through projects tied to astronomical events. In Spring 2012, we offered short essays focused on eclipses, transits and occultations to promote the rare transit of Venus that occurred on June 5th, 2012. We asked students to write two short essays from three that were offered. The essays contained descriptive and conceptual parts. They were meant to serve as teaching tools. 62% of 106 essays from 55 students earned A, B or C grades. 21% of 47 feedback survey respondents felt the essays increased their interest in astronomy. 49% of respondents felt that the essays were not educationally beneficial and should not be offered again. The most common written response to our survey indicated th...

  13. Architecture-Adaptive Computing Environment: A Tool for Teaching Parallel Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorband, John E.; Aburdene, Maurice F.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, networked and cluster computation have become very popular. This paper is an introduction to a new C based parallel language for architecture-adaptive programming, aCe C. The primary purpose of aCe (Architecture-adaptive Computing Environment) is to encourage programmers to implement applications on parallel architectures by providing them the assurance that future architectures will be able to run their applications with a minimum of modification. A secondary purpose is to encourage computer architects to develop new types of architectures by providing an easily implemented software development environment and a library of test applications. This new language should be an ideal tool to teach parallel programming. In this paper, we will focus on some fundamental features of aCe C.

  14. Developing and testing multimedia educational tools to teach Polar Sciences in the Italian school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macario, Maddalena; Cattadori, Matteo; Bianchi, Cristiana; Zattin, Massimiliano; Talarico, Franco Maria

    2013-04-01

    In the last few years science education moved forward rapidly by connecting the expertise and enthusiasm of polar educators worldwide. The interest in Polar Sciences determined the creation of a global professional network for those that educate in, for, and about the Polar Regions. In Italy, this cooperation is well represented by APECS-Italy, the Italian section of the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) that is composed by young researchers and teachers of the Italian School. The Polar Regions represent one of the best natural environments where students can investigate directly on global changes. In this sense, the working group UNICAMearth of the Geology Division of School of Science and Technology, University of Camerino (Italy), promotes the arrangement of instructional resources based on real data coming from the research world. Our project aims to develop innovative teaching resources and practices designed to bring the importance of the Polar Regions closer to home. Consequently, Polar Sciences could become a focus point in the new national school curricula, where Earth Sciences have to be thought and learnt in an integrated way together with other sciences. In particular, M. Macario is producing a teaching tool package, starting from a case study, which includes a dozen of full lesson plans based on multimedia tools (images, smart board lessons and videos of lab experiments) as well as on hands-on activities about polar issues and phenomena. Among the resources the teaching tool package is referring to, there is also an App for tablet named CLAST (CLimate in Antartica from Sediments and Tectonics). This App has been designed by a team made up of polar scientists belonging to the University of Siena and University of Padova, two science teachers of the Museo delle Scienze (MUSE) of Trento other than M. Macario. CLAST has been funded by two Research Projects, CLITEITAM ("CLImate-TEctonics Interactions along the TransAntarctic Mountains

  15. The Web as an educational tool for/in learning/teaching bioinformatics statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J; Pisano, M E; Alonso, T; Roca, P

    2005-12-01

    Statistics provides essential tool in Bioinformatics to interpret the results of a database search or for the management of enormous amounts of information provided from genomics, proteomics and metabolomics. The goal of this project was the development of a software tool that would be as simple as possible to demonstrate the use of the Bioinformatics statistics. Computer Simulation Methods (CSMs) developed using Microsoft Excel were chosen for their broad range of applications, immediate and easy formula calculation, immediate testing and easy graphics representation, and of general use and acceptance by the scientific community. The result of these endeavours is a set of utilities which can be accessed from the following URL: http://gmein.uib.es/bioinformatica/statistics. When tested on students with previous coursework with traditional statistical teaching methods, the general opinion/overall consensus was that Web-based instruction had numerous advantages, but traditional methods with manual calculations were also needed for their theory and practice. Once having mastered the basic statistical formulas, Excel spreadsheets and graphics were shown to be very useful for trying many parameters in a rapid fashion without having to perform tedious calculations. CSMs will be of great importance for the formation of the students and professionals in the field of bioinformatics, and for upcoming applications of self-learning and continuous formation.

  16. [EpiInfo as a research and teaching tool in epidemiology and statistics: strengths and weaknesses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannocci, Alice; Bontempi, Claudio; Giraldi, Guglielmo; Chiaradia, Giacomina; de Waure, Chiara; Sferrazza, Antonella; Ricciardi, Walter; Boccia, Antonio; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    EpiInfo is a free software developed in 1988 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta to facilitate field epidemiological investigations and statistical analysis. The aim of this study was to assess whether the software represents, in the Italian biomedical field, an effective analytical research tool and a practical and simple epidemiology and biostatistics teaching tool. A questionnaire consisting of 20 multiple-choice and open questions was administered to 300 healthcare workers, including doctors, biologists, nurses, medical students and interns, at the end of a CME course in epidemiology and biostatistics. Sixty-four percent of participants were aged between 26 and 45 years, 52% were women and 73% were unmarried. Results show that women are more likely to utilize EpiInfo in their research activities with respect to men (p = 0.023), as are individuals aged 26-45 years with respect to the older and younger age groups (p = 0.023) and unmarried participants with respect to those married (p = 0.010). Thirty-one percent of respondents consider EpiInfo to be more than adequate for analysis of their research data and 52% consider it to be sufficiently so. The inclusion of an EpiInfo course in statistics and epidemiology modules facilitates the understanding of theoretical concepts and allows researchers to more easily perform some of the clinical/epidemiological research activities.

  17. Overview of Nuclear Physics Data: Databases, Web Applications and Teaching Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchan, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The mission of the United States Nuclear Data Program (USNDP) is to provide current, accurate, and authoritative data for use in pure and applied areas of nuclear science and engineering. This is accomplished by compiling, evaluating, and disseminating extensive datasets. Our main products include the Evaluated Nuclear Structure File (ENSDF) containing information on nuclear structure and decay properties and the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) containing information on neutron-induced reactions. The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), through the website www.nndc.bnl.gov, provides web-based retrieval systems for these and many other databases. In addition, the NNDC hosts several on-line physics tools, useful for calculating various quantities relating to basic nuclear physics. In this talk, I will first introduce the quantities which are evaluated and recommended in our databases. I will then outline the searching capabilities which allow one to quickly and efficiently retrieve data. Finally, I will demonstrate how the database searches and web applications can provide effective teaching tools concerning the structure of nuclei and how they interact. Work supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics, Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  18. A teaching skills assessment tool inspired by the Calgary-Cambridge model and the patient-centered approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Johanna; Lanier, Cédric; Perron, Noelle Junod; Nendaz, Mathieu; Clavet, Diane; Audétat, Marie-Claude

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a descriptive tool for peer review of clinical teaching skills. Two analogies framed our research: (1) between the patient-centered and the learner-centered approach; (2) between the structures of clinical encounters (Calgary-Cambridge communication model) and teaching sessions. During the course of one year, each step of the action research was carried out in collaboration with twelve clinical teachers from an outpatient general internal medicine clinic and with three experts in medical education. The content validation consisted of a literature review, expert opinion and the participatory research process. Interrater reliability was evaluated by three clinical teachers coding thirty audiotaped standardized learner-teacher interactions. This tool contains sixteen items covering the process and content of clinical supervisions. Descriptors define the expected teaching behaviors for three levels of competence. Interrater reliability was significant for eleven items (Kendall's coefficient pteaching skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Access, Use and Perceptions of Teachers and Students towards Mobile Phones as a Tool for Teaching and Learning in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafyulilo, Ayoub

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the access, use and perceptions of teachers and students towards mobile phones as a tool for facilitating teaching and learning beyond the classroom walls. A total of 29 pre-service teachers and four college instructors from Dar es salaam University College of Education (DUCE) as well as 12 in-service teachers and 40 students…

  20. A tool for teaching three-dimensional dermatomes combined with distribution of cutaneous nerves on the limbs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooloos, J.G.M.; Vorstenbosch, M.A.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    A teaching tool that facilitates student understanding of a three-dimensional (3D) integration of dermatomes with peripheral cutaneous nerve field distributions is described. This model is inspired by the confusion in novice learners between dermatome maps and nerve field distribution maps. This con

  1. Video as a Professional Development Tool to Support Novice Teachers as They Learn to Teach English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estapa, Anne; Pinnow, Rachel J.; Chval, Kathryn B.

    2016-01-01

    This two-year study investigated how an innovative video tool enhanced novice-teacher noticing abilities and instructional practice in relation to teaching mathematics to English language learners in third grade classrooms. Specifically, teachers viewed videos of their mathematics lessons that were filmed by Latino English language learners who…

  2. Video as a Professional Development Tool to Support Novice Teachers as They Learn to Teach English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estapa, Anne; Pinnow, Rachel J.; Chval, Kathryn B.

    2016-01-01

    This two-year study investigated how an innovative video tool enhanced novice-teacher noticing abilities and instructional practice in relation to teaching mathematics to English language learners in third grade classrooms. Specifically, teachers viewed videos of their mathematics lessons that were filmed by Latino English language learners who…

  3. Measuring Effectiveness of Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) Tools in Teaching School Children: A Case Study from Chattisgarh State, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, J. Durga Prasad; Singh, Raksha

    2011-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of Information Communication and Technology tools viz DLP (Distance Learning Projector) and Computer/Laptop in comparison with selected instructional media for teaching primary and secondary school pupils. It examined the effect of grade on the performance of the pupils taught with four…

  4. Students' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of the World Wide Web as a Research and Teaching Tool in Science Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wan; Gunstone, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the use of the World Wide Web (WWW) as a research and teaching tool in promoting self-directed learning groups of 15-year-old students. Discusses the perceptions of students of the effectiveness of the WWW in assisting them with the construction of knowledge on photosynthesis and respiration. (Contains 33 references.) (Author/YDS)

  5. Plagiarism Detection: A Comparison of Teaching Assistants and a Software Tool in Identifying Cheating in a Psychology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifried, Eva; Lenhard, Wolfgang; Spinath, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Essays that are assigned as homework in large classes are prone to cheating via unauthorized collaboration. In this study, we compared the ability of a software tool based on Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) and student teaching assistants to detect plagiarism in a large group of students. To do so, we took two approaches: the first approach was…

  6. Using Portfolios as a Learning Tool to Develop Preservice Teachers' Inquiries and Perspectives in Early Science Teaching in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung-Yoeun

    2009-01-01

    This study has identified the effectiveness of using portfolios for the prospective teachers as a tool of an explicit, reflective, and instructional approach in science education. Early childhood science method courses in a college for unskilled early childhood teachers influence their theory and practice toward science teaching. It describes…

  7. The Teaching Practices Inventory: A New Tool for Characterizing College and University Teaching in Mathematics and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieman, Carl; Gilbert, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    We have created an inventory to characterize the teaching practices used in science and mathematics courses. This inventory can aid instructors and departments in reflecting on their teaching. It has been tested with several hundred university instructors and courses from mathematics and four science disciplines. Most instructors complete the…

  8. The teaching practices inventory: a new tool for characterizing college and university teaching in mathematics and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieman, Carl; Gilbert, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    We have created an inventory to characterize the teaching practices used in science and mathematics courses. This inventory can aid instructors and departments in reflecting on their teaching. It has been tested with several hundred university instructors and courses from mathematics and four science disciplines. Most instructors complete the inventory in 10 min or less, and the results allow meaningful comparisons of the teaching used for the different courses and instructors within a department and across different departments. We also show how the inventory results can be used to gauge the extent of use of research-based teaching practices, and we illustrate this with the inventory results for five departments. These results show the high degree of discrimination provided by the inventory, as well as its effectiveness in tracking the increase in the use of research-based teaching practices.

  9. A Teach-Discover-Treat Application of ZincPharmer: An Online Interactive Pharmacophore Modeling and Virtual Screening Tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ryan Koes

    Full Text Available The 2012 Teach-Discover-Treat (TDT community-wide experiment provided a unique opportunity to test prospective virtual screening protocols targeting the anti-malarial target dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH. Facilitated by ZincPharmer, an open access online interactive pharmacophore search of the ZINC database, the experience resulted in the development of a novel classification scheme that successfully predicted the bound structure of a non-triazolopyrimidine inhibitor, as well as an overall hit rate of 27% of tested active compounds from multiple novel chemical scaffolds. The general approach entailed exhaustively building and screening sparse pharmacophore models comprising of a minimum of three features for each bound ligand in all available DHODH co-crystals and iteratively adding features that increased the number of known binders returned by the query. Collectively, the TDT experiment provided a unique opportunity to teach computational methods of drug discovery, develop innovative methodologies and prospectively discover new compounds active against DHODH.

  10. [Peer teaching and peer assessment are appropriate tools in medical education in otorhinolaryngology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, M; Linke, J; Zahnert, T; Neudert, M

    2014-06-01

    The use of student tutors (peers) is an accepted method in medical education. In 2011, final year students of the otorhinolaryngology (ORL) department of the University Hospital in Dresden were appointed as peers for the clinical ORL examination. They assisted in the instruction of the clinical ORL examination (peer teaching, PT) and served as examiners (peer assessment, PA) in the final objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). The effect on the quality of education and examination was examined. 248 medical students (5(th) year) were divided in 2 groups. They were trained and finally examined in the standardized clinical ORL examination by peers and/or physicians. Group I (n=118) was exclusively trained and examined by physicians and group II (n=130) by peers and physicians. The results of the OSCE were stratified for the 2 groups and in group II for the subgroups according to the instructors' and examiners' qualification (peer or physician). The students evaluated the internship and the instructors' and examiners' quality with a validated questionnaire. In the OSCE, group I scored in the mean 59.9±4.9 points (max. 65). In group II the mean score was 58.3±4.3 points examined by the peers and 59.5±4.8 points for same performance assessed by the physicians. There were no statistical significant differences in the examination results when stratified for the instructors' and examiners' qualification. The evaluation results were consistently positive and identical when compared to the previous year without use of PT and PA and between the 2 groups and subgroups. When using a standardized clinical examination routine peers can be used for PT and PA to appropriate tools in student's medical education without any decrease in the teaching and examination quality. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Scholarship 2.0: analyzing scholars’ use of Web 2.0 tools in research and teaching activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licia Calvi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 15 years the Web has transformed the ways in which we search for information and use it. In more recent years, we have seen the emergence of a new array of innovative tools that collectively go under the name of ‘Web 2.0’, in which the information user is also increasingly an information producer (i.e., prosumer, by sharing or creating content.The success of Web 2.0 tools for personal use is only partially replicated in the professional sphere and, particularly, in the academic environment in relation with research and teaching.To date, very few studies have explored the level of adoption of Web 2.0 among academic researchers in their research and teaching activity. It is not known in what way how and how much Web 2.0 is currently used within research communities, and we are not aware of the drivers and the drawbacks of the use of Web 2.0 tools in academia, where the majority of people is focused either on research or on teaching activities.To analyse these issues, i.e. the combined adoption of Web 2.0 tools in teaching and research, the authors carried out a survey among teaching and researching staff of the University of Breda in The Netherlands. This country was chosen mainly because it is on the cutting edge as far as innovation is concerned. An important driver in choosing the Breda University’s academic community was the fact that one of the two authors of this survey works as senior researcher at this university.The purpose of our survey was to explore the level of adoption of Web 2.0 tools among the academic communities. We were interested in investigating how they were using these tools in the creation of scientific knowledge both in their research and teaching activity. We were also interested in analysing differences in the level of adoption of Web 2.0 tools with regard to researchers’ position, age, gender, and research field.Finally, in our study we explored the issue of peer reviewing in the Web 2.0 setting

  12. Some personal notes on role plays as an excellent teaching tool : commentary on "using and developing role plays in teaching aimed at preparing for social responsibility".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Iris

    2013-12-01

    Role plays are extremely valuable tools to address different aspects of teaching social responsibility, because they allow students to "live through" complex ethical decision making dilemmas. While role plays are getting high marks from students because their entertainment value is high, their educational value depends on their closeness to students' work experience and the skills of the teacher in helping students comprehend the lessons they are meant to convey.

  13. Teaching Tools for Pedagogy at the Nanoscale: Towards the Understanding of Concepts Through Experience and Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Marc Nicholas

    The field of nanochemistry is at the forefront of the physical sciences, and is increasingly finding diverse applications. As such, there is a need to allow this frontier to be explored thoroughly in undergraduate chemistry curricula. The development of new instructional materials is necessary, as the existing literature in undergraduate nanochemistry education does not provide instructors with adequate resources to help students make connections between core scientific concepts and those pertinent to the nanoscale. As such, we aim to treat nanoscale phenomena not as a niche subject but as an educationally rich portion of chemistry at the interface of discrete and bulk structures. To accomplish this, we have developed and tested instructional materials that are designed to fit directly into the chemistry curriculum and provide instructors with the flexibility to incorporate them in their courses. These teaching tools/modules have been designed using a theoretical framework for analogy and similarity coupled with a bridging framework in order to reinforce students' physical and chemical concepts and facilitate their recognition of such in the context of nanochemistry. Our approach is to construct concepts related to nanochemistry by tethering them directly, through the use of analogy and similarity, to material commonly covered within the courses, rather than present them in an unrelated fashion or completely outside the students' current frame of reference. Assessment of these tools has been carried out through a qualitative analysis incorporating a discourse analytical framework applied to individual student interviews and small group discussions. A coding scheme was devised and utilized for consistent characterization of students' responses and discussions. Results are discussed critically and pedagogical implications for each activity and the project as a whole are provided.

  14. Research and Teaching: Photovoice as a Pedagogical Tool--Student Engagement in Undergraduate Introductory Chemistry for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Mary W.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the use of Photovoice as a pedagogical tool in two introductory undergraduate chemistry courses for nonscience majors. Photovoice, historically linked to participatory action research, is a qualitative mode of inquiry in which the perspectives provided in narratives and pictures are generally personal, subjective, and unique.…

  15. Two-compartment model as a teaching tool for cholesterol homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrona, Artur; Balbus, Joanna; Hrydziuszko, Olga; Kubica, Krystian

    2015-12-01

    Cholesterol is a vital structural and functional molecule in the human body that is only slightly soluble in water and therefore does not easily travels by itself in the bloodstream. To enable cholesterol's targeted delivery to cells and tissues, it is encapsulated by different fractions of lipoproteins, complex particles containing both proteins and lipids. Maintaining cholesterol homeostasis is a highly regulated process with multiple factors acting at both molecular and tissue levels. Furthermore, to regulate the circulatory transport of cholesterol in lipoproteins, the amount of cholesterol present depends on and is controlled by cholesterol dietary intake, de novo synthesis, usage, and excretion; abnormal and/or unbalanced cholesterol levels have been shown to lead to severe outcomes, e.g., cardiovascular diseases. To investigate cholesterol transport in the circulatory system, we have previously developed a two-compartment mathematical model. Here, we show how this model can be used as a teaching tool for cholesterol homeostasis. Using the model and a hands-on approach, students can familiarize themselves with the basic components and mechanisms behind balanced cholesterol circulatory transport as well as investigate the consequences of and countermeasures to abnormal cholesterol levels. Among others, various treatments of high blood cholesterol levels can be simulated, e.g., with commonly prescribed de novo cholesterol synthesis inhibitors.

  16. Simulation in Nursing Education: iPod As a Teaching Tool for Undergraduate Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jennifer; Webster, Sue; Gallagher, Susan; Brown, Peter; Sinclair, John

    2015-07-01

    Most people with psychosis and schizophrenia experience auditory hallucinations, particularly the hearing of voices. A common cause of frustration and alienation for consumers is the lack of understanding by therapists, family members and caregivers, who find it difficult to relate to the consumers' experiences. The purpose of this study is to examine and evaluate whether students' participation in a simulated auditory hallucination will increase their understanding and knowledge about psychosis and auditory hallucinations. The design method consisted of a lecture on psychosis and schizophrenia disorders, followed by a simulation of auditory hallucinations using iPods. Students' knowledge and perceptions of psychosis and hallucinations was assessed using quasi-experimental pre-post matched-design questionnaires. The questionnaire was divided into two parts, the first comprised closed questions to assess students' knowledge, and the second part consisted of open-ended questions to collect information about students' perceptions of auditory hallucinations. The results confirmed that students' knowledge of psychosis and hallucination increased following the teaching session and simulation is a useful tool to prepare students for clinical placements in mental health practice.

  17. SOCIAL PROJECT IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHING AS A TOOL FOR EFFECTIVE MOTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлия Леонидовна Гончарова

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Subject and purpose of the researchThis paper describes an experiment on the use of social projects as a kind of extra-curricular collaboration in order to increase students' motivation to learn English, to overcome the psychological barrier of communication in a foreign language, and for the purpose of evaluating the skills of independent learning in the process of solving practical problems or tasks.Design of the experimentThe origin of the problem and the development of learning and cognitive activity during the preparation of students for the project is being described; the expected positive result and the organizational algorithm of the project are proposed.Progress and findingsA phased description of the work of students with emphasis on unexpected and interesting findings is presented; an evaluation system of the individual contribution of each of the students on the project and the ability to work on a team is offered.Practical implicationsConclusions are made about the relevance of the use of group projects in teaching foreign languages as an effective tool to stimulate learning motivation and overcoming socio-psychological and communication problems within the training group and the community as a whole.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-6-44

  18. From the Field to the Classroom: A Web-Based Teaching Tool on Depositional Environments and Landscape Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzic, M.; Watson, K.; Grand, S.; Crowley, C.; Dyanatkar, S.; Bomke, A.; Smith, S.

    2012-04-01

    The relationship between sedimentary deposits, landforms and soil profile development is difficult for students to grasp in a conventional classroom setting. The ideal way to solve this is to take the students on extended field trips; however, field trips are expensive, have to be conducted during specific time periods, and can only handle a limited number of students. The objective of this project was to bring the field to the classroom via a virtual, dynamic web-based teaching tool illustrating common depositional environments and associated landforms and soils. The teaching tool was largely based on video footage obtained in the Canadian Rocky Mountains and in the grasslands of the southern interior of British Columbia. The Canadian Rockies are undergoing rapid deglaciation and provided excellent examples of new glacial deposits and early landscape development processes. On the other hand, British Columbia's grasslands became ice-free about 10,000 years ago and were used to illustrate landscape evolution and post-glaciation soil profile development. To bring these two environments together, video footage of corresponding landforms was shot at both locations and edited into a series of short video clips illustrating the link between depositional processes, resulting landforms and soils and their post-glacial evolution. Soil scientists, survey specialists and geomorphologists provided live commentary. The teaching tool (http://soilweb.landfood.ubc.ca/landscape/) is an open-access website merging video clips, sound recordings, text, photos and graphics intended to help students situate landforms within their geomorphologic context. This online teaching resource allows students to observe, on their own time, conditions under which sediments are deposited and soils are formed, and to witness the transformation of a barren, glacial landscape into a vegetated soil landscape. The tool can be used in various geomorphology, soil, agriculture, forestry, and natural

  19. Applying a visual language for image processing as a graphical teaching tool in medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchman, James J.; Tanimoto, Steven L.; Rowberg, Alan H.; Choi, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Yongmin

    1992-05-01

    the user creates and edits a dataflow path, more complex algorithms can be built on the screen. Once the algorithm is built, it can be executed, its results can be reviewed, and operator parameters can be interactively adjusted until an optimized output is produced. The optimized algorithm can then be saved and added to the system as a new operator. This system has been evaluated as a graphical teaching tool for window width and window level adjustment, image enhancement using unsharp masking, and other techniques.

  20. Improving process of teaching students by means of methods and tools of knowledge management and e-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Banachowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of teaching students is of the greatest importance. It is important to study how to manage it to achieve the best advantages to the students and the university. The authors propose to apply the methods and tools of knowledge management and e-learning. The potential of knowledge management lies in the optimization of university processes, in introducing organizational learning and in helping to take well grounded decisions. The potential of e-learning lies in the improvement of the quality of education, in higher flexibility and adaptability of teaching process to the needs of individual students and in lowering the cost of education. The article shows how to apply e-portfolios and information systems to support the teaching process and knowledge management at academic institutions.

  1. The digital microscope: a tool for teaching laboratory skills in distance learning courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommett, Eleanor J; Leys, Katherine S

    2008-01-01

    The majority of undergraduate students studying for a science degree will at some point carry out experiments in a laboratory setting, thus developing their practical skills and understanding of experimental principles. For distance learning students, there is no laboratory setting available for them to complete such work and as such there is a risk that they will lack these key skills. The Open University has developed a computerized tool, in the form of a Digital Microscope, to allow students to collect data to investigate the effects of drugs of abuse on different regions of the rat brain. Small groups of students were set a specific hypothesis to investigate, in this instance students were looking at the differential effects of cocaine and amphetamine on the caudate putamen. Using the microscope students counted the number of Fos positive cells in the caudate putamen to contribute to a group data set. Tutors collated the data from all students in the group and returned the full set to them for analysis and interpretation. In order to evaluate the Digital Microscope we compared student data with data collected by a tutor on the course and obtained feedback questionnaires from students and tutors. We found that while student counts were substantially higher than those made by a tutor, the relationships between experimental groups were preserved. Furthermore, the majority of students and tutors felt that using the microscope had provided useful experience of a number of key practical skills including obtaining and collating data, and the potential areas of error in experiments. Both tutors and students felt that the provision of the microscope had added value to the course. In light of these positive ratings, we feel that this unique tool is useful, not only in distance learning, but also in traditional universities where animal experimentation is limited.

  2. Using Modern And Inexpensive Tools In the Classroom To Teach Spectroscopy And To Do Exciting Citizen Science On Astronomical Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, T.

    2014-12-01

    Spectroscopy is a key tool used in modern astronomical research. But, it's always been a difficult topic to teach or practice because the expense and complexity of the available tools. Over the past few years, there's been somewhat of a revolution in this field as new technologies have applied. In this presentation we'll review some new spectroscopy tools that enable educators, students and citizen scientists to do exciting spectroscopic work. With the addition of a simple, inexpensive grating, it's now possible to capture scientifically significant spectra of astronomical objects with small (6") telescopes and even just a DSLR. See the tools that citizen scientists are using to contribute data to pro-am collaborations around the world. We'll also examine a simple, surprisingly inexpensive, tripod-mounted spectrometer that can be used in the classroom for demonstrations and hands-on labs with gas tubes and other light sources. Both of the above instruments use a software program named RSpec, which is state of the art software suite that is easy to learn and easy to use. In this presentation we'll see these devices in operation and discuss how they can be used by educators to dramatically improve their teaching of this topic. You'll see how these tools can eliminate the frustration of hand-held rainbow foil and plastic spectrometers. And we'll review some exciting examples of astronomical spectra being collected by amateurs and educators.

  3. The Effect of Using a Visual Representation Tool in a Teaching-Learning Sequence for Teaching Newton's Third Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinainen, Antti; Mäkynen, Asko; Nieminen, Pasi; Viiri, Jouni

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a research-based teaching-learning sequence (TLS) that focuses on the notion of interaction in teaching Newton's third law (N3 law) which is, as earlier studies have shown, a challenging topic for students to learn. The TLS made systematic use of a visual representation tool—an interaction diagram (ID)—highlighting interactions between objects and addressing the learning demand related to N3 law. This approach had been successful in enhancing students' understanding of N3 law in pilot studies conducted by teacher-researchers. However, it was unclear whether teachers, who have neither been involved with the research nor received intensive tutoring, could replicate the positive results in ordinary school settings. To address this question, we present an empirical study conducted in 10 Finnish upper secondary schools with students ( n = 261, aged 16) taking their mandatory physics course. The study design involved three groups: the heavy ID group (the TLS with seven to eight exercises on IDs), the light ID group (two to three exercises on IDs) and the no ID group (no exercises on IDs). The heavy and light ID groups answered eight ID questions, and all the students answered four questions on N3 law after teaching the force concept. The findings clearly suggest that systematic use of the IDs in teaching the force concept significantly fostered students' understanding of N3 law even with teachers who have no intensive tutoring or research background.

  4. Systematic evaluation of the teaching qualities of Obstetrics and Gynecology faculty: reliability and validity of the SETQ tools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée van der Leeuw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The importance of effective clinical teaching for the quality of future patient care is globally understood. Due to recent changes in graduate medical education, new tools are needed to provide faculty with reliable and individualized feedback on their teaching qualities. This study validates two instruments underlying the System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ aimed at measuring and improving the teaching qualities of obstetrics and gynecology faculty. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This cross-sectional multi-center questionnaire study was set in seven general teaching hospitals and two academic medical centers in the Netherlands. Seventy-seven residents and 114 faculty were invited to complete the SETQ instruments in the duration of one month from September 2008 to September 2009. To assess reliability and validity of the instruments, we used exploratory factor analysis, inter-item correlation, reliability coefficient alpha and inter-scale correlations. We also compared composite scales from factor analysis to global ratings. Finally, the number of residents' evaluations needed per faculty for reliable assessments was calculated. A total of 613 evaluations were completed by 66 residents (85.7% response rate. 99 faculty (86.8% response rate participated in self-evaluation. Factor analysis yielded five scales with high reliability (Cronbach's alpha for residents' and faculty: learning climate (0.86 and 0.75, professional attitude (0.89 and 0.81, communication of learning goals (0.89 and 0.82, evaluation of residents (0.87 and 0.79 and feedback (0.87 and 0.86. Item-total, inter-scale and scale-global rating correlation coefficients were significant (P<0.01. Four to six residents' evaluations are needed per faculty (reliability coefficient 0.60-0.80. CONCLUSIONS: Both SETQ instruments were found reliable and valid for evaluating teaching qualities of obstetrics and gynecology faculty. Future research should examine improvement of

  5. Effects of Using Online Tools in Improving Regulation of the Teaching-Learning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Jesus; Cano, Francisco; Justicia, Fernando; Pichardo, Maria del Carmen; Garcia-Berben, Ana Belen; Martinez-Vicente, Jose Manuel; Sander, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The current panorama of Higher Education reveals a need to improve teaching and learning processes taking place there. The rise of the information society transforms how we organize learning and transmit knowledge. On this account, teaching-learning processes must be enhanced, the role of teachers and students must be evaluated, and…

  6. Using Games as a Tool in Teaching Vocabulary to Young Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsh, Sahar Ameer

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few decades, teaching English become a phenomenon in Saudi Arabia, especially to young learners. English is taught as a main subject in kindergarten and elementary schools. Like any other children, Saudis accept new foreign languages easily, but they get bored very fast if the teacher is teaching them using the old conventional…

  7. Teaching Lab Science Courses Online: Resources for Best Practices, Tools, and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschofnig, Linda; Jeschofnig, Peter

    2011-01-01

    "Teaching Lab Science Courses Online" is a practical resource for educators developing and teaching fully online lab science courses. First, it provides guidance for using learning management systems and other web 2.0 technologies such as video presentations, discussion boards, Google apps, Skype, video/web conferencing, and social media…

  8. Use of the One-Minute Preceptor as a Teaching Tool in the Gross Anatomy Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lap Ki; Wiseman, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The one-minute preceptor (OMP) is a time-efficient technique used for teaching in busy clinical settings. It consists of five microskills: (1) get a commitment from the student, (2) probe for supporting evidence, (3) reinforce what was done right, (4) correct errors and fill in omissions, and (5) teach a general rule. It can also be used to…

  9. Integration of Open Educational Resources in Undergraduate Chemistry Teaching--A Mapping Tool and Lecturers' Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman-Maggor, Yael; Rom, Amira; Tuvi-Arad, Inbal

    2016-01-01

    This study examines chemistry lecturers' considerations for using open educational resources (OER) in their teaching. Recent technological developments provide innovative approaches for teaching chemistry and visualizing chemical phenomena. End users' improved ability to upload information online enables integration of various pedagogical models…

  10. What Was College Like for You?: Ethnography as a Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Marian H.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this learning activity was to teach undergraduate students about recreation and leisure experiences of the older members of the Lumbee Tribe who attended the local university. This activity utilized ethnographic interviews to teach students about the local community and college life for those from older generations. Ethnography is a…

  11. Discussion of teaching method of CNC machine tools and applications%数控机床及应用课程教学方法的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志荣; 俞庆

    2014-01-01

    针对数控机床及应用课程中不同环节的教学内容,采用多种教学方法相结合的形式,如多媒体教学、虚拟仿真技术教学、案例教学、现场教学以及项目驱动教学等方法,使学生更好地理解和掌握所学知识,提高教学质量。%In the paper, according to the different contents in the course of CNC machine tools and applications, a form of the combination of different teaching methods was used, such as multimedia teaching, virtual simulation technology teaching, case teaching, scene teaching and project driven teaching method. It can enable students to better understand and grasp the knowledge and improve the quality of teaching.

  12. Systematic Evaluation of the Teaching Qualities of Obstetrics and Gynecology Faculty: Reliability and Validity of the SETQ Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Leeuw, Renée; Lombarts, Kiki; Heineman, Maas Jan; Arah, Onyebuchi

    2011-01-01

    Background The importance of effective clinical teaching for the quality of future patient care is globally understood. Due to recent changes in graduate medical education, new tools are needed to provide faculty with reliable and individualized feedback on their teaching qualities. This study validates two instruments underlying the System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ) aimed at measuring and improving the teaching qualities of obstetrics and gynecology faculty. Methods and Findings This cross-sectional multi-center questionnaire study was set in seven general teaching hospitals and two academic medical centers in the Netherlands. Seventy-seven residents and 114 faculty were invited to complete the SETQ instruments in the duration of one month from September 2008 to September 2009. To assess reliability and validity of the instruments, we used exploratory factor analysis, inter-item correlation, reliability coefficient alpha and inter-scale correlations. We also compared composite scales from factor analysis to global ratings. Finally, the number of residents' evaluations needed per faculty for reliable assessments was calculated. A total of 613 evaluations were completed by 66 residents (85.7% response rate). 99 faculty (86.8% response rate) participated in self-evaluation. Factor analysis yielded five scales with high reliability (Cronbach's alpha for residents' and faculty): learning climate (0.86 and 0.75), professional attitude (0.89 and 0.81), communication of learning goals (0.89 and 0.82), evaluation of residents (0.87 and 0.79) and feedback (0.87 and 0.86). Item-total, inter-scale and scale-global rating correlation coefficients were significant (Pobstetrics and gynecology faculty. Future research should examine improvement of teaching qualities when using SETQ. PMID:21559275

  13. Teaching and Learning on Enzymes: The Need for New didactic tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Luiele

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes  are biological catalysts essential  for vital  chemical reactions  in the  cell.  The proper  under- standing  of enzyme  functioning  is an  important step  to  learn  more about life, the  subject  study  of biology. However, without  the opportunity to use a laboratory, it is difficult to the student to visualize the enzyme function.  Our project  is based in the production of a didactic  tool in a CD-rom media to teach enzymes.  In this way, we intend  to teach enzymology in a easy, playful, and more comprehensive way than  usually  is done by lectures.  The CD-room will present three  main subjects:  (i Theoretical aspects of enzymes; (ii Experimental and Interactive; and (iii Applications.  The first part  will bring short  texts  on the  structure and  function  of enzymes as well as some of their  history.   There  will be also a interactive show of some structures of enzymes,  collected  at  the  Protein Data  Bank,  where important  residues  and  location  of the  active  site will be shown in evidence.   In the  second part  of the CD-rom,  the student will be able to choose from different conditions  (substrate or concentration, pH, and temperature to visualize the kinetics  of a reaction  in a virtual  spctrophotometer where the changes  in absorbance  with  time  will be based  on actual  experiments done at the laboratory. The kinetic data  bank  includes reaction with  chymotrypsin, trypsin, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and alkaline phosphatase. From the experiments it will be possible to show how the rate  of a reaction is measured,  and how the kinetic constants can be obtained. The interactive part will show schematics where the  conditions  can be changed  and  a cartoon  corresponding  to the  situation will be displayed and will change according to the movement of a cursor.  Part III will describe some applications of

  14. EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF JOURNAL CLUB AS A TEACHING-LEARNING TOOL AMONG MEDICAL POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagyalakshm

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Journal club is an example of small group method of teaching-learning technique, being an important ingredient in medical education. Journal club has been advocated as a bridge between research and evidence based medical care in practice. It has been recognized as a means of keeping update with the literature; promoting the research activities; promoting evidence based medical care and teaching critical appraisal skills. METHODOLOGY This study assess the role of journal club as a teaching-learning tool by recording the perception of post graduates on journal club through a questionnaire based survey. RESULTS The scores for most of the items of fifteen point questionnaire were above three indicating that learning through journal club method is satisfactory. DISCUSSION The use of journal club should help the post graduate students see the connections between theory, research and practice aspects. The value of journal club is that it can promote better understanding of research process and improved ability to critically appraise research. CONCLUSION Many of the post graduate medical students perceived that journal club enhances the skills, promote evidence based medical care and update the knowledge on recent advances and felt that journal club must be scheduled regularly as a part of teaching-learning method in post graduate curriculum.

  15. Social Network Sites as ESL/EFL Learning and Teaching Tools: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Alnujaidi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the educational and instructional implications of Social Network Sites (SNS in the ESL/EFL teaching and learning context. SNS's definition, types, classifications, features, positive and negative aspects, their educational implications as well as their limitations and challenges in the ESL/EFL classroom settings are identified and discussed in order to better utilize and integrate their innovative aspects into the language teaching and learning practices.

  16. Personal experience narratives by students: a teaching-learning tool in bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Radhika H; Shukla, Radha; Gor, Alpa P; Ganguly, Barna

    2016-01-01

    The principles of bioethics have been identified as important requirements for training basic medical doctors. Till now, various modalities have been used for teaching bioethics, such as lectures, followed by a small case-based discussion, case vignettes or debates among students. For effective teaching-learning of bioethics, it is necessary to integrate theory and practice rather than merely teach theoretical constructs without helping the students translate those constructs into practice. Classroom teaching can focus on the theoretical knowledge of professional relationships, patient-doctor relationships, issues at the beginning and end of life, reproductive technologies, etc. However, a better learning environment can be created through an experiencebased approach to complement lectures and facilitate successful teaching. Engaging students in reflective dialogue with their peers would allow them to refine their ideas with respect to learning ethics. It can help in the development both of the cognitive and affective domains of the teaching of bioethics. Real-life narratives by the interns, when used as case or situation analysis models for a particular ethical issue, can enhance other students' insight and give them a moral boost. Doing this can change the classroom atmosphere, enhance motivation, improve the students' aptitude and improve their attitude towards learning bioethics. Involving the students in this manner can prove to be a sustainable way of achieving the goal of deep reflective learning of bioethics and can serve as a new technique for maintaining the interest of students as well as teachers.

  17. Competencia digital y herramientas de autor en la didáctica de las lenguas / Digital competence and authoring systems as teaching tools in language teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel López Ogáyar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Dedicamos este estudio a la competencia digital y a las herramientas de autor por la gran utilidad y el valor pedagógico que tienen como un recurso o instrumento de apoyo en el marco de la clase presencial. Las herramientas de autor nos permiten conseguir un proceso de enseñanza/aprendizaje multimedia, que además es significativo y constructivo. Explicamos una de las herramientas: Hot Potatoes. Ofrecemos una descripción técnica y hacemos hincapié en sus posibilidades de aplicación didáctica. Abstract: In this work we address the importance of digital competence and Authoring Systems as highly valuable pedagogical tools to be used as resources or supporting instruments within the classroom framework. Authoring Tools allow us to achieve a constructive and meaningful multimedia learning/teaching process. We focus our attention on one computer-based learning program: Hot Potatoes. We provide a technical description of the mentioned programs and, finally, we highlight their teaching implications.

  18. Teaching Methods and Tools Used In Food Safety Extension Education Programs in the North Central Region of the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Martin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the ways to ensure food safety is to educate thepublic. Of the organizations providing food safety educationin the United States (U.S., the Cooperative Extension System(CES is one of the most reliable. The effectiveness CESprograms depends not only on what is being taught but also onhow it is taught. Both a needs-based curriculum and how thatcurriculum is delivered are equally important. This descriptivecross-sectional study using a disproportional stratified randomsample identified the teaching methods and tools being used byfood safety extension educators of the CES of North CentralRegion (NCR. A Likert-type scale administered to extensioneducators revealed that they were adopting a balanced use ofteaching methods and tools, and using learner-centered teachingmethods in their programs. However, distance education, casestudies and podcasts, which are commonly used in educationprograms, were not being used extensively. We recommend thatfood safety extension educators of NCR should increase the useof these two teaching methods and tool while continuing to usethe current ones. This study has implications for improving foodsafety education delivery to clients in the NCR and for designinginservice education for food safety extension educators

  19. What Is Your Favorite Ed Tech Tool? Educators Hail the Benefits of Many Technologies during 30 Years of Effective Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Paul

    2009-01-01

    In honor of International Society for Technology in Education's (ISTE's) 30th anniversary, "Learning & Leading with Technology" conducted a poll asking members to cite their favorite teaching tools. After asking members of ISTE's Special Interest Groups to name three tech tools they felt were the most influential in education over the course of…

  20. Understanding and teaching key concepts and tools of evidence-based medicine: perspectives of a clinician-researcher pharmaceutical physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagianis, Jamie

    2011-12-01

    Clinical practice benefits from research to inform good decision making. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) helps physicians integrate experience and individual expertise with the best evidence. Various philosophical concepts, including "primum non nocere," are balanced to achieve this. The tools of EBM, such as number needed to treat, are easy to calculate and to use. Other valuable tools include number needed to harm, attributable risk, and likelihood of being helped or harmed. It is also important to distinguish between relative risk and absolute risk to avoid drawing the wrong conclusions. With the right teaching techniques to grab attention and encourage active participation, real examples can be used to impart practical skills that the clinician can employ in translating research findings into something that helps the individual patient.

  1. Virtual tours as a new teaching tool in geoscience: an example from the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Antoine; Champagnac, Jean-Daniel; Nomade, Jérome

    2013-04-01

    Since almost two decades, numerical tools allowed to spread the science to the people at large, worldwide. Within a few minutes, it is now easy to find a detailed course on one technical or scientific topic. A teacher can lead students to online contents (created by his/her own or by others) to complement his/her own course, with videos, maps or any other content that would remain accessible for the students a long time after the course itself. In geosciences, many national and international institutions provide real time monitoring of the Earth (e.g. seismicity, climate, volcanisms...) and / or scientific content based on active research or more mature results. There is little doubt that this new scientific content is a great step forward for the students and the researchers alike. Geosciences (and especially geology), however, usually require field observations and in situ measurements, and a good student curriculum cannot be achieved without a significant amount of walking, observations, and questions answered on the field. We, as geologists, all experienced days and days of sun, dust and pouring rain... Most of the universities provide the students with field courses that allow them to (try to) apply what they have learnt in the universities' buildings. However, these few days (often reduced to cut the costs and fit teachers' schedules) may not be sufficient given the complexity of the area visited and the possible lack of some parts of the teacher's explanations for various reasons. It is therefore important to build a virtual suite to the field itself to provide a cost-free support available year round, to eventually achieve or complete the field course. The new images technologies now offer amazing visualization capabilities to "show" the field in an interactive fashion. For instance, a few tens of pictures taken with a good SRL camera equipped with an ultra wide angle lens permit to build a 360° panorama with no deformation of a point of interest. Moreover

  2. Using case studies as a semester-long tool to teach neuroanatomy and structure-function relationships to undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Susan

    2013-01-01

    In addition to being inherently interesting to students, case studies can serve as useful tools to teach neuroanatomy and demonstrate important relationships between brain structure and function. In most undergraduate courses, however, neuroanatomy is presented to students as a "unit" or chapter, much like other topics (e.g., receptors, pharmacology) covered in the course, over a period of a week or two. In this article, a relatively simple model of teaching neuroanatomy is described in which students are actively engaged in the presentation and discussion of case studies throughout the semester, following a general introduction to the structure of the nervous system. In this way, the teaching of neuroanatomy is "distributed" throughout the semester and put into a more user-friendly context for students as additional topics are introduced. Generally, students report enjoying learning brain structure using this method, and commented positively on the class activities associated with learning brain anatomy. Advantages and disadvantages of such a model are presented, as are suggestions for implementing similar models of undergraduate neuroanatomy education.

  3. THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS WITH MEDIATING TOOLS: MOODLE WITH GEOGEBRA AND WEBQUEST FOR THE LEARNING OF MATHEMATICAL KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Aluizio Reali

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Much has been thought through about how to make the teaching and learning of scientific content more significant in order to collaborate with education. In this sense, it is up to the teacher to know aspects of human behavior to mediate and facilitate the interpretation of incoming information to students so that this information is transformed into knowledge. Therefore, the educator has seen its role as a transmitter of information turning into a facilitator of the transformation of this information into knowledge, a process that depends on both the teacher and the student. Thus, this work presents some aspects related to the teaching and learning of mathematics, highlighting the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs as mediating and helpful tools of learning. It also presents a virtual learning environment, Moodle, which comprehends Geogebra software, presented in a WebQuest so that together they may be used in the future for the teaching and learning of mathematics in Ourinhos- Fatec Technology College, São Paulo- - Brazil. It is expected, by means of this work, to contribute to discussions and reflections on some emblematic issues of this new practice and mode, as well as disseminate and encourage the use of Geogebra application.

  4. "Victor the Wild Boy" as a Teaching Tool for the History of Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The article describes an innovative technique for teaching the History of Psychology (HoP) using the story of Victor the "Wild Boy" of Aveyron. Students were given both a traditional history textbook and assignments, along with a novel on the life of Victor and a themed writing assignment. The goal was to elicit connections between…

  5. A Heuristic Tool for Teaching Business Writing: Self-Assessment, Knowledge Transfer, and Writing Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Lorelei A.

    2013-01-01

    To teach effective business communication, instructors must target students’ current weaknesses in writing. One method for doing so is by assigning writing exercises. When used heuristically, writing exercises encourage students to practice self-assessment, self-evaluation, active learning, and knowledge transfer, all while reinforcing the basics…

  6. The Periodic Table as a Tool for Teaching the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Erin E.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2008-01-01

    Teaching the connectedness of relationships among elements in the Periodic Table is often an overwhelming task, and can result in shallow student understanding. This article contains a series of activities that evoke student prior knowledge about classification, leads them to discover periodicity and other relationships among the characteristics…

  7. Mathematical Modelling and the Learning Trajectory: Tools to Support the Teaching of Linear Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárcamo Bahamonde, Andrea Dorila; Fortuny Aymemí, Josep Maria; Gómez i Urgellés, Joan Vicenç

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present a didactic proposal for teaching linear algebra based on two compatible theoretical models: emergent models and mathematical modelling. This proposal begins with a problematic situation related to the creation and use of secure passwords, which leads students toward the construction of the concepts of spanning set and…

  8. Tools of Inaction: The Impasse between Teaching Social Issues and Creating Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picower, Bree

    2015-01-01

    Within the field of teacher education, increased emphasis has been placed on social justice education (SJE). This qualitative study examined a group of beginning teachers who voluntarily participated in a social justice critical inquiry project (CIP). The findings indicate that while many of them were successful at teaching social issues, they…

  9. Gender-sensitive observations in public spaces as a teaching tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogleever Fortuijn, J.

    2009-01-01

    Public spaces can be seen as arenas where gendered social roles, relations and identities are (re)produced, represented and contested. Because of their (assumed) public character - crowded, open, accessible and visible - these spaces are extremely useful as «observatories» for teaching and learning

  10. Dialogic Practices in Using Podcasting and Blogging as Teaching Tools for Teachers Seeking ESOL Certificate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deoksoon; Jang, Seung Eun

    2014-01-01

    Rapid globalization and the emergence of new instructional technologies have encouraged educators to explore technologies like podcasting and blogging to enhance their teaching. This study examines how six English speakers of other languages (ESOL) teachers used podcasting and blogging to help young English learners, themselves 21st century…

  11. Sharing Songs: A Powerful Tool for Teaching Tolerance and Honoring Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Louise Mary

    2011-01-01

    Teaching songs from a wide variety of cultures is commonplace in music classrooms around the United States. Students gain understanding of and insight into a wide range of cultures by singing their songs and listening to their music. The Afghan Children's Songbook Project is a project focused on preserving and returning traditional songs,…

  12. Metaphors as a Tool for Diagnosing Beliefs about Teaching and Learning in Social Studies Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Szukala

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Do domain specific teaching/learning beliefs and epistemological beliefs exist and do they explain a domain specific approach to teaching and learning the social sciences? This paper reports on the first stage of an exploratory qualitative study carried out at the University of Bielefeld in 2010/11 on pre-service social studies teachers (PSST, n=61. It has a threefold aim: First, providing a very short overview of relevant trends in recent research on epistemological beliefs and teaching/learning beliefs and presenting some plausible hypotheses on if and how these belief dimensions are related to each other in the field of social studies education; second, presenting and discussing metaphors as a suitable qualitative research method for diagnosing and analysing the teaching and learning beliefs in the field; third, presenting the general outline of the Bielefeld project and a comparison of two emblematic cases of the project to evaluate the potential advantages and shortcomings of the research design and methods, especially of metaphor analysis.

  13. Developing and Testing EVALOE: A Tool for Assessing Spoken Language Teaching and Learning in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gràcia, Marta; Vega, Fàtima; Galván-Bovaira, Maria José

    2015-01-01

    Broadly speaking, the teaching of spoken language in Spanish schools has not been approached in a systematic way. Changes in school practices are needed in order to allow all children to become competent speakers and to understand and construct oral texts that are appropriate in different contexts and for different audiences both inside and…

  14. "Victor the Wild Boy" as a Teaching Tool for the History of Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The article describes an innovative technique for teaching the History of Psychology (HoP) using the story of Victor the "Wild Boy" of Aveyron. Students were given both a traditional history textbook and assignments, along with a novel on the life of Victor and a themed writing assignment. The goal was to elicit connections between…

  15. Is Virtual Reality a Useful Tool in the Teaching of Physiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This opinion statement points out some of the considerations and pitfalls in using virtual reality computer programs in the teaching of life sciences. Emphasis is placed on the possibility of such programs leading to reductionist thinking including how reductionist thinking could foster the formation of misconceptions. Negative feedback is used as…

  16. The Photomontages of John Heartfield: A Provocative Teaching Tool for "Landeskunde."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Gustave Bording

    1992-01-01

    A case is made for the use of the politically provocative photomontages of Heartfield (a.k.a. Berlin-born Helmut Herzfeld) in the German classroom. The interplay of language, art, culture, and history makes them especially useful as realia. A model for teaching them is presented, including a chronology and nine reproductions. (Author/LB)

  17. An Audit of Ward Experience as a Tool for Teaching Diagnosis in Pulmonary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Madhav K.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Analyzes and compares diagnoses made over a five-year period to determine whether differences between diagnoses of students and those of specialists justified further verification by specialized staff, and whether the proportion of such differences had changed with time because of more effective teaching. (WM)

  18. Image Processing for Teaching: Transforming a Scientific Research Tool into an Educational Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Image Processing for Teaching (IPT) project which provides digital image processing to excite students about science and mathematics as they use research-quality software on microcomputers. Provides information on IPT whose components of this dissemination project have been widespread teacher education, curriculum-based materials…

  19. Parasitology as a Teaching Tool: Isolation of Apicomplexan Cysts from Store-Bought Meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Tracy L.; Fitzpatrick, Eileen; Hager, Kristin M.

    2008-01-01

    There are obstacles to teaching science; however, these obstacles are not insurmountable. One obstacle is the students themselves. Students often labor under the misconception or anxiety that the course material will be too difficult to understand, or boring (mind-numbing), or that the information learned will not be applicable in their day-to-day…

  20. Dialogic Practices in Using Podcasting and Blogging as Teaching Tools for Teachers Seeking ESOL Certificate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deoksoon; Jang, Seung Eun

    2014-01-01

    Rapid globalization and the emergence of new instructional technologies have encouraged educators to explore technologies like podcasting and blogging to enhance their teaching. This study examines how six English speakers of other languages (ESOL) teachers used podcasting and blogging to help young English learners, themselves 21st century…

  1. Overcoming Textbook Fatigue: 21st Century Tools to Revitalize Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lent, ReLeah Cossett

    2012-01-01

    Go beyond a one-size-fits-all approach to teaching, and discover how shifting textbooks from "sole source" to just another resource revitalizes your practice, improves student achievement, and meets Common Core State Standards. Veteran teacher and literacy expert ReLeah Cossett Lent explains that how you use textbooks makes a huge difference in…

  2. Using Environmental Science as a Motivational Tool to Teach Physics to Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Hauke C.

    2010-01-01

    A traditional physical science course was transformed into an environmental physical science course to teach physics to non-science majors. The objective of the new course was to improve the learning of basic physics principles by applying them to current issues of interest. A new curriculum was developed with new labs, homework assignments,…

  3. Student-Generated Submicro Diagrams: A Useful Tool for Teaching and Learning Chemical Equations and Stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidowitz, Bette; Chittleborough, Gail; Murray, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a pedagogical approach to the teaching of chemical equations introduced to first year university students with little previous chemical knowledge. During the instruction period students had to interpret and construct diagrams of reactions at the submicro level, and relate them to chemical equations at the symbolic level with…

  4. Effective Teaching of the Physical Design of Integrated Circuits Using Educational Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Sicard, Etienne; Ben Dhia, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the strategies used for effective teaching and skill development in integrated circuit (IC) design using project-based learning (PBL) methodologies. It presents the contexts in which these strategies are applied to IC design courses at the University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia, and the National Institute of Applied…

  5. Teaching in the Digital Age: Smart Tools for Age 3 to Grade 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerling, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Integrate technology into your classroom and help children develop skills they need as they learn and grow. Technology is rapidly changing the ways we live our lives and interact with the world. It's also changing how you teach. Technology can enhance your classroom's complete curriculum and assessment and help you create and capture meaningful…

  6. An Examination of Teaching a Networking Strategy to Job Seekers. ICI Tools for Inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfo, Cecilia; Graham, Audrey

    This issue brief describes the outcomes of a study conducted by the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) that investigated the effectiveness of a training workshop on using a networking approach to job development for people with disabilities. The two-day workshop focused on teaching how to identify and use connections such as family members,…

  7. Scale Model of a Soil Aggregate and Associated Organisms: A Teaching Tool for Soil Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Mary Ann; Byrne, Loren B.

    2004-01-01

    Soil is a complex habitat for diverse biota. A significant challenge in teaching soil ecology is our inability to observe organisms as they live and interact in the soil. The objective of this article is to describe an interactive class project to help students visualize the sizes of different groups of soil organisms and to relate these to soil…

  8. Mathematical Modelling and the Learning Trajectory: Tools to Support the Teaching of Linear Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárcamo Bahamonde, Andrea Dorila; Fortuny Aymemí, Josep Maria; Gómez i Urgellés, Joan Vicenç

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present a didactic proposal for teaching linear algebra based on two compatible theoretical models: emergent models and mathematical modelling. This proposal begins with a problematic situation related to the creation and use of secure passwords, which leads students toward the construction of the concepts of spanning set and…

  9. Gender-sensitive observations in public spaces as a teaching tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogleever Fortuijn, J.

    2009-01-01

    Public spaces can be seen as arenas where gendered social roles, relations and identities are (re)produced, represented and contested. Because of their (assumed) public character - crowded, open, accessible and visible - these spaces are extremely useful as «observatories» for teaching and learning

  10. Teaching and Learning about Economics and Business Using Web GIS Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerski, Joseph J.

    2017-01-01

    Teaching about economics and business has a long tradition in geography. Planning the optimal site for a business or service in a community; examining the demographics and behavior of a certain target market; studying supply chain management to build a specific product such as a mobile phone or a piece of furniture; and examining median income by…

  11. Standardized training tools for the UPDRS activities of daily living scale: newly available teaching program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Christopher G; LeWitt, Peter A; Weidenman, Meredith

    2003-12-01

    The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) is the most widely used scale for evaluation of clinical impairment in PD. Whereas the motor section has been studied intensively for clinimetric properties and has an associated training tape, the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) section has been studied less rigorously. In preparation for a multicenter study that planned to use the UPDRS ADL score as an outcome, the authors reviewed the UPDRS ADL scale and designed a teaching program to provide a uniform technique for data acquisition without changing any wording of the primary scale. The teaching program is composed of four components: overall guidelines, clarifying points, recommended strategies, and a teaching videotape. The videotape shows examples of interviewers assessing each ADL item with patients of different disability levels and provides a complete ADL assessment of a single patient. Systematic training and utilization of this teaching program offer the potential for more uniformity in results of ADL assessments conducted in clinical practice and multicenter, international studies of PD. The written materials and videotape belong to the Movement Disorder Society and are available by contacting the MDS central office.

  12. Using Environmental Science as a Motivational Tool to Teach Physics to Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Hauke C.

    2010-01-01

    A traditional physical science course was transformed into an environmental physical science course to teach physics to non-science majors. The objective of the new course was to improve the learning of basic physics principles by applying them to current issues of interest. A new curriculum was developed with new labs, homework assignments,…

  13. Student-Generated Submicro Diagrams: A Useful Tool for Teaching and Learning Chemical Equations and Stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidowitz, Bette; Chittleborough, Gail; Murray, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a pedagogical approach to the teaching of chemical equations introduced to first year university students with little previous chemical knowledge. During the instruction period students had to interpret and construct diagrams of reactions at the submicro level, and relate them to chemical equations at the symbolic level with…

  14. An Old Tool Reexamined: Using the Star Power Simulation to Teach Social Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Barbara F.; Kozimor-King, Michele Lee; Steele, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of the Star Power simulation for teaching stratification and inequality to students of the net generation. The data for this study were obtained through the use of survey methodology and content analysis of 126 course papers from introductory sociology classes. Papers were analyzed for identification and…

  15. Generation X Teaches College: Generation Construction as Pedagogical Tool in the Writing Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Holly; Epp, Dawn Vernooy

    In the 1996 book "Generation X Goes to College: An Eye-Opening Account of Teaching in Post-Modern America," Peter Sacks probes the "decay" of higher education in the United States; a decay he attributes to listless, entitled students. This paper interrogates the paradigm of Boomers and Generation Xers poised in opposition to one another,…

  16. Is Virtual Reality a Useful Tool in the Teaching of Physiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This opinion statement points out some of the considerations and pitfalls in using virtual reality computer programs in the teaching of life sciences. Emphasis is placed on the possibility of such programs leading to reductionist thinking including how reductionist thinking could foster the formation of misconceptions. Negative feedback is used as…

  17. Connecting Theory and Practice: Preservice Teachers' Construction of Practical Tools for Teaching Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobbe, Tim; Ross, Dorene D.; Caron, D. Alvarez; Barko, Timothy; Busi, Rich

    2014-01-01

    The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) has called for changes in mathematics teaching from a procedural to conceptual focus since 1980, yet the way mathematics is taught in many classrooms continues to contradict the recommended practices. The pervasiveness of this challenge has led some educators to suggest changes in university…

  18. Advising as Teaching: Establishing Outcomes, Developing Tools, and Assessing Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    In every way that matters, advising is a form of teaching. Using Bloom's (1956) taxonomy of educational outcomes, I explain how to develop learning objectives within advising contexts. The article also suggests commonly available educational materials, such as university catalogs, as content delivery mechanisms for students; in addition, it offers…

  19. Teaching Bioinformatics and Neuroinformatics by Using Free Web-Based Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisham, William; Schottler, Natalie A.; Valli-Marill, Joanne; Beck, Lisa; Beatty, Jackson

    2010-01-01

    This completely computer-based module's purpose is to introduce students to bioinformatics resources. We present an easy-to-adopt module that weaves together several important bioinformatic tools so students can grasp how these tools are used in answering research questions. Students integrate information gathered from websites dealing with…

  20. A Visual Training Tool for Teaching Kanji to Children with Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeshita-Yamazoe, Hanae; Miyao, Masutomo

    2016-01-01

    We developed a visual training tool to assist children with developmental dyslexia in learning to recognize and understand Chinese characters (kanji). The visual training tool presents the strokes of a kanji character as separate shapes and requires students to use these fragments to construct the character. Two types of experiments were conducted…

  1. Teaching-Learning Process by Synchronic Communication Tools: The Elluminate Live Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santovena-Casal, Sonia Ma

    2012-01-01

    When integrating a new online tool in university educational system, it is necessary to know its features, applications and functions in depth, advantages and disadvantages, and the results obtained when it has been used by other educational institutions. Synchronous communication tool, "Elluminate Live" can be integrated into a virtual platform…

  2. Web-based teaching tool incorporating peer assessment and self-assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEvoy, Fintan; McEvoy, Peter M.; Svalastoga, Eiliv L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Our objective was to create an electronic learning tool that incorporates the pedagogic advantages of peer assessment and self-assessment into report-generating skills. CONCLUSION. The tool was created using Web programming software. It was tested with 12 veterinary students and provided...

  3. Applying New Diabetes Teaching Tools in Health-Related Extension Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenci, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    In response to the emerging global diabetes epidemic, health educators are searching for new and better education tools to help people make positive behavior changes to successfully prevent or manage diabetes. Conversation Maps[R] are new learner-driven education tools that have been developed to empower individuals to improve their health…

  4. Teaching Bioinformatics and Neuroinformatics by Using Free Web-Based Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisham, William; Schottler, Natalie A.; Valli-Marill, Joanne; Beck, Lisa; Beatty, Jackson

    2010-01-01

    This completely computer-based module's purpose is to introduce students to bioinformatics resources. We present an easy-to-adopt module that weaves together several important bioinformatic tools so students can grasp how these tools are used in answering research questions. Students integrate information gathered from websites dealing with…

  5. Teaching-Learning Process by Synchronic Communication Tools: The Elluminate Live Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santovena-Casal, Sonia Ma

    2012-01-01

    When integrating a new online tool in university educational system, it is necessary to know its features, applications and functions in depth, advantages and disadvantages, and the results obtained when it has been used by other educational institutions. Synchronous communication tool, "Elluminate Live" can be integrated into a virtual platform…

  6. A Visual Training Tool for Teaching Kanji to Children with Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeshita-Yamazoe, Hanae; Miyao, Masutomo

    2016-01-01

    We developed a visual training tool to assist children with developmental dyslexia in learning to recognize and understand Chinese characters (kanji). The visual training tool presents the strokes of a kanji character as separate shapes and requires students to use these fragments to construct the character. Two types of experiments were conducted…

  7. Application of Maintenance Simulate System of NC Machine Tools in Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Xin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The project design is the foundation of training, which can insure the usefulness of human resource development system. The Training Project Maintenance Simulate System of NC Machine Tools is presented based on analyzed contradiction between supply and demand. This paper introduces several scheme of Maintenance Simulate System of NC Machine Tools.

  8. Exploring Just-in-Time Teaching 3D Development as a Tool for Enhancing Knowledge and Understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morag C.E. McFadyen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The integumentary system (skin is the first line of defence in the body and part of the innate immune system. Within first year modules on Pharmaceutical Biology and Integrative Physiology in the Masters of Pharmacy degree at Robert Gordon University (RGU several software tools were used to support both lecture and coursework material for the immune and integumentary systems. However, students had difficulty visualizing the various layers of the skin and how they become affected by different skin lesions. As a response to these identified learning difficulties, a just-in-time teaching 3-Dimensional elearning object was developed using free-to-use 3D CAD packages alongside common elearning software. The outcome was a virtualised human arm equipped to illustrate and label primary or secondary skin lesions whilst allowing spatial manipulation of the arm. This allowed students to manipulate and identify the specific skin layers involved. Evaluation of student engagement and learning was favourable, with students reflecting that they had a better understanding of the topic. Initial findings from this study highlight the benefits of quick, low-cost 3D production processes as just-in-time teaching elearning tools that have a positive impact on students’ performance.

  9. Teacher collaboration and elementary science teaching: Using action research as a tool for instructional leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sara Hayes

    The primary purpose of this action research study was to explore an elementary science program and find ways to support science education as an administrator of an elementary school. The study took place in a large suburban school system in the southeastern United States. Seven teachers at a small rural school volunteered to participate in the study. Each participant became an active member of the research by determining what changes needed to take place and implementing the lessons in science. The study was also focused on teacher collaboration and how it influenced the science instruction. The data collected included two interviews, ten observations of science lessons, the implementation of four science units, and informal notes from planning sessions over a five month period. The questions that guided this study focused on how teachers prepare to teach science through active learning and how instruction shifts due to teacher collaboration. Teachers were interviewed at the beginning of the study to gain the perceptions of the participants in the areas of (a) planning, (b) active learning, (c) collaboration, and (d) teaching science lessons. The teachers and principal then formed a research team that determined the barriers to teaching science according to the Standards, designed units of study using active learning strategies, and worked collaboratively to implement the units of study. The action research project reviewed the National Science Education Standards, the theory of constructivism, active learning and teacher collaboration as they relate to the actions taken by a group of teachers in an elementary school. The evidence from this study showed that by working together collaboratively and overcoming the barriers to teaching science actively, teachers feel more confident and knowledgeable about teaching the concepts.

  10. UBIQUITOUS, FREE, AND EFFICIENT ONLINE COLLABORATION TOOLS FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jace HARGIS

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of free, online tools that make collaboration effective, efficient, and engaging. Each tool is available world-wide wherever there is access to the internet. These tools help create a more collaborative environment because they allow for voice, video, text, simultaneous editing, and immediate feedback. The tools presented are easy to use, user friendly, and have online support available if needed. Methods for using the tools are suggested, and examples of how they have been used by the authors are discussed. Professional presentations, instructional activities, meetings, and preparing manuscripts or other collaborative documents can all be developed in collaborative online meetings using Skype, Google tools including Talk, Chat, Calendar, Docs, and Notebooks, and Second Life. These may also be used to enhance education in distance learning or on campus classes. The features, functionality, and intuitive ease of use promote collaborative efforts, increasing the effective and efficient use of time while decreasing costs. Hyperlinks are provided for tools so users can determine technology specifications, download necessary files, learn more about their capabilities, and locate help or support information.

  11. The ANIE a math assessment tool that reveals learning and informs teaching

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    A powerful classroom tool, the ANIE (Assessment for Numeracy in Education) is a user-friendly, one-page template that transforms math assessment from traditional right or wrong answers to an in-depth look at student understanding.

  12. Evaluation of tablet PC as a tool for teaching tooth brushing to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, F; Abobakr, I; Al-Khodair, N; Al-Wakeel, M

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a single time tooth brushing instruction using video on a tablet PC (Apple iPad) compared to operator presentation using jaw model for plaque removal. This cross-sectional study included a convenience sample of 100 children divided into two groups. For Group 1 brushing was demonstrated to the child by the operator with the use of a jaw model. This demonstration was videotaped for subsequent use in Group 2 using a tablet PC (Apple iPad). Plaque index was recorded before and after demonstration of the assigned method of teaching tooth brushing. The results showed a significant difference using the two methods. The difference between the mean plaque index values with the jaw model and tablet PC at baseline and after tooth brushing represented 17.27% (50% improvement) and 11.56% (34% improvement) respectively. Boys showed a 18.3%. higher improvement in tooth brushing compared to girls. Seventy-five percent of the children reported using tablet computers in their daily life. CONCLUSION Teaching children by using a jaw model was more effective in improving plaque index score than using video on tablet PC by 16%. Both methods of tooth brushing teaching were fully accepted by all children.

  13. Learn and Unlearn: Drama as an Effective Tool in Teaching English Language and Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibani Banerjee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It is argued that learning the importance of positive reinforcement and unlearning the de-motivating and unfruitful experiences of one’s life can help students cope up with the existing inhibition about learning a foreign language and, in turn, can motivate them to do something productive and creative. In this respect, the role of drama, in EFL classroom, has been debated and recommended for achieving the intended effects. However, it has also been suggested that the motive of teaching a foreign language like English, through drama, is not to make the young learners professionals in acting but to provide an aid to learn and rehearse the language in its given framework. Exploring such arguments in support of the use of drama in EFL classroom, the present paper highlights the benefits of using drama as a teaching methodology so as to help the students in speaking in English and help them think ‘out of the box’. The practical application of the language in real-life situations is also suggested and recommended based upon the findings of the study. As the use of drama, in EFL classroom, has many benefits for EFL learners, attempt has also been made to investigate, discuss and explore different techniques and methods through which drama can be successfully introduced and incorporated in the foreign language classrooms for effective, motivating and interesting teaching and learning.

  14. Campaign Documentaries: Behind-the-Scenes Perspectives Make Useful Teaching Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfford, David

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, independent filmmakers have produced insightful documentaries of high profile political campaigns with behind-the-scenes footage. These documentaries offer inside looks and unique perspectives on electoral politics. This campaign season, consider "The War Room"; "A Perfect Candidate"; "Journeys With George;" "Chisholm '72";…

  15. NASA's unique networking environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1988-01-01

    Networking is an infrastructure technology; it is a tool for NASA to support its space and aeronautics missions. Some of NASA's networking problems are shared by the commercial and/or military communities, and can be solved by working with these communities. However, some of NASA's networking problems are unique and will not be addressed by these other communities. Individual characteristics of NASA's space-mission networking enviroment are examined, the combination of all these characteristics that distinguish NASA's networking systems from either commercial or military systems is explained, and some research areas that are important for NASA to pursue are outlined.

  16. Effectiveness of a Technology-Based Intervention to Teach Evidence-Based Practice: The EBR Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, JoAnn D; Gannaway, Paula; Ford, Cindy; Doumit, Rita; Zeeni, Nadine; Sukkarieh-Haraty, Ola; Milane, Aline; Byers, Beverly; Harrison, LaNell; Hatch, Daniel; Brown, Justin; Proper, Sharlan; White, Patricia; Song, Huaxin

    2016-02-01

    As the world becomes increasingly digital, advances in technology have changed how students access evidence-based information. Research suggests that students overestimate their ability to locate quality online research and lack the skills needed to evaluate the scientific literature. Clinical nurses report relying on personal experience to answer clinical questions rather than searching evidence-based sources. To address the problem, a web-based, evidence-based research (EBR) tool that is usable from a computer, smartphone, or iPad was developed and tested. The purpose of the EBR tool is to guide students through the basic steps needed to locate and critically appraise the online scientific literature while linking users to quality electronic resources to support evidence-based practice (EBP). Testing of the tool took place in a mixed-method, quasi-experimental, and two-population randomized controlled trial (RCT) design in a U.S. and Middle East university. A statistically significant improvement in overall research skills was supported in the quasi-experimental nursing student group and RCT nutrition student group using the EBR tool. A statistically significant proportional difference was supported in the RCT nutrition and PharmD intervention groups in participants' ability to distinguish the credibility of online source materials compared with controls. The majority of participants could correctly apply PICOTS to a case study when using the tool. The data from this preliminary study suggests that the EBR tool enhanced student overall research skills and selected EBP skills while generating data for assessment of learning outcomes. The EBR tool places evidence-based resources at the fingertips of users by addressing some of the most commonly cited barriers to research utilization while exposing users to information and online literacy standards of practice, meeting a growing need within nursing curricula. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  17. SCID mouse model of psoriasis: A unique tool for drug development of autoreactive T-cell and TH-17 cell-mediated autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raychaudhuri Smriti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In both skin and synovial tissues of psoriatic arthritis (PsA patients, there are prominent lymphocytic infiltrates localized to the dermal papillae in the skin and the sublining layer stroma in the joint. T-cells, with a predominance of CD4+ lymphocytes, are the most significant lymphocytes in the tissues; in contrast, this ratio is reversed in the epidermis, synovial fluid compartment, and at the enthesis, where CD8+ T-cells are more common. This differential tropism of CD8+ T-cell suggests that the CD8+ T-cells may be driving the immune response in the joint and skin. This is supported by an association with MHC class I. The cytokine network in the psoriatic skin and synovium is dominated by monocyte and T-cell-derived cytokines: IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α. In PsA synovium, higher levels of IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-10 have been detected than in psoriatic skin. An analysis of T-cell receptor beta-chain variable (TCRβV gene repertoires revealed common expansions in both skin and synovial inflammatory sites, suggesting an important role for cognate T-cell responses in the pathogenesis of PsA and that the inciting antigen may be identical or homologous between the afflicted skin and synovium. Traditionally, T-cells have been classified as T helper 1 (Th1 or Th2 cells by production of defining cytokines, IFN- γ and IL-4, respectively. Recently, a new type of T-cell, Th17, has been linked to autoimmune inflammation. T-helper 17 (Th17 cells are a unique effector CD4+ T-cell subset characterized by the production of interleukin (IL-17. Murine diseases that were previously considered to be pure Th1-mediated responses have been shown to contain mixed populations of Th1 and Th17 cells. Also, in humans, a critical immunoregulatory role of Th-17 cells in infectious and autoimmune diseases has been identified. It has been postulated that IL-17 may be important in psoriasis. Our initial observations demonstrate that IL-17 and its receptor system

  18. Teaching structure: student use of software tools for understanding macromolecular structure in an undergraduate biochemistry course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaswal, Sheila S; O'Hara, Patricia B; Williamson, Patrick L; Springer, Amy L

    2013-01-01

    Because understanding the structure of biological macromolecules is critical to understanding their function, students of biochemistry should become familiar not only with viewing, but also with generating and manipulating structural representations. We report a strategy from a one-semester undergraduate biochemistry course to integrate use of structural representation tools into both laboratory and homework activities. First, early in the course we introduce the use of readily available open-source software for visualizing protein structure, coincident with modules on amino acid and peptide bond properties. Second, we use these same software tools in lectures and incorporate images and other structure representations in homework tasks. Third, we require a capstone project in which teams of students examine a protein-nucleic acid complex and then use the software tools to illustrate for their classmates the salient features of the structure, relating how the structure helps explain biological function. To ensure engagement with a range of software and database features, we generated a detailed template file that can be used to explore any structure, and that guides students through specific applications of many of the software tools. In presentations, students demonstrate that they are successfully interpreting structural information, and using representations to illustrate particular points relevant to function. Thus, over the semester students integrate information about structural features of biological macromolecules into the larger discussion of the chemical basis of function. Together these assignments provide an accessible introduction to structural representation tools, allowing students to add these methods to their biochemical toolboxes early in their scientific development.

  19. New Pedagogy for Using Internet-Based Teaching Tools in Physics Course

    CERN Document Server

    Toback, D; Novikova, I; Toback, David; Mershin, Andreas; Novikova, Irina

    2004-01-01

    Acquiring the mathematical, conceptual, and problem-solving skills required in university-level physics courses is hard work, and the average student often lacks the knowledge and study skills they need to succeed in the introductory courses. Here we propose a new pedagogical model and a straight-forwardly reproducible set of internet-based testing tools. Our work to address some of the most important student deficiencies is based on three fundamental principles: balancing skill level and challenge, providing clear goals and feedback at every stage, and allowing repetition without penalty. Our tools include an Automated Mathematics Evaluation System (AMES), a Computerized Homework Assignment Grading System (CHAGS), and a set of after-homework quizzes and mini-practice exams (QUizzes Intended to Consolidate Knowledge, or QUICK). We describe how these tools are incorporated into the course, and present some preliminary results on their effectiveness.

  20. ESHOPPS: A COMPUTATIONAL TOOL TO AID THE TEACHING OF SHORTEST PATH ALGORITHMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. de A. LIMA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of a computational tool called EShoPPS – Environment for Shortest Path Problem Solving, which is used to assist students in understanding the working of Dijkstra, Greedy search and A*(star algorithms is presented in this paper. Such algorithms are commonly taught in graduate and undergraduate courses of Engineering and Informatics and are used for solving many optimization problems that can be characterized as Shortest Path Problem. The EShoPPS is an interactive tool that allows students to create a graph representing the problem and also helps in developing their knowledge of each specific algorithm. Experiments performed with 155 students of undergraduate and graduate courses such as Industrial Engineering, Computer Science and Information Systems have shown that by using the EShoPPS tool students were able to improve their interpretation of investigated algorithms.

  1. Using Environmental Science as a Motivational Tool to Teach Physics to Non-science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Hauke C.

    2010-12-01

    A traditional physical science course was transformed into an environmental physical science course to teach physics to non-science majors. The objective of the new course was to improve the learning of basic physics principles by applying them to current issues of interest. A new curriculum was developed with new labs, homework assignments, worksheets, and interactive classroom learning techniques such as Peer Instruction (PI) and SCALE-UP.2 It was found that the new course showed an increase in students' class participation, attendance, and overall interest, with most rating their science experience as very positive.

  2. The available lexicon: A tool for selecting appropriate vocabulary to teach a foreign language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Manuel Ávila Muñoz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to provide foreign language professionals with a sound methodology for selecting a suitable lexicon apropos of their students’ level in the language. The justification of said selection is, herein, rooted in a cognitive argument: If we are able to observe the manner in which words are organized within the mind, we will be better able to select the words needed for the natural process of communication. After analyzing over lists of lexical availability compiled by previous analyses, this study puts forth a glossary filtered by way of an objective procedure based on the mathematical concept known as Fuzzy Expected Value. I begin first by rigorously defining the concept of lexical availability and then thoroughly examining and explaining the manner in which I have obtained the results. Next, I employ the cognitive theory of prototypes to expound upon the organizational apparatus which arranges words within speakers’ minds. Subsequently, and in accordance with objective criteria, a lexical selection is proposed. To end, I contemplate and muse upon the significance of a program that would enable us to identify the most appropriate vocabulary according to the students’ level of linguistic competence. In order to further substantiate this study, it will be juxtaposed with the specific notions outlined by the curriculum of The Cervantes Institute. Moreover, it will relate to the teaching levels proposed by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL and Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR.

  3. Presenting Fake Figures: A Tool to Teach Effective Scientific Figure Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica A. Segarra

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available As trained scientists, we become adept not only at analyzing and understanding figures in the scientific literature, but also at designing figures to effectively represent our own data and findings. As educators, we strive to pass on these skills to our students, some of whom will ultimately become scientists themselves. Conveying the principles of effective figure design can be challenging, particularly when students have had little exposure to the process of reading scientific literature, much less writing a piece of scientific literature. Improvisational activities in the classroom reinforce teaching goals such as spontaneity, risk-taking, creativity, communication skills, team-building, and critical thinking (2. Indeed, improv training for scientists is becoming more common, helping scientists to communicate more spontaneously about their work and connect with their audience (1. In this article, we present an improvisational game that can aid in the teaching of effective scientific figure design. This “Present-a-Fake-Figure Exercise” is applicable to both the classroom and laboratory settings. In this learning activity, students improvise presenting fake scientific figures to an audience of their peers. These fake figures are prepared beforehand by the instructor and exemplify the do’s and don’ts of scientific figure design. Some of the learning outcomes of the activity include (1 identifying what makes a scientific figure cohesive, easy to analyze, and reader-friendly, and (2 identifying strategies that are useful in the design of a multi-panel figure to convey a scientific story.

  4. Interactive Teaching as a Recruitment and Training Tool for K-12 Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Teacher Preparation (STEMTP) program at the University of Colorado has been designed to recruit and train prospective K-12 science teachers while improving student learning through interactive teaching. The program has four key goals: (1) recruit undergraduate students into K-12 science education, (2) provide these prospective teachers with hands-on experience in an interactive teaching pedagogy, (3) create an intergrated program designed to support (educationally, socially, and financially) and engage these prospective science teachers up until they obtain liscensure and/or their masters degree in education, and (4) improve student learning in large introductory science classes. Currently there are 31 students involved in the program and a total of 72 students have been involved in the year and a half it has been in existence. I will discuss the design of the STEMTP program, the success in recruiting K-12 science teachers, and the affect on student learning in a large lecture class of implementing interactive learning pedagogies by involving these prospective K-12 science teachers. J. L. Rosenberg would like to acknowledge the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellowship for support for this work. The course transformation project is also supported by grants from the National Science Foundation.

  5. Semantic clues and fields: tools for linguistic analysis and teaching of José Martí’s speeches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivelissi Jiménez Cruz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article approaches the oratory of Jose Marti related to Latin American and is aimed at appraising the value of semantic shades of references to nature as a contextual clue in the speeches of Latin American topic. The procedure of the semantic field was used to establish relationships, contextual, intratextuals and intertextuals and for recognizing the thematic nucleus. This procedure might be a tool at the disposal of readers and is consequently regarded as content and method of teaching and independent work. The study was completed in a sample of speeches deliver at the assembly of the Hispano-American Literary Society between 1889 y 1893. The findings were systematized from the stylistic, semantic, biographic and historic-cultural perspective. Key words: oratory, contextual relations, intra-text and inter-text relations, thematic nucleus.

  6. Cinematherapy and film as an educational tool in undergraduate psychiatry teaching: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankir, Ahmed; Holloway, David; Zaman, Rashid; Agius, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Film possesses an extraordinary power and offers an unrivalled medium for entertainment and escapism. There are many films that revolve around a mental illness theme and the medical specialty that most commonly features in motion picture is psychiatry. Over the last few decades films have become increasingly used as an educational tool in the teaching of psychiatry topics such as mental state examination to undergraduate students. Above and beyond its utility in pedagogy, film also has the power to heal and the term cinematherapy has been coined to reflect this. Indeed, there are case studies of people with first-hand experience of psychopathology who report that watching films with a mental illness theme has contributed to their recovery. We provide a first person narrative from an individual with schizophrenia in which he expounds on the concepts of cinematherpy and metaphorical imagery in films which theme on psychosis.

  7. Teaching astronomy and astrophysics at the Valencian International University (VIU): Application and use of Virtual Observatory tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diago, P. D.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Ruiz, J. E.; Solano, E.

    2013-05-01

    The Astronomy and Astrophysics Master, running at the Valencian International University (VIU, http://www.viu.es) since march 2010, is a clear example of how development of infor- mation and communication technologies (ICTs) and new e-learning methods are changing the traditional distance learning. In the context of the European Space for Higher Edu- cation (ESHE) we present how the Virtual Observatory (VO) tools can be an important part in the Astronomy and Astrophysics teaching. The described tasks has been carried out during the last three courses. These tasks are representative of the state of the art in Astrophysics research. We attach a description and a learning results list of each one of the presented tasks. The tasks can be downloaded at the Spanish VO website: http://svo.cab.inta-csic.es/docs/index.php?pagename=Education/VOcases

  8. Digital Storytelling as a Pedagogical Tool within a Didactic Sequence in Foreign Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Agustin Reyes; Ponce, Eva Pich; Pastor, Ma Dolores Garcia

    2012-01-01

    Digital storytelling constitutes a pedagogical tool for teachers to work on different linguistic skills while generating students' interest and attention. This study analyses the usefulness of including digital storytelling within a didactic sequence in order to work on linguistic routines such as greetings and leave-takings in English as a…

  9. An Entrepreneurial Learning Exercise as a Pedagogical Tool for Teaching CSR: A Peruvian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Vanina A.; Prialé, María Angela; Fuchs, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory cross-sectional study of the value of an entrepreneurial learning exercise as a tool for examining the entrepreneurship dimension of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The study used grounded theory to analyse diaries kept by graduate (MBA) students during the "20 Nuevos Soles Project". From the…

  10. Using a Self-Administered Visual Basic Software Tool To Teach Psychological Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Harold R.; Sullivan, Amie K.; Schoeny, Zahrl G.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces LearningLinks, a Visual Basic software tool that allows teachers to create individualized learning modules that use constructivist and behavioral learning principles. Describes field testing of undergraduates at the University of Virginia that tested a module designed to improve understanding of the psychological concepts of…

  11. Use of Synchronous Online Tools in Private English Language Teaching in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Like many other industries, private tutoring is now being transformed by the growth of information and communication technologies (ICT). An increasing number of educational entrepreneurs in different countries are incorporating Internet tools in their professional practice. While the popularity of online tutoring in countries with widespread…

  12. VINCE--An On-Line Tutorial Tool for Teaching Introductory Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Glenn; Thorburn, Gareth

    2000-01-01

    Describes a tutorial tool which allows the execution of a C program to be graphically displayed. VINCE (Visual Instruction for Novices in a C Environment) is written in Java, allowing it to be used on the Web. Students can enter their own C code, or select from a menu of pre-written tutorials, each illustrating a particular aspect of programming.…

  13. Facebook as an Online Teaching Tool: Effects on Student Participation, Learning, and Overall Course Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Melinda; Hurt, Nicole E.; Larson, Lincoln R.; Prevost, Luanna

    2016-01-01

    Online discussions are widely viewed as a valuable tool for encouraging student engagement and promoting interaction with course material outside of the traditional classroom. Strategies for conducting online discussions vary and are not confined to traditional, university-sponsored learning management systems (LMS). Social media platforms such as…

  14. Teacher-Perceived Adequacy of Tools and Equipment Available to Teach Agricultural Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbins, O. P.; Anderson, Ryan G.; Paulsen, Thomas H.; Wells, Trent

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural mechanics is an important component of a well-rounded school-based agricultural education (SBAE) program. Within agricultural mechanics courses lies a plethora of topics and skills to be covered. Adequate tools and equipment are vital in preparing students to fill an expanding, 21st century workforce. The issue of inadequate teaching…

  15. An Interactive Computer Tool for Teaching About Desalination and Managing Water Demand in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolkowska, J. R.; Reyes, R.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an interactive tool to geospatially and temporally analyze desalination developments and trends in the US in the time span 1950-2013, its current contribution to satisfying water demands and its future potentials. The computer tool is open access and can be used by any user with Internet connection, thus facilitating interactive learning about water resources. The tool can also be used by stakeholders and policy makers for decision-making support and with designing sustainable water management strategies. Desalination technology has been acknowledged as a solution to a sustainable water demand management stemming from many sectors, including municipalities, industry, agriculture, power generation, and other users. Desalination has been applied successfully in the US and many countries around the world since 1950s. As of 2013, around 1,336 desalination plants were operating in the US alone, with a daily production capacity of 2 BGD (billion gallons per day) (GWI, 2013). Despite a steady increase in the number of new desalination plants and growing production capacity, in many regions, the costs of desalination are still prohibitive. At the same time, the technology offers a tremendous potential for `enormous supply expansion that exceeds all likely demands' (Chowdhury et al., 2013). The model and tool are based on data from Global Water Intelligence (GWI, 2013). The analysis shows that more than 90% of all the plants in the US are small-scale plants with the capacity below 4.31 MGD. Most of the plants (and especially larger plants) are located on the US East Coast, as well as in California, Texas, Oklahoma, and Florida. The models and the tool provide information about economic feasibility of potential new desalination plants based on the access to feed water, energy sources, water demand, and experiences of other plants in that region.

  16. Jules Verne Voyager, Jr: An Interactive Map Tool for Teaching Plate Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburger, M. W.; Meertens, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present an interactive, web-based map utility that can make new geological and geophysical results accessible to a large number and variety of users. The tool provides a user-friendly interface that allows users to access a variety of maps, satellite images, and geophysical data at a range of spatial scales. The map tool, dubbed 'Jules Verne Voyager, Jr.', allows users to interactively create maps of a variety of study areas around the world. The utility was developed in collaboration with the UNAVCO Consortium for study of global-scale tectonic processes. Users can choose from a variety of base maps (including "Face of the Earth" and "Earth at Night" satellite imagery mosaics, global topography, geoid, sea-floor age, strain rate and seismic hazard maps, and others), add a number of geographic and geophysical overlays (coastlines, political boundaries, rivers and lakes, earthquake and volcano locations, stress axes, etc.), and then superimpose both observed and model velocity vectors representing a compilation of 2933 GPS geodetic measurements from around the world. A remarkable characteristic of the geodetic compilation is that users can select from some 21 plates' frames of reference, allowing a visual representation of both 'absolute' plate motion (in a no-net rotation reference frame) and relative motion along all of the world's plate boundaries. The tool allows users to zoom among at least three map scales. The map tool can be viewed at http://jules.unavco.org/VoyagerJr/Earth. A more detailed version of the map utility, developed in conjunction with the EarthScope initiative, focuses on North America geodynamics, and provides more detailed geophysical and geographic information for the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The ‘EarthScope Voyager’ can be accessed at http://jules.unavco.org/VoyagerJr/EarthScope. Because the system uses pre-constructed gif images and overlays, the system can rapidly create and display maps to a large number of users

  17. PADLET AND OTHER INFORMATION COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY TOOLS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Borisovna Lysunets

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the necessity of the computerization of the education sphere. Information Communication Technology (ICT tools and services of Google, blended learning techniques help to enhance autonomous education and answer the training needs of future specia-lists. The paper describes the Padlet (Google application and provides with its practical usage in language classroom. The authors come to the following conclusions: improving Internet and computer technology competence through mastering various Internet tools and applications can be traced. Besides, the introduction of IT into traditional classroom intensifies the process of cognitive development and mental activities, forming the high level of students’ motivation and interest. For students the usage of IT proves the positive dynamics of their accomplishments in the field of selecting, organizing and dealing with information provided in various forms. It enhances students’ opportunities in creating, designing and performing their works and achievements.

  18. A new instructional tool paradigm to teach geoscience at the intermediate (age 12 - 14) school level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, C.; Landsfeld, M.; Schweizer, D.

    2003-04-01

    A new pedagogically sound tool, based on accurate and up-to-date science, has been developed that allows students to practice science using real-time and archived data sets. Based on the process of scientific inquiry around a series of selected topics in geoscience (e.g., El Nino, the ozone hole, global warming, the Amazon river) this multi-media tool is graphically rich and user friendly and engages students in the practices of geoscientists. Under the guidance of a scientific leader, students embark on a virtual research vessel for an exploratory research expedition and navigate from instruction provided with quicktime movies, to data sets through a rich and accessible data center and information through a web-based information center. A comprehensive teacher’s guide helps the teacher with the software and classroom management as well as grading through a rubric approach. Some elements of this software will be demonstrated in this presentation.

  19. Digital Storytelling as a Pedagogical Tool within a Didactic Sequence in Foreign Language Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Agustín Reyes; Eva Pich Ponce; MªDolores García Pastor

    2012-01-01

    Digital storytelling constitutes a pedagogical tool for teachers to work on different linguistic skills while generating students' interest and attention. This study analyses the usefulness of including digital storytelling within a didactic sequence in order to work on linguistic routines such as greetings and leave-takings in English as a foreign language. To this aim, we have worked with first year students in the Faculty of Education at the Universitat de València to improve their ability...

  20. The new tools: What 21st century education can teach us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volandes, Angelo E; Kennedy, William J; Davis, Aretha Delight; Gillick, Muriel R; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2013-12-01

    This article explores the shifting education paradigm that leverages videos and massive online open courses (MOOCs) and the implication of these developments for the patient-doctor encounter. This essay argues that medicine can learn from the rapid evolution of online video learning techniques to empower both patients and clinicians. Video technology is a powerful tool for the patient and physician and has the potential to significantly improve the delivery of care in an increasingly complex health care system.

  1. Digital Storytelling as a Pedagogical Tool within a Didactic Sequence in Foreign Language Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Agustín Reyes; Eva Pich Ponce; MªDolores García Pastor

    2012-01-01

    Digital storytelling constitutes a pedagogical tool for teachers to work on different linguistic skills while generating students' interest and attention. This study analyses the usefulness of including digital storytelling within a didactic sequence in order to work on linguistic routines such as greetings and leave-takings in English as a foreign language. To this aim, we have worked with first year students in the Faculty of Education at the Universitat de València to improve their ability...

  2. The Digital Microscope: A Tool for Teaching Laboratory Skills in Distance Learning Courses

    OpenAIRE

    Dommett, Eleanor J.; Leys, Katherine S.

    2008-01-01

    The majority of undergraduate students studying for a science degree will at some point carry out experiments in a laboratory setting, thus developing their practical skills and understanding of experimental principles. For distance learning students, there is no laboratory setting available for them to complete such work and as such there is a risk that they will lack these key skills. The Open University has developed a computerized tool, in the form of a Digital Microscope, to allow studen...

  3. Padlet and other information Communication technology tools in English language teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana Borisovna Lysunets; Natalia Vladimirovna Bogoryad

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers the necessity of the computerization of the education sphere. Information Communication Technology (ICT) tools and services of Google, blended learning techniques help to enhance autonomous education and answer the training needs of future specia-lists. The paper describes the Padlet (Google application) and provides with its practical usage in language classroom. The authors come to the following conclusions: improving Internet and computer technology competence through m...

  4. Pharmacist's management of drug-related problems: a tool for teaching and providing pharmaceutical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslade, N E; Bajcar, J M; Bombassaro, A M; Caravaggio, C D; Strong, D K; Yamashita, S K

    1997-01-01

    During the development of education and practice models based on the philosophy of pharmaceutical care (PC), six pharmacists worked with the University of Toronto Faculty of Pharmacy to implement the PC model in their practice sites. These pharmacists found it necessary to modify existing tools to create one that explicitly guided them through the PC process, including the phase of monitoring patients for desired outcomes. This resulted in the development of the Pharmacist's Management of Drug Related Problems. This tool requires pharmacists to collect patient drug and medical data and write responses to specific questions about the data to interpret their significance. As proficiency in providing PC is attained, the questions and space for written responses can be eliminated, leaving a comprehensive documentation system of patient outcomes and the data collected, recommendations made, and monitoring completed by the pharmacist. This tool has been adopted by the University of Toronto Faculty of Pharmacy and is being used in various continuing education programs and by practicing pharmacists across Canada.

  5. Simulator program as a form of implementation of electronic teaching tools for self-study of foreign students at the stage of pre-university training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriy O. Savel'ev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Questions of empowerment the organization of classroom and extracurricular self-study of foreign students at the stage of pre-university training through the implementation of electronic teaching tools as a component of computer training facilities in educational process are considered. Classification of modern electronic teaching tools as a component of computer hardware training, developed on the basis of modern information and communication technologies is offered. Version of program-simulator "Introductory course" is offered. The program is created by means of WEB-programming and uses training material of introductory course. Introductory course is one of the most important elements of teaching of scientific style of speech within the language training for the foreign students at the preparatory faculty.

  6. The Current Use of Web 2.0 Tools in University Teaching from the Perspective of Faculty Members at the College of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdelrahman M.; AbdelAlmuniem, Arwa; Almabhouh, Ahmed A.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the current status of using Web 2.0 tools in university teaching by the faculty members of the College of Education at Sudan University of Science and Technology. The study used a descriptive analytical method based on the use of questionnaires and interviews. The questionnaire was administered to a sample of 40…

  7. An Examination of the Changes in Science Teaching Orientations and Technology-Enhanced Tools for Student Learning in the Context of Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Todd; Zuwallack, Rebecca; Longhurst, Max; Shelton, Brett E.; Wolf, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    This research examines how science teaching orientations and beliefs about technology-enhanced tools change over time in professional development (PD). The primary data sources for this study came from learning journals of 8 eighth grade science teachers at the beginning and conclusion of a year of PD. Based on the analysis completed, Information…

  8. Students' Perceptions about the Use of Educational Games as a Tool for Teaching the Periodic Table of Elements at the High School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Mariscal, Antonio Joaquín; Oliva-Martínez, Jose´ María; Gil, M. L. Almoraima

    2015-01-01

    The study reported here was conducted to investigate the perceptions of high school students on the use of educational games as a tool for teaching the periodic table of elements in a chemistry class in Spain. The 127 students who participated in this study came from six different classes in grade 10 (15-16 years old). The students' perceptions of…

  9. Students' Perceptions about the Use of Educational Games as a Tool for Teaching the Periodic Table of Elements at the High School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Mariscal, Antonio Joaquín; Oliva-Martínez, Jose´ María; Gil, M. L. Almoraima

    2015-01-01

    The study reported here was conducted to investigate the perceptions of high school students on the use of educational games as a tool for teaching the periodic table of elements in a chemistry class in Spain. The 127 students who participated in this study came from six different classes in grade 10 (15-16 years old). The students' perceptions of…

  10. Effects of Using History as a Tool to Teach Mathematics on Students' Attitudes, Anxiety, Motivation and Achievement in Grade 11 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew Yee; Chapman, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    For decades, educators have advocated using history of mathematics in mathematics classrooms. Empirical research on the efficacy of this practice, however, is scarce. A quasi-experiment was used to investigate the effects of using history as a tool to teach mathematics on grade 11 students' mathematics achievement. Effects in three affective…

  11. Tools for enhancing motivation in teaching climate change and impacts for students in forest- and environmental engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálos, Borbála

    2017-04-01

    Climate change is observed to have severe impacts on forest ecosystems. Ongoing research projects are dealing with the complex analysis of the causes of the health status decline and mortality of the vulnerable tree species. In the Carpathian Basin, recurrent long lasting drought periods and heatwaves of the last decades initiated the sequence of abiotic and biotic impacts in the beech and oak forests. Threatening extreme events are very likely to occur more frequent under changing climate conditions until the end of the 21st century. Therefore adaptation strategies and renewed regulations of the tree species selection are necessary. Learning material of forest education needs to be continuously updated with the new aspects and results of recent research and forest management planning. Therefore ideas and tools have been developed for teaching climate change impacts for students in forest- and environmental engineering. Using examples from world sport championships (e.g. losers and winners of climate change) these tools are applied to communicate the basic research questions in an easily understandable way as well as to motivate students and raise their awareness for the complex processes of forest - climate interactions. By the application of the developed examples for motivation, the key competences and learning outcomes can be the following: • students get an insight into the observed and projected tendencies of climate extremes; • they get an impression on the complexity of the climate change related damage chains; • they will be able to identify the climatic drivers of forest decline and mortality; • with the skill of critical thinking they will be able to evaluate the ecological role of forests that are already affected and that could be affected by the consequences of changing climate conditions; • they recognize the importance and urgency of the appropriate decisions in forestry and nature conservation. Keywords: climate change impacts, forest

  12. Twitter as a teaching tool in the Social Sciences faculties. A case study from the Economic History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misael Arturo López Zapico

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 127 701 USAL 5 1 827 14.0 Normal 0 21 false false false ES JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:ES; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} The increasing use of social networking among university students ease the way for teachers to use these kinds of tools towards achieving the objectives set in the European Higher Education Area. In this sense, Twitter appears as a highly versatile learning tool that perfectly fits with the skill-based education approach, as evidenced by the literature. This paper describes the methodology, as well as, discusses the results of three experiments that took place during the 2011-2012 Academic Year at the School of Economics and Business of the University of Oviedo. Twitter was used during those experiments to debate the today’s economic crisis. The indicators obtained are used to conclude that microblogging services are a proper tool not only for teaching Economic History but also for doing so for any Social Sciences.

  13. Analyzing Concept Maps as an Assessment (Evaluation Tool in Teaching Mathematics

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    Ahmet S.   Ozdemir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research concept mapping has been used as a testing instrument. In our country’s education system, the relationship between the scores which are given to concept maps and the scores which are given to traditional written exams and multiple choice examinations in teaching mathematics, has been analyzed. Especially the examinations about functions, numbers, exponent numbers, rooted numbers and absolute values have been evaluated. Literature class scores which are assumed to reflect the student’s oral thinking and their ability to express their thoughts have been compared with concept mapping’s scores. At the end of the research, it is understood that someone can make reliable testing and evaluation by using concept mapping. There is no meaningful correlation between concept mapping and multiple choice type examinations. On the other hand, there is a meaningful correlation between the scores of concept mapping and traditional mathematics examinations. About p<0.1 meaningfulness has been determined between concept mapping testing and literature examinations. In this research comments have been made on these results and various suggestions have been given according to these results.

  14. The Walkshop: a tool to integrate research on human aspects of sustainable urban design in teaching

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    Maria Johansson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Teaching in higher education should be based on research findings. Urban design and architecture are ‘making disciplines’ and their link to formal research is described as tenuous. This paper reports on a collaborative educational workshop, the Walkshop, designed to bridge the gap between the multidisciplinary research project Urban Walking and the master’s programme in sustainable urban design and city planning. The need for understanding of differences regarding knowledge competence and cultural skills between disciplines for successful multidisciplinary communication was addressed in the Walkshop design through theoretical input, acquaintance with methodology, design task, and presentation of design solutions. The Walkshop facilitated the students’ learning process towards a close-up perspective in analysis of the environment. Students’ design proposals integrated new perspectives and key facts from research, and provided inspiration and concrete suggestions for the analysed urban area. Collaborative educational workshops seem to be a useful component to include in a Master’s course syllabus, to strengthen the link to research in practice-based education, and to disseminate current research results directly into practice.

  15. Currently Available Tools and Teaching Strategies for the Interprofessional Education of Students in Health Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nelofar S.; Shahnaz, Syed I.; Gomathi, Kadayam G.

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is designed to provide students from different health sectors with opportunities to work together to enhance future collaboration. The implementation of IPE activities is a current trend in various countries. This review exclusively targets IPE issues involving undergraduate health profession students and highlights various approaches in different regions. A total of 28 articles published in peer-reviewed journals between January 2012 and July 2015 were assessed to determine recent trends in IPE implementation. Nine main strategies were identified: simulation-based education programmes; rotations in rural and community settings; interprofessional training wards; patient-centred case studies; theme-centred workshops; student seminars; student-delivered lectures; health promotion activities; and interactive lectures in a common setting. Many of these institutions had not restricted themselves to a single strategy and supplemented these activities with additional teaching or learning methods. Recommendations gathered from these diverse approaches may assist the development of sustainable strategies for implementing IPE in undergraduate medical curricula. PMID:27606105

  16. Educational Technology as a Teaching and Learning Tool in Environmental Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandratos George

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the following research paper, we discuss an educational action research that was carried out in order to investigate students' knowledge, attitudes and views in relation to understanding, managing and solving environmental problems in connection with recycling, before and after implementing an environmental education programme that utilised the “Recycle-Land” educational software. The objective of using this software application was to make students view waste management problems as genuine problems of the environment to which they themselves are related. Exploiting Information and Communication Technology (ICT in education based on social constructionism, it becomes possible to approach environmental education in a holistic manner whilst avoiding to isolate students outside the general framework within which it take place. Student activities lead to concept formation, theory and practice come together, teaching, learning and evaluation become integrated and active problem solving is encouraged. This educational software application –through a user-friendly and familiar interface – makes it possible for students to realize the environmental and financial benefits of recycling and hence, as modern citizens, act to promote the viability and sustainability of the planet.

  17. Exploring Proteins Purification Techniques Animations as Tools for the Biochemistry Teaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cortez

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Some classical techniques usually applied in protein purification and characterization are most important to understand different aspects related to protein structure. These experiments can be carried out beyond the laboratory because security and logistics reasons but its basic concepts and their applicability may be better understood with the help of virtual models and animations. The objective of this work was to produce interactive virtual models and animations of equipments used in protein purification and characterization. To make the animations were used real protein structures downloaded from PubMed with the aid of CN3D software. Electrophoresis equipments, chromatography columns, HPLC's and spectrophotometers models were built used software Google sketch up. Final animations were compiled with macromedia flash software giving more interactivity to these tools. To supply tools of help to the users of the produced material some avatars are designed with Iclone and Crazy Talk softwares.

  18. MaSK: A visualization tool for teaching and research in computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolyan, Yevgeniy; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    The number of researchers using computational chemistry tools is growing every year. There are multiple programs used for calculation of various molecular and electronic properties such as optimized geometry, energy, vibrational spectra, and so forth. Another set of programs is used for the visualization of these properties. However, such programs are either too complex for a beginner or too simple for an intermediate user for everyday use. Molecular Modeling and Simulation Kit (MaSK) is designed to fill this gap by presenting an easy-to-use intuitive interface to quantum chemical programs such as GAMESS and Gaussian with an array of advanced tools. The program can be used as a postprocessor to visualize calculated properties or as a preprocessor to prepare the input files for quantum chemical programs. In addition, some properties such as the surfaces of molecular orbitals, electron and spin densities, and molecular electrostatic potentials are actually calculated by MaSK. If MaSK is combined with PC GAMESS, the preparation of the input, running of the calculations, and the display of the results can all be done without leaving the program's interface.

  19. MoManI: a tool to facilitate research, analysis, and teaching of computer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, Mark; Pelakauskas, Martynas; Almulla, Youssef; Tkaczyk, Alan H.; Zepeda, Eduardo

    2017-04-01

    Allocating limited resource efficiently is a task to which efficient planning and policy design aspires. This may be a non-trivial task. For example, the seventh sustainable development goal (SDG) of Agenda 2030 is to provide access to affordable sustainable energy to all. On the one hand, energy is required to realise almost all other SDGs. (A clinic requires electricity for fridges to store vaccines for maternal health, irrigate agriculture requires energy to pump water to crops in dry periods etc.) On the other hand, the energy system is non-trivial. It requires the mapping of resource, its conversion into useable energy and then into machines that we use to meet our needs. That requires new tools that draw from standard techniques, best-in-class models and allow the analyst to develop new models. Thus we present the Model Management Infrastructure (MoManI). MoManI is used to develop, manage, run, store input and results data for linear programming models. MoManI, is a browser-based open source interface for systems modelling. It is available to various user audiences, from policy makers and planners through to academics. For example, we implement the Open Source energy Modelling System (OSeMOSYS) in MoManI. OSeMOSYS is a specialized energy model generator. A typical OSeMOSYS model would represent the current energy system of a country, region or city; in it, equations and constraints are specified; and calibrated to a base year. From that future technologies and policy options are represented. From those scenarios are designed and run. Efficient allocation of energy resource and expenditure on technology is calculated. Finally, results are visualized. At present this is done in relatively rigid interfaces or via (for some) cumbersome text files. Implementing and operating OSeMOSYS in MoManI shortens the learning curve and reduces phobia associated with the complexity of computer modelling, thereby supporting effective capacity building activities. The novel

  20. Wormholes in spacetime and their use for interstellar travel: A tool for teaching general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, M.S.; Thorne, K.S.

    1988-05-01

    Rapid interstellar travel by means of spacetime wormholes is described in a way that is useful for teaching elementary general relativity. The description touches base with Carl Sagan's novel Contact, which, unlike most science fiction novels, treats such travel in a manner that accords with the best 1986 knowledge of the laws of physics. Many objections are given against the use of black holes or Schwarzschild wormholes for rapid interstellar travel. A new class of solutions of the Einstein field equations is presented, which describe wormholes that, in principle, could be traversed by human beings. It is essential in these solutions that the wormhole possess a throat at which there is no horizon; and this property, together with the Einstein field equations, places an extreme constraint on the material that generates the wormhole's spacetime curvature: In the wormhole's throat that material must possess a radial tension tau/sub 0/ with the enormous magnitude tau/sub 0/approx. (pressure at the center of the most massive of neutron stars) x (20 km)/sup 2//(circumference of throat)/sup 2/. Moreover, this tension must exceed the material's density of mass-energy, rho/sub 0/c/sup 2/. No known material has this tau/sub 0/>rho/sub 0/c/sup 2/ property, and such material would violate all the ''energy conditions'' that underlie some deeply cherished theorems in general relativity. However, it is not possible today to rule out firmly the existence of such material; and quantum field theory gives tantalizing hints that such material might, in fact, be possible.

  1. How to build and teach with QuakeCaster: an earthquake demonstration and exploration tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Kelsey; Stein, Ross S.

    2015-01-01

    QuakeCaster is an interactive, hands-on teaching model that simulates earthquakes and their interactions along a plate-boundary fault. QuakeCaster contains the minimum number of physical processes needed to demonstrate most observable earthquake features. A winch to steadily reel in a line simulates the steady plate tectonic motions far from the plate boundaries. A granite slider in frictional contact with a nonskid rock-like surface simulates a fault at a plate boundary. A rubber band connecting the line to the slider simulates the elastic character of the Earth’s crust. By stacking and unstacking sliders and cranking in the winch, one can see the results of changing the shear stress and the clamping stress on a fault. By placing sliders in series with rubber bands between them, one can simulate the interaction of earthquakes along a fault, such as cascading or toggling shocks. By inserting a load scale into the line, one can measure the stress acting on the fault throughout the earthquake cycle. As observed for real earthquakes, QuakeCaster events are not periodic, time-predictable, or slip-predictable. QuakeCaster produces rare but unreliable “foreshocks.” When fault gouge builds up, the friction goes to zero and fault creep is seen without large quakes. QuakeCaster events produce very small amounts of fault gouge that strongly alter its behavior, resulting in smaller, more frequent shocks as the gouge accumulates. QuakeCaster is designed so that students or audience members can operate it and record its output. With a stopwatch and ruler one can measure and plot the timing, slip distance, and force results of simulated earthquakes. People of all ages can use the QuakeCaster model to explore hypotheses about earthquake occurrence. QuakeCaster takes several days and about $500.00 in materials to build.

  2. Teaching Spatial Thinking in Undergraduate Geology Courses Using Tools and Strategies from Cognitive Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormand, C. J.; Shipley, T. F.; Dutrow, B. L.; Goodwin, L. B.; Hickson, T. A.; Tikoff, B.; Atit, K.; Gagnier, K. M.; Resnick, I.

    2015-12-01

    Spatial visualization is an essential skill in the STEM disciplines, including the geological sciences. Undergraduate students, including geoscience majors in upper-level courses, bring a wide range of spatial skill levels to the classroom. Students with weak spatial skills may struggle to understand fundamental concepts and to solve geological problems with a spatial component. However, spatial thinking skills are malleable. Using strategies that have emerged from cognitive science research, we developed a set of curricular materials that improve undergraduate geology majors' abilities to reason about 3D concepts and to solve spatially complex geological problems. Cognitive science research on spatial thinking demonstrates that predictive sketching, making visual comparisons, gesturing, and the use of analogy can be used to develop students' spatial thinking skills. We conducted a three-year study of the efficacy of these strategies in strengthening the spatial skills of students in core geology courses at three universities. Our methodology is a quasi-experimental quantitative design, utilizing pre- and post-tests of spatial thinking skills, assessments of spatial problem-solving skills, and a control group comprised of students not exposed to our new curricular materials. Students taught using the new curricular materials show improvement in spatial thinking skills. Further analysis of our data, to be completed prior to AGU, will answer additional questions about the relationship between spatial skills and academic performance, spatial skills and gender, spatial skills and confidence, and the impact of our curricular materials on students who are struggling academically. Teaching spatial thinking in the context of discipline-based exercises has the potential to transform undergraduate education in the geological sciences by removing one significant barrier to success.

  3. A software tool for teaching and training how to build and use a TOWS matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Mariño Ibáñez

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Strategic planning is currently being used by most companies; it analyses current and expected future situations, determines com-pany orientation and develops means or strategies for achieving their stated missions. This article is aimed at reviewing general considerations in strategic planning and presenting a computational tool designed for building a TOWS matrix for matching a company’s opportunities and threats with its weaknesses and, more especially, its strengths. The software development life cycle (SDLC involved analysis, design, implementation and use. The literature about strategic planning and SWOT analysis was re-viewed for making the analysis. The software only automates an aspect of the whole strategic planning process and can be used for improving students and staff training in SWOT analysis. This type of work seeks to motivate interdisciplinary research.

  4. Algodoo: A Tool for Encouraging Creativity in Physics Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorcic, Bor; Bodin, Madelen

    2017-01-01

    Algodoo (http://www.algodoo.com) is a digital sandbox for physics 2D simulations. It allows students and teachers to easily create simulated "scenes" and explore physics through a user-friendly and visually attractive interface. In this paper, we present different ways in which students and teachers can use Algodoo to visualize and solve physics problems, investigate phenomena and processes, and engage in out-of-school activities and projects. Algodoo, with its approachable interface, inhabits a middle ground between computer games and "serious" computer modeling. It is suitable as an entry-level modeling tool for students of all ages and can facilitate discussions about the role of computer modeling in physics.

  5. Digital Storytelling as a Pedagogical Tool within a Didactic Sequence in Foreign Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Reyes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital storytelling constitutes a pedagogical tool for teachers to work on differentlinguistic skills while generating students’ interest and attention. This studyanalyses the usefulness of including digital storytelling within a didactic sequencein order to work on linguistic routines such as greetings and leave-takings inEnglish as a foreign language. To this aim, we have worked with first yearstudents in the Faculty of Education at the Universitat de València to improve theirability to adapt their language skills to specific situations within common dailyinteraction. We have designed a didactic sequence consisting of differentworkshops that have been put into practice in class. The sequence ends with afinal project in which students are expected to produce their own digital stories,showing thus what they have learnt. This final production has highlighted a clearimprovement in the use of linguistic routines, as well as in the use of morecomplex structures and of varied expressions used to open and close aconversation.

  6. INTERACTIONS: DESIGN, IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A COMPUTATIONAL TOOL FOR TEACHING INTERMOLECULAR FORCES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Geraldo Barbosa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intermolecular forces are a useful concept that can explain the attraction between particulate matter as well as numerous phenomena in our lives such as viscosity, solubility, drug interactions, and dyeing of fibers. However, studies show that students have difficulty understanding this important concept, which has led us to develop a free educational software in English and Portuguese. The software can be used interactively by teachers and students, thus facilitating better understanding. Professors and students, both graduate and undergraduate, were questioned about the software quality and its intuitiveness of use, facility of navigation, and pedagogical application using a Likert scale. The results led to the conclusion that the developed computer application can be characterized as an auxiliary tool to assist teachers in their lectures and students in their learning process of intermolecular forces.

  7. Be-Breeder - Learning: a new tool for teaching and learning plant breeding principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Fritsche-Neto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Be-Breeder application is an on-line tool constructed through the R software for the purpose of assisting in some of the main genetic and statistical analyses related to the area of plant breeding. In addition, Be-Breeder provides a section called “Learning”, which in a simple click-point manner allows explanation of theories related to the effect of inbreeding, population structure, qualitative and quantitative traits, heterosis, population size, effect of selection, and composition of hybrids. Be-Breeder is available for network use on the website of the Allogamous Plant Breeding Laboratory (Laboratório de Melhoramento de Plantas Alógamas of ESALQ-USP through the link: http://www.genetica.esalq.usp.br/alogamas/R.html.

  8. Unique post-doctoral positions in Master of Arts in Teaching Earth Science program at the American Museum of Natural History: Involving early-career research scientists in Earth science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, K. E.; Nadeau, P. A.; Zirakparvar, N. A.; Grcevich, J.; Ustunisik, G. K.

    2012-12-01

    Post-doctoral positions in Earth science fields traditionally emphasize research within a university setting or research institute. Such positions may include a teaching component, but one which is often restricted to introductory undergraduate Earth science courses or upper-level courses within their own field of specialization. With such a specific focus, there may not be much inclination on the part of a post-doctoral fellow to involve themselves in broader education programs, such as public outreach or secondary schools. The American Museum of Natural History is now conducting a non-traditional post-doctoral position as part of its new Master of Arts in Teaching Earth Science (MAT). This pilot program involves forging a one-of-a-kind partnership between a world-class research museum and high-needs schools in New York City with the goal of addressing a critical shortage of qualified Earth Science teachers in New York State, particularly in high-needs schools with diverse populations. The program, which is part of the state's Race to the Top initiative, is approved by the NYS Board of Regents and will prepare a total of 50 candidates in two cohorts to earn a Board of Regents-awarded Masters of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree with a specialization in Earth Science for grades 7-12. The post-doctoral fellows of the MAT program have unique 3-year positions, with more traditional research-based work comprising 65% of the tenure and non-traditional educational roles 35%. The MAT fellows are divided into two types: those with a teaching role, who are involved in the co-design and co-teaching of graduate-level Earth science courses; and those in a research/mentoring role, who design and teach a summer-long science research practicum while also providing informal support to MAT teaching candidates throughout the school year. Over the first year of the MAT program's implementation, fellows have been exposed to a range of activities outside the realm of a traditional post

  9. Randomized Trial of a Novel ACLS Teaching Tool: Does it Improve Student Performance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Nacca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mounting evidence suggests that high-fidelity mannequin-based (HFMBS and computer-based simulation are useful adjunctive educational tools for advanced cardiac life support (ACLS instruction. We sought to determine whether access to a supplemental, online computer-based ACLS simulator would improve students’ performance on a standardized Mega Code using high-fidelity mannequin based simulation (HFMBS. Methods: Sixty-five third-year medical students were randomized. Intervention group subjects (n = 29 each received a two-week access code to the online ACLS simulator, whereas the control group subjects (n = 36 did not. Primary outcome measures included students’ time to initiate chest compressions, defibrillate ventricular fibrillation, and pace symptomatic bradycardia. Secondary outcome measures included students’ subjective self-assessment of ACLS knowledge and confidence. Results: Students with access to the online simulator on average defibrillated ventricular fibrillation in 112 seconds, whereas those without defibrillated in 149.9 seconds, an average of 38 seconds faster [p<.05]. Similarly, those with access to the simulator paced symptomatic bradycardia on average in 95.14 seconds whereas those without access paced on average 154.9 seconds a difference of 59.81 seconds [p<.05]. On a subjective 5-point scale, there was no difference in self-assessment of ACLS knowledge between the control (mean 3.3 versus intervention (mean 3.1 [p-value =.21]. Despite having outperformed the control group subjects in the standardized Mega Code test scenario, the intervention group felt less confident on a 5-point scale (mean 2.5 than the control group. (mean 3.2 [p<.05] Conclusion: The reduction in time to defibrillate ventricular fibrillation and to pace symptomatic bradycardia among the intervention group subjects suggests that the online computer-based ACLS simulator is an effective adjunctive ACLS instructional tool. [West J Emerg Med

  10. Solving ordinary differential equations by electrical analogy: a multidisciplinary teaching tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Perez, J. F.; Conesa, M.; Alhama, I.

    2016-11-01

    Ordinary differential equations are the mathematical formulation for a great variety of problems in science and engineering, and frequently, two different problems are equivalent from a mathematical point of view when they are formulated by the same equations. Students acquire the knowledge of how to solve these equations (at least some types of them) using protocols and strict algorithms of mathematical calculation without thinking about the meaning of the equation. The aim of this work is that students learn to design network models or circuits in this way; with simple knowledge of them, students can establish the association of electric circuits and differential equations and their equivalences, from a formal point of view, that allows them to associate knowledge of two disciplines and promote the use of this interdisciplinary approach to address complex problems. Therefore, they learn to use a multidisciplinary tool that allows them to solve these kinds of equations, even students of first course of engineering, whatever the order, grade or type of non-linearity. This methodology has been implemented in numerous final degree projects in engineering and science, e.g., chemical engineering, building engineering, industrial engineering, mechanical engineering, architecture, etc. Applications are presented to illustrate the subject of this manuscript.

  11. Dynamic computer simulations of electrophoresis: a versatile research and teaching tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, Wolfgang; Breadmore, Michael C; Caslavska, Jitka; Mosher, Richard A

    2010-03-01

    Software is available, which simulates all basic electrophoretic systems, including moving boundary electrophoresis, zone electrophoresis, ITP, IEF and EKC, and their combinations under almost exactly the same conditions used in the laboratory. These dynamic models are based upon equations derived from the transport concepts such as electromigration, diffusion, electroosmosis and imposed hydrodynamic buffer flow that are applied to user-specified initial distributions of analytes and electrolytes. They are able to predict the evolution of electrolyte systems together with associated properties such as pH and conductivity profiles and are as such the most versatile tool to explore the fundamentals of electrokinetic separations and analyses. In addition to revealing the detailed mechanisms of fundamental phenomena that occur in electrophoretic separations, dynamic simulations are useful for educational purposes. This review includes a list of current high-resolution simulators, information on how a simulation is performed, simulation examples for zone electrophoresis, ITP, IEF and EKC and a comprehensive discussion of the applications and achievements.

  12. Efficacy of MedMyst: an Internet Teaching Tool for Middle School Microbiology

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    Leslie Miller

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Can web-based technology be used to effectively introduce or reinforce aspects of microbiology to middle school students? This central hypothesis examines whether brief exposure to a web adventure format containing virtual lab experiments and computer games within an engaging story line can impact student learning. An episodic adventure series, MedMyst (http://medmyst.rice.edu, focuses on infectious diseases and the microbes that cause them. The website is not intended to replace classroom instruction, but rather to engage students in problem-solving activities not likely to be encountered elsewhere. It also provides scientists with a resource to introduce microbiology to adolescent audiences through outreach activities. In the online adventure, the player (student enters a futuristic world in which he or she becomes a “Reconstructor,” a member of an elite team charged with preventing the spread of infectious disease. The series consists of three “missions,” each lasting approximately 30 to 40 minutes and designed to address a limited set of learning objectives. Middle school students participated in the creation of the characters and the stylized design through focus groups. Classroom teachers oversaw the alignment of the web adventure objectives with the National Science Content Standards. Scientists and clinicians reviewed the web adventure for content and accuracy. A field test involving over 700 students from nine different schools assessed the knowledge gains attributable to playing MedMyst. Gain scores from pretest to posttest indicated that middle school students retained important information by interacting with the online material for as little as 30 minutes per adventure; however, gains for high school students were less persuasive, perhaps indicating a different learning tool or content is required for this age audience.

  13. 3D printing technology as innovative tool for math and geometry teaching applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huleihil, M.

    2017-01-01

    The industrial revolution and automation of production processes have changed the face of the world. Three dimensional (3D) printing has the potential to revolutionize manufacturing and further change methods of production toward allowing in increasing number of people to produce products at home. According to a recent OECD (see Backer [1]) publication, “…tapping into the next industrial revolution requires actions on many levels and in many different areas. In particular, unlocking the potential of emerging and enabling technologies requires policy development along a number of fronts, from commercialization to regulation and the supply of skills through education.” In this paper we discuss the role of schools and their responsibility to act as quickly as possible to design a plan of action that will prepare the future citizens to deal with this new reality. This requires planning of action in different directions and on different planes, such as labs, teachers, and curricula. 3D printing requires higher levels of thinking, innovation and creativity. It has the power to develop human imagination and give students the opportunity to visualize numbers, two- dimensional shapes, and three-dimensional objects. The combination of thinking, design, and production has immense power to increase motivation and satisfaction, with a highly probable increase in a student’s math and geometry achievements. The CAD system includes a measure tool which enables and alternative way for calculating properties of the objects under consideration and allows development of reflection and critical thinking. The research method was based on comparison between a reference group and a test group; it was found that intervention significantly improved the reflection abilities of 6th grade students in mathematics.

  14. 思维可视化工具的教学应用%Teaching Application of Visual Thinking Tool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王会霞; 王亚荣

    2015-01-01

    Visual thinking is the use of graphic and visual form to express the concept, formed in the minds of people, knowledge, ideas and so on, the tacit knowledge explicitation, visualization, convenient for people to think, expression, understanding and a graphics technology to facilitate the exchange of. In this paper, based on elaborating on the definition of visual thinking, applica⁃tion of thinking visualization tools in teaching.%思维可视化是利用图形化、形象化的形式来表达人们头脑中形成的概念、知识、思想等,把隐性知识显性化、可视化,方便人们思考、表达、理解并能促进交流的一种图形技术。该文在阐述思维可视化定义的基础上,研究了思维可视化工具在教学中的应用。

  15. Developing and assessing research-based tools for teaching quantum mechanics and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin R.

    Research-based tools to educate college students in physics courses from introductory level to graduate level are essential for helping students with a diverse set of goals and backgrounds learn physics. This thesis explores issues related to student common difficulties with some topics in undergraduate quantum mechanics and thermodynamics courses. Student difficulties in learning quantum mechanics and thermodynamics are investigated by administering written tests and surveys to many classes and conducting individual interviews with a subset of students outside the class to unpack the cognitive mechanisms of the difficulties. The quantum mechanics research also focuses on using the research on student difficulties for the development and evaluation of a Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT) to help students learn about the time-dependence of expectation values using the context of Larmor precession of spin and evaluating the role of asking students to self-diagnose their mistakes on midterm examination on their performance on subsequent problem solving. The QuILT on Larmor precession of spin has both paper-pencil activities and a simulation component to help students learn these foundational issues in quantum mechanics. Preliminary evaluations suggest that the QuILT, which strives to help students build a robust knowledge structure of time-dependence of expectation values in quantum mechanics using a guided approach, is successful in helping students learn these topics in the junior-senior level quantum mechanics courses. The technique to help upper-level students in quantum mechanics courses effectively engage in the process of learning from their mistakes is also found to be effective. In particular, research shows that the self-diagnosis activity in upper-level quantum mechanics significantly helps students who are struggling and this activity can reduce the gap between the high and low achieving students on subsequent problem solving. Finally, a survey

  16. Developing a User-Centred Planning Tool for Young Adults with Development Disorders: A Research-Based Teaching Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribu, Kirsten; Patel, Tulpesh

    2016-01-01

    People with development disorders, for instance autism, need structured plans to help create predictability in their daily lives. Digital plans can facilitate enhanced independency, learning, and quality of life, but existing apps are largely general purpose and lack the flexibility required by this specific but heterogeneous user group. Universal design is both a goal and a process and should be based on a holistic approach and user-centered design, interacting with the users in all stages of the development process. At Oslo and Akershus University College (HiOA) we conducted a research-based teaching project in co-operation with the Department of Neuro-habilitation at Oslo University Hospital (OUS) with two employees acting as project managers and students as developers. Three groups of Computer Science bachelor students developed digital prototypes for a planning tool for young adults with pervasive development disorders, who live either with their families or in supervised residences, and do not receive extensive public services. The students conducted the initial planning phase of the software development process, focusing on prototyping the system requirements, whilst a professional software company programmed the end solution. The goal of the project was to develop flexible and adaptive user-oriented and user-specific app solutions for tablets that can aid this diverse user group in structuring daily life, whereby, for example, photos of objects and places known to the individual user replace general pictures or drawings, and checklists can be elaborate or sparse as necessary. The three student groups worked independently of each other and created interactive working prototypes based on tests, observations and short interviews with end users (both administrators and residents) and regular user feedback from the project managers. Three very different solutions were developed that were of high enough quality that an external software company were able to

  17. Empirical links between instruction with teaching tools and the hierarchical model of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation in a Korean college tennis class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Myoungjin; Kwon, Sungho

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the sequential process (i.e., social factors→mediators→motivation→consequences) underlying the Hierarchical Model of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation at the contextual level in instruction using three teaching tools, modified balls, a high net, and colored balls and cones in a college-level tennis class in South Korea. 126 students enrolled in a 15-week tennis class participated in the study. The results indicate that the three teaching tools positively affected students' perceived competence, with perceived competence's beta on intrinsic motivation equal to 0.45. Intrinsic motivation was found to reduce negative affect further by -0.33, thereby demonstrating the sequential process of the Hierarchical Model of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation.

  18. REPRESENTATION OF ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORKS IN THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS: POTENTIALY OF VIRTUAL GROUPS AS TOOLS FOR TEACHING- LEARNING IN HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Victor Ribeiro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available One tool that has been in evidence, especially among young people, is Facebook. It can be classified as a synchronous communication tool that allows communities of people with similar interests to discuss and exchange experiences in real time, promoting the sharing of information and the creation of collective knowledge, even if they being in different parts of the globe. In this paper we show that Facebook can be used as an educational tool to aid the work done in the classroom and the impact of creating closed groups in online social networking for educational purposes. The survey was conducted with a group of students at a private school in Bauru/SP. We investigated the interaction profile of students with a closed group created on Facebook and through a questionnaire analyzed whether students use virtual environments for personal or educational. The survey reveals students perceptions about relevant aspects and the potential use of this tool as teaching-learning strategy.

  19. Study on the Effects of Educational Environment (Physical Space and Educational Tools on Learning and Teaching Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reihane Nazari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the survey of educational problem regarding to increasing the interested students to education, evidences show that teaching aids effect to student learning. Psychological findings show that students learn the lesson better and easier by visual method and use of teaching aids. Generally teaching aids make students senses active and also cause educational process real, practical and more pleasant. To investigate the effect of teaching aids and learning environment on mathematical achievement Lesson, 120 second grade students at Shahre Kords schools were chosen randomly and divided in control and experiment groups. Experiment groups learned mathematics by teaching aids. Training control group had normal manner. In opinion of students teaching aids and learning environment had positive effect to mathematics learning. The results of hypothesis' test show that components of educational environment (lighting system, sound, painting, etc. have a significant role in learning mathematics. Learning environmentcomponents (lighting system, sound, painting, etc. has effected to students performance in mathematics learning.

  20. On Application of Multimedia Tools in English Teaching%多媒体手段在英语教学中的应用浅析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈桂忠

    2014-01-01

    With the popularity of the Internet and the computer era, the rapid rise of multimedia technology and thrive, its application has also been deep into all aspects of social life, this paper multimedia tools in teaching English what is the exam-ple of the multimedia teaching? Compared to traditional multimedia English teaching English teaching what are the advan-tages? This paper talks about China's current status and improvements of multimedia English teaching.%随着互联网时代的到来以及电脑的普及,多媒体技术迅速兴起并蓬勃发展,其应用也已经深入到社会生活的方方面面,本文以多媒体手段在英语教学中的运用为例浅谈一下什么是多媒体教学?多媒体英语教学相较于传统英语教学有哪些优势?中国目前多媒体英语教学的现状及改善措施。

  1. A Microsoft Excel interface for rhyolite-MELTS: a tool for research and teaching of magma properties and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualda, G. A.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    The thermodynamic modeling software MELTS (and its derivatives) is a powerful and much utilized tool for investigating crystallization and melting in natural magmatic systems. Rhyolite-MELTS (Gualda et al. 2012, J. Petrol. 53:875-890) is a recent recalibration of MELTS aimed at better capturing the evolution of magmas present in the upper crust (up to ~400 MPa pressure). Currently, most users of rhyolite-MELTS rely on a graphical user interface (GUI), which can be run on UNIX/LINUX and Mac OS X computers. While the interface is powerful and flexible, it can be somewhat cumbersome for the novice and the output is in the form of text files that need to be processed offline. This situation is probably the main reason why MELTS - despite great potential - has not been used more frequently for teaching purposes. We are currently developing an alternative GUI for rhyolite-MELTS using web services consumed by a VBA backend in Microsoft Excel©. The goal is to create a much more interactive tool, that is easy to use that can be made available to a widespread audience, and that will be useful for both research and teaching. The interface is contained within a macro-enabled workbook, which includes editable cells where the user can insert the model input information. Interface buttons initiate computations that are executed on a central server at OFM Research in Seattle (WA). Results of simple calculations are shown immediately within the interface itself. For instance, a user can very rapidly determine the temperature at which a magma of a given composition is completely molten (i.e. find the liquidus); or determine which phases are present, in what abundances, their compositions, and their physical properties (e.g. density, viscosity) at any given combination of temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity. We expect that using the interface in this mode will greatly facilitate building intuition about magmas and their properties. It is also possible to combine a sequence of

  2. Item Analysis an Effective Tool for Assessing Exam Quality, Designing Appropriate Exam and Determining Weakness in Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghadam Ali Talebi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Item analysis is an integrate component of course assessment which helps observe the item characteristics and improve the quality of the course exam. It also provides a guide for improving the teaching method to enhance the students’ learning outcomes. However, item analysis results may not be applied to adjust the way teachers teach and improve the items characteristics. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of item analysis in improving assessment and teaching quality. Methods: The Item characteristics of the final exam for kinesiology course for physiotherapy students in 2 semesters were studied. Improved and good multiple choice questions (MCQs were then conducted for another semester, followed by application of both good MCQs and improved teaching for the other semester. The item characteristics were compared to observe any effect of good MCQs and teaching on educational performance. Results: The good MCQs along with the improved teaching were associated with the greater mean score and the students who passed the exam rather than those with only good MCQs. The percentage of easy questions (42.5% in students who received good MCQs and improved teaching compared with those (15% who only received good MCQs indicated that the improved pool of questions were shifted from medium to easier questions. Conclusion: We concluded that the item analysis should be followed by revised and improved teaching method. It appears that improved item characteristics are associated with improved teaching method and possibly with an improvement in students’ learning.

  3. Teaching children with autism spectrum disorder through technology: the effects of using an iPad as both a supportive and independent teaching tool

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Pui Tzan

    2017-01-01

    The advancements in software application and mobile technology, have seen numerous ways in which technology can been used to teach children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Many studies have demonstrated the positive outcomes and benefits associated with the use of technological devices such as tablets in the education of children with ASD. There are, however, gaps in the current body of research. Firstly, the evidence base to support the use of mobile technology to teach academic skills ...

  4. Compassion: A Teaching Tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Colin is a kindergartener who acted like a three-year-old with an attitude. This author, his kindergarten teacher, had tried visual schedules, positive and negative reinforcement, ignoring disruptive behavior, clear expectations and choices, and nothing was curbing his defiant behaviors. So far, all he had learned was that grown-ups were always…

  5. A Reconceptualised Translation-Based Task as a Viable Teaching Tool in EFL Class to Avoid Calque Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Roberto Martínez

    2015-01-01

    The negative attitude towards translation as another pedagogical means in Foreign Language Teaching (FLT) has prevailed for much time (Cook, 2010). Nonetheless, currently, many theorists and linguistics agree on the importance of using translation activities in foreign language teaching and underline its beneficial effects to expand vocabulary, to…

  6. Teaching Aids a Special Pedagogy Tool of Brain Development in School Children, Interest and Academic Achievement to Enhance Future Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohwojero, Chamberlain Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The school system is an institution where teachers adopt different teaching methods to impact knowledge and skills. The teaching method adopted by a class teacher has a great effect on children interest, academic achievement and brain development of a child. To support this fact the researcher used two groups of children from ten schools to carry…

  7. Developing skills for teaching: reflections on the lecture as a learning tool for the novice midwife educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Deirdre; Fleming, Sandra

    2012-09-01

    This paper explored how I, as a novice midwife educator in a Higher Education Institution, utilised my reflections on the preparation, delivery and evaluation of a lecture to develop my teaching skills. My personal teaching and learning philosophy was informed by humanism. Reflecting on my teaching and learning philosophy, and the teaching and learning theories that guided the session, enabled me to identify aspects of my teaching that required further development. Similarly, the process permitted me to recognise positive aspects that I could take forward and build upon in my professional development as an educator. The key learning for me as a novice educator is outlined, with an emphasis placed on preparation and strategic question formulation.

  8. Enhancing STEM Education through Cubesats: Using Satellite Integration as a Teaching Tool at a Non-Tech School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, S.; Cotten, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    University-based satellite programs have been successfully used as a platform for teaching STEM related fields, bringing tremendous benefits to graduate and undergraduate education. Considering their infrastructure and curricula, tech schools have traditionally been considered logical candidates for hosting such programs. More recently, with the dissemination of small satellites initiatives, non-tech schools have been presented the opportunity of developing satellite design and implementation programs. This work reports on the experiences and challenges associated with implementing a satellite program at the University of Georgia (UGA), a non-tech university. With funding from the Air Force Research Laboratory's (AFRL) University Nanosat Program (UNP) and NASA's Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP) a team of undergraduates at UGA has recently been tasked with building two small satellites and helping to create a Small Satellite Research Laboratory (SSRL) at the university. Unique features of the satellite program at UGA include its team of students from a broad range of backgrounds and departments (Engineering, Computer Science, Art, Business, and Geography) and the previous exposure of many of these students to synergistic technologies, including arduino and unmanned aerial systems. We show how informal exposure to those technologies and willingness of students to focus on areas outside of their field of study can benefit from the implementation of satellite programs. In this regard, we report on methods and techniques used to find and recruit driven and knowledgeable students to work in a high paced field such as satellite system integration. We show how students and faculty from multiple departments have collaborated to reach a common, far reaching goal and describe our proposed methods to evaluate and measure educational goals based around SSRL and its projects. We also present the challenges associated with the lack of a developed engineering

  9. The implementation of e-learning tools to enhance undergraduate bioinformatics teaching and learning: a case study in the National University of Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Chay

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid advancement of computer and information technology in recent years has resulted in the rise of e-learning technologies to enhance and complement traditional classroom teaching in many fields, including bioinformatics. This paper records the experience of implementing e-learning technology to support problem-based learning (PBL in the teaching of two undergraduate bioinformatics classes in the National University of Singapore. Results Survey results further established the efficiency and suitability of e-learning tools to supplement PBL in bioinformatics education. 63.16% of year three bioinformatics students showed a positive response regarding the usefulness of the Learning Activity Management System (LAMS e-learning tool in guiding the learning and discussion process involved in PBL and in enhancing the learning experience by breaking down PBL activities into a sequential workflow. On the other hand, 89.81% of year two bioinformatics students indicated that their revision process was positively impacted with the use of LAMS for guiding the learning process, while 60.19% agreed that the breakdown of activities into a sequential step-by-step workflow by LAMS enhances the learning experience Conclusion We show that e-learning tools are useful for supplementing PBL in bioinformatics education. The results suggest that it is feasible to develop and adopt e-learning tools to supplement a variety of instructional strategies in the future.

  10. The map: An essential tool in the teaching-learning process of the Marxism-Leninism and History curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montero, Martiza Isabel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the use of maps in teaching Geography by a sample of professor at “José Marti” College of Education. A systematic use of maps constitutes one of the major problems in the teaching-learning process in the Marxism-Leninism and History Curriculum. Likewise, it has been identify as a shortcoming in graduates and in-service trainees. It would be recommendable to highlight the value and importance of maps in teaching, consequently a number of suggestions are given to lead, reflection and discussion by the teacher’s.

  11. Using Video as a Stimulus to Reveal Elementary Teachers' Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Angela T.; Gaddy, Angeline K.; Baxter, Wesley A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the usefulness of a video-based tool for measuring teachers' mathematical knowledge for teaching. Unique to this tool is the use of a video featuring a mathematical disagreement that occurred in an elementary classroom. The authors define mathematical disagreements as instances in which students challenge…

  12. Teaching Energy Science as Inquiry: Reflections on Professional Development as a Tool to Build Inquiry Teaching Skills for Middle and High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraphin, Kanesa Duncan; Philippoff, Joanna; Parisky, Alex; Degnan, Katherine; Warren, Diana Papini

    2013-06-01

    A hybrid (face-to-face and online) professional development (PD) course focused on energy science for middle and high school teachers (N = 47) was conducted using the teaching science as inquiry (TSI) framework. Data from the PD indicates that online opportunities enhanced participation and that the TSI structure improved teachers' inquiry implementation. Teachers found the TSI modes of inquiry easily accessible and effectively implemented them (modes correspond to the inquiry mechanisms of investigation, such as product evaluation, authoritative, inductive, deductive, and descriptive). On the other hand, the TSI phase structure (i.e. learning cycle) was most helpful for teachers novice to inquiry teaching, suggesting that modification of the PD is needed to promote more in-depth use of the phases in the TSI framework. In terms of content, teacher interest in energy science was high, which resulted in implementation of energy science activities across a range of disciplines. However, teachers' confidence in teaching energy science through inquiry was low compared to similar TSI PD courses on other subjects (mean perceived pedagogical content knowledge = 8.96 ± 2.07 SD for energy compared to 15.45 ± 1.83, 16.44 ± 1.81 and 15.63 ± 1.69, for elementary astronomy, high school aquatic science, and college aquatic science, respectively). These data support current findings on the complexities of teaching and understanding energy science content and suggest the need for additional teacher PD opportunities in energy science in order to provide opportunities for teachers to increase both their content knowledge and their confidence in teaching energy science.

  13. Relationships between teaching faculty and teaching librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    Every librarian who teaches in an academic library setting understands the complexities involved in partnering with teaching faculty. Relationships Between Teaching Faculty and Teaching Librarians recounts the efforts of librarians and faculty working together in disciplines across the board to create and sustain connections crucial to the success of library instruction. This unique collection of essays examines various types of partnerships between librarians and faculty (networking, coordination, and collaboration) and addresses the big issues involved, including teaching within an academic

  14. Using Supplementary Video in Multimedia Instruction as a Teaching Tool to Increase Efficiency of Learning and Quality of Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos Ljubojevic

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research is to investigate efficiency of use of supplementary video content in multimedia teaching. Integrating video clips in multimedia lecture presentations may increase students’ perception of important information and motivation for learning. Because of that, students can better understand and remember key points of a lecture. Those improvements represent some important learning outcomes. This research showed that segmentation of teaching materials with supplementary video clips may improve lecture organization and presentation in order to achieve effective teaching and learning. The context of the video content and the position of supplementary video clips in teaching material are important influences on factors for motivation and efficiency of learning. This research presents the effects of the use of supplementary videos with different context of content (entertainment and educational as well as the effects of their position within the teaching material. The experimental results showed that the most efficient method of use of supplementary video is integration with educational video content in the middle of a lecture. This position of video insertion provides the best results. The context of video content influences efficiency of learning also. Entertainment video was not as efficient as educational, but it can be used to engage and motivate students for learning. The given results have been confirmed with a subjective assessment of students’ quality of experience with different methods of embedding video clips.

  15. Unique Path Partitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bessenrodt, Christine; Olsson, Jørn Børling; Sellers, James A.

    2013-01-01

    We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions.......We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions....

  16. Reinventing Student Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran-Smith, Marilyn

    1991-01-01

    Describes innovative student teaching programs, noting assumptions about power, knowledge, and language of teaching. The paper discusses contrasting relationships (consonance, critical dissonance, and collaborative resonance), arguing that programs based on collaborative university-school relationships provide unique learning opportunities. The…

  17. The Lasso Problem and Uniqueness

    CERN Document Server

    Tibshirani, Ryan J

    2012-01-01

    The lasso is a popular tool for sparse linear regression, especially for problems in which the number of variables p exceeds the number of observations n. But when p>n, the lasso criterion is not strictly convex, and hence it may not have a unique minimum. An important question is: when is the lasso solution well-defined (unique)? We review results from the literature, which show that if the predictor variables are drawn from a continuous probability distribution, then there is a unique lasso solution with probability one, regardless of the sizes of n and p. We also show that this result extends easily to $\\ell_1$ penalized minimization problems over a wide range of loss functions. A second important question is: how can we deal with the case of non-uniqueness in lasso solutions? In light of the aforementioned result, this case really only arises when some of the predictor variables are discrete, or when some post-processing has been performed on continuous predictor measurements. Though we certainly cannot c...

  18. The design of teaching materials as a tool in EFL teacher education: experiences of a Brazilian teacher education program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Hercules Augusto-Navarro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2015v68n1p121 This paper discusses how teaching material design can contribute to educate EFL teachers to consider their prospective students’ profile. This professional activity requires the student teachers to take a set of decisions, make choices and explain the reasons for them. The described practices in teacher education are carried at a public university in the southeast of Brazil and Larsen-Freeman's (1983 assertion that teaching is about making choices, which should be informed, is closely considered. The author describes three different contexts of practice and presents student teacher considerations about the experiences. There are challenges and gains in the process of teaching/learning how to design ELT materials, but as has been pointed out by the participants involved in this practice the gains are worth the challenges.

  19. Using the stress and adversity inventory as a teaching tool leads to significant learning gains in two courses on stress and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavich, George M; Toussaint, Loren

    2014-10-01

    The ability to measure cumulative stress exposure is important for research and teaching in stress and health, but until recently, no structured system has existed for assessing exposure to stress over the lifespan. Here, we report the results of two experimental studies that examined the pedagogical efficacy of using an automated system for assessing life stress, called the Stress and Adversity Inventory (STRAIN), for teaching courses on stress and health. In Study 1, a randomized, wait-list controlled experiment was conducted with 20 college students to test whether the STRAIN, coupled with a related lecture and discussion, promoted learning about stress and health. Results showed that this experiential lesson led to significant learning gains. To disentangle the effects of completing the STRAIN from participating in the lecture and discussion, we subsequently conducted Study 2 on 144 students using a 2 (STRAIN versus control activity) by 2 (STRAIN-specific lecture versus general stress lecture) repeated-measures design. Although the STRAIN-specific lecture was sufficient for promoting learning, completing the STRAIN also generated significant learning gains when paired with only the general stress lecture. Together, these studies suggest that the STRAIN is an effective tool for promoting experiential learning and teaching students about stress and health.

  20. Using Innovative Tools to Teach Computer Application to Business Students--A Hawthorne Effect or Successful Implementation Here to Stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zeenath Reza

    2014-01-01

    A year after the primary study that tested the impact of introducing blended learning and guided discovery to help teach computer application to business students, this paper looks into the continued success of using guided discovery and blended learning with learning management system in and out of classrooms to enhance student learning.…

  1. Analysing the Opportunities and Challenges to Use of Information and Communication Technology Tools in Teaching-Learning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastjerdi, Negin Barat

    2016-01-01

    The research aims at the evaluation of ICT use in teaching-learning process to the students of Isfahan elementary schools. The method of this research is descriptive-surveying. The statistical population of the study was all teachers of Isfahan elementary schools. The sample size was determined 350 persons that selected through cluster sampling…

  2. Triatominae Biochemistry Goes to School: Evaluation of a Novel Tool for Teaching Basic Biochemical Concepts of Chagas Disease Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Leonardo Rodrigues; de Oliveria Cudischevitch, Cecília; Carneiro, Alan Brito; Macedo, Gustavo Bartholomeu; Lannes, Denise; da Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate a new approach to teaching the basic biochemistry mechanisms that regulate the biology of Triatominae, major vectors of "Trypanosoma cruzi," the causative agent of Chagas disease. We have designed and used a comic book, "Carlos Chagas: 100 years after a hero's discovery" containing scientific information…

  3. Using Supplementary Video in Multimedia Instruction as a Teaching Tool to Increase Efficiency of Learning and Quality of Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubojevic, Milos; Vaskovic, Vojkan; Stankovic, Srecko; Vaskovic, Jelena

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to investigate efficiency of use of supplementary video content in multimedia teaching. Integrating video clips in multimedia lecture presentations may increase students' perception of important information and motivation for learning. Because of that, students can better understand and remember key points of…

  4. Effectiveness of Student-Generated Video as a Teaching Tool for an Instrumental Technique in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeremy T.; Box, Melinda C.; Eguren, Kristen E.; Parker, Thomas A.; Saraldi-Gallardo, Victoria M.; Wolfe, Michael I.; Gallardo-Williams, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    Multimedia instruction has been shown to serve as an effective learning aid for chemistry students. In this study, the viability of student-generated video instruction for organic chemistry laboratory techniques and procedure was examined and its effectiveness compared to instruction provided by a teaching assistant (TA) was evaluated. After…

  5. Triatominae Biochemistry Goes to School: Evaluation of a Novel Tool for Teaching Basic Biochemical Concepts of Chagas Disease Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Leonardo Rodrigues; de Oliveria Cudischevitch, Cecília; Carneiro, Alan Brito; Macedo, Gustavo Bartholomeu; Lannes, Denise; da Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate a new approach to teaching the basic biochemistry mechanisms that regulate the biology of Triatominae, major vectors of "Trypanosoma cruzi," the causative agent of Chagas disease. We have designed and used a comic book, "Carlos Chagas: 100 years after a hero's discovery" containing scientific information obtained by…

  6. The Course Improvement Flowchart: A Description of a Tool and Process for the Evaluation of University Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Philip

    2008-01-01

    The use of evaluation to examine and improve the quality of teaching and courses is now a component of most universities. However, despite the various methods and opportunities for evaluation, a lack of understanding of the processes, measures and value are some of the major impediments to effective evaluation. Evaluation requires an understanding…

  7. Teaching History of Architecture--Moving from a Knowledge Transfer to a Multi-Participative Methodology Based on IT Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimadomo, Guido

    2014-01-01

    The changes that the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) framework obliged the School of Architecture of Malaga, University of Malaga. to make to its "History of Architecture" course are discussed in this paper. It was taken up as an opportunity to modify the whole course, introducing creative teaching and "imaginative…

  8. Triatominae Biochemistry Goes to School: Evaluation of a Novel Tool for Teaching Basic Biochemical Concepts of Chagas Disease Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Leonardo Rodrigues; de Oliveria Cudischevitch, Cecília; Carneiro, Alan Brito; Macedo, Gustavo Bartholomeu; Lannes, Denise; da Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate a new approach to teaching the basic biochemistry mechanisms that regulate the biology of Triatominae, major vectors of "Trypanosoma cruzi," the causative agent of Chagas disease. We have designed and used a comic book, "Carlos Chagas: 100 years after a hero's discovery" containing scientific information obtained by…

  9. Using a Conceptual Change Text as a Tool to Teach the Nature of Science in an Explicit Reflective Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepni, Salih; Cil, Emine

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop conceptual change texts in the teaching of aspects of the nature of science and to introduce the development of texts. The socio-cultural and the subjective aspects were taken into consideration in the conceptual change texts, which are presented in the study. The conceptual change texts were prepared to be used…

  10. Literacy Tools in the Classroom: Teaching through Critical Inquiry, Grades 5-12. Language and Literacy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Richard; Campano, Gerald; Edmiston, Brian; Borgmann, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    This innovative resource describes how teachers can help students employ "literacy tools" across the curriculum to foster learning. The authors demonstrate how literacy tools such as narratives, question-asking, spoken-word poetry, drama, writing, digital communication, images, and video encourage critical inquiry in the 5-12 classroom. The book…

  11. PORTAAL: A Classroom Observation Tool Assessing Evidence-Based Teaching Practices for Active Learning in Large Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Sarah L.; Converse, Mercedes; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that active learning works better than a completely passive lecture. Despite this evidence, adoption of these evidence-based teaching practices remains low. In this paper, we offer one tool to help faculty members implement active learning. This tool identifies 21 readily implemented elements that have been shown to increase student outcomes related to achievement, logic development, or other relevant learning goals with college-age students. Thus, this tool both clarifies the research-supported elements of best practices for instructor implementation of active learning in the classroom setting and measures instructors’ alignment with these practices. We describe how we reviewed the discipline-based education research literature to identify best practices in active learning for adult learners in the classroom and used these results to develop an observation tool (Practical Observation Rubric To Assess Active Learning, or PORTAAL) that documents the extent to which instructors incorporate these practices into their classrooms. We then use PORTAAL to explore the classroom practices of 25 introductory biology instructors who employ some form of active learning. Overall, PORTAAL documents how well aligned classrooms are with research-supported best practices for active learning and provides specific feedback and guidance to instructors to allow them to identify what they do well and what could be improved. PMID:26033871

  12. Seismic Sensors to Supercomputers: Internet Mapping and Computational Tools for Teaching and Learning about Earthquakes and the Structure of the Earth from Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meertens, C. M.; Seber, D.; Hamburger, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Internet has become an integral resource in the classrooms and homes of teachers and students. Widespread Web-access to seismic data and analysis tools enhances opportunities for teaching and learning about earthquakes and the structure of the earth from seismic tomography. We will present an overview and demonstration of the UNAVCO Voyager Java- and Javascript-based mapping tools (jules.unavco.org) and the Cornell University/San Diego Supercomputer Center (www.discoverourearth.org) Java-based data analysis and mapping tools. These map tools, datasets, and related educational websites have been developed and tested by collaborative teams of scientific programmers, research scientists, and educators. Dual-use by research and education communities ensures persistence of the tools and data, motivates on-going development, and encourages fresh content. With these tools are curricular materials and on-going evaluation processes that are essential for an effective application in the classroom. The map tools provide not only seismological data and tomographic models of the earth's interior, but also a wealth of associated map data such as topography, gravity, sea-floor age, plate tectonic motions and strain rates determined from GPS geodesy, seismic hazard maps, stress, and a host of geographical data. These additional datasets help to provide context and enable comparisons leading to an integrated view of the planet and the on-going processes that shape it. Emerging Cyberinfrastructure projects such as the NSF-funded GEON Information Technology Research project (www.geongrid.org) are developing grid/web services, advanced visualization software, distributed databases and data sharing methods, concept-based search mechanisms, and grid-computing resources for earth science and education. These developments in infrastructure seek to extend the access to data and to complex modeling tools from the hands of a few researchers to a much broader set of users. The GEON

  13. Application of E-learning tools for the teaching of Natural Science. A case related to Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldes, G.; Gallino, M.; Britos, D.; Lago, D.; Tavella, G.; Vidal, E.; Morales, S.; Nicotra, M.

    The requirements, recent experiences and projections of the application of virtual learning techniques and environments for the teaching of basic sciences at the National University of Córdoba, Argentina, are described. The reasons to still consider basic science E-learning as an institutional vacancy area are discussed. Present activities designed to revert this situation are also discussed. A particular experience about the application of tics as a complementary resource for teaching astronomy at the University is described and discussed on the basis of both strengths and limitations. The organization of E-learning activities at the Faculty of Engineering, Biology and Geology ("Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Físicas y Naturales") is discussed in some detail.

  14. La Maqueta como herramienta didáctica del Diseño Industrial = Model as teaching tools of industrial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Alía García

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEn el Diseño Industrial las maquetas son unas herramientas didácticas fundamentales porque permiten conocer los objetos tridimensionales de una manera sencilla e intuitiva. Con la ayuda de estos instrumentos se puede conocer el paso intermedio entre la representación de los objetos en dos dimensiones ysu materialización en las tres dimensiones con el fin de analizar el volumen desde todos los puntos de vista. Por otro lado, la amplia gama de materiales y técnicas que pueden emplearse en la realización de las maquetas hacen que esta disciplina sea imprescindible en cualquier programa de Diseño Industrial.En este sentido, como ejemplo práctico del empleo de las maquetas en el Diseño Industrial, se desarrolló una actividad en la “I Feria el Aprendiz de Ingeniero” promovida por la Universidad Politécnica de Madrid que tenía como objetivo fomentar las vocaciones tecnológicas entre los estudiantes de secundaria y que se concluyó con un elevado éxito. AbstractIn the Industrial Design scale models are fundamental teaching tools that allow to know the three-dimensional objects in a simple and intuitive way. With the help of these tools can make the intermediate step between the representation of objects in two dimensions and three dimensions in order to analyze the volume from all points of view. Furthermore, the wide range of materials for use in making models makes them a teaching to be considered in any course of industrial design tools. Finally, as a practical example of the use of models in Industrial Design an activity promoted by the Polytechnic University of Madrid which aimed to promote technological vocations among high school students was developed. This activity ended with a high success.

  15. Sources of Information and Documentation and Working Tools in Foreign Language Teaching in Romania, 1960-1980 (I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Brînduşa Nicolaescu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article, the first part of a broader research project, attempts to analyze the evolution of the status of foreign language teaching and the subsequent methodology in Romania under the communist regime, especially under the totalitarian rule of Ceausescu. The languages taken into account are French, English, German, Italian and Spanish, among which the first two are given more importance in the documents used in this research: scientific journals, specialised reviews.

  16. LACO-Wiki: A land cover validation tool and a new, innovative teaching resource for remote sensing and the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Linda; Perger, Christoph; Dresel, Christopher; Hofer, Martin; Weichselbaum, Juergen; Mondel, Thomas; Steffen, Fritz

    2016-04-01

    The validation of land cover products is an important step in the workflow of generating a land cover map from remotely-sensed imagery. Many students of remote sensing will be given exercises on classifying a land cover map followed by the validation process. Many algorithms exist for classification, embedded within proprietary image processing software or increasingly as open source tools. However, there is little standardization for land cover validation, nor a set of open tools available for implementing this process. The LACO-Wiki tool was developed as a way of filling this gap, bringing together standardized land cover validation methods and workflows into a single portal. This includes the storage and management of land cover maps and validation data; step-by-step instructions to guide users through the validation process; sound sampling designs; an easy-to-use environment for validation sample interpretation; and the generation of accuracy reports based on the validation process. The tool was developed for a range of users including producers of land cover maps, researchers, teachers and students. The use of such a tool could be embedded within the curriculum of remote sensing courses at a university level but is simple enough for use by students aged 13-18. A beta version of the tool is available for testing at: http://www.laco-wiki.net.

  17. The Solid Earth Research and Teaching Environment, a new software framework to share research tools in the classroom and across disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, K.; Becker, T. W.; Boschi, L.; Sain, J.; Schorlemmer, D.; Waterhouse, H.

    2009-12-01

    The Solid Earth Teaching and Research Environment (SEATREE) is a modular and user-friendly software framework to facilitate the use of solid Earth research tools in the classroom and for interdisciplinary research collaboration. SEATREE is open source and community developed, distributed freely under the GNU General Public License. It is a fully contained package that lets users operate in a graphical mode, while giving more advanced users the opportunity to view and modify the source code. Top level graphical user interfaces which initiate the calculations and visualize results, are written in the Python programming language using an object-oriented, modern design. Results are plotted with either Matlab-like Python libraries, or SEATREE’s own Generic Mapping Tools wrapper. The underlying computational codes used to produce the results can be written in any programming language and accessed through Python wrappers. There are currently four fully developed science modules for SEATREE: (1) HC is a global geodynamics tool based on a semi-analytical mantle-circulation program based on work by B. Steinberger, Becker, and C. O'Neill. HC can compute velocities and tractions for global, spherical Stokes flow and radial viscosity variations. HC is fast enough to be used for classroom instruction, for example to let students interactively explore the role of radial viscosity variations for global geopotential (geoid) anomalies. (2) ConMan wraps Scott King’s 2D finite element mantle convection code, allowing users to quickly observe how modifications to input parameters affect heat flow over time. As seismology modules, SEATREE includes, (3), Larry, a global, surface wave phase-velocity inversion tool and, (4), Syn2D, a Cartesian tomography teaching tool for ray-theory wave propagation in synthetic, arbitrary velocity structure in the presence of noise. Both underlying programs were contributed by Boschi. Using Syn2D, students can explore, for example, how well a given

  18. 多媒体辅助工具在会计专业课程教学中的应用探析%The Analysis of Application about Multimedia Auxiliary Tool in Accounting Major Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高锦云

    2013-01-01

    Traditional teaching way has many limitations and shortcomings comparing with modern accounting course teaching. In view of this situation, with the development of multimedia technology, multimedia teaching tools are widely applied to aux-iliary teaching course. Under this background, the article com-bines the characteristic of secondary vocational accounting teaching, detailed analysis of multimedia auxiliary tool in the teaching of accounting professional course advantage, points out matters of attention in the multimedia in the teaching, and pre-sents application of multimedia teaching of basic course for the accounting. Practice shows that the rational use of multimedia teaching,which can greatly improve the teaching effect.%  传统授课方式在现代会计专业课程教学中存在诸多局限和不足,针对这种情况,随着多媒体技术的发展,多媒体教学工具被广泛运用于课程的辅助教学。在此背景下,文章结合中职会计专业教学的特点,详细分析多媒体辅助工具在会计专业课程教学中的优势,指出多媒体在教学中的注意事项,并给出会计基础课程多媒体教学的应用实例。实践表明,合理使用多媒体教学,能够大幅提高教学效果。

  19. The Possibility of Using Iconic and Symbolic Tools in Teaching Preschoolers (on Example of the Acquisition of the Rainbow Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veraksa A.N.,

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available article focuses on use of cognitive activity in preschool children. Particular attention is paid to understanding of the symbolic mediation in the context of the study of play activities. We describe an experiment which purpose was to develop the representations of the rainbow phenomenon in children of preschool age. The formation occurred in two ways: through the use of symbolic means (using models, and through the use of symbols in the play activity. The subjects were preschoolers aged 4-5 years (N = 23 attending preschools in Moscow. The results show that the use of iconic and symbolic tools during development of the phenomenon have been effective when working with preschoolers. The discovered relationship suggests that the application of the iconic and symbolic means represent different cognitive processes: the successful use of symbolic tools is associated with high levels of general intelligence and vocabulary; the use symbolic tools is associated with creativity.

  20. Unique Access to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Don

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the many learning opportunities that broadcast technology students at Ladue Horton Watkins High School in St. Louis, Missouri, experience because of their unique access to technology and methods of learning. Through scaffolding, stepladder techniques, and trial by fire, students learn to produce multiple television programs,…

  1. Addressing climate and energy misconceptions - teaching tools offered by the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A. U.; Ledley, T. S.; Kirk, K. B.; Grogan, M.; McCaffrey, M. S.; Buhr, S. M.; Manduca, C. A.; Fox, S.; Niepold, F.; Howell, C.; Lynds, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    Despite a prevalence of peer-reviewed scientific research and high-level reports by intergovernmental agencies (e.g., IPCC) that document changes in our climate and consequences for human societies, the public discourse regards these topics as controversial and sensitive. The chasm between scientific-based understanding of climate systems and public understanding can most easily be addressed via high quality, science-based education on these topics. Well-trained and confident educators are required to provide this education. However, climate science and energy awareness are complex topics that are rapidly evolving and have a great potential for controversy. Furthermore, the interdisciplinary nature of climate science further increases the difficulty for teachers to stay abreast of the science and the policy. Research has shown that students and educators alike hold misconceptions about the climate system in general and the causes and effects of climate change in particular. The NSF-funded CLEAN Pathway (http://cleanet.org) as part of the National Science Digital Library (http://www.nsdl.org) strives to address these needs and help educators address misconceptions by providing high quality learning resources and professional development opportunities to support educators of grade levels 6 through 16. The materials focus on teaching climate science and energy use. The scope and framework of the CLEAN Pathway is defined by the Essential Principles of Climate Science (CCSP, 2009) and the Energy Literacy Principles recently developed by the Department of Energy. Following this literacy-based approach, CLEAN helps with developing mental models to address misconceptions around climate science and energy awareness through a number of different avenues. These are: 1) Professional development opportunities for educators - interactive webinars for secondary teachers and virtual workshops for college faculty, 2) A collection of scientifically and pedagogically reviewed, high

  2. Using Adaptive Tools and Techniques To Teach a Class of Students Who Are Blind or Low-Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supalo, Cary A.; Mallouk, Thomas E.; Lanouette, James; Amorosi, Christeallia; Wohlers, H. David; McEnnis, Kathleen

    2009-05-01

    A brief overview of the 2007 National Federation of the Blind-Jernigan Institute Youth Slam Chemistry Track, a course of study within a science camp that provided firsthand experimental experience to 200 students who are blind and low-vision, is given. For many of these students, this was their first hands-on experience with laboratory chemistry. Several new blind and low vision-accessible laboratory technologies were successfully debuted. These tools and techniques bring a greater degree of freedom and independence to students with visual impairments in their science classes. Modifications of standard chemistry experiments that incorporated these new tools are described.

  3. Pathology informatics fellowship retreats: The use of interactive scenarios and case studies as pathology informatics teaching tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy E Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Last year, our pathology informatics fellowship added informatics-based interactive case studies to its existing educational platform of operational and research rotations, clinical conferences, a common core curriculum with an accompanying didactic course, and national meetings. Methods: The structure of the informatics case studies was based on the traditional business school case study format. Three different formats were used, varying in length from short, 15-minute scenarios to more formal multiple hour-long case studies. Case studies were presented over the course of three retreats (Fall 2011, Winter 2012, and Spring 2012 and involved both local and visiting faculty and fellows. Results: Both faculty and fellows found the case studies and the retreats educational, valuable, and enjoyable. From this positive feedback, we plan to incorporate the retreats in future academic years as an educational component of our fellowship program. Conclusions: Interactive case studies appear to be valuable in teaching several aspects of pathology informatics that are difficult to teach in more traditional venues (rotations and didactic class sessions. Case studies have become an important component of our fellowship′s educational platform.

  4. Triatominae biochemistry goes to school: evaluation of a novel tool for teaching basic biochemical concepts of Chagas disease vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Leonardo Rodrigues; Cudischevitch, Cecília de Oliveira; Carneiro, Alan Brito; Macedo, Gustavo Bartholomeu; Lannes, Denise; Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso da

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate a new approach to teaching the basic biochemistry mechanisms that regulate the biology of Triatominae, major vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. We have designed and used a comic book, "Carlos Chagas: 100 years after a hero's discovery" containing scientific information obtained by seven distinguished contemporary Brazilian researchers working with Triatominaes. Students (22) in the seventh grade of a public elementary school received the comic book. The study was then followed up by the use of Concept Maps elaborated by the students. Six Concept Maps elaborated by the students before the introduction of the comic book received an average score of 7. Scores rose to an average of 45 after the introduction of the comic book. This result suggests that a more attractive content can greatly improve the knowledge and conceptual understanding among students not previously exposed to insect biochemistry. In conclusion, this study illustrates an alternative to current strategies of teaching about the transmission of neglected diseases. It also promotes the diffusion of the scientific knowledge produced by Brazilian researchers that may stimulate students to choose a scientific career.

  5. [A web-based e-learning tool in academic teaching of trauma surgery. First experiences and evaluation results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citak, M; Haasper, C; Behrends, M; Kupka, T; Kendoff, D; Hüfner, T; Matthies, H K; Krettek, C

    2007-04-01

    There are lots of possibilities for universities to offer contents of teaching to students by the Internet. Often the students can download slides or a special lecture note from the intranet of the university. Another way is to make a movie of the lecture and post this lecture movie on the Internet. In the Hanover Medical School we employed an alternative. It was developed by the Trauma Surgery Clinic and the Institute of Medical Informatics at the Hanover Medical School. Our goal was to use just one web-based content resource for the lecture and for the work at home. The Institute of Medical Informatics used a web-based content management system (CMS) Schoolbook to implement this e-learning application.Since October 2005 the Trauma Surgery Schoolbook has been used in the lecture on trauma surgery in all terms, and we evaluated the academic year 2005/2006. The results of the evaluation showed us that the students were very interested in using this e-learning application. The possibility to reinforce the learning material at home is a good chance for the students. Also the organisation of lectures was improved because the materials were all in one place. The lecturer needs to learn several new tasks, but we also got a positive response. Our experiences of the last academic year showed that it was a good way to use one web-based content resource for teaching and learning in the context of a lecture.

  6. Laboratory preparation questionnaires as a tool for the implementation of the Just in Time Teaching in the Physics I laboratories: Research training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, David A.; Sanchez, Melba J.; Forero, Oscar M.

    2017-06-01

    The implementation of the JiTT (Just in Time Teaching) strategy is presented to increase the previous preparation of students enrolled in the subject Physics Laboratory I offered at the Industrial University of Santander (UIS), Colombia. In this study, a laboratory preparation questionnaire (CPL) was applied as a tool for the implementation of JiTT combined with elements of mediated learning. It was found that the CPL allows to improve the students’ experience regarding the preparation of the laboratory and the development of the experimental session. These questionnaires were implemented in an academic manager (Moodle) and a web application (lab.ciencias.uis.edu.co) was used to publish the contents essential for the preparation of the student before each practical session. The most significant result was that the students performed the experimental session with the basic knowledge to improve their learning experience.

  7. CALCULATION OF CONDITIONAL EQUILIBRIUM IN SERIAL MULTIPLE PRECIPITATION OF METAL SULFIDES WITH HYDROGEN SULFIDE STREAM GENERATED FROM SODIUM SULFIDE: A DIDACTIC TOOL FOR CHEMISTRY TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Bellová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide is presented in textbooks as toxic, environmentally unacceptable species, however some positive effects in human metabolism were discovered in the last decades. It is important to offer students also some new information about this compound. As didactic tool in this case may serve serial precipitation of Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Mn2+ and Pb2+ ions forming various colored sulfides in bubblers with chemically generated hydrogen sulfide stream. This experiment has strong and diverse color effect for enhancing the visual perception to motivate students to understand more abstract and complex information about hydrogen sulfide. It also may be helpful in analytical chemistry courses for conditional precipitation equilibrium teaching and calculations.

  8. Generation Y, Learner Autonomy and the Potential of Web 2.0 Tools for Language Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Liam

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the development of learner autonomy and the application of Web 2.0 tools in the language classroom. Design/methodology/approach: The approach taken is that of qualitative action research within an explicit theoretical framework and the data were collected via surveys and…

  9. The Use of Interactive Computer Animations Based on POE as a Presentation Tool in Primary Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpınar, Ercan

    2014-08-01

    This study investigates the effects of using interactive computer animations based on predict-observe-explain (POE) as a presentation tool on primary school students' understanding of the static electricity concepts. A quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test control group design was utilized in this study. The experiment group consisted of 30 students, and the control group of 27 students. The control group received normal instruction in which the teacher provided instruction by means of lecture, discussion and homework. Whereas in the experiment group, dynamic and interactive animations based on POE were used as a presentation tool. Data collection tools used in the study were static electricity concept test and open-ended questions. The static electricity concept test was used as pre-test before the implementation, as post-test at the end of the implementation and as delay test approximately 6 weeks after the implementation. Open-ended questions were used at the end of the implementation and approximately 6 weeks after the implementation. Results indicated that the interactive animations used as presentation tools were more effective on the students' understanding of static electricity concepts compared to normal instruction.

  10. Recontextualising Cellular Respiration : Designing an learning-and-teaching strategy for developing biological concepts as flexible tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierdsma, M.D.M.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis reports on a design-research study on recontextualising biological concepts. The term ‘recontextualising’ is based in socio-cultural activity theory and was proposed by van Oers in 1998 as a change of perspective on the idea of knowledge-transfer. Within this view concepts are tools to b

  11. Recontextualising Cellular Respiration : Designing an learning-and-teaching strategy for developing biological concepts as flexible tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierdsma, M.D.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337617058

    2012-01-01

    This thesis reports on a design-research study on recontextualising biological concepts. The term ‘recontextualising’ is based in socio-cultural activity theory and was proposed by van Oers in 1998 as a change of perspective on the idea of knowledge-transfer. Within this view concepts are tools to

  12. The Use of Interactive Computer Animations Based on POE as a Presentation Tool in Primary Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Ercan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of using interactive computer animations based on predict-observe-explain (POE) as a presentation tool on primary school students' understanding of the static electricity concepts. A quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test control group design was utilized in this study. The experiment group consisted of 30…

  13. Mapas conceituais: estratégia de ensino/aprendizagem e ferramenta avaliativa Conceptual maps: teaching and learning strategies and an evaluative tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Aparecida de Souza

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente ensaio tem por objetivo apresentar uma reflexão sobre as potencia lidades do mapa conceitual como estratégia de ensino/aprendizagem e ferramenta ava liativa. Revisitar o referencial teórico relativo à temática possibilitou contemplar a utili dade do mapa conceitual sob diferentes perspectivas: daquele que ensina e daquele que aprende. Valer-se dos mapas conceituais como estratégias de ensino/aprendizagem, também e concomitantemente como ferramenta avaliativa, é criar possibilidades para a organiza ção do conhecimento pela promoção de experiências educativas que provoquem não somen te reflexão, busca de compreensão e processamento profundo da informação, mas tam bém o desenvolvimento da autorregulação, da metacognição e do aprender a aprenderThis essay has the purpose of reflecting upon the potential benefits of con ceptual map as teaching and learning strategies and an evaluative tool. To revisit the the oretical framework of this theme made it possible to analyze the utility of conceptual map under different perspectives: the teachers´ and the students´. It became clear that the use of conceptual map as teaching and learning strategies, as well as an evaluative tool, leads to knowledge organization by means of promotion of learning experiences which not only generate reflection, comprehension and deep processing of information, but also contributes to the development of metacognition, self-regulation and learning to learn processes

  14. PORTAAL: A Classroom Observation Tool Assessing Evidence-Based Teaching Practices for Active Learning in Large Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Sarah L; Converse, Mercedes; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that active learning works better than a completely passive lecture. Despite this evidence, adoption of these evidence-based teaching practices remains low. In this paper, we offer one tool to help faculty members implement active learning. This tool identifies 21 readily implemented elements that have been shown to increase student outcomes related to achievement, logic development, or other relevant learning goals with college-age students. Thus, this tool both clarifies the research-supported elements of best practices for instructor implementation of active learning in the classroom setting and measures instructors' alignment with these practices. We describe how we reviewed the discipline-based education research literature to identify best practices in active learning for adult learners in the classroom and used these results to develop an observation tool (Practical Observation Rubric To Assess Active Learning, or PORTAAL) that documents the extent to which instructors incorporate these practices into their classrooms. We then use PORTAAL to explore the classroom practices of 25 introductory biology instructors who employ some form of active learning. Overall, PORTAAL documents how well aligned classrooms are with research-supported best practices for active learning and provides specific feedback and guidance to instructors to allow them to identify what they do well and what could be improved. © 2015 S. L. Eddy et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  15. Undergraduate teaching modules featuring geodesy data applied to critical social topics (GETSI: GEodetic Tools for Societal Issues)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt-Sitaula, B. A.; Walker, B.; Douglas, B. J.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Miller, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    The GETSI project, funded by NSF TUES, is developing and disseminating teaching and learning materials that feature geodesy data applied to critical societal issues such as climate change, water resource management, and natural hazards (serc.carleton.edu/getsi). It is collaborative between UNAVCO (NSF's geodetic facility), Mt San Antonio College, and Indiana University. GETSI was initiated after requests by geoscience faculty for geodetic teaching resources for introductory and majors-level students. Full modules take two weeks but module subsets can also be used. Modules are developed and tested by two co-authors and also tested in a third classroom. GETSI is working in partnership with the Science Education Resource Center's (SERC) InTeGrate project on the development, assessment, and dissemination to ensure compatibility with the growing number of resources for geoscience education. Two GETSI modules are being published in October 2015. "Ice mass and sea level changes" includes geodetic data from GRACE, satellite altimetry, and GPS time series. "Imaging Active Tectonics" has students analyzing InSAR and LiDAR data to assess infrastructure earthquake vulnerability. Another three modules are in testing during fall 2015 and will be published in 2016. "Surface process hazards" investigates mass wasting hazard and risk using LiDAR data. "Water resources and geodesy" uses GRACE, vertical GPS, and reflection GPS data to have students investigating droughts in California and the High Great Plains. "GPS, strain, and earthquakes" helps students learn about infinitesimal and coseismic strain through analysis of horizontal GPS data and includes an extension module on the Napa 2014 earthquake. In addition to teaching resources, the GETSI project is compiling recommendations on successful development of geodesy curricula. The chief recommendations so far are the critical importance of including scientific experts in the authorship team and investing significant resources in

  16. An economical view of soil conservation. The use of geotextil as a tool to teach on higher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez Morera, Antonio; Cerdà, Artemi

    2010-05-01

    Soil and earth science did not take into account the important of economics to teach on higher education. Economics contribute with a positive view on applied soil and earth science. Only if the soil conservation strategies are feasible from an economic point of view they will be sustainable from an environmental point of view. This paper shows the strategies developed at the Soil Erosion and Degradation Experimental Station of El Teularet-Sierra de Enguera. By means of soil erosion plots and rainfall simulation experiments the students can understand the effect of geotextiles on soil erosion control and soil conservation. The task developed in the field, in the laboratory and in the lectures rooms, the students develop the calculations on how much cost the geotextiles and how much soil is protected. The results show that the students found the way to reach a sustainable soil conservation strategy based on soil science and on economics.

  17. Currently Available Tools and Teaching Strategies for the Interprofessional Education of Students in Health Professions: Literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nelofar S; Shahnaz, Syed I; Gomathi, Kadayam G

    2016-08-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is designed to provide students from different health sectors with opportunities to work together to enhance future collaboration. The implementation of IPE activities is a current trend in various countries. This review exclusively targets IPE issues involving undergraduate health profession students and highlights various approaches in different regions. A total of 28 articles published in peer-reviewed journals between January 2012 and July 2015 were assessed to determine recent trends in IPE implementation. Nine main strategies were identified: simulation-based education programmes; rotations in rural and community settings; interprofessional training wards; patient-centred case studies; theme-centred workshops; student seminars; student-delivered lectures; health promotion activities; and interactive lectures in a common setting. Many of these institutions had not restricted themselves to a single strategy and supplemented these activities with additional teaching or learning methods. Recommendations gathered from these diverse approaches may assist the development of sustainable strategies for implementing IPE in undergraduate medical curricula.

  18. WEB-QUESTS IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDYING AND TEACHING AS A VALUABLE RESOURCE AND EFFECTIVE TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Pererva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This paper is a study of innovative methods of learning and teaching English with the help of Internet resources and students motivation to seek the necessary information at homework. Methodology. The main principle of the Web-Quest as a type of English language teaching is to motivate students. For example, by participation in the Web-Quest students, who were unsure of their knowledge, become more confident. Having clear goals and objectives, using computer skills, motivated young people more actively acts as a confident user of English. Findings. According to the technology of We-Quests students were asked to create one or more projects directly related to the successful execution of the work. It is a significant result of all the hard work of students, and it is the subject of evaluation. Evaluation is an essential component of Web-Quest or any other project, and from this point of view, the criteria should be clear and accessible to students from the very beginning. These instructions can and should be changed in order to differentiate and provide an oral presentation and written work. Originality. Basically, Web-Quests are mini-projects in which a higher percentage of the material obtained from the Internet. They can be created by teachers or students, depending on the type of training work. The author detailed the increase of possibilities in the search of Internet projects with other creative types of student work. They may include: review of the literature, essay writing, discussion of read works and other. Practical value. The paper confirmed that the roles and tasks, reflecting the real world, invites to cooperate, stimulate and train the thinking process at a higher level. That is why the use of Web-Quests can improve the language skills of the educational process (reading for information extraction, detailed reading, negotiations, oral and written communication, and other.

  19. Exploring Just-in-Time Teaching 3D Development as a Tool for Enhancing Knowledge and Understanding

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The integumentary system (skin) is the first line of defence in the body and part of the innate immune system. Within first year modules on Pharmaceutical Biology and Integrative Physiology in the Masters of Pharmacy degree at Robert Gordon University (RGU) several software tools were used to support both lecture and coursework material for the immune and integumentary systems. However, students had difficulty visualizing the various layers of the skin and how they become affected by differen...

  20. The Teaching Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battro, Antonio M.

    2010-01-01

    Animals cannot teach as humans do. Therefore, we lack the experimental support of animal studies that are so important to understand the evolution of our basic learning skills but are useless to explore the development of the teaching skills, unique to humans. And most important: children teach! We have at least two new challenges in our Mind,…

  1. Culture and English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莹

    2008-01-01

    There is a natural relationship between culture and language. Language reflects how the people of a nation form the unique way of life and the way of thinking. Therefore, English teaching necessarily involves cultural education as well. This paper analyzes the influence of social culture in English teaching and tries to set up a principle of teaching English culture.

  2. [The issue of dialysis withdrawal and palliative cares. A 3-year retrospective study carried out at Grenoble university teaching hospital development of a decision-making tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrin, Guillemette; Maurizi-Balzan, Jocelyne; Laval, Guillemette

    2007-07-01

    Dialysis-related constraints encourage questioning about discontinuation of treatment. In France, the 04/22/2005 law, related to patients' rights and end-of-life issues, defines bounds to treatment withdrawal, authorizing it in specific conditions, to avoid foolish obstinacy. Shortly before the publication of this law, a study has been conducted at Grenoble University Teaching Hospital, involving 31 patients followed by the dialysis service and the palliative care service, in order to analyse the circumstances in which withdrawals from dialysis happen. These patients were old and their general condition was very poor. After initiation of the questioning, treatment was removed in older patients and in those who had been dialysed for short time, which suggests they may have poor adaption to the treatment. No dialysis withdrawal was ever decided without the patient consent or without his nearest and dearest consent. After multidisciplinary discussions, a decision-making tool for dialysis withdrawal has been developed, with a view to be a starting point in the thinking process, for each decision to be adapted to each situation. This tool emphasizes the importance of time and collegial consultation in the decision-making process. It points out to that the decision lies with the referent nephrologist. After withdrawing dialysis, palliative cares must be implemented, since stopping the treatment does not mean stopping cares.

  3. Application of Education Information Management Support Tools in the Promotion of Teaching/Learning and Management of Students' Performance in Federal Universities in the South-South Zone of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwuo, S. O.; Enefaa, Bestman Briggs Anthonia

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the application of education information management support tools in the promotion of teaching/learning and management of students' performance in federal universities in the South-South zone of Nigeria. Two research questions and two null hypotheses guided the study. The study adopted a descriptive survey design. The…

  4. Promoting Students' Problem Solving Skills and Knowledge of STEM Concepts in a Data-Rich Learning Environment: Using Online Data as a Tool for Teaching about Renewable Energy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurmond, Brandi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to compare a data-rich learning (DRL) environment that utilized online data as a tool for teaching about renewable energy technologies (RET) to a lecture-based learning environment to determine the impact of the learning environment on students' knowledge of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) concepts related…

  5. Promoting Students' Problem Solving Skills and Knowledge of STEM Concepts in a Data-Rich Learning Environment: Using Online Data as a Tool for Teaching about Renewable Energy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurmond, Brandi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to compare a data-rich learning (DRL) environment that utilized online data as a tool for teaching about renewable energy technologies (RET) to a lecture-based learning environment to determine the impact of the learning environment on students' knowledge of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) concepts related…

  6. Use of a wiki as an interactive teaching tool in pathology residency education: Experience with a genomics, research, and informatics in pathology course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The need for informatics and genomics training in pathology is critical, yet limited resources for such training are available. In this study we sought to critically test the hypothesis that the incorporation of a wiki (a collaborative writing and publication tool with roots in "Web 2.0" in a combined informatics and genomics course could both (1 serve as an interactive, collaborative educational resource and reference and (2 actively engage trainees by requiring the creation and sharing of educational materials. Materials and Methods: A 2-week full-time course at our institution covering genomics, research, and pathology informatics (GRIP was taught by 36 faculty to 18 second- and third-year pathology residents. The course content included didactic lectures and hands-on demonstrations of technology (e.g., whole-slide scanning, telepathology, and statistics software. Attendees were given pre- and posttests. Residents were trained to use wiki technology (MediaWiki and requested to construct a wiki about the GRIP course by writing comprehensive online review articles on assigned lectures. To gauge effectiveness, pretest and posttest scores for our course were compared with scores from the previous 7 years from the predecessor course (limited to informatics given at our institution that did not utilize wikis. Results: Residents constructed 59 peer-reviewed collaborative wiki articles. This group showed a 25% improvement (standard deviation 12% in test scores, which was greater than the 16% delta recorded in the prior 7 years of our predecessor course (P = 0.006. Conclusions: Our use of wiki technology provided a wiki containing high-quality content that will form the basis of future pathology informatics and genomics courses and proved to be an effective teaching tool, as evidenced by the significant rise in our resident posttest scores. Data from this project provide support for the notion that active participation in content creation

  7. American Association of Orthodontists Foundation Craniofacial Growth Legacy Collection: Overview of a powerful tool for orthodontic research and teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Sheldon; Curry, Sean

    2015-08-01

    This article reports on the current status of the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation (AAOF) Craniofacial Growth Legacy Collection--an AAOF-supported multi-institutional project that uses the Internet and cloud computing to collect and share craniofacial images and data for orthodontic research and education. The project gives investigators and clinicians all over the world online access to longitudinal information on craniofacial development in untreated children with malocclusions of various types. It also is a unique source of control samples for testing the validity of consensually accepted beliefs about the effects of orthodontic treatment or of failure to treat. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. DatComNet: Designing an Intelligent Visual Tool for Teaching Data Communication and Network Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel B. Salem

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available DatComNet is a tutorial tool designed to assist students in understanding the concepts of designing, implementing and managing the data communication networks. It is particularly useful for computer science and computer engineering students in computer communication network courses. The DatComNet interface is written in C++ and clips. The use of Java as the language of implementation provides platform independent access to potential users through their web browser. The application utilizes an attractive, user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI to direct the students step-by-step through the process learning data communication. For students, the proposed tutoring course is structured from seven modules and there are approximately 100 automated quiz question per module allowing them to test their knowledge of concepts on- line, an immediate response will let them to know how they are doing. Also, flash animation of selected figures from the course help networking concepts come to life. They can watch as the diagrams actively demonstrate their concepts. The proposed approach depends on using a bottom-up methodology. In this approach, students can learn first about telecommunications (lower layers before learning about data communications (upper layers, i.e., students can learn about signaling, encoding, modulating and error detection before learning about data transfer across the Internet. This eliminates the need for two courses: one for telecommunications and one for data communication. The suggested tutorial tool has been implemented and applied on a classroom of thirty students. It is shown that this tutoring tool offers significant advantages over traditional education and training since it reduces costs, improves the consistency, gives flexible scheduling, improve timing and supports the streamlined logistics.

  9. VIRLAB: teaching tool for photovoltaic systems technology; VIRLAB: ferramenta de ensino para a tecnologia de sistemas fotovoltaicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Rita Maria B.; Holanda, Edgney Sarvio O.; Antunes, Fernando Luiz M.; Carvalho, Paulo Cesar M. de [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica

    2004-07-01

    This work concerns about the use of the Internet as a tool of information and formation to researchers and planners in Photovoltaic (PV) systems. The setup is based on a computer device with a data acquisition system that is capable to simulate the performance of a PV module, through software and a data acquisition system, and show measurements in Internet. Being a flexible system, and having a friendly interface with the user, and having an easy operation for showing measurements in very short intervals, it making possible to give knowledge of students, through the internet, in a way to apply the theory about PV systems in a practical virtual laboratory. (author)

  10. Determination of difficult concepts in the interpretation of musculoskeletal radiographs using a web-based learning/teaching tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunn, Heidi, E-mail: heidi@imageinterpretation.co.uk [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Colney Lane, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7UY (United Kingdom); Nunn, David L. [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Colney Lane, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7UY (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: To identify which aspects of musculoskeletal radiograph image interpretation users of a web-based learning resource found to be most difficult. Method: The resource provides modular online training, based on twelve musculoskeletal anatomical and pathological areas. At the end of each module is a multiple choice self-test, which users can utilize to consolidate their learning. There are 217 questions within the tests. The results for all questions answered on or before 1st February 2011 were analyzed, and the lowest scoring 25% of questions subsequently reviewed. A low-scoring question implies that the subject was difficult. Results: Users provided a total of 117,097 answers. The range of scores provided by the test questions varied significantly (P < 0.0001), from 15.8% to 93.8%. Topics appearing in the lowest quartile were analyzed in detail. They included interpretation of paediatric radiographs, the Salter-Harris classification, soft-tissue signs and the identification of multiple injuries. The lowest scoring modules were the shoulder and ankle. Conclusion: The results of this study will help to guide educators both within radiography and other health professions in providing more targeted teaching in musculoskeletal image interpretation.

  11. Currently Available Tools and Teaching Strategies for the Interprofessional Education of Students in Health Professions; Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed I. Shahnaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Interprofessional education (IPE is designed to provide students from different health sectors with opportunities to work together to enhance future collaboration. The implementation of IPE activities is a current trend in various countries. This review exclusively targets IPE issues involving undergraduate health profession students and highlights various approaches in different regions. A total of 28 articles published in peer-reviewed journals between January 2012 and July 2015 were assessed to determine recent trends in IPE implementation. Nine main strategies were identified: simulation-based education programmes; rotations in rural and community settings; interprofessional training wards; patient-centred case studies; theme-centred workshops; student seminars; student-delivered lectures; health promotion activities; and interactive lectures in a common setting. Many of these institutions had not restricted themselves to a single strategy and supplemented these activities with additional teaching or learning methods. Recommendations gathered from these diverse approaches may assist the development of sustainable strategies for implementing IPE in undergraduate medical curricula.

  12. DSM-5 Teaching Materials: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibson, Michael D; Seyfried, Lisa S

    2017-02-01

    The publication of DSM-5 by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) in 2013 was accompanied by the release of a series of APA-approved "essential guides" to aid clinicians and trainees in its use and the transition from DSM-IV. Several of these were explicitly designated as study guides, but all serve educational as well as clinical functions. To assist trainees and educators in their selection of appropriate materials for study and teaching, several of these books were reviewed from the perspective of psychiatry education. DSM-5 and seven of the 11 essential guides featured on the American Psychiatric Publishing website were selected for review as to their value as education tools and the audience most likely to find them useful. Four of the books reviewed were intended as teaching tools; two were designated as aids to clinicians, but with novice practitioners specifically included as target users; and two were not designed as teaching tools at all, but only as clinical manuals. All eight of these books had significant value as texts or teaching tools, although they differed significantly in the quality and uniqueness of their content, their specific focus, and the readers for whom they would be most helpful. DSM-5 and the essential guides that accompany it have significant value as texts and study guides for teachers and trainees and make a valuable contribution to psychiatry education.

  13. Integrating evidence-based imaging into the radiology core clerkship: a proposed teaching tool of imaging strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadgir, Rohini; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2010-07-01

    Despite an increasing emphasis on incorporating evidence-based practice into medical student education curricula, no previous work has specifically addressed the incorporation of evidence-based imaging strategies into a radiology clerkship. The authors therefore introduced an evidence-based imaging curriculum during the required radiology core clerkship at their institution and then formally evaluated the sessions. From March 2007 to March 2008, 150 students in the radiology core clerkship underwent a didactic session on the principles of evidence-based imaging and then participated in a small-group case-based session. At the end of the clinical rotation, students evaluated the exercise for its effectiveness in teaching imaging strategies and its impact on their future careers. Of the 134 students (89%) who responded, 119 (89%) felt challenged to think differently about radiology as a result of these sessions, 129 (96%) believed that they had a better understanding of the indications for certain imaging tests than before the experience, and 119 (89%) were certain that they would use this information later in their careers. The majority, 86 of 134 (64%), preferred the interactive small-group session over a didactic session. Students praised the opportunity to work in teams, work on common clinical scenarios, and gain some awareness of the costs of different imaging tests. A minority of students cited concern for the high volume of information presented per session and a preference to cover more scenarios per session. An evidence-based imaging curriculum was comfortably integrated into a required radiology clerkship and was well received by students. Copyright 2010 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 研究生专业英语(水文类)课程的特色教学%Unique Teaching of the Graduate Course of Specialty English for the Majors Related to Hydrology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周训; 方斌; 沈晔

    2012-01-01

    研究生专业英语(水文类)课程的教学内容不仅阅读翻译英文原文,而且要讲授英语知识并介绍专业知识,既注重英文原文的阅读理解能力和文献查询方法,又重视提高专业英语论文的写作能力。采取讲授重点词汇和表示方法,提供大量例句、设置提问和小测验等灵活的教学方式,重视专业英语知识的运用、比较和积累,提高了课程教学质量。%The teaching contents of the graduate course of specialty English for the majors related to hydrology not only include reading and translating of the original English articles,but also teaching of basic English language knowledge and the specialty knowledge.The course places its emphasis on the reading and understanding ability of the original English articles and methods of searching specialty literatures,and on the writing ability of specialty articles in English.Key vocabulary and expression used in specialty literatures are introduced and large amount of example sentences are offered in the course.Questions are designed and quizzes are also conducted.Special attention is paid to the application,comparison and accumulation of the specialty English knowledge.These teaching ways are helpful in increasing the teaching quality of the course.

  15. The spreadsheet as a tool for teaching set theory: Part 1 – an Excel lesson plan to help solve Sudokus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Sugden

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is intended to be used in the classroom. It describes essentially every step of the construction of an Excel model to help solve Sudoku puzzles. For those up to moderate difficulty, it will usually solve the puzzle to completion. For the more difficult ones, it still provides a platform for decision support. The paper may be found useful for a lesson in which students, who, having some basic knowledge of Excel, are learning some of its lesser-known features, such as conditional formatting. It also generates a useful tool for working with Sudoku puzzles, from the very easiest right up to the ones often labelled as fiendish or diabolical. Fundamental mathematical concepts such as set intersection, set partition and reduction of set partition to singletons are very graphically illustrated by the present Excel model for Sudoku. Prominent spreadsheet concepts presented here are conditional formatting, names, COUNTIF, CONCATENATE. The paper is accompanied by a completed Excel model, constructed by using the steps described herein. No VBA code is employed; the whole thing is done with Excel formulas and conditional formatting.

  16. Design and validation of a novel learning tool, the "Anato-Rug," for teaching equine topographical anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braid, Francesca; Williams, Sarah B; Weller, Renate

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of anatomical landmarks in live animals (and humans) is key for clinical practice, but students often find it difficult to translate knowledge from dissection-based anatomy onto the live animal and struggle to acquire this vital skill. The purpose of this study was to create and evaluate the use of an equine anatomy rug ("Anato-Rug") depicting topographical anatomy and key areas of lung, heart, and gastrointestinal auscultation, which could be used together with a live horse to aid learning of "live animal" anatomy. Over the course of 2 weeks, 38 third year veterinary students were randomly allocated into an experimental group, revising topographical anatomy from the "Anato-Rug," or a control group, learning topographical anatomy from a textbook. Immediately post activity, both groups underwent a test on live anatomy knowledge and were retested 1 week later. Both groups then completed a questionnaire to ascertain their perceptions of their learning experiences. Results showed that the experimental groups scored significantly higher than the control group at the first testing session, experienced more enjoyment during the activity and gained more confidence in identifying anatomical landmarks than the control group. There was not a significant difference in scores between groups at the second testing session. The findings indicate that the anatomy rug is an effective learning tool that aids understanding, confidence, and enjoyment in learning equine thorax and abdominal anatomy; however it was not better than traditional methods with regards to longer term memory recall. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Anatomists.

  17. Translation as a teaching tool to bridge L1 and L2 for adult learners at elementary levels.DOI: 10.5007/2175-7968.2011v1n27p179

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natanael Ferreira França Rocha

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the extent to which translation is useful in Foreign Language Teaching for adult learners at elementary levels. Although the effectiveness of translation has been questioned, this study presents reasons why a language teacher should resort to this tool.  The research drew on data collected from written translation exercises of elementary learners at a language center in the city of Londrina, Brazil, in 2009. The exercises were analyzed by examining the occurrence and disappearance of errors lesson by lesson. The results demonstrated that the act of translating fosters learning. Keywords: translation, foreign language teaching, adult learners, elementary levels, errors.

  18. Tools and their uses

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    Teaches names, general uses, and correct operation of all basic hand and power tools, fasteners, and measuring devices you are likely to need. Also, grinding, metal cutting, soldering, and more. 329 illustrations.

  19. ACTIVE TEACHING-LEARNING METHODOLOGY TO APPROACH CARBOHYDRATE AND LIPID METABOLISM: An interdisciplinary strategy that involved the Moodle tool in the development of Problem Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M.P. Borges

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Highlight the relevance of topics studied for professional practice and associate approaches provided by different areas of knowledge are pointed as essential aspects for significant learning. Contextualize the study of metabolic pathways, linking the clinical use and expanding the vision with the approach of cellular and molecular biology discipline was the motivation for the development of the strategy described and evaluated here. In this work, starting from the concept of active methodology of teaching and learning was developed a methodological strategy to approach the carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. This strategy included: questioning the content through the clinical case study on diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolemia, individual and collective study in the external space the classroom with the help of Moodle tool, classroom discussion accompanied by the teacher, preparation of seminar, evaluation of the content through individual written test and evaluation of the method. Analysis of student involvement with method indicates an average frequency of 98% in the practical class of Biochemistry discipline, effective participation in the preparation of seminars, an increase of 2 points in average of individual written evaluation. As for the fact that the cases were studied in two curricular components, the answers show that 92% of students feel more compression. Only 6% of students think  unnecessary to interdisciplinary approach. As for the different steps of the method, the answers show that 99% of students consider how relevant the initial self-study and discussions in class. However, only 50% of students appreciated the use of Moodle tool. Thus, student responses indicated the perception of the effectiveness of the method for their ability to: stimulate interest in learning, stimulate the search for answers through research and the building of learning.

  20. From Classroom Teaching to Remote Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Ole; Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2000-01-01

    for teaching purpose on the Internet. It is also described how courses in the two different teaching environments can be maintained in one place. More professional teaching tools are available on the market, but the methods described in this paper are based on Luvit[1], an open low-cost web-based teaching tool......Abundant research has taken place in the area of remote learning. When it comes to remote teaching, it really hurts the developing teacher - who is used to perform classroom teaching - in terms of time consumption and way of thinking. This article describes how courses and project work can be build...... and at the same time easy to learn and use by both developer and students. Two in-house project groups have tested the project work with success after a short learning period. 35 remote students under Open Education in Multimedia Industrial Information Technology (MII) are using the Luvit[1] tool and the methods...

  1. From Classroom Teaching to Remote Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Ole; Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2000-01-01

    for teaching purpose on the Internet. It is also described how courses in the two different teaching environments can be maintained in one place. More professional teaching tools are available on the market, but the methods described in this paper are based on Luvit[1], an open low-cost web-based teaching tool......Abundant research has taken place in the area of remote learning. When it comes to remote teaching, it really hurts the developing teacher - who is used to perform classroom teaching - in terms of time consumption and way of thinking. This article describes how courses and project work can be build...... and at the same time easy to learn and use by both developer and students. Two in-house project groups have tested the project work with success after a short learning period. 35 remote students under Open Education in Multimedia Industrial Information Technology (MII) are using the Luvit[1] tool and the methods...

  2. How we created a targeted teaching tool using blog architecture for anesthesia and critical care education--the A/e anesthesia exchange blog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saichaie, Kem; Benson, Jocelyn; Kumar, Avinash B

    2014-08-01

    The time constraints on a clinical educator have increased immensely over the past decade. Technology has served to significantly bridge the challenge over the past decade. WHAT WE DID: We created a method of delivering targeted educational content for point of care learning in anesthesia and critical care. Our blog platform allows clinician-educators to deliver content as videopodcasts and presentations to learners in a straightforward and easily accessible manner both on the web and through mobile platforms. The A/e Anesthesia exchange "pushed" content at predetermined time intervals to learners and content was based on timely topics that were clinically relevant to their daily practice. The A/e Blog allowed multiple authors across disciplines to contribute content, thus providing learners potentially access to resources of knowledge from the entire team of clinician-educators at an institution. During the pilot phase of A/e blog implementation, the authors gained valuable insights into the use and limitations of web-based technology as a teaching tool. These included challenges with faculty and student participation, managing techno stress of faculty not fluent with the technology, tailoring content based on analytics data and web platform robustness and spam protection. With these insights in hand, we anticipate the launch of an even more robust A/e: Anesthesia Exchange (version 2.0) by the end of 2013.

  3. Improve the Primary Mathematics Teaching with Multimedia Tools%恰当运用多媒体手段优化小学数学教学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂桂花

    2011-01-01

    随着学校软硬件设施的完善和教师计算机应用水平的不断提高,多媒体辅助教学已成为广大教师实施教学活动的得力工具。但部分教师在实践过程中存在一些认识上的误区和不当做法,本文将就目前运用多媒体开展教学过程中存在的不足及其合理运用问题进行探讨,以期发挥多媒体辅助教学的最佳效益。%With the development of software and hardware and the application of multi-media,CAI has been a useful teaching tool for most teachers.But there exsist some mistakes in thoughts when they use it.The paper mainly disguesses the mistakes in the daily application.and it aims to make good use of multi-media.

  4. Estetoscópio digital como ferramenta inovadora no ensino da ausculta cardíaca Digital stethoscope as an innovative tool on the teaching of auscultatory skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Tinoco Mesquita

    2013-02-01

    accuracy of clinical examination, however, its impact on the teaching of cardiac auscultation for undergraduate students of medicine is not known. The objective is to demonstrate the usefulness of the digital stethoscope compared to traditional methods as a tool in the teaching of auscultatory skills. nterventional, longitudinal, controlled, unicenter and randomized study. Thirty-eight medicine students were enrolled for a cardiovascular semiology course lasting eight weeks. The course program included lectures and bedside practice in Cardiology wards. In the practical lessons, the students were randomized into two groups: 1 (n = 21 digital stethoscope (Littmann® Model 3200, 3M; and 2 (n = 17 conventional stethoscopes. A pre-training evaluation was conducted through a test using the software Heart Sounds®, which was repeated after the course. The average scores were compared by paired T test and unpaired T test. It is observed that, at the end of the course, there was a significantly greater improvement in the group that used the digital stethoscope (51.9% compared to the group using the conventional stethoscope (29.5%. Short-term interventions for cardiac semiology teaching are able to contribute significantly to improving proficiency in the identification of heart sounds. The use of digital stethoscope proved to be a positive factor in teaching these skills.

  5. 基于多媒体背景的高校思想政治理论课多向教学互动%Multi-interactive teaching of the ideological and political theory course based on multimedia tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佳

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of multimedia technology into College Ideological and Political theory course highlights its unique advantages. But in practical application process, the teaching method is single and sometimes the classroom appears dull, lack of interaction and other factors which aren’t conducive to teaching activities. The multimedia environment of College Ideological and political theory courses also need to use a variety of teaching methods according to the teaching content, teaching target, teaching the elements of the course. Enhancing multi-interaction in ideological and Political Theory Course-such as the interaction of teacher-student interaction, student-student interaction and human-computer interaction under multimedia environment, is to improve the ideological and political theory course teaching quality and students' learning.%多媒体技术引入高校思想政治理论课突显了其独特的优势,但在实际运用过程中,高校思想政治理论课如果过分依赖多媒体,不注意教学方法的综合运用,也不利于教学活动开展。多媒体环境下高校思想政治理论课还需要运用多种教学方法,尤其是互动教学方法,同时结合教学内容、教学目标等教学要素进行教学手段的综合运用。增强多媒体环境下高校思想政治理论课多向互动,是提高高校思想政治理论课教学质量和学生学习效果的重要途径。

  6. Students Discover Unique Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Three undergraduate students, from Leiden University in the Netherlands, have discovered an extrasolar planet. The extraordinary find, which turned up during their research project, is about five times as massive as Jupiter. This is also the first planet discovered orbiting a fast-rotating hot star. Omega Centauri ESO PR Photo 45a/08 A planet around a hot star The students were testing a method of investigating the light fluctuations of thousands of stars in the OGLE database in an automated way. The brightness of one of the stars was found to decrease for two hours every 2.5 days by about one percent. Follow-up observations, taken with ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile, confirmed that this phenomenon is caused by a planet passing in front of the star, blocking part of the starlight at regular intervals. According to Ignas Snellen, supervisor of the research project, the discovery was a complete surprise. "The project was actually meant to teach the students how to develop search algorithms. But they did so well that there was time to test their algorithm on a so far unexplored database. At some point they came into my office and showed me this light curve. I was completely taken aback!" The students, Meta de Hoon, Remco van der Burg, and Francis Vuijsje, are very enthusiastic. "It is exciting not just to find a planet, but to find one as unusual as this one; it turns out to be the first planet discovered around a fast rotating star, and it's also the hottest star found with a planet," says Meta. "The computer needed more than a thousand hours to do all the calculations," continues Remco. The planet is given the prosaic name OGLE2-TR-L9b. "But amongst ourselves we call it ReMeFra-1, after Remco, Meta, and myself," says Francis. The planet was discovered by looking at the brightness variations of about 15 700 stars, which had been observed by the OGLE survey once or twice per night for about four years between 1997 and 2000. Because the data had been made public

  7. Uniqueness is Important in Competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Ai-Xia; XV Xiu-Lian; HE Da-Ren

    2009-01-01

    We propose a quantitative network description on the function of uniqueness in a competition system. Two statistical parameters, competition ability and uniqueness are defined, and their relationship in ordinary cases is analytically discussed. The competition between Chinese regional universities is taken as an example. The empirical investigation results show that the uniqueness of a university is really important in competition. Also,uniqueness is very helpful in the promotion of the university overall quality.

  8. On Uniqueness of coalitional equilibria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finus, M.; Mouche, van P.H.M.; Rundshagen, B.

    2014-01-01

    For the so-called "new approach" of coalitio formation it is important that coalitional equilibria are unique. Uniqueness comes down to existene and to semi-uniqueness, i.e.\\\\that there exists at most one equilibrium. Although conditions for existence are not problematic, conditions for semi-uniquen

  9. Teaching Astronomy with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Carmen; Impey, Chris David; Wenger, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Students today are expected to have access to computers and the Internet. Students young and old, in school and out of school, are interested in learning about astronomy, and have computers to use for this. Teach Astronomy is a website with a comprehensive digital astronomy textbook freely available to students and educators. In addition to the textbook, there are astronomy Wikipedia articles, image archives from Astronomy Picture of the Day and AstroPix, and video lectures covering all topics of astronomy. Teach Astronomy has a unique search tool called the wikimap that can be used to search through all of the resources on the site. Astronomy: State of the Art (ASOTA) is a massive, open, online course (MOOC). Over 18,000 students have enrolled over the past year and half. This MOOC has been presented in various forms. First, only to students on the web, with content released weekly on host site Udemy. Then to university students who met formally in the classroom for educational activities, but were also expected to watch lectures online on their own time. Presently, it is available online for students to go at their own pace. In the future it will be available in an extended format on a new host site, Coursera. ASOTA instructors use social media to interact with students. Students ask questions via the course host site, Udemy. Live question and answer sessions are conducted using Google Hangouts on Air, and interesting and relevant astronomy news, or supplementary educational content is shared via the ASOTA Facebook page. Teaching on the Internet may seem impersonal and impractical, but by learning to use all of these tools, instructors have the ability to interact with students, and keep them engaged.

  10. Applied investigation on multimedia interactive teaching system of numerical control machine tools%多媒体视频互动系统在数控机床实训中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施立钦

    2014-01-01

    多媒体数控机床实训互动教学系统由高清示教系统、视频监控系统、视频显示系统、语音对讲系统、集中控制系统及课程录播等多个子系统构成,并通过后台软件融合成一个有机的整体。运用该系统可以解决当前高职院校数控技术专业面临的教学方法滞后、实践效果差、安全隐患不断、教师资源不足等诸多问题,探索出一种新的多媒体视频互动系统在数控机床实训中的教学模式。%Multimedia interactive teaching system of numerical control machine tools consisted of high deifnition demonstration teaching system, video monitoring system, video display system, voice intercom system, centralized control system, course recorded and multiple subsystems and formed an organic whole through the background software. The multimedia interactive teaching system solved the current numerical control technology specialty teaching facing many problems such as teaching lag, low practice teaching method effect, safety hidden trouble, insufifciency of teacher resources and many other issues in higher vocational colleges. A new teaching mode was explored.

  11. The Relationship Between the Managerial Skills and Results of “Performance Evaluation “Tool Among Nursing Managers in Teaching Hospitals of Iran University of Medical Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isfahani, Haleh Mousavi; Aryankhesal, Aidin; Haghani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Performance of different organizations, such as hospitals is mainly influenced by their managers’ performance. Nursing managers have an important role in hospital performance and their managerial skills can improve the quality of the services. Hence, the present study was conducted in order to assess the relationship between the managerial skills and the results of their performance evaluation in Teaching Hospitals of Iran University of Medical Science in 2013. The research used the cross sectional method in 2013. It was done by distributing a managerial skills assessment questionnaire, with close-ended questions in 5 choice Likert scale, among 181 managers and head nurses of hospitals of Iran university of Medical Sciences; among which 131 answered the questions. Another data collection tools was a forms to record evaluation marks from the personnel records. We used Pearson and Spearman correlation tests and SPSS for analysis and description (frequency, mean and standard deviation). Results showed that the managerial skills of the nursing mangers were fair (2.57 out of 5) and the results of the performance evaluation were in a good condition (98.44). The mangers’ evaluation results and the managerial skills scores were not in a meaningful correlation (r=0.047 np=0.856). The research showed no correlation between different domains of managerial skills and the performance evaluation marks: decision making skills (r=0.074 and p=0.399), leadership (correlation coefficient 0.028 and p=0.654), motivation (correlation coefficient 0.118 and p=0.163), communication (correlation coefficient 0.116 and p=0.122), systematic thinking (correlation coefficient 0.028 and p=0.828), time management (correlation coefficient 0.077 and p=0.401) and strategic thinking (correlation coefficient 0.041 and p=0.756). Lack of any correlation and relation between managers’ managerial skills and their performance evaluation results shows need to a fundamental revision at managers

  12. The Teaching of Mathematics in Secondary Schools as a Tool for Self-Reliance and Re-Branding Process in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonah, Tali D.; Caleb, Mbwas .L.; Stephen, Abe A.

    2012-01-01

    Mathematics teaching is an interaction between the teacher and the learners that leads to acquisition of desirable mathematical knowledge, ideas and skills necessary for applicability in our everyday life. This paper therefore looks at the concept of self-reliance, the concept of mathematics teaching, problems and prospects of mathematics teaching…

  13. Comparison of Students' Perceptions of Their Teaching-Learning Environments in Three Professional Academic Disciplines: A Valuable Tool for Quality Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarala-Muhonen, Anne; Ruohoniemi, Mirja; Katajavuori, Nina; Lindblom-Ylanne, Sari

    2011-01-01

    The present study explored differences in students' perceptions of their teaching-learning environments in three professional academic disciplines at the University of Helsinki, using a modified version of the Experiences of Teaching & Learning Questionnaire. A total of 426 first-year students from the Faculties of Law, Pharmacy and Veterinary…

  14. The Teaching of Mathematics in Secondary Schools as a Tool for Self-Reliance and Re-Branding Process in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonah, Tali D.; Caleb, Mbwas .L.; Stephen, Abe A.

    2012-01-01

    Mathematics teaching is an interaction between the teacher and the learners that leads to acquisition of desirable mathematical knowledge, ideas and skills necessary for applicability in our everyday life. This paper therefore looks at the concept of self-reliance, the concept of mathematics teaching, problems and prospects of mathematics teaching…

  15. Gender, ethnicity and teaching evaluations : Evidence from mixed teaching teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Wagner (Natascha); M. Rieger (Matthias); K.J. Voorvelt (Katherine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper studies the effect of teacher gender and ethnicity on student evaluations of teaching quality at university. We analyze a unique data-set featuring mixed teaching teams and a diverse, multicultural, multi-ethnic group of students and teachers. Co-teaching allows us to study th

  16. Preliminary Exploration of Practice Teaching Status in Unique Biological Engineering Talents Training%实践教学在生物工程专业特色人才培养中的作用初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于大禹; 刘月华; 魏群; 赵晴潇

    2009-01-01

    从教学工作改革的角度出发,探讨了实践教学在生物工程特色人才培养中的重要作用;在实践教学的实验环节重新整合实验课程,实习环节加强实习基地建设,改革实习模式,注重创新创业能力培养,引导学生参与课外科研创新课题与创业活动.结果证明,以上改革有利于为生物工程专业培养出高素质、有特色的创新、创业型人才.%The important status of practice education in biological engineering talents training is discussed in this paper. The experiment courses system is reintegrated. Construction of ficldwork bases is enhanced, and practice mode is reformed. Innovation and entrepreneurial capacities of the students are improved, and they are introduced to participate in extracurricular research subjects and entrepreneurial actions. It is concluded that all of the reform steps above are beneficial to training high-quality, unique innovation and entrepreneurial bio-logical engineering talents..

  17. Brief Homeopathic Pathogenetic Experimentation: A Unique Educational Tool in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Zulian Teixeira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In homeopathy, many difficulties are encountered in understanding theoretical presuppositions because they represent different paradigms from those of hegemonic science. In our medical school, we developed a brief homeopathic pathogenetic experimentation course to be added as curricular content and a didactic method in homeopathic disciplines to add practical experience to the theoretical approach of homeopathic presuppositions. In accordance with the premises laid out by Hahnemann, the father of homeopathy, brief pathogenetic experimentation was offered on a voluntary basis for students who were free of chronic diseases and who had not regularly used medication in the last 3 months. The clinical test, either crossed or sequential (randomized and blind, was used as a study model. Single weekly doses of a homeopathic medicine of 30 cH or placebo were taken by participants during 4 weeks after which crossover of the experimented substances took place for another 4 weeks. Polycrest medicines were used so that symptoms developed by the participants could be compared to those described in Homeopathic Materia Medica. Thirty-three of the 50 students who studied homeopathy as an elective discipline over the last 4 years at the School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (FMUSP participated. Participants described symptoms according to specific methodology including many comments with peculiar characteristics and notable idiosyncrasies. All these students endorsed the course because it contributed to their understanding of how dynamized substances produced symptoms in healthy participants as well as the cure of symptoms according to the casual similitude principle. Brief homeopathic pathogenetic experimentation proved to be an effective method to observe the idiosyncratic manifestations of human individuality based on qualitative methodology, thus building a basis of understanding of homeopathy.

  18. An Assessment Tool to Detect Unique Characteristics of Cognitive Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    would require the collection of additional datasets comprising other sources of cognitive impairment (e.g., stroke, ADHD , etc.). These additional...Stockholm, Sweden : changes in disability and the value of different factors in predicting disability and mortality, J. Neurol. Sci. 332 (1–2) (2013) 121

  19. "C.R.E.A.T.E."-ing Unique Primary-Source Research Paper Assignments for a Pleasure and Pain Course Teaching Neuroscientific Principles in a Large General Education Undergraduate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Richard J; Rotella, Francis M; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Coke, Tricia; Olsson, Kerstin; Barrientos, Alicia; Blachorsky, Lauren; Warshaw, Deena; Buras, Agata; Sanchez, Ciara M; Azad, Raihana; Stellar, James R

    2016-01-01

    A large (250 registrants) General Education lecture course, Pleasure and Pain, presented basic neuroscience principles as they related to animal and human models of pleasure and pain by weaving basic findings related to food and drug addiction and analgesic states with human studies examining empathy, social neuroscience and neuroeconomics. In its first four years, the course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page review of three unique peer-reviewed research articles. Although well-registered and well-received, 18% of the students received Incomplete grades, primarily due to failing to submit the paper that went largely unresolved and eventually resulted in a failing grade. To rectify this issue, a modified version of the C.R.E.A.T.E. (Consider, Read, Elucidate hypotheses, Analyze and interpret data, Think of the next Experiment) method replaced the paper with eight structured assignments focusing on an initial general-topic article, the introduction-methods, and results-discussion of each of three related peer-review neuroscience-related articles, and a final summary. Compliance in completing these assignments was very high, resulting in only 11 INC grades out of 228 students. Thus, use of the C.R.E.A.T.E. method reduced the percentage of problematic INC grades from 18% to 4.8%, a 73% decline, without changing the overall grade distribution. Other analyses suggested the students achieved a deeper understanding of the scientific process using the C.R.E.A.T.E. method relative to the original term paper assignment.

  20. “C.R.E.A.T.E.”-ing Unique Primary-Source Research Paper Assignments for a Pleasure and Pain Course Teaching Neuroscientific Principles in a Large General Education Undergraduate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Richard J.; Rotella, Francis M.; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Coke, Tricia; Olsson, Kerstin; Barrientos, Alicia; Blachorsky, Lauren; Warshaw, Deena; Buras, Agata; Sanchez, Ciara M.; Azad, Raihana; Stellar, James R.

    2016-01-01

    A large (250 registrants) General Education lecture course, Pleasure and Pain, presented basic neuroscience principles as they related to animal and human models of pleasure and pain by weaving basic findings related to food and drug addiction and analgesic states with human studies examining empathy, social neuroscience and neuroeconomics. In its first four years, the course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page review of three unique peer-reviewed research articles. Although well-registered and well-received, 18% of the students received Incomplete grades, primarily due to failing to submit the paper that went largely unresolved and eventually resulted in a failing grade. To rectify this issue, a modified version of the C.R.E.A.T.E. (Consider, Read, Elucidate hypotheses, Analyze and interpret data, Think of the next Experiment) method replaced the paper with eight structured assignments focusing on an initial general-topic article, the introduction-methods, and results-discussion of each of three related peer-review neuroscience-related articles, and a final summary. Compliance in completing these assignments was very high, resulting in only 11 INC grades out of 228 students. Thus, use of the C.R.E.A.T.E. method reduced the percentage of problematic INC grades from 18% to 4.8%, a 73% decline, without changing the overall grade distribution. Other analyses suggested the students achieved a deeper understanding of the scientific process using the C.R.E.A.T.E. method relative to the original term paper assignment. PMID:27385918