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Sample records for unique spectroscopic approach

  1. A Spectroscopically Unique Main Belt Asteroid: 10537 (1991 RY16)

    CERN Document Server

    Moskovitz, Nicholas A; Jedicke, Robert; Willman, Mark; Haghighipour, Nader; Bus, Schelte J; Gaidos, Eric

    2008-01-01

    We present visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra and interpreted surface mineralogy for asteroid 10537 (1991 RY16). The spectrum of this object is without precedent amongst the Main Belt asteroids. A unique absorption band centered at 0.63 microns could be attributed to one of several mineralogies. Pronounced 1- and 2-micron absorption bands suggest that the composition of 10537 is a mixture of pyroxenes and olivine and that it originated from a parent body that was partially or fully differentiated. The closest available analog is the large Main Belt asteroid 349 Dembowska but 10537 may be an isolated fragment from a completely eroded parent body.

  2. AN ANALYTICAL APPROACH TO GENERATE UNIQUE SONG SIGNAL (AUSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam Kr. Mondal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Embedding uniqueness in characteristics of song signal and accustoming changes of environment is one of the challenging issues for researchers with maintaining its audible quality. Researchers are modifying or manipulating audio signal properties for generating uniqueness in content such a manner that will not vary so much in changed environment or changes can be easily defined due to unique structure of song signal. In this paper, an approach has been made based on defining a symmetric structure of song signal, followed by some secret code embedding in a specified manner will not alter the trade off ratio of embedding/modifying data but provide uniqueness in properties, even retain the properties in changing environment/ format. Therefore, authentication of song signal is easily achieved with these self manipulated properties. A comparative study has been made with similar existing techniques and experimental results are also supported with mathematical formula based on Microsoft WAVE (".wav" stereo sound file.

  3. The Einstein constraints: uniqueness and non-uniqueness in the conformal thin sandwich approach

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgarte, T W; Pfeiffer, H P; Baumgarte, Thomas W.; Murchadha, Niall \\'{O}; Pfeiffer, Harald P.

    2006-01-01

    We study the appearance of multiple solutions to certain decompositions of Einstein's constraint equations. Pfeiffer and York recently reported the existence of two branches of solutions for identical background data in the extended conformal thin-sandwich decomposition. We show that the Hamiltonian constraint alone, when expressed in a certain way, admits two branches of solutions with properties very similar to those found by Pfeiffer and York. We construct these two branches analytically for a constant-density star in spherical symmetry, but argue that this behavior is more general. In the case of the Hamiltonian constraint this non-uniqueness is well known to be related to the sign of one particular term, and we argue that the extended conformal thin-sandwich equations contain a similar term that causes the breakdown of uniqueness.

  4. Plant tolerance: A unique approach to control hemipteran pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant tolerance to insect pests has been indicated to be a unique category of resistance, however, very little information is available on the mechanism of tolerance against insect pests. Tolerance is distinctive in terms of the plant’s ability to withstand or recover from herbivore injury through g...

  5. Multistage bioassociation of uranium onto an extremely halophilic archaeon revealed by a unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, Miriam; Müller, Katharina; Foerstendorf, Harald; Drobot, Björn [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Schmidt, Matthias; Musat, Niculina [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZ, Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Swanson, Juliet S.; Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Repository Science and Operations, 1400 University Drive, Carlsbad, NM, 88220 (United States); Stumpf, Thorsten [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Cherkouk, Andrea, E-mail: a.cherkouk@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • First prolonged kinetics study of uranium to halophilic archaea was performed. • An atypical time-dependent bioassociation behavior of uranium was observed. • Unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods was used. • In situ ATR FT-IR showed association of U(VI) to phosphoryl and carboxylate groups. • Time-dependent changes of U(VI) localization could be monitored by SEM/EDX. - Abstract: The interactions of two extremely halophilic archaea with uranium were investigated at high ionic strength as a function of time, pH and uranium concentration. Halobacterium noricense DSM-15987 and Halobacterium sp. putatively noricense, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository, were used for these investigations. The kinetics of U(VI) bioassociation with both strains showed an atypical multistage behavior, meaning that after an initial phase of U(VI) sorption, an unexpected interim period of U(VI) release was observed, followed by a slow reassociation of uranium with the cells. By applying in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, the involvement of phosphoryl and carboxylate groups in U(VI) complexation during the first biosorption phase was shown. Differences in cell morphology and uranium localization become visible at different stages of the bioassociation process, as shown with scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate for the first time that association of uranium with the extremely halophilic archaeon is a multistage process, beginning with sorption and followed by another process, probably biomineralization.

  6. Plant Tolerance: A Unique Approach to Control Hemipteran Pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Kyle G.; Chapman, Kaitlin; Louis, Joe; Heng-Moss, Tiffany; Sarath, Gautam

    2016-01-01

    Plant tolerance to insect pests has been indicated to be a unique category of resistance, however, very little information is available on the mechanism of tolerance against insect pests. Tolerance is distinctive in terms of the plant’s ability to withstand or recover from herbivore injury through growth and compensatory physiological processes. Because plant tolerance involves plant compensatory characteristics, the plant is able to harbor large numbers of herbivores without interfering with the insect pest’s physiology or behavior. Some studies have observed that tolerant plants can compensate photosynthetically by avoiding feedback inhibition and impaired electron flow through photosystem II that occurs as a result of insect feeding. Similarly, the up-regulation of peroxidases and other oxidative enzymes during insect feeding, in conjunction with elevated levels of phytohormones can play an important role in providing plant tolerance to insect pests. Hemipteran insects comprise some of the most economically important plant pests (e.g., aphids, whiteflies), due to their ability to achieve high population growth and their potential to transmit plant viruses. In this review, results from studies on plant tolerance to hemipterans are summarized, and potential models to understand tolerance are presented. PMID:27679643

  7. The Recovery College: A unique service approach and qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman-Taylor, Katherine; Stone, Nicola; Valentine, Paul; Hooks, Zoe; Sault, Katherine

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the impact of a Recovery College, an educational service model focusing specifically on health care to engage people's hope, agency, and opportunities for recovery. For the purpose of the study, a qualitative approach was used given the absence of research in this area. Eleven people completed semistructured interviews conducted by an independent researcher. Verbatim transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. The analyses yielded themes emphasizing the impact of the organizational structure of the college. Coproduction of service delivery was contrasted with traditional provision and identified as fundamental to personal and professional changes made. Recovery College participants described clear gains. These findings are discussed in relation to the recovery literature and highlight the need for routine coproduction of services to facilitate recovery from the often devastating impact of mental ill-health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Superfield Approach To Exact And Unique Nilpotent Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Malik, R P

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of usual superfield approach, we derive the exact local, covariant, continuous and off-shell nilpotent Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) and anti-BRST symmetry transformations for the U(1) gauge field ($A_\\mu$) and the (anti-)ghost fields ($(\\bar C)C$) of the Lagrangian density of a four ($3 + 1$)-dimensional QED by exploiting the horizontality condition defined on the six ($4 + 2)$-dimensional supermanifold. The long-standing problem of the exact derivation of the above nilpotent symmetry transformations for the matter (Dirac) fields ($\\bar \\psi, \\psi$), in the framework of superfield formulation, is resolved by a new restriction on the $(4 + 2)$-dimensional supermanifold. This new gauge invariant restriction on the supermanifold, due to the augmented superfield formalism, owes its origin to the (super) covariant derivatives. The geometrical interpretations for all the above off-shell nilpotent transformations are provided in the framework of augmented superfield formalism.

  9. Tongue base schwannoma: report, review, and unique surgical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Raja; Carron, Michael A; Mathog, Robert H

    2008-01-01

    Base of tongue schwannomas are exceedingly rare and therefore often are not immediately included in the differential diagnosis and treatment of oropharyngeal tumors. After a thorough review of the English literature, we found only 6 previously reported cases of tongue base schwannomas. We are contributing a report of a 37-year-old woman with progressive dysphagia, dysarthria, and large tongue base schwannoma. Diagnosis was confirmed by imaging studies and biopsy followed by surgical excision designed to preserve nerve function. A number of surgical approaches have been described for tongue base schwannomas. Each has its own degree of postoperative morbidity. The use of a unilateral transcervical incision with blunt dissection was simple and quickly accomplished with protection of nearby nerves. Histologic identification of Antoni A and B areas along with strong and diffuse staining with S-100 stain pathologically completed the diagnosis of schwannoma.

  10. Detection of carotenoids in psychrotrophic bacteria by spectroscopic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Kushwaha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The combination of Raman and Infrared spectroscopic signatures were used to find the different vibrational modes of individual carotenoid as their spectral fingerprint. Both have been previously demonstrated to be highly useful methodology for the identification and/or typing of microorganisms. In this study, we set out to evaluate whether these technologies could be applied to detect the presence of carotenoids in psychrotrophic bacterial isolates. FTIR and Raman spectra of four psychrotrophic bacteria viz. Kocuria rosea, K. turfanensis, Sanguibacter suarezii and Planococcus maritimus were examined during the investigation. FTIR spectra bands at 1653-1661cm-1 in different samples were assigned as part of chlorophyll, 1424-1426 cm-1 as -C-H- (CH2 bending vibration from methylene of carotenoids or lycopene, 1366-1367 cm-1 band as the -ionone ring of β-carotene due to the C-H, (–CH3 symmetrical bending. Interestingly, Raman spectra revealed intense Raman bands in the range of 1511-1530, 1153-1159 and 1003-1010 cm-1 representing bacterial carotenoids. We hypothesize the biosynthesis of carotenoid as adaptive strategy to cope up inhospitable cold environments of Leh and Ladakh. The strong, scattering bands by different isolates attributable to ν(C=C phase stretching, ν(C-C and δ(C-CH3 methyl components systems, which could be probably membrane-associated C50 carotenoids. Their high intensities are due to resonance enhancement. It can be concluded that Raman spectroscopy is a sensitive and convenient detection tool for typing of the bacterial biomarkers with less time consumption.

  11. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-05

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm(-1) and 1545 cm(-1), respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties.

  12. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm- 1 and 1545 cm- 1, respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties.

  13. A Bayesian sequential processor approach to spectroscopic portal system decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, K; Candy, J; Breitfeller, E; Guidry, B; Manatt, D; Gosnell, T; Chambers, D

    2007-07-31

    The development of faster more reliable techniques to detect radioactive contraband in a portal type scenario is an extremely important problem especially in this era of constant terrorist threats. Towards this goal the development of a model-based, Bayesian sequential data processor for the detection problem is discussed. In the sequential processor each datum (detector energy deposit and pulse arrival time) is used to update the posterior probability distribution over the space of model parameters. The nature of the sequential processor approach is that a detection is produced as soon as it is statistically justified by the data rather than waiting for a fixed counting interval before any analysis is performed. In this paper the Bayesian model-based approach, physics and signal processing models and decision functions are discussed along with the first results of our research.

  14. Diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging: A multidimensional approach for probing microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daeun; Doyle, Eamon K; Wisnowski, Jessica L; Kim, Joong Hee; Haldar, Justin P

    2017-03-19

    To propose and evaluate a novel multidimensional approach for imaging subvoxel tissue compartments called Diffusion-Relaxation Correlation Spectroscopic Imaging. Multiexponential modeling of MR diffusion or relaxation data is commonly used to infer the many different microscopic tissue compartments that contribute signal to macroscopic MR imaging voxels. However, multiexponential estimation is known to be difficult and ill-posed. Observing that this ill-posedness is theoretically reduced in higher dimensions, diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging uses a novel multidimensional imaging experiment that jointly encodes diffusion and relaxation information, and then uses a novel constrained reconstruction technique to generate a multidimensional diffusion-relaxation correlation spectrum for every voxel. The peaks of the multidimensional spectrum are expected to correspond to the distinct tissue microenvironments that are present within each macroscopic imaging voxel. Using numerical simulations, experiment data from a custom-built phantom, and experiment data from a mouse model of traumatic spinal cord injury, diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging is demonstrated to provide substantially better multicompartment resolving power compared to conventional diffusion- and relaxation-based methods. The diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging approach provides powerful new capabilities for resolving the different components of multicompartment tissue models, and can be leveraged to significantly expand the insights provided by MRI in studies of tissue microstructure. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Spectroscopic evidence for an engineered, catalytically active Trp radical that creates the unique reactivity of lignin peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew T; Doyle, Wendy A; Dorlet, Pierre; Ivancich, Anabella

    2009-09-22

    The surface oxidation site (Trp-171) in lignin peroxidase (LiP) required for the reaction with veratryl alcohol a high-redox-potential (1.4 V) substrate, was engineered into Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CiP) by introducing a Trp residue into a heme peroxidase that has similar protein fold but lacks this activity. To create the catalytic activity toward veratryl alcohol in CiP, it was necessary to reproduce the Trp site and its negatively charged microenvironment by means of a triple mutation. The resulting D179W+R258E+R272D variant was characterized by multifrequency EPR spectroscopy. The spectra unequivocally showed that a new Trp radical [g values of g(x) = 2.0035(5), g(y) = 2.0027(5), and g(z) = 2.0022(1)] was formed after the [Fe(IV)=O Por(*+)] intermediate, as a result of intramolecular electron transfer between Trp-179 and the porphyrin. Also, the EPR characterization crucially showed that [Fe(IV)=O Trp-179(*)] was the reactive intermediate with veratryl alcohol. Accordingly, our work shows that it is necessary to take into account the physicochemical properties of the radical, fine-tuned by the microenvironment, as well as those of the preceding [Fe(IV)=O Por(*+)] intermediate to engineer a catalytically competent Trp site for a given substrate. Manipulation of the microenvironment of the Trp-171 site in LiP allowed the detection by EPR spectroscopy of the Trp-171(*), for which direct evidence has been missing so far. Our work also highlights the role of Trp residues as tunable redox-active cofactors for enzyme catalysis in the context of peroxidases with a unique reactivity toward recalcitrant substrates that require oxidation potentials not realized at the heme site.

  16. General approach for modeling partial coherence in spectroscopic Mueller matrix polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingerl, Kurt; Ossikovski, Razvigor

    2016-01-15

    We present a general formalism for modeling partial coherence in spectroscopic Mueller matrix measurements of stratified media. The approach is based on the statistical definition of a Mueller matrix, as well as, on the fundamental representation of the measurement process as the convolution of the sample response with a specific instrumental function. The formalism is readily extended to describe other measurement imperfections occurring jointly with partial coherence and resulting in depolarizing experimental Mueller matrices.

  17. IPAD: A unique approach to government/industry cooperation for technology development and transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Robert E.; Salley, George C.

    1985-01-01

    A key element to improved industry productivity is effective management of Computer Aided Design / Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) information. To stimulate advancement, a unique joint government/industry project designated Integrated Programs for Aerospace-Vehicle Design (IPAD) was carried out from 1971 to 1984. The goal was to raise aerospace industry productivity through advancement of computer based technology to integrate and manage information involved in the design and manufacturing process. IPAD research was guided by an Industry Technical Advisory Board (ITAB) composed of over 100 representatives from aerospace and computer companies. The project complemented traditional NASA/DOD research to develop aerospace design technology and the Air Force's Integrated Computer Aided Manufacturing (ICAM) program to advance CAM technology. IPAD had unprecedented industry support and involvement and served as a unique approach to government industry cooperation in the development and transfer of advanced technology. The IPAD project background, approach, accomplishments, industry involvement, technology transfer mechanisms and lessons learned are summarized.

  18. Quantitative nucleation and growth kinetics of gold nanoparticles via model-assisted dynamic spectroscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yao; Wang, Huixuan; Lin, Wenshuang; Lin, Liqin; Gao, Yixian; Yang, Feng; Du, Mingming; Fang, Weiping; Huang, Jiale; Sun, Daohua; Li, Qingbiao

    2013-10-01

    Lacking of quantitative experimental data and/or kinetic models that could mathematically depict the redox chemistry and the crystallization issue, bottom-to-up formation kinetics of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) remains a challenge. We measured the dynamic regime of GNPs synthesized by l-ascorbic acid (representing a chemical approach) and/or foliar aqueous extract (a biogenic approach) via in situ spectroscopic characterization and established a redox-crystallization model which allows quantitative and separate parameterization of the nucleation and growth processes. The main results were simplified as the following aspects: (I) an efficient approach, i.e., the dynamic in situ spectroscopic characterization assisted with the redox-crystallization model, was established for quantitative analysis of the overall formation kinetics of GNPs in solution; (II) formation of GNPs by the chemical and the biogenic approaches experienced a slow nucleation stage followed by a growth stage which behaved as a mixed-order reaction, and different from the chemical approach, the biogenic method involved heterogeneous nucleation; (III) also, biosynthesis of flaky GNPs was a kinetic-controlled process favored by relatively slow redox chemistry; and (IV) though GNPs formation consists of two aspects, namely the redox chemistry and the crystallization issue, the latter was the rate-determining event that controls the dynamic regime of the whole physicochemical process.

  19. Many-body approach to proton emission and the role of spectroscopic factors

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, J S; Escher, J; Jennings, B K; Sparenberg, J M; Al-Khalili, Jim; Barbieri, Carlo; Escher, Jutta; Jennings, Byron K.; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

    2003-01-01

    The process of proton emission from nuclei is studied by utilizing the two-potential approach of Gurvitz and Kalbermann in the context of the full many-body problem. A time-dependent approach is used for calculating the decay width. Starting from an initial many-body quasi-stationary state, we employ the Feshbach projection operator approach and reduce the formalism to an effective one-body problem. We show that the decay width can be expressed in terms of a one-body matrix element multiplied by a normalization factor. We demonstrate that the traditional interpretation of this normalization as the square root of a spectroscopic factor is only valid for one particular choice of projection operator. This causes no problem for the calculation of the decay width in a consistent microscopic approach, but it leads to ambiguities in the interpretation of experimental results. In particular, spectroscopic factors extracted from a comparison of the measured decay width with a calculated single-particle width may be af...

  20. Consolation as a unique outcome within a pastoral-narrative approach to grief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred R. Brunsdon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Consolation as a unique outcome within a pastoral-narrative approach to grief The pastoral counselling of those who grieve, poses new challenges to pastoral care. Because of the shift away from a modernist paradigm, the grief process is now seen as an open-ended process rather than a closed process which focuses on the mastering of the so-called tasks of mourning and the avoidance of grief pathology. Recent grief theory suggests that the grief process cannot reach a point of closure. Grief counselling should therefore rather embark on a process of generating new meaning to the problem-saturated discourses surrounding death and loss. Narrative therapy is suggested as a means of grief counselling as it makes use of the story analogy which supports the notion of an open end to the grief process. In this study the narrative is explored within the framework of practical theology. Both the master Story of God and the grief-saturated stories of people are combined in a pastoral approach which envisages consolation as the unique outcome of the therapeutic process. Consolation is regarded as one of the secondary narratives in the greater narrative of God as well as the reformed theological vocabulary. It is suggested that a pastoral-narrative approach to grief will generate the consolation needed by the grief-stricken on their life-long journey of coming to terms with their loss.

  1. Raman spectroscopic approach to monitor the in vitro cyclization of creatine → creatinine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Sharma, Poornima; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Singh, Pushkar; Tarcea, Nicolae; Deckert, Volker; Popp, Jürgen; Singh, Ranjan K.

    2015-01-01

    The creatine → creatinine cyclization, an important metabolic phenomenon has been initiated in vitro at acidic pH and studied through Raman spectroscopic and DFT approach. The equilibrium composition of neutral, zwitterionic and protonated microspecies of creatine has been monitored with time as the reaction proceeds. Time series Raman spectra show clear signature of creatinine formation at pH 3 after ∼240 min at room temperature and reaction is faster at higher temperature. The spectra at pH 1 and pH 5 do not show such signature up to 270 min implying faster reaction rate at pH 3.

  2. A whole spectroscopic mapping approach for studying the spatial distribution of pigments in paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, S.; Alberti, R.; Frizzi, T.; Nevin, A.; Valentini, G.; Comelli, D.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a non-invasive approach for the identification and mapping of pigments in paintings. The method is based on three highly complementary imaging spectroscopy techniques, visible multispectral imaging, X-Ray fluorescence mapping and Raman mapping, combined with multivariate data analysis of multidimensional spectroscopic datasets for the extraction of key distribution information in a semi-automatic way. The proposed approach exploits a macro-Raman mapping device, capable of detecting Raman signals from non-perfectly planar surfaces without the need of refocusing. Here, we show that the presence of spatially correlated Raman signals, detected in adjacent points of a painted surface, reinforces the level of confidence for material identification with respect to single-point analysis, even in the presence of very weak and complex Raman signals. The new whole-mapping approach not only provides the identification of inorganic and organic pigments but also gives striking information on the spatial distribution of pigments employed in complex mixtures for achieving different hues. Moreover, we demonstrate how the synergic combination on three spectroscopic methods, characterized by highly different time consumption, yields maximum information.

  3. Computational approaches for identification of conserved/unique binding pockets in the A chain of ricin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecale Zhou, C L; Zemla, A T; Roe, D; Young, M; Lam, M; Schoeniger, J; Balhorn, R

    2005-01-29

    Specific and sensitive ligand-based protein detection assays that employ antibodies or small molecules such as peptides, aptamers, or other small molecules require that the corresponding surface region of the protein be accessible and that there be minimal cross-reactivity with non-target proteins. To reduce the time and cost of laboratory screening efforts for diagnostic reagents, we developed new methods for evaluating and selecting protein surface regions for ligand targeting. We devised combined structure- and sequence-based methods for identifying 3D epitopes and binding pockets on the surface of the A chain of ricin that are conserved with respect to a set of ricin A chains and unique with respect to other proteins. We (1) used structure alignment software to detect structural deviations and extracted from this analysis the residue-residue correspondence, (2) devised a method to compare corresponding residues across sets of ricin structures and structures of closely related proteins, (3) devised a sequence-based approach to determine residue infrequency in local sequence context, and (4) modified a pocket-finding algorithm to identify surface crevices in close proximity to residues determined to be conserved/unique based on our structure- and sequence-based methods. In applying this combined informatics approach to ricin A we identified a conserved/unique pocket in close proximity (but not overlapping) the active site that is suitable for bi-dentate ligand development. These methods are generally applicable to identification of surface epitopes and binding pockets for development of diagnostic reagents, therapeutics, and vaccines.

  4. Structure and tautomerism of tenuazonic acid – A synergetic computational and spectroscopic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikula, Hannes, E-mail: hannes.mikula@tuwien.ac.at [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Applied Synthetic Chemistry, Getreidemarkt 9/163-OC, 1060 Vienna (Austria); University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Institute of Applied Genetics and Cell Biology, Muthgasse 18, 1190 Wien (Austria); Horkel, Ernst; Hans, Philipp; Hametner, Christian; Fröhlich, Johannes [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Applied Synthetic Chemistry, Getreidemarkt 9/163-OC, 1060 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Many published structures for tenuazonic acid (TeA) are incorrect. ► DFT calculations were used for quantum chemical treatment of tenuazonic acid. ► This article reports the confirmation of the main tautomeric structures of TeA. ► A synergetic computational and spectroscopic approach was applied. -- Abstract: All reasonable tautomers and rotamers of tenuazonic acid, which is considered to be of the highest toxicity amongst the Alternaria mycotoxins, were investigated by DFT calculations at different levels of theory in gas phase and in solution to obtain optimized geometries for further examinations. Calculated NMR spectra of tautomeric structures are being presented and compared to experimental data to finally achieve a synergetic computational and spectroscopic approach for structure elucidation of 3-acetyltetramic acids, affording the predominant tautomer of tenuazonic acid in aqueous solution. Furthermore we were able to simulate the less hindered rotation of the exocyclic acetyl group, which occurs after dissociation of tenuazonic acid in protic solvents.

  5. Spatiotemporal Characterization of Extracellular Matrix Microstructures in Engineered Tissue: A Whole-Field Spectroscopic Imaging Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhengbin; Ozcelikkale, Altug; Kim, Young L; Han, Bumsoo

    2013-02-01

    Quality and functionality of engineered tissues are closely related to the microstructures and integrity of their extracellular matrix (ECM). However, currently available methods for characterizing ECM structures are often labor-intensive, destructive, and limited to a small fraction of the total area. These methods are also inappropriate for assessing temporal variations in ECM structures. In this study, to overcome these limitations and challenges, we propose an elastic light scattering approach to spatiotemporally assess ECM microstructures in a relatively large area in a nondestructive manner. To demonstrate its feasibility, we analyze spectroscopic imaging data obtained from acellular collagen scaffolds and dermal equivalents as model ECM structures. For spatial characterization, acellular scaffolds are examined after a freeze/thaw process mimicking a cryopreservation procedure to quantify freezing-induced structural changes in the collagen matrix. We further analyze spatial and temporal changes in ECM structures during cell-driven compaction in dermal equivalents. The results show that spectral dependence of light elastically backscattered from engineered tissue is sensitively associated with alterations in ECM microstructures. In particular, a spectral decay rate over the wavelength can serve as an indicator for the pore size changes in ECM structures, which are at nanometer scale. A decrease in the spectral decay rate suggests enlarged pore sizes of ECM structures. The combination of this approach with a whole-field imaging platform further allows visualization of spatial heterogeneity of EMC microstructures in engineered tissues. This demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed method that nano- and micrometer scale alteration of the ECM structure can be detected and visualized at a whole-field level. Thus, we envision that this spectroscopic imaging approach could potentially serve as an effective characterization tool to nondestructively, accurately

  6. Within-culture variations of uniqueness: towards an integrative approach based on social status, gender, life contexts, and interpersonal comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causse, Elsa; Félonneau, Marie-Line

    2014-01-01

    Research on uniqueness is widely focused on cross-cultural comparisons and tends to postulate a certain form of within-culture homogeneity. Taking the opposite course of this classic posture, we aimed at testing an integrative approach enabling the study of within-culture variations of uniqueness. This approach considered different sources of variation: social status, gender, life contexts, and interpersonal comparison. Four hundred seventy-nine participants completed a measure based on descriptions of "self" and "other." Results showed important variations of uniqueness. An interaction between social status and life contexts revealed the expression of uniqueness in the low-status group. This study highlights the complexity of uniqueness that appears to be related to both cultural ideology and social hierarchy.

  7. Characterizing the interaction between oridonin and bovine serum albumin by a hybrid spectroscopic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhen [Department of Chemistry, Shantou University, Shantou 515063 (China); Chen, Junhui, E-mail: chenjupush@126.com [Interventional Oncology and Minimally Invasive Therapies Department, Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen 518036 (China); Wang, Shaobin [The Fourth People' s Hospital of Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518033 (China); Chen, Zhanguang, E-mail: kqlu@stu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Shantou University, Shantou 515063 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Oridonin is an effective anticancer drug which has high potency and low systemic toxicity. In this study, the interaction between oridonin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by several spectroscopic approaches for the first time. The binding characteristics of oridonin and BSA were determined by fluorescence emission spectra and resonance light scattering spectra. It is showed that the oridonin quenches the fluorescence of BSA and the static quenching constant K{sub SV} is 1.30 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1} at 298 K. Moreover, oridonin and BSA form a 1:1 complex with a binding constant of 0.62 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1}. On the other hand, the thermodynamic parameters indicate that the binding process was a spontaneous molecular interaction procedure, in which hydrophobic forces played a major role. The structure analysis indicates that oridonin binding results in an increased hydrophobicity around the tryptophan residues of BSA. Additionally, as shown by the UV-vis absorption, synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence results, oridonin could lead to conformational and some microenvironmental changes of BSA. The work provides accurate and full basic data for clarifying the binding mechanism of oridonin with BSA in vitro and is helpful for understanding its effect on protein function during its transportation and distribution in blood. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction between oridonin and BSA was evaluated by multi-spectroscopic methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding constant, number of binding sites and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oridonin binds to Subdomain II site in BSA and form a 1:1 complex with it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oridonin-BSA complex is stabilized mainly by hydrophobic force. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oridonin binding induces conformational and microenvironmental changes in BSA.

  8. A branch-and-cut approach to physical mapping of chromosomes by unique end-probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christof, T; Jünger, M; Kececioglu, J; Mutzel, P; Reinelt, G

    1997-01-01

    A fundamental problem in computational biology is the construction of physical maps of chromosomes from hybridization experiments between unique probes and clones of chromosome fragments in the presence of error. Alizadeh, Karp, Weisser and Zweig (Algorithmica 13:1/2, 52-76, 1995) first considered a maximum-likelihood model of the problem that is equivalent to finding an ordering of the probes that minimizes a weighted sum of errors and developed several effective heuristics. We show that by exploiting information about the end-probes of clones, this model can be formulated as a Weighted Betweenness Problem. This affords the significant advantage of allowing the well-developed tools of integer linear-programming and branch-and-cut algorithms to be brought to bear on physical mapping, enabling us for the first time to solve small mapping instances to optimality even in the presence of high error. We also show that by combining the optimal solution of many small overlapping Betweenness Problems, one can effectively screen errors from larger instances and solve the edited instance to optimality as a Hamming-Distance Traveling Salesman Problem. This suggests a new approach, a Betweenness-Traveling Salesman hybrid, for constructing physical maps.

  9. A unique in vivo approach for investigating antimicrobial materials utilizing fistulated animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berean, Kyle J.; Adetutu, Eric M.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Nour, Majid; Nguyen, Emily P.; Paull, David; McLeod, Jess; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Latham, Kay; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J.; McSweeney, Chris; Ball, Andrew S.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-06-01

    Unique in vivo tests were conducted through the use of a fistulated ruminant, providing an ideal environment with a diverse and vibrant microbial community. Utilizing such a procedure can be especially invaluable for investigating the performance of antimicrobial materials related to human and animal related infections. In this pilot study, it is shown that the rumen of a fistulated animal provides an excellent live laboratory for assessing the properties of antimicrobial materials. We investigate microbial colonization onto model nanocomposites based on silver (Ag) nanoparticles at different concentrations into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). With implantable devices posing a major risk for hospital-acquired infections, the present study provides a viable solution to understand microbial colonization with the potential to reduce the incidence of infection through the introduction of Ag nanoparticles at the optimum concentrations. In vitro measurements were also conducted to show the validity of the approach. An optimal loading of 0.25 wt% Ag is found to show the greatest antimicrobial activity and observed through the in vivo tests to reduce the microbial diversity colonizing the surface.

  10. A unique in vivo approach for investigating antimicrobial materials utilizing fistulated animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berean, Kyle J.; Adetutu, Eric M.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Nour, Majid; Nguyen, Emily P.; Paull, David; Mcleod, Jess; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Latham, Kay; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J.; McSweeney, Chris; Ball, Andrew S.; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-01-01

    Unique in vivo tests were conducted through the use of a fistulated ruminant, providing an ideal environment with a diverse and vibrant microbial community. Utilizing such a procedure can be especially invaluable for investigating the performance of antimicrobial materials related to human and animal related infections. In this pilot study, it is shown that the rumen of a fistulated animal provides an excellent live laboratory for assessing the properties of antimicrobial materials. We investigate microbial colonization onto model nanocomposites based on silver (Ag) nanoparticles at different concentrations into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). With implantable devices posing a major risk for hospital-acquired infections, the present study provides a viable solution to understand microbial colonization with the potential to reduce the incidence of infection through the introduction of Ag nanoparticles at the optimum concentrations. In vitro measurements were also conducted to show the validity of the approach. An optimal loading of 0.25 wt% Ag is found to show the greatest antimicrobial activity and observed through the in vivo tests to reduce the microbial diversity colonizing the surface. PMID:26098413

  11. Radiative transfer and spectroscopic databases: A line-sampling Monte Carlo approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtier, Mathieu; Blanco, Stéphane; Dauchet, Jérémi; El Hafi, Mouna; Eymet, Vincent; Fournier, Richard; Roger, Maxime; Spiesser, Christophe; Terrée, Guillaume

    2016-03-01

    Dealing with molecular-state transitions for radiative transfer purposes involves two successive steps that both reach the complexity level at which physicists start thinking about statistical approaches: (1) constructing line-shaped absorption spectra as the result of very numerous state-transitions, (2) integrating over optical-path domains. For the first time, we show here how these steps can be addressed simultaneously using the null-collision concept. This opens the door to the design of Monte Carlo codes directly estimating radiative transfer observables from spectroscopic databases. The intermediate step of producing accurate high-resolution absorption spectra is no longer required. A Monte Carlo algorithm is proposed and applied to six one-dimensional test cases. It allows the computation of spectrally integrated intensities (over 25 cm-1 bands or the full IR range) in a few seconds, regardless of the retained database and line model. But free parameters need to be selected and they impact the convergence. A first possible selection is provided in full detail. We observe that this selection is highly satisfactory for quite distinct atmospheric and combustion configurations, but a more systematic exploration is still in progress.

  12. Binding of 8-methoxypsoralen to DNA in vitro: Monitoring by spectroscopic and chemometrics approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xiaoyue; Zhang, Guowen, E-mail: gwzhang@ncu.edu.cn; Wang, Langhong

    2014-10-15

    8-Methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) is a naturally occurring furanocoumarin with a variety of biological and pharmacological activities. The binding mechanism of 8-MOP to calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) at physiological pH was investigated by multi-spectroscopic techniques including UV–vis absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy along with DNA melting studies and viscosity measurements. The multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) chemometrics approach was introduced to resolve the expanded UV–vis spectral data matrix, and both the pure spectra and the equilibrium concentration profiles for the components (8-MOP, ctDNA and 8-MOP-ctDNA complex) in the system were successfully obtained to monitor the 8-MOP-ctDNA interaction. The results suggested that 8-MOP could bind to ctDNA via intercalation binding as evidenced by significant increases in melting and relative viscosity of ctDNA and competitive study using acridine orange (AO) as a fluorescence probe. The positive values of enthalpy and entropy change suggested that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces played a predominant role in the binding process. Further, FT-IR and CD spectra analysis indicated that 8-MOP preferentially bound to A–T base pairs with no major perturbation in ctDNA double helix conformation. Moreover, molecular docking was employed to exhibit the specific binding mode of 8-MOP to ctDNA intuitively. - Highlights: • The interaction processes of 8-MOP with ctDNA was monitored by MCR-ALS approach. • The binding mode of 8-MOP to ctDNA was an intercalation. • 8-MOP most likely bound to adenine and thymine base pairs of ctDNA. • Molecular docking illustrated the specific binding.

  13. Two-Pronged Approach to Overcome Spectroscopically Interfering Organic Compounds with Isotopic Water Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Nabil; Hsiao, Gregor; Chapellet-Volpini, London; Vu, Danthu

    2013-04-01

    The ability to measure the stable isotopes of hydrogen (dD) and oxygen (d18O) has become much more accessible with the advent of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) laser optical devices. These small and inexpensive analyzers have led to a significant increase in the acquisition of data from a variety of studies in the fields of groundwater, watershed, and other water source applications. However for some samples, such as those linked to fracking, mining, and other activities where higher than normal concentrations of organic materials are to be found, optical spectroscopy may require an adaptation from current methodologies in order to ensure data confidence. That is because CRDS is able to measure all the components within a spectral region - which will include the spectral characteristics of the isotopologues of water as well as the available features from interfering organic molecules. Although, at the first level, the information from the organic material provides spectral overlaps that can perturb the isotopic ratios, a more thorough review shows that these features are a source of information that will be inherently useful. This presentation will examine the approaches developed within the past year to allow for more accurate analyses of such samples by optical methods. The first approach uses an advanced spectroscopic model to flag the presence of organic material in the sample. Signals from known interfering compounds (i.e., alcohols, ketones, aldehydes, short-chain hydrocarbons, etc.) are incorporated into the overall fit of the measured spectra used to calculate the concentration of the individual isotopes. The second approach uses physical treatment of the sample to break down the organic molecules into non-interfering species. The vaporized liquid or solid sample travels through a cartridge packed with an oxidation catalyst. The interfering organic molecules will undergo high temperature oxidation using O2 present in the air carrier gas stream prior

  14. The Unique Contribution of Learning Approaches to Academic Performance, after Controlling for IQ and Personality: Are There Gender Differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosander, Pia; Backstrom, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the unique contribution of learning approaches to academic performance, also taking gender differences into account. The participant sample consisted of 476 school pupils (53% girls and 47% boys) from two upper secondary schools in Sweden who completed two self-reported measures related to personality and learning…

  15. Interaction between 8-methoxypsoralen and trypsin: Monitoring by spectroscopic, chemometrics and molecular docking approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingying; Zhang, Guowen; Zeng, Ni; Hu, Song

    2017-02-01

    8-Methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) is a naturally occurring furanocoumarin with various biological activities. However, there is little information on the binding mechanism of 8-MOP with trypsin. Here, the interaction between 8-MOP and trypsin in vitro was determined by multi-spectroscopic methods combined with the multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) chemometrics approach. An expanded UV-vis spectral data matrix was analysed by MCR-ALS, the concentration profiles and pure spectra for the three reaction species (trypsin, 8-MOP and 8-MOP-trypsin) were obtained to monitor the interaction between 8-MOP and trypsin. The fluorescence data suggested that a static type of quenching mechanism occurred in the binding of 8-MOP to trypsin. Hydrophobic interaction dominated the formation of the 8-MOP-trypsin complex on account of the positive enthalpy and entropy changes, and trypsin had one high affinity binding site for 8-MOP with a binding constant of 3.81 × 104 L mol- 1 at 298 K. Analysis of three dimensional fluorescence, UV-vis absorption and circular dichroism spectra indicated that the addition of 8-MOP induced the rearrangement of the polypeptides carbonyl hydrogen-bonding network and the conformational changes in trypsin. The molecular docking predicted that 8-MOP interacted with the catalytic residues His57, Asp102 and Ser195 in trypsin. The binding patterns and trypsin conformational changes may result in the inhibition of trypsin activity. This study has provided insights into the binding mechanism of 8-MOP with trypsin.

  16. An improved constrained scheme for the Einstein equations: an approach to the uniqueness issue

    CERN Document Server

    Cordero-Carrión, Isabel; Dimmelmeier, Harald; Jaramillo, José Luis; Novak, Jérôme; Gourgoulhon, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Uniqueness problems in the elliptic sector of constrained formulations of Einstein equations have a dramatic effect on the physical validity of some numerical solutions, for instance when calculating the spacetime of very compact stars or nascent black holes. The fully constrained formulation (FCF) proposed by Bonazzola, Gourgoulhon, Grandcl\\'ement, and Novak is one of these formulations. It contains, as a particular case, the approximation of the conformal flatness condition (CFC) which, in the last ten years, has been used in many astrophysical applications. The elliptic part of the FCF basically shares the same differential operators as the elliptic equations in CFC scheme. We present here a reformulation of the elliptic sector of CFC that has the fundamental property of overcoming the local uniqueness problems. The correct behavior of our new formulation is confirmed by means of a battery of numerical simulations. Finally, we extend these ideas to FCF, complementing the mathematical analysis carried out i...

  17. Cultures Around the World: A Unique Approach to Youth Cultural Diversity Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justen O. Smith

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly diverse cultural trends have significant implications for the educational needs of American youth. Learning about and valuing diverse cultures will help prepare youth to become better citizens in an ever-changing society. Cultures Around the World was developed to meet the educational needs of youth in the area of cultural diversity. The Cultures Around the World program brings to life exciting cultures and customs from countries all over the world. Countries are presented in a unique format by teaching youth (ages 10 to 18 a specific country’s history, culture, food, music, dance, language, religion, and current issues. The Cultures Around the World program can be used by any youth educator. The program comes in a ready to use CD containing presentations, handicraft instructions, language guides, and resource guides for nine different countries (Armenia, Australia, Ecuador, Egypt, England, France, Ghana, Slovakia and Mexico.

  18. Wastewater as a resource: a unique approach to achieving energy sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, P M; Rittmann, B E; Schraa, O J; Banaszak, J E; Togna, A P

    2011-01-01

    A wastewater-treatment flowsheet was developed to integrate uniquely designed biological processes with physical-chemical unit processes, allowing conversion of the organic carbon in the wastewater to methane, the removal and recovery of phosphorus and nitrogen from the wastewater, and the production of water suitable for reuse. In the flowsheet, energy is derived from the wastewater by first shunting a large fraction of the organic carbon in the wastewater to a solids slurry which is treated via anaerobic digestion. The anaerobic digestion system consists of focused pulsed (FP) pretreatment coupled to anaerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs). Computer modelling and simulation results are used to optimize design of the system. Energy generation from the system is maximized and costs are reduced by using modest levels of recycle flow from the anaerobic MBRS to the FP pretreatment step.

  19. A Novel Approach to Beam Steering Using Arrays Composed of Multiple Unique Radiating Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labadie, Nathan Richard

    Phased array antennas have found wide application in both radar and wireless communications systems particularly as implementation costs continue to decrease. The primary advantages of electronically scanned arrays are speed of beam scan and versatility of beamforming compared to mechanically scanned fixed beam antennas. These benefits come at the cost of a few well known design issues including element pattern rolloff and mutual coupling between elements. Our primary contribution to the field of research is the demonstration of significant improvement in phased array scan performance using multiple unique radiating modes. In short, orthogonal radiating modes have minimal coupling by definition and can also be generated with reduced rolloff at wide scan angles. In this dissertation, we present a combination of analysis, full-wave electromagnetic simulation and measured data to support our claims. The novel folded ring resonator (FRR) antenna is introduced as a wideband and multi-band element embedded in a grounded dielectric substrate. Multiple radiating modes of a small ground plane excited by a four element FRR array were also investigated. A novel hemispherical null steering antenna composed of two collocated radiating elements, each supporting a unique radiating mode, is presented in the context of an anti-jam GPS receiver application. Both the antenna aperture and active feed network were fabricated and measured showing excellent agreement with analytical and simulated data. The concept of using an antenna supporting multiple radiating modes for beam steering is also explored. A 16 element hybrid linear phased array was fabricated and measured demonstrating significantly improved scan range and scanned gain compared to a conventional phased array. This idea is expanded to 2 dimensional scanning arrays by analysis and simulation of a hybrid phased array composed of novel multiple mode monopole on patch antenna sub-arrays. Finally, we fabricated and

  20. Interaction of Catechu Dye with DNA: Spectroscopic and In Silico Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemachandran, Hridya; Anantharaman, Amrita; Priya, Rajendra Rao; Doss, George Priya; Siva, Ramamoorthy

    2016-01-01

    Catechin, a yellow colored molecule obtained from the wood of Acacia catechu was analyzed for its interaction with synthetic DNA duplexes using spectroscopic analysis. UV-Visible spectroscopic analysis revealed the non-intercalative binding mode. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis expose chemical shift indicated by various vibrational stretches and an increase in the intensity of base stacking was observed by Circular Dichroism (CD), respectively. This inference was further confirmed through nuclear staining technique and also in electrophoretic technique; the dye quenches the fluorescent intensity of ethidium bromide. The result of fluorescence spectroscopy was in concordance with the electrophoretic technique. In addition, the spectroscopic results were in accordance with the molecular docking studies of specific catechin compound from the catechu dye with CT-DNA. This kind of site specificity is a gain in the medicinal field as the drug can be DNA targeted for cancer therapeutics. The present work reveals that catechu dye has a noteworthy application in the field of medical bioscience.

  1. Quantification Approach of Gas Temperate Distribution in Atmospheric Positive DC Glow Discharge Measured by Spectroscopic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Ryo; Orii, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Takao; Izawa, Yasuji; Nishijima, Kiyoto

    2015-09-01

    In our previous work, a two-dimensional (2D) gas temperature distribution in a positive DC steady-state glow corona was qualitatively measured by spectroscopic imaging. Spectral images of its glow corona were taken using ICCD camera with ultra-narrow band-pass filters, and they were corresponded to the head and tail of a second positive system bands of nitrogen (2PS N2 (0-2)). The qualitative gas temperature was obtained from the emission intensity ratio (I2 Ptail/I2 Phead) between the head and tail of 2PS N2 (0-2). This emission intensity ratio also equals the rotational temperature (TR) , and TR almost equals the gas temperature (TG) in atmospheric pressure. In this work, the qualitative 2D gas temperature distribution was derived from 2D I2 Ptail/I2 Phead plots, and the calibration date of I2 Ptail/I2 Phead for TR was accumulated by investigating the relationship between the spatially average absolute gas temperature (Tav) obtained by single-point spectroscopic measurement and the average value of I2 Ptail/I2 Phead plots. On the basis of the calibration date, a spectroscopically-imaged qualitative 2D I2 Ptail/I2 Phead distribution in a positive DC glow corona was converted to a quantitative 2D image of gas rotational temperature.

  2. Behavior-based network management: a unique model-based approach to implementing cyber superiority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Jocelyn M.

    2016-05-01

    Behavior-Based Network Management (BBNM) is a technological and strategic approach to mastering the identification and assessment of network behavior, whether human-driven or machine-generated. Recognizing that all five U.S. Air Force (USAF) mission areas rely on the cyber domain to support, enhance and execute their tasks, BBNM is designed to elevate awareness and improve the ability to better understand the degree of reliance placed upon a digital capability and the operational risk.2 Thus, the objective of BBNM is to provide a holistic view of the digital battle space to better assess the effects of security, monitoring, provisioning, utilization management, allocation to support mission sustainment and change control. Leveraging advances in conceptual modeling made possible by a novel advancement in software design and implementation known as Vector Relational Data Modeling (VRDM™), the BBNM approach entails creating a network simulation in which meaning can be inferred and used to manage network behavior according to policy, such as quickly detecting and countering malicious behavior. Initial research configurations have yielded executable BBNM models as combinations of conceptualized behavior within a network management simulation that includes only concepts of threats and definitions of "good" behavior. A proof of concept assessment called "Lab Rat," was designed to demonstrate the simplicity of network modeling and the ability to perform adaptation. The model was tested on real world threat data and demonstrated adaptive and inferential learning behavior. Preliminary results indicate this is a viable approach towards achieving cyber superiority in today's volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous (VUCA) environment.

  3. Determining optimal corrosion control techniques for small water systems: A unique and systematic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarallo, S.M.; Beardsley, E. [Camp Dresser & McKee Inc., Povidence, RI (United States); Pytel, D.; Chaplin, T. [Rhode Island Department of Health, Providence, RI (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The Lead and Copper Rule represents one of the most complex rules currently in effect for small water treatment systems. In an effort to attain timely compliance by small systems with limited technical and financial resources, the Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDOH) Division of Drinking Water Quality initiated a study to recommend appropriate corrosion control approaches. The study encompassed three goals: to continue a good compliance record, to help small systems reduce their lead and copper levels, and to avoid unnecessary safety risks to operators and customers.

  4. Synchronous Morgagni and Bochdalek Hernias: A Case Report of a Unique Approach to a Rare Finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlager

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Multiple unilateral congenital diaphragmatic hernias (CDH are extremely rare, described only five times in the medical literature. Concurrent ipsilateral Bochdalek and Morgagni hernias are rarer still with only two cases previously described. In all reported cases of multiple concurrent defects, the hernias were repaired in an open fashion, either via a thoracotomy or laparotomy with both of the two combined Bochdalek and Morgagni hernias repaired via laparotomy. Case Presentation In this case report we have a 2-day-old who developed respiratory distress and on CT scan was found to have a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH or eventration. This patient is ideal for this case report because he meets a lot of the previously established criteria for minimally invasive repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernias - minimal respiratory compromise, no congenital heart defects - and he has synchronous defects which have very rarely been seen before. Here we present the first reported case of concurrent ipsilateral Bochdalek and Morgagni hernias repaired in a one-stage minimally invasive fashion, approaching the Bochdalek hernia thoracoscopically and the Morgagni laparoscopically. The patient had a quick recovery post-operatively and he continues to do well. Conclusions From this experience, we argue that in the right circumstances a completely minimally invasive approach can be taken for synchronous congenital diaphragmatic hernias.

  5. Earth Hazards Consortium: a Unique Approach to Student-Centered Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, C. P.; Granados, H. D.; Durant, A.; Wolf, R. E.; Girard, G.; Javier, I. H.; Cisneros, M.; Rose, W.; Sánchez, S. S.; Stix, J.

    2006-12-01

    contributing to their professional development, in addition to gaining a unique cultural experience. The course and field trip foci for the next two years are: Volcanic Edifice Failure/Cascades and Western Canada (2007) and Convergent Plate Boundary Volcanism/Mexican Volcanic Belt (2008). The consortium welcomes participation in the EHaz program from interested discussion leaders, students, and education specialists in teaching and learning.

  6. Children's unique experience of depression: Using a developmental approach to predict variation in symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginicola Misty M

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current clinical knowledge suggests that children can have different types of depressive symptoms (irritability and aggression, but presents no theoretical basis for these differences. Using a developmental approach, the present study sought to test the relationship between developmental level (mental age and expression of depressive symptoms. The primary hypothesis was that as children's mental age increased, so would the number of internalizing symptoms present. Methods Participants were 252 psychiatric inpatients aged 4 to 16 with a diagnosed depressive disorder. All children were diagnosed by trained clinicians using DSM criteria. Patients were predominantly male (61% with varied ethnic backgrounds (Caucasian 54%; African American 22%; Hispanic 19%; Other 5%. Children were given an IQ test (KBIT or WISC while within the hospital. Mental age was calculated by using the child's IQ score and chronological age. Four trained raters reviewed children's records for depressive symptoms as defined by the DSM-IV TR. Additionally, a ratio score was calculated to indicate the number of internalizing symptoms to total symptoms. Results Mental age positively correlated (r = .51 with an internalizing total symptom ratio score and delineated between several individual symptoms. Mental age also predicted comorbidity with anxiety and conduct disorders. Children of a low mental age were more likely to be comorbid with conduct disorders, whereas children with a higher mental age presented more often with anxiety disorders. Gender was independently related to depressive symptoms, but minority status interacted with mental age. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that a developmental approach is useful in understanding children's depressive symptoms and has implications for both diagnosis and treatment of depression. If children experience depression differently, it follows that treatment options may also differ from that which is

  7. Walking blindfolded unveils unique contributions of behavioural approach and inhibition to lateral spatial bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weick, Mario; Allen, John A; Vasiljevic, Milica; Yao, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Healthy individuals display a tendency to allocate attention unequally across space, and this bias has implications for how individuals interact with their environments. However, the origins of this phenomenon remain relatively poorly understood. The present research examined the joint and independent contributions of two fundamental motivational systems - behavioural approach and inhibition systems (BAS and BIS) - to lateral spatial bias in a locomotion task. Participants completed self-report measures of trait BAS and BIS, then repeatedly traversed a room, blindfolded, aiming for a straight line. We obtained locomotion data from motion tracking to capture variations in the walking trajectories. Overall, walking trajectories deviated to the left, and this tendency was more pronounced with increasing BIS scores. Meanwhile, BAS was associated with relative rightward tendencies when BIS was low, but not when BIS was high. These results demonstrate for the first time an association between BIS and lateral spatial bias independently of variations in BAS. The findings also contribute to clarify the circumstances in which BAS is associated with a rightward bias. We discuss the implications of these findings for the neurobiological underpinnings of BIS and for the literature on spatial bias. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cancer comortality patterns in schizophrenia and psychotic disorders: a new methodological approach for unique databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Tschopp, Alois; Bopp, Matthias; Gutzwiller, Felix; Rössler, Wulf

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of cancer comortality in deaths registered with schizophrenia and psychotic disorders. It focused on the question of whether the proportions of different types of cancer diverge when they are co-registered with schizophrenia/psychotic disorders or with other causes of death in mortality statistics. We developed an analysis approach applicable to common mortality statistics data when no linkage with morbidity databases or other registers is possible. The analysis covered Swiss mortality data from a 39-year period (1969 - 2007) and was confined to the most frequent cancers. We applied a two-step case-control analysis with bootstrapping (1000 repetitions). The cases were defined by the cancer-schizophrenia registrations for each specific cancer, whereas the controls were matched from the remaining cases (matching criteria: sex, age, region, subperiod). Cancers with deviant standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) included stomach cancer (1.6; 2.2 after reweighting), lung cancer (0.8; 0.5 after reweighting) and breast cancer (1.6; 1.5 after reweighting). The comortality pattern of cancers in schizophrenia and psychotic disorders diverges from the pattern found in other co-registered causes of death. The relatively low frequency of lung cancers is particularly paradoxical in view of the smoking habits of schizophrenia patients.

  9. Horizontal direction drill shore approach - a unique field joint coating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, Robert; Lemuchi, Andre; Gudme, Carl [Canusa-CPS, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    High performance pipeline coatings such as 3-layer polypropylene (3LPP) have been developed to meet the more demanding applications of today's pipelines. For offshore applications, this coating type is ideal because it offers lay contractors a tough, virtually holiday free coating, which enhances lay speeds. However, the field joint on polypropylene-coated pipe is one of the challenges for contractors who want to maximize lay speed and minimize cost. In recent years, a polypropylene-based heat-shrinkable sleeve has been developed to overcome some of the issues that lay contractors had, and the system is in widespread use globally. At the point where offshore pipelines transition to onshore sections the construction has also been a major challenge. Recently, contractors have used a system whereby they trench or directionally drill the pipeline up the shore approach then directionally drill through sensitive areas beyond the beach. This minimizes the environmental impact at the shoreline and can be quite cost effective. Again, the challenge of a more universally accepted field joint solution for polypropylene-coated pipelines that could withstand the rigours of the construction method was present. (author)

  10. Poly(ADP-ribose)--a unique natural polymer structural features, biological role and approaches to the chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenichev, Mikhail S; Mikhailov, Sergey N

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is a natural polymer, taking part in numerous important cellular processes. Several enzymes are involved in biosynthesis and degradation of PAR. One of them, poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is considered to be a perspective target for the design of new drugs, affecting PAR metabolism. The structure of PAR was established by enzymatic hydrolysis and further analysis of the products, but total chemical synthesis of PAR hasn't been described yet. Several approaches have been developed on the way to chemical synthesis of this unique biopolymer.

  11. A unique therapeutic approach to emesis and itch with a proanthocyanidin-rich genonutrient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace John L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined the therapeutic potential of a proprietary Croton palanostigma extract (Zangrado® in the management of emesis and itch. Methods Emesis was induced in ferrets with morphine-6-glucuronide (0.05 mg/kg sc in the presence of Zangrado (3 mg/kg, ip and the cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist, AM 251 (5 mg/kg, ip. Topical Zangrado (1% was assessed for anti-pruretic actions in the 5-HT-induced scratching model in rats and evaluated in capsaicin-induced gastric hyperemia as measured by laser doppler flow. In the ApcMinmouse model of precancerous adenomatosis polyposis, mice received Zangrado (100 μg/ml in drinking water from the age of 6 – 16 weeks for effects on polyp number. In RAW 264.7 cells Zangrado was examined for effects on lipopolysaccharide-induced nitrite production. Results Zangrado was a highly effective anti-emetic, reducing morphine-induced vomiting and retching by 77%. These benefits were not associated with sedation or hypothermia and were not reversed by cannabinoid receptor antagonism. Itch responses were blocked in both the morphine and 5-HT models. Zangrado did not exacerbate the ApcMincondition rather health was improved. Capsaicin-induced hyperemia was blocked by Zangrado, which also attenuated the production of nitric oxide by activated macrophages. Conclusion Zangrado is an effective anti-emetic and anti-itch therapy that is devoid of common side-effects, cannabinoid-independent and broadly suppresses sensory afferent nerve activation. This complementary medicine represents a promising new approach to the management of nausea, itch and irritable bowel syndrome.

  12. Macromolecular fingerprinting of sulfolobus species in biofilm: a transcriptomic and proteomic approach combined with spectroscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerdt, Andrea; Orell, Alvaro; Pham, Trong Khoa; Mukherjee, Joy; Wlodkowski, Alexander; Karunakaran, Esther; Biggs, Catherine A; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2011-09-02

    Microorganisms in nature often live in surface-associated sessile communities, encased in a self-produced matrix, referred to as biofilms. Biofilms have been well studied in bacteria but in a limited way for archaea. We have recently characterized biofilm formation in three closely related hyperthermophilic crenarchaeotes: Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, S. solfataricus, and S. tokodaii. These strains form different communities ranging from simple carpet structures in S. solfataricus to high density tower-like structures in S. acidocaldarius under static condition. Here, we combine spectroscopic, proteomic, and transcriptomic analyses to describe physiological and regulatory features associated with biofilms. Spectroscopic analysis reveals that in comparison to planktonic life-style, biofilm life-style has distinctive influence on the physiology of each Sulfolobus spp. Proteomic and transcriptomic data show that biofilm-forming life-style is strain specific (eg ca. 15% of the S. acidocaldarius genes were differently expressed, S. solfataricus and S. tokodaii had ~3.4 and ~1%, respectively). The -omic data showed that regulated ORFs were widely distributed in basic cellular functions, including surface modifications. Several regulated genes are common to biofilm-forming cells in all three species. One of the most striking common response genes include putative Lrs14-like transcriptional regulators, indicating their possible roles as a key regulatory factor in biofilm development.

  13. Interactions between {beta}-carboline alkaloids and bovine serum albumin: Investigation by spectroscopic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nafisi, Shohreh, E-mail: drshnafisi@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Central Tehran Branch (IAUCTB), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Panahyab, Ataollah [Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Central Tehran Branch (IAUCTB), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri Sadeghi, Golshan [Department of Biology, Islamic Azad University, Science and Research Branch, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    {beta}-Carboline alkaloids are present in medicinal plants such as Peganum harmala L. that have been used as folk medicine in anticancer therapy. BSA is the major soluble protein constituent of the circulatory system, and has many physiological functions including the transport of a variety of compounds. This study is the first attempt to investigate the binding of {beta}-carboline alkaloids to BSA by using a constant protein concentration and varying drug concentrations at pH 7.2. FTIR and UV-Vis spectroscopic methods were used to analyze the binding modes of {beta}-carboline alkaloids, the binding constants and the effects of drug complexation on BSA stability and conformation. Spectroscopic evidence showed that {beta}-carboline alkaloids bind BSA via hydrophobic interaction and van der Waals contacts along with H-bonding with the -NH groups, with overall binding constants of K{sub harmine-BSA}=2.04 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}, K{sub tryptoline-BSA}=1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}, K{sub harmaline-BSA}=5.04 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} M{sup -1}, K{sub harmane-BSA}=1.41 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} and K{sub harmalol-BSA}=1.01 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} M{sup -1}, assuming that there is one drug molecule per protein. The BSA secondary structure was altered with a major decrease of {alpha}-helix from 64% (free protein) to 59% (BSA-harmane), 56% (BSA-harmaline and BSA-harmine), 55% (BSA-tryptoline), 54% (BSA-harmalol) and {beta}-sheet from 15% (free protein) to 6-8% upon {beta}-carboline alkaloids complexation, inducing a partial protein destabilization. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the binding of {beta}-carboline alkaloids to BSA by using the spectroscopic methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the effects of drug complexation on BSA stability and conformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A partial protein destabilization occurred at high alkaloids concentration. Black

  14. Multidisciplinary approach for the study of an Egyptian coffin (late 22nd/early 25th dynasty): Combining imaging and spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracci, S.; Caruso, O.; Galeotti, M.; Iannaccone, R.; Magrini, D.; Picchi, D.; Pinna, D.; Porcinai, S.

    2015-06-01

    This paper demonstrates that an educated methodology based on both non-invasive and micro invasive techniques in a two-step approach is a powerful tool to characterize the materials and stratigraphies of an Egyptian coffin, which was restored several times. This coffin, belonging to a certain Mesiset, is now located at the Museo Civico Archeologico of Bologna (inventory number MCABo EG 1963). Scholars attributed it to the late 22nd/early 25th dynasty by stylistic comparison. The first step of the diagnostic approach applied imaging techniques on the whole surface in order to select measurements spots and to unveil both original and restored areas. Images and close microscopic examination of the polychrome surface allowed selecting representative areas to be investigated in situ by portable spectroscopic techniques: X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Fiber Optic Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). After the analysis of the results coming from the first step, very few selected samples were taken to clarify the stratigraphy of the polychrome layers. The first step, based on the combination of imaging and spectroscopic techniques in a totally non-invasive modality, is quite unique in the literature on Egyptian coffins and enabled us to reveal many differences in the ground layer's composition and to identify a remarkable number of pigments in the original and restored areas. This work offered also a chance to check the limitations of the non-invasive approach applied on a complex case, namely the right localization of different materials in the stratigraphy and the identification of binding media. Indeed, to dissolve any remaining doubts on superimposed layers belonging to different interventions, it was necessary to sample few micro-fragments in some selected areas and analyze them prepared as cross-sections. The original ground layer is made of calcite, while the restored areas show the presence of either a mixture of calcite

  15. A high throughput approach to quantify protein adsorption on combinatorial metal/metal oxide surfaces using electron microprobe and spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, T.; Lohstreter, L.; Filiaggi, M. J.; Bai, Zhijun; Dahn, J. R.

    2008-09-01

    Although metallic biomaterials are widely used, systematic studies of protein adsorption onto such materials are generally lacking. Combinatorial binary films of Al 1-xTi x and Al 1-xNb x (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1) and corresponding pure element films were produced on glass substrates using a unique magnetron sputtering technique. Fibrinogen and albumin adsorption amounts were measured by wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy (WDS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) equipment, both high throughput techniques with automated motion stage capabilities. X-ray diffraction revealed that the binary films have crystalline phases present near the ends of the compositional gradient with an amorphous region throughout the interior of the gradient. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provided the surface chemistry along the binary films and showed that Al 2O 3 preferentially formed at the surface. Protein adsorption onto these films was found to be closely correlated to the alumina surface fraction, with high alumina content at the surface leading to low amounts of adsorbed fibrinogen and albumin. Protein adsorption amounts obtained with WDS and SE were in excellent agreement for all films. This suggests that this combinatorial materials approach combined with these state-of-the-art, automated high throughput instruments provides a novel way to accurately monitor protein adsorption taking place at the surfaces of these metal/metal oxide materials.

  16. New chemometric approach MCR-ALS to unmix EPR spectroscopic data from complex mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, Maya Abou; de Juan, Anna; Touati, Nadia; Vezin, Hervé; Duponchel, Ludovic

    2014-11-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of mixtures are often difficult to interpret due to the superposition of spectral contribution of various species present in the complex materials. It is challenging to accurately identify the number of pure compounds present and to extract their pure spectra. In this study, the powerful chemometric method, multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS), is applied to identify different paramagnetic centers. This method is used to simultaneously extract, with no prior knowledge, the pure spectra and the corresponding concentration profiles of all the compounds in the unknown and unresolved mixtures. The goal of our work is to apply, for the first time, this new chemometrics methodology, MCR-ALS, on EPR spectroscopic data in order to characterize a series of distinct but strongly overlapping spectra of various paramagnetic species.

  17. Identifying Unique Neighborhood Characteristics to Guide Health Planning for Stroke and Heart Attack: Fuzzy Cluster and Discriminant Analyses Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedigo, Ashley; Seaver, William; Odoi, Agricola

    2011-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic, demographic, and geographic factors are known determinants of stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) risk. Clustering of these factors in neighborhoods needs to be taken into consideration during planning, prioritization and implementation of health programs intended to reduce disparities. Given the complex and multidimensional nature of these factors, multivariate methods are needed to identify neighborhood clusters of these determinants so as to better understand the unique neighborhood profiles. This information is critical for evidence-based health planning and service provision. Therefore, this study used a robust multivariate approach to classify neighborhoods and identify their socio-demographic characteristics so as to provide information for evidence-based neighborhood health planning for stroke and MI. Methods and Findings The study was performed in East Tennessee Appalachia, an area with one of the highest stroke and MI risks in USA. Robust principal component analysis was performed on neighborhood (census tract) socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, obtained from the US Census, to reduce the dimensionality and influence of outliers in the data. Fuzzy cluster analysis was used to classify neighborhoods into Peer Neighborhoods (PNs) based on their socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. Nearest neighbor discriminant analysis and decision trees were used to validate PNs and determine the characteristics important for discrimination. Stroke and MI mortality risks were compared across PNs. Four distinct PNs were identified and their unique characteristics and potential health needs described. The highest risk of stroke and MI mortality tended to occur in less affluent PNs located in urban areas, while the suburban most affluent PNs had the lowest risk. Conclusions Implementation of this multivariate strategy provides health planners useful information to better understand and effectively plan for the unique

  18. Deciphering the interaction of bovine heart cystatin with ZnO nanoparticles: Spectroscopic and thermodynamic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Aamir; Faraz, Mohd; Arif, Hussain; Bhat, Sheraz Ahmad; Siddiqui, Azad Alam; Bano, Bilqees

    2017-02-01

    ZnO-NPs have been widely used in biomedical fields such as therapeutics, cellular imaging, and drug delivery. However, the risk of exposure of nanoparticles to the biological system is not well understood. Nanoparticle-protein interaction is pivotal to understand their biological behavior and predict nanoparticle toxicity that is crucial for its safer applications. In the present study zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) were synthesized and subjected to interact with buffalo heart cystatin (BHC), purified from buffalo heart, to assess the effect(s) of ZnO-NPs on the structure and function of BHC. In vitro toxicity assessments revealed that BHC, upon interaction with ZnO-NPs, led to the altered protein conformation and perturbed function. A decrease in the anti-papain activity of BHC was observed. Spectroscopic studies demonstrated that formation of BHC-ZnO-NPs complex accompanied by structural changes in BHC along with a significant decrease in its α-helical content. ITC determined the thermodynamic parameters of binding between ZnO-NPs and BHC quantitatively. Increased surface hydrophobicity (change in the tertiary structure) was observed by ANS fluorescence that demonstrated the formation of molten globular intermediates that were found to be stable without any signs of aggregation as depicted by ThT fluorescence. TEM images gave the physical evidence of the formation of ZnO-NPs-BHC corona.

  19. A spectroscopic approach to monitor the cut processing in pulsed laser osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Konrad; Gubaidullin, Gail G; Bongartz, Jens; Wahrburg, Jürgen; Roth, Hubert; Kunkel, Martin

    2013-01-01

    During laser osteotomy surgery, plasma arises at the place of ablation. It was the aim of this study to explore whether a spectroscopic analysis of this plasma would allow identification of the type of tissue that was affected by the laser. In an experimental setup (Rofin SCx10, CO(2) Slab Laser, wavelength 10.6 μm, pulse duration 80 μs, pulse repetition rate 200 Hz, max. output in cw-mode 100 W), the plasma spectra evoked by a pulsed laser, cutting 1-day postmortem pig and cow bones, were recorded. Spectra were compared to the reference spectrum of bone via correlation analysis. Our measurements show a clear differentiation between the plasma spectra when cutting either a bone or a soft tissue. The spectral changes could be detected from one to the next spectrum within 200 ms. Continuous surveillance of plasma spectra allows us to differentiate whether bone or soft tissue is hit by the last laser pulse. With this information, it may be possible to stop the laser when cutting undesired soft tissue and to design an automatic control of the ablation process.

  20. Thermal stability and hydration behavior of ritonavir sulfate: A vibrational spectroscopic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaweri Gambhir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ritonavir sulfate is a protease inhibitor widely used in the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In order to elucidate the inherent stability and sensitivity characteristics of ritonavir sulfate, it was investigated under forced thermal and hydration stress conditions as recommended by the International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. In addition, competency of vibrational (infrared and Raman spectroscopy was assessed to identify structural changes of the drug symbolizing its stress degradation. High performance liquid chromatography was used as a confirmatory technique for both thermal and hydration stress study, while thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis and atomic force microscopy substantiated the implementation of vibrational spectroscopy in this framework. The results exhibited high thermal stability of the drug as significant variations were observed in the diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectra only after the drug exposure to thermal radiations at 100 °C. Hydration behavior of ritonavir sulfate was evaluated using Raman spectroscopy and the value of critical relative humidity was found to be >67%. An important aspect of this study was to utilize vibrational spectroscopic technique to address stability issues of pharmacological molecules, not only for their processing in pharmaceutical industry, but also for predicting their shelf lives and suitable storage conditions.

  1. Investigation of the interaction between berberine and nucleosomes in solution: Spectroscopic and equilibrium dialysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra; Mollaei, Hossein; Sargolzaei, Javad

    2017-02-01

    Berberine is a natural plant alkaloid with high pharmacological potential. Although its interaction with free DNA has been the subject of several reports, to date there is no work concerning the effect of berberine on nucleoprotein structure of DNA, the nucleosomes. The present study focuses on the binding affinity of berberine to nucleosomes and histone H1 employing various spectroscopic techniques, fluorescence, circular dichroism, thermal denaturation as well as equilibrium dialysis. The results showed that the binding of berberine to nucleosomes is positive cooperative with Ka = 5.57 × 103 M- 1. Berberine quenched with the chromophores of protein moiety of nucleosomes and reduced fluorescence emission intensity at 335 nm with Ksv value of 0.135. Binding of berberine to nucleosomes decreased the absorbance at 210 and 260 nm, produced hypochromicity in thermal denaturation profiles and its affinity to nucleoprotein structure of nucleosomes was much higher than to free DNA. Berberine also exhibited high affinity to histone H1 in solution and the binding was positive cooperative with. Ka = 3.61 × 103 M- 1. Moreover berberine decreased fluorescence emission intensity of H1 by quenching with tyrosine residue in its globular core domain. The circular dichroism profiles demonstrated that the binding of drug induced secondary structural changes in both DNA stacking and histone H1. It is concluded that berberine is genotoxic drug, interacts with nucleosomes and in this process histone H1 is involved to exert its anticancer activity.

  2. Thermal stability and hydration behavior of ritonavir sulfate:A vibrational spectroscopic approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaweri Gambhir; Parul Singh; Deepak K Jangir; Ranjana Mehrotra

    2015-01-01

    abstract Ritonavir sulfate is a protease inhibitor widely used in the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In order to elucidate the inherent stability and sensitivity characteristics of ritonavir sulfate, it was investigated under forced thermal and hydration stress conditions as recommended by the Inter-national Conference on Harmonization guidelines. In addition, competency of vibrational (infrared and Raman) spectroscopy was assessed to identify structural changes of the drug symbolizing its stress de-gradation. High performance liquid chromatography was used as a confirmatory technique for both thermal and hydration stress study, while thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis and atomic force microscopy substantiated the implementation of vibrational spectroscopy in this frame-work. The results exhibited high thermal stability of the drug as significant variations were observed in the diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectra only after the drug exposure to thermal ra-diations at 100 °C. Hydration behavior of ritonavir sulfate was evaluated using Raman spectroscopy and the value of critical relative humidity was found to be 4 67%. An important aspect of this study was to utilize vibrational spectroscopic technique to address stability issues of pharmacological molecules, not only for their processing in pharmaceutical industry, but also for predicting their shelf lives and suitable storage conditions.

  3. New quinolone derivative: Spectroscopic characterization and reactivity study by DFT and MD approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjith, P. K.; Mary, Y. Sheena; Panicker, C. Yohannan; Anto, P. L.; Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J.; Musiol, Robert; Jampilek, Josef; Van Alsenoy, C.

    2017-05-01

    The spectral characterization of ethyl-4-hydroxy-2-oxo-1, 2-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylate (EHODQ3C) was performed by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic techniques and density functional theory computations have been carried using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. On the basis of potential energy distribution the vibrational assignments of the wavenumbers were proposed. Splitting of the Nsbnd H stretching mode and downshifted from the computed value which indicates the weakening of the Nsbnd H bond. NBO analysis was performed to study donor acceptor interactions. DFT calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been combined in order to investigate fundamental reactive properties of the title molecule. To determine important reactive molecule sites we have calculated average local ionization energies (ALIE) and Fukui functions. Sensitivity towards autoxidation mechanism has been investigated by calculation of bond dissociation energies, while stability of title molecule in water has been investigated by calculation of radial distribution functions (RDF) after (MD) simulations. EHODQ3C exhibits inhibitory activity against ACP reductase and appears to be highly selective.

  4. A Multiscale Vibrational Spectroscopic Approach for Identification and Biochemical Characterization of Pollen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Bağcıoğlu

    Full Text Available Analysis of pollen grains reveals valuable information on biology, ecology, forensics, climate change, insect migration, food sources and aeroallergens. Vibrational (infrared and Raman spectroscopies offer chemical characterization of pollen via identifiable spectral features without any sample pretreatment. We have compared the level of chemical information that can be obtained by different multiscale vibrational spectroscopic techniques.Pollen from 15 different species of Pinales (conifers were measured by seven infrared and Raman methodologies. In order to obtain infrared spectra, both reflectance and transmission measurements were performed on ground and intact pollen grains (bulk measurements, in addition, infrared spectra were obtained by microspectroscopy of multigrain and single pollen grain measurements. For Raman microspectroscopy measurements, spectra were obtained from the same pollen grains by focusing two different substructures of pollen grain. The spectral data from the seven methodologies were integrated into one data model by the Consensus Principal Component Analysis, in order to obtain the relations between the molecular signatures traced by different techniques.The vibrational spectroscopy enabled biochemical characterization of pollen and detection of phylogenetic variation. The spectral differences were clearly connected to specific chemical constituents, such as lipids, carbohydrates, carotenoids and sporopollenins. The extensive differences between pollen of Cedrus and the rest of Pinaceae family were unambiguously connected with molecular composition of sporopollenins in pollen grain wall, while pollen of Picea has apparently higher concentration of carotenoids than the rest of the family. It is shown that vibrational methodologies have great potential for systematic collection of data on ecosystems and that the obtained phylogenetic variation can be well explained by the biochemical composition of pollen. Out of the

  5. Active index model: a unique approach for regional quantitative morphometry in longitudinal and cross-sectional studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, P. K.; Zhang, H.; Sonka, M.; Christensen, G. E.; Rajapakse, C. S.

    2007-03-01

    Recent advancements in digital medical imaging have opened avenues for quantitative analyses of different volumetric and morphometric indices in response to a disease or a treatment. However, a major challenge in performing such an analysis is the lack of a technology of building a mean anatomic space (MAS) that allows mapping data of a given subject onto MAS. This approach leads to a tool for point-by-point regional analysis and comparison of quantitative indices for data coming from a longitudinal or transverse study. Toward this goal, we develop a new computation technique, called Active Index Model (AIM), which is a unique tool to solve the stated problem. AIM consists of three building blocks - (1) development of MAS for a particular anatomic site, (2) mapping a specific data onto MAS, (3) regional statistical analysis of data from different populations assessing regional response to a disease or treatment progression. The AIM presented here is built at the training phase from two known populations (e.g., normal and diseased) which will be immediately ready for diagnostic purpose in a subject whose clinical status is unknown. AIM will be useful for both cross sectional and longitudinal studies and for early diagnostic. This technique will be a vital tool for understanding regional response of a disease or treatment at various stages of its progression. This method has been applied for analyzing regional trabecular bone structural distribution in rabbit femur via micro-CT imaging and to localize the affected myocardial regions from cardiac MR data.

  6. Dynamic gas slippage: A unique dual-mechanism approach to the flow of gas in tight formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertekin; King, G.R.; Schwerer, F.C.

    1983-10-01

    A mathematical formulation, applicable to both numerical simulation and transient well analysis, describing the flow of gas in very tight (k < 0.1 md) porous media has been developed. Unique to this formulation is the dual-mechanism transport of gas. In this formulation gas is assumed to be traveling under the influence of two fields: a concentration field and a pressure field. Transport through the concentration field is a Knudsen flow process and is modeled with Fick's Law of diffusion. Transport through the pressure field is a laminar process and is modeled with Darcy's law (inertial-turbulent effects are ignored). The combination of these two flow mechanisms rigorously yields a composition, pressure and saturation dependent slippage factor. The pressure dependence arises from treating the gas as a real gas. The dynamic slippage derived from this formulation is found to be most applicable in reservoirs with permeabilities less than or equal to 0.01 md. The results from this study indicate that in reservoirs of this type, differences between recoveries after ten years of production using the dynamic slip described in this paper and constant slip approaches were as great as 10% depending on the initial gas saturation. If an economic production rate is considered, differences as great as 30 can be expected.

  7. Comparison of gravimetric and spectroscopic approaches to quantify stratum corneum removed by tape-stripping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, D; Yang, Q; Guy, R H; Matts, P J; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2012-09-01

    Skin surface tape-stripping is an extensively used technique to examine the distribution profile, penetration and safety of various active compounds. It is also a widely accepted method to probe skin barrier properties and more specifically, those of the stratum corneum (SC). The amount of SC removed by tape-stripping is generally determined either gravimetrically or by extraction and measurement of SC proteins. A novel infra-red densitometry (IRD) technique has recently been introduced to measure SC protein content. In the present study, IRD was investigated as an alternative method to measure the mass of SC removed by tape-stripping. Tape-stripping experiments were conducted on human volunteers. The weight of the stratum corneum removed was assessed by the gravimetric approach and by IRD. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was also measured before and after each tape-strip. A linear correlation coefficient was obtained for the data from the gravimetric and IRD measurements (r(2)=0.65; n=240). IRD is therefore proposed as a rapid, non-destructive alternative to the gravimetric approach to estimate the amount of SC removed by tape-stripping in vivo.

  8. A Unique Approach for Studying Venus’s Atmosphere: Technology Development for the Venus Atmospheric Maneuverable Platform (VAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuele, Rocco; Lee, Greg; Sokol, Daniel; Polidan, Ron; Griffin, Kristen; Bolisay, Linden; Michi, Yuki; Barnes, Nathan

    2014-11-01

    We are investigating a novel, reduced-risk approach to long-duration upper atmosphere exploration of Venus. The Venus Atmospheric Maneuverable Platform (VAMP) concept is a semi-buoyant plane with a science payload that can perform in situ measurements of Venus’s atmosphere. VAMP is also capable of revisiting scientifically interesting locations. Designed with a low ballistic coefficient, VAMP deploys in space and enters Venus’s atmosphere without an aeroshell. Once in the atmosphere, it can engage in a variety of science campaigns while varying its altitude between 50 and 68 km as it circumnavigates Venus. During daytime, VAMP will be able to make continuous science measurements at a range of latitudes, longitudes, and altitudes, while at night the vehicle will descend to a fully-buoyant, lower-power state, capable of performing modest science measurements at the float altitude. Near the end of VAMP’s mission life, the vehicle may attempt an end-of-life trajectory into higher latitudes or descend to lower altitudes. This presentation focuses on the technology roadmap that will allow the vehicle to accomplish these science measurements. The roadmap is driven by high priority science measurements and the technology needed to implement VAMP’s main mission phases: deployment, entry into Venus’s atmosphere, and the transition to flight and science flight performance. The roadmap includes materials tests, planform aerodynamic characterization, various subscale and full-scale packaging and deployment tests, and a full-scale suborbital flight and is being produced with extensive science community interaction to define the science measurements that would be uniquely possible with this new science platform.

  9. Colored grounds of gilt stucco surfaces as analyzed by a combined microscopic, spectroscopic and elemental analytical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansonetti, A; Striova, J; Biondelli, D; Castellucci, E M

    2010-08-01

    A survey of gilts applied to stucco surfaces that specifically focuses on the compositions of their colored grounds is reported. Gilt samples of a common geographical (Lombardy in Italy) and temporal provenance (17th-18th century) were studied in the form of polished cross-sections by optical and electron microscopy (SEM-EDS), micro-Raman (microRaman) spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy (microFTIR). Comparing samples with superimposed grounds and gilts enabled light to be shed on the choice of specific materials, their stratigraphic functions, decorative effects, and technological performances. Iron oxide pigments were found in the older grounds, sometimes in the presence of lead white (2PbCO(3).Pb(OH)(2)) or minium (Pb(3)O(4)). In more recent grounds, chrome yellow (PbCrO(4)), chrome orange (PbCrO(4).PbO), cinnabar (alpha-HgS) and barium white (BaSO(4)), invariably mixed with lead white, were encountered. Evidence for the use of organic mordants (colophony and wax, or siccative oil) was obtained by microFTIR. This combined microFTIR and microRaman spectroscopic and elemental (SEM-EDS) analytical approach enhances knowledge of the composition of gold grounds, their variability and their chronological evolution.

  10. Exploring the spectroscopic diversity of type Ia supernovae with DRACULA: a machine learning approach

    CERN Document Server

    Sasdelli, Michele; Vilalta, R; Aguena, M; Busti, V C; Camacho, H; Trindade, A M M; Gieseke, F; de Souza, R S; Fantaye, Y T; Mazzali, P A

    2015-01-01

    The existence of multiple subclasses of type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) has been the subject of great debate in the last decade. One major challenge inevitably met when trying to infer the existence of one or more subclasses is the time consuming, and subjective, process of subclass definition. In this work, we show how machine learning tools facilitate the automatic discovery of sub-populations of SNIa; to that end we introduce the DRACULA Python package (Dimensionality Reduction And Clustering for Unsupervised Learning in Astronomy). Our approach is divided in three steps: (i) Transfer Learning, which takes advantage of all available spectra (even those without an epoch estimate) as an information source, (ii) dimensionality reduction through Deep Learning and (iii) unsupervised learning (clustering) using K-Means. Results match a previously suggested classification scheme, showing that the proposed method is able to grasp the main spectral features behind the definition of such subclasses. Moreover, our methodo...

  11. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies on aspirin : An experimental and theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, R.; Premkumar, S.; Rekha, T. N.; Parameswari, A.; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies on aspirin molecule adsorbed on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were investigated by experimental and density functional theory approach. The AgNPs were synthesized by the solution-combustion method and characterized by the X-ray diffraction and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques. The averaged particle size of synthesized AgNPs was calculated as ˜55 nm. The normal Raman spectrum (nRs) and SERS spectrum of the aspirin were recorded. The molecular structure of the aspirin and aspirin adsorbed on silver cluster were optimized by the DFT/ B3PW91 method with LanL2DZ basis set. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation. The calculated nRs and SERS frequencies were correlated well with the observed frequencies. The flat-on orientation was predicted from the nRs and SERS spectra, when the aspirin adsorbed on the AgNPs. Hence, the present studies lead to the understanding of adsorption process of aspirin on the AgNPs, which paves the way for biomedical applications.

  12. Spectroscopic Studies of Some Diatomic Molecules using Spectrum Generating Algebra Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Oyewumi, K J

    2011-01-01

    For arbitrary values n and l quantum numbers, we present the solutions of the 3-dimensional Schrodinger wave equation with the pseudoharmonic potential via SU(1,1) Spectrum Generating Algebra (SGA) approach. The explicit bound state energies and eigenfunctions are obtained. The matrix elements r2 and r d/dr are obtained (in a closed form) directly from the creation and annihilation operators. In addition, the expectation values of r2 and p2 and the Heisenberg Uncertainty Products (HUP) for set of diatomic molecules (O2, I2, N2, H2, CO, NO, HCl, CH, LiH, ScH, TiH, VH, CrH, MnH, TiC, NiC, ScN, ScF, Ar2) for arbitrary values of n and l quantum numbers are obtained. The results obtained are in excellent agreement with the available results in the literature. It is also shown that the HUP is obeyed for all diatomic molecules considered.

  13. Spectroscopic and statistical approach of archaeological artifacts recently excavated from Tamilnadu, South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetha, D.; Velraj, G.

    2015-10-01

    The ancient materials characterization will bring back the more evidence of the ancient people life styles. In this study, the archaeological pottery shards recently excavated from Kodumanal, Erode District in Tamilnadu, South India were investigated. The experimental results enlighten us to the elemental and the mineral composition of the pottery shards. The FT-IR technique tells that the mineralogy and the firing temperature of the samples are less than 800 °C, in the oxidizing/reducing atmosphere and the XRD was used as a complementary technique for the mineralogy. A thorough scientific study of SEM-EDS with the help of statistical approach done to find the provenance of the selected pot shards has not yet been performed. EDS and XRF results revealed that the investigated samples have the elements O, Si, Al, Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Ti, K and Na are in different compositions. For establishing the provenance (same or different origin) of pottery samples, Al and Si concentration ratio as well as hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used and the results are correlated.

  14. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies on aspirin : An experimental and theoretical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premkumar, R.; Premkumar, S.; Parameswari, A.; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin, E-mail: miltonfranklin@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, N.M.S.S.V.N College, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu, India. (India); Rekha, T. N. [PG and Research Department of Physics, Lady Doak College, Madurai-625 002, Tamilnadu, India. (India)

    2016-05-06

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies on aspirin molecule adsorbed on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were investigated by experimental and density functional theory approach. The AgNPs were synthesized by the solution-combustion method and characterized by the X-ray diffraction and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques. The averaged particle size of synthesized AgNPs was calculated as ∼55 nm. The normal Raman spectrum (nRs) and SERS spectrum of the aspirin were recorded. The molecular structure of the aspirin and aspirin adsorbed on silver cluster were optimized by the DFT/ B3PW91 method with LanL2DZ basis set. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation. The calculated nRs and SERS frequencies were correlated well with the observed frequencies. The flat-on orientation was predicted from the nRs and SERS spectra, when the aspirin adsorbed on the AgNPs. Hence, the present studies lead to the understanding of adsorption process of aspirin on the AgNPs, which paves the way for biomedical applications.

  15. [Spectroscopic analysis of the crystallization mechanism of synthesized zeolite with XRD and FTIR approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chun-hui; Ma, Hong-rui; Hua, Li

    2012-04-01

    Zeolites were synthesized from fly ash using modified one-stage method. The changes in cation exchange capacity (CEC) and chemical elements of zeolite were investigated during the synthesis process to reveal the materials and elements transformation in solid-liquid system. The approaches of XRD, SEM and FTIR were used to indicate the crystallization characteristics and mechanism. The zeolite NaP1 was synthesized, and the CEC value reached to the maximum of 135 mmol/100g at 24 h. After the hydrothermal reaction for 12 h, the characteristic peak and metastable crystalline structure of zeolite NaP1 appeared, then the hydroxy sodalite products formed at 48 h. The crystallization process was the result of materials transformation: the elements of fly ash released into the liquid system for the melting effect of alkali solution, and the solid system played the role of skeleton in crystallization process, being the "source" and the "sink" of the reaction, respectively, and the achievements presented the crystallization mechanism of liquid-phase and solid-phase transformation.

  16. A Markov random field based approach to the identification of meat and bone meal in feed by near-infrared spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xunpeng; Yang, Zengling; Han, Lujia

    2014-07-01

    Contaminated meat and bone meal (MBM) in animal feedstuff has been the source of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) disease in cattle, leading to a ban in its use, so methods for its detection are essential. In this study, five pure feed and five pure MBM samples were used to prepare two sets of sample arrangements: set A for investigating the discrimination of individual feed/MBM particles and set B for larger numbers of overlapping particles. The two sets were used to test a Markov random field (MRF)-based approach. A Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging system was used for data acquisition. The spatial resolution of the near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic image was 25 μm × 25 μm. Each spectrum was the average of 16 scans across the wavenumber range 7,000-4,000 cm(-1), at intervals of 8 cm(-1). This study introduces an innovative approach to analyzing NIR spectroscopic images: an MRF-based approach has been developed using the iterated conditional mode (ICM) algorithm, integrating initial labeling-derived results from support vector machine discriminant analysis (SVMDA) and observation data derived from the results of principal component analysis (PCA). The results showed that MBM covered by feed could be successfully recognized with an overall accuracy of 86.59% and a Kappa coefficient of 0.68. Compared with conventional methods, the MRF-based approach is capable of extracting spectral information combined with spatial information from NIR spectroscopic images. This new approach enhances the identification of MBM using NIR spectroscopic imaging.

  17. Exploring the spectroscopic diversity of Type Ia supernovae with DRACULA: a machine learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasdelli, M.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Vilalta, R.; Aguena, M.; Busti, V. C.; Camacho, H.; Trindade, A. M. M.; Gieseke, F.; de Souza, R. S.; Fantaye, Y. T.; Mazzali, P. A.

    2016-09-01

    The existence of multiple subclasses of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) has been the subject of great debate in the last decade. One major challenge inevitably met when trying to infer the existence of one or more subclasses is the time consuming, and subjective, process of subclass definition. In this work, we show how machine learning tools facilitate identification of subtypes of SNe Ia through the establishment of a hierarchical group structure in the continuous space of spectral diversity formed by these objects. Using deep learning, we were capable of performing such identification in a four-dimensional feature space (+1 for time evolution), while the standard principal component analysis barely achieves similar results using 15 principal components. This is evidence that the progenitor system and the explosion mechanism can be described by a small number of initial physical parameters. As a proof of concept, we show that our results are in close agreement with a previously suggested classification scheme and that our proposed method can grasp the main spectral features behind the definition of such subtypes. This allows the confirmation of the velocity of lines as a first-order effect in the determination of SN Ia subtypes, followed by 91bg-like events. Given the expected data deluge in the forthcoming years, our proposed approach is essential to allow a quick and statistically coherent identification of SNe Ia subtypes (and outliers). All tools used in this work were made publicly available in the PYTHON package Dimensionality Reduction And Clustering for Unsupervised Learning in Astronomy (DRACULA) and can be found within COINtoolbox (https://github.com/COINtoolbox/DRACULA).

  18. Linear and nonlinear optical investigations of nano-scale Si-doped ZnO thin films: spectroscopic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilani, Asim; Abdel-wahab, M. Sh.; Zahran, H. Y.; Yahia, I. S.; Al-Ghamdi, Attieh A.

    2016-09-01

    Pure and Si-doped ZnO (SZO) thin films at different concentration of Si (1.9 and 2.4 wt%) were deposited on highly cleaned glass substrate by radio frequency (DC/RF) magnetron sputtering. The morphological and structural investigations have been performed by atomic force electron microscope (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was employed to study the composition and the change in the chemical state of Si-doped ZnO thin films. The optical observations like transmittance, energy band gap, extinction coefficient, refractive index, dielectric loss of pure and Si-doped ZnO thin films have been calculated. The linear optical susceptibility, nonlinear refractive index, and nonlinear optical susceptibility were also studied by the spectroscopic approach rather than conventional Z-scan method. The energy gap of Si-doped ZnO thin films was found to increase as compared to pure ZnO thin films. The crystallinity of the ZnO thin films was effected by the Si doping. The O1s spectra in pure and Si-doped ZnO revealed the bound between O-2 and Zn+2 ions and reduction in the surface oxygen with the Si doping. The chemical state analysis of Si 2p showed the conversation of Si to SiOx and SiO2. The increase in the first-order linear optical susceptibility χ (1) and third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility χ (3) was observed with the Si doping. The nonlinear studies gave some details about the applications of metal oxides in nonlinear optical devices. In short, this study showed that Si doping through sputtering has effected on the structural, surface and optical properties of ZnO thin films which could be quite useful for advanced applications such as metal-oxide-based optical devices.

  19. Identification of Disulfide Bonds in Protein Proteolytic Degradation Products Using de Novo-Protein Unique Sequence Tags Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Purvine, Samuel O.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-08-01

    Disulfide bonds are a form of posttranslational modification that often determines protein structure(s) and function(s). In this work, we report a mass spectrometry method for identification of disulfides in degradation products of proteins, and specifically endogenous peptides in the human blood plasma peptidome. LC-Fourier transform tandem mass spectrometry (FT MS/MS) was used for acquiring mass spectra that were de novo sequenced and then searched against the IPI human protein database. Through the use of unique sequence tags (UStags) we unambiguously correlated the spectra to specific database proteins. Examination of the UStags’ prefix and/or suffix sequences that contain cysteine(s) in conjunction with sequences of the UStags-specified database proteins is shown to enable the unambigious determination of disulfide bonds. Using this method, we identified the intermolecular and intramolecular disulfides in human blood plasma peptidome peptides that have molecular weights of up to ~10 kDa.

  20. Critical insight into the interaction of naringenin with human haemoglobin: A combined spectroscopic and computational modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Subhajit; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2017-02-01

    The present study demonstrates critical insight into the binding of a bioactive flavanone naringenin with normal human haemoglobin (NHb). Both spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric studies reveal that naringenin interacts with NHb. The binding affinity constant and number of binding sites appear to be approximately (1.5 ± 0.2) × 104 M-1 and 1, respectively. Static quenching seems to be an important factor in binding process, as evident from steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic studies. Far UV circular dichroism spectroscopy depicts that binding of naringenin to NHb causes no change in the secondary structure of the protein, which is also evident from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study. Free energy change (ΔG0) for naringenin-NHb interaction, determined by spectroscopic and isothermal calorimetric method, appears to be -5.67 kcal/mol and -6.90 kcal/mol, respectively, and is close to the docking energy -6.84 kcal/mol. Molecular docking suggests that naringenin binds near the cavity of the tetrameric heme protein, forming hydrogen bonds with surrounding amino acid residues. The binding site is away from the heme moieties, implicating naringenin binding does not affect the oxygen binding capacity of NHb, which makes the protein a suitable carrier of the flavonoid.

  1. Adulteration screening of botanical materials by a sensitive and model-free approach using infrared spectroscopic imaging and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-bo; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Su-qin

    2016-11-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is often used as a simple, fast, and green method for the adulteration screening of botanical materials for foods and herbs. However, the overlapping of absorption signals of various substances significantly decrease the sensitivity and specificity of IR spectroscopy in the detection of adulterated samples. In this research, a model-free approach is proposed for the sensitive and non-targeted screening of botanical materials adulterated by adding other plant materials. First, the spectra of the entities in the test sample are collected by near-infrared spectroscopic imaging and clustered by unsupervised pattern recognition methods. The sample may be adulterated if there are two or more clusters of the entities. Next, the entities of different clusters are characterized by mid-infrared spectroscopy to interpret the chemical compositions to determine the clustering is caused whether by adulteration or other reasons. Second derivative spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy are often needed to resolve the overlapped bands mathematically or experimentally to find the characteristic signals to identify the authentic and adulterant entities. The feasibility of this approach was proved by the simulated adulterated sample of saffron. In conclusion, botanical materials adulterated by adding other plant materials can be detected by a simple, fast, sensitive, and green screening approach using IR spectroscopic imaging, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy, and necessary chemometrics techniques.

  2. Optimization of healthcare supply chain in context of macro-ergonomics factors by a unique mathematical programming approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadeh, A; Motevali Haghighi, S; Gaeini, Z; Shabanpour, N

    2016-07-01

    This study presents an integrated approach for analyzing the impact of macro-ergonomics factors in healthcare supply chain (HCSC) by data envelopment analysis (DEA). The case of this study is the supply chain (SC) of a real hospital. Thus, healthcare standards and macro-ergonomics factors are considered to be modeled by the mathematical programming approach. Over 28 subsidiary SC divisions with parallel missions and objectives are evaluated by analyzing inputs and outputs through DEA. Each division in this HCSC is considered as decision making unit (DMU). This approach can analyze the impact of macro-ergonomics factors on supply chain management (SCM) in healthcare sector. Also, this method ranks the relevant performance efficiencies of each HCSC. In this study by using proposed method, the most effective macro-ergonomics factor on HCSC is identified as "teamwork" issue. Also, this study would help managers to identify the areas of weaknesses in their SCM system and set improvement target plan for the related SCM system in healthcare industry. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study for macro-ergonomics optimization of HCSC.

  3. Nature of interactions of tryptophan with zinc oxide nanoparticles and L-aspartic acid: A spectroscopic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Gopa; Bhattacharya, Sudeshna; Ganguly, Tapan

    2009-04-01

    The interaction between an essential amino acid L-tryptophan (TRP) with semiconductor zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and amino acid L-aspartic acid (ASP) is investigated by steady state and time resolved spectroscopic techniques. In both the cases static mode of fluorescence quenching occurs indicating the formation of ground-state complex. Binding constants and the number of binding sites were determined for both the complexes. The observed thermodynamic parameters suggest that the key interacting forces involved are van der Waals interaction and hydrogen bonding in case of TRP and ZnO nanoparticles whereas hydrophobic interaction is responsible in formations of TRP-ASP complex.

  4. Function of minerals in the natural radioactivity level of Vaigai River sediments, Tamilnadu, India--spectroscopical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, V; Paramasivam, K; Suresh, G; Jose, M T

    2014-01-03

    Using Gamma ray and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques, level of natural radioactivity ((238)U, (232)Th and (40)K) and mineralogical characterization of Vaigai River sediments have been analyzed with the view of evaluating the radiation risk and its relation to available minerals. Different radiological parameters are calculated to know the entire radiological characterization. The average of activity concentrations and all radiological parameters are lower than the recommended safety limit. However, some sites are having higher radioactivity values than the safety limit. From the FTIR spectroscopic technique, the minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, orthoclase feldspar, kaolinite, gibbsite, calcite, montmorillonite and organic carbon are identified and they are characterized. The extinction co-efficient values are calculated to know the relative distribution of major minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, orthoclase feldspar and kaolinite. The calculated values indicate that the amount of quartz is higher than orthoclase feldspar, microcline feldspar and much higher than kaolinite. Crystallinity index is calculated to know the crystalline nature of quartz and the result indicates that the presence of ordered crystalline quartz in the present sediment. The role of minerals in the level of radioactivity is assessed by multivariate statistical analysis (Pearson's correlation and Cluster analysis). The statistical analysis confirms that the clay mineral kaolinite is the major factor than other major minerals to induce the important radioactivity variables such as absorbed dose rate and concentrations of (232)Th and (238)U. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. On Uniqueness of coalitional equilibria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finus, M.; Mouche, van P.H.M.; Rundshagen, B.

    2014-01-01

    For the so-called "new approach" of coalitio formation it is important that coalitional equilibria are unique. Uniqueness comes down to existene and to semi-uniqueness, i.e.\\\\that there exists at most one equilibrium. Although conditions for existence are not problematic, conditions for semi-uniquen

  6. Investigation on Acute Biochemical Effects of Ce(NO3)3 on Liver and Kidney Tissues by MAS 1H NMR Spectroscopic-Based Metabonomic Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    High resolution magic angle spinning (MAS)-1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic-based metabonomic approach was applied to the investigation on the acute biochemical effects of Ce(NO3)3. Male Wistar rats were liver and kidney tissues were analyzed using principal component analysis to extract toxicity information. The biochemical effects of Ce(NO3)3 were characterized by the increase of triglycerides and lactate and the decrease of glycogen in rat liver tissue, together with an elevation of the triglyceride level and a depletion of glycerophosphocholine and betaine in kidney tissues. The target lesions of Ce(NO3)3 on liver and kidney were found by MAS NMR-based metabonomic method. This study demonstrates that the combination of MAS 1H NMR and pattern recognition analysis can be an effective method for studies of biochemical effects of rare earths.

  7. Effect of pH on the interaction of vitamin B12 with bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daojin; Zhang, Tian; Xu, Chen; Ji, Baoming

    2011-12-01

    The interaction mechanism between vitamin B12 (B12, cyanocobalamin) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been investigated by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, ultraviolet-vis (UV) absorbance, and three-dimensional fluorescence. The intrinsic fluorescence of BSA was strongly quenched by the addition of B12 in different pH buffer solutions (pH 2.5, 3.5, 5.0, 7.4, and 9.0) and spectroscopic observations are mainly rationalized in terms of a static quenching process at lower concentration of B12 ( CB12/ CBSA 5). The structural characteristics of B12 and BSA were probed, and their binding affinities were determined under different pH conditions. The results indicated that the binding abilities of B12 to BSA in the acidic and basic pH regions (pH 2.5, 3.5, 5.0, and 9.0) were lower than that at simulating physiological condition (pH 7.4). In addition, the efficiency of energy transfer from tryptophan fluorescence to B12 was found to depend on the binding distance r between the donor and acceptor calculated using Förster's theory. The effect of B12 on the conformation of BSA was analyzed using UV, synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence under different pH conditions. These results showed that the binding of B12 to BSA causes apparent change in the secondary and tertiary structures of BSA.

  8. An experimental and theoretical approach of spectroscopic and structural properties of a new chelidamate copper (II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural, Hatice; Uçar, İbrahim; Soylu, M Serkan

    2014-03-25

    The crystal structure of new chelidamate complex of copper (II) ion, [Cu(chel)H2O(pym)]·H2O [chel: chelidamate or 4-hydroxypyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate; pym: 2-Pyridylmethanol] has been determined by single crystal X-ray crystallographic method. The complex was characterized by IR and UV-Vis spectroscopic techniques. The magnetic environment of copper (II) ion has been defined by electron paramagnetic technique (EPR). The central copper (II) ion is six-coordinate with a distorted octahedral geometry, which exhibits Jahn-Teller distortions along one of the O-Cu-O axes with tetragonality of 0.81. Chelidamate behaved as a tridentate ligand was bonded to Cu(II) ion through carboxyl oxygens with nitrogen. The crystal structure is stabilized by O-H⋯O hydrogen bond and π-π interactions. Theoretical calculations have been carried out by using the DFT method. The modeling of copper (II) complex was made by geometric optimization. The geometry optimization and EPR study were carried out using the following unrestricted hybrid density functionals: LSDA, BPV86, B3LYP, B3PW91, MPW1PW91 and HCTH. Frontier molecular orbital energies, absorption wavelengths and excitation energy were computed by time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method with polarizable continuum model. IR spectra were discussed and compared to other relevant complexes together with theoretical results. The natural charges on the atoms and second-order interaction energies were derived from natural bond orbital analysis (NBO).

  9. New Evidences of Key Factors Involved in "Silent Stones" Etiopathogenesis and Trace Elements: Microscopic, Spectroscopic, and Biochemical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalu, Simona; Popa, Adriana; Bratu, Ioan; Borodi, Gheorghe; Maghiar, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    The knowledge of the key factors involved in etiopathogenesis of the gallstone disease requires chemical, structural, and elemental composition analysis. The application of different complementary analytical techniques, both microscopic and spectroscopic, are aimed to provide a more comprehensive determination of the gallbladder calculi ultrastructure and trace element identification. High sensitivity techniques such as electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) along with biochemical analysis are used in a new attempt to investigate various factors which play a regulatory role in the pathogenesis of gallstones. The microstructure of different types of gallbladder stones has specific characteristics which are related to the elemental composition. The binding of metal ions with bile salts and bilirubin plays important roles in gallstone formation as revealed by FTIR spectrum of calcium bilirubinate complex in pigment gallstones. The EPR results demonstrated the generation of bilirubin free radicals and variation of its electronic structure and conjugation system in the skeleton of bilirubin molecule during complex formation. EPR spectra of pigment gallstones demonstrate the coexistence of four paramagnetic centers including stable bilirubin free radical, Mn2+, Cu2+, and Fe3+ with distinct magnetic parameters and well-resolved hyperfine structure in the case of Mn2+ ions. The result confirms a macromolecular network structure with proteins and the formation of bilirubin-coordinated polymer. Bilirubin and bilirubinate free radical complexes may play an important role in pigment gallstone formation.

  10. Investigation of the behavior of HSA upon binding to amlodipine and propranolol: Spectroscopic and molecular modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Rouhbakhsh Zaeri, Zeinab; Bahrololoom, Mahmood; Chamani, Jamshid; Bozorgmehr, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between human serum albumin (HSA) and two drugs - amlodipine and propranolol - was investigated using fluorescence, UV absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. In addition, the binding site was established by applying molecular modeling technique. Fluorescence data suggest that amlodipine will quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA; whereas propranolol enhances the fluorescence of HSA. The binding constants for the interaction of amlodipine and propranolol with HSA were found to be 3.63 × 10 5 M -1 and 2.29 × 10 4 M -1, respectively. The percentage of secondary structure feature of each one of the HSA-bound drugs, i.e. the α-helix content, was estimated empirically by circular dichroism. The results indicated that amlodipine causes an increase, and that propranolol leads to a decrease in α-helix content of HSA. The spectroscopic analysis indicates that the binding mechanisms of the two drugs are different from each other. The data obtained by the molecular modeling study indicated that these drugs bind, with different affinity, to different sites located in subdomain IIA and IIIA.

  11. Spectroscopic data

    CERN Document Server

    Melzer, J

    1976-01-01

    During the preparation of this compilation, many people contributed; the compilers wish to thank all of them. In particular they appreciate the efforts of V. Gilbertson, the manuscript typist, and those of K. C. Bregand, J. A. Kiley, and W. H. McPherson, who gave editorial assistance. They would like to thank Dr. J. R. Schwartz for his cooperation and encouragement. In addition, they extend their grati­ tude to Dr. L. Wilson of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, who gave the initial impetus to this project. v Contents I. I ntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. Organization ofthe Spectroscopic Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Methods of Production and Experimental Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Band Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2...

  12. Development of multifunctional heterocyclic Schiff base as a potential metal chelator: a comprehensive spectroscopic approach towards drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhao, Manojkumar; Das, Chayan; Rawat, Anoop; Kumar, Himank; Joshi, Ritika; Maiti, Sudipta; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid-β peptides and their metal-associated aggregated states have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The present paper epitomises the design and synthesis of a small, neutral, lipophilic benzothiazole Schiff base (E)-2-((6-chlorobenzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino)methyl)-5-diethylamino)phenol (CBMDP), and explores its multifunctionalty as a potential metal chelator/fluorophore using UV-visible absorption, steady-state fluorescence, single molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopic (FCS) techniques which is further corroborated by in silico studies. Some pharmaceutically relevant properties of the synthesized compound have also been calculated theoretically. Steady-state fluorescence and single molecule FCS reveal that the synthesized CBMDP not only recognizes oligomeric Aβ40, but could also be used as an amyloid-specific extrinsic fluorophore as it shows tremendous increase in its emission intensity in the presence of Aβ40. Molecular docking exercise and MD simulation reveal that CBMDP localizes itself in the crucial amyloidogenic and copper-binding region of Aβ40 and undergoes a strong binding interaction via H-bonding and π-π stacking. It stabilizes the solitary α-helical Aβ40 monomer by retaining the initial conformation of the Aβ central helix and mostly interacts with the hydrophilic N-terminus and the α-helical region spanning from Ala-2 to Val-24. CBMDP exhibits strong copper as well as zinc chelation ability and retards the rapid copper-induced aggregation of amyloid peptide. In addition, CBMDP shows radical scavenging activity which enriches its functionality. Overall, the consolidated in vitro and in silico results obtained for the synthesized molecule could provide a rational template for developing new multifunctional agents.

  13. A novel Bayesian approach to quantify clinical variables and to determine their spectroscopic counterparts in 1H NMR metabonomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaski Kimmo

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A key challenge in metabonomics is to uncover quantitative associations between multidimensional spectroscopic data and biochemical measures used for disease risk assessment and diagnostics. Here we focus on clinically relevant estimation of lipoprotein lipids by 1H NMR spectroscopy of serum. Results A Bayesian methodology, with a biochemical motivation, is presented for a real 1H NMR metabonomics data set of 75 serum samples. Lipoprotein lipid concentrations were independently obtained for these samples via ultracentrifugation and specific biochemical assays. The Bayesian models were constructed by Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC and they showed remarkably good quantitative performance, the predictive R-values being 0.985 for the very low density lipoprotein triglycerides (VLDL-TG, 0.787 for the intermediate, 0.943 for the low, and 0.933 for the high density lipoprotein cholesterol (IDL-C, LDL-C and HDL-C, respectively. The modelling produced a kernel-based reformulation of the data, the parameters of which coincided with the well-known biochemical characteristics of the 1H NMR spectra; particularly for VLDL-TG and HDL-C the Bayesian methodology was able to clearly identify the most characteristic resonances within the heavily overlapping information in the spectra. For IDL-C and LDL-C the resulting model kernels were more complex than those for VLDL-TG and HDL-C, probably reflecting the severe overlap of the IDL and LDL resonances in the 1H NMR spectra. Conclusion The systematic use of Bayesian MCMC analysis is computationally demanding. Nevertheless, the combination of high-quality quantification and the biochemical rationale of the resulting models is expected to be useful in the field of metabonomics.

  14. Spectroscopic characterization approach to study surfactants effect on ZnO 2 nanoparticles synthesis by laser ablation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drmosh, Q. A.; Gondal, M. A.; Yamani, Z. H.; Saleh, T. A.

    2010-05-01

    Zinc peroxide nanoparticles having grain size less than 5 nm were synthesized using pulsed laser ablation in aqueous solution in the presence of different surfactants and solid zinc target in 3% H 2O 2. The effect of surfactants on the optical and structure of ZnO 2 was studied by applying different spectroscopic techniques. Structural properties and grain size of the synthesized nanoparticles were studied using XRD method. The presence of the cubic phase of zinc peroxide in all samples was confirmed with XRD, and the grain sizes were 4.7, 3.7, 3.3 and 2.8 nm in pure H 2O 2, and H 2O 2 mixed with SDS, CTAB and OGM respectively. For optical characterization, FTIR transmittance spectra of ZnO 2 nanoparticles prepared with and without surfactants show a characteristic ZnO 2 absorption at 435-445 cm -1. FTIR spectrum revealed that the adsorbed surfactants on zinc peroxide disappeared in case of CTAB and OGM while it appears in case of SDS. This could be due to high critical micelles SDS concentration comparing with others which is attributed to the adsorption anionic nature of this surfactant. Both FTIR and UV-vis spectra show a red shift in the presence of SDS and blue shift in the presence of CTAB and OGM. The blue shift in the absorption edge indicates the quantum confinement property of nanoparticles. The zinc peroxide nanoparticles prepared in additives-free media was also characterized by Raman spectra which show the characteristic peaks at 830-840 and 420-440 cm -1.

  15. Spectroscopic characterization approach to study surfactants effect on ZnO{sub 2} nanoparticles synthesis by laser ablation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drmosh, Q.A. [Laser Research Group, Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology (CENT), King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Gondal, M.A., E-mail: magondal@kfupm.edu.sa [Laser Research Group, Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology (CENT), King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Yamani, Z.H. [Laser Research Group, Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology (CENT), King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Saleh, T.A. [Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology (CENT), King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Chemistry Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-05-01

    Zinc peroxide nanoparticles having grain size less than 5 nm were synthesized using pulsed laser ablation in aqueous solution in the presence of different surfactants and solid zinc target in 3% H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The effect of surfactants on the optical and structure of ZnO{sub 2} was studied by applying different spectroscopic techniques. Structural properties and grain size of the synthesized nanoparticles were studied using XRD method. The presence of the cubic phase of zinc peroxide in all samples was confirmed with XRD, and the grain sizes were 4.7, 3.7, 3.3 and 2.8 nm in pure H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} mixed with SDS, CTAB and OGM respectively. For optical characterization, FTIR transmittance spectra of ZnO{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared with and without surfactants show a characteristic ZnO{sub 2} absorption at 435-445 cm{sup -1}. FTIR spectrum revealed that the adsorbed surfactants on zinc peroxide disappeared in case of CTAB and OGM while it appears in case of SDS. This could be due to high critical micelles SDS concentration comparing with others which is attributed to the adsorption anionic nature of this surfactant. Both FTIR and UV-vis spectra show a red shift in the presence of SDS and blue shift in the presence of CTAB and OGM. The blue shift in the absorption edge indicates the quantum confinement property of nanoparticles. The zinc peroxide nanoparticles prepared in additives-free media was also characterized by Raman spectra which show the characteristic peaks at 830-840 and 420-440 cm{sup -1}.

  16. Spectroscopic and chemical reactivity analysis of D-Myo-Inositol using quantum chemical approach and its experimental verification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DEVENDRA P MISHRA; ANCHAL SRIVASTAVA; R K SHUKLA

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes the spectroscopic ($_{1}\\rm{H}$ and $_{13}\\rm{C NMR}$, FT-IR and UV–Visible), chemical, nonlinear optical and thermodynamic properties of D-Myo-Inositol using quantum chemical technique and its experimental verification. The structural parameters of the compound are determined from the optimized geometry by B3LYP method with $6-311++G(d,p)$ basis set. It was found that the optimized parameters thus obtained are almost in agreement with the experimental ones. A detailed interpretation of the infrared spectra of D-Myo-Inositol is also reported in the present work. After optimization, the proton and carbon NMR chemical shifts of the studied compound are calculated using GIAO and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The search of organic materials with improved charge transfer properties requires precise quantum chemical calculations of space-charge density distribution, state and transition dipole moments and HOMO–LUMO states. The nature of the transitions in the observed UV–Visible spectrum of the compound has been studied by the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The global reactivity descriptors like chemical potential, electronegativity, hardness, softness and electrophilicity index, have been calculated using DFT. The thermodynamic calculation related to the title compound was also performed at $B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)$ level of theory. The standard statistical thermodynamic functions like heat capacity at constant pressure, entropy and enthalpy change were obtained from the theoretical harmonic frequencies of the optimized molecule. It is observed that the values of heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy increase with increase intemperature from 100 to 1000 K, which is attributed to the enhancement of molecular vibration with the increase in temperature.

  17. Spectroscopic and chemical reactivity analysis of D-Myo-Inositol using quantum chemical approach and its experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Devendra P.; Srivastava, Anchal; Shukla, R. K.

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes the spectroscopic (^1H and ^{13}C NMR, FT-IR and UV-Visible), chemical, nonlinear optical and thermodynamic properties of D-Myo-Inositol using quantum chemical technique and its experimental verification. The structural parameters of the compound are determined from the optimized geometry by B3LYP method with 6 {-}311{+}{+}G(d,p) basis set. It was found that the optimized parameters thus obtained are almost in agreement with the experimental ones. A detailed interpretation of the infrared spectra of D-Myo-Inositol is also reported in the present work. After optimization, the proton and carbon NMR chemical shifts of the studied compound are calculated using GIAO and 6 {-}311{+}{+}G(d,p) basis set. The search of organic materials with improved charge transfer properties requires precise quantum chemical calculations of space-charge density distribution, state and transition dipole moments and HOMO-LUMO states. The nature of the transitions in the observed UV-Visible spectrum of the compound has been studied by the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The global reactivity descriptors like chemical potential, electronegativity, hardness, softness and electrophilicity index, have been calculated using DFT. The thermodynamic calculation related to the title compound was also performed at B3LYP/ 6 {-}311{+}{+}G(d,p) level of theory. The standard statistical thermodynamic functions like heat capacity at constant pressure, entropy and enthalpy change were obtained from the theoretical harmonic frequencies of the optimized molecule. It is observed that the values of heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy increase with increase in temperature from 100 to 1000 K, which is attributed to the enhancement of molecular vibration with the increase in temperature.

  18. Insight into the interaction between α-lapachone and bovine serum albumin employing a spectroscopic and computational approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otávio Augusto Chaves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum albumin is the most abundant protein in blood plasma; among its functions is the transport of a high variety of drugs in the body. Quinones show several biological and pharmacological activities, such as anti-malarial, antitumor, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and anti-parasitic. We report fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD spectroscopic studies to try to understand the interaction process between α-lapachone (α-LAP and bovine serum albumin (BSA. Studies using computational methods, such as molecular docking, were performed to identify the main cavity in which this interaction occurs as well as the type of intermolecular interactions between the amino acid residues from albumin and the ligand. The BSA fluorescence quenching by added α-LAP is a static process, indicating an initial association BSA: α-LAP. The Ka and Kb values for the interaction BSA: α-LAP are in the range 105-104 L∙mol-1, indicating a strong binding between these two species. CD data show that there is no significant perturbation on the secondary structure of the protein with binding. The negative ΔGo values are consistent with spontaneous binding occurring endothermically (ΔHo = 127 kJ∙mol-1, and possibly driven by hydrophobic factors (ΔSo = 0.526 kJ∙mol-1∙s-1. The number of binding sites (n indicates the existence of just one main binding site in BSA for α-LAP, with molecular docking results showing that it binds preferentially to the albumin in the domain IIA, where the Trp-212 residue is located. The ligand interacts via hydrogen bond with Arg-259 and Tyr-149 residues and via T-stacking with the fluorophore Trp-212 residue.

  19. Design, synthesis, physicochemical studies, solvation, and DNA damage of quinoline-appended chalcone derivative: comprehensive spectroscopic approach toward drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Himank; Chattopadhyay, Anjan; Prasath, R; Devaraji, Vinod; Joshi, Ritika; Bhavana, P; Saini, Praveen; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar

    2014-07-01

    The present study epitomizes the design, synthesis, photophysics, solvation, and interaction with calf-thymus DNA of a potential antitumor, anticancer quinoline-appended chalcone derivative, (E)-3-(anthracen-10-yl)-1-(6,8-dibromo-2-methylquinolin-3-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (ADMQ) using steady state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular modeling, molecular docking, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, and gel electrophoresis studies. ADMQ shows an unusual photophysical behavior in a variety of solvents of different polarity. The dual emission has been observed along with the formation of twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) excited state. The radiationless deactivation of the TICT state is found to be promoted strongly by hydrogen bonding. Quantum mechanical (DFT, TDDFT, and ZINDO-CI) calculations show that the ADMQ is sort of molecular rotor which undergoes intramolecular twist followed by a complete charge transfer in the optimized excited state. FTIR studies reveals that ADMQ undergoes important structural change from its native structure to a β-hydroxy keto form in water at physiological pH. The concentration-dependent DNA cleavage has been identified in agarose gel DNA electrophoresis experiment and has been further supported by MD simulation. ADMQ forms hydrogen bond with the deoxyribose sugar attached with the nucleobase adenine DA-17 (chain A) and result in significant structural changes which potentially cleave DNA double helix. The compound does not exhibit any deleterious effect or toxicity to the E. coli strain in cytotoxicity studies. The consolidated spectroscopic research described herein can provide enormous information to open up new avenues for designing and synthesizing chalcone derivatives with low systematic toxicity for medicinal chemistry research.

  20. Chromatographic, Spectroscopic and Mass Spectrometric Approaches for Exploring the Habitability of Mars in 2012 and Beyond with the Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of instruments on the Curiosity Rover of Mars Science Laboratory Mission is designed to provide chemical and isotopic analysis of organic and inorganic volatiles for both atmospheric and solid samples. The goals of the science investigation enabled by the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer and tunable laser spectrometer instruments of SAM are to work together with the other MSL investigations is to quantitatively assess habitability through a series of chemical and geological measurements. We describe the multi-column gas chromatograph system employed on SAM and the approach to extraction and analysis of organic compounds that might be preserved in ancient martian rocks.

  1. Anodic stripping voltammetry with gold electrodes as an alternative method for the routine determination of mercury in fish. Comparison with spectroscopic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomino, Agnese; Ruo Redda, Andrea; Squadrone, Stefania; Rizzi, Marco; Abete, Maria Cesarina; La Gioia, Carmela; Toniolo, Rosanna; Abollino, Ornella; Malandrino, Mery

    2017-04-15

    The applicability to the determination of mercury in tuna of square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SW-ASV) conducted at both solid gold electrode (SGE) and a gold nanoparticle-modified glassy carbon electrode (AuNPs-GCE) was demonstrated. Mercury content in two certified materials and in ten samples of canned tuna was measured. The performances of the electrodes were compared with one another as well as with two spectroscopic techniques, namely cold vapour atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AAS) and a direct mercury analyser (DMA). The results found pointed out that both SW-ASV approaches were suitable and easy-to-use method to monitor mercury concentration in tunas, since they allowed accurate quantification at concentration values lower than the maximum admissible level in this matrix ([Hg]=1mg/kgwet weight,ww). In particular, mercury detection at the AuNPs-GCE showed a LOQ in fish-matrix of 0.1μg/l, corresponding to 0.06mg/kgww, with performance comparable to that of DMA.

  2. Structural and spectroscopic studies of water-alkaline earth ion micro clusters: an alternate approach using genetic algorithm in conjunction with quantum chemical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly Neogi, S.; Chaudhury, P.

    2014-08-01

    We present an approach of using a stochastic optimization technique namely genetic algorithm in association with quantum chemical methods to first elucidate structure and then infrared spectroscopy and thermochemistry of water-alkaline earth metal ion clusters. We show that an initial determination of structure using stochastic techniques and following it up with quantum chemical calculation can lead to much faster convergence to high quality structures for these systems. Infrared spectroscopic, thermochemical calculations and natural population analysis based charges on the central metal ions are done to further ascertain the correctness of the structures using our technique. We have done a comparative study with a pure density functional theory calculation and have shown that even for very poor starting guess geometries genetic algorithm in conjunction with density functional theory indeed converges to global structure while pure density functional theory can encounter problems in certain situations to arrive at global geometry. We have also discussed usefulness of Unimodal Normal distribution crossover for handling situation with real coded variables.

  3. Divergent Urinary Metabolic Phenotypes between Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar Disorder Identified by a Combined GC-MS and NMR Spectroscopic Metabonomic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Chan-Juan; Liu, Zhao; Fu, Yu-Ying; Zheng, Peng; Yang, De-Yu; Li, Qi; Mu, Jun; Wei, You-Dong; Zhou, Jing-Jing; Huang, Hua; Xie, Peng

    2015-08-07

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a complex debilitating mental disorder that is often misdiagnosed as major depressive disorder (MDD). Therefore, a large percentage of BD subjects are incorrectly treated with antidepressants in clinical practice. To address this challenge, objective laboratory-based tests are needed to discriminate BD from MDD patients. Here, a combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic-based metabonomic approach was performed to profile urine samples from 76 MDD and 43 BD subjects (training set) to identify the differential metabolites. Samples from 126 healthy controls were included as metabolic controls. A candidate biomarker panel was identified by further analyzing these differential metabolites. A testing set of, 50 MDD and 28 BD subjects was then used to independently validate the diagnostic efficacy of the identified panel using an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). A total of 20 differential metabolites responsible for the discrimination between MDD and BD subjects were identified. A panel consisting of six candidate urinary metabolite biomarkers (propionate, formate, (R*,S*)2,3-dihydroxybutanoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxypyrimidine, phenylalanine, and β-alanine) was identified. This panel could distinguish BD from MDD subjects with an AUC of 0.913 and 0.896 in the training and testing sets, respectively. These results reveal divergent urinary metabolic phenotypes between MDD and BD. The identified urinary biomarkers can aid in the future development of an objective laboratory-based diagnostic test for distinguishing BD from MDD patients.

  4. Study on the molecular interaction of graphene quantum dots with human serum albumin: Combined spectroscopic and electrochemical approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shan; Qiu, Hangna; Lu, Shuangyan; Zhu, Fawei [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Guangxi Teachers Education University, Nanning 530001 (China); Xiao, Qi, E-mail: qi.xiao@whu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Guangxi Teachers Education University, Nanning 530001 (China); State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • The interactions between GQDs and HSA were systematically investigated. • GQDs could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA via static mode. • The binding site of GQDs was mainly located in site I of HSA. • The potential toxicity of GQDs resulted in the structural damage of HSA. - Abstract: Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted great attention in biological and biomedical applications due to their super properties, but their potential toxicity investigations are rarely involved. Since few studies have addressed whether GQDs could bind and alter the structure and function of human serum albumin (HSA), the molecular interaction between GQDs and HSA was systematically characterized by the combination of multispectroscopic and electrochemical approaches. GQDs could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA via static mode. The competitive binding fluorescence assay revealed that the binding site of GQDs was site I of HSA. Some thermodynamic parameters suggested that GQDs interacted with HSA mainly through van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding interactions, and protonation might also participate in the process. As further revealed by FT-IR spectroscopy and circular dichroism technique, GQDs could cause the global and local conformational change of HSA, which illustrated the potential toxicity of GQDs that resulted in the structural damage of HSA. Electrochemical techniques demonstrated the complex formation between GQDs and HSA. Our results offered insights into the binding mechanism of GQDs with HSA and provided important information for possible toxicity risk of GQDs to human health.

  5. Spectroscopic investigation, HOMO-LUMO and NLO studies on L-histidinium maleate based on DFT approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanavel, S.; Stephen, A.; Asirvatham, P. Samuel

    2017-05-01

    The molecular structure of the title compound L-Histidinium Maleate (LHM) was constructed and optimized based on Density Functional Theory method (DFT-B3LYP) with the 6-31G (d,p) basis set. The fundamental vibrational spectral assignment was analyzed with the aid of optimized structure of LHM. The study on electronic properties such as, HOMO-LUMO energies and absorption wavelength were performed using Time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach which reveals that energy transfer occur within the molecule. 13C NMR chemical shift values were measured using Gauge independent atomic orbital method (GIAO) and the obtained values are in good agreement with the reported experimental values. Hardness, ionization potential and electrophilicity index also calculated. The electric dipole moment (μtot) and hyperpolarizability (βtot) values of the investigated molecules were computed. The calculated value (β) was 3.7 times higher than that of urea, which confirms the LHM molecule is a potential candidate for NLO applications.

  6. Dragon pulse information management system (DPIMS): A unique model-based approach to implementing domain agnostic system of systems and behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas S.

    2016-05-01

    The Global Information Network Architecture is an information technology based on Vector Relational Data Modeling, a unique computational paradigm, DoD network certified by USARMY as the Dragon Pulse Informa- tion Management System. This network available modeling environment for modeling models, where models are configured using domain relevant semantics and use network available systems, sensors, databases and services as loosely coupled component objects and are executable applications. Solutions are based on mission tactics, techniques, and procedures and subject matter input. Three recent ARMY use cases are discussed a) ISR SoS. b) Modeling and simulation behavior validation. c) Networked digital library with behaviors.

  7. Multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehle, Jean-Louis [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Samartzis, Peter C., E-mail: sama@iesl.forth.gr [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Stamataki, Katerina [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, Voutes, 71003, Heraklion (Greece); Piel, Jean-Philippe [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Katsoprinakis, George E.; Papadakis, Vassilis [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Schimowski, Xavier [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Rakitzis, T. Peter [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, Voutes, 71003, Heraklion (Greece); Loppinet, Benoit [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece)

    2014-03-31

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is an established technique, particularly useful for thickness measurements of thin films. It measures polarization rotation after a single reflection of a beam of light on the measured substrate at a given incidence angle. In this paper, we report the development of multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry where the light beam reflects multiple times on the sample. We have investigated both theoretically and experimentally the effect of sample reflectivity, number of reflections (passes), angles of incidence and detector dynamic range on ellipsometric observables tanΨ and cosΔ. The multiple pass approach provides increased sensitivity to small changes in Ψ and Δ, opening the way for single measurement determination of optical thickness T, refractive index n and absorption coefficient k of thin films, a significant improvement over the existing techniques. Based on our results, we discuss the strengths, the weaknesses and possible applications of this technique. - Highlights: • We present multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry (MPSE), a multi-pass approach to ellipsometry. • Different detectors, samples, angles of incidence and number of passes were tested. • N passes improve polarization ratio sensitivity to the power of N. • N reflections improve phase shift sensitivity by a factor of N. • MPSE can significantly improve thickness measurements in thin films.

  8. Unique Path Partitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bessenrodt, Christine; Olsson, Jørn Børling; Sellers, James A.

    2013-01-01

    We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions.......We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions....

  9. Spectroscopic analysis and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate; , James D.; Reed, Christopher J.; Domke, Christopher H.; Le, Linh; Seasholtz, Mary Beth; Weber, Andy; Lipp, Charles

    2017-04-18

    Apparatus for spectroscopic analysis which includes a tunable diode laser spectrometer having a digital output signal and a digital computer for receiving the digital output signal from the spectrometer, the digital computer programmed to process the digital output signal using a multivariate regression algorithm. In addition, a spectroscopic method of analysis using such apparatus. Finally, a method for controlling an ethylene cracker hydrogenator.

  10. New approach to color calibration of high fidelity color digital camera by using unique wide gamut color generator based on LED diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretkowski, M.; Shimodaira, Y.; Jabłoński, R.

    2008-11-01

    Development of a high accuracy color reproduction system requires certain instrumentation and reference for color calibration. Our research led to development of a high fidelity color digital camera with implemented filters that realize the color matching functions. The output signal returns XYZ values which provide absolute description of color. In order to produce XYZ output a mathematical conversion must be applied to CCD output values introducing a conversion matrix. The conversion matrix coefficients are calculated by using a color reference with known XYZ values and corresponding output signals from the CCD sensor under each filter acquisition from a certain amount of color samples. The most important feature of the camera is its ability to acquire colors from the complete theoretically visible color gamut due to implemented filters. However market available color references such as various color checkers are enclosed within HDTV gamut, which is insufficient for calibration in the whole operating color range. This led to development of a unique color reference based on LED diodes called the LED Color Generator (LED CG). It is capable of displaying colors in a wide color gamut estimated by chromaticity coordinates of 12 primary colors. The total amount of colors possible to produce is 25512. The biggest advantage is a possibility of displaying colors with desired spectral distribution (with certain approximations) due to multiple primary colors it consists. The average color difference obtained for test colors was found to be ▵E~0.78 for calibration with LED CG. The result is much better and repetitive in comparison with the Macbeth ColorCheckerTM which typically gives ▵E~1.2 and in the best case ▵E~0.83 with specially developed techniques.

  11. Exploring the Interactions of the Dietary Plant Flavonoids Fisetin and Naringenin with G-Quadruplex and Duplex DNA, Showing Contrasting Binding Behavior: Spectroscopic and Molecular Modeling Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Snehasish; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Pradeep K; Bhowmik, Sudipta

    2016-09-01

    Guanine-rich sequences have the propensity to fold into a four-stranded DNA structure known as a G-quadruplex (G4). G4 forming sequences are abundant in the promoter region of several oncogenes and become a key target for anticancer drug binding. Here we have studied the interactions of two structurally similar dietary plant flavonoids fisetin and naringenin with G4 as well as double stranded (duplex) DNA by using different spectroscopic and modeling techniques. Our study demonstrates the differential binding ability of the two flavonoids with G4 and duplex DNA. Fisetin more strongly interacts with parallel G4 structure than duplex DNA, whereas naringenin shows stronger binding affinity to duplex rather than G4 DNA. Molecular docking results also corroborate our spectroscopic results, and it was found that both of the ligands are stacked externally in the G4 DNA structure. C-ring planarity of the flavonoid structure appears to be a crucial factor for preferential G4 DNA recognition of flavonoids. The goal of this study is to explore the critical effects of small differences in the structure of closely similar chemical classes of such small molecules (flavonoids) which lead to the contrasting binding properties with the two different forms of DNA. The resulting insights may be expected to facilitate the designing of the highly selective G4 DNA binders based on flavonoid scaffolds.

  12. Assessment of natural radioactivity and function of minerals in soils of Yelagiri hills, Tamilnadu, India by Gamma Ray spectroscopic and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) techniques with statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, A; Ravisankar, R; Rajalakshmi, A; Eswaran, P; Vijayagopal, P; Venkatraman, B

    2015-02-01

    Gamma Ray and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques were used to evaluate the natural radioactivity due to natural radionuclides and mineralogical characterization in soils of Yelagiri hills, Tamilnadu, India. Various radiological parameters were calculated to assess the radiation hazards associated with the soil. The distribution pattern of activity due to natural radionuclides is explained by Kriging method of mapping. Using FTIR spectroscopic technique the minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, orthoclase feldspar, kaolinite, montmorillonite, illite, and organic carbon were identified and characterized. The extinction coefficient values were calculated to know the relative distribution of major minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, orthoclase feldspar and kaolinite. The calculated values indicate that the amount of quartz is higher than orthoclase feldspar, microcline feldspar and much higher than kaolinite. Crystallinity index was calculated to know the crystalline nature of quartz. The result indicates that the presence of disordered crystalline quartz in soils. The relation between minerals and radioactivity was assessed by multivariate statistical analysis (Pearson's correlation and cluster analysis). The statistical analysis confirms that the clay mineral kaolinite and non-clay mineral quartz is the major factor than other major minerals to induce the important radioactivity variables and concentrations of uranium and thorium.

  13. Prospective Observational Study of Single-Site Multiport Per-umbilical Laparoscopic Endosurgery versus Conventional Multiport Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: Critical Appraisal of a Unique Umbilical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshan Anand Jategaonkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This prospective observational study compares an innovative approach of Single-Site Multi-Port Per-umbilical Laparoscopic Endo-surgery (SSMPPLE cholecystectomy with the gold standard—Conventional Multi-port Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy (CMLC—to assess the feasibility and efficacy of the former. Methods. In all, 646 patients were studied. SSMPPLE cholecystectomy utilized three ports inserted through three independent mini-incisions at the umbilicus. Only the day-to-day rigid laparoscopic instruments were used in all cases. The SSMPPLE cholecystectomy group had 320 patients and the CMLC group had 326 patients. The outcomes were statistically compared. Results. SSMPPLE cholecystectomy had average operative time of 43.8 min and blood loss of 9.4 mL. Their duration of hospitalization was 1.3 days (range, 1–5. Six patients (1.9% of this group were converted to CMLC. Eleven patients had controlled gallbladder perforations at dissection. The Visual Analogue Scores for pain on postoperative days 0 and 7, the operative time, and the scar grades were significantly better for SSMPPLE than CMLC. However, umbilical sepsis and seroma outcomes were similar. We had no bile-duct injuries or port-site hernias in this study. Conclusion. SSMPPLE cholecystectomy approach complies with the principles of laparoscopic triangulation; it seems feasible and safe method of minimally invasive cholecystectomy. Overall, it has a potential to emerge as an economically viable alternative to single-port surgery.

  14. Toward feasible and comprehensive computational protocol for simulation of the spectroscopic properties of large molecular systems: the anharmonic infrared spectrum of uracil in the solid state by the reduced dimensionality/hybrid VPT2 approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Teresa; Carnimeo, Ivan; Biczysko, Malgorzata

    2015-05-28

    Feasible and comprehensive computational protocols for simulating the spectroscopic properties of large and complex molecular systems are very sought after. Indeed, due to the great variety of intra- and intermolecular interactions that may take place, the interpretation of experimental data becomes more and more difficult as the system under study increases in size or is placed in a complex environment, such as condensed phases. In this framework, we are actively developing a comprehensive and robust computational protocol aimed at quantitative reproduction of the spectra of nucleic acid base complexes, with increasing complexity toward condensed phases and monolayers of biomolecules on solid supports. We have resorted to fully anharmonic quantum mechanical computations within the generalized second-order vibrational perturbation theory (GVPT2) approach, combined with the cost-effective B3LYP-D3 method, in conjunction with basis sets of double-ζ plus polarization quality. Such an approach has been validated in a previous work ( Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2014 , 16 , 10112 - 10128 ) for simulating the IR spectra of the monomers of nucleobases and some of their dimers. In the present contribution we have extended such computational protocol to simulate spectroscopic properties of a molecular solid, namely polycrystalline uracil. First we have selected a realistic molecular model for representing the spectroscopic properties of uracil in the solid state, the uracil heptamer, and then we have computed the relative anharmonic frequencies combining less demanding approaches such as the hybrid B3LYP-D3/DFTBA one, in which the harmonic frequencies are computed at a higher level of theory (B3LYP-D3/N07D) whereas the anharmonic shifts are evaluated at a lower level of theory (DFTBA), and the reduced dimensionality VPT2 (RD-VPT2) approach, where only selected vibrational modes are computed anharmonically along with the couplings with other modes. The good agreement between the

  15. The Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply: A unique public-private partnership for conducting research on the sustainability of animal housing systems using a multistakeholder approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mench, J A; Swanson, J C; Arnot, C

    2016-03-01

    The growing emphasis on ensuring the sustainability of animal agriculture is providing an impetus for the adoption of new approaches to structuring and conducting research. Sustainability is a complex topic involving many considerations related to the economic, social, and environmental impacts of production systems. Successfully addressing this topic requires multidisciplinary research as well as a high degree of communication with food system stakeholders to ensure that the research results contribute to informed decision making. In this paper, we provide an overview of a public-private partnership, the Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply (CSES), which was formed to support research evaluating the sustainability of laying hen housing systems. Because of increasing public concerns about the behavioral restriction imposed on laying hens housed in conventional cages, the U.S. egg industry is faced with a need to transition to alternative systems. However, before the CSES project, there was limited information available about how this transition might affect trade-offs related to the sustainability of egg production. The goal of the CSES project was to provide this information by conducting holistic research on a commercial farm that had 3 different hen housing systems. The CSES members represented a variety of stakeholders, including food retailers and distributors, egg producers, universities, and governmental (USDA ARS) and nongovernmental organizations. The CSES was facilitated by a not-for-profit intermediary, the Center for Food Integrity, which was also responsible for communicating the research results to food system stakeholders, including via quantitative and qualitative consumer research. In this paper, we describe the structural aspects of the CSES that were responsible for the successful completion and dissemination of the research as well as the insights that were gained regarding multidisciplinary and multi-institutional collaboration, conducting

  16. Spectroscopic Dosimeter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Analysis of Phase I test data demonstrates that the Photogenics Spectroscopic Dosimeter will detect neutron energies from 0.8 up to 600 MeV. The detector...

  17. Unique Astrophysics in the Lyman Ultraviolet

    CERN Document Server

    Tumlinson, Jason; Kriss, Gerard; France, Kevin; McCandliss, Stephan; Sembach, Ken; Fox, Andrew; Tripp, Todd; Jenkins, Edward; Beasley, Matthew; Danforth, Charles; Shull, Michael; Stocke, John; Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, Christopher; Froning, Cynthia; Green, James; Oliveira, Cristina; Fullerton, Alex; Blair, Bill; Kruk, Jeff; Sonneborn, George; Penton, Steven; Wakker, Bart; Prochaska, Xavier; Vallerga, John; Scowen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is unique and groundbreaking science to be done with a new generation of UV spectrographs that cover wavelengths in the "Lyman Ultraviolet" (LUV; 912 - 1216 Ang). There is no astrophysical basis for truncating spectroscopic wavelength coverage anywhere between the atmospheric cutoff (3100 Ang) and the Lyman limit (912 Ang); the usual reasons this happens are all technical. The unique science available in the LUV includes critical problems in astrophysics ranging from the habitability of exoplanets to the reionization of the IGM. Crucially, the local Universe (z <= 0.1) is entirely closed to many key physical diagnostics without access to the LUV. These compelling scientific problems require overcoming these technical barriers so that future UV spectrographs can extend coverage to the Lyman limit at 912 Ang.

  18. Obtaining the Electron Angular Momentum Coupling Spectroscopic Terms, jj

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orofino, Hugo; Faria, Roberto B.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed to obtain the electron angular momentum coupling (jj) spectroscopic terms, which is based on building microstates in which each individual electron is placed in a different m[subscript j] "orbital". This approach is similar to that used to obtain the spectroscopic terms under the Russell-Saunders (LS) coupling…

  19. Unique Access to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Don

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the many learning opportunities that broadcast technology students at Ladue Horton Watkins High School in St. Louis, Missouri, experience because of their unique access to technology and methods of learning. Through scaffolding, stepladder techniques, and trial by fire, students learn to produce multiple television programs,…

  20. Theoretical and vibrational spectroscopic approach to keto-enol tautomerism in methyl-2-(4-methoxybenzoyl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-oxopropanoylcarbamate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arı, Hatice; Özpozan, Talat; Büyükmumcu, Zeki; Kabacalı, Yiğit; Saçmaci, Mustafa

    2016-10-01

    A carbamate compound having tricarbonyl groups, methyl-2-(4-methoxybenzoyl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-oxopropanoylcarbamate (BPOC) was investigated from theoretical and vibrational spectroscopic point of view employing quantum chemical methods. Hybrid Density Functionals (B3LYP, X3LYP and B3PW91) with 6-311 G(d,p) basis set were used for the calculations. Rotational barrier and conformational analyses were performed to find the most stable conformers of keto and enol forms of the molecule. Three transition states for keto-enol tautomerism in gas phase were determined. The results of the calculations show that enol-1 form of BPOC is more stable than keto and enol-2 forms. Hydrogen bonding investigation including Natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) for all the tautomeric structures was employed to compare intra-molecular interactions. The energies of HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals for all tautomeric forms of BPOC were predicted. Normal Coordinate Analysis (NCA) was carried out for the enol-1 to assign vibrational bands of IR and Raman spectra. The scaling factors were calculated as 0.9721, 0.9697 and 0.9685 for B3LYP, X3LYP and B3PW91 methods, respectively. The correlation graphs of experimental versus calculated vibrational wavenumbers were plotted and X3LYP method gave better frequency agreement than the others.

  1. A spectroscopic study on interaction between bovine serum albumin and titanium dioxide nanoparticle synthesized from microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Shivendu; Dasgupta, Nandita; Srivastava, Priyanka; Ramalingam, Chidambaram

    2016-08-01

    The use of nanoparticles in food or pharma requires a molecular-level perceptive of how NPs interact with protein corona once exposed to a physiological environment. In this study, the conformational changes of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated in detail when exposed to different concentration of titanium dioxide nanoparticle by various techniques. To analyze the effects of NPs on proteins, the interaction between bovine serum albumin and titanium dioxide nanoparticles at different concentrations were investigated. The interaction, BSA conformations, kinetics, and adsorption were analyzed by dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching. Dynamic light scattering analysis confirms the interaction with major changes in the size of the protein. Fluorescence quenching analysis confirms the side-on or end-on interaction of 1.1 molecules of serum albumin to titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Further, pseudo-second order kinetics was determined with equilibrium contact time of 20min. The spectroscopic analysis suggests that there is a conformational change both at secondary and tertiary structure levels. A distortion in both α-helix and β-sheets was observed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Fluorescence quenching analysis confirms the interaction of a molecule of bovine serum albumin to the single TiO2 nanoparticle. Further, pseudo-second order kinetics was determined with equilibrium contact time of 20min. The data of the present study determines the detailed evaluation of BSA adsorption on TiO2 nanoparticle along with mechanism and adsorption kinetics.

  2. Exploring the affinity binding of alkylmaltoside surfactants to bovine serum albumin and their effect on the protein stability: A spectroscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierrezuelo, J M; Carnero Ruiz, C

    2015-08-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence together with circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies was performed to examine the interactions between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and two alkylmaltoside surfactants, i.e. n-decyl-β-D-maltoside (β-C10G2) and n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (β-C12G2), having identical structures but different tail lengths. Changes in the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA from static as well as dynamic measurements revealed a weak protein-surfactant interaction and gave the corresponding binding curves, suggesting that the binding mechanism of surfactants to protein is essentially cooperative in nature. The behavior of both surfactants is similar, so that the differences detected were attributed to the more hydrophobic nature of β-C12G2, which favors the adsorption of micelle-like aggregates onto the protein surface. These observations were substantially demonstrated by data derived from synchronous, three-dimensional and anisotropy fluorescence experiments. Changes in the secondary structure of the protein induced by the interaction with surfactants were analyzed by CD to determine the contents of α-helix and β-strand. It was noted that whereas the addition of β-C10G2 appears to stabilize the secondary structure of the protein, β-C12G2 causes a marginal denaturation of BSA for a protein:surfactant molar ratio as high as 1 to 100.

  3. Inclusion complexation between baicalein and β-cyclodextrin and the influence of β-cyclodextrin on the binding of baicalein with DNA: a spectroscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameena, Yousuf; Chandrasekaran, Sowrirajan; Israel V M V, Enoch

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the commonly studied cyclic oligosaccharide and gains importance as it is entered on a drug delivering carbohydrate and provides insight into the oligosaccharide complex-biomolecular interaction. The binding of a flavone, baicalein, to β-cyclodextrin and calf thymus DNA is studied. The binding of baicalein to calf thymus DNA in the presence of β-cyclodextrin is analysed using the UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The mode of binding and structure of the baicalein-β-cyclodextrin complex are reported. The role of the structure and the stoichiometry of the inclusion complex of baicalein-β-cyclodextrin in its influence on DNA binding are analysed. Highlights • This paper deals with the binding of a flavone, baicalein to β-cyclodextrin and/or DNA. • The inclusion complexation between baicalein and β-cyclodextrin is analysed. • The stoichiometry and the binding strength of the inclusion complex is reported. • The role of β-cyclodextrin in tuning the binding of baicalein to DNA is emphasized. • Spectroscopic and docking analysis are used to articulate the results.

  4. Effect of the binding interaction of an emissive niacin derivative on the conformation and activity of a model plasma protein: A spectroscopic and simulation-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sett, Riya; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2016-11-01

    The present work demonstrates a detailed photophysics of bio-active drug-like acid viz., 2-hydroxynicotinic acid (2-HNA) and its interaction with a model plasma protein Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). The drug which is in essence a vitamin-B3 derivative, is capable of exhibiting ultrafast lactim-lactam cross-over response and thereby the modulation of the lactam emission within the bio-environment of the protein has been depicted spectroscopically to reveal the drug-protein interaction. Apart from evaluating the binding constant, the probable location of the neutral drug molecule within the protein cavity (hydrophobic subdomain IIIA) has been explored by AutoDock-based blind docking simulation technique. In this microheterogeneous medium, slow solvent reorientation time with respect to the emissive lifetime of the drug explicate the Red Edge Effect (REE). To complement the findings about the binding process, chaotrope-induced protein denaturation has also been inspected. The probe also illustrates a perceptible difference in rotational relaxation time in confined medium than in aqueous medium which strengthen our verdict. Unfolding of the protein in the presence of the drug molecule has been probed by the decrease of the α-helical content, obtained via circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, which is also supported by the gradual slaughter of the esterase activity of the protein in the presence of the drug molecule.

  5. Synthesis of 5-Fluorouracil conjugated LaF3:Tb3+/PEG-COOH nanoparticles and its studies on the interaction with bovine serum albumin: spectroscopic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangaiyarkarasi, Rajendiran; Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2015-03-01

    The luminescent lanthanide-doped nanoparticles have gathered considerable attention in many fields especially in biomedicine. In this work, the lanthanum fluoride-doped terbium nanoparticles (LaF3:Tb3+ NPs) via simple chemical precipitation method has been synthesized and functionalized with polyethylene glycol. The size and the shape of the nanoparticles are confirmed using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The conjugation of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and thus synthesized nanoparticles (NPs) were confirmed using various spectroscopic methods such as UV-Visible spectroscopy, fluorescence steady state, and excited state spectroscopy studies. The enhancement in fluorescence emission ( λ = 543 nm) of drug-conjugated nanoparticles confirms the Vander Waals force of attraction due to F-F bonding between the drug and the nanoparticles. Further, the effects of 5FU-NPs in carrier protein were investigated using bovine serum albumin as a protein model. The 5FU-LaF3:Tb3+ nanoparticles binding is illustrated with binding constant and number of binding sites. The structural change of bovine serum albumin has been studied using circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis.

  6. A microwave molecular solution based approach towards high-κ-tantalum(V)oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, dielectric properties and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies of their defect chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, R C; Kaloumenos, M; Spiehl, D; Erdem, E; Repp, S; Weber, S; Schneider, J J

    2015-12-21

    Stable dispersions of tantalum oxide nanoparticles are accessible from solutions of tantalum(V) complexes with a mixed malonato and alkanolato ligand sphere in ethoxyethanol by microwave processing. The malonato ligand is cleaved during decomposition and acetic acid or acetic acid esters are formed as derived from in situ spectroscopic studies. The solubility of the tantalum precursor and the obtained particle size therefrom depend strongly on the type of alkanolato ligand moiety. Dispersions of the molecular complexes possess good film forming properties. Films with low surface roughness can be obtained by spincoating. These exhibited a dielectric constant of about 15 and disruptive strengths above 1.5 MV cm(-1). The electrical measurements indicate that the presence of moisture is detrimental with respect to the dielectric performance of the films. After removal of the solvent from the suspensions of the nanoparticles, the residue can be redispersed in aprotic solvents. The particles can be isolated therefrom by precipitation with pentane. XRD and HRTEM indicate that the material remains amorphous up to temperatures of 750 °C. XPS proved that only Ta2O5 is formed as lower oxidation states of Ta cannot be detected. A detailed EPR study allows us to gain insight into the surface defect chemistry. Multiple types of oxygen vacancies exist at the surface of the Ta2O5 particles which are influenced by additional calcination and annealing in a vacuum.

  7. Probing the biological evaluations of a new designed Pt(II) complex using spectroscopic and theoretical approaches: human hemoglobin as a target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazari, Omid; Shafaei, Zahra; Divsalar, Adeleh; Eslami-Moghadam, Mahbubeh; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, using heavy metal compounds such as platinum as anticancer agent is one of the common ways in chemical therapy. In this study, a new anticancer compound of glycine derivatives of Pt(II) complex (amyl-glycine1, 10-phenanthroline Platinum nitrate) was designed, and the biological effects of this novel compound on the alterations in the function and structure of human hemoglobin (Hb) at different temperatures of 25 and 37°C were assessed by applying various spectroscopic (fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD)) and theoretical methods. Fluorescence data indicated the strong ability of Pt(II) complex to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of Hb. The binding constant, number of binding sites, and thermodynamic parameters at two temperatures were calculated, and the results indicated the major possibility of occurring van der Waals force or hydrogen bond interactions in the Pt(II) complex-Hb interaction. For evaluating the alteration of secondary structure of Hb upon interaction with various concentrations of complex, far-UV CD spectra were used and it was observed that in high dose of complex, significant changes were occurred which is indicative of some side effects in overdosing of this complex. On the other hand, the molecular docking results illustrate that are well in agreement in obtaining data with spectroscopy. Above results suggested that using Pt(II) complex as an anticancer agent, model drug in high-dose usage might cause some disordering in structure and function of Hb as well as improve understanding of the side effects of newly designed metal anticancer drugs undergoing.

  8. Semiconductor Nanomaterials-Based Fluorescence Spectroscopic and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI Mass Spectrometric Approaches to Proteome Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar Kailasa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs or nanoparticles (NPs exhibit very unusual physico-chemcial and optical properties. This review article introduces the applications of semiconductor nanomaterials (NMs in fluorescence spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS for biomolecule analysis. Due to their unique physico-chemical and optical properties, semiconductors NMs have created many new platforms for investigating biomolecular structures and information in modern biology. These semiconductor NMs served as effective fluorescent probes for sensing proteins and cells and acted as affinity or concentrating probes for enriching peptides, proteins and bacteria proteins prior to MALDI-MS analysis.

  9. NASA's unique networking environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1988-01-01

    Networking is an infrastructure technology; it is a tool for NASA to support its space and aeronautics missions. Some of NASA's networking problems are shared by the commercial and/or military communities, and can be solved by working with these communities. However, some of NASA's networking problems are unique and will not be addressed by these other communities. Individual characteristics of NASA's space-mission networking enviroment are examined, the combination of all these characteristics that distinguish NASA's networking systems from either commercial or military systems is explained, and some research areas that are important for NASA to pursue are outlined.

  10. Two semi-automated computational approaches for spectroscopic analysis of stellar photospheres: detailed characterization at high resolution and abundance determination at medium resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Milone, Andre; Sansom, Anne; Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    We report on two distinct computational approaches to self-consistently measure photospheric properties of large samples of stars. Both procedures consist of a set of several semi-integrated tasks based on shell and Python scripts, which efficiently run either our own codes or open source software commonly adopted by the astronomical community. One approach aims to derive the main stellar photospheric parameters and abundances of a few elements by analysing high-resolution spectra from a given public library homogeneously constructed. The other one is applied to recover the abundance of a single element in stars with known photospheric parameters by using mid-resolution spectra from another open homogeneous database and calibrating derived abundances. Both semi-automated computational approaches provide homogeneity and objectivity to every step of the process and represent a fast way to reach partial and final results as well as to estimate measurement errors, making possible to systematically evaluate and im...

  11. Shell model and spectroscopic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poves, P. [Madrid Univ. Autonoma and IFT, UAM/CSIC, E-28049 (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    In these lectures, I introduce the notion of spectroscopic factor in the shell model context. A brief review is given of the present status of the large scale applications of the Interacting Shell Model. The spectroscopic factors and the spectroscopic strength are discussed for nuclei in the vicinity of magic closures and for deformed nuclei. (author)

  12. The SDSS-IV extended Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Quasar Target Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Adam D; Prakash, Abhishek; Pâris, Isabelle; Yeche, Christophe; Dawson, Kyle S; Bovy, Jo; Lang, Dustin; Schlegel, David J; Newman, Jeffrey A; Petitjean, Patrick; Kneib, Jean Paul; Laurent, Pierre; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy L; Armengaud, Eric; Brownstein, Joel; Burtin, Etienne; Cai, Zheng; Comparat, Johan; Kasliwal, Mansi; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Laher, Russ; Levitan, David; McBride, Cameron K; McGreer, Ian D; Miller, Adam A; Nugent, Peter; Ofek, Eran; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Schneider, Donald P; Sesar, Branimir; Streblyanska, Alina; Surace, Jason

    2015-01-01

    As part of the SDSS-IV the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) will perform measurements of the cosmological distance scale via application of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) method to samples of quasars and galaxies. Quasar surveys are particularly useful in the BAO context as they can trace extremely large volumes back to moderately high redshift. eBOSS will adopt two approaches to target quasars over a 7500 sq. deg. area. First, z > 2.1 quasars will be targeted to improve BAO measurements in the Lyman-Alpha Forest. Second, a homogeneously selected "CORE" sample of quasars at 0.9 2.1 quasars. A supplemental selection based on variability of quasars in multi-epoch imaging from the Palomar Transient Factory should recover an additional ~3-4 per sq. deg. z > 2.1 quasars to g 500,000 new spectroscopically confirmed quasars and > 500,000 uniformly selected spectroscopically confirmed 0.9 < z < 2.2 quasars. At the conclusion of SDSS-IV, the SDSS will have provided unique spectra...

  13. Spectroscopic signatures of quantum friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Juliane; Bennett, Robert; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2016-12-01

    We present a formula for the spectroscopically accessible level shifts and decay rates of an atom moving at an arbitrary angle relative to a surface. Our Markov formulation leads to an intuitive analytic description whereby the shifts and rates are obtained from the coefficients of the Heisenberg equation of motion for the atomic flip operators but with complex Doppler-shifted (velocity-dependent) transition frequencies. Our results conclusively demonstrate that for the limiting case of parallel motion the shifts and rates are quadratic or higher in the atomic velocity. We show that a stronger, linear velocity dependence is exhibited by the rates and shifts for perpendicular motion, thus opening the prospect of experimentally probing the Markovian approach to the phenomenon of quantum friction.

  14. Application of spectroscopic methods for identification (FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy) and determination (UV, EPR) of quercetin-3-O-rutinoside. Experimental and DFT based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczkowska, Magdalena; Lewandowska, Kornelia; Bednarski, Waldemar; Mizera, Mikołaj; Podborska, Agnieszka; Krause, Anna; Cielecka-Piontek, Judyta

    2015-04-05

    Vibrational (FT-IR, Raman) and electronic (UV, EPR) spectral measurements were performed for an analysis of rutin (quercetin-3-O-rutinoside) obtained from Rutaofficinalis. The identification of rutin was done with the use of FT-IR and Raman spectra. Those experimental spectra were determined with the support of theoretical calculations based on a DFT method with the B3LYP hybrid functional and 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The application of UV and EPR spectra was found to be a suitable analytical approach to the evaluation of changes in rutin exposed to certain physicochemical factors. Differences in absorbance observed in direct UV spectra were used to monitor changes in the concentration of rutin in degraded samples. Spectra of electron paramagnetic resonance allowed studying the process of free-radical quenching in rutin following its exposure to light. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and frontier molecular orbitals (LUMO-HOMO) were also determined in order to predict structural changes and reactive sites in rutin.

  15. Application of spectroscopic methods for identification (FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy) and determination (UV, EPR) of quercetin-3-O-rutinoside. Experimental and DFT based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczkowska, Magdalena; Lewandowska, Kornelia; Bednarski, Waldemar; Mizera, Mikołaj; Podborska, Agnieszka; Krause, Anna; Cielecka-Piontek, Judyta

    2015-04-01

    Vibrational (FT-IR, Raman) and electronic (UV, EPR) spectral measurements were performed for an analysis of rutin (quercetin-3-O-rutinoside) obtained from Rutaofficinalis. The identification of rutin was done with the use of FT-IR and Raman spectra. Those experimental spectra were determined with the support of theoretical calculations based on a DFT method with the B3LYP hybrid functional and 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The application of UV and EPR spectra was found to be a suitable analytical approach to the evaluation of changes in rutin exposed to certain physicochemical factors. Differences in absorbance observed in direct UV spectra were used to monitor changes in the concentration of rutin in degraded samples. Spectra of electron paramagnetic resonance allowed studying the process of free-radical quenching in rutin following its exposure to light. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and frontier molecular orbitals (LUMO-HOMO) were also determined in order to predict structural changes and reactive sites in rutin.

  16. Nanoantenna-Enhanced Infrared Spectroscopic Chemical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühner, Lucca; Hentschel, Mario; Zschieschang, Ute; Klauk, Hagen; Vogt, Jochen; Huck, Christian; Giessen, Harald; Neubrech, Frank

    2017-05-26

    Spectroscopic infrared chemical imaging is ideally suited for label-free and spatially resolved characterization of molecular species, but often suffers from low infrared absorption cross sections. Here, we overcome this limitation by utilizing confined electromagnetic near-fields of resonantly excited plasmonic nanoantennas, which enhance the molecular absorption by orders of magnitude. In the experiments, we evaporate microstructured chemical patterns of C60 and pentacene with nanometer thickness on top of homogeneous arrays of tailored nanoantennas. Broadband mid-infrared spectra containing plasmonic and vibrational information were acquired with diffraction-limited resolution using a two-dimensional focal plane array detector. Evaluating the enhanced infrared absorption at the respective frequencies, spatially resolved chemical images were obtained. In these chemical images, the microstructured chemical patterns are only visible if nanoantennas are used. This confirms the superior performance of our approach over conventional spectroscopic infrared imaging. In addition to the improved sensitivity, our technique provides chemical selectivity, which would not be available with plasmonic imaging that is based on refractive index sensing. To extend the accessible spectral bandwidth of nanoantenna-enhanced spectroscopic imaging, we employed nanostructures with dual-band resonances, providing broadband plasmonic enhancement and sensitivity. Our results demonstrate the potential of nanoantenna-enhanced spectroscopic infrared chemical imaging for spatially resolved characterization of organic layers with thicknesses of several nanometers. This is of potential interest for medical applications which are currently hampered by state-of-art infrared techniques, e.g., for distinguishing cancerous from healthy tissues.

  17. A genetic algorithm-Bayesian network approach for the analysis of metabolomics and spectroscopic data: application to the rapid identification of Bacillus spores and classification of Bacillus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodacre Royston

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid identification of Bacillus spores and bacterial identification are paramount because of their implications in food poisoning, pathogenesis and their use as potential biowarfare agents. Many automated analytical techniques such as Curie-point pyrolysis mass spectrometry (Py-MS have been used to identify bacterial spores giving use to large amounts of analytical data. This high number of features makes interpretation of the data extremely difficult We analysed Py-MS data from 36 different strains of aerobic endospore-forming bacteria encompassing seven different species. These bacteria were grown axenically on nutrient agar and vegetative biomass and spores were analyzed by Curie-point Py-MS. Results We develop a novel genetic algorithm-Bayesian network algorithm that accurately identifies sand selects a small subset of key relevant mass spectra (biomarkers to be further analysed. Once identified, this subset of relevant biomarkers was then used to identify Bacillus spores successfully and to identify Bacillus species via a Bayesian network model specifically built for this reduced set of features. Conclusions This final compact Bayesian network classification model is parsimonious, computationally fast to run and its graphical visualization allows easy interpretation of the probabilistic relationships among selected biomarkers. In addition, we compare the features selected by the genetic algorithm-Bayesian network approach with the features selected by partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA. The classification accuracy results show that the set of features selected by the GA-BN is far superior to PLS-DA.

  18. Uniqueness is Important in Competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Ai-Xia; XV Xiu-Lian; HE Da-Ren

    2009-01-01

    We propose a quantitative network description on the function of uniqueness in a competition system. Two statistical parameters, competition ability and uniqueness are defined, and their relationship in ordinary cases is analytically discussed. The competition between Chinese regional universities is taken as an example. The empirical investigation results show that the uniqueness of a university is really important in competition. Also,uniqueness is very helpful in the promotion of the university overall quality.

  19. A bottom-up geostatistical approach for quantifying landcover in Asian desert ecosystems and implications for global and climate models: a case study in Afghanistan utilizing a unique hyperspectral dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreve, C. M.; Okin, G. S.; Bowles, J.; Gardner, J.

    2007-12-01

    Political tensions, rough terrain, and remoteness have lead to a gap in the ecological understanding cold, mountainous deserts of Asia. Remote sensing is a time- and cost-efficient way to understand the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of plant and snow cover in these regions. Here, a unique high-resolution hyperspectral dataset from Afghanistan is employed to classify ground cover at high resolution. The hyperspectral data was taken using a CASI-1500 Visible Near InfraRed (VNIR) spectrometer. The instrument was run in a mode with 1518 crosstrack pixels and 72 spectral bands between 380 and 1050 nm. The GSD was controlled by the altitude above ground level and aircraft speed, which varied resulting in GSD between 4 and 6 meters. Geolocation was provided by a CMIGITS II and the resulting accuracy will be better than 40 m. Atmospheric conditions were challenging and proper atmospheric compensation of the data remains a challenge. A bottom- up geostatistical approach for quantifying the coverage of vegetation and snow will be applied to establish the practical limits of coarse resolution MODIS data for classifying vegetation and snow cover, a scale suitable for monitoring large regions and for modeling. A Multiple Endmember Linear Spectral Mixture Algorithm (MESMA) will be applied to classify land cover. Semivariograms at the multispectral (30 m) and coarse resolution scale (1 km) will be compared with simulated variograms using hysperspectral data. Patches of vegetation and snow cover used for spatial comparison will be identified in the image and characterized using object-oriented image analysis software. The relative amount of cover will be determined using block-kriging and compared between scenes with statistical tests. Insight gained from this analysis can be applied to improve existing data products and can be applied for carbon budget and climate change models.

  20. Spectroscopic follow up of Kepler planet candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latham..[], D. W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from...... and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using...... high-resolution spectrometers on the Lick 3.0-m Shane Telescope, the McDonald 2.7-m Reflector, the 2.5-m Nordic Optical Telescope, and the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Whipple observatory. In this paper we will summarize the scope and organization of the spectroscopic follow-up observations...

  1. Infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Andrew V; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2017-01-16

    Infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, are robust, label free and inherently non-destructive methods with a high chemical specificity and sensitivity that are frequently employed in forensic science research and practices. This review aims to discuss the applications and recent developments of these methodologies in this field. Furthermore, the use of recently emerged Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging in transmission, external reflection and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) modes are summarised with relevance and potential for forensic science applications. This spectroscopic imaging approach provides the opportunity to obtain the chemical composition of fingermarks and information about possible contaminants deposited at a crime scene. Research that demonstrates the great potential of these techniques for analysis of fingerprint residues, explosive materials and counterfeit drugs will be reviewed. The implications of this research for the examination of different materials are considered, along with an outlook of possible future research avenues for the application of vibrational spectroscopic methods to the analysis of forensic samples.

  2. The New Mexico Tech Extrasolar Spectroscopic Survey Instrument (NESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Jurgenson, C.; Vasisht, G.; Swain, M.; Boston, P.; Santoro, F.

    2010-01-01

    We present the design and scientific objectives behind NESSI, a near-infrared spectroscopic purpose-built for studying exoplanet atmospheres. This instrument is being designed and assembled by a team of scientists and engineers at New Mexico Tech (NMT), the Magdalena Ridge Observatory (MRO) and NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL), and is scheduled for deployment in late 2010 at the MRO 2.4m telescope. NESSI's unique design is driven by recent space and ground-based NIR spectroscopy of exoplanet atmospheres by members of our team. Optimization of the instrument to achieve 0.01% relative accuracies in spectra of exoplanetary molecular constituents requires careful attention to certain design features and a new technical approach. We present an overview of NESSI's design, including the four major subassemblies: 1) a field derotator, 2) a reimaging module, 3) an optical guiding module, and 4) a multi-object spectrograph subassembly. We also present an overview of our science program specifically designed to build the community of exoplanet researchers and students in NM. The financial support of our team and NESSI itself have been made possible by a NM NASA EPSCoR grant, matching funds from the NMT administration, and internal support for the NESSI hardware from Dr. Van Romero, NMT's Research Vice-President.

  3. Metalworking Techniques Unlock a Unique Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Approached by West Hartford, Connecticut-based Abbot Ball Company, Glenn Research Center agreed to test an intriguing alloy called Nitinol 60 that had been largely unused for a half century. Using powdered metallurgy, the partners developed a method for manufacturing and working with the material, which Abbott Ball has now commercialized. Nitinol 60 provides a unique combination of qualities that make it an excellent material for ball bearings, among other applications.

  4. Uniqueness property for quasiharmonic functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevdiyor A. Imomkulov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider a class of continuous functions, called quasiaharmonic functions, admitting best approximations by harmonic polynomials. In this class we prove a uniqueness theorem by analogy with the analytic functions.

  5. Diabetes: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Urinary Incontinence Related Documents PDF Choosing Wisely: Diabetes Tests and Treatments Download Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Diabetes Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ...

  6. Osteoporosis: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Osteoporosis Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... and widely-prescribed medications for the treatment of osteoporosis. Some serious side effects of these medication have ...

  7. Nutrition: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nutrition Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... teeth that are needed for grinding up food, nutrition suffers. If you are unable to chew and ...

  8. XRASE: The X-Ray Spectroscopic Explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnopper, H.W.; Silver, E.; Murray, S.

    2001-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectroscopic Explorer (XRASE) has a unique combination of features that will make it possible to address many of NASA's scientific goals. These include how galaxy clusters form, the physics and chemistry of the ISM, the heating of stellar coronae, the amount and content of intergalactic...... baryonic matter, the mass of black holes and the formation of disks and jets in AGN and galactic binaries. XRASE has a thin foil, multilayered telescope with a large collecting area up to 10 keV, especially in the Fe K alpha region (1100 cm(2)). Its microcalorimeter array combines high energy resolution (7...... eV at 6 keV) and efficiency with a field-of-view of 26 arcmin(2) . A deep orbit allows for long, continuous observations. Monitoring instruments in the optical (WOM-X), UV (TAUVEX) and hard X-RAY (GRAM) bands will offer exceptional opportunities to make simultaneous multi-wavelength observations....

  9. XRASE: The X-Ray Spectroscopic Explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnopper, H.W.; Silver, E.; Murray, S.

    2001-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectroscopic Explorer (XRASE) has a unique combination of features that will make it possible to address many of NASA's scientific goals. These include how galaxy clusters form, the physics and chemistry of the ISM, the heating of stellar coronae, the amount and content of intergalactic...... baryonic matter, the mass of black holes and the formation of disks and jets in AGN and galactic binaries. XRASE has a thin foil, multilayered telescope with a large collecting area up to 10 keV, especially in the Fe K alpha region (1100 cm(2)). Its microcalorimeter array combines high energy resolution (7...... eV at 6 keV) and efficiency with a field-of-view of 26 arcmin(2) . A deep orbit allows for long, continuous observations. Monitoring instruments in the optical (WOM-X), UV (TAUVEX) and hard X-RAY (GRAM) bands will offer exceptional opportunities to make simultaneous multi-wavelength observations....

  10. Spectroscopic failures in photometric redshift calibration: cosmological biases and survey requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Carlos E. [KIPAC, Menlo Park; Huterer, Dragan [Michigan U.; Lin, Huan [Fermilab; Busha, Michael T. [Zurich U.; Wechsler, Risa H. [SLAC

    2014-10-11

    We use N-body-spectro-photometric simulations to investigate the impact of incompleteness and incorrect redshifts in spectroscopic surveys to photometric redshift training and calibration and the resulting effects on cosmological parameter estimation from weak lensing shear-shear correlations. The photometry of the simulations is modeled after the upcoming Dark Energy Survey and the spectroscopy is based on a low/intermediate resolution spectrograph with wavelength coverage of 5500{\\AA} < {\\lambda} < 9500{\\AA}. The principal systematic errors that such a spectroscopic follow-up encounters are incompleteness (inability to obtain spectroscopic redshifts for certain galaxies) and wrong redshifts. Encouragingly, we find that a neural network-based approach can effectively describe the spectroscopic incompleteness in terms of the galaxies' colors, so that the spectroscopic selection can be applied to the photometric sample. Hence, we find that spectroscopic incompleteness yields no appreciable biases to cosmology, although the statistical constraints degrade somewhat because the photometric survey has to be culled to match the spectroscopic selection. Unfortunately, wrong redshifts have a more severe impact: the cosmological biases are intolerable if more than a percent of the spectroscopic redshifts are incorrect. Moreover, we find that incorrect redshifts can also substantially degrade the accuracy of training set based photo-z estimators. The main problem is the difficulty of obtaining redshifts, either spectroscopically or photometrically, for objects at z > 1.3. We discuss several approaches for reducing the cosmological biases, in particular finding that photo-z error estimators can reduce biases appreciably.

  11. Spectroscopic neutron detection using composite scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, I.; Foster, A.; Kukharev, V.; Mayer, M.; Meddeb, A.; Nattress, J.; Ounaies, Z.; Trivelpiece, C.

    2016-09-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM), especially highly enriched uranium, is exceptionally difficult to detect without the use of active interrogation (AI). We are investigating the potential use of low-dose active interrogation to realize simultaneous high-contrast imaging and photofission of SNM using energetic gamma-rays produced by low-energy nuclear reactions, such as 11B(d,nγ)12C and 12C(p,p‧)12C. Neutrons produced via fission are one reliable signature of the presence of SNM and are usually identified by their unique timing characteristics, such as the delayed neutron die-away. Fast neutron spectroscopy may provide additional useful discriminating characteristics for SNM detection. Spectroscopic measurements can be conducted by recoil-based or thermalization and capture-gated detectors; the latter may offer unique advantages since they facilitate low-statistics and event-by-event neutron energy measurements without spectrum unfolding. We describe the results of the development and characterization of a new type of capture-gated spectroscopic neutron detector based on a composite of scintillating polyvinyltoluene and lithium-doped scintillating glass in the form of millimeter-thick rods. The detector achieves >108 neutron-gamma discrimination resulting from its geometric properties and material selection. The design facilitates simultaneous pulse shape and pulse height discrimination, despite the fact that no materials intrinsically capable of pulse shape discrimination have been used to construct the detector. Accurate single-event measurements of neutron energy may be possible even when the energy is relatively low, such as with delayed fission neutrons. Simulation and preliminary measurements using the new composite detector are described, including those conducted using radioisotope sources and the low-dose active interrogation system based on low-energy nuclear reactions.

  12. Unraveling the evolution of uniquely human cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Evan L

    2016-06-07

    A satisfactory account of human cognitive evolution will explain not only the psychological mechanisms that make our species unique, but also how, when, and why these traits evolved. To date, researchers have made substantial progress toward defining uniquely human aspects of cognition, but considerably less effort has been devoted to questions about the evolutionary processes through which these traits have arisen. In this article, I aim to link these complementary aims by synthesizing recent advances in our understanding of what makes human cognition unique, with theory and data regarding the processes of cognitive evolution. I review evidence that uniquely human cognition depends on synergism between both representational and motivational factors and is unlikely to be accounted for by changes to any singular cognitive system. I argue that, whereas no nonhuman animal possesses the full constellation of traits that define the human mind, homologies and analogies of critical aspects of human psychology can be found in diverse nonhuman taxa. I suggest that phylogenetic approaches to the study of animal cognition-which can address questions about the selective pressures and proximate mechanisms driving cognitive change-have the potential to yield important insights regarding the processes through which the human cognitive phenotype evolved.

  13. Rufus Choate: A Unique Orator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Reed

    Rufus Choate, a Massachusetts lawyer and orator, has been described as a "unique and romantic phenomenon" in America's history. Born in 1799 in Essex, Massachusetts, Choate graduated from Dartmouth College and attended Harvard Law School. Choate's goal was to be the top in his profession. Daniel Webster was Choate's hero. Choate became well…

  14. Uniqueness of PL Minimal Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi NI

    2007-01-01

    Using a standard fact in hyperbolic geometry, we give a simple proof of the uniqueness of PL minimal surfaces, thus filling in a gap in the original proof of Jaco and Rubinstein. Moreover, in order to clarify some ambiguity, we sharpen the definition of PL minimal surfaces, and prove a technical lemma on the Plateau problem in the hyperbolic space.

  15. On the Nagumo uniqueness theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Octavian G. Mustafa; O'Regan, Donal

    2011-01-01

    By a convenient reparametrisation of the integral curves of a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE), we are able to improve the conclusions of the recent contribution [A. Constantin, Proc. Japan Acad. {\\bf 86(A)} (2010), 41--44]. In this way, we establish a flexible uniqueness criterion for ODEs without Lipschitz-like nonlinearities.

  16. The Lasso Problem and Uniqueness

    CERN Document Server

    Tibshirani, Ryan J

    2012-01-01

    The lasso is a popular tool for sparse linear regression, especially for problems in which the number of variables p exceeds the number of observations n. But when p>n, the lasso criterion is not strictly convex, and hence it may not have a unique minimum. An important question is: when is the lasso solution well-defined (unique)? We review results from the literature, which show that if the predictor variables are drawn from a continuous probability distribution, then there is a unique lasso solution with probability one, regardless of the sizes of n and p. We also show that this result extends easily to $\\ell_1$ penalized minimization problems over a wide range of loss functions. A second important question is: how can we deal with the case of non-uniqueness in lasso solutions? In light of the aforementioned result, this case really only arises when some of the predictor variables are discrete, or when some post-processing has been performed on continuous predictor measurements. Though we certainly cannot c...

  17. Spectroscopic analysis of optoelectronic semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with standard spectroscopic techniques which can be used to analyze semiconductor samples or devices, in both, bulk, micrometer and submicrometer scale. The book aims helping experimental physicists and engineers to choose the right analytical spectroscopic technique in order to get specific information about their specific demands. For this purpose, the techniques including technical details such as apparatus and probed sample region are described. More important, also the expected outcome from experiments is provided. This involves also the link to theory, that is not subject of this book, and the link to current experimental results in the literature which are presented in a review-like style. Many special spectroscopic techniques are introduced and their relationship to the standard techniques is revealed. Thus the book works also as a type of guide or reference book for people researching in optical spectroscopy of semiconductors.

  18. Characterising galaxy groups: spectroscopic observations of the Shakhbazyan sample

    CERN Document Server

    Capozzi, Diego; Barbati, Silvio; Paolillo, Maurizio; De Filippis, Elisabetta; Longo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Groups of galaxies are the most common cosmic structures. However, due to the poor statistics, projection effects and the lack of accurate distances, our understanding of their dynamical and evolutionary status is still limited. This is particularly true for the so called Shakhbazyan groups (SHK) which are still largely unexplored due to the lack of systematic spectroscopic studies of both their member galaxies and the surrounding environment. In our previous paper, we investigated the statistical properties of a large sample of SHK groups using SDSS data and photometric redshifts. Here we present the follow-up of 5 SHK groups (SHK 10, 71, 75, 80, 259) observed within our spectroscopic campaign with the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, aimed at confirming their physical reality and strengthening our photometric results. For each of the selected groups we were able to identify between 6 and 13 spectroscopic members, thus confirming the robustness of the photometric redshift approach in identifying real galaxy ove...

  19. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  20. Enhancing forensic science with spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Camilla; Kazarian, Sergei G.

    2006-09-01

    This presentation outlines the research we are developing in the area of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging with the focus on materials of forensic interest. FTIR spectroscopic imaging has recently emerged as a powerful tool for characterisation of heterogeneous materials. FTIR imaging relies on the ability of the military-developed infrared array detector to simultaneously measure spectra from thousands of different locations in a sample. Recently developed application of FTIR imaging using an ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) mode has demonstrated the ability of this method to achieve spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit of infrared light in air. Chemical visualisation with enhanced spatial resolution in micro-ATR mode broadens the range of materials studied with FTIR imaging with applications to pharmaceutical formulations or biological samples. Macro-ATR imaging has also been developed for chemical imaging analysis of large surface area samples and was applied to analyse the surface of human skin (e.g. finger), counterfeit tablets, textile materials (clothing), etc. This approach demonstrated the ability of this imaging method to detect trace materials attached to the surface of the skin. This may also prove as a valuable tool in detection of traces of explosives left or trapped on the surfaces of different materials. This FTIR imaging method is substantially superior to many of the other imaging methods due to inherent chemical specificity of infrared spectroscopy and fast acquisition times of this technique. Our preliminary data demonstrated that this methodology will provide the means to non-destructive detection method that could relate evidence to its source. This will be important in a wider crime prevention programme. In summary, intrinsic chemical specificity and enhanced visualising capability of FTIR spectroscopic imaging open a window of opportunities for counter-terrorism and crime-fighting, with applications ranging

  1. Extracting spectroscopic factors from direct reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kate

    2009-10-01

    Direct reactions have been used to probe the structure of the nucleus for decades. After some decline in the 80's and 90's these methods have more recently had a surge in popularity, and new techniques have been added to the experimentalists toolbox. One goal of direct reaction experiments is to extract spectroscopic factors (SFs), related to the shell occupancy. SFs extracted from neutron knockout reactions show reductions, compared to the theoretical value, that are related to the neutron separation energy [1], whereas SFs from the well-established (e,e'p) reaction on stable nuclei are consistently 50% - 60% lower than those expected from the independent-particle shell model [2] over a wide range of masses. pardAs the extraction of spectroscopic factors from direct reaction measurements requires the comparison of data with calculated differential cross sections, the results are by nature model dependent. The influence of different scattering (commonly optical), and bound state potentials, should not be over-looked. Recent attempts to reanalyze single-neutron transfer data using a consistent approach have shown agreement with large basis shell model calculations [3], clearly conflicting with both the (e,e'p) and the knockout data. It has been suggested that the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient (ANC) is a more valid quantity to extract when the reaction is peripheral [4]. spectroscopic factors are, how they are extracted and what they really mean will be discussed in this talk.[4pt] [1] Alexandra Gade, and Thomas Glasmacher, Prog Part. Nucl. Phys. 60 (2008) 161-224.[0pt] [2] G.J. Kramer, H.P. Blok, and L. Lapik'as, Nucl. Phys. A679 (2001) 267-286.[0pt] [3] Jenny Lee, M.B. Tsang, and W.G. Lynch, Phys. Rev C 75, (2007), 064320.[0pt] [4] D.Y. Pan, F.M. Nunes, and A.M. Mukhamedzhanov, Phys. Rev. C 75, (2007) 024601.

  2. Uniqueness theorems in linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Knops, Robin John

    1971-01-01

    The classical result for uniqueness in elasticity theory is due to Kirchhoff. It states that the standard mixed boundary value problem for a homogeneous isotropic linear elastic material in equilibrium and occupying a bounded three-dimensional region of space possesses at most one solution in the classical sense, provided the Lame and shear moduli, A and J1 respectively, obey the inequalities (3 A + 2 J1) > 0 and J1>O. In linear elastodynamics the analogous result, due to Neumann, is that the initial-mixed boundary value problem possesses at most one solution provided the elastic moduli satisfy the same set of inequalities as in Kirchhoffs theorem. Most standard textbooks on the linear theory of elasticity mention only these two classical criteria for uniqueness and neglect altogether the abundant literature which has appeared since the original publications of Kirchhoff. To remedy this deficiency it seems appropriate to attempt a coherent description ofthe various contributions made to the study of uniquenes...

  3. Uniqueness and Non-uniqueness in the Einstein Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, H P; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; York, James W.

    2005-01-01

    We examine numerically a sequence of free data for the conformal thin sandwich (CTS) equations representing non-linearly perturbed Minkowski spacetimes. We find only one solution for the standard (four) CTS equations; however, we find {\\em two} distinct solutions for the same free data when the lapse is determined by a fifth elliptic equation arising from specification of the time derivative of the mean curvature. For a given {\\em physical} (conformally scaled) amplitude of the perturbation, the solution for the physical data $g_{ij}, K_{ij}$ nevertheless appears to be unique.

  4. Chiral Ionic Liquids in Chromatographic Separation and Spectroscopic Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Bwambok, David K.; Fakayode, Sayo O.; Warner, Isiah M.

    Chiral ionic liquids (CILs) are a subclass of ionic liquids (ILs) in which the cation, anion, or both may be chiral. The chirality can be central, axial, or planar. CILs possess a number of unique advantageous properties which are inherited from ionic liquids including negligible vapor pressure, wide liquidus temperature range, high thermal stability, and high tunability. Due to their dual functionalities as chiral selectors and chiral solvents simultaneously, CILs recently have been widely used both in enantiomeric chromatographic separation and in chiral spectroscopic discrimination. In this chapter, the various applications of CILs in chiral chromatographic separations such as GC, HPLC, CE, and MEKC are reviewed. The applications of CILs in enantiomeric spectroscopic discrimination using techniques such as NMR, fluorescence, and NIR are described. In addition, chiral recognition and separation mechanism using the CILs as chiral selectors or chiral solvents is also discussed.

  5. Lithium nephropathy: unique sonographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Salvo, Donald N; Park, Joseph; Laing, Faye C

    2012-04-01

    This case series describes a unique sonographic appearance consisting of numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci seen on renal sonograms of 10 adult patients receiving chronic lithium therapy. Clinically, chronic renal insufficiency was present in 6 and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in 2. Sonography showed numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci. Computed tomography in 5 patients confirmed microcysts and microcalcifications, which were fewer in number than on sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging in 2 patients confirmed microcysts in each case. Renal biopsy in 1 patient showed chronic interstitial nephritis, microcysts, and tubular dilatation. The diagnosis of lithium nephropathy should be considered when sonography shows these findings.

  6. Mucormycosis in India: unique features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Singh, Rachna

    2014-12-01

    Mucormycosis remains a devastating invasive fungal infection, with high mortality rates even after active management. The disease is being reported at an alarming frequency over the past decades from India. Indian mucormycosis has certain unique features. Rhino-orbito-cerebral presentation associated with uncontrolled diabetes is the predominant characteristic. Isolated renal mucormycosis has emerged as a new clinical entity. Apophysomyces elegans and Rhizopus homothallicus are emerging species in this region and uncommon agents such as Mucor irregularis and Thamnostylum lucknowense are also being reported. This review focuses on these distinct features of mucormycosis observed in India.

  7. UNIQUE ORAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raphael M. Ottenbrite; ZHAO Ruifeng; Sam Milstein

    1995-01-01

    An oral drug delivery system using proteinoid microspheres is discussed with respect to its unique dependence on pH. It has been found that certain drugs such as insulin and heparin can be encapsulated in proteinoid spheres at stomach pH's (1-3). These spheres also dissemble at intestinal pH's (6-7) releasing the drug for absorption. Using this technique low molecular weight heparin and human growth hormone have been orally delivered successfully to several animal species. Future work has been proposed to study the interaction and binding of the specific drugs with synthesized oligopeptides.

  8. Analysis of unique beta transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eman, B.; Krmpotic, F.; Tadic, D;

    1967-01-01

    The Heidelberg group measurements [For abstr. see Phys. Rev. Nucl. Sci. Vol. 15 (1965)] of unique forbidden transitions have been analysed. It has been found that experimental shape factors can be reproduced only with the induced pseudoscalar form factor d ...-non-conserving tensor form factor b > 0. In the former case they contradict Daniel's results [See abstr. 1966A10720] for 0- rarr 0+ transitions, whereas in the latter they are in disagreement with other known analyses of mu-meson capture, allowed and forbidden transitions. The conclusion appears to be independent...

  9. The in Silico Approach to Identify a Unique Plant-Derived Inhibitor Against E6 and E7 Oncogenic Proteins of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus 16 and 18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Globally, the human papillomavirus (HPV remains the foremost cause of cancer mortality among women. There is a need to identify natural anti-cancerous compounds that can fight against life-threatening infections by HPV. Various kinds of natural plant-originated compounds have been used in the traditional system of medicine for cancer therapy. Different studies have reported the effective inhibition of HPV infection enacted by certain natural compounds. Out of all the different HPV types, HPV-16 and 18 are the ones mainly associated with causing cervical cancer; furthermore, the E6 and E7 oncoproteins of these two high-risk HPV types typically interact with tumor protein 53 (p53 and retinoblastoma tumor suppressor proteins (pRb of human host which consequent to cancer formation. Objectives The goal of this study is to identify unique plant-originated compounds to utilize in order to combat the high-risk human papillomavirus oncoproteins using docking measures. Materials and Methods Twelve natural compounds jaceosidin, withaferin A, curcumin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, artemisinin, gingerol, ursolic acid, ferulic acid, berberin, silymarin, resveratrol, and indol-3-carbinol were docked against E6 and E7 oncoproteins of high-risk HPV types 16 and 18 using a protein-ligand docking software called AutoDock4.2. Results Out of these 12 natural compounds, withaferin A was found to inhibit all four oncoproteins with minimum binding energy. Conclusions These in silico findings indicate that withaferin A may be used as a common drug for cervical cancer caused by high-risk HPV types, perhaps by restoring the normal functions of tumor suppressor proteins.

  10. 3D Spectroscopic Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Bershady, Matthew A

    2009-01-01

    In this Chapter we review the challenges of, and opportunities for, 3D spectroscopy, and how these have lead to new and different approaches to sampling astronomical information. We describe and categorize existing instruments on 4m and 10m telescopes. Our primary focus is on grating-dispersed spectrographs. We discuss how to optimize dispersive elements, such as VPH gratings, to achieve adequate spectral resolution, high throughput, and efficient data packing to maximize spatial sampling for 3D spectroscopy. We review and compare the various coupling methods that make these spectrographs ``3D,'' including fibers, lenslets, slicers, and filtered multi-slits. We also describe Fabry-Perot and spatial-heterodyne interferometers, pointing out their advantages as field-widened systems relative to conventional, grating-dispersed spectrographs. We explore the parameter space all these instruments sample, highlighting regimes open for exploitation. Present instruments provide a foil for future development. We give an...

  11. Introducing Students to a Synthetic and Spectroscopic Study of the Free Radical Chlorine Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Sarah C.; Cleland, Walter E.; Hammer, Nathan I.

    2017-01-01

    This advanced undergraduate chemistry laboratory exercise takes advantage of the unique spectroscopic properties of the free radical chlorine dioxide to allow for a direct comparison of its symmetric stretch in both the ground and excited states. It incorporates several subject areas covered in an undergraduate chemistry degree (synthesis,…

  12. Improved spectroscopic parameters for transiting planet hosts

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, Guillermo; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Buchhave, Lars A; Winn, Joshua N; Holman, Matthew J; Carter, Joshua A

    2012-01-01

    We report homogeneous spectroscopic determinations of the effective temperature, metallicity, and projected rotational velocity for the host stars of 56 transiting planets. Our analysis is based primarily on the Stellar Parameter Classification (SPC) technique. We investigate systematic errors by examining subsets of the data with two other methods that have often been used in previous studies (SME and MOOG). The SPC and SME results, both based on comparisons between synthetic spectra and actual spectra, show strong correlations between temperature, [Fe/H], and log g when solving for all three quantities simultaneously. In contrast the MOOG results, based on a more traditional curve-of-growth approach, show no such correlations. To combat the correlations and improve the accuracy of the temperatures and metallicities, we repeat the SPC analysis with a constraint on log g based on the mean stellar density that can be derived from the analysis of the transit light curves. Previous studies that have not taken ad...

  13. Unique Features of Mobile Commerce

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Xiaojun; IIJIMA Junichi; HO Sho

    2004-01-01

    While the market potentials and impacts of web-based e-commerce are still in the ascendant, the advances in wireless technologies and mobile networks have brought about a new business opportunity and research attention, what is termed mobile commerce. Commonly, mobile commerce is considered to be another new application of existing web-based e-commerce onto wireless networks, but as an independent business area, mobile commerce has its own advantages and challenges as opposed to traditional e-commerce applications. This paper focuses on exploring the unique features of mobile commerce as. Compared with traditional e-commerce. Also, there are still some limitations arisen in m-commerce in contrast to web-based e-commerce. Finally, current state of mobile commerce in Japan is presented in brief, with an introduction of several cases involving mobile commerce applications in today 's marketplace.

  14. Unique features of space reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, David

    Space reactors are designed to meet a unique set of requirements; they must be sufficiently compact to be launched in a rocket to their operational location, operate for many years without maintenance and servicing, operate in extreme environments, and reject heat by radiation to space. To meet these restrictions, operating temperatures are much greater than in terrestrial power plants, and the reactors tend to have a fast neutron spectrum. Currently, a new generation of space reactor power plants is being developed. The major effort is in the SP-100 program, where the power plant is being designed for seven years of full power, and no maintenance operation at a reactor outlet operating temperature of 1350 K.

  15. The probabilities of unique events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeet S Khemlani

    Full Text Available Many theorists argue that the probabilities of unique events, even real possibilities such as President Obama's re-election, are meaningless. As a consequence, psychologists have seldom investigated them. We propose a new theory (implemented in a computer program in which such estimates depend on an intuitive non-numerical system capable only of simple procedures, and a deliberative system that maps intuitions into numbers. The theory predicts that estimates of the probabilities of conjunctions should often tend to split the difference between the probabilities of the two conjuncts. We report two experiments showing that individuals commit such violations of the probability calculus, and corroborating other predictions of the theory, e.g., individuals err in the same way even when they make non-numerical verbal estimates, such as that an event is highly improbable.

  16. The Evolution of Human Uniqueness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Robert

    2017-01-09

    The human species is an outlier in the natural world. Two million years ago our ancestors were a slightly odd apes. Now we occupy the largest ecological and geographical range of any species, have larger biomass, and process more energy. Usually, this transformation is explained in terms of cognitive ability-people are just smarter than all the rest. In this paper I argue that culture, our ability to learn from each other, and cooperation, our ability to make common cause with large groups of unrelated individuals are the real roots of human uniqueness, and sketch an evolutionary account of how these crucial abilities co-evolved with each other and with other features of our life histories.

  17. The 1997 spectroscopic GEISA databank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Arie, E.; Ballard, J.; Barbe, A.; Bjoraker, G.; Bonnet, B.; Brown, L. R.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Champion, J. P.; Chedin, A.; Chursin, A.; Clerbaux, C.; Duxbury, G.; Flaud, J.-M.; Fourrie, N.; Fayt, A.; Graner, G.; Gamache, R.; Goldman, A.; Golovko, V.; Guelachvili, G.; Hartmann, J. M.; Hilico, J. C.; Hillman, J.; Lefevre, G.; Lellouch, E.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nemtchinov, V.; Newnham, D. A.; Nikitin, A.; Orphal, J.; Perrin, A.; Reuter, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Rosenmann, L.; Rothman, L. S.; Scott, N. A.; Selby, J.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Sirota, J. M.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, K. M.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Tipping, R. H.; Urban, S.; Varanasi, P.; Weber, M.

    1999-05-01

    The current version GEISA-97 of the computer-accessible database system GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmospheriques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) is described. This catalogue contains 1,346,266 entries. These are the spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located between 0 and 22656 cm-1. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the giant planets. GEISA-97 contains also a catalog of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. The modifications and improvements made to the earlier edition (GEISA-92) and the data management software are described.

  18. High-Resolution Photoionization, Photoelectron and Photodissociation Studies. Determination of Accurate Energetic and Spectroscopic Database for Combustion Radicals and Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Cheuk-Yiu [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2016-04-25

    The main goal of this research program was to obtain accurate thermochemical and spectroscopic data, such as ionization energies (IEs), 0 K bond dissociation energies, 0 K heats of formation, and spectroscopic constants for radicals and molecules and their ions of relevance to combustion chemistry. Two unique, generally applicable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser photoion-photoelectron apparatuses have been developed in our group, which have used for high-resolution photoionization, photoelectron, and photodissociation studies for many small molecules of combustion relevance.

  19. Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yongheng

    2011-01-01

    The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) is a meridian reflecting Schmidt telescope with a clear aperture of four meters, a focal length of 20 meters and a field of view of five degrees. By using active optics technique to control its reflecting corrector, the LAMOST is made a unique astronomical instrument in combining a large aperture with a wide field of view. The available large focal plane of 1.75 meter in diameter can accommodate up to 4,000 fibers,

  20. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haw [Moraga, CA; Cang, Hu [Berkeley, CA; Xu, Cangshan [Berkeley, CA; Wong, Chung M [San Gabriel, CA

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  1. The Unique Destination Proposition of Eskisehir: Industrial Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yılmaz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the transformation of Unique Sales Proposition (USP concept which is one of the most important strategies of advertising history, to the Unique Destination Proposition (UDP for the case of Eskisehir. This study aims to propose industrial heritage as the UDP of Eskisehir by a descriptive approach. Industrial heritage helps Eskisehir destination brand to attain a meaningful, sustainable and distinctive dimension from its competitors. The current industrial heritage samples of Eskisehir were initially evaluated in this context. Subsequently, in the focus of the relation between industrial heritage and tourism, an excursion route and a tour program is suggested including the unique industrial heritage values of Eskisehir.

  2. CYP1B1: a unique gene with unique characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiq, Muneeb A; Dada, Rima; Sharma, Reetika; Saluja, Daman; Dada, Tanuj

    2014-01-01

    CYP1B1, a recently described dioxin inducible oxidoreductase, is a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily involved in the metabolism of estradiol, retinol, benzo[a]pyrene, tamoxifen, melatonin, sterols etc. It plays important roles in numerous physiological processes and is expressed at mRNA level in many tissues and anatomical compartments. CYP1B1 has been implicated in scores of disorders. Analyses of the recent studies suggest that CYP1B1 can serve as a universal/ideal cancer marker and a candidate gene for predictive diagnosis. There is plethora of literature available about certain aspects of CYP1B1 that have not been interpreted, discussed and philosophized upon. The present analysis examines CYP1B1 as a peculiar gene with certain distinctive characteristics like the uniqueness in its chromosomal location, gene structure and organization, involvement in developmentally important disorders, tissue specific, not only expression, but splicing, potential as a universal cancer marker due to its involvement in key aspects of cellular metabolism, use in diagnosis and predictive diagnosis of various diseases and the importance and function of CYP1B1 mRNA in addition to the regular translation. Also CYP1B1 is very difficult to express in heterologous expression systems, thereby, halting its functional studies. Here we review and analyze these exceptional and startling characteristics of CYP1B1 with inputs from our own experiences in order to get a better insight into its molecular biology in health and disease. This may help to further understand the etiopathomechanistic aspects of CYP1B1 mediated diseases paving way for better research strategies and improved clinical management.

  3. Astronomy Outreach for Large and Unique Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, D.; Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Kendall, J. S.; Dugan, C.

    2013-04-01

    In this session, we discuss different approaches to reaching large audiences. In addition to star parties and astronomy events, the audiences for some of the events include music concerts or festivals, sick children and their families, minority communities, American Indian reservations, and tourist sites such as the National Mall. The goal is to bring science directly to the public—to people who attend astronomy events and to people who do not come to star parties, science museums, or science festivals. These programs allow the entire community to participate in astronomy activities to enhance the public appreciation of science. These programs attract large enthusiastic crowds often with young children participating in these family learning experiences. The public will become more informed, educated, and inspired about astronomy and will also be provided with information that will allow them to continue to learn after this outreach activity. Large and unique audiences often have common problems, and their solutions and the lessons learned will be presented. Interaction with the participants in this session will provide important community feedback used to improve astronomy outreach for large and unique audiences. New ways to expand astronomy outreach to new large audiences will be discussed.

  4. Analysis of variance in spectroscopic imaging data from human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Jin Tae; Reddy, Rohith; Sinha, Saurabh; Bhargava, Rohit

    2012-01-17

    The analysis of cell types and disease using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is promising. The approach lacks an appreciation of the limits of performance for the technology, however, which limits both researcher efforts in improving the approach and acceptance by practitioners. One factor limiting performance is the variance in data arising from biological diversity, measurement noise or from other sources. Here we identify the sources of variation by first employing a high throughout sampling platform of tissue microarrays (TMAs) to record a sufficiently large and diverse set data. Next, a comprehensive set of analysis of variance (ANOVA) models is employed to analyze the data. Estimating the portions of explained variation, we quantify the primary sources of variation, find the most discriminating spectral metrics, and recognize the aspects of the technology to improve. The study provides a framework for the development of protocols for clinical translation and provides guidelines to design statistically valid studies in the spectroscopic analysis of tissue.

  5. Visualizing the zero order basis of the spectroscopic Hamiltonian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, George L; Kellman, Michael E

    2012-01-14

    Recent works have shown that a generalization of the spectroscopic effective Hamiltonian can describe spectra in surprising regions, such as isomerization barriers. In this work, we seek to explain why the effective Hamiltonian is successful where there was reason to doubt that it would work at all. All spectroscopic Hamiltonians have an underlying abstract zero-order basis (ZOB) which is the "ideal" basis for a given form and parameterization of the Hamiltonian. Without a physical model there is no way to transform this abstract basis into a coordinate representation. To this end, we present a method of obtaining the coordinate space representation of the abstract ZOB of a spectroscopic effective Hamiltonian. This method works equally well for generalized effective Hamiltonians that encompass above-barrier multiwell behavior, and standard effective Hamiltonians for the vicinity of a single potential minimum. Our approach relies on a set of converged eigenfunctions obtained from a variational calculation on a potential surface. By making a one-to-one correspondence between the energy eigenstates of the effective Hamiltonian and those of the coordinate space Hamiltonian, a physical representation of the abstract ZOB is calculated. We find that the ZOB basis naturally adjusts its complexity depending on the underlying nature of phase space, which allows spectroscopic Hamiltonians to succeed for systems sampling multiple stationary points.

  6. Synthesis of 5-Fluorouracil conjugated LaF{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+}/PEG-COOH nanoparticles and its studies on the interaction with bovine serum albumin: spectroscopic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangaiyarkarasi, Rajendiran; Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu, E-mail: sganesan@annauniv.edu, E-mail: ganesansingaravelu@gmail.com [Anna University, Department of Medical Physics (India)

    2015-03-15

    The luminescent lanthanide-doped nanoparticles have gathered considerable attention in many fields especially in biomedicine. In this work, the lanthanum fluoride-doped terbium nanoparticles (LaF{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+} NPs) via simple chemical precipitation method has been synthesized and functionalized with polyethylene glycol. The size and the shape of the nanoparticles are confirmed using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The conjugation of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and thus synthesized nanoparticles (NPs) were confirmed using various spectroscopic methods such as UV–Visible spectroscopy, fluorescence steady state, and excited state spectroscopy studies. The enhancement in fluorescence emission (λ = 543 nm) of drug-conjugated nanoparticles confirms the Vander Waals force of attraction due to F–F bonding between the drug and the nanoparticles. Further, the effects of 5FU-NPs in carrier protein were investigated using bovine serum albumin as a protein model. The 5FU–LaF{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+} nanoparticles binding is illustrated with binding constant and number of binding sites. The structural change of bovine serum albumin has been studied using circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis.

  7. SPECTROSCOPIC PROBING OF POTENTIAL SURFACES IN REACTIVE COLLISIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Telle, H.

    1985-01-01

    For the investigation of unstable intermediates, ABC*, which constitute the "transition states" in some simple reactive collisions, spectroscopic methods are beginning to provide valuable results. In a (relatively) simple approach molecules are photodissociated, and the interaction potentials during the process of separation (half-collision) are mapped in either absorption or emission ; the method will be described exemplary for the photolysis of NaI, giving rise to emission from NaI≠*. For r...

  8. 2D NMR-spectroscopic screening reveals polyketides in ladybugs

    OpenAIRE

    Deyrup, Stephen T.; Eckman, Laura E.; McCarthy, Patrick H.; Smedley, Scott R.; Meinwald, Jerrold; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2011-01-01

    Small molecules of biological origin continue to yield the most promising leads for drug design, but systematic approaches for exploring nature’s cache of structural diversity are lacking. Here, we demonstrate the use of 2D NMR spectroscopy to screen a library of biorationally selected insect metabolite samples for partial structures indicating the presence of new chemical entities. This NMR-spectroscopic survey enabled detection of novel compounds in complex metabolite mixtures without prior...

  9. The ionised, radical and molecular Milky Way: spectroscopic surveys with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Mark; Dickinson, Clive; Mottram, Joseph C; Klaassen, Pamela; Ginsburg, Adam; Longmore, Steve; Remijan, Anthony; Menten, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The bandwith, sensitivity and sheer survey speed of the SKA offers unique potential for deep spectroscopic surveys of the Milky Way. Within the frequency bands available to the SKA lie many transitions that trace the ionised, radical and molecular components of the interstellar medium and which will revolutionise our understanding of many physical processes. In this chapter we describe the impact on our understanding of the Milky Way that can be achieved by spectroscopic SKA surveys, including "out of the box" early science with radio recombination lines, Phase 1 surveys of the molecular ISM using anomalous formaldehyde absorption, and full SKA surveys of ammonia inversion lines.

  10. Spectroscopic properties of chlorophyll f.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqiong; Cai, Zheng-Li; Chen, Min

    2013-09-26

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of chlorophyll f (newly discovered in 2010) have been measured in acetone and methanol at different temperatures. The spectral analysis and assignment are compared with the spectra of chlorophyll a and d under the same experimental conditions. The spectroscopic properties of these chlorophylls have further been studied by the aid of density functional CAM-B3LYP and high-level symmetric adapted coupled-cluster configuration interaction calculations. The main Q and Soret bands and possible sidebands of chlorophylls have been determined. The photophysical properties of chlorophyll f are discussed.

  11. UNIQUENESS ON ZERO PRESSURE GAS DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄飞敏; 王振

    2001-01-01

    By introducing a new idea, the authors prove the uniqueness of weak solution of pressureless gases with the large initial data. In particular, uniqueness theorem is obtained in the same functional space as the existence theorem.

  12. The GEISA Spectroscopic Database System in its latest Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Crépeau, L.; Capelle, V.; Scott, N. A.; Armante, R.; Chédin, A.

    2009-04-01

    GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information)[1] is a computer-accessible spectroscopic database system, designed to facilitate accurate forward planetary radiative transfer calculations using a line-by-line and layer-by-layer approach. It was initiated in 1976. Currently, GEISA is involved in activities related to the assessment of the capabilities of IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer on board the METOP European satellite -http://earth-sciences.cnes.fr/IASI/)) through the GEISA/IASI database[2] derived from GEISA. Since the Metop (http://www.eumetsat.int) launch (October 19th 2006), GEISA/IASI is the reference spectroscopic database for the validation of the level-1 IASI data, using the 4A radiative transfer model[3] (4A/LMD http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr; 4A/OP co-developed by LMD and Noveltis with the support of CNES). Also, GEISA is involved in planetary research, i.e.: modelling of Titan's atmosphere, in the comparison with observations performed by Voyager: http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/, or by ground-based telescopes, and by the instruments on board the Cassini-Huygens mission: http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Cassini-Huygens/index.html. The updated 2008 edition of GEISA (GEISA-08), a system comprising three independent sub-databases devoted, respectively, to line transition parameters, infrared and ultraviolet/visible absorption cross-sections, microphysical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosols, will be described. Spectroscopic parameters quality requirement will be discussed in the context of comparisons between observed or simulated Earth's and other planetary atmosphere spectra. GEISA is implemented on the CNES/CNRS Ether Products and Services Centre WEB site (http://ether.ipsl.jussieu.fr), where all archived spectroscopic data can be handled through general and user friendly associated management software facilities. More than 350 researchers are

  13. On the uniqueness of supersymmetric attractors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taniya Mandal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the uniqueness of supersymmetric attractors in four-dimensional N=2 supergravity theories coupled to n vector multiplets. We prove that for a given charge configuration the supersymmetry preserving axion free attractors are unique. We generalise the analysis to axionic attractors and state the conditions for uniqueness explicitly. We consider the example of a two-parameter model and find all solutions to the supersymmetric attractor equations and discuss their uniqueness.

  14. 77 FR 69393 - Unique Device Identification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 801 RIN 0910-AG31 Unique Device Identification... unique device identification system as required by recent amendments to the Federal Food, Drug, and..., FDA published a proposed rule to establish a unique device identification system, as required by...

  15. On chromatic and flow polynomial unique graphs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duan, Yinghua; Wu, Haidong; Yu, Qinglin

    2008-01-01

    ... research on graphs uniquely determined by their chromatic polynomials and more recently on their Tutte polynomials, but rather spotty research on graphs uniquely determined by their flow polynomials or the combination of both chromatic and flow polynomials. This article is an initiation of investigation on graphs uniquely determin...

  16. A Unique Pedagogical Approach to Voting and Public Goods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Douglas A.; Chappell, Matthew; Baggett, L. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Fourth grade students at a public elementary school in Houston, Texas, participated in a one-week exercise intended to mimic the process of creating a public good through a democratic process. The exercise involved students in four separate classes designing a class party with different characteristics (theme, music, and food) through a voluntary…

  17. EEL spectroscopic tomography: Towards a new dimension in nanomaterials analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yedra, Lluis, E-mail: llyedra@el.ub.es [Laboratory of Electron Nanoscopies (LENS)-MIND/IN2UB, Dept. d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, c/ Marti Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); CCiT, Scientific and Technological Centers, Universitat de Barcelona, C/Lluis Sole i Sabaris 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Eljarrat, Alberto [Laboratory of Electron Nanoscopies (LENS)-MIND/IN2UB, Dept. d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, c/ Marti Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Arenal, Raul [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Fundacion ARAID, E-50004 Zaragoza (Spain); Pellicer, Eva; Cabo, Moises [Departament de Fisica, Facultat de Ciencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Lopez-Ortega, Alberto; Estrader, Marta [CIN2(CIN-CSIC) and Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology, Campus de la UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Sort, Jordi [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Departament de Fisica, Facultat de Ciencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Baro, Maria Dolors [Departament de Fisica, Facultat de Ciencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); and others

    2012-11-15

    Electron tomography is a widely spread technique for recovering the three dimensional (3D) shape of nanostructured materials. Using a spectroscopic signal to achieve a reconstruction adds a fourth chemical dimension to the 3D structure. Up to date, energy filtering of the images in the transmission electron microscope (EFTEM) is the usual spectroscopic method even if most of the information in the spectrum is lost. Unlike EFTEM tomography, the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectrum images (SI) for tomographic reconstruction retains all chemical information, and the possibilities of this new approach still remain to be fully exploited. In this article we prove the feasibility of EEL spectroscopic tomography at low voltages (80 kV) and short acquisition times from data acquired using an aberration corrected instrument and data treatment by Multivariate Analysis (MVA), applied to Fe{sub x}Co{sub (3-x)}O{sub 4}@Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} mesoporous materials. This approach provides a new scope into materials; the recovery of full EELS signal in 3D. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EELS-SI tomography was performed at low voltage and low acquisition times. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MVA has been applied for noise reduction and information extraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tomographic reconstruction has been achieved for chemical information. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elemental distribution extraction in 3D has been proved.

  18. EEL spectroscopic tomography: towards a new dimension in nanomaterials analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedra, Lluís; Eljarrat, Alberto; Arenal, Raúl; Pellicer, Eva; Cabo, Moisés; López-Ortega, Alberto; Estrader, Marta; Sort, Jordi; Baró, Maria Dolors; Estradé, Sònia; Peiró, Francesca

    2012-11-01

    Electron tomography is a widely spread technique for recovering the three dimensional (3D) shape of nanostructured materials. Using a spectroscopic signal to achieve a reconstruction adds a fourth chemical dimension to the 3D structure. Up to date, energy filtering of the images in the transmission electron microscope (EFTEM) is the usual spectroscopic method even if most of the information in the spectrum is lost. Unlike EFTEM tomography, the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectrum images (SI) for tomographic reconstruction retains all chemical information, and the possibilities of this new approach still remain to be fully exploited. In this article we prove the feasibility of EEL spectroscopic tomography at low voltages (80 kV) and short acquisition times from data acquired using an aberration corrected instrument and data treatment by Multivariate Analysis (MVA), applied to Fe(x)Co((3-x))O(4)@Co(3)O(4) mesoporous materials. This approach provides a new scope into materials; the recovery of full EELS signal in 3D.

  19. Solutions of fractional nabla difference equations - existence and uniqueness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagan Mohan Jonnalagadda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we discuss existence, uniqueness and dependency of solutions of nonlinear fractional nabla difference equations in a Banach space equipped with a suitable norm, using the contractive mapping approach. As an application of the established results we present and analyse a few examples.

  20. Uniqueness in inverse elastic scattering with finitely many incident waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elschner, Johannes [Weierstrass-Institut fuer Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (WIAS) im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany); Yamamoto, Masahiro [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences

    2009-07-01

    We consider the third and fourth exterior boundary value problems of linear isotropic elasticity and present uniqueness results for the corresponding inverse scattering problems with polyhedral-type obstacles and a finite number of incident plane elastic waves. Our approach is based on a reflection principle for the Navier equation. (orig.)

  1. The stereochemistry of baishouwubenzophenone, a unique atropisomer from C. wilfordii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhixu; Wang, Zhiqiang; Li, Linwei; Zhang, Ke; Peng, Qing; Wang, Shuyun; Wang, Jinhui; Huang, Jian; Sun, Tiemin

    2016-12-01

    Baishouwubenzophenone (1), possessing a unique atropisomeric feature, has been isolated from the roots of Cynanchum wilfordii. The congested structure makes it showing optical activity and consequently the absolute configuration was identified by experimental CD and computational approaches. Configurational assignment was further confirmed by exciton chirality method. The structural features in baishouwubenzophenone molecule allow it to be a potential atropisomeric ligand in asymmetric synthesis.

  2. Spectroscopic investigation of local mechanical impedance of living cells

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luca; Benseny-Cases, Núria; Mayeaux, Véronique; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of PC12 living cells have been studied at the nanoscale with a Force Feedback Microscope using two experimental approaches. Firstly, the local mechanical impedance of the cell membrane has been mapped simultaneously to the cell morphology at constant force. As the force of the interaction is gradually increased, we observed the appearance of the sub-membrane cytoskeleton. We shall compare the results obtained with this method with the measurement of other existing techniques. Secondly, a spectroscopic investigation has been performed varying the indentation of the tip in the cell membrane and consequently the force applied on it. In contrast with conventional dynamic atomic force microscopy techniques, here the small oscillation amplitude of the tip is not necessarily imposed at the cantilever first eigenmode. This allows the user to arbitrarily choose the excitation frequency in developing spectroscopic AFM techniques. The mechanical response of the PC12 cell membrane is found to be...

  3. The TNG EROs Spectroscopic Identification Survey (TESIS)

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, P; Ceca, R D; Severgnini, P; Braito, V; Bender, R; Drory, N; Feulner, G; Hopp, U; Mannucci, F; Maraston, C

    2003-01-01

    We are carrying on a near-IR very low resolution spectroscopic follow-up in parallel with XMM-Newton observations of a complete sample of ~30 bright (K'<18.5) Extremely Red Objects (EROs) selected over an area of 360 arcmin^2 of the MUNICS survey. We here present the preliminary results of the spectroscopic and X-ray data analysis.

  4. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  5. Spectroscopic modeling and characterization of a collisionally confined laser-ablated plasma plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, M E; Mancini, R C; Bailey, J; Filuk, A; Clark, B; Lake, P; Abdallah, J

    2007-11-01

    Plasma plumes produced by laser ablation are an established method for manufacturing the high quality stoichiometrically complex thin films used for a variety of optical, photoelectric, and superconducting applications. The state and reproducibility of the plasma close to the surface of the irradiated target plays a critical role in producing high quality thin films. Unfortunately, this dense plasma has historically eluded quantifiable characterization. The difficulty in modeling the plume formation arises in the accounting for the small amount of energy deposited into the target when physical properties of these exotic target materials are not known. In this work we obtain the high density state of the plasma plume through the use of an experimental spectroscopic technique and a custom spectroscopic model. In addition to obtaining detailed temperature and density profiles, issues regarding line broadening and opacity for spectroscopic characterization will be addressed for this unique environment.

  6. Spectroscopically Enhanced Method and System for Multi-Factor Biometric Authentication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishva, Davar

    This paper proposes a spectroscopic method and system for preventing spoofing of biometric authentication. One of its focus is to enhance biometrics authentication with a spectroscopic method in a multifactor manner such that a person's unique ‘spectral signatures’ or ‘spectral factors’ are recorded and compared in addition to a non-spectroscopic biometric signature to reduce the likelihood of imposter getting authenticated. By using the ‘spectral factors’ extracted from reflectance spectra of real fingers and employing cluster analysis, it shows how the authentic fingerprint image presented by a real finger can be distinguished from an authentic fingerprint image embossed on an artificial finger, or molded on a fingertip cover worn by an imposter. This paper also shows how to augment two widely used biometrics systems (fingerprint and iris recognition devices) with spectral biometrics capabilities in a practical manner and without creating much overhead or inconveniencing their users.

  7. Sick, the spectroscopic inference crank

    CERN Document Server

    Casey, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    There exists an inordinate amount of spectral data in both public and private astronomical archives which remain severely under-utilised. The lack of reliable open-source tools for analysing large volumes of spectra contributes to this situation, which is poised to worsen as large surveys successively release orders of magnitude more spectra. In this Article I introduce sick, the spectroscopic inference crank, a flexible and fast Bayesian tool for inferring astrophysical parameters from spectra. sick can be used to provide a nearest-neighbour estimate of model parameters, a numerically optimised point estimate, or full Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability distributions. This generality empowers any astronomer to capitalise on the plethora of published synthetic and observed spectra, and make precise inferences for a host of astrophysical (and nuisance) quantities. Model intensities can be reliably approximated from existing grids of synthetic or observed spectra using linear multi-di...

  8. Unique Signal mathematical analysis task group FY03 status report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baty, Roy Stuart (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Johnston, Anna Marie; Hart, Elizabeth (Utah State University, Logan, UT); White, Allan (NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA); Cooper, James Arlin

    2003-12-01

    The Unique Signal is a key constituent of Enhanced Nuclear Detonation Safety (ENDS). Although the Unique Signal approach is well prescribed and mathematically assured, there are numerous unsolved mathematical problems that could help assess the risk of deviations from the ideal approach. Some of the mathematics-based results shown in this report are: 1. The risk that two patterns with poor characteristics (easily generated by inadvertent processes) could be combined through exclusive-or mixing to generate an actual Unique Signal pattern has been investigated and found to be minimal (not significant when compared to the incompatibility metric of actual Unique Signal patterns used in nuclear weapons). 2. The risk of generating actual Unique Signal patterns with linear feedback shift registers is minimal, but the patterns in use are not as invulnerable to inadvertent generation by dependent processes as previously thought. 3. New methods of testing pair-wise incompatibility threats have resulted in no significant problems found for the set of Unique Signal patterns currently used. Any new patterns introduced would have to be carefully assessed for compatibility with existing patterns, since some new patterns under consideration were found to be deficient when associated with other patterns in use. 4. Markov models were shown to correspond to some of the engineered properties of Unique Signal sequences. This gives new support for the original design objectives. 5. Potential dependence among events (caused by a variety of communication protocols) has been studied. New evidence has been derived of the risk associated with combined communication of multiple events, and of the improvement in abnormal-environment safety that can be achieved through separate-event communication.

  9. The Homunculus: a Unique Astrophysical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gull, T. R.; Nielsen, K. E.

    η Car is surrounded by bipolar shells, the Homunculus and the internal Little Homunculus, that are observed in both emission and absorption. Thin disks, located between the bipolar lobes, include the very bright Weigelt blobs and the neutral emission structure called the Strontium filament. All are affected by changes in UV and X-Ray flux of the binary system. For example, the normally ionized Little Homunculus recombines during the few month long spectroscopic minimum and then reionizes. Spectral data, obtained with Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) and with Very Large Telescope UltraViolet Echelle Spectrograph (VLT/UVES), provide a wealth of information on spectroscopic properties of neutral and singly-ionized metals and on chemistry of nitrogen rich, carbon, oxygen poor, dense, warm gas. This information is important to understand gamma ray bursters (GRB) that reveal red-shifted near-UV metallic absorptions from pre-GRB stellar ejecta.

  10. Unique Physician Identification Number (UPIN) Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Unique Physician Identification Number (UPIN) Directory contains selected information on physicians, doctors of Osteopathy, limited licensed practitioners and...

  11. How spectroscopic ellipsometry can aid graphene technology?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, Maria, E-mail: maria.losurdo@cnr.it; Giangregorio, Maria M.; Bianco, Giuseppe V.; Capezzuto, Pio; Bruno, Giovanni

    2014-11-28

    We explore the effects of substrate, grain size, oxidation and cleaning on the optical properties of chemical vapor deposited polycrystalline monolayer graphene exploiting spectroscopic ellipsometry in the NIR-Vis–UV range. Both Drude–Lorentz oscillators' and point-by-point fit approaches are used to analyze the ellipsometric spectra. For monolayer graphene, since anisotropy cannot be resolved, an isotropic model is used. A prominent absorption peak at approximately 4.8 eV, which is a mixture of π–π* interband transitions at the M-point of the Brillouin zone and of the π-plasmonic excitation, is observed. We discuss the sensitivity of this peak to the structural and cleaning quality of graphene. The comparison with previous published dielectric function spectra of graphene is discussed giving a rationale for the observed differences. - Highlights: • Optical properties of graphene are determined by ellipsometry on copper and on glass. • Optical spectra reveal the cleaning quality of transferred graphene. • Sensitivity of absorption peak to graphene structural quality is proven. • Optical properties are proven to be sensitive to oxidation of graphene. • Electronic interaction with substrate affects graphene optical properties.

  12. Alpbach Summer School - a unique learning experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, K.; Aulinas, J.; Clifford, D.; Krejci, D.; Topham, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Alpbach Summer School is a ten-day program that provides a unique opportunity for young european science and engineering students, both undergraduate and graduate, to learn how to approach the entire design process of a space mission. The theme of the 2010 Summer School was "New Space Missions to Understand Climate Change", a current, challenging, very broad and complex topic. The program was established more than 35 years ago and is organised in two interrelated parts: a series of lectures held by renowned experts in the field (in the case of this specific year, climate change and space engineering experts) that provides a technical and scientific background for the workshops that follow, the core of the Summer School. For the workshops the students are split into four international, interdisciplinary teams of about 15 students. In 2010 every team had to complete a number of tasks, four in total: (1) identify climate change research gaps and design a space mission that has not yet been flown or proposed, (2) define the science objectives and requirements of the mission, (3) design a spacecraft that meets the mission requirements, which includes spacecraft design and construction, payload definition, orbit calculations, but also the satellite launch, operation and mission costs and (4) write up a short mission proposal and present the results to an expert review panel. Achieving these tasks in only a few days in a multicultural, interdisciplinary team represents a major challenge for all participants and provides an excellent practical learning experience. Over the course of the program, students do not just learn facts about climate change and space engineering, but scientists also learn from engineers and engineers from scientists. The participants have to deepen their knowledge in an often unfamiliar field, develop organisational and team-work skills and work under pressure. Moreover, teams are supported by team and roving tutors and get the opportunity to

  13. Integrated microfluidic spectroscopic sensor using arrayed waveguide grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhixiong; Glidle, Andrew; Ironside, Charles N.; Sorel, Marc; Strain, Michael; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Yin, Huabing

    2013-08-01

    With non-invasive properties and high sensitivities, portable optical biosensors are extremely desirable for point-of-care (POC) applications. Lab-on-a-chip technology such as microfluidics has been treated as an ideal approach to integrate complex sample processing and analysis units with optical detection elements. The work in this paper has developed an integrated dispersive component in combination with a microfluidic chip, providing a portable and inexpensive platform for on-chip spectroscopic sensing. We demonstrate an integrated microfluidic spectroscopic sensor by using an arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) device. In particular, a visible AWG device (λc=680nm) with chip size of 12.1mm by 1.5mm was designed and fabricated by employing flamed hydrolysis deposited (FHD) silica as the waveguide material. A straight input waveguide is used to perform device characterization while a perpendicular curved waveguide is employed to introduce laser excitation light. A polymer microfluidic chip is integrated with the AWG device by oxygen plasma bonding. To prove effectiveness of the integrated spectroscopic sensor, fluorescence spectrum of an organic fluorophore (Cy5) was tested. Reconstructed spectrum by using the AWG device is compared with the outcome from a conventional spectrometer and a good consistency is presented.

  14. Uniqueness: skews bit occurrence frequencies in randomly generated fingerprint libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nelson G

    2016-08-01

    Requiring that randomly generated chemical fingerprint libraries have unique fingerprints such that no two fingerprints are identical causes a systematic skew in bit occurrence frequencies, the proportion at which specified bits are set. Observed frequencies (O) at which each bit is set within the resulting libraries systematically differ from frequencies at which bits are set at fingerprint generation (E). Observed frequencies systematically skew toward 0.5, with the effect being more pronounced as library size approaches the compound space, which is the total number of unique possible fingerprints given the number of bit positions each fingerprint contains. The effect is quantified for varying library sizes as a fraction of the overall compound space, and for changes in the specified frequency E. The cause and implications for this systematic skew are subsequently discussed. When generating random libraries of chemical fingerprints, the imposition of a uniqueness requirement should either be avoided or taken into account.

  15. Uniqueness of time-independent electromagnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Per W.

    1974-01-01

    As a comment on a recent paper by Steele, a more general uniqueness theorem for time-independent fields is mentioned. ©1974 American Institute of Physics......As a comment on a recent paper by Steele, a more general uniqueness theorem for time-independent fields is mentioned. ©1974 American Institute of Physics...

  16. Some Graphs Containing Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, two classes of graphs of arbitrary order are described which contain unique Hamiltonian cycles. All the graphs have mean vertex degree greater than one quarter the order of the graph. The Hamiltonian cycles are detailed, their uniqueness proved and simple rules for the construction of the adjacency matrix of the graphs are given.…

  17. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  18. 78 FR 58785 - Unique Device Identification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... 16, 801, 803, et al. Unique Device Identification System; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78... 0910-AG31 Unique Device Identification System AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final... will substantially reduce existing obstacles to the adequate identification of medical devices used in...

  19. A note on uniquely (nil clean ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Sahebi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A ring $R$ is uniquely (nil clean in case for any $a\\in R$‎ ‎there exists a uniquely idempotent $e\\in R$ such that $a-e$ is‎ ‎invertible (nilpotent‎. ‎Let‎ ‎$C=\\small\\left(‎‎\\begin{array}{cc}‎‎A & V \\\\‎ ‎W & B‎‎\\end{array}‎‎\\right$‎ ‎be the Morita Context ring‎. ‎We determine conditions under which the rings $A‎, ‎B$‎ ‎are uniquely (nil clean‎. ‎Moreover we show that the center of a uniquely (nil‎‎clean ring is uniquely (nil clean.

  20. MDM OSMOS Spectroscopic classification of Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Subhash; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping; Klusmeyer, J.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Shappee, B.; Shields, J.; Brown, J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C.

    2016-11-01

    We report optical spectroscopic classification of supernova candidates 2016hgd (ATel #9651), 2016hli (ATel #9685), CSS161013:015319+171853 and CSS161013:020130+141534 (http://nesssi.cacr.caltech.edu/catalina/AllSN.html).

  1. Deep slitless infrared spectroscopic surveys with HST/WFC3

    CERN Document Server

    Weiner, Benjamin J

    2012-01-01

    HST is commonly thought of as an optical-IR imaging or UV-spectroscopy observatory. However, the advent of WFC3-IR made it possible to do slitless infrared spectroscopic surveys over an area significant for galaxy evolution studies (~0.15 deg^2). Slitless infrared spectroscopy is uniquely possible from space due to the reduced background. Redshift surveys with WFC3-IR offer probes of the astrophysics of the galaxy population at z=1-3 from line features, and the true redshift and spatial distribution of galaxies, that cannot be done with photometric surveys alone. While HST slitless spectroscopy is low spectral resolution, its high multiplex advantage makes it competitive with future ground based IR spectrographs, its flux calibration is stable, and its high spatial resolution allows measuring the spatial extent of emission lines, which only HST can do currently for large numbers of objects. A deeper slitless IR spectroscopic survey over hundreds of arcmin^2 (eg one or more GOODS fields) is one of the remainin...

  2. Threefold Complementary Approach to Holographic QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); de Teramond, Guy F. [Univ. of Costa Rica, San Jose (Costa Rica); Dosch, Hans Gunter [Inst. for Theoretical Physics, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-12-27

    A complementary approach, derived from (a) higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, (b) light-front quantization and (c) the invariance properties of the full conformal group in one dimension leads to a nonperturbative relativistic light-front wave equation which incorporates essential spectroscopic and dynamical features of hadron physics. The fundamental conformal symmetry of the classical QCD Lagrangian in the limit of massless quarks is encoded in the resulting effective theory. The mass scale for confinement emerges from the isomorphism between the conformal group andSO(2,1). This scale appears in the light-front Hamiltonian by mapping to the evolution operator in the formalism of de Alfaro, Fubini and Furlan, which retains the conformal invariance of the action. Remarkably, the specific form of the confinement interaction and the corresponding modification of AdS space are uniquely determined in this procedure.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, U.; Szeghalmi, A.; Schmitt, M.; Kiefer, W.; Popp, J.; Holzgrabe, U.

    2005-05-01

    Quinolones are important gyrase inhibitors. Even though they are used as active agents in many antibiotics, the detailed mechanism of action on a molecular level is so far not known. It is of greatest interest to shed light on this drug-target interaction to provide useful information in the fight against growing resistances and obtain new insights for the development of new powerful drugs. To reach this goal, on a first step it is essential to understand the structural characteristics of the drugs and the effects that are caused by the environment in detail. In this work we report on Raman spectroscopical investigations of a variety of gyrase inhibitors (nalidixic acid, oxolinic acid, cinoxacin, flumequine, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, ofloxacin, enoxacin, sarafloxacin and moxifloxacin) by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy excited with various excitation wavelengths, both in the off-resonance region (532, 633, 830 and 1064 nm) and in the resonance region (resonance Raman spectroscopy at 244, 257 and 275 nm). Furthermore DFT calculations were performed to assign the vibrational modes, as well as for an identification of intramolecular hydrogen bonding motifs. The effect of small changes in the drug environment was studied by adding successively small amounts of water until physiological low concentrations of the drugs in aqueous solution were obtained. At these low concentrations resonance Raman spectroscopy proved to be a useful and sensitive technique. Supplementary information was obtained from IR and UV/vis spectroscopy.

  4. Spectroscopic studies of copper enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, D.M.; Moog, R.; Zumft, W.; Koenig, S.H.; Scott, R.A.; Cote, C.E.; McGuirl, M.

    1986-05-01

    Several spectroscopic methods, including absorption, circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), X-ray absorption, resonance Raman, EPR, NMR, and quasi-elastic light-scattering spectroscopy, have been used to probe the structures of copper-containing amine oxidases, nitrite reductase, and nitrous oxide reductase. The basic goals are to determine the copper site structure, electronic properties, and to generate structure-reactivity correlations. Collectively, the results on the amine oxidases permit a detailed model for the Cu(II) sites in these enzymes to be constructed that, in turn, rationalizes the ligand-binding chemistry. Resonance Raman spectra of the phenylhydrazine and 2,4-dinitrophenyl-hydrazine derivatives of bovine plasma amine oxidase and models for its organic cofactor, e.g. pyridoxal, methoxatin, are most consistent with methoxatin being the intrinsic cofactor. The structure of the Cu(I) forms of the amine oxidases have been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS); the copper coordination geometry is significantly different in the oxidized and reduced forms. Some anomalous properties of the amine oxidases in solution are explicable in terms of their reversible aggregation, which the authors have characterized via light scattering. Nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases display several novel spectral properties. The data suggest that new types of copper sites are present.

  5. SDSS spectroscopic survey of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ivezic, Z; Uomoto, A; Bond, N; Beers, T; Allende-Prieto, C; Wilhelm, R; Lee, Y S; Sivarani, T; Juric, M; Lupton, R; Rockosi, C M; Knapp, G; Gunn, J; Yanny, B; Jester, S; Kent, S; Pier, J; Munn, J A; Richards, G; Newberg, H; Blanton, M; Eisenstein, D; Hawley, S; Anderson, S; Harris, H; Kiuchi, F; Chen, A; Bushong, J; Sohi, H; Haggard, D; Kimball, A; Barentine, J; Brewington, H; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A

    2007-01-01

    In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is also producing a massive spectroscopic database. We discuss determination of stellar parameters, such as effective temperature, gravity and metallicity from SDSS spectra, describe correlations between kinematics and metallicity, and study their variation as a function of the position in the Galaxy. We show that stellar parameter estimates by Beers et al. show a good correlation with the position of a star in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram, thereby demonstrating their robustness as well as a potential for photometric parameter estimation methods. Using Beers et al. parameters, we find that the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way stars at a few kpc from the galactic plane is bimodal with a local minimum at [Z/Zo]~ -1.3. The median metallicity for the low-metallicity [Z/Zo] -1.3 sample. We also find that the low-metallicity sample has ~2.5 times larger velocity dispersion and that it does not rotate (at ...

  6. Asiago spectroscopic classification of transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasella, L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.

    2017-08-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of SN 2017giq, discovered by Zhijian Xu et al. in SDSS J235754.69+283007.1, and the observations of AT 2017ghp and AT 2017gio discovered by Torny et al (ATLAS) The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.82 m Copernico Telescope equipped with AFOSC (range 340-820 nm; resolution 1.4 nm). Survey Name | IAU Name | Discovery date (UT) | Discovery mag | Observation (UT) | Type | z | Notes| PTSS-17vkg | SN 2017giq | 2017-08-27 15:15:18 | 18.8 |2017-08-29 22:09:09 | SN Ic | 0.029813| (1) | ATLAS17juy | AT 2017ghp | 2017-08-23 14:00:57 | 17.53 |2017-08-29 23:49:52 | ? | ? | (2) | (1) The spectrum is consistent with that of Type Ic SN events around maximum light, at a redshift 0.0298, according to the redshift of the host galaxy SDSS J235754.69+283007.1 (Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 13 as obtained Jan. 31, 2017 from http://www.sdss.org/dr13/data_access/bulk/); (2) Featureless, blue continuum.

  7. Automated pipelines for spectroscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende Prieto, C.

    2016-09-01

    The Gaia mission will have a profound impact on our understanding of the structure and dynamics of the Milky Way. Gaia is providing an exhaustive census of stellar parallaxes, proper motions, positions, colors and radial velocities, but also leaves some glaring holes in an otherwise complete data set. The radial velocities measured with the on-board high-resolution spectrograph will only reach some 10 % of the full sample of stars with astrometry and photometry from the mission, and detailed chemical information will be obtained for less than 1 %. Teams all over the world are organizing large-scale projects to provide complementary radial velocities and chemistry, since this can now be done very efficiently from the ground thanks to large and mid-size telescopes with a wide field-of-view and multi-object spectrographs. As a result, automated data processing is taking an ever increasing relevance, and the concept is applying to many more areas, from targeting to analysis. In this paper, I provide a quick overview of recent, ongoing, and upcoming spectroscopic surveys, and the strategies adopted in their automated analysis pipelines.

  8. Spectroscopic Detection of Caries Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Ruohonen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A caries lesion causes changes in the optical properties of the affected tissue. Currently a caries lesion can be detected only at a relatively late stage of development. Caries diagnosis also suffers from high interobserver variance. Methods. This is a pilot study to test the suitability of an optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for caries diagnosis. Reflectance visible/near-infrared spectroscopy (VIS/NIRS was used to measure caries lesions and healthy enamel on extracted human teeth. The results were analysed with a computational algorithm in order to find a rule-based classification method to detect caries lesions. Results. The classification indicated that the measured points of enamel could be assigned to one of three classes: healthy enamel, a caries lesion, and stained healthy enamel. The features that enabled this were consistent with theory. Conclusions. It seems that spectroscopic measurements can help to reduce false positives at in vitro setting. However, further research is required to evaluate the strength of the evidence for the method’s performance.

  9. Spectroscopic Analysis of the Eclipsing Binary ∝ CrB

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. I. Nouh; S. M. Saad; B. Korany; M. A. Elkhamisy

    2013-09-01

    The eclipsing binary ∝ CrB, is a well-known double-lined spectroscopic binary. The system is considered unique among main-sequence systems with respect to its small mass ratio and large magnitude difference between the components. Our aim in the present paper is to compute the orbital parameters and to model the atmospheric parameters of the system. Synthetic spectral analysis of both the individual and disentangled spectra has been performed and yielded effective temperatures eff = 10000 ± 250 K, surface gravities log = 4 ± 0.25 and projected rotational velocities sin = 110 ± 5 km/sec for the primary component, and eff = 6000 ± 250 K and log = 4.5 ± 0.25 for the secondary component. Evolutionary state of the system is investigated using stellar models.

  10. On Unique Ergodicity in Nonlinear Stochastic Partial Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatt-Holtz, Nathan; Mattingly, Jonathan C.; Richards, Geordie

    2017-02-01

    We illustrate how the notion of asymptotic coupling provides a flexible and intuitive framework for proving the uniqueness of invariant measures for a variety of stochastic partial differential equations whose deterministic counterpart possesses a finite number of determining modes. Examples exhibiting parabolic and hyperbolic structure are studied in detail. In the later situation we also present a simple framework for establishing the existence of invariant measures when the usual approach relying on the Krylov-Bogolyubov procedure and compactness fails.

  11. On Unique Ergodicity in Nonlinear Stochastic Partial Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatt-Holtz, Nathan; Mattingly, Jonathan C.; Richards, Geordie

    2016-08-01

    We illustrate how the notion of asymptotic coupling provides a flexible and intuitive framework for proving the uniqueness of invariant measures for a variety of stochastic partial differential equations whose deterministic counterpart possesses a finite number of determining modes. Examples exhibiting parabolic and hyperbolic structure are studied in detail. In the later situation we also present a simple framework for establishing the existence of invariant measures when the usual approach relying on the Krylov-Bogolyubov procedure and compactness fails.

  12. Catalyst Architecture for Stable Single Atom Dispersion Enables Site-Specific Spectroscopic and Reactivity Measurements of CO Adsorbed to Pt Atoms, Oxidized Pt Clusters, and Metallic Pt Clusters on TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRita, Leo; Dai, Sheng; Lopez-Zepeda, Kimberly; Pham, Nicholas; Graham, George W; Pan, Xiaoqing; Christopher, Phillip

    2017-10-11

    Oxide-supported precious metal nanoparticles are widely used industrial catalysts. Due to expense and rarity, developing synthetic protocols that reduce precious metal nanoparticle size and stabilize dispersed species is essential. Supported atomically dispersed, single precious metal atoms represent the most efficient metal utilization geometry, although debate regarding the catalytic activity of supported single precious atom species has arisen from difficulty in synthesizing homogeneous and stable single atom dispersions, and a lack of site-specific characterization approaches. We propose a catalyst architecture and characterization approach to overcome these limitations, by depositing ∼1 precious metal atom per support particle and characterizing structures by correlating scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and CO probe molecule infrared spectroscopy. This is demonstrated for Pt supported on anatase TiO2. In these structures, isolated Pt atoms, Ptiso, remain stable through various conditions, and spectroscopic evidence suggests Ptiso species exist in homogeneous local environments. Comparing Ptiso to ∼1 nm preoxidized (Ptox) and prereduced (Ptmetal) Pt clusters on TiO2, we identify unique spectroscopic signatures of CO bound to each site and find CO adsorption energy is ordered: Ptiso ≪ Ptmetal atoms bonded to TiO2 and that Ptiso exhibits optimal reactivity because every atom is exposed for catalysis and forms an interfacial site with TiO2. This approach should be generally useful for studying the behavior of supported precious metal atoms.

  13. High Blood Pressure: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z High Blood Pressure Hypertension Unique to Older Adults This section provides ... Pressure Targets are Different for Very Old Adults High blood pressure (also called hypertension) increases your chance of having ...

  14. Arachnoiditis ossificans and syringomyelia: A unique presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F Opalak

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This case demonstrates a unique presentation of AO and highlights the need for CT imaging when a noncommunicating syringx is identified. In addition, surgical decompression can achieve good results when AO is associated with concurrent compressive lesions.

  15. Falls Prevention: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Falls Prevention Unique to Older Adults This section provides ... and Muscle Strengthening Exercises As part of your fall prevention program, you should follow an exercise program ...

  16. Right temporopolar activation associated with unique perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Tomoki; Konishi, Seiki; Jimura, Koji; Chikazoe, Junichi; Nakamura, Noriko; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2008-05-15

    Unique mode of perception, or the ability to see things differently from others, is one of the psychological resources required for creative mental activities. Behavioral studies using ambiguous visual stimuli have successfully induced diverse responses from subjects, and the unique responses defined in this paradigm were observed in higher frequency in the artistic population as compared to the nonartistic population. However, the neural substrates that underlie such unique perception have yet to be investigated. In the present study, ten ambiguous figures were used as stimuli. The subjects were instructed to say what the figures looked like during functional MRI scanning. The responses were classified as "frequent", "infrequent" or "unique" responses based on the appearance frequency of the same response in an independent age- and gender-matched control group. An event-related analysis contrasting unique vs. frequent responses revealed the greatest activation in the right temporal pole, which survived a whole brain multiple comparison. An alternative parametric modulation analysis was also performed to show that potentially confounding perceptual effects deriving from differences in visual stimuli make no significant contribution to this temporopolar activation. Previous neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies have shown the involvement of the temporal pole in perception-emotion linkage. Thus, our results suggest that unique perception is produced by the integration of perceptual and emotional processes, and this integration might underlie essential parts of creative mental activities.

  17. Spectroscopic Analysis of the Crystallization Mechanism of Synthesized Zeolite with XRD and FTIR Approaches%XRD和FTIR对沸石合成机制的光谱学解析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范春辉; 马宏瑞; 花莉

    2012-01-01

    Zeolites were synthesized from fly ash using modified one-stage method. The changes in cation exchange capacity(CEC) and chemical elements of zeolite were investigated during the synthesis process to reveal the materials and elements transformation in solid-liquid system. The approaches of XRD, SEM and FTIR were used to indicate the crystallization characteristics and mechanism. The zeolite NaPl was synthesized, and the CEC value reached to the maximum of 135 mmol/1OOg at 24 h. After the hydrothermal reaction for 12 h, the characteristic peak and metastable crystalline structure of zeolite NaPl appeared, then the hydroxy sodalite products formed at 48 h. The crystallization process was the result of materials transformation: the elements of fly ash released into the liquid system for the melting effect of alkali solution, and the solid system played the role of skeleton in crystallization process, being the "source" and the "sink" of the reaction, respectively, and the achievements presented the crystallization mechanism of liquid-phase and solid-phase transformation.%以粉煤灰为原料,采用优化的水热晶化一步法合成沸石.比较晶化反应过程沸石产物CEC值及化学成分的变化,推断固液体系中物质转换及元素迁移方式和途径.借助XRD,SEM,FTIR等表征反应过程沸石的晶型变化及成核特性,提出可能存在的沸石生成机制.合成产物主要为NaP1型沸石,反应24 h后CEC值最大为135 mmol/100 g.12 h后,产物中初步发现NaP1沸石相特征峰和亚晶结构,48 h后出现羟基方钠石的特征弱峰.沸石生成过程涉及到固液体系间的物质流动:碱熔融作用将粉煤灰组分侵蚀进入液相体系,为沸石形成提供了原料组分,而固相体系为沸石生长提供骨架结构,液相体系和固相体系分别为晶化反应的“源”和“汇”,这是液相转化机制和固相转化机制的客观反映.

  18. Flexible and efficient genome tiling design with penalized uniqueness score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Yang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a powerful tool in whole genome analysis, tiling array has been widely used in the answering of many genomic questions. Now it could also serve as a capture device for the library preparation in the popular high throughput sequencing experiments. Thus, a flexible and efficient tiling array design approach is still needed and could assist in various types and scales of transcriptomic experiment. Results In this paper, we address issues and challenges in designing probes suitable for tiling array applications and targeted sequencing. In particular, we define the penalized uniqueness score, which serves as a controlling criterion to eliminate potential cross-hybridization, and a flexible tiling array design pipeline. Unlike BLAST or simple suffix array based methods, computing and using our uniqueness measurement can be more efficient for large scale design and require less memory. The parameters provided could assist in various types of genomic tiling task. In addition, using both commercial array data and experiment data we show, unlike previously claimed, that palindromic sequence exhibiting relatively lower uniqueness. Conclusions Our proposed penalized uniqueness score could serve as a better indicator for cross hybridization with higher sensitivity and specificity, giving more control of expected array quality. The flexible tiling design algorithm incorporating the penalized uniqueness score was shown to give higher coverage and resolution. The package to calculate the penalized uniqueness score and the described probe selection algorithm are implemented as a Perl program, which is freely available at http://www1.fbn-dummerstorf.de/en/forschung/fbs/fb3/paper/2012-yang-1/OTAD.v1.1.tar.gz.

  19. Spectroscopic studies of microwave plasmas containing hexamethyldisiloxane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, A. S. C.; Mitschker, F.; Awakowicz, P.; Röpcke, J.

    2016-10-01

    Low-pressure microwave discharges containing hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) with admixtures of oxygen and nitrogen, used for the deposition of silicon containing films, have been studied spectroscopically. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in the visible spectral range has been combined with infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (IRLAS). The experiments were carried out in order to analyze the dependence of plasma chemical phenomena on power and gas mixture at relatively low pressures, up to 50 Pa, and power values, up to 2 kW. The evolution of the concentration of the methyl radical, CH3, and of seven stable molecules, HMDSO, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, CO and CO2, was monitored in the plasma processes by in situ IRLAS using tunable lead salt diode lasers (TDL) and external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL) as radiation sources. To achieve reliable values for the gas temperature inside and outside the plasma bulk as well as for the temperature in the plasma hot and colder zones, which are of great importance for calculation of species concentrations, three different methods based on emission and absorption spectroscopy data of N2, CH3 and CO have been used. In this approach line profile analysis has been combined with spectral simulation methods. The concentrations of the various species, which were found to be in the range between 1011 to 1015 cm-3, are in the focus of interest. The influence of the discharge parameters power, pressure and gas mixture on the molecular concentrations has been studied. To achieve further insight into general plasma chemical aspects the dissociation of the HMDSO precursor gas including its fragmentation and conversion to the reaction products was analyzed in detail.

  20. SICK: THE SPECTROSCOPIC INFERENCE CRANK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Andrew R., E-mail: arc@ast.cam.ac.uk [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambdridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    There exists an inordinate amount of spectral data in both public and private astronomical archives that remain severely under-utilized. The lack of reliable open-source tools for analyzing large volumes of spectra contributes to this situation, which is poised to worsen as large surveys successively release orders of magnitude more spectra. In this article I introduce sick, the spectroscopic inference crank, a flexible and fast Bayesian tool for inferring astrophysical parameters from spectra. sick is agnostic to the wavelength coverage, resolving power, or general data format, allowing any user to easily construct a generative model for their data, regardless of its source. sick can be used to provide a nearest-neighbor estimate of model parameters, a numerically optimized point estimate, or full Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability distributions. This generality empowers any astronomer to capitalize on the plethora of published synthetic and observed spectra, and make precise inferences for a host of astrophysical (and nuisance) quantities. Model intensities can be reliably approximated from existing grids of synthetic or observed spectra using linear multi-dimensional interpolation, or a Cannon-based model. Additional phenomena that transform the data (e.g., redshift, rotational broadening, continuum, spectral resolution) are incorporated as free parameters and can be marginalized away. Outlier pixels (e.g., cosmic rays or poorly modeled regimes) can be treated with a Gaussian mixture model, and a noise model is included to account for systematically underestimated variance. Combining these phenomena into a scalar-justified, quantitative model permits precise inferences with credible uncertainties on noisy data. I describe the common model features, the implementation details, and the default behavior, which is balanced to be suitable for most astronomical applications. Using a forward model on low-resolution, high signal

  1. Molecular imaging true-colour spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Francisco E.; Wilson, Christy; Grant, Gerald; Wax, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging holds a pivotal role in medicine due to its ability to provide invaluable insight into disease mechanisms at molecular and cellular levels. To this end, various techniques have been developed for molecular imaging, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. For example, fluorescence imaging achieves micrometre-scale resolution, but has low penetration depths and is mostly limited to exogenous agents. Here, we demonstrate molecular imaging of endogenous and exogenous chromophores using a novel form of spectroscopic optical coherence tomography. Our approach consists of using a wide spectral bandwidth laser source centred in the visible spectrum, thereby allowing facile assessment of haemoglobin oxygen levels, providing contrast from readily available absorbers, and enabling true-colour representation of samples. This approach provides high spectral fidelity while imaging at the micrometre scale in three dimensions. Molecular imaging true-colour spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (METRiCS OCT) has significant implications for many biomedical applications including ophthalmology, early cancer detection, and understanding fundamental disease mechanisms such as hypoxia and angiogenesis.

  2. Amygdalar enlargement associated with unique perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Tomoki; Konishi, Seiki; Jimura, Koji; Chikazoe, Junichi; Nakamura, Noriko; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    Interference by amygdalar activity in perceptual processes has been reported in many previous studies. Consistent with these reports, previous clinical studies have shown amygdalar volume change in multiple types of psychotic disease presenting with unusual perception. However, the relationship between variation in amygdalar volume in the normal population and the tendency toward unusual or unique perception has never been investigated. To address this issue, we defined an index to represent the tendency toward unique perception using ambiguous stimuli: subjects were instructed to state what the figures looked like to them, and "unique responses" were defined depending on the appearance frequency of the same responses in an age- and gender-matched control group. The index was defined as the ratio of unique responses to total responses per subject. We obtained structural brain images and values of the index from sixty-eight normal subjects. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed a positive correlation between amygdalar volume and the index. Since previous reports have indicated that unique responses were observed at higher frequency in the artistic population than in the nonartistic normal population, this positive correlation suggests that amygdalar enlargement in the normal population might be related to creative mental activity.

  3. Spectroscopic characterizations of organic/inorganic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govani, Jayesh R.

    2009-12-01

    In the present study, pure and 0.3 wt%, 0.4 wt%, as well as 0.5 wt% L-arginine doped potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals were grown using solution growth techniques and further subjected to infrared (IR) absorption and Raman studies for confirmation of chemical group functionalization for investigating the incorporation mechanism of the L-arginine organic material into the KDP crystal structure. Infrared spectroscopic analysis suggests that structural changes are occurring for the L-arginine molecule as a result of its interaction with the KPD crystal. Infrared spectroscopic technique confirms the disturbance of the N-H, C-H and C-N bonds of the amino acid, suggesting successful incorporation of L-arginine into the KDP crystals. Raman analysis also reveals modification of the N-H, C-H and C-N bonds of the amino acid, implying successful inclusion of L-arginine into the KDP crystals. With the help of Gaussian software, a prediction of possible incorporation mechanisms of the organic material was obtained from comparison of the simulated infrared and Raman vibrational spectra with the experimental results. Furthermore, we also studied the effect of L-arginine doping on the thermal stability of the grown KDP crystal by employing Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA suggests that increasing the level of L-arginine doping speeds the decomposition process and it weakens the KDP crystal, which indicates successful doping of the KDP crystals with L-arginine amino acid. Urinary stones are one of the oldest and most widely spread diseases in humans, animals and birds. Many remedies have been employed through the ages for the treatment of urinary stones. Recent medicinal measures reflect the modern advances, which are based on surgical removal, percutaneous techniques and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Although these procedures are valuable, they are quite expensive for most people. Furthermore, recurrence of these diseases is awfully frequent with

  4. Existence and Uniqueness in Shape from Shading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓雁萍; 李价谷

    1997-01-01

    For the image of a smooth surface object fully contained within the field of view and illuminated in and arbitrary direction,this paper discusses the existence and uniqueness o the conditions for solving a shape-from-shading problem under the conditions that the Fourier series expansion of the image intensity contains only zero and first order terms in a polar coordinate system.Three theorems are established,one for the existence and two for the uniqueness of z-axis symmetric shape from shading.

  5. Accurate spectroscopic characterization of protonated oxirane: a potential prebiotic species in Titan's atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puzzarini, Cristina [Dipartimento di Chimica " Giacomo Ciamician," Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Ali, Ashraf [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo, E-mail: cristina.puzzarini@unibo.it [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-09-10

    An accurate spectroscopic characterization of protonated oxirane has been carried out by means of state-of-the-art computational methods and approaches. The calculated spectroscopic parameters from our recent computational investigation of oxirane together with the corresponding experimental data available were used to assess the accuracy of our predicted rotational and IR spectra of protonated oxirane. We found an accuracy of about 10 cm{sup –1} for vibrational transitions (fundamentals as well as overtones and combination bands) and, in relative terms, of 0.1% for rotational transitions. We are therefore confident that the spectroscopic data provided herein are a valuable support for the detection of protonated oxirane not only in Titan's atmosphere but also in the interstellar medium.

  6. Vibrational spectroscopic and structural investigations on fullerene: A DFT approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christy, P. Anto; Premkumar, S.; Asath, R. Mohamed; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin, E-mail: miltonfranklin@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, N.M.S.S.V.N. College, Madurai-625 019, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-05-06

    The molecular structure of fullerene (C{sub 60}) molecule was optimized by the DFT/B3LYP method with 6-31G and 6-31G(d,p) basis sets using Gaussian 09 program. The vibrational frequencies were calculated for the optimized molecular structure of the molecule. The calculated vibrational frequencies confirm that the molecular structure of the molecule was located at the minimum energy potential energy surface. The calculated vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of functional group analysis and also confirmed using the GaussView 05 software. The frontier molecular orbitals analysis was carried out. The FMOs related molecular properties were predicted. The higher ionization potential, higher electron affinity, higher softness, lower band gap energy and lower hardness values were obtained, which confirm that the fullerene molecule has a higher molecular reactivity. The Mulliken atomic charge distribution of the molecule was also calculated. Hence, these results play an important role due to its potential applications as drug delivery devices.

  7. Nano/Micro and Spectroscopic Approaches to Food Pathogen Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Il-Hoon; Radadia, Adarsh D.; Farrokhzad, Khashayar; Ximenes, Eduardo; Bae, Euiwon; Singh, Atul K.; Oliver, Haley; Ladisch, Michael; Bhunia, Arun; Applegate, Bruce; Mauer, Lisa; Bashir, Rashid; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Despite continuing research efforts, timely and simple pathogen detection with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity remains an elusive goal. Given the recent explosion of sensor technologies, significant strides have been made in addressing the various nuances of this important global challenge that affects not only the food industry but also human health. In this review, we provide a summary of the various ongoing efforts in pathogen detection and sample preparation in areas related to Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, light scattering, phage display, micro/nanodevices, and nanoparticle biosensors. We also discuss the advantages and potential limitations of the detection methods and suggest next steps for further consideration.

  8. Vibrational spectroscopic and structural investigations on fullerene: A DFT approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, P. Anto; Premkumar, S.; Asath, R. Mohamed; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    The molecular structure of fullerene (C60) molecule was optimized by the DFT/B3LYP method with 6-31G and 6-31G(d,p) basis sets using Gaussian 09 program. The vibrational frequencies were calculated for the optimized molecular structure of the molecule. The calculated vibrational frequencies confirm that the molecular structure of the molecule was located at the minimum energy potential energy surface. The calculated vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of functional group analysis and also confirmed using the GaussView 05 software. The frontier molecular orbitals analysis was carried out. The FMOs related molecular properties were predicted. The higher ionization potential, higher electron affinity, higher softness, lower band gap energy and lower hardness values were obtained, which confirm that the fullerene molecule has a higher molecular reactivity. The Mulliken atomic charge distribution of the molecule was also calculated. Hence, these results play an important role due to its potential applications as drug delivery devices.

  9. Uniqueness vs non-uniqueness in complete connections with modified majority rules

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, J. C. A.; Friedli, S.

    2013-01-01

    We take a closer look at a class of chains with complete connections introduced by Berger, Hoffman and Sidoravicius. Besides giving a sharper description of the uniqueness and non-uniqueness regimes, we show that if the pure majority rule used to fix the dependence on the past is replaced with a function that is Lipschitz at the origin, then uniqueness always holds, even with arbitrarily slow decaying variation.

  10. Dusty plasma as a unique object of plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, G. E.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The self-consistency and basic openness of dusty plasma, charge fluctuations, high dissipation and other features of dusty plasma system lead to the appearance of a number of unusual and unique properties of dusty plasma. “Anomalous” heating of dusty particles, anisotropy of temperatures and other features, parametric resonance, charge fluctuations and interaction potential are among these unique properties. Study is based on analytical approach and numerical simulation. Mechanisms of “anomalous” heating and energy transfer are proposed. Influence of charge fluctuations on the system properties is discussed. The self-consistent, many-particle, fluctuation and anisotropic interparticle interaction potential is studied for a significant range of gas temperature. These properties are interconnected and necessary for a full description of dusty plasmas physics.

  11. A Unique Case of Allogeneic Fat Grafting Between Brothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Samuel; Edelson, Richard L.; Sumpio, Brandon; Kwei, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We present a case of a 65-year-old man with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma treated with radiation therapy and an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant from his human leukocyte antigen-matched brother. Engraftment was successful, but the patient went on to develop painful, radiation-induced ulcers. The ulcers were fat-allografted using liposuctioned fat from his brother because of the patient’s unique chimeric state. Postprocedure follow-up revealed epithelialization of the ulcer sites and significant improvement in neuropathic pain. Our unique case study supports the use of fat grafting for its restorative purposes and for its ability to alleviate chronic neuropathic pain. Additionally, it appears that our case provides a basis of a general approach to the treatment of radiation-induced ulcers in chimeric patients with lymphoid malignancies.

  12. Vibrational spectroscopic studies of newly developed synthetic biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Rajan K; Bruch, Reinhard F; Covington, Aaron M

    2010-05-01

    Vibrational spectroscopic techniques such as near-infrared (NIR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and Raman spectroscopy are valuable diagnostic tools that can be used to elucidate comprehensive structural information of numerous biological samples. In this review article, we have highlighted the advantages of nanotechnology and biophotonics in conjunction with vibrational spectroscopic techniques in order to understand the various aspects of new kind of synthetic biopolymers termed as polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated lipids. In contrast to conventional phospholipids, these novel lipids spontaneously form liposomes or nanovesicles upon hydration, without the supply of external activation energy. The amphiphiles considered in this study differ in their hydrophobic acyl chain length and contain different units of PEG hydrophilic headgroups. We have further explored the thermotropic phase behaviors and associated changes in the conformational order/disorder of such lipids by using variable-temperature FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. Phase transition temperature profiles and correlation between various spectral indicators have been identified by either monitoring the shifts in the vibrational peak positions or plotting vibrational peak intensity ratios in the C--H stretching region as a function of temperature. To supplement our observations of phase transformations, a thermodynamic approach known as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been applied and revealed a good agreement with the infrared and Raman spectroscopic data. Finally, the investigation of thermal properties of lipids is extremely crucial for numerous purposes, thus the results obtained in this work may find application in a wide variety of studies including the development of PEGylated lipid based drug and substances delivery vehicles.

  13. In a unique position or squeezed out?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Christensen, Inge

    2009-01-01

    language, they experience that their patients disappear, they are seldom involved, and they lack knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: GPs have few experiences with YA cancer patients, but they have a potentially unique role in general primary cancer care if they develop their vocational vocabulary, relate more...

  14. Uniqueness of meromorphic functions concerning differential polynomials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Lei

    2007-01-01

    Based on a unicity theorem for entire funcitions concerning differential polynomials proposed by M. L. Fang and W. Hong, we studied the uniqueness problem of two meromorphic functions whose differential polynomials share the same 1-point by proving two theorems and their related lemmas. The results extend and improve given by Fang and Hong's theorem.

  15. LCA – Unique and Controversial Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This session will focus on case studies and applications that have a unique or controversial aspect. Some of the most recent topics that seem to have significant interest include: LCA-based product declarations, LCA-based standards, LCA-based labels, alternative energy, agricul...

  16. Marketing the Uniqueness of Small Towns. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Douglas; Hogg, David H.

    The key to marketing a town is determining and promoting the town's "differential advantage" or uniqueness that would make people want to visit or live there. Exercises to help communities gain important insights into the town's competitive edge include a brainstorming session with knowledgeable community members, a visitor questionnaire, a…

  17. The Uniqueness of Speech among Motor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Ray

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers evidence that the speech muscles are unique in their genetic, developmental, functional and phenotypical properties. The literature was reviewed using PubMed, ScienceDirect, ComDisDome and other literature-retrieval systems to identify studies reporting on the craniofacial and laryngeal muscles. Particular emphasis was given…

  18. Multicultural Poetry: Voices Unique, yet Universal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webre, Elizabeth C.

    As teachers gravitate more and more to the use of literature and strive to include a range of cultural experiences in their classrooms, the use of poetry from various cultural groups should be considered. Poetry is a very real means of having children see themselves and others as being both unique and yet the same. In considering poetry across…

  19. Tulane Student Designs Unique Learning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    A Louisiana architect has created plans for a unique supplementary learning environment consisting of five circular buildings featuring a planetarium, an indoor display of small animals in their native habitat, an indoor pond, a library, a media center, and an auditorium. (Author/MLF)

  20. Art Libraries: Creating Access to Unique Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Art libraries face similar issues to other types of libraries during the digital transition but have unique twists driven by the needs of their collections. Art library information seekers may possess a sense of what an art library is: a library, set apart, to support the study of art and art history. For art libraries, it is the collection,…

  1. UNIQUENESS OF DIFFERENCE POLYNOMIALS OF MEROMORPHIC FUNCTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘永; 祁晓光

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the uniqueness problems of difference polynomials of meromorphic functions and obtain some results which can be viewed as discrete analogues of the results given by Shibazaki. Some examples are given to show the results in this article are best possible.

  2. Unique characteristics of Geneva apple rootstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Geneva® apple rootstock breeding program has been operating since the early 1970’s. It is a unique program in that it had access to important germplasm resources that later became the USDA ARS apple collection in Geneva, NY. This genetic diversity allowed for the achievement of one of the proj...

  3. Uniqueness and Zeros of -Shift Difference Polynomials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kai Liu; Xin-Ling Liu; Ting-Bin Cao

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the zero distributions of -shift difference polynomials of meromorphic functions with zero order, and obtain two theorems that extend the classical Hayman results on the zeros of differential polynomials to -shift difference polynomials. We also investigate the uniqueness problem of -shift difference polynomials that share a common value.

  4. Application of Spectroscopic Methods for Structural Analysis of Chitin and Chitosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumirska, Jolanta; Czerwicka, Małgorzata; Kaczyński, Zbigniew; Bychowska, Anna; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Thöming, Jorg; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Chitin, the second most important natural polymer in the world, and its N-deacetylated derivative chitosan, have been identified as versatile biopolymers for a broad range of applications in medicine, agriculture and the food industry. Two of the main reasons for this are firstly the unique chemical, physicochemical and biological properties of chitin and chitosan, and secondly the unlimited supply of raw materials for their production. These polymers exhibit widely differing physicochemical properties depending on the chitin source and the conditions of chitosan production. The presence of reactive functional groups as well as the polysaccharide nature of these biopolymers enables them to undergo diverse chemical modifications. A complete chemical and physicochemical characterization of chitin, chitosan and their derivatives is not possible without using spectroscopic techniques. This review focuses on the application of spectroscopic methods for the structural analysis of these compounds. PMID:20559489

  5. Application of Spectroscopic Methods for Structural Analysis of Chitin and Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Kumirska

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Chitin, the second most important natural polymer in the world, and its N-deacetylated derivative chitosan, have been identified as versatile biopolymers for a broad range of applications in medicine, agriculture and the food industry. Two of the main reasons for this are firstly the unique chemical, physicochemical and biological properties of chitin and chitosan, and secondly the unlimited supply of raw materials for their production. These polymers exhibit widely differing physicochemical properties depending on the chitin source and the conditions of chitosan production. The presence of reactive functional groups as well as the polysaccharide nature of these biopolymers enables them to undergo diverse chemical modifications. A complete chemical and physicochemical characterization of chitin, chitosan and their derivatives is not possible without using spectroscopic techniques. This review focuses on the application of spectroscopic methods for the structural analysis of these compounds.

  6. Asiago spectroscopic classification of two SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; OAPd, M. Turatto (INAF

    2016-09-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of two transients. The targets are supplied by the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNOvae (ASAS-SN) and the TNS (https://wis-tns.weizmann.ac.il).

  7. Asiago spectroscopic classification of ASASSN-15db

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Tartaglia, L.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; Turatto, M.

    2015-02-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of ASASSN-15db in NGC 5996. The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.82m Copernico Telescope (+AFOSC; range 340-820 nm; resolution 1.4 nm), equipped with the CCD Andor IKON L936.

  8. Asiago spectroscopic classification of 2 SNe candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Tomasella, L.; Turatto, M.; Terreran, G.

    2017-01-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of SN 2017lf and SN 2017ms. The targets were supplied by the Tsinghua-NAOC Transient Survey (TNTS) and the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS).

  9. Crystallization and spectroscopic studies of manganese malonate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Varghese Mathew; Jochan Joseph; Sabu Jacob; K E Abraham

    2010-08-01

    The preparation of manganese malonate crystals by gel method and its spectroscopic studies are reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern reveals the crystalline nature. The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the crystals are recorded and the vibrational assignments are given with possible explanations. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is used to measure the bandgap (g) of the material.

  10. TESIS - The TNG EROs Spectroscopic Identification Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, P; Severgnini, P; Ceca, R D; Bender, R; Drory, N; Feulner, G; Ghinassi, F; Hopp, U; Mannucci, F; Maraston, C

    2002-01-01

    A near-IR low-resolution spectroscopic follow-up of a complete sample of K1.2 and at estimating their spatial density to put constraints on the galaxy formation and evolution models. In this proceeding, the preliminary analysis of the first spectra obtained is presented.

  11. The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Asplund, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey has begun and will obtain high quality spectroscopy of some 100000 Milky Way stars, in the field and in open clusters, down to magnitude 19, systematically covering all the major components of the Milky Way. This survey will provide the first homogeneous o...

  12. Asiago spectroscopic classification of two transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turatto, M.; Benetti, S.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Terreran, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of Gaia16bzi, AT2016isl. The targets were supplied by the ESA Gaia Photometric Science Alerts Team and DPAC (http://gsaweb.ast.cam.ac.uk/alerts), the Tsinghua-NAOC Transient Survey (TNTS) and by Kunihiro Shima..

  13. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN 2017fof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasella, L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.

    2017-07-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of AT 2017fof, discovered by S. Leonini, M. Conti, L.M. Tinjaca Ramirez and P. Rosi (Italian Supernovae Search Project, ISSP) in UGC 10602.

  14. Pulsating variable stars and large spectroscopic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cat, Peter

    2017-09-01

    In the past decade, the research of pulsating variable stars has taken a giant leap forward thanks to the photometric measurements provided by space missions like Most, CoRoT, Kepler/K2, and Brite. These missions have provided quasi uninterrupted photometric time-series with an ultra-high quality and a total length that is not achievable from Earth. However, many of the success stories could not have been told without ground-based spectroscopic follow-up observations. Indeed, spectroscopy has some important assets as it can provide (more) accurate information about stellar parameters (like the effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and abundances that are mandatory parameters for an in-depth asteroseismic study), the radial velocity (that is important for the detection of binaries and for the confirmation of cluster membership, if applicable), and the projected rotational velocity (that allows the study of the effects of rotation on pulsations). Fortunately, several large spectroscopic surveys are (becoming) available that can be used for these purposes. For some of these surveys, sub-projects have been initiated with the specific goal to complement space-based photometry. In this review, several spectroscopic surveys are introduced and compared with each other. We show that a large amount of spectroscopic data is (becoming) available for a large variety of objects.

  15. Synthesis and Spectroscopic Investigation of Azoporphyrins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis of a series of new covalently-connected azoporphyrin derivatives is described and the photochemical properties of the new compounds are discussed. The two chromophores of these derivatives exhibit their absorption spectroscopic properties respectively.In the fluorescence emission spectra, intermolecular fluorescence quenching is detected.

  16. Spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, S; Tabosa, J W R; Failache, H; Lezama, A

    2006-09-15

    We report on the first spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler shift associated with light beams carrying orbital angular momentum. The effect is evidenced as the broadening of a Hanle electromagnetically induced transparency coherence resonance on Rb vapor when the two incident Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams have opposite topological charges. The observations closely agree with theoretical predictions.

  17. The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Asplund, M.;

    2012-01-01

    The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey has begun and will obtain high quality spectroscopy of some 100000 Milky Way stars, in the field and in open clusters, down to magnitude 19, systematically covering all the major components of the Milky Way. This survey will provide the first homogeneous o...

  18. Electrochemical and spectroscopic characterization of surface sol-gel processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohong; Wilson, George S

    2004-09-28

    (3-Mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MTS) forms a unique film on a platinum substrate by self-assembly and sol-gel cross-linking. The gelating and drying states of the self-assembled MTS sol-gel films were probed by use of electrochemical and spectroscopic methods. The thiol moiety was the only active group within the sol-gel network. Gold nanoparticles were employed to detect the availability of the thiol group and their interaction further indicated the physicochemical states of the sol-gel inner structure. It was found that the thiol groups in the open porous MTS aerogel matrix were accessible to the gold nanoparticles while thiol groups in the compact MTS xerogel network were not accessible to the gold nanoparticles. The characteristics of the sol-gel matrix change with time because of its own irreversible gelating and drying process. The present work provides direct evidence of gold nanoparticle binding with thiol groups within the sol-gel structures and explains the different permeability of "aerogel" and "xerogel" films of MTS on the basis of electrochemical and spectroscopic results. Two endogenous species, hydrogen peroxide and ascorbic acid, were used to test the permeability of the self-assembled sol-gel film in different states. The MTS xerogel film on the platinum electrode was extremely selective against ascorbic acid while maintaining high sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide in contrast to the relatively high permeability of ascorbic acid in the MTS aerogel film. This study showed the potential of the MTS sol-gel film as a nanoporous material in biosensor development.

  19. Instrumental analysis of bacterial cells using vibrational and emission Moessbauer spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamnev, Alexander A. [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, 410049 Saratov (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: aakamnev@ibppm.sgu.ru; Tugarova, Anna V. [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, 410049 Saratov (Russian Federation); Antonyuk, Lyudmila P. [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, 410049 Saratov (Russian Federation); Tarantilis, Petros A. [Laboratory of Chemistry, Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athens (Greece); Kulikov, Leonid A. [Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry Techniques, Department of Radiochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Perfiliev, Yurii D. [Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry Techniques, Department of Radiochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Polissiou, Moschos G. [Laboratory of Chemistry, Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athens (Greece); Gardiner, Philip H.E. [Division of Chemistry, School of Science and Mathematics, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-28

    In biosciences and biotechnology, the expanding application of physicochemical approaches using modern instrumental techniques is an efficient strategy to obtain valuable and often unique information at the molecular level. In this work, we applied a combination of vibrational (Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), FT-Raman) spectroscopic techniques, useful in overall structural and compositional analysis of bacterial cells of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense, with {sup 57}Co emission Moessbauer spectroscopy (EMS) used for sensitive monitoring of metal binding and further transformations in live bacterial cells. The information obtained, together with ICP-MS analyses for metals taken up by the bacteria, is useful in analysing the impact of the environmental conditions (heavy metal stress) on the bacterial metabolism and some differences in the heavy metal stress-induced behaviour of non-endophytic (Sp7) and facultatively endophytic (Sp245) strains. The results show that, while both strains Sp7 and Sp245 take up noticeable and comparable amounts of heavy metals from the medium (0.12 and 0.13 mg Co, 0.48 and 0.44 mg Cu or 4.2 and 2.1 mg Zn per gram of dry biomass, respectively, at a metal concentration of 0.2 mM in the medium), their metabolic responses differ essentially. Whereas for strain Sp7 the FTIR measurements showed significant accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates as storage materials involved in stress endurance, strain Sp245 did not show any major changes in cellular composition. Nevertheless, EMS measurements showed rapid binding of cobalt(II) by live bacterial cells (chemically similar to metal binding by dead bacteria) and its further transformation in the live cells within an hour.

  20. Improving the automatic wavelength calibration of EMIR spectroscopic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiel, N.; Pascual, S.; Picazo, P.; Gallego, J.; Garzón, F.; Castro-Rodríguez, N.; González-Fernández, C.; Hammersley, P.; Insausti, M.; Manjavacas, E.; Miluzio, M.

    2017-03-01

    EMIR, the near-infrared camera-spectrograph operating in the near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths 0.9-2.5μm, is being commissioned at the Nasmyth focus of the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS. One of the most outstanding capabilities of EMIR will be its multi-object spectroscopic mode which, with the help of a robotic reconfigurable slit system, will allow to take around 53 spectra simultaneously. A data reduction pipeline, PyEmir, based on Python, is being developed in order to facilitate the automatic reduction of EMIR data taken in both imaging and spectroscopy mode. Focusing on the reduction of spectroscopic data, some critical manipulations include the geometric distortion correction and the wavelength calibration. Although usually these reductions steps are carried out separately, it is important to realise that these kind of manipulations involve data rebinning and interpolation, which in addition unavoidably lead to the increase of error correlation and to resolution degradation. In order to minimise these effects, it is possible to incorporate those data manipulations as a single geometric transformation. This approach is being used in the development of PyEmir. For this purpose, the geometric transformations available in the Python package Scikit-image are being used. This work was funded by the Spanish Programa Nacional de Astronomía y Astrofísica under grant AYA2013-46724-P.

  1. 2D NMR-spectroscopic screening reveals polyketides in ladybugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyrup, Stephen T; Eckman, Laura E; McCarthy, Patrick H; Smedley, Scott R; Meinwald, Jerrold; Schroeder, Frank C

    2011-06-14

    Small molecules of biological origin continue to yield the most promising leads for drug design, but systematic approaches for exploring nature's cache of structural diversity are lacking. Here, we demonstrate the use of 2D NMR spectroscopy to screen a library of biorationally selected insect metabolite samples for partial structures indicating the presence of new chemical entities. This NMR-spectroscopic survey enabled detection of novel compounds in complex metabolite mixtures without prior fractionation or isolation. Our screen led to discovery and subsequent isolation of two families of tricyclic pyrones in Delphastus catalinae, a tiny ladybird beetle that is employed commercially as a biological pest control agent. The D. catalinae pyrones are based on 23-carbon polyketide chains forming 1,11-dioxo-2,6,10-trioxaanthracene and 4,8-dioxo-1,9,13-trioxaanthracene derivatives, representing ring systems not previously found in nature. This study highlights the utility of 2D NMR-spectroscopic screening for exploring nature's structure space and suggests that insect metabolomes remain vastly underexplored.

  2. Spectroscopic Methods of Remote Sensing for Vegetation Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    been applied to map the distributions of minerals in soils and rocks; however, its application to characterize vegetation cover has been less widespread than SFA. Using IS data and the USGS Processing Routines in IDL for Spectroscopic Measurements (PRISM; http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2011/1155/), this talk will examine requirements for and limitations in applying SFA and SFC to characterize vegetation. A time series of Airborne Visible/InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data collected in the marshes of Louisiana following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill will be used to examine the impact of varying leaf water content on the shapes of the SWIR 1700, 2100, and 2300 nm features and the implications of these changes on vegetation identification and biochemical estimation. The USGS collection of HyMap data over Afghanistan, the largest terrestrial coverage of IS data to date, will be used to demonstrate the characterization of vegetation in arid and semi-arid regions, in which chlorophyll absorption is often weak and soil and rock mineral absorption features overlap vegetation features. Hyperion data, overlapping the HyMap data, will be presented to illustrate the complications that arise when signal-to-noise is low. The benefits of and challenges to applying a spectroscopic remote sensing approach to imaging spectrometer data will be discussed.

  3. Uniqueness of the mass in the radiating regime

    CERN Document Server

    Chrúsciel, P T; MacCallum, M A H; Chrusciel, Piotr T.; Jezierski, Jacek; Callum, Malcolm A.H. Mac

    1998-01-01

    The usual approaches to the definition of energy give an ambiguous result for the energy of fields in the radiating regime. We show that for a massless scalar field in Minkowski space-time the definition may be rendered unambiguous by adding the requirement that the energy cannot increase in retarded time. We present a similar theorem for the gravitational field, proved elsewhere, which establishes that the Trautman-Bondi energy is the unique (up to a multiplicative factor) functional, within a natural class, which is monotonic in time for all solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations admitting a smooth ``piece'' of conformal null infinity Scri.

  4. On the uniqueness of flow in a recent tsunami model

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, Octavian G

    2011-01-01

    We give an elementary proof of uniqueness for the integral curve starting from the vertical axis in the phase-plane analysis of the recent model [A. Constantin, R.S. Johnson, Propagation of very long water waves, with vorticity, over variable depth, with applications to tsunamis, Fluid Dynam. Res. 40 (2008), 175--211]. Our technique can be applied easily in circumstances where the reparametrization device from [A. Constantin, A dynamical systems approach towards isolated vorticity regions for tsunami background states, Arch. Rational Mech. Anal. doi: 10.1007/s00205-010-0347-1] might lead to some serious difficulties.

  5. Spectroscopic analyses of trivalent rare-earth ions doped in different host materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharan, Sreerenjini

    2011-12-01

    Trivalent rare-earth (RE3+) ions of 4f n electronic configurations are found to possess potential applications in the field of optoelectronic and biophotonic technologies owing to their unique optical properties. They have been used as optical activators in a large number of solid-state laser host materials due to their rich energy level structure. This work focuses on the spectroscopic study of two RE 3+ ions, namely, trivalent erbium and neodymium (Er3+ and Nd3+, respectively), embedded in some important single crystal and nanocrystalline host materials including yttrium orthoaluminate (YAlO3), erbium oxide (Er2O3), yttrium oxide (Y2O3) and a combined host system of Y2O 3 and a vinyl polymer named Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA). Each one of these host materials are known to be unique for their characteristic properties such as chemical durability, thermal stability, optical clarity, wide band gaps, biocompatibility, and success as phosphors in various optoelectronic devices. The complete material characterization has been performed through morphology analyses using advanced microscopy techniques and spectroscopic analyses of the characteristic absorption and emission spectra by applying phenomenological crystal-field splitting and Judd-Ofelt techniques. The important spectroscopic parameters such as line strengths, radiative decay rates, and branching ratios have been obtained for the intermanifold transitions from the upper multiplets to the corresponding lower-lying multiplet manifolds 2S+1LJ of RE3+ ions doped in various host systems. Using the radiative decay rates, radiative life times are obtained and the experimental analyses of the fluorescent spectra yield the measured lifetimes of emitting metastable states. Finally, the results are compared with the previously published set of values for the same ions doped in similar type of host systems. Detailed analyses of the spectroscopic properties show that the studied systems RE3+ doped single crystals and

  6. Unique device identification system. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to establish a system to adequately identify devices through distribution and use. This rule requires the label of medical devices to include a unique device identifier (UDI), except where the rule provides for an exception or alternative placement. The labeler must submit product information concerning devices to FDA's Global Unique Device Identification Database (GUDID), unless subject to an exception or alternative. The system established by this rule requires the label and device package of each medical device to include a UDI and requires that each UDI be provided in a plain-text version and in a form that uses automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) technology. The UDI will be required to be directly marked on the device itself if the device is intended to be used more than once and intended to be reprocessed before each use.

  7. Multiple floating metatarsals: a unique injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trikha Vivek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Concomitant dislocation of the tar-sometatarsal and metatarsophalangeal joints of foot is an extremely rare injury. Such injuries presenting in a single or adjacent dual rays have been described in few cases previously. We describe such an injury in adjacent three metatarsals of a polytrauma patient. These injuries are likely to be missed in the initial assessment of a polytrauma patient. These patients are at risk of an overlooked diagnosis but the consequences of missing this type of injury may be Vivek Trikha*, Tarun Goyal, Amit K Agarwal quite severe. This case is presented in view of its unique-ness along with possible mechanism of injury, the sequence of reduction and follow-up. Knowledge of such injury and its proper management may be useful to the trauma surgeons. Key words: Metatarsal bones; Metatarsophalangeal joint; Wounds and injuries

  8. Theory of uniqueness of Indian Caste System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kumar

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Classical studies on pre-modern Indian social structure have suggested apparent differences between the Indian caste system and social stratification as one can discern in other parts of the world. However, one needs to question such dogmatic assertions that such vast differences really existed. An endeavor is made in this research paper to reflect on the nature of caste hierarchy in pre-modern India. The caste system forms the significant basis of pre-modern Indian social structure. Early writers conceived the caste system of pre-modern India as something unique to India. An attempt is made to question this application of theory of uniqueness in the case of India.

  9. Theory of uniqueness of Indian Caste System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kumar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Classical studies on pre-modern Indian social structure have suggested apparent differences between the Indian caste system and social stratification as one can discern in other parts of the world. However, one needs to question such dogmatic assertions that such vast differences really existed. An endeavor is made in this research paper to reflect on the nature of caste hierarchy in pre-modern India. The caste system forms the significant basis of pre-modern Indian social structure. Early writers conceived the caste system of pre-modern India as something unique to India. An attempt is made to question this application of theory of uniqueness in the case of India.

  10. Uniqueness of entire functions concerning weighted sharing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yao-qiang; MA Chao-wei

    2007-01-01

    The uniqueness problem of entire functions concerning weighted sharing was discussed, and the following theorem was proved. Let f and g be two non-constant entire functions, m, n and k three positive integers, and n>2k+4. If Em(1,(f n)(k))= Em(1,(gn)(k)), then either f (z)=c1ecz and g(z)= c2e-cz, or f =tg, where c, c1 and c2 are three constants satisfying (-1)k(c1c2)n(nc)2k=1, and t is a constant satisfying t n=1. The theorem generalizes the result of Fang [Fang ML, Uniqueness and value sharing of entire functions, Computer & Mathematics with Applications, 2002, 44: 823-831].

  11. Mushrooms—Biologically Distinct and Nutritionally Unique

    OpenAIRE

    Feeney, Mary Jo; Miller, Amy Myrdal; Roupas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mushrooms are fungi, biologically distinct from plant- and animal-derived foods (fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, protein [meat, fish, poultry, legumes, nuts, and seeds]) that comprise the US Department of Agriculture food patterns operationalized by consumer-focused MyPlate messages. Although mushrooms provide nutrients found in these food groups, they also have a unique nutrient profile. Classified into food grouping systems by their use as a vegetable, mushrooms’ increasing use in main e...

  12. A unique case of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Khizar

    2009-01-01

    An 18-year-old Asian girl was referred to the nephrology unit with rapidly progressive renal failure. At the age of 15 she was diagnosed as having systemic lupus erythematosus but had defaulted treatment. Her renal functions improved with cyclophosphamide pulse treatment but she continued to have central nervous system vasculitis, gastrointestinal vasculitis and opportunistic infections making her a unique and challenging case of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  13. Uniqueness from locality and BCFW shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Rodina, Laurentiu

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a BCFW shift which can be used to recursively build the full Yang-Mills amplitude as a function of polarization vectors. Furthermore, in line with the recent results of arXiv:1612.02797, we conjecture that the Yang-Mills scattering amplitude is uniquely fixed by locality and demanding the usual asymptotic behavior under a sufficient number of shifts. Unitarity therefore emerges from locality and constructability. We prove this statement at the leading order in the soft expansion.

  14. Synthetic Biology of Cyanobacteria: Unique Challenges and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertram M Berla

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic organisms, and especially cyanobacteria, hold great promise as sources of renewably-produced fuels, bulk and specialty chemicals, and nutritional products. Synthetic biology tools can help unlock cyanobacteria’s potential for these functions, but unfortunately tool development for these organisms has lagged behind that for S. cerevisiae and E. coli. While these organisms may in many cases be more difficult to work with as ‘chassis’ strains for synthetic biology than certain heterotrophs, the unique advantages of autotrophs in biotechnology applications as well as the scientific importance of improved understanding of photosynthesis warrant the development of these systems into something akin to a ‘green E. coli’. In this review, we highlight unique challenges and opportunities for development of synthetic biology approaches in cyanobacteria. We review classical and recently developed methods for constructing targeted mutants in various cyanobacterial strains, and offer perspective on what genetic tools might most greatly expand the ability to engineer new functions in such strains. Similarly, we review what genetic parts are most needed for the development of cyanobacterial synthetic biology. Finally, we highlight recent methods to construct genome-scale models of cyanobacterial metabolism and to use those models to measure properties of autotrophic metabolism. Throughout this paper, we discuss some of the unique challenges of a diurnal, autotrophic lifestyle along with how the development of synthetic biology and biotechnology in cyanobacteria must fit within those constraints.

  15. Synthetic biology of cyanobacteria: unique challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berla, Bertram M; Saha, Rajib; Immethun, Cheryl M; Maranas, Costas D; Moon, Tae Seok; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms, and especially cyanobacteria, hold great promise as sources of renewably-produced fuels, bulk and specialty chemicals, and nutritional products. Synthetic biology tools can help unlock cyanobacteria's potential for these functions, but unfortunately tool development for these organisms has lagged behind that for S. cerevisiae and E. coli. While these organisms may in many cases be more difficult to work with as "chassis" strains for synthetic biology than certain heterotrophs, the unique advantages of autotrophs in biotechnology applications as well as the scientific importance of improved understanding of photosynthesis warrant the development of these systems into something akin to a "green E. coli." In this review, we highlight unique challenges and opportunities for development of synthetic biology approaches in cyanobacteria. We review classical and recently developed methods for constructing targeted mutants in various cyanobacterial strains, and offer perspective on what genetic tools might most greatly expand the ability to engineer new functions in such strains. Similarly, we review what genetic parts are most needed for the development of cyanobacterial synthetic biology. Finally, we highlight recent methods to construct genome-scale models of cyanobacterial metabolism and to use those models to measure properties of autotrophic metabolism. Throughout this paper, we discuss some of the unique challenges of a diurnal, autotrophic lifestyle along with how the development of synthetic biology and biotechnology in cyanobacteria must fit within those constraints.

  16. Overcoming tumor immune evasion with an unique arbovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyday, Bruce; Chen, Tony; Kesari, Santosh; Minev, Boris

    2015-01-16

    Combining dendritic cell vaccination with the adjuvant effect of a strain of dengue virus may be a way to overcome known tumor immune evasion mechanisms. Dengue is unique among viruses as primary infections carry lower mortality than the common cold, but secondary infections carry significant risk of hypovolemic shock. While current immuno-therapies rely on a single axis of attack, this approach combines physiological (hyperthermic reduction of tumor perfusion), immunological (activation of effector cells of the adaptive and innate immune system), and apoptosis-inducing pathways (sTRAIL) to destroy tumor cells. The premise of using multiple mechanisms of action in synergy with a decline in the ability of the tumor cells to employ resistance methods suggests the potential of this combination approach in cancer immunotherapy.

  17. TIME SERIES ANALYSIS USING A UNIQUE MODEL OF TRANSFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Klepac

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available REFII1 model is an authorial mathematical model for time series data mining. The main purpose of that model is to automate time series analysis, through a unique transformation model of time series. An advantage of this approach of time series analysis is the linkage of different methods for time series analysis, linking traditional data mining tools in time series, and constructing new algorithms for analyzing time series. It is worth mentioning that REFII model is not a closed system, which means that we have a finite set of methods. At first, this is a model for transformation of values of time series, which prepares data used by different sets of methods based on the same model of transformation in a domain of problem space. REFII model gives a new approach in time series analysis based on a unique model of transformation, which is a base for all kind of time series analysis. The advantage of REFII model is its possible application in many different areas such as finance, medicine, voice recognition, face recognition and text mining.

  18. Combining Spectroscopic and Photometric Surveys: Same or different sky?

    CERN Document Server

    Eriksen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at the combined constraints from a photometric and spectroscopic survey. These surveys will measure cosmology using weak lensing (WL), galaxy cluster- ing, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and redshift space distortions (RSD). We find, contrary to some findings in the recent literature, that overlapping surveys can give important benefits when measuring dark energy. We therefore try to clarify the status of this issue with a full forecast of two stage-IV surveys using a new approach to prop- erly account for covariance between the different probes in the overlapping samples. The benefit of the overlapping survey can be traced back to two factors: additional observables and sample variance cancellation. Both needs to be taken into account and contribute equally when combining 3D power spectrum and 2D correlations for lensing. With an analytic example we also illustrate that for optimal constraints, one should minimize the (Pearson) correlation coefficient between cosmological and nui- sanc...

  19. Mm-Wave Spectroscopic Sensors, Catalogs, and Uncatalogued Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Ivan; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-06-01

    Analytical chemical sensing based on high resolution rotational molecular spectra has been recognized as a viable technique for decades. We recently demonstrated a compact implementation of such a sensor. Future generations of these sensors will rely on automated algorithms for quantification of chemical dilutions based on their spectral libraries, as well as identification of spectral features not present in spectral catalogs. Here we present an algorithm aimed at detection of unidentified lines in complex molecular species based on spectroscopic libraries developed in our previous projects. We will discuss the approaches suitable for data mining in feature-rich rotational molecular spectra. Neese, C.F., I.R. Medvedev, G.M. Plummer, A.J. Frank, C.D. Ball, and F.C. De Lucia, "A Compact Submillimeter/Terahertz Gas Sensor with Efficient Gas Collection, Preconcentration, and ppt Sensitivity." Sensors Journal, IEEE, 2012. 12(8): p. 2565-2574

  20. Identification and Classification of the Unique Features of Mass Housing Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titus Ebenezer Kwofie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass housing projects (MHPs are said to differ significantly from the “one-off” traditional building projects often encountered in the construction industry and thus require unique management skills and approach in MHPs delivery. This unique nature of MHPs contributes to managerial inefficiencies that result in delivery failures when management approaches are not adapted to the project characteristics. However, understanding and knowledge of the unique attributes of MHPs are critical towards improving the organisation, planning, managerial effectiveness, and delivery success of mass housing projects. To date, extensive studies establishing the unique features of mass housing projects are lacking. This study is set out to identify what constitutes the unique features of mass housing projects by comparing mass housing projects to traditional “one-off” building projects. A questionnaire survey was used to establish mass housing practitioners’ perception of the unique characteristics of MHPs. Data analysis involving mean scores and ANOVA revealed 10 unique features of MHP. A clear and systematic understanding of these unique features of MHPs is crucial for evolving effective project management practices and critical competencies towards successful delivery of current and future MHPs.

  1. Stationary Black Holes: Uniqueness and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr T. Chruściel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of known black-hole solutions to the stationary Einstein equations has been steadily increasing, sometimes in unexpected ways. In particular, it has turned out that not all black-hole-equilibrium configurations are characterized by their mass, angular momentum and global charges. Moreover, the high degree of symmetry displayed by vacuum and electro vacuum black-hole spacetimes ceases to exist in self-gravitating non-linear field theories. This text aims to review some developments in the subject and to discuss them in light of the uniqueness theorem for the Einstein-Maxwell system.

  2. Stationary Black Holes: Uniqueness and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heusler Markus

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of known black hole solutions to the stationary Einstein equations has increased in an unexpected way during the last decade. In particular, it has turned out that not all black hole equilibrium configurations are characterized by their mass, angular momentum and global charges. Moreover, the high degree of symmetry displayed by vacuum and electro-vacuum black hole space-times ceases to exist in self-gravitating non-linear field theories. This text aims to review some of the recent developments and to discuss them in the light of the uniqueness theorem for the Einstein-Maxwell system.

  3. Unique double recurrence of cerebral arteriovenous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagm, Alhusain; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Ichinose, Shunsuke; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Surgically treated patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are considered cured when the postoperative angiogram proves complete resection. However, despite no residual nidus or early draining vein on postoperative angiogram, rare instances of AVM recurrence have been reported in adults. In this paper, the authors present a case of a 24-year-old woman with asymptomatic double recurrence of her cerebral AVM after angiographically proven complete resection. To the authors' knowledge, this patient represents the first case with double de novo asymptomatic recurrence of Spetzler-Martin grade I AVM. Also, she represents the first case with unique AVM criteria in each recurrence.

  4. A unique variation of superficial palmar arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiji PJ

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a unique variation in the arterial pattern of superficial palmar arch in which it was completed by one of the large terminal branches of radial artery. The origin of the arteria radialis indicis was also peculiar that it was arising from the communicating branch of the radial artery and further reinforced by the first dorsal metacarpal artery that joined it after reaching the volar aspect. Pertinent anatomical knowledge regarding the variations of the palmar arch is significant for the purposes of microvascular repairs and re-implantations.

  5. Type III factors with unique Cartan decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Houdayer, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    We prove that for any free ergodic nonsingular nonamenable action \\Gamma\\ \\actson (X,\\mu) of all \\Gamma\\ in a large class of groups including all hyperbolic groups, the associated group measure space factor $L^\\infty(X) \\rtimes \\Gamma$ has L^\\infty(X) as its unique Cartan subalgebra, up to unitary conjugacy. This generalizes the probability measure preserving case that was established in [PV12]. We also prove primeness and indecomposability results for such crossed products, for the corresponding orbit equivalence relations and for arbitrary amalgamated free products $M_1 *_B M_2$ over a subalgebra B of type I.

  6. Uniqueness of Centauro-type events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augusto, C.R.A.; Barroso, S.L.C.; Beggio, P.C.; Carvalho, A.O. de; Menon, M.J.; Navia, C.E.; Oliveira, R. de; Shibuya, E.H

    2003-07-01

    Analysis to discriminate Centauro events from normal events is made without previous identification of secondary emitted particles. For this purpose their energy and derived quantities like distance from the center of momenta it were mainly used. As a result we found in a sample of (280+87) experimental events only 3 were compatible with 5 Centauro events, but none of them dad a high content of hadrons, characteristic of Centauro events. With this result we are confident about the uniqueness of Centauro events, especially for two events that have vertex directly determined. Comparing with some interaction models features we depict a possible scenario to explain Centauro events.

  7. Uniqueness of the Trautman-Bondi mass

    CERN Document Server

    Chrúsciel, P T; MacCallum, M A H; Chru\\'sciel, Piotr T.; Jezierski, Jacek; Callum, Malcolm A.H. Mac

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that the only functionals, within a natural class, which are monotonic in time for all solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations admitting a smooth ``piece'' of conformal null infinity Scri, are those depending on the metric only through a specific combination of the Bondi `mass aspect' and other next--to--leading order terms in the metric. Under the extra condition of passive BMS invariance, the unique such functional (up to a multiplicative factor) is the Trautman--Bondi energy. It is also shown that this energy remains well-defined for a wide class of `polyhomogeneous' metrics.

  8. Unique supply function equilibrium with capacity constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, Paer [Department of Economics, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 513, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2008-01-15

    Consider a market where producers submit supply functions to a procurement auction with uncertain demand, e.g. an electricity auction. In the Supply Function Equilibrium (SFE), every firm commits to the supply function that maximises expected profit in the one-shot game given the supply functions of competitors. A basic weakness of the SFE is the presence of multiple equilibria. This paper shows that with (i) symmetric producers, (ii) perfectly inelastic demand, (iii) a price cap, and (iv) capacity constraints that bind with a positive probability, there exists a unique, symmetric SFE. (author)

  9. [Celiac disease: an unique autoinmune model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo Sáez, Luis Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Celiac disease is a unique autoimmune disorder, because the environmental precipitant factor is known. It is gluten, the major storage protein of wheat and similar grains. Originally was considered a rare malabsorption syndrome of childhood, but nowadays is recognized a common condition, that affects to 1% of the general population, all over the world', involves to all different races, may be diagnosed at any age, and affects to many organ systems. Therapy for the disease is a gluten-free-diet that must be strict and long-term. This diet cause a total recovery clinical and analytical, with excellent quality of life of patients.

  10. Uniqueness, Self belonging and Intercourse in Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsh, Dr. Marvin / E.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript has ensued from my past studies in biochemistry (PhD, CUNY 1986) and my current endeavors in graduate study in philosophy and anthropology. The current research project began during my period as a graduate student in biochemistry with a professor of classical genetics comment that DNA was unique in the physical world. The paradox presented to relate this notion to existing natural law lead me to evolve and communicate a view that the world itself is a special case of a general...

  11. Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis Methods and Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted along with photoluminescence spectroscopy (i.e. fluorescence and/or phosphorescence spectroscopy) to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  12. Spectroscopic study of solar twins and analogues

    CERN Document Server

    Datson, Juliet; Portinari, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Context. Many large stellar surveys have been and are still being carried out, providing huge amounts of data, for which stellar physical parameters will be derived. Solar twins and analogues provide a means to test the calibration of these stellar catalogues because the Sun is the best-studied star and provides precise fundamental parameters. Solar twins should be centred on the solar values. Aims. This spectroscopic study of solar analogues selected from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (GCS) at a resolution of 48,000 provides effective temperatures and metallicities for these stars. We test whether our spectroscopic parameters, as well as the previous photometric calibrations, are properly centred on the Sun. In addition, we search for more solar twins in our sample. Methods. The methods used in this work are based on literature methods for solar twin searches and on methods we developed in previous work to distinguish the metallicity-temperature degeneracies in the differential comparison of spectra of solar ...

  13. Spectroscopic Imaging of Strongly Correlated Electronic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Ali; da Silva Neto, Eduardo H.; Aynajian, Pegor

    2016-03-01

    The study of correlated electronic systems from high-Tc cuprates to heavy-fermion systems continues to motivate the development of experimental tools to probe electronic phenomena in new ways and with increasing precision. In the past two decades, spectroscopic imaging with scanning tunneling microscopy has emerged as a powerful experimental technique. The combination of high energy and spatial resolutions provided by this technique reveals unprecedented detail of the electronic properties of strongly correlated metals and superconductors. This review examines specific experiments, theoretical concepts, and measurement methods that have established the application of these techniques to correlated materials. A wide range of applications, such as the study of collective responses to single atomic impurities, the characterization of quasiparticle-like excitations through their interference, and the identification of competing electronic phases using spectroscopic imaging, are discussed.

  14. Are your spectroscopic data being used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Iouli E.; Potterbusch, Megan R.; Bouquin, Daina; Erdmann, Christopher C.; Wilzewski, Jonas S.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2016-09-01

    The issue of availability of data and their presentation in spectroscopic publications is discussed. Different current practices are critically reviewed from the point of view of potential users, government policies, and merit of success of the authors. Indeed, properly providing the data benefits not only users but also the authors of the spectroscopic research. We will show that this increases citations to the spectroscopy papers and visibility of the research groups. Examples based on the statistical analyses of the articles published in the Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy will be shown. We will discuss different methods including supplementary materials to the Journals, public-curated databases and also new tools that can be utilized by spectroscopists.

  15. Structural and spectroscopic studies of surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Laitenberger, P

    1996-01-01

    and on a 10ML thick Ar spacer layer, a remarkable substrate dependence is revealed. A new STM-based technique for fabricating simple metal-structures with dimensions in the 10-100nm regime which are partially electrically isolated from their environment was developed in collaboration with Dr. L. A. Silva. This technique employs the STM tip as a mechanical nanofabrication tool to machine gaps into a thin metallic film deposited on an insulating substrate, which laterally confine and electrically isolate the desired metal regions. Several metal structures, such as nanoscale wires and pads, were successfully created. Finally, the conceptual basis and present stage of construction of a new surface analytical tool, the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer (SPELS), is discussed. The SPELS offers the exciting prospect of collecting structural as well as spectroscopic information with a spatial resolution of a few nanometres. Once successfully developed, it will be ideally suited for spectroscopic studies of nanos...

  16. Uniqueness plots: A simple graphical tool for identifying poor peak fits in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Bhupinder; Diwan, Anubhav; Jain, Varun [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 84606 (United States); Herrera-Gomez, Alberto [CINVESTAV-Unidad Queretaro, Queretaro, 76230 (Mexico); Terry, Jeff [Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL, 60616 (United States); Linford, Matthew R., E-mail: mrlinford@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 84606 (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Uniqueness plots are introduced as a new tool for identifying poor XPS peak fits. • Uniqueness plots are demonstrated on real XPS data sets. • A horizontal line in a uniqueness plot indicates a poor fit, i.e., fit parameter correlation. • A parabolic shape in a uniqueness plot indicates that a fit may be appropriate. - Abstract: Peak fitting is an essential part of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) narrow scan analysis, and the Literature contains both good and bad examples of peak fitting. A common cause of poor peak fitting is the inclusion of too many fit parameters, often without a sound chemical and/or physical basis for them, and/or the failure to reasonably constrain them. Under these conditions, fit parameters are often correlated, and therefore lacking in statistical meaning. Here we introduce the uniqueness plot as a simple graphical tool for identifying bad peak fits in XPS, i.e., fit parameter correlation. These plots are widely used in spectroscopic ellipsometry. We illustrate uniqueness plots with two data sets: a C 1s narrow scan from ozone-treated carbon nanotube forests and an Si 2p narrow scan from an air-oxidized silicon wafer. For each fit, we consider different numbers of parameters and constraints on them. As expected, the uniqueness plots are parabolic when fewer fit parameters and/or more constraints are applied. However, they fan out and eventually become horizontal lines as more unconstrained parameters are included in the fits. Uniqueness plots are generated by plotting the chi squared (χ{sup 2}) value for a fit vs. a systematically varied value of a parameter in the fit. The Abbe criterion is also considered as a figure of merit for uniqueness plots in the Supporting Information. We recommend that uniqueness plots be used by XPS practitioners for identifying inappropriate peak fits.

  17. Spectroscopic studies of ion implanted PPV films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, C. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Friend, R.H. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Sarnecki, G.J. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Lucas, B. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France)); Moliton, A. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France)); Ratier, B. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France)); Belorgeot, C. (Lab. de Physique Moleculaire, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France))

    1993-03-15

    The main results of the spectroscopic analyses (infrared and ultraviolet - visible - near infrared) carried out on PPV films before and after ion implantation with halogen and alkali ions are presented in this paper. The influence of both ions nature and implantation parameters on optical properties of this polymer have been pointed out and the appearance of a weak band due to doping has been observed by infrared spectroscopy. (orig.)

  18. Studying Young Stars with Large Spectroscopic Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Martell, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Galactic archaeology is the study of the history of star formation and chemical evolution in the Milky Way, based on present-day stellar populations. Studies of young stars are a key anchor point for Galactic archaeology, since quantities like the initial mass function and the star formation rate can be studied directly in young clusters and star forming regions. Conversely, massive spectroscopic Galactic archaeology surveys can be used as a data source for young star studies.

  19. Spectroscopic Characterisation of SWNT Polymer Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Keogh, Sinead

    2006-01-01

    In this study hybrid systems of the conjugated organic polymer poly(p-phenylene vinylene-co-2,5-dioctyloxy-m-phenylene vinylene) (PmPV) with single-walled carbon nanotubes synthesised by the Arc discharge method and by gas-phase catalytic decomposition of carbon monoxide at high pressure (HiPco process) are explored using a wide variety of spectroscopic, microscopic and thermal techniques. Diameter dependent solubilisation has been previously shown in solutions of such composites. Firstly the...

  20. SPECTROSCOPIC GRADIENTS IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Buzzoni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We review some relevant properties of the observed changes of H , Mg2, and Fei Lick indices across the surface of 25 bright elliptical galaxies. The impact of these spectroscopic gradients is brie y discussed, in the framework of the leading physical mechanisms that led to galaxy formation. In particular, three relevant evolutionary scenarios are sketched, each one able, in principle, to consistently match galaxy spectral properties and e ectively constrain the composing stellar populations in these systems.

  1. Spectroscopic Gradients in Early-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzoni, A.; Battistini, C.; Carrasco, L.; Recillas, E.

    2009-11-01

    We review some relevant properties of the observed changes of Hβ, Mg_2, and FeI Lick indices across the surface of 25 bright elliptical galaxies. The impact of these spectroscopic gradients is briefly discussed, in the framework of the leading physical mechanisms that led to galaxy formation. In particular, three relevant evolutionary scenarios are sketched, each one able, in principle, to consistently match galaxy spectral properties and effectively constrain the composing stellar populations in these systems.

  2. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles unique cost estimating requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, P.; Apgar, H.; Stukes, S.; Sterk, S.

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), also referred to as drones, are aerial platforms that fly without a human pilot onboard. UAVs are controlled autonomously by a computer in the vehicle or under the remote control of a pilot stationed at a fixed ground location. There are a wide variety of drone shapes, sizes, configurations, complexities, and characteristics. Use of these devices by the Department of Defense (DoD), NASA, civil and commercial organizations continues to grow. UAVs are commonly used for intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (ISR). They are also use for combat operations, and civil applications, such as firefighting, non-military security work, surveillance of infrastructure (e.g. pipelines, power lines and country borders). UAVs are often preferred for missions that require sustained persistence (over 4 hours in duration), or are “ too dangerous, dull or dirty” for manned aircraft. Moreover, they can offer significant acquisition and operations cost savings over traditional manned aircraft. Because of these unique characteristics and missions, UAV estimates require some unique estimating methods. This paper describes a framework for estimating UAV systems total ownership cost including hardware components, software design, and operations. The challenge of collecting data, testing the sensitivities of cost drivers, and creating cost estimating relationships (CERs) for each key work breakdown structure (WBS) element is discussed. The autonomous operation of UAVs is especially challenging from a software perspective.

  3. Event Segmentation Ability Uniquely Predicts Event Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Jesse Q.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Hambrick, David Z.; Zacks, Rose T.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Bailey, Heather R.; Eisenberg, Michelle L.; Beck, Taylor M.

    2013-01-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79 years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan. PMID:23942350

  4. An experiment on Lowest Unique Integer Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashi; Hanaki, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally study Lowest Unique Integer Games (LUIGs) to determine if and how subjects self-organize into different behavioral classes. In a LUIG, N(≥ 3) players submit a positive integer up to M and the player choosing the smallest number not chosen by anyone else wins. LUIGs are simplified versions of real systems such as Lowest/Highest Unique Bid Auctions that have been attracting attention from scholars, yet experimental studies are scarce. Furthermore, LUIGs offer insights into choice patterns that can shed light on the alleviation of congestion problems. Here, we consider four LUIGs with N = { 3 , 4 } and M = { 3 , 4 } . We find that (a) choices made by more than 1/3 of subjects were not significantly different from what a symmetric mixed-strategy Nash equilibrium (MSE) predicts; however, (b) subjects who behaved significantly differently from what the MSE predicts won the game more frequently. What distinguishes subjects was their tendencies to change their choices following losses.

  5. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaugher, Brenna; Bebek, Chris

    2014-07-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar spectroscopic redshift survey. The DESI instrument consists of a new wide-field (3.2 deg. linear field of view) corrector plus a multi-object spectrometer with up to 5000 robotically positioned optical fibers and will be installed at prime focus on the Mayall 4m telescope at Kitt Peak, Arizona. The fibers feed 10 three-arm spectrographs producing spectra that cover a wavelength range from 360-980 nm and have resolution of 2000-5500 depending on the wavelength. The DESI instrument is designed for a 14,000 sq. deg. multi-year survey of targets that trace the evolution of dark energy out to redshift 3.5 using the redshifts of luminous red galaxies (LRGs), emission line galaxies (ELGs) and quasars. DESI is the successor to the successful Stage-III BOSS spectroscopic redshift survey and complements imaging surveys such as the Stage-III Dark Energy Survey (DES, currently operating) and the Stage-IV Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST, planned start early in the next decade).

  6. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Spectroscopic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, A M; Brough, S; Owers, M S; Bauer, A E; Gunawardhana, M L P; Cluver, M E; Colless, M; Foster, C; Lara-Lopez, M A; Roseboom, I; Sharp, R; Steele, O; Thomas, D; Baldry, I K; Brown, M J I; Liske, J; Norberg, P; Robotham, A S G; Bamford, S; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Drinkwater, M J; Loveday, J; Meyer, M; Peacock, J A; Tuffs, R; Agius, N; Alpaslan, M; Andrae, E; Cameron, E; Cole, S; Ching, J H Y; Christodoulou, L; Conselice, C; Croom, S; Cross, N J G; De Propris, R; Delhaize, J; Dunne, L; Eales, S; Ellis, S; Frenk, C S; Graham, A; Grootes, M W; Haussler, B; Heymans, C; Hill, D; Hoyle, B; Hudson, M; Jarvis, M; Johansson, J; Jones, D H; van Kampen, E; Kelvin, L; Kuijken, K; Lopez-Sanchez, A; Maddox, S; Madore, B; Maraston, C; McNaught-Roberts, T; Nichol, R C; Oliver, S; Parkinson, H; Penny, S; Phillipps, S; Pimbblet, K A; Ponman, T; Popescu, C C; Prescott, M; Proctor, R; Sadler, E M; Sansom, A E; Seibert, M; Staveley-Smith, L; Sutherland, W; Taylor, E; Van Waerbeke, L; Vazquez-Mata, J A; Warren, S; Wijesinghe, D B; Wild, V; Wilkins, S

    2013-01-01

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is a multiwavelength photometric and spectroscopic survey, using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain spectra for up to ~300000 galaxies over 280 square degrees, to a limiting magnitude of r_pet < 19.8 mag. The target galaxies are distributed over 0spectroscopic reduction and analysis pipeline. We present the steps involved in taking the raw two-dimensional spectroscopic images through to flux-calibrated one-dimensional spectra. The resulting GAMA spectra cover an observed wavelength range of 3750

  7. The Spectroscopic Diversity of Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Blondin, S; Kirshner, R P; Mandel, K S; Berlind, P; Calkins, M; Challis, P; Garnavich, P M; Jha, S W; Modjaz, M; Riess, A G; Schmidt, B P

    2012-01-01

    We present 2603 spectra of 462 nearby Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) obtained during 1993-2008 through the Center for Astrophysics Supernova Program. Most of the spectra were obtained with the FAST spectrograph at the FLWO 1.5m telescope and reduced in a consistent manner, making data set well suited for studies of SN Ia spectroscopic diversity. We study the spectroscopic and photometric properties of SN Ia as a function of spectroscopic class using the classification schemes of Branch et al. and Wang et al. The width-luminosity relation appears to be steeper for SN Ia with broader lines. Based on the evolution of the characteristic Si II 6355 line, we propose improved methods for measuring velocity gradients, revealing a larger range than previously suspected, from ~0 to ~400 km/s/day considering the instantaneous velocity decline rate at maximum light. We find a weaker and less significant correlation between Si II velocity and intrinsic B-V color at maximum light than reported by Foley et al., owing to a more ...

  8. How specific Raman spectroscopic models are: a comparative study between different cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S. P.; Kumar, K. Kalyan; Chowdary, M. V. P.; Maheedhar, K.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2010-02-01

    Optical spectroscopic methods are being contemplated as adjunct/ alternative to existing 'Gold standard' of cancer diagnosis, histopathological examination. Several groups are actively pursuing diagnostic applications of Ramanspectroscopy in cancers. We have developed Raman spectroscopic models for diagnosis of breast, oral, stomach, colon and larynx cancers. So far, specificity and applicability of spectral- models has been limited to particular tissue origin. In this study we have evaluated explicitly of spectroscopic-models by analyzing spectra from already developed spectralmodels representing normal and malignant tissues of breast (46), cervix (52), colon (25), larynx (53), and oral (47). Spectral data was analyzed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) using scores of factor, Mahalanobis distance and Spectral residuals as discriminating parameters. Multiparametric limit test approach was also explored. The preliminary unsupervised PCA of pooled data indicates that normal tissue types were always exclusive from their malignant counterparts. But when we consider tissue of different origin, large overlap among clusters was found. Supervised analysis by Mahalanobis distance and spectral residuals gave similar results. The 'limit test' approach where classification is based on match / mis-match of the given spectrum against all the available spectra has revealed that spectral models are very exclusive and specific. For example breast normal spectral model show matches only with breast normal spectra and mismatch to rest of the spectra. Same pattern was seen for most of spectral models. Therefore, results of the study indicate the exclusiveness and efficacy of Raman spectroscopic-models. Prospectively, these findings might open new application of Raman spectroscopic models in identifying a tumor as primary or metastatic.

  9. Applications for unique identifiers in the geological sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, J.; Lehnert, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Even though geology has always been a generalist discipline in many parts, approaches towards questions about Earth's past have become increasingly interdisciplinary. At the same time, a wealth of samples has been collected, the resulting data have been stored in in disciplinary databases, the interpretations published in scientific literature. In the past these resources have existed alongside each other, semantically linked only by the knowledge of the researcher and his peers. One of the main drivers towards the inception of the world wide web was the ability to link scientific sources over the internet. The Uniform Resource Locator (URL) used to locate resources on the web soon turned out to be ephemeral in nature. A more reliable way of addressing objects was needed, a way of persistent identification to make digital objects, or digital representations of objects, part of the record of science. With their high degree of centralisation the scientific publishing houses were quick to implement and adopt a system for unique and persistent identification, the Digital Object Identifier (DOI) ®. At the same time other identifier systems exist alongside DOI, e.g. URN, ARK, handle ®, and others. There many uses for persistent identification in science, other than the identification of journal articles. DOI are already used for the identification of data, thus making data citable. There are several initiatives to assign identifiers to authors and institutions to allow unique identification. A recent development is the application of persistent identifiers for geological samples. As most data in the geosciences are derived from samples, it is crucial to be able to uniquely identify the samples from which a set of data were derived. Incomplete documentation of samples in publications, use of ambiguous sample names are major obstacles for synthesis studies and re-use of data. Access to samples for re-analysis and re-appraisal is limited due to the lack of a central

  10. Spectroscopic Parameters of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terbetas, G.; Kozlovskaja, A.; Varanius, D.; Graziene, V.; Vaitkus, J.; Vaitkuviene, A.

    2009-06-01

    There are numerous methods of investigating intervertebral disc. Visualization methods are widely used in clinical practice. Histological, imunohistochemical and biochemical methods are more used in scientific research. We propose that a new spectroscopic investigation would be useful in determining intervertebral disc material, especially when no histological specimens are available. Purpose: to determine spectroscopic parameters of intervertebral disc material; to determine emission spectra common for all intervertebral discs; to create a background for further spectroscopic investigation where no histological specimen will be available. Material and Methods: 20 patients, 68 frozen sections of 20 μm thickness from operatively removed intervertebral disc hernia were excited by Nd:YAG microlaser STA-01-TH third harmonic 355 nm light throw 0, 1 mm fiber. Spectrophotometer OceanOptics USB2000 was used for spectra collection. Mathematical analysis of spectra was performed by ORIGIN multiple Gaussian peaks analysis. Results: In each specimen of disc hernia were found distinct maximal spectral peaks of 4 types supporting the histological evaluation of mixture content of the hernia. Fluorescence in the spectral regions 370-700 nm was detected in the disc hernias. The main spectral component was at 494 nm and the contribution of the components with the peak wavelength values at 388 nm, 412 nm and 435±5 nm were varying in the different groups of samples. In comparison to average spectrum of all cases, there are 4 groups of different spectral signatures in the region 400-500 nm in the patient groups, supporting a clinical data on different clinical features of the patients. Discussion and Conclusion: besides the classical open discectomy, new minimally invasive techniques of treating intervertebral disc emerge (PLDD). Intervertebral disc in these techniques is assessed by needle, no histological specimen is taken. Spectroscopic investigation via fiber optics through the

  11. The core and unique proteins of haloarchaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capes Melinda D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the first genome of a halophilic archaeon was sequenced in 2000, biologists have been advancing the understanding of genomic characteristics that allow for survival in the harsh natural environments of these organisms. An increase in protein acidity and GC-bias in the genome have been implicated as factors in tolerance to extreme salinity, desiccation, and high solar radiation. However, few previous attempts have been made to identify novel genes that would permit survival in such extreme conditions. Results With the recent release of several new complete haloarchaeal genome sequences, we have conducted a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis focusing on the identification of unique haloarchaeal conserved proteins that likely play key roles in environmental adaptation. Using bioinformatic methods, we have clustered 31,312 predicted proteins from nine haloarchaeal genomes into 4,455 haloarchaeal orthologous groups (HOGs. We assigned likely functions by association with established COG and KOG databases in NCBI. After identifying homologs in four additional haloarchaeal genomes, we determined that there were 784 core haloarchaeal protein clusters (cHOGs, of which 83 clusters were found primarily in haloarchaea. Further analysis found that 55 clusters were truly unique (tucHOGs to haloarchaea and qualify as signature proteins while 28 were nearly unique (nucHOGs, the vast majority of which were coded for on the haloarchaeal chromosomes. Of the signature proteins, only one example with any predicted function, Ral, involved in desiccation/radiation tolerance in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, was identified. Among the core clusters, 33% was predicted to function in metabolism, 25% in information transfer and storage, 10% in cell processes and signaling, and 22% belong to poorly characterized or general function groups. Conclusion Our studies have established conserved groups of nearly 800 protein clusters present in all

  12. Uniqueness plots: A simple graphical tool for identifying poor peak fits in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupinder; Diwan, Anubhav; Jain, Varun; Herrera-Gomez, Alberto; Terry, Jeff; Linford, Matthew R.

    2016-11-01

    Peak fitting is an essential part of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) narrow scan analysis, and the Literature contains both good and bad examples of peak fitting. A common cause of poor peak fitting is the inclusion of too many fit parameters, often without a sound chemical and/or physical basis for them, and/or the failure to reasonably constrain them. Under these conditions, fit parameters are often correlated, and therefore lacking in statistical meaning. Here we introduce the uniqueness plot as a simple graphical tool for identifying bad peak fits in XPS, i.e., fit parameter correlation. These plots are widely used in spectroscopic ellipsometry. We illustrate uniqueness plots with two data sets: a C 1s narrow scan from ozone-treated carbon nanotube forests and an Si 2p narrow scan from an air-oxidized silicon wafer. For each fit, we consider different numbers of parameters and constraints on them. As expected, the uniqueness plots are parabolic when fewer fit parameters and/or more constraints are applied. However, they fan out and eventually become horizontal lines as more unconstrained parameters are included in the fits. Uniqueness plots are generated by plotting the chi squared (χ2) value for a fit vs. a systematically varied value of a parameter in the fit. The Abbe criterion is also considered as a figure of merit for uniqueness plots in the Supporting Information. We recommend that uniqueness plots be used by XPS practitioners for identifying inappropriate peak fits.

  13. Denoising spectroscopic data by means of the improved Least-Squares Deconvolution method

    CERN Document Server

    Tkachenko, A; Tsymbal, V; Aerts, C; Kochukhov, O; Debosscher, J

    2013-01-01

    The MOST, CoRoT, and Kepler space missions led to the discovery of a large number of intriguing, and in some cases unique, objects among which are pulsating stars, stars hosting exoplanets, binaries, etc. Although the space missions deliver photometric data of unprecedented quality, these data are lacking any spectral information and we are still in need of ground-based spectroscopic and/or multicolour photometric follow-up observations for a solid interpretation. Both faintness of most of the observed stars and the required high S/N of spectroscopic data imply the need of using large telescopes, access to which is limited. In this paper, we look for an alternative, and aim for the development of a technique allowing to denoise the originally low S/N spectroscopic data, making observations of faint targets with small telescopes possible and effective. We present a generalization of the original Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD) method by implementing a multicomponent average profile and a line strengths corre...

  14. Conditional and Unique Coloring of Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, P Venkata Subba

    2011-01-01

    For integers $k, r > 0$, a conditional $(k,r)$-coloring of a graph $G$ is a proper $k$-coloring of the vertices of $G$ such that every vertex $v$ of degree $d(v)$ in $G$ is adjacent to at least $\\min\\{r, d(v)\\}$ differently colored vertices. Given $r$, the smallest integer $k$ for which $G$ has a conditional $(k,r)$-coloring is called the $r$th order conditional chromatic number $\\chi_r(G)$ of $G$. We give results (exact values or bounds for $\\chi_r(G)$, depending on $r$) related to the conditional coloring of some graphs. We introduce \\emph{unique conditional colorability} and give some related results. (Keywords. cartesian product of graphs; conditional chromatic number; gear graph; join of graphs.)

  15. Developing innovative programs for unique student populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, D A; Caruso, J; Chauncey, D M

    1994-12-01

    Optometric education has been faced with ever-increasing expectations. These include the ability to educate students and practitioners to care for new patient populations, deal with more diverse and complex clinical problems, to be significant participants in the research community and to fulfill leadership positions within the profession. To fulfill this expectation, schools and colleges need to diversify their program offerings to attract and educate unique student populations who come from diverse backgrounds and bring a range of pre-existing knowledge and skills. This paper provides an overview of The New England College of Optometry's efforts in this area and two programs, the "Advanced Standing International Program" and the "Accelerated Doctor of Optometry Degree Program," are examined in detail. An emphasis is placed on outcomes assessment to ensure the programs are fulfilling their purpose and the results of a retrospective analysis of the two programs is provided.

  16. Computational Transition at the Uniqueness Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Sly, Allan

    2010-01-01

    The hardcore model is a model of lattice gas systems which has received much attention in statistical physics, probability theory and theoretical computer science. It is the probability distribution over independent sets $I$ of a graph weighted proportionally to $\\lambda^{|I|}$ with fugacity parameter $\\lambda$. We prove that at the uniqueness threshold of the hardcore model on the $d$-regular tree, approximating the partition function becomes computationally hard on graphs of maximum degree $d$. Specifically, we show that unless NP$=$RP there is no polynomial time approximation scheme for the partition function (the sum of such weighted independent sets) on graphs of maximum degree $d$ for fugacity $\\lambda_c(d) 0$. Weitz produced an FPTAS for approximating the partition function when $0<\\lambda < \\lambda_c(d)$ so this result demonstrates that the computational threshold exactly coincides with the statistical physics phase transition thus confirming the main conjecture of [28]. We further analyze the s...

  17. Organizing the spatially and temporally unique hydrosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghuijs, Wouter

    2016-04-01

    Growing anthropogenic activity is quickly changing the hydrosphere. Panta Rhei calls for improved understanding of changing hydrosphere dynamics in their connection with human systems. I argue that progress within the Panta Rhei initiative is strongly limited by the absence of hydrological principles that help to organise our spatially and temporally unique hydrosphere; without guiding principles (e.g. classification systems) hydrology will continue to be a case study dominated science that will have a hard time to efficiently improve understanding, estimation and prediction of human affected systems. Exposing such organising principles should not be considered as a step backwards into the recent PUB decade. Instead, it should be regarded as an exciting scientific challenge that is becoming increasingly relevant now the hydrosphere is quickly changing.

  18. Multiple floating metatarsals: a unique injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vivek Trikha; Tarun Goyal; Amit K Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Concomitant dislocation of the tarsometatarsal and metatarsophalangeal joints of foot is an extremely rare injury.Such injuries presenting in a single or adjacent dual rays have been described in few cases previously.We describe such an injury in adjacent three metatarsals of a polytrauma patient.These injuries are likely to be missed in the initial assessment of a polytrauma patient.These patients are at risk of an overlooked diagnosis but the consequences of missing this type of injury may be quite severe.This case is presented in view of its uniqueness along with possible mechanism of injury,the sequence of reduction and follow-up.Knowledge of such injury and its proper management may be useful to the trauma surgeons.

  19. Hue discrimination, unique hues and naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachy, Romain; Dias, Jérôme; Alleysson, David; Bonnardel, Valérie

    2012-02-01

    The hue discrimination curve (HDC) that characterizes performances over the entire hue circle was determined by using sinusoidally modulated spectral power distributions of 1.5 c/300 nm with fixed amplitude and twelve reference phases. To investigate relationship between hue discrimination and appearance, observers further performed a free color naming and unique hue tasks. The HDC consistently displayed two minima and two maxima; discrimination is optimal at the yellow/orange and blue/magenta boundaries and pessimal in green and in the extra-spectral magenta colors. A linear model based on Müller zone theory correctly predicts a periodical profile but with a phase-opponency (minima/maxima at 180° apart) which is inconsistent with the empirical HDC's profile.

  20. Injectable hydrogels as unique biomedical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin; Ding, Jiandong

    2008-08-01

    A concentrated fish soup could be gelled in the winter and re-solled upon heating. In contrast, some synthetic copolymers exhibit an inverse sol-gel transition with spontaneous physical gelation upon heating instead of cooling. If the transition in water takes place below the body temperature and the chemicals are biocompatible and biodegradable, such gelling behavior makes the associated physical gels injectable biomaterials with unique applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering etc. Various therapeutic agents or cells can be entrapped in situ and form a depot merely by a syringe injection of their aqueous solutions at target sites with minimal invasiveness and pain. This tutorial review summarizes and comments on this soft matter, especially thermogelling poly(ethylene glycol)-(biodegradable polyester) block copolymers. The main types of injectable hydrogels are also briefly introduced, including both physical gels and chemical gels.

  1. Fullerenes as unique nanopharmaceuticals for disease treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As unique nanoparticles,fullerenes have attracted much attention due to their unparalleled physical,chemical and biological properties.Various functionalized fullerenes with OH,NH2,COOH,and peptide modifications were developed.It summarized the biological activities of fullerenes derivatives in cancer therapy with high efficiency and low toxicity,as reactive oxygen species scavenger and lipid peroxidation inhibitor,to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus and to suppress bacteria and microbial at low concentration.In addition,the mechanism for fullerene to enter cells and biodistribution of fullerene in vivo was also discussed.This research focuses on the current understanding of fullerenes-based nanomaterials in the potential clinical application as well as biological mechanism of fullerenes and its derivatives in disease therapy.

  2. Detecting beer intake by unique metabolite patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde; Jensen, Morten Georg; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of health related effects of beer intake is hampered by the lack of accurate tools for assessing intakes (biomarkers). Therefore, we identified plasma and urine metabolites associated with recent beer intake by untargeted metabolomics and established a characteristic metabolite pattern...... representing raw materials and beer production as a qualitative biomarker of beer intake. In a randomized, crossover, single-blinded meal study (MSt1) 18 participants were given one at a time four different test beverages: strong, regular and non-alcoholic beers and a soft drink. Four participants were...... assigned to have two additional beers (MSt2). In addition to plasma and urine samples, test beverages, wort and hops extract were analyzed by UPLC-QTOF. A unique metabolite pattern reflecting beer metabolome, including metabolites derived from beer raw material (i.e. N-methyl tyramine sulfate and the sum...

  3. The bacterial magnetosome: a unique prokaryotic organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Brian H; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial magnetosome is a unique prokaryotic organelle comprising magnetic mineral crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer. These inclusions are biomineralized by the magnetotactic bacteria which are ubiquitous, aquatic, motile microorganisms. Magnetosomes cause cells of magnetotactic bacteria to passively align and swim along the Earth's magnetic field lines, as miniature motile compass needles. These specialized compartments consist of a phospholipid bilayer membrane surrounding magnetic crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4). The morphology of these membrane-bound crystals varies by species with a nominal magnetic domain size between 35 and 120 nm. Almost all magnetotactic bacteria arrange their magnetosomes in a chain within the cell there by maximizing the magnetic dipole moment of the cell. It is presumed that magnetotactic bacteria use magnetotaxis in conjunction with chemotaxis to locate and maintain an optimum position for growth and survival based on chemistry, redox and physiology in aquatic habitats with vertical chemical concentration and redox gradients. The biosynthesis of magnetosomes is a complex process that involves several distinct steps including cytoplasmic membrane modifications, iron uptake and transport, initiation of crystallization, crystal maturation and magnetosome chain formation. While many mechanistic details remain unresolved, magnetotactic bacteria appear to contain the genetic determinants for magnetosome biomineralization within their genomes in clusters of genes that make up what is referred to as the magnetosome gene island in some species. In addition, magnetosomes contain a unique set of proteins, not present in other cellular fractions, which control the biomineralization process. Through the development of genetic systems, proteomic and genomic work, and the use of molecular and biochemical tools, the functions of a number of magnetosome membrane proteins have been demonstrated and the molecular

  4. FAST CARS: Engineering a Laser Spectroscopic Technique for Rapid Identification of Bacterial Spores

    OpenAIRE

    Scully, M. O.; Kattawar, G. W.; Lucht, R. P.; Opatrný, T.; Pilloff, H.; Rebane, A.; Sokolov, A.V.(Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia); Zubairy, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromole...

  5. Émission de photons uniques par un atome unique piégé

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darquié, B.; Beugnon, J.; Jones, M. P. A.; Dingjan, J.; Sortais, Y.; Browaeys, A.; Messin, G.; Grangier, P.

    2006-10-01

    En illuminant un atome unique piégé dans une pince optique de taille micrométrique à l'aide d'impulsions lumineuses résonantes d'une durée de 4 ns, nous avons réalisé une source efficace de photons uniques déclenchés, de polarisation bien définie. Nous avons mesuré la fonction d'autocorrélation temporelle en intensité qui met en évidence un dégroupement de photons presque parfait. Une telle source de photons uniques de haut flux possède des applications potentielles pour le traitement de l'information quantique.

  6. On the Uniqueness of the Sparse Signals Reconstruction Based on the Missing Samples Variation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubiša Stanković

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to sparse signals reconstruction considering its missing measurements/samples as variables is recently proposed. Number and positions of missing samples determine the uniqueness of the solution. It has been assumed that analyzed signals are sparse in the discrete Fourier transform (DFT domain. A theorem for simple uniqueness check is proposed. Two forms of the theorem are presented, for an arbitrary sparse signal and for an already reconstructed signal. The results are demonstrated on illustrative and statistical examples.

  7. 14 CFR 221.203 - Unique rule numbers required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unique rule numbers required. 221.203... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS TARIFFS Electronically Filed Tariffs § 221.203 Unique rule numbers required... bear a unique rule number. (b) The unique rule numbers for the fares specified in this section shall...

  8. Spectroscopic AC susceptibility imaging (sASI) of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficko, Bradley W., E-mail: Bradley.W.Ficko@Dartmouth.edu; Nadar, Priyanka M.; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-02-01

    This study demonstrates a method for alternating current (AC) susceptibility imaging (ASI) of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) using low cost instrumentation. The ASI method uses AC magnetic susceptibility measurements to create tomographic images using an array of drive coils, compensation coils and fluxgate magnetometers. Using a spectroscopic approach in conjunction with ASI, a series of tomographic images can be created for each frequency measurement set and is termed sASI. The advantage of sASI is that mNPs can be simultaneously characterized and imaged in a biological medium. System calibration was performed by fitting the in-phase and out-of-phase susceptibility measurements of an mNP sample with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm to a Brownian relaxation model (R{sup 2}=0.96). Samples of mNPs with core diameters of 10 and 40 nm and a sample of 100 nm hydrodynamic diameter were prepared in 0.5 ml tubes. Three mNP samples were arranged in a randomized array and then scanned using sASI with six frequencies between 425 and 925 Hz. The sASI scans showed the location and quantity of the mNP samples (R{sup 2}=0.97). Biological compatibility of the sASI method was demonstrated by scanning mNPs that were injected into a pork sausage. The mNP response in the biological medium was found to correlate with a calibration sample (R{sup 2}=0.97, p<0.001). These results demonstrate the concept of ASI and advantages of sASI. - Highlights: • Development of an AC susceptibility imaging model. • Comparison of AC susceptibility imaging (ASI) and susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI). • Demonstration of ASI and spectroscopic ASI (sASI) using three different magnetic nanoparticle types. • SASI scan separation of three different magnetic nanoparticles samples using 5 spectroscopic frequencies. • Demonstration of biological feasibility of sASI.

  9. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html.

  10. Common processes at unique volcanoes – a volcanological conundrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine eCashman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An emerging challenge in modern volcanology is the apparent contradiction between the perception that every volcano is unique, and classification systems based on commonalities among volcano morphology and eruptive style. On the one hand, detailed studies of individual volcanoes show that a single volcano often exhibits similar patterns of behaviour over multiple eruptive episodes; this observation has led to the idea that each volcano has its own distinctive pattern of behaviour (or personality. In contrast, volcano classification schemes define eruption styles referenced to type volcanoes (e.g. Plinian, Strombolian, Vulcanian; this approach implicitly assumes that common processes underpin volcanic activity and can be used to predict the nature, extent and ensuing hazards of individual volcanoes. Actual volcanic eruptions, however, often include multiple styles, and type volcanoes may experience atypical eruptions (e.g., violent explosive eruptions of Kilauea, Hawaii1. The volcanological community is thus left with a fundamental conundrum that pits the uniqueness of individual volcanic systems against generalization of common processes. Addressing this challenge represents a major challenge to volcano research.

  11. Lipases at interfaces: unique interfacial properties as globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, P; Miller, R; Krägel, J; Leser, M; Fainerman, V B; Watzke, H; Holmberg, K

    2008-06-01

    The adsorption behavior of two globular proteins, lipase from Rhizomucor miehei and beta-lactoglobulin, at inert oil/water and air/water interfaces was studied by the pendant drop technique. The kinetics and adsorption isotherms were interpreted for both proteins in different environments. It was found that the adopted mathematical models well describe the adsorption behavior of the proteins at the studied interfaces. One of the main findings is that unique interfacial properties were observed for lipase as compared to the reference beta-lactoglobulin. A folded drop with a "skinlike" film was formed for the two proteins after aging followed by compression. This behavior is normally associated with protein unfolding and covalent cross-linking at the interface. Despite this, the lipase activity was not suppressed. By highlighting the unique interfacial properties of lipases, we believe that the presented work contributes to a better understanding of lipase interfacial activation and the mechanisms regulating lipolysis. The results indicate that the understanding of the physical properties of lipases can lead to novel approaches to regulate their activity.

  12. Pooling optimal combinations of energy thresholds in spectroscopic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Thomas; Zuber, Marcus; Hamann, Elias; Runz, Armin; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2014-03-01

    Photon counting detectors used in spectroscopic CT are often based on small pixels and therefore offer only limited space to include energy discriminators and their associated counters in each pixel cell. For this reason, it is important to make efficient use of the available energy discriminators in order to achieve an optimized material contrast at a radiation dose as low as possible. Unfortunately, the complexity of evaluating every possible combination of energy thresholds, given a fixed number of counters, rapidly increases with the resolution at which this search is performed, and makes brute-force approaches to this problem infeasible. In this work, we introduce methods from machine learning, in particular sparse regression, to perform a feature selection to determine optimal combinations of energy thresholds. We will demonstrate how methods enforcing row-sparsity on a linear regression's coefficient matrix can be applied to the multiple response problem in spectroscopic CT, i.e. the case in which a single set of energy thresholds is sought to simultaneously retrieve concentrations pertaining to a multitude of materials in an optimal way. These methods are applied to CT images experimentally obtained with a Medipix3RX detector operated in charge summing mode and with a CdTe sensor at a pixel pitch of 110μm. We show that the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso), generalized to the multiple response case, chooses four out of 20 possible threshold positions that allow discriminating PMMA, iodine and gadolinium in a contrast agent phantom at a higher accuracy than with equally spaced thresholds. Finally, we illustrate why it might be unwise to use a higher number of energy thresholds than absolutely necessary.

  13. PRIMitive Asteroids Spectroscopic Survey - PRIMASS: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Julia; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Campins, Humberto; Lorenzi, Vania; Licandro, Javier; Morate, David; Tanga, Paolo; Cellino, Alberto; Delbo, Marco

    2015-11-01

    NASA OSIRIS-REx and JAXA Hayabusa 2 sample-return missions have targeted two near-Earth asteroids: (101955) Bennu and (162173) 1999 JU3, respectively. These are primitive asteroids that are believed to originate in the inner belt, where five distinct sources have been identified: four primitive collisional families (Polana, Erigone, Sulamitis, and Clarissa), and a population of low-albedo and low-inclination background asteroids. Identifying and characterizing the populations from which these two NEAs might originate will enchance the science return of the two missions.With this main objective in mind, we initiated in 2010 a spectroscopic survey in the visible and the near-infrared to characterize the primitive collisional families in the inner belt and the low-albedo background population. This is the PRIMitive Asteroids Spectroscopic Survey - PRIMASS. So far we have obtained more than 200 spectra using telescopes located at different observatories. PRIMASS uses a variety of ground based facilities. Most of the spectra have been obtained using the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), and the 3.6m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), both located at the El Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (La Palma, Spain), and the 3.0m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea (Hawai, USA).We present the first results from our on-going survey (de Leon et al. 2015; Pinilla-Alonso et al. 2015; Morate et al. 2015), focused on the Polana and the Erigone primitive families, with visible and near-infrared spectra of more than 200 objects, most of them with no previous spectroscopic data. Our survey is already the largest database of primitive asteroids spectra, and we keep obtaining data on the Sulamitis and the Clarissa families, as well as on the background low-albedo population.

  14. Spectroscopic amplitudes and microscopic substructure effects in nucleon capture reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, J; Sherif, H S; Escher, Jutta; Jennings, Byron K.; Sherif, Helmy S.

    2001-01-01

    Spectroscopic amplitudes play an important role in nuclear capture reactions. These amplitudes are shown to include both single-particle and polarization effects: the former through their spatial dependence and the latter through their normalization (the spectroscopic factors). Coupled-channels equations are developed for the spectroscopic amplitudes. These equations serve as a convenient starting point for the derivation of several approximations: Hartree, Hartree-Fock and two different single-particle models. The single-particle models include antisymmetry in different ways, but both miss many-body effects. Therefore, cross sections calculated with either of these models need to be multiplied by the spectroscopic factor.

  15. A Tandem Valve, a unique complication of TAVR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Sattiraju

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available , MD1*,, MD1,, MD1,, MD2, MD2,, MD, PhD3 1. Division of Cardiology, Carle Heart and Vascular Institute, Carle Hospital, Urbana, IL 2. Cardiovascular Surgery, Carle Heart and Vascular Institute, Carle Hospital, Urbana, IL 3. Division of Cardiology, University of Minnesota Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN Received: 11-1-16, Reviewed: 22-1-16, Accepted: 26-1-16 Keywords: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement, TAVR, Valve embolisation DOI: ABSTRACT We report a unique complication of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR in which there is mechanical entrapment of two Edward Sapien valves. The tandem valve con guration created a high gradient across the valves stuck in tandem. The images and videos in this case capture ndings that underscore the complexity of interaction between two prosthetic valves. We believe this case serves a high teaching value for physicians taking care of patients with aortic stenosis managed with TAVR approach.

  16. Comparative developmental psychology: how is human cognitive development unique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Alexandra G; Wobber, Victoria; Hughes, Kelly; Santos, Laurie R

    2014-04-29

    The fields of developmental and comparative psychology both seek to illuminate the roots of adult cognitive systems. Developmental studies target the emergence of adult cognitive systems over ontogenetic time, whereas comparative studies investigate the origins of human cognition in our evolutionary history. Despite the long tradition of research in both of these areas, little work has examined the intersection of the two: the study of cognitive development in a comparative perspective. In the current article, we review recent work using this comparative developmental approach to study non-human primate cognition. We argue that comparative data on the pace and pattern of cognitive development across species can address major theoretical questions in both psychology and biology. In particular, such integrative research will allow stronger biological inferences about the function of developmental change, and will be critical in addressing how humans come to acquire species-unique cognitive abilities.

  17. Comparative Developmental Psychology: How is Human Cognitive Development Unique?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra G. Rosati

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The fields of developmental and comparative psychology both seek to illuminate the roots of adult cognitive systems. Developmental studies target the emergence of adult cognitive systems over ontogenetic time, whereas comparative studies investigate the origins of human cognition in our evolutionary history. Despite the long tradition of research in both of these areas, little work has examined the intersection of the two: the study of cognitive development in a comparative perspective. In the current article, we review recent work using this comparative developmental approach to study non-human primate cognition. We argue that comparative data on the pace and pattern of cognitive development across species can address major theoretical questions in both psychology and biology. In particular, such integrative research will allow stronger biological inferences about the function of developmental change, and will be critical in addressing how humans come to acquire species-unique cognitive abilities.

  18. Dialectical behavior therapy: current indications and unique elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Alexander L

    2006-09-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is a comprehensive, evidence-based treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD). The patient populations for which DBT has the most empirical support include parasuicidal women with borderline personality disorder (BPD), but there have been promising findings for patients with BPD and substance use disorders (SUDs), persons who meet criteria for binge-eating disorder, and depressed elderly patients. Although DBT has many similarities with other cognitive-behavioral approaches, several critical and unique elements must be in place for the treatment to constitute DBT. Some of these elements include (a) serving the five functions of treatment, (b) the biosocial theory and focusing on emotions in treatment, (c) a consistent dialectical philosophy, and (d) mindfulness and acceptance-oriented interventions.

  19. A unique funding opportunity for public health in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Thomas; Huber, Carol A

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the Affordable Care Act, states are more frequently turning to Medicaid waivers to achieve the "Triple Aim" goals of improving the experience of care, improving population health, and reducing per capita costs. These demonstration waivers provide opportunities to test innovative ways to finance and deliver care. Texas is currently implementing a waiver known as the Transformation and Quality Improvement Program. Its inclusion of public health agencies is a unique approach to a system typically limited to traditional providers. San Antonio Metropolitan Health District is one public health agency taking advantage of this new funding opportunity to implement 6 new or expanded programs targeting health issues of highest priority in this south Texas region. This article discusses the use of Medicaid waivers and the advantages and challenges of public health agency participation.

  20. UV Spectroscopic Indices of Galactic Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Hernández, J.; Chávez, M.; Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Bressan, A.

    2009-03-01

    We present the calculation of a set of 12 mid-ultraviolet (1900-3200 Å) spectroscopic indices for a sample of 15 galactic globular clusters (GGC) observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). We explore the dependence of the indices on age and metal abundance. We found that five indices (BL 2538, Fe II 2609, Mg II 2800, Mg I 2852 and Mg Wide) display a remarkably good correlation with [Fe/H]. With respect to age, only one index (BL 2740) shows a good correlation. Results from theoretical simple stellar populations well reproduce the global trends of indices vs. [Fe/H].

  1. Spectroscopic detection and characterisation of planetary atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collier Cameron A.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Space based broadband infrared observations of close orbiting extrasolar giant planets at transit and secondary eclipse have proved a successful means of determining atmospheric spectral energy distributions and molecular composition. Here, a ground-based spectroscopic technique to detect and characterise planetary atmospheres is presented. Since the planet need not be transiting, this method enables a greater sample of systems to be studied. By modelling the planetary signature as a function of phase, high resolution spectroscopy has the potential to recover the signature of molecules in planetary atmospheres.

  2. Spectroscopic observation of 5 SN candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias-Rosa, N.; Pursimo, T.; Korhonen, H.; Pastorello, A.; Derlopa, the NEON school PhD students S.; Marian, V.; Scognamiglio, D.; Szigeti, L.; Cabezas, M.; Fernandes, C. S.; McWhirter, P. R.; Zervas, K.

    2017-09-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of SNe 2017gla, 2017glz, 2017gop, and 2017gqq, and the verification of SN2017gmr. The targets were supplied by the following surveys: ATLAS survey, see Tonry et al. (2011, PASP, 123, 58) and Tonry et al. (ATel #8680); Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (Chambers et al. 2016, arXiv:1612.05560, and http://pswww.ifa.hawaii.edu ), the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/ ); and the D The observations were performed with the 2.56 m Nordic Optical Telescope equipped with ALFOSC (range 350-950 nm; resolution 1.4 nm FWHM).

  3. Spectroscopic diagnostics of tritium recycling in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, C.H.; Stotler, D.P.; Adler, H.; Ramsey, A.T.

    1995-03-01

    The authors present the first spectroscopic measurements of tritium Balmer-alpha (T{sub {alpha}}) emission from a fusion plasma. A Fabry-Perot interferometer is used to measure the H{sub {alpha}}, D{sub {alpha}}, T{sub {alpha}} spectrum in the current D-T a experimental campaign on TFTR and the contributions of H, D and T are separated by spectral analysis. The T{sub {alpha}} line was measurable at concentrations T{sub {alpha}}/(H{sub {alpha}} + D{sub {alpha}} + T{sub {alpha}}) down to 2%.

  4. Spectroscopic studies of star forming regions

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the results of studies of star forming regions, carried out at the Konkoly Observatory in the last two decades. The studies involved distance determination of star-forming dark clouds, search for candidate pre-main sequence stars, and determination of the masses and ages of the candidates by spectroscopic follow-up observations. The results expanded the list of the well-studied star forming regions in our galactic environment. Data obtained by this manner may be useful in a...

  5. The AD: The unique anti-accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    Slide show by Maximilien Brice. Voice (French only): Jacques Fichet. Content: Paola Catapano, Django Manglunki, CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Unlike other machines whose performance is measured in terms of energy records, AD's uniqueness resides in the fact that it can very effectively decelerate beams. At the hearth of antimatter production at CERN, the AD is making headlines in the world's press. This provides an excellent opportunity for us to retrace its history in images.   var flash_video_player=get_video_player_path(); insert_player_for_external('Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083-0753-kbps-480x360-25-fps-audio-64-kbps-44-kHz-stereo', 'mms://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083-0480-kbps-384x288-25-fps-audio-128-kbps-48-kHz-stereo.wmv', 'false', 480, 360, 'http://mediaarchive.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083-posterframe-480x360-at-5-percent.jpg', '1357551', true, '');  

  6. Arachnoiditis ossificans and syringomyelia: A unique presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalak, Charles F.; Opalak, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arachnoiditis ossificans (AO) is a rare disorder that was differentiated from leptomeningeal calcification by Kaufman and Dunsmore in 1971. It generally presents with progressive lower extremity myelopathy. Though the underlying etiology has yet to be fully described, it has been associated with various predisposing factors including vascular malformations, previous intradural surgery, myelograms, and adhesive arachnoiditis. Associated conditions include syringomyelia and arachnoid cyst. The preferred diagnostic method is noncontrast computed tomography (CT). Surgical intervention is still controversial and can include decompression and duroplasty or durotomy. Case Description: The authors report the case of a 62-year-old male with a history of paraplegia who presented with a urinary tract infection and dysautonomia. His past surgical history was notable for a C4–C6 anterior fusion and an intrathecal phenol injection for spasticity. A magnetic resonance image (MR) also demonstrated a T6-conus syringx. At surgery, there was significant ossification of the arachnoid/dura, which was removed. After a drain was placed in the syrinx, there was a significant neurologic improvement. Conclusion: This case demonstrates a unique presentation of AO and highlights the need for CT imaging when a noncommunicating syringx is identified. In addition, surgical decompression can achieve good results when AO is associated with concurrent compressive lesions. PMID:26693389

  7. Unique type of isolated cardiac valvular amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reehana Salma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid deposition in heart is a common occurrence in systemic amyloidosis. But localised valvular amyloid deposits are very uncommon. It was only in 1922 that the cases of valvular amyloidosis were reported. Then in 1980, Goffin et al reported another type of valvular amyloidosis, which he called the dystrophic valvular amyloidosis. We report a case of aortic valve amyloidosis which is different from the yet described valvular amyloidosis. Case presentation A 72 years old gentleman underwent urgent aortic valve replacement. Intraoperatively, a lesion was found attached to the inferior surface of his bicuspid aortic valve. Histopathology examination of the valve revealed that the lesion contained amyloid deposits, identified as AL amyloidosis. The serum amyloid A protein (SAP scan was normal and showed no evidence of systemic amyloidosis. The ECG and echocardiogram were not consistent with cardiac amyloidosis. Conclusion Two major types of cardiac amyloidosis have been described in literature: primary-myelomatous type (occurs with systemic amyolidosis, and senile type(s. Recently, a localised cardiac dystrophic valvular amyloidosis has been described. In all previously reported cases, there was a strong association of localised valvular amyloidosis with calcific deposits. Ours is a unique case which differs from the previously reported cases of localised valvular amyloidosis. In this case, the lesion was not associated with any scar tissue. Also there was no calcific deposit found. This may well be a yet unknown type of isolated valvular amyloidosis.

  8. Unique Ganglioside Recognition Strategies for Clostridial Neurotoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Marc A.; Fu, Zhuji; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Baldwin, Michael R. (MCW); (UMC)

    2012-03-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin are the causative agents of the paralytic diseases botulism and tetanus, respectively. The potency of the clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) relies primarily on their highly specific binding to nerve terminals and cleavage of SNARE proteins. Although individual CNTs utilize distinct proteins for entry, they share common ganglioside co-receptors. Here, we report the crystal structure of the BoNT/F receptor-binding domain in complex with the sugar moiety of ganglioside GD1a. GD1a binds in a shallow groove formed by the conserved peptide motif E ... H ... SXWY ... G, with additional stabilizing interactions provided by two arginine residues. Comparative analysis of BoNT/F with other CNTs revealed several differences in the interactions of each toxin with ganglioside. Notably, exchange of BoNT/F His-1241 with the corresponding lysine residue of BoNT/E resulted in increased affinity for GD1a and conferred the ability to bind ganglioside GM1a. Conversely, BoNT/E was not able to bind GM1a, demonstrating a discrete mechanism of ganglioside recognition. These findings provide a structural basis for ganglioside binding among the CNTs and show that individual toxins utilize unique ganglioside recognition strategies.

  9. Unique biosynthesis of sesquarterpenes (C35 terpenes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    To the best of my knowledge, only 19 cyclic and 8 linear C35 terpenes have been identified to date, and no family name was assigned to this terpene class until recently. In 2011, it was proposed that these C35 terpenes should be called sesquarterpenes. This review highlights the biosynthesis of two kinds of sesquarterpenes (C35 terpenes) that are produced via cyclization of a linear C35 isoprenoid in Bacillus and Mycobacterium species. In Bacillus species, a new type of terpene cyclase that has no sequence homology with any known terpene synthases, as well as a bifunctional terpene cyclase that biosynthesizes two classes of cyclic terpenes with different numbers of carbons as natural products, have been identified. On the other hand, in Mycobacterium species, the first bifunctional Z-prenyltransferase has been found, but a novel terpene cyclase and a unique polyprenyl reductase remain unidentified. The identification of novel enzyme types should lead to the discovery of many homologous enzymes and their products including novel natural compounds. On the other hand, many enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of natural products have low substrate specificities in vitro. Therefore, to find novel natural products present in organisms, the multifunctionality of enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of natural products should be analyzed.

  10. Condition evaluation of a unique mining site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Junsheng; Chen Frank Y.; Ma Yan; Zhang Siya

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the existing conditions and the stability of a mining site in which the unique features of seismicity, mining activity, hydrological conditions, geological con-ditions, environmental conditions, and future development plans were considered. In particular, the potential subsidence locations near the proposed construction site, the effects of mining boundary profile, and the influence scope of the mining activity on the neighboring areas were investigated using the finite element method. The study results indicate:(1) the overlying sandstone layer to the coal layer is the key to the stability of the mining roof; (2) the broken boundary has the most effect, followed by the arc boundary and linear boundary; (3) the safe distance from the mining boundary should be at least 400 m if the proposed structure is to be built near an active mining site. Other relevant engineering rec-ommendations are also proposed. The concluded results from this study may serve as a guide to other similar sites in the world.

  11. Isospin asymmetry dependence of the α spectroscopic factor for heavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, W. M.; Shalaby, M.; Alrakshy, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Both the valence nucleons (holes) and the isospin asymmetry dependencies of the preformation probability of an α-cluster inside parents radioactive nuclei are investigated. The calculations are employed in the framework of the density-dependent cluster model of an α-decay process for the even-even spherical parents nuclei with protons number around the closed shell Z0 = 82 and neutrons number around the closed shells Z0 = 82 and Z0 = 126. The microscopic α-daughter nuclear interaction potential is calculated in the framework of the Hamiltonian energy density approach based on the SLy4 Skyrme-like effective interaction. Also, the calculations based on the realistic effective M3Y-Paris nucleon-nucleon force have been used to confirm the results. The calculations then proceed to find the assault frequency and the α penetration probability within the WKB approximation. The half-lives of the different mentioned α decays are then determined and have been used in turn to find the α spectroscopic factor. We found that the spectroscopic factor increases with increasing the isospin asymmetry of the parent nuclei if they have valence protons and neutrons. When the parent nuclei have neutron or proton holes in addition to the valence protons or neutrons, then the spectroscopic factor is found to decrease with increasing isospin asymmetry. The obtained results show also that the deduced spectroscopic factors follow individual linear behaviors as a function of the multiplication of the valence proton (Np) and neutron (Nn) numbers. These linear dependencies are correlated with the closed shells core (Z0,N0). The same individual linear behaviors are obtained as a function of the multiplication of NpNn and the isospin asymmetry parameter, NpNnI. Moreover, the whole deduced spectroscopic factors are found to exhibit a nearly general linear trend with the function NpNn/(Z0+N0).

  12. Accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for nucleobases: A combined computational - microwave investigation of 2-thiouracil as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The computational composite scheme purposely set up for accurately describing the electronic structure and spectroscopic properties of small biomolecules has been applied to the first study of the rotational spectrum of 2-thiouracil. The experimental investigation was made possible thanks to the combination of the laser ablation technique with Fourier Transform Microwave spectrometers. The joint experimental – computational study allowed us to determine accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for the title molecule, but more important, it demonstrates a reliable approach for the accurate investigation of isolated small biomolecules. PMID:24002739

  13. Evolution of a Unique Systems Engineering Capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert M. Caliva; James A. Murphy; Kyle B. Oswald

    2011-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering laboratory dedicated to supporting U.S. Department of Energy missions in nuclear and energy research, science, and national security. The INL’s Systems Engineering organization supports all of the various programs under this wide array of missions. As with any multifaceted organization, strategic planning is essential to establishing a consistent culture and a value discipline throughout all levels of the enterprise. While an organization can pursue operational excellence, product leadership or customer intimacy, it is extremely difficult to excel or achieve best-in-class at all three. In fact, trying to do so has resulted in the demise of a number of organizations given the very intricate balancing act that is necessary. The INL’s Systems Engineering Department has chosen to focus on customer intimacy where the customer’s needs are first and foremost and a more total solution is the goal. Frequently a total solution requires the employment of specialized tools to manage system complexity. However, it is only after understanding customer needs that tool selection and use would be pursued. This results in using both commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and, in some cases, requires internal development of specialized tools. This paper describes how a unique systems engineering capability, through the development of customized tools, evolved as a result of this customer-focused culture. It also addresses the need for a common information model or analysis framework and presents an overview of the tools developed to manage and display relationships between entities, support trade studies through the application of utility theory, and facilitate the development of a technology roadmap to manage system risk and uncertainty.

  14. Some unique superconductive Properties of Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K. A.

    2013-04-01

    Copper oxides are the only materials that show transition temperatures, Tc, above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen, with a maximum Tmc of 162 K under pressure. Their structure is layered, with one to several CuO2 planes, and upon hole doping, their transition temperature follows a dome-shaped curve with a maximum at Tmc. In the underdoped regime, i.e., below Tmc, a pseudogap T* is found, with T* always being larger than Tc, a property unique to the copper oxides [1]. In the superconducting state, Cooper pairs (two holes with antiparallel spins) are formed that exhibit coherence lengths on the order of a lattice distance in the CuO2 plane and one order of magnitude less perpendicular to it. Their macroscopic wave function is parallel to the CuO2 plane near 100% d at their surface, but only 75% d and 25 % s in the bulk, and near 100% s perpendicular to the plane in YBCO. There are two gaps with the same Tc [2]. As function of doping, the oxygen isotope effect is novel and can be quantitatively accounted for by a two-band vibronic theory [3] near Tmc, and underdoped below it till Tc = 0 with by a formula valid for (bi)polarons [4]. These cuprates are intrinsically heterogeneous in a dynamic way. In terms of quasiparticles, Jahn-Teller bipolarons are present at low doping, and aggregate upon cooling [1], so that probably ramified clusters and/or stripes are formed, leading over to a more Fermi-liquid-type behavior at large carrier concentrations above Tmc.

  15. Unique properties of Plasmodium falciparum porphobilinogen deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Viswanathan Arun; Arumugam, Rajavel; Gopalakrishnan, Bulusu; Jyothsna, Yeleswarapu Sri; Rangarajan, Pundi N; Padmanaban, Govindarajan

    2008-01-04

    The hybrid pathway for heme biosynthesis in the malarial parasite proposes the involvement of parasite genome-coded enzymes of the pathway localized in different compartments such as apicoplast, mitochondria, and cytosol. However, knowledge on the functionality and localization of many of these enzymes is not available. In this study, we demonstrate that porphobilinogen deaminase encoded by the Plasmodium falciparum genome (PfPBGD) has several unique biochemical properties. Studies carried out with PfPBGD partially purified from parasite membrane fraction, as well as recombinant PfPBGD lacking N-terminal 64 amino acids expressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells (DeltaPfPBGD), indicate that both the proteins are catalytically active. Surprisingly, PfPBGD catalyzes the conversion of porphobilinogen to uroporphyrinogen III (UROGEN III), indicating that it also possesses uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) activity, catalyzing the next step. This obviates the necessity to have a separate gene for UROS that has not been so far annotated in the parasite genome. Interestingly, DeltaPfP-BGD gives rise to UROGEN III even after heat treatment, although UROS from other sources is known to be heat-sensitive. Based on the analysis of active site residues, a DeltaPfPBGDL116K mutant enzyme was created and the specific activity of this recombinant mutant enzyme is 5-fold higher than DeltaPfPBGD. More interestingly, DeltaPfPBGDL116K catalyzes the formation of uroporphyrinogen I (UROGEN I) in addition to UROGEN III, indicating that with increased PBGD activity the UROS activity of PBGD may perhaps become rate-limiting, thus leading to non-enzymatic cyclization of preuroporphyrinogen to UROGEN I. PfPBGD is localized to the apicoplast and is catalytically very inefficient compared with the host red cell enzyme.

  16. Grating Spectroscopes and How to Use Them

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Ken M

    2012-01-01

    Transmission grating spectroscopes look like simple filters and are designed to screw into place on the eyepiece tube of a telescope for visual use, or into a camera adapter for digicam or CCD imaging. They are relatively inexpensive and by far the easiest type of astronomical spectroscope to use, and so are the starting point for most beginners. Using the most popular commercially made filter gratings - from Rainbow Optics in the United States to Star Analyser in the United Kingdon - as examples, the book provides all the information needed to set up and use the grating to obtain stellar spectra. It also presents methods of analyzing the results. No heavy mathematics or formulas are involved, although a reasonable level of proficiency in using an astronomic telescope and, if relevant, imaging camera, is assumed. This book contains many practical hints and tips - something that is almost essential to success when starting out. It encourages new users to get quick results, and by following the worked examples,...

  17. Science capabilities of the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devost, Daniel; McConnachie, Alan; Flagey, Nicolas; Cote, Patrick; Balogh, Michael; Driver, Simon P.; Venn, Kim

    2017-01-01

    The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer (MSE) project will transform the CFHT 3.6m optical telescope into a 10m class dedicated multiobject spectroscopic facility, with an ability to simultaneously measure thousands of objects with a spectral resolution range spanning 2,000 to 20,000. The project is currently in design phase, with full science operations nominally starting in 2025. MSE will enable transformational science in areas as diverse as exoplanetary host characterization; stellar monitoring campaigns; tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of the distant Galaxy; connecting galaxies to the large scale structure of the Universe; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, eROSITA, SKA, and WFIRST, and is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT. I will give an update on the status of the project and review some of the most exciting scientific capabilities of the observatory.

  18. Exploring the spectroscopic properties of relic radiogalaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Capetti, Alessandro; Baldi, Ranieri D; Buttiglione, Sara; Axon, David J; Celotti, Annalisa; Chiaberge, Marco

    2013-01-01

    From an optical spectroscopic survey of 3CR radiogalaxies (RGs) with z<0.3, we discovered three objects characterized by an extremely low level of gas excitation and a large deficit of line emission with respect to RGs of similar radio luminosity. We interpreted these objects as relic active galactic nuclei (AGN), i.e., sources observed after a large drop in their nuclear activity. We here present new spectroscopic observations for these three galaxies and for a group of "candidate" relics. None of the candidates can be convincingly confirmed. From the new data for the three relics, we estimate the density of the line-emitting gas. This enables us to explore the temporal evolution of the line ratios after the AGN "death". The characteristic timescale is the light-crossing time of the emission line region, a few thousand years, too short to correspond to a substantial population of relic RGs. Additional mechanisms of gas ionization, such as "relic shocks" from their past high power phase or stellar sources,...

  19. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging: The Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging seemingly matured as a technology in the mid-2000s, with commercially successful instrumentation and reports in numerous applications. Recent developments, however, have transformed our understanding of the recorded data, provided capability for new instrumentation, and greatly enhanced the ability to extract more useful information in less time. These developments are summarized here in three broad areas— data recording, interpretation of recorded data, and information extraction—and their critical review is employed to project emerging trends. Overall, the convergence of selected components from hardware, theory, algorithms, and applications is one trend. Instead of similar, general-purpose instrumentation, another trend is likely to be diverse and application-targeted designs of instrumentation driven by emerging component technologies. The recent renaissance in both fundamental science and instrumentation will likely spur investigations at the confluence of conventional spectroscopic analyses and optical physics for improved data interpretation. While chemometrics has dominated data processing, a trend will likely lie in the development of signal processing algorithms to optimally extract spectral and spatial information prior to conventional chemometric analyses. Finally, the sum of these recent advances is likely to provide unprecedented capability in measurement and scientific insight, which will present new opportunities for the applied spectroscopist. PMID:23031693

  20. Spectroscopic investigations of carious tooth decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thareja, R K; Sharma, A K; Shukla, Shobha

    2008-11-01

    We report on the elemental composition of healthy and infected part of human tooth using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). We have used prominent constituent transitions in laser-excited tooth to diagnose the state of the tooth. A nanosecond laser pulse (355nm, 5ns) was used as an ablating pulse and the sodium (3s2S-3p2P) at 588.99 and (3s2S-3p2P) at 589.99nm, strontium (5s21S-1s5P) at 460.55nm, and calcium (3d3D-4f 3F0) at 452.55nm transitions for spectroscopic analysis. The spectroscopic observations in conjunction with discriminate analysis showed that calcium attached to the hydroxyapatite structure of the tooth was affected severely at the infected part of the tooth. The position-time plots generated from two-dimensional (2D) images conclusively showed a decrease in calcium concentration in the infected region of the irradiated tooth. Using the technique, we could distinguish between the healthy and carious parts of the tooth with significant accuracy.

  1. The HITRAN 2004 molecular spectroscopic database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, L.S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)]. E-mail: lrothman@cfa.harvard.edu; Jacquemart, D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Barbe, A. [Universite de Reims-Champagne-Ardenne, Groupe de Spectrometrie Moleculaire et Atmospherique, 51062 Reims (France)] (and others)

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2004 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database. The HITRAN compilation consists of several components that serve as input for radiative transfer calculation codes: individual line parameters for the microwave through visible spectra of molecules in the gas phase; absorption cross-sections for molecules having dense spectral features, i.e., spectra in which the individual lines are unresolvable; individual line parameters and absorption cross-sections for bands in the ultra-violet; refractive indices of aerosols; tables and files of general properties associated with the database; and database management software. The line-by-line portion of the database contains spectroscopic parameters for 39 molecules including many of their isotopologues. The format of the section of the database on individual line parameters of HITRAN has undergone the most extensive enhancement in almost two decades. It now lists the Einstein A-coefficients, statistical weights of the upper and lower levels of the transitions, a better system for the representation of quantum identifications, and enhanced referencing and uncertainty codes. In addition, there is a provision for making corrections to the broadening of line transitions due to line mixing.

  2. The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer: Science and Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, A.; McConnachie, A.; MSE Team

    2016-10-01

    MSE is a project to replace the current 3.6 m CFHT with a 10 m class, segmented, wide-field telescope that will feed a dedicated suite of multi-object spectrographs, operating at resolutions from R˜2000 to R>20000, and obtaining >3000 spectra per pointing (>> 5 million spectra/yr). It will use much of the existing infrastructure of the current CFHT, including the pier, and will closely approximate the envelope of the existing facility. MSE will be the only fully dedicated, 10 m class, wide-field spectroscopic telescope at first light in ˜ 2025. It will fill arguably the single biggest "missing link" in the international network of astronomical facilities. At optical wavelengths, LSST, WFIRST, Euclid, and Gaia will identify many millions of astrophysically interesting targets that otherwise lack the dedicated, large aperture, spectroscopic followup facilities required to probe their chemodynamical properties. Elsewhere, SKA, eRosita and others will provide a revolution in our understanding of the multiwavelength Universe. Among this capability, MSE will be an essential tool by providing the optical data that will otherwise be chronically absent.

  3. A Spectroscopic Study of Kepler Asteroseismic Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Latham, D W; Jerzykiewicz, M

    2009-01-01

    Reported are spectroscopic observations of 15 candidates for Kepler primary asteroseismic targets and 14 other stars in the Kepler field, carried out at three observatories (see the footnote). For all these stars, the radial velocities, effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and the projected rotational velocity are derived from two separate sets of data by means of two independent methods. In addition, MK type is estimated from one of these sets of data. Three stars, HIP 94335, HIP 94734, and HIP 94743, are found to have variable radial-velocity. For HIP 94335 = FL Lyr, a well-known Algol-type eclipsing variable and a double-lined spectroscopic binary, the orbital elements computed from our data agree closely with those of Popper et al. For HIP 94734 and HIP 94743 = V2077 Cyg, which we discover to be single-lined systems, orbital elements are derived. In addition, from our value of the orbital period and the Hipparcos epoch photometry, HIP 94743 is demonstrated to be a detached eclipsing binary...

  4. Spectroscopic Instrumentation in Undergraduate Astronomy Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovici, Dominic; Mutel, Robert Lucien; Lang, Cornelia C.

    2017-01-01

    We have designed and built two spectrographs for use in undergraduate astronomy laboratories at the University of Iowa. The first, a low cost (appx. $500) low resolution (R ~ 150 - 300) grating-prism (grism) spectrometer consists of five optical elements and is easily modified to other telescope optics. The grism spectrometer is designed to be used in a modified filter wheel. This type of spectrometer allows students to undertake projects requiring sensitive spectral measurements, such as determining the redshifts of quasars. The second instrument is a high resolution (R ~ 8000), moderate cost (appx. $5000) fiber fed echelle spectrometer. The echelle spectrometer will allow students to conduct Doppler measurements such as those used to study spectroscopic binaries. Both systems are designed to be used with robotic telescope systems. The availability of 3D printing enables both of these spectrographs to be constructed in hands-on instrumentation courses where students build and commission their own instruments. Additionally, these instruments enable introductory majors and non-majors laboratory students to gain experience conducting their own spectroscopic observations.

  5. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopic techniques as applied to Channelrhodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglof eRitter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Among optogenetic tools, channelrhodopsins, the light gated ion channels of the plasma membrane from green algae, play the most important role. Properties like channel selectivity, timing parameters or color can be influenced by the exchange of selected amino acids. Although widely used, in the field of neurosciences for example, there is still little known about their photocycles and the mechanism of ion channel gating and conductance. One of the preferred methods for these studies is infrared spectroscopy since it allows observation of proteins and their function at a molecular level and in near-native environment. The absorption of a photon in channelrhodopsin leads to retinal isomerization within femtoseconds, the conductive states are reached in the microsecond time scale and the return into the fully dark-adapted state may take more than minutes. To be able to cover all these time regimes, a range of different spectroscopical approaches are necessary. This mini-review focuses on time-resolved applications of the infrared technique to study channelrhodopsins and other light triggered proteins. We will discuss the approaches with respect to their suitability to the investigation of channelrhodopsin and related proteins.

  6. Coupled cluster study of spectroscopic constants of ground states of heavy rare gas dimers with spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zhe-Yan; Wang, Wen-Liang; Li, Ren-Zhong; Xia, Cai-Juan; Li, Lian-Bi

    2016-07-01

    The CCSD(T) approach based on two-component relativistic effective core potential with spin-orbit interaction just included in coupled cluster iteration is adopted to study the spectroscopic constants of ground states of Kr2, Xe2 and Rn2 dimers. The spectroscopic constants have significant basis set dependence. Extrapolation to the complete basis set limit provides the most accurate values. The spin-orbit interaction hardly affects the spectroscopic constants of Kr2 and Xe2. However, the equilibrium bond length is shortened about 0.013 Å and the dissociation energy is augmented about 18 cm-1 by the spin-orbit interaction for Rn2 in the complete basis set limit.

  7. Uniqueness of measures in loop quantum cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanusch, Maximilian, E-mail: hanuschm@fau.edu [Mathematics Department, University of Paderborn, Paderborn (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    In Ashtekar and Campiglia [Classical Quantum Gravity 29, 242001 (2012)], residual diffeomorphisms have been used to single out the standard representation of the reduced holonomy-flux algebra in homogeneous loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We show that, in the homogeneous isotropic case, unitarity of the translations with respect to the extended ℝ-action (exponentiated reduced fluxes in the standard approach) singles out the Bohr measure on both the standard quantum configuration space ℝ{sub Bohr} as well as on the Fleischhack one (ℝ⊔ℝ{sub Bohr}). Thus, in both situations, the same condition singles out the standard kinematical Hilbert space of LQC.

  8. Advanced in situ spectroscopic techniques and their applications in environmental biogeochemistry: introduction to the special section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombi, Enzo; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M; Scheckel, Kirk G

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the molecular-scale complexities and interplay of chemical and biological processes of contaminants at solid, liquid, and gas interfaces is a fundamental and crucial element to enhance our understanding of anthropogenic environmental impacts. The ability to describe the complexity of environmental biogeochemical reaction mechanisms relies on our analytical ability through the application and developmemnt of advanced spectroscopic techniques. Accompanying this introductory article are nine papers that either review advanced in situ spectroscopic methods or present original research utilizing these techniques. This collection of articles summarizes the challenges facing environmental biogeochemistry, highlights the recent advances and scientific gaps, and provides an outlook into future research that may benefit from the use of in situ spectroscopic approaches. The use of synchrotron-based techniques and other methods are discussed in detail, as is the importance to integrate multiple analytical approaches to confirm results of complementary procedures or to fill data gaps. We also argue that future direction in research will be driven, in addition to recent analytical developments, by emerging factors such as the need for risk assessment of new materials (i.e., nanotechnologies) and the realization that biogeochemical processes need to be investigated in situ under environmentally relevant conditions.

  9. Estimation of kinetic parameters of the passive state of carbon steel in mildly alkaline solutions from electrochemical impedance spectroscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.; Wren, J.C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond St, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Betova, I. [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Sofia, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria); Bojinov, M., E-mail: martin@uctm.edu [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: > The passive state of carbon steel is described using the Mixed-Conduction Model for oxide films. > Kinetic parameters are estimated by comparison of the model to EIS and XPS data. > The passive film is intermediate between magnetite and maghemite. > Relevance of film growth and dissolution reactions for corrosion is discussed. - Abstract: The unambiguous interpretation of electrochemical impedance spectra of complex systems such as passive metals and alloys in terms of an unique kinetic model is often hampered by the large number of adjustable modeling parameters. In this paper, a combination of in situ electrochemical data and ex situ surface analytical information is employed to validate the estimates of kinetic and transport parameters of the passive state of carbon steel. For the purpose, electrochemical impedance spectroscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic data for the oxidation of carbon steel in mildly alkaline solutions are quantitatively compared with the predictions of the Mixed-Conduction Model for oxide films that represent the passive oxide as an intermediate phase between magnetite and maghemite. Estimates of the kinetic rate constants at the film interfaces, as well as the diffusion coefficients and field strength in the film are obtained and their relevance for the corrosion mechanism of carbon steel is discussed.

  10. Characterizing the unique photochemical environment in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Gu, D.; Zhao, C.; Huey, L. G.; Stickel, R.; Liao, J.

    2010-12-01

    Recent observational evidence suggests that the atmospheric chemical system over China could be more complex than expected, possibly as a result of the rapid increasing anthropogenic emissions. During the CAREBeijing-2007 Experiment in August of 2007, up to 14 ppbv of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN, CH3C(O)OONO2) and 4.5 ppbv of glyoxal (CHOCHO) were observed, among the highest levels observed in the world in recent years. Elevated nitrous acid (HNO2) (~1.0 ppbv on average) was also observed in the early afternoon despite of the moderate amount of its precursors, i.e. nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO + NO2). We employ a 1-D photochemical model (REAM) to analyze the observations. The results indicate that reactive aromatics are the dominating source of PAN (55%-75%) and glyoxal (90%), and methylglyoxal is the major precursor of peroxy acetyl radical (50%). Downward transport from boundary layer is found to contribute ~50% of the PAN observed at surface. Photolysis of HNO2 is by far the largest primary OH source (more than 50%) throughout the daytime, and yet the fast formation rate of HNO2 inferred from the observations could not be explained by current known mechanisms. Detailed photochemical analysis is conducted to understand the controlling factors for O3 formation. O3 formation chemistry is strongly affected by aromatics and HNO2. By providing a large primary OH source, HNO2 leads to ~25% enhancement of the average O3 production rate, and aromatics contribute ~40% by serving as a major source of RO2 and HO2 radicals. Due to the large abundance of reactive hydrocarbons, O3 formation is generally NOx limited, although the sensitivity is low that a 50% reduction of NOx could only result in less than 25% reduction of the O3 production rate. Future research targeting HNO2 formation mechanism and emission sources of aromatics is necessary for better understanding the unique photochemical environment in China under significant anthropogenic impacts and the regional pollution

  11. In vivo single-shot (13)C spectroscopic imaging of hyperpolarized metabolites by spatiotemporal encoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Rita; Laustsen, Christoffer; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarized metabolic imaging is a growing field that has provided a new tool for analyzing metabolism, particularly in cancer. Given the short life times of the hyperpolarized signal, fast and effective spectroscopic imaging methods compatible with dynamic metabolic characterizations are nece......Hyperpolarized metabolic imaging is a growing field that has provided a new tool for analyzing metabolism, particularly in cancer. Given the short life times of the hyperpolarized signal, fast and effective spectroscopic imaging methods compatible with dynamic metabolic characterizations...... are necessary. Several approaches have been customized for hyperpolarized (13)C MRI, including CSI with a center-out k-space encoding, EPSI, and spectrally selective pulses in combination with spiral EPI acquisitions. Recent studies have described the potential of single-shot alternatives based...

  12. Likelihood for detection of sub-parsec supermassive black hole binaries in spectroscopic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflueger, Bryan James; Bogdanovic, Tamara; Eracleous, Michael; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Sigurdsson, Steinn

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by observational searches for sub-parsec supermassive black hole binaries (SBHBs) we develop a semi-analytic model to determine the likelihood for detection of SBHBs by ongoing spectroscopic surveys. The model combines theoretical expectations for the rate of orbital evolution of SBHBs in circumbinary disks and takes into account the selection effects of spectroscopic surveys. It returns a multivariate probability density for SBHB detection in terms of the binary mass, orbital separation, mass ratio, and mass accretion rate through the circumbinary disk. This approach allows us to infer the most likely orbital parameters for observed SBHB candidates and can be used to provide constraints on the rate of orbital evolution of SBHBs, if observed candidates are shown to be genuine binaries.

  13. FAST CARS Developing a Laser Spectroscopic Technique for Rapid Identification of Bacterial Spores

    CERN Document Server

    Scully, M O; Lucht, R P; Opatrny, T; Pilloff, H; Rebane, A; Sokolov, A V; Zubairy, M S

    2002-01-01

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time consuming microscopic, chemical and biological assays. Current research into real time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g. resonant Raman spectroscopy. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. The connection with previous studies based on "Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy" (CARS) is to be noted. However generating and utilizing maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is much more challenging. This extension of the CARS technique is called FAST CARS (Femtosecond Adaptive Spectroscopic Techniques for Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy), and the present paper proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify pre-selected molecules in real time.

  14. Resolving Spectral Lines with a Periscope-Type DVD Spectroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka

    2008-01-01

    A new type of DVD spectroscope, the periscope type, is described and the numerical analysis of the observed emission and absorption spectra is demonstrated. A small and thin mirror is put inside and an eighth part of a DVD is used as a grating. Using this improved DVD spectroscope, one can observe and photograph visible spectra more easily and…

  15. Fundamental spectroscopic studies of carbenes and hydrocarbon radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlieb, C.A.; Thaddeus, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Highly reactive carbenes and carbon-chain radicals are studied at millimeter wavelengths by observing their rotational spectra. The purpose is to provide definitive spectroscopic identification, accurate spectroscopic constants in the lowest vibrational states, and reliable structures of the key intermediates in reactions leading to aromatic hydrocarbons and soot particles in combustion.

  16. Preparation of cesium targets for gamma-spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Basu, S. K.; Chanda, S.; Deb, P.; Eqbal, Md; Kundu, S.; Joseph, D.

    2000-11-01

    A procedure to prepare monoisotopic cesium compound targets for gamma-spectroscopic experiments is described. Using this procedure, uniform targets up to thicknesses of 0.6-1.2 mg/cm 2 were prepared and used for in-beam spectroscopic studies. The purity of the target was tested by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) measurements.

  17. SEVERAL UNIQUENESS THEOREMS OF ALGEBROID FUNCTIONS ON ANNULI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang TAN

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the uniqueness problem of algebroid functions on an-nuli, we get several uniqueness theorems of algebroid functions on annuli, which extend the Nevanlinna value distribution theory for algebroid functions on annuli.

  18. Existence and uniqueness of positive eigenfunctions for certain eigenvalue systems

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Ru-Ying; Yang, Yi-Min

    2004-01-01

    The existence and uniqueness of eigenvalues and positive eigenfunctions for some quasilinear elliptic systems are considered. Some necessary and sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence and uniqueness of eigenvalues and positive eigenfunctions are given.

  19. EXISTENCE AND UNIQUENESS OF POSITIVE EIGENVALUES FOR CERTAIN EIGENVALUE SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Ruying; QIN Yuchun

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we consider certain eigenvalue systems.Imposing some reasonable hypotheses, we prove that theeigenvalue system has a unique eigenvalue with positiveeigenfunctions, and that the eigenfunction is unique upto a scalar multiple.

  20. Uniqueness Problems for Meromorphic Functions that Share Three Values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJian-ping

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigate the uniqueness problems for meromorphic functions that share three values CM and proves a uniqueness theorem on this topic which can be used to improve some previous related results.

  1. Kinematical uniqueness of homogeneous isotropic LQC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Jonathan; Hanusch, Maximilian

    2017-01-01

    In a paper by Ashtekar and Campiglia, invariance under volume preserving residual diffeomorphisms has been used to single out the standard representation of the reduced holonomy-flux algebra in homogeneous loop quantum cosmology (LQC). In this paper, we use invariance under all residual diffeomorphisms to single out the standard kinematical Hilbert space of homogeneous isotropic LQC for both the standard configuration space {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} , as well as for the Fleischhack one {R}\\sqcup {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} . We first determine the scale invariant Radon measures on these spaces, and then show that the Haar measure on {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} is the only such measure for which the momentum operator is hermitian w.r.t. the corresponding inner product. In particular, the measure is forced to be identically zero on {R} in the Fleischhack case, so that for both approaches, the standard kinematical LQC-Hilbert space is singled out.

  2. Kinematical uniqueness of homogeneous isotropic LQC

    CERN Document Server

    Engle, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In a paper by Ashtekar and Campiglia, invariance under volume preserving residual diffeomorphisms has been used to single out the standard representation of the reduced holonomy-flux algebra in homogeneous loop quantum cosmology (LQC). In this paper, we use invariance under all residual diffeomorphisms to single out the standard kinematical Hilbert space of homogeneous isotropic LQC for both the standard configuration space $\\mathbb{R}_{\\mathrm{Bohr}}$, as well as for the Fleischhack one $\\mathbb{R} \\sqcup \\mathbb{R}_{\\mathrm{Bohr}}$. We first determine the scale invariant Radon measures on these spaces, and then show that the Haar measure on $\\mathbb{R}_{\\mathrm{Bohr}}$ is the only such measure for which the momentum operator is hermitian w.r.t. the corresponding inner product. In particular, the measure is forced to be identically zero on $\\mathbb{R}$ in the Fleischhack case, so that for both approaches, the standard kinematical LQC-Hilbert space is singled out.

  3. Super-resolution spectroscopic microscopy via photon localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay; Urban, Ben E.; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Khuon, Satya; Chew, Teng-Leong; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-07-01

    Traditional photon localization microscopy analyses only the spatial distributions of photons emitted by individual molecules to reconstruct super-resolution optical images. Unfortunately, however, the highly valuable spectroscopic information from these photons have been overlooked. Here we report a spectroscopic photon localization microscopy that is capable of capturing the inherent spectroscopic signatures of photons from individual stochastic radiation events. Spectroscopic photon localization microscopy achieved higher spatial resolution than traditional photon localization microscopy through spectral discrimination to identify the photons emitted from individual molecules. As a result, we resolved two fluorescent molecules, which were 15 nm apart, with the corresponding spatial resolution of 10 nm--a four-fold improvement over photon localization microscopy. Using spectroscopic photon localization microscopy, we further demonstrated simultaneous multi-colour super-resolution imaging of microtubules and mitochondria in COS-7 cells and showed that background autofluorescence can be identified through its distinct emission spectra.

  4. How spectroscopic x-ray imaging benefits from inter-pixel communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Thomas; Zuber, Marcus; Hamann, Elias; Cecilia, Angelica; Ballabriga, Rafael; Campbell, Michael; Ruat, Marie; Tlustos, Lukas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2014-10-01

    Spectroscopic x-ray imaging based on pixellated semiconductor detectors can be sensitive to charge sharing and K-fluorescence, depending on the sensor material used, its thickness and the pixel pitch employed. As a consequence, spectroscopic resolution is partially lost. In this paper, we study a new detector ASIC, the Medipix3RX, that offers a novel feature called charge summing, which is established by making adjacent pixels communicate with each other. Consequently, single photon interactions resulting in multiple hits are almost completely avoided. We investigate this charge summing mode with respect to those of its imaging properties that are of interest in medical physics and benchmark them against the case without charge summing. In particular, we review its influence on spectroscopic resolution and find that the low energy bias normally present when recording energy spectra is dramatically reduced. Furthermore, we show that charge summing provides a modulation transfer function which is almost independent of the energy threshold setting, which is in contrast to approaches common so far. We demonstrate that this property is directly linked to the detective quantum efficiency, which is found to increase by a factor of three or more when the energy threshold approaches the photon energy and when using charge summing. As a consequence, the contrast-to-noise ratio is found to double at elevated threshold levels and the dynamic range increases for a given counter depth. All these effects are shown to lead to an improved ability to perform material discrimination in spectroscopic CT, using iodine and gadolinium contrast agents. Hence, when compared to conventional photon counting detectors, these benefits carry the potential of substantially reducing the imaging dose a patient is exposed to during diagnostic CT examinations.

  5. How spectroscopic x-ray imaging benefits from inter-pixel communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Thomas; Zuber, Marcus; Hamann, Elias; Cecilia, Angelica; Ballabriga, Rafael; Campbell, Michael; Ruat, Marie; Tlustos, Lukas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2014-10-21

    Spectroscopic x-ray imaging based on pixellated semiconductor detectors can be sensitive to charge sharing and K-fluorescence, depending on the sensor material used, its thickness and the pixel pitch employed. As a consequence, spectroscopic resolution is partially lost. In this paper, we study a new detector ASIC, the Medipix3RX, that offers a novel feature called charge summing, which is established by making adjacent pixels communicate with each other. Consequently, single photon interactions resulting in multiple hits are almost completely avoided. We investigate this charge summing mode with respect to those of its imaging properties that are of interest in medical physics and benchmark them against the case without charge summing. In particular, we review its influence on spectroscopic resolution and find that the low energy bias normally present when recording energy spectra is dramatically reduced. Furthermore, we show that charge summing provides a modulation transfer function which is almost independent of the energy threshold setting, which is in contrast to approaches common so far. We demonstrate that this property is directly linked to the detective quantum efficiency, which is found to increase by a factor of three or more when the energy threshold approaches the photon energy and when using charge summing. As a consequence, the contrast-to-noise ratio is found to double at elevated threshold levels and the dynamic range increases for a given counter depth. All these effects are shown to lead to an improved ability to perform material discrimination in spectroscopic CT, using iodine and gadolinium contrast agents. Hence, when compared to conventional photon counting detectors, these benefits carry the potential of substantially reducing the imaging dose a patient is exposed to during diagnostic CT examinations.

  6. The 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko nucleus spectroscopic properties and their evolution over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasier, S.

    2016-11-01

    different regions of the comet (Pommerol et al., 2015; De Sanctis et al., 2015; Filacchione et al., 2016; Barucci et al. 2016). Thanks to the unprecedented spatial resolution, VIRTIS and OSIRIS instruments have detected the occurrence of water frost close to the morning shadows, putting in evidence the diurnal cycle of water. Seasonal color and spectral variations have also been observed when the comet approached perihelion, indicating that the increasing activity had progressively shed the surface dust, partially showing the underlying ice-rich layer. I will present an overview of the spectroscopic properties of the 67P nucleus and of their diurnal and seasonal variations over time and heliocentric distance.

  7. ROSAT Discovers Unique, Distant Cluster of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Brightest X-ray Cluster Acts as Strong Gravitational Lens Based on exciting new data obtained with the ROSAT X-ray satellite and a ground-based telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, a team of European astronomers [2] has just discovered a very distant cluster of galaxies with unique properties. It emits the strongest X-ray emission of any cluster ever observed by ROSAT and is accompanied by two extraordinarily luminous arcs that represent the gravitationally deflected images of even more distant objects. The combination of these unusual characteristics makes this cluster, now known as RXJ1347.5-1145, a most interesting object for further cosmological studies. DISCOVERY AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS This strange cluster of galaxies was discovered during the All Sky Survey with the ROSAT X-ray satellite as a moderately intense X-ray source in the constellation of Virgo. It could not be identified with any already known object and additional ground-based observations were therefore soon after performed with the Max-Planck-Society/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla observatory in Chile. These observations took place within a large--scale redshift survey of X-ray clusters of galaxies detected by the ROSAT All Sky Survey, a so-called ``ESO Key Programme'' led by astronomers from the Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik and the Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera. The main aim of this programme is to identify cluster X-ray sources, to determine the distance to the X-ray emitting clusters and to investigate their overall properties. These observations permitted to measure the redshift of the RXJ1347.5-1145 cluster as z = 0.45, i.e. it moves away from us with a velocity (about 106,000 km/sec) equal to about one-third of the velocity of light. This is an effect of the general expansion of the universe and it allows to determine the distance as about 5,000 million light-years (assuming a Hubble constant of 75 km/sec/Mpc). In other words, we see these

  8. Rapid MR spectroscopic imaging of lactate using compressed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidya Shankar, Rohini; Agarwal, Shubhangi; Geethanath, Sairam; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.

    2015-03-01

    Imaging lactate metabolism in vivo may improve cancer targeting and therapeutics due to its key role in the development, maintenance, and metastasis of cancer. The long acquisition times associated with magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), which is a useful technique for assessing metabolic concentrations, are a deterrent to its routine clinical use. The objective of this study was to combine spectral editing and prospective compressed sensing (CS) acquisitions to enable precise and high-speed imaging of the lactate resonance. A MRSI pulse sequence with two key modifications was developed: (1) spectral editing components for selective detection of lactate, and (2) a variable density sampling mask for pseudo-random under-sampling of the k-space `on the fly'. The developed sequence was tested on phantoms and in vivo in rodent models of cancer. Datasets corresponding to the 1X (fully-sampled), 2X, 3X, 4X, 5X, and 10X accelerations were acquired. The under-sampled datasets were reconstructed using a custom-built algorithm in MatlabTM, and the fidelity of the CS reconstructions was assessed in terms of the peak amplitudes, SNR, and total acquisition time. The accelerated reconstructions demonstrate a reduction in the scan time by up to 90% in vitro and up to 80% in vivo, with negligible loss of information when compared with the fully-sampled dataset. The proposed unique combination of spectral editing and CS facilitated rapid mapping of the spatial distribution of lactate at high temporal resolution. This technique could potentially be translated to the clinic for the routine assessment of lactate changes in solid tumors.

  9. Fabrication and spectroscopic properties of transparent Nd3+:MgO and Er3+:MgO ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanamyan, T.; Cooper, C.; Gilde, G.; Sutorik, A. C.; Dubinskii, M.

    2014-06-01

    We present the results of the development and comprehensive characterization of fully densified Er3+:MgO and Nd3+:MgO transparent ceramics fabricated from specially formulated nanopowders. Also presented are the spectroscopic characterization results (absorption, fluorescence and emission lifetimes) of Er3+ and Nd3+ dopant ions in MgO in the temperature range 10 to 300 K. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported successful demonstration of bulk MgO host material doped with rare earth (RE) ions. Spectroscopic results are indicative of a single-site RE ion incorporation with a nearly perfect single crystalline environment within the MgO ceramic grains. The results are presented with major emphasis on potential laser application and the outlook for substantially improved laser power scaling at room temperature based on the unique thermal properties of the host material.

  10. Spectroscopic analysis of LYSO:Ce crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, A. F.; Carreira, J. F. C.; Rodrigues, J.; Sedrine, N. Ben; Castro, I. F. C.; Correia, P. M. M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Rino, L.; Monteiro, T.

    2017-02-01

    Rare earth orthosilicates are among the most widely used scintillator materials in the last decades. Particularly, lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) is known to exhibit great potentialities in the field of radiation detectors for medical imaging. Consequently, an in-depth knowledge of the material properties is of utmost interest for the mentioned applications. In this work the spectroscopic properties of commercial cerium doped lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystals (LYSO:Ce) were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, steady state photoluminescence, photoluminescence excitation and time resolved photoluminescence. Site selective excitation was used under steady state (325 nm) and pulsed (266 nm) conditions to separately investigate the temperature dependence of the 5d → 4f Ce1 and Ce2 luminescence, allowing to establish the thermal quenching dependence of the Ce2 optical center. In the case of the Ce1 optical center, a luminescence quantum efficiency of 78% was obtained from 14 K to room temperature with 266 nm photon excitation.

  11. Robust Spectroscopic Inference with Imperfect Models

    CERN Document Server

    Czekala, Ian; Mandel, Kaisey S; Hogg, David W; Green, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    We present a modular, extensible framework for the spectroscopic inference of physical parameters based on synthetic model spectra. The subtraction of an imperfect model from a continuously sampled spectrum introduces covariance between adjacent datapoints (pixels) into the residual spectrum. In the limit of high signal-to-noise data with large spectral range that is common for stellar parameter estimation, that covariant structure can bias the parameter determinations. We have designed a likelihood function formalism to account for the structure of the covariance matrix, utilizing the machinery of Gaussian process kernels. We specifically address the common problem of mismatches in model spectral line strengths (with respect to data) due to intrinsic model imperfections (e.g., in the atomic or molecular data, or radiative transfer treatment) by developing a novel local covariance kernel framework that identifies and self-consistently downweights pathological spectral line "outliers." By fitting multiple spec...

  12. Compact fluorescence spectroscopic tool for cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Valerie; Hamdan, Khaled; Hewett, Jacqueline; Makaryceva, Juljia; Tait, Iain; Cuschieri, Alfred; Padgett, Miles J.

    2002-05-01

    We describe a compact fluorescence spectroscopic tool for in vivo point monitoring of aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence and autofluorescence, as a non-invasive method of differentiating normal and cancerous tissue. This instrument incorporates a 405nm diode laser with a shutter to prevent exposure of tissue to harmful light doses and reduce photobleaching, a bifurcated optical fibre to allow illumination of tissue and collection of fluorescence with a single fibre, a compact grating spectrometer for collection of spectra and a PC for system control. We present spectra obtained using this system both during routine gastro-intestinal (GI) endoscopy for cancer detection and during photodynamic therapy (PDT) of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) for monitoring of treatment progress. These results illustrate the potential of the system to be used for fluorescence monitoring in a variety of clinical applications.

  13. Spectroscopic properties of Callinectes sapidus hemocyanin subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeva, Stanka; Dolashka, Pavlina; Bankov, Banko; Voelter, Wolfgang; Salvato, Benedeto; Genov, Nicolay

    1995-10-01

    The two major subunits of the Callinectes sapidus hemocyanin were isolated and characterized by spectroscopic techniques. They consist of 641 and 652 residues, respectively. Circular dichroism spectra showed that the structural integrity of the isolated polypeptide chains is preserved. Tryptophan fluorescence parameters were determined for the hemocyanin aggregates and for the subunits Cs1 and Cs2. The emitting tryptophyl fluorophores in the native hemocyanin are deeply buried in hydrophobic regions and are shielded from the solvent by the quaternary structure of the protein aggregates. In two subunits, obtained after dissociation of the aggregates, these residues become "exposed". It is concluded that the tryptophyl side chains in Cs1 and Cs2 are located in subunit interfaces (contact regions) in a negatively charged environment when the polypeptide chains are aggregated. Most probably they participate in hydrophobic protein-protein interactions. The environment of these fluorophores is more negatively charged after the dissociation of the aggregates to subunits.

  14. The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer: throughput optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flagey, Nicolas; Mignot, Shan; Szeto, Kei; McConnachie, Alan; Murowinski, Rick

    2016-08-01

    The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer (MSE) will obtain millions of optical to near-infrared spectra, at low (R 2,500) to high (R 40,000) spectral resolution, via a highly multiplexed ( 3000) fiber-fed system. Key science programs for MSE (black hole reverberation mapping, stellar population analysis at high redshift, subkm/ s velocity accuracy for stellar astrophysics) will target faint Galactic and extra-galactic targets (typical visual magnitudes up to 24). MSE will thus need to achieve the highest throughput possible over the 360 to 1800 nm wavelength range. Here we discuss building an optimized throughput budget in terms of performance allocation and technical solutions to steer the concept design studies.

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of genetically modified flax fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymińska, L.; Gągor, A.; Hanuza, J.; Kulma, A.; Preisner, M.; Żuk, M.; Szatkowski, M.; Szopa, J.

    2014-09-01

    The principal goal of this paper is an analysis of flax fiber composition. Natural and genetically modified flax fibers derived from transgenic flax have been analyzed. Development of genetic engineering enables to improve the quality of fibers. Three transgenic plant lines with different modifications were generated based on fibrous flax plants as the origin. These are plants with: silenced cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) gene; overexpression of polygalacturonase (PGI); and expression of three genes construct containing β-ketothiolase (phb A), acetoacetyl-CoA reductase (phb B), and poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid synthase (phb C). Flax fibers have been studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. The integral intensities of the IR bands have been used for estimation of the chemical content of the normal and transgenic flaxes. The spectroscopic data were compared to those obtained from chemical analysis of flax fibers. X-ray studies have been used to characterize the changes of the crystalline structure of the flax cellulose fibers.

  16. Synthetic Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Indices in Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, M.; Rodríguez-Merino, L. H.; Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Bressan, A.

    2007-12-01

    We present a progress report on the calculation of ultraviolet spectroscopic indices by using the UVBLUE library of synthetic spectra. The ensemble of indices are aimed at complementing empirical databases for the study of stellar populations. The definitions for the set of indices are mainly those empirically built upon data collected with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). Because the far-ultraviolet (far-UV) and mid-ultraviolet (mid-UV) are sensitive to quite dissimilar stellar populations, they are presented separately. We provide a few examples on the effects of the leading atmospheric parameters on index values. This analysis is, to our knowledge, the first based upon high resolution synthetic spectra and we envisage important applications on the study of stellar aggregates at UV wavelengths.

  17. Spectroscopic Confirmation of the Pisces Overdensity

    CERN Document Server

    Kollmeier, Juna A; Shectman, Stephen; Thompson, Ian B; Preston, George W; Simon, Joshua D; Crane, Jeffrey D; Ivezić, Željko; Sesar, Branimir

    2009-01-01

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of the "Pisces Overdensity", also known as "Structure J", a photometric overdensity of RR Lyrae stars discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) at an estimated photometric distance of ~85kpc. We measure radial velocities for 8 RR Lyrae stars within Pisces. We find that 5 of the 8 stars have heliocentric radial velocities within a narrow range of -87 km/s < v < -67 km/s, suggesting that the photometric overdensity is mainly due to a physically associated system, probably a dwarf galaxy or a disrupted galaxy. Two of the remaining 3 stars differ from one another by only 9 km/s, but it would be premature to identify them as a second system.

  18. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope Use in Electrocatalysis Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Turid

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the electrocatalytic properties of an electrode and its ability to transfer electrons between the electrode and a metallic tip in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is investigated. The alkaline oxygen evolution reaction (OER) was used as a test reaction with four different metallic glasses, Ni78Si8B14, Ni70Mo20Si5B5, Ni58Co20Si10B12, and Ni25Co50Si15B10, as electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrodes were determined. The electrode surfaces were then investigated with an STM. A clear relationship between the catalytic activity of an electrode toward the OER and its tunneling characteristics was found. The use of a scanning tunneling spectroscope (STS) in electrocatalytic testing may increase the efficiency of the optimization of electrochemical processes.

  19. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope Use in Electrocatalysis Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turid Knutsen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the electrocatalytic properties of an electrode and its ability to transfer electrons between the electrode and a metallic tip in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM is investigated. The alkaline oxygen evolution reaction (OER was used as a test reaction with four different metallic glasses, Ni78Si8B14, Ni70Mo20Si5B5, Ni58Co20Si10B12, and Ni25Co50Si15B10, as electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrodes were determined. The electrode surfaces were then investigated with an STM. A clear relationship between the catalytic activity of an electrode toward the OER and its tunneling characteristics was found. The use of a scanning tunneling spectroscope (STS in electrocatalytic testing may increase the efficiency of the optimization of electrochemical processes.

  20. Spectroscopic and chemometric exploration of food quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dorthe Kjær

    2002-01-01

    The desire to develop non-invasive rapid measurements of essential quality parameters in foods is the motivation of this thesis. Due to the speed and noninvasive properties of spectroscopic techniques, they have potential as on-line or atline methods and can be employed in the food industry...... in order to control the quality of the end product and to continuously monitor the production. In this thesis, the possibilities and limitations of the application of spectroscopy and chemometrics in rapid control of food quality are discussed and demonstrated by the examples in the eight included...... publications. Different aspects of food quality are covered, but the focus is mainly on the development of multivariate calibrations for predictions of rather complex attributes such as the water-holding capacity of meat, ethical quality of the slaughtering procedure, protein content of single wheat kernels...

  1. Selective spectroscopic methods for water analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidya, Bikas [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-06-24

    This dissertation explores in large part the development of a few types of spectroscopic methods in the analysis of water. Methods for the determination of some of the most important properties of water like pH, metal ion content, and chemical oxygen demand are investigated in detail. This report contains a general introduction to the subject and the conclusions. Four chapters and an appendix have been processed separately. They are: chromogenic and fluorogenic crown ether compounds for the selective extraction and determination of Hg(II); selective determination of cadmium in water using a chromogenic crown ether in a mixed micellar solution; reduction of chloride interference in chemical oxygen demand determination without using mercury salts; structural orientation patterns for a series of anthraquinone sulfonates adsorbed at an aminophenol thiolate monolayer chemisorbed at gold; and the role of chemically modified surfaces in the construction of miniaturized analytical instrumentation.

  2. Cosmic Ray Removal in Fiber Spectroscopic Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhongrui; Zhang, Haotong; Yuan, Hailong; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Li, Guangwei; Lei, Yajuan; Dong, Yiqiao; Yang, Huiqin; Zhao, Yongheng; Cao, Zihuang

    2017-02-01

    Single-exposure spectra in large spectral surveys are valuable for time domain studies such as stellar variability, but there is no available method to eliminate cosmic rays for single-exposure, multi-fiber spectral images. In this paper, we describe a new method to detect and remove cosmic rays in multi-fiber spectroscopic single exposures. Through the use of two-dimensional profile fitting and a noise model that considers the position-dependent errors, we successfully detect as many as 80% of the cosmic rays and correct the cosmic ray polluted pixels to an average accuracy of 97.8%. Multiple tests and comparisons with both simulated data and real LAMOST data show that the method works properly in detection rate, false detection rate, and validity of cosmic ray correction.

  3. The Spectroscopic Variability of GRB 021004

    CERN Document Server

    Matheson, T; Foltz, C; West, S; Williams, G; Falco, E E; Calkins, M L; Castander, F J; Gawiser, E; Jha, S; Bersier, D F; Stanek, K Z

    2003-01-01

    We present spectra of the optical transient (OT) associated with GRB 021004. The spectra show a blue continuum with superposed absorption features and one emission line. There are two intervening metal-line systems at z = 1.380 and z = 1.602 and one very strong absorption system at a redshift of z = 2.323. Ly_alpha emission is also seen at this redshift. While the spectrum of the OT overall cannot be simply described with a power law, the spectral index over the range 5500-8850 A is steep, F_nu prop nu^(-0.96 +/- 0.03). Comparison of spectra from multiple epochs shows a distinct color evolution with the OT becoming redder with time, implying a B-V increase of ~0.2-0.3 mag over the first three days. This is the first clear example of color change in an OT detected spectroscopically.

  4. Spectroscopic sensitive polarimeter for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Nayak, Amritha; Prahl, Scott A

    2011-04-01

    We present the design and calibration of a spectroscopic sensitive polarimeter. The polarimeter can measure the full Stokes vector in the wavelength range 550 to 750 nm with 1-nm resolution and consists of a fiber-based spectrophotometer, a white light emitting diode light source, two liquid crystal retarders, and one polarizer. Calibration of the system is achieved with a scheme that does not require knowledge of the polarizing elements' orientation or retardation. Six intensity spectra are required to calculate the full spectrum Stokes vector. Error in the polarimeter is less than 5%. We report the Stokes vectors for light transmitted through nonscattering polarizing elements as well as a measurement of the depolarizing properties of chicken muscle at several wavelengths.

  5. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Mechanism of Photocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Nosaka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Reaction mechanisms of various kinds of photocatalysts have been reviewed based on the recent reports, in which various spectroscopic techniques including luminol chemiluminescence photometry, fluorescence probe method, electron spin resonance (ESR, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy were applied. The reaction mechanisms elucidated for bare and modified TiO2 were described individually. The modified visible light responsive TiO2 photocatalysts, i.e., Fe(III-deposited metal-doped TiO2 and platinum complex-deposited TiO2, were studied by detecting paramagnetic species with ESR, •O2− (or H2O2 with chemiluminescence photometry, and OH radicals with a fluorescence probe method. For bare TiO2, the difference in the oxidation mechanism for the different crystalline form was investigated by the fluorescence probe method, while the adsorption and decomposition behaviors of several amino acids and peptides were investigated by 1H-NMR spectroscopy.

  6. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic Studies in Flotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been extensively employed in flotation research.The work done by the author and co-workers has been reported.A comparison has been made among the different FTIR spectroscopic techniques,e.g.,transmission FTIR spectroscopy,diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy,and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FTIR spectroscopy.FTIR spectroscopy has been used to study the mechanism of interaction between the collector and the surfaces of different minerals,the mechanism of action of the depressant in improving the selectivity of flotation,and the mechanism of adsorption of the polymeric modifying reagent on mineral surfaces.The interaction between particles in mineral suspension has also been studied by FTIR spectroscopy.

  7. The Glory Program: Global Science from a Unique Spacecraft Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpayee Jaya; Durham, Darcie; Ichkawich, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The Glory program is an Earth and Solar science mission designed to broaden science community knowledge of the environment. The causes and effects of global warming have become a concern in recent years and Glory aims to contribute to the knowledge base of the science community. Glory is designed for two functions: one is solar viewing to monitor the total solar irradiance and the other is observing the Earth s atmosphere for aerosol composition. The former is done with an active cavity radiometer, while the latter is accomplished with an aerosol polarimeter sensor to discern atmospheric particles. The Glory program is managed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) with Orbital Sciences in Dulles, VA as the prime contractor for the spacecraft bus, mission operations, and ground system. This paper will describe some of the more unique features of the Glory program including the integration and testing of the satellite and instruments as well as the science data processing. The spacecraft integration and test approach requires extensive analysis and additional planning to ensure existing components are successfully functioning with the new Glory components. The science mission data analysis requires development of mission unique processing systems and algorithms. Science data analysis and distribution will utilize our national assets at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) and the University of Colorado's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP). The Satellite was originally designed and built for the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mission, which was terminated in the middle of integration and testing due to payload development issues. The bus was then placed in secure storage in 2001 and removed from an environmentally controlled container in late 2003 to be refurbished to meet the Glory program requirements. Functional testing of all the components was done as a system at the start of the program, very different from a traditional program

  8. Spectroscopic detection of chemotherapeutics and antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latka, Ines; Grüner, Roman; Matthäus, Christian; Dietzek, Benjamin; Werncke, W.; Lademann, Jürgen; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    The hand-foot-syndrome presents a severe dermal side-effect of chemotherapeutic cancer treatment. The cause of this side-effect is the elimination of systemically administered chemotherapeutics with the sweat. Transported to the skin surface, the drugs subsequently penetrate into the skin in the manner of topically applied substances. Upon accumulation of the chemotherapeutics in the skin the drugs destroy cells and tissue - in the same way as they are supposed to act in cancer cells. Aiming at the development of strategies to illuminate the molecular mechanism underlying the handfoot- syndrome (and, in a second step, strategies to prevent this severe side-effect), it might be important to evaluate the concentration and distribution of chemotherapeutics and antioxidants in the human skin. The latter can be estimated by the carotenoid concentration, as carotenoids serve as marker substances for the dermal antioxidative status.Following the objectives outlined above, this contribution presents a spectroscopic study aiming at the detection and quantification of carotenoids and selected chemotherapeutics in human skin. To this end, spontaneous Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy are combined with two-photon excited fluorescence. While the latter technique is Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to your MySPIE To Do List at http://myspie.org and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval.restricted to the detection of fluorescent chemotherapeutics, e.g., doxorubicin, the vibrational spectroscopic techniques can - in principle - be applied to any type of analyte molecules. Furthermore, we will present the

  9. Highlights of the Brazilian Solar Spectroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, H. S.; Cecatto, J. R.; Mészárosová, H.; Faria, C.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Karlický, M.; de Andrade, M. C.

    2009-07-01

    The digital, decimetric (950-2500 MHz) Brazilian Solar Spectroscope (BSS, Sawant, H.S., Subramanian, K.R., Faria, C., et al. Brazilian Solar Spectroscope (BSS). Solar Phys. 200, 167-176, 2001) with high time (10-1000 ms) and frequency (1-10 MHz) resolution is in regular operation since April, 1998, at the National Space Research Institute (INPE) at São José dos Campos, Brazil. The BSS has now been upgraded with a new digital data acquisition and data processing system. The new version of the BSS has improved the observational possibilities with the capability to record up to 200 frequency channels available in the selectable frequency range 950-2500 MHz. The GPS receiver permits the acquisition of data with time accuracy in the order of 0.1 ms. The software system of the BSS is composed by two distinct modules: the first, data acquisition system provides a flexible Graphical User Interface (GUI) that allows one to choose the observational parameters. The second module is the real time visualization system that permits real time visualization of the observed dynamic spectrum and additionally allows procedures for visualization and preliminary analysis of the recorded solar spectra. Using the new visualization system, we have realized two new types of dm-radio fine structures: narrow band type III bursts with positive as well as negative group frequency drift and dots emissions arranged in zebra-like and fiber-like chains. Furthermore, we have found flare generated fast wave trains according to their tadpole signature in wavelet power spectra for a decimetric type IV radio event (June 6, 2000 flare).

  10. On the Uniqueness of the Canonical Polyadic Decomposition of third-order tensors --- Part II: Uniqueness of the overall decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Domanov, Ignat; De Lathauwer, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Canonical Polyadic (also known as Candecomp/Parafac) Decomposition (CPD) of a higher-order tensor is decomposition in a minimal number of rank-1 tensors. In Part I, we gave an overview of existing results concerning uniqueness and presented new, relaxed, conditions that guarantee uniqueness of one factor matrix. In Part II we use these results for establishing overall CPD uniqueness in cases where none of the factor matrices has full column rank. We obtain uniqueness conditions involving Khat...

  11. Psychological well-being and uniqueness seeking behaviour / Colleen Ashleigh La

    OpenAIRE

    Law, Colleen Ashleigh

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between psychological wellbeing and uniqueness seeking behaviour. Early research in psychology has primarily followed a pathogenic approach, focusing on the way in which stressful life events predispose an individual to negative health outcomes. More recently a number of theorists and researchers have adopted a salutogenic approach, which refers to the origins of physical and mental health and explores the factors th...

  12. Monotone Concave Operators: An application to the existence and uniqueness of solutions to the Bellman equation

    OpenAIRE

    Cuong LE VAN; Morhaim, Lisa; Vailakis, Yiannis

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new approach to the issue of existence and uniqueness of solutions to the Bellman equation, exploiting an emerging class of methods, called monotone map methods, pioneered in the work of Krasnosel’skii (1964) and Krasnosel’skii-Zabreiko (1984). The approach is technically simple and intuitive. It is derived from geometric ideas related to the study of fixed points for monotone concave operators defined on partially order spaces.

  13. The rural market: a unique communication medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, P

    1992-01-01

    In January 1990, the Health Secretary asked the Technologies for Primary Health Care (PRITECH) project to facilitate access to the many small villages with 500 people in Mexico since PRITECH had assisted the diarrhea disease control program. 1st PRITECH had Ministry of Health staff train trainers which would eventually spread the information to the rural areas. This strategy was effective only for those people who did not live in remote areas. The same reasons for remote people being at high risk of disease also limited this strategy: isolation, lack of education, limited diets, lack of access to services, and limited fluency in Spanish. PRITECH hired a local consulting organization, CICLOPE, to develop a new strategy. CICLOPE limited its activities to the states of Hidalgo and Vera Cruz for 8 months. 1st CICLOPE staff provided proper diarrhea management training including emphasis on oral rehydration therapy (ORT) to rural health auxiliaries. They used a gourd painted to look like an infant with holes and other modifications to depict the workings and results of diarrheal dehydration. The staff then sent the auxiliaries to their own communities to use the gourd dolls to teach mothers about ORT and correct diarrhea management. The staff conducted follow-up activities to monitor the auxiliaries' progress. This training approach allowed the auxiliaries to realize the abilities of the mothers and their active role in learning. The auxiliaries conducted the training at markets where women living in remote areas came weekly. The local radio announced market day events in which the auxiliaries participated and aired dramas about diarrhea management. CICLOPE staff and the auxiliaries sat up a booth at these markets to promote proper diarrhea management. They used a flip chart, comic books, a lottery game, and entertainment to impart education messages.

  14. Pancreatic cancer vaccine: a unique potential therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappello P

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Paola Cappello, Moitza Principe, Francesco Novelli Department of Molecular Biotechnologies and Health Sciences, Center for Experimental Research and Medical Studies, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, University of Turin, Turin, Italy Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA is a lethal disease and is one of the cancers that is most resistant to traditional therapies. Historically, neither chemotherapy nor radiotherapy has provided any significant increase in the survival of patients with PDA. Despite intensive efforts, any attempts to improve the survival in the past 15 years have failed. This holds true even after the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, chosen on the basis of their involvement in pathways that are considered to be important in PDA development and progression. Recently, however, FOLFIRINOX (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin treatment has provided a limited survival advantage in patients with advanced PDA. Therefore, effective therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to improve the survival rate of patients with PDA. Results from the last 10 years of research in the field of PDA have helped to identify new immunological targets and develop new vaccines that are capable of stimulating an immune response. In addition, the information obtained about the role of the tumor microenvironment in suppressing the immune response and the possibility of targeting PDA microenvironment to limit immune suppression and enhance the response of effector T-cells has opened new avenues for treating this incurable disease. The time is ripe for developing new therapeutic approaches that are able to effectively counteract the progression and spreading of PDA. This review discusses the potential prospects in the care of patients with pancreatic cancer through vaccination and its combination therapy with surgery, chemotherapy, targeting of the tumor microenvironment, and inhibition of immunological

  15. Unique strategies for technical information management at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishen, Vijay

    1994-01-01

    In addition to the current NASA manned programs, the maturation of Space Station and the introduction of the Space Exploration programs are anticipated to add substantially to the number and variety of data and documentation at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). This growth in the next decade has been estimated at five to ten fold compared to the current numbers. There will be an increased requirement for the tracking and currency of space program data and documents with National pressures to realize economic benefits from the research and technological developments of space programs. From a global perspective the demand for NASA's technical data and documentation is anticipated to increase at local, national, and international levels. The primary users will be government, industry, and academia. In our present national strategy, NASA's research and technology will assume a great role in the revitalization of the economy and gaining international competitiveness. Thus, greater demand will be placed on NASA's data and documentation resources. In this paper the strategies and procedures developed by DDMS, Inc., to accommodate the present and future information utilization needs are presented. The DDMS, Inc., strategies and procedures rely on understanding user requirements, library management issues, and technological applications for acquiring, searching, storing, and retrieving specific information accurately and quickly. The proposed approach responds to changing customer requirements and product deliveries. The unique features of the proposed strategy include: (1) To establish customer driven data and documentation management through an innovative and unique methods to identify needs and requirements. (2) To implement a structured process which responds to user needs, aimed at minimizing costs and maximizing services, resulting in increased productivity. (3) To provide a process of standardization of services and procedures. This standardization is the central

  16. Statistical spectroscopic tools for biomarker discovery and systems medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinette, Steven L; Lindon, John C; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2013-06-04

    Metabolic profiling based on comparative, statistical analysis of NMR spectroscopic and mass spectrometric data from complex biological samples has contributed to increased understanding of the role of small molecules in affecting and indicating biological processes. To enable this research, the development of statistical spectroscopy has been marked by early beginnings in applying pattern recognition to nuclear magnetic resonance data and the introduction of statistical total correlation spectroscopy (STOCSY) as a tool for biomarker identification in the past decade. Extensions of statistical spectroscopy now compose a family of related tools used for compound identification, data preprocessing, and metabolic pathway analysis. In this Perspective, we review the theory and current state of research in statistical spectroscopy and discuss the growing applications of these tools to medicine and systems biology. We also provide perspectives on how recent institutional initiatives are providing new platforms for the development and application of statistical spectroscopy tools and driving the development of integrated "systems medicine" approaches in which clinical decision making is supported by statistical and computational analysis of metabolic, phenotypic, and physiological data.

  17. Imaging spectroscopic ellipsometry of MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, S.; Miller, B.; Parzinger, E.; Thiesen, P.; Holleitner, A. W.; Wurstbauer, U.

    2016-09-01

    Micromechanically exfoliated mono- and multilayers of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are investigated by spectroscopic imaging ellipsometry. In combination with knife edge illumination, MoS2 flakes can be detected and classified on arbitrary flat and also transparent substrates with a lateral resolution down to 1-2 µm. The complex dielectric functions from mono- and trilayer MoS2 are presented. They are extracted from a multilayer model to fit the measured ellipsometric angles employing an anisotropic and an isotropic fit approach. We find that the energies of the critical points of the optical constants can be treated to be independent of the utilized model, whereas the magnitude of the optical constants varies with the used model. The anisotropic model suggests a maximum absorbance for a MoS2 sheet supported by sapphire of about 14% for monolayer and of 10% for trilayer MoS2. Furthermore, the lateral homogeneity of the complex dielectric function for monolayer MoS2 is investigated with a spatial resolution of 2 µm. Only minor fluctuations are observed. No evidence for strain, for a significant amount of disorder or lattice defects can be found in the wrinkle-free regions of the MoS2 monolayer from complementary µ-Raman spectroscopy measurements. We assume that the minor lateral variation in the optical constants are caused by lateral modification in the van der Waals interaction presumably caused by the preparation using micromechanical exfoliation and viscoelastic stamping.

  18. Synthetic Mid-UV Spectroscopic Indices of Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Chavez, M; Buzzoni, A; Franchini, M; Malagnini, M L; Morossi, C; Rodríguez-Merino, L H

    2006-01-01

    Using the UVBLUE library of synthetic stellar spectra we have computed a set of mid-UV line and continuum spectroscopic indices. We explore their behavior in terms of the leading stellar parameters [T_eff,log(g)]. The overall result is that synthetic indices follow the general trends depicted by those computed from empirical databases. Separately we also examine the index sensitivity to changes in chemical composition, an analysis only feasible under a theoretical approach. In this respect, lines indices FeI3000, BL3096 and MgI2852 and the continuum index 2828/2921 are the least sensitive features, an important characteristic to be taken into account for the analyses of integrated spectra of stellar systems. We also quantify the effects of instrumental resolution on the indices and find that indices display variations up to 0.1 mag in the resolution interval between 6-10 angstrom of FWHM. We discuss the extent to which synthetic indices are compatible with indices measured in spectra collected by the Internat...

  19. Enhancements to INO's broadband SWIR/MWIR spectroscopic lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert-Girard, Simon; Babin, François; Allard, Martin; Piché, Michel

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in the INO broadband SWIR/MWIR spectroscopic lidar will be presented. The system is designed for the detection of gaseous pollutants via active infrared differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Two distinctive features are a sub-nanosecond PPMgO:LN OPG capable of generating broadband (10 to plane array used in the output plane of a grating spectrograph. The operation consists in closely gating the returns from back-scattering off topographic features, and is thus, for now, a path integrated measurement. All wavelengths are emitted and received simultaneously, for low concentration measurements and DOAS fitting methods are then applied. The OPG approach enables the generation of moderate FWHM continua with high spectral energy density and tunable to absorption features of many molecules. Recent measurements demonstrating a minimum sensitivity of 10 ppm-m for methane around 3.3 μm with ˜ 2 mW average power in less than 10 seconds will be described. Results of enhancements to the laser source using small or large bandwidth seeds constructed from telecom off-the-shelf components indicate that the OPG output spectral energy density can have controllable spectral widths and shapes. It also has a slightly more stable spectral shape from pulse to pulse than without the seed (25 % enhancement). Most importantly, the stabilized output spectra will allow more sensitive measurements.

  20. Comparative evaluation of spectroscopic models using different multivariate statistical tools in a multicancer scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanate, A D; Kothiwale, S; Singh, S P; Bertrand, Dominique; Krishna, C Murali

    2011-02-01

    Cancer is now recognized as one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Histopathological diagnosis, the gold standard, is shown to be subjective, time consuming, prone to interobserver disagreement, and often fails to predict prognosis. Optical spectroscopic methods are being contemplated as adjuncts or alternatives to conventional cancer diagnostics. The most important aspect of these approaches is their objectivity, and multivariate statistical tools play a major role in realizing it. However, rigorous evaluation of the robustness of spectral models is a prerequisite. The utility of Raman spectroscopy in the diagnosis of cancers has been well established. Until now, the specificity and applicability of spectral models have been evaluated for specific cancer types. In this study, we have evaluated the utility of spectroscopic models representing normal and malignant tissues of the breast, cervix, colon, larynx, and oral cavity in a broader perspective, using different multivariate tests. The limit test, which was used in our earlier study, gave high sensitivity but suffered from poor specificity. The performance of other methods such as factorial discriminant analysis and partial least square discriminant analysis are at par with more complex nonlinear methods such as decision trees, but they provide very little information about the classification model. This comparative study thus demonstrates not just the efficacy of Raman spectroscopic models but also the applicability and limitations of different multivariate tools for discrimination under complex conditions such as the multicancer scenario.

  1. Fast magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging techniques in human brain- applications in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Iedani, Oun; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Ribbons, Karen; Ramadan, Saadallah

    2017-02-28

    Multi voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is an important imaging tool that combines imaging and spectroscopic techniques. MRSI of the human brain has been beneficially applied to different clinical applications in neurology, particularly in neurooncology but also in multiple sclerosis, stroke and epilepsy. However, a major challenge in conventional MRSI is the longer acquisition time required for adequate signal to be collected. Fast MRSI of the brain in vivo is an alternative approach to reduce scanning time and make MRSI more clinically suitable.Fast MRSI can be categorised into spiral, echo-planar, parallel and turbo imaging techniques, each with its own strengths. After a brief introduction on the basics of non-invasive examination ((1)H-MRS) and localization techniques principles, different fast MRSI techniques will be discussed from their initial development to the recent innovations with particular emphasis on their capacity to record neurochemical changes in the brain in a variety of pathologies.The clinical applications of whole brain fast spectroscopic techniques, can assist in the assessment of neurochemical changes in the human brain and help in understanding the roles they play in disease. To give a good example of the utilities of these techniques in clinical context, MRSI application in multiple sclerosis was chosen. The available up to date and relevant literature is discussed and an outline of future research is presented.

  2. The Far Infrared Spectroscopic Explorer (FIRSPEX): probing the lifecycle of the ISM in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigopoulou, D.; Caldwell, M.; Ellison, B.; Pearson, C.; Caux, E.; Cooray, A.; Gallego, J. D.; Gerin, M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Goldsmith, P.; Kramer, C.; Lis, D. C.; Molinari, S.; Ossenkopf-Okada, V.; Savini, G.; Tan, B. K.; Tielens, X.; Viti, S.; Wiedner, M.; Yassin, G.

    2016-07-01

    The Far Infrared Spectroscopic Explorer (FIRSPEX) is a novel European-led astronomy mission concept developed to enable large area ultra high spectroscopic resolution surveys in the THz regime. FIRSPEX opens up a relatively unexplored spectral and spatial parameter space that will produce an enormously significant scientific legacy by focusing on the properties of the multi-phase ISM, the assembly of molecular clouds in our Galaxy and the onset of star formation; topics which are fundamental to our understanding of galaxy evolution. The mission uses a heterodyne instrument and a ~1.2 m primary antenna to scan large areas of the sky in a number of discreet spectroscopic channels from L2. The FIRSPEX bands centered at [CI] 809 GHz, [NII]1460 GHz, [CII]1900 GHz and [OI]4700 GHz have been carefully selected to target key atomic and ionic fine structure transitions difficult or impossible to access from the ground but fundamental to the study of the multi-phase ISM in the Universe. The need for state-of-the-art sensitivity dictates the use of superconducting mixers configured either as tunnel junctions or hot electron bolometers. This technology requires cooling to low temperatures, approaching 4K, in order to operate. The receivers will operate in double sideband configuration providing a total of 7 pixels on the sky. FIRSPEX will operate from L2 in both survey and pointed mode enabling velocity resolved spectroscopy of large areas of sky as well as targeted observations.

  3. Comparative evaluation of spectroscopic models using different multivariate statistical tools in a multicancer scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanate, A. D.; Kothiwale, S.; Singh, S. P.; Bertrand, Dominique; Krishna, C. Murali

    2011-02-01

    Cancer is now recognized as one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Histopathological diagnosis, the gold standard, is shown to be subjective, time consuming, prone to interobserver disagreement, and often fails to predict prognosis. Optical spectroscopic methods are being contemplated as adjuncts or alternatives to conventional cancer diagnostics. The most important aspect of these approaches is their objectivity, and multivariate statistical tools play a major role in realizing it. However, rigorous evaluation of the robustness of spectral models is a prerequisite. The utility of Raman spectroscopy in the diagnosis of cancers has been well established. Until now, the specificity and applicability of spectral models have been evaluated for specific cancer types. In this study, we have evaluated the utility of spectroscopic models representing normal and malignant tissues of the breast, cervix, colon, larynx, and oral cavity in a broader perspective, using different multivariate tests. The limit test, which was used in our earlier study, gave high sensitivity but suffered from poor specificity. The performance of other methods such as factorial discriminant analysis and partial least square discriminant analysis are at par with more complex nonlinear methods such as decision trees, but they provide very little information about the classification model. This comparative study thus demonstrates not just the efficacy of Raman spectroscopic models but also the applicability and limitations of different multivariate tools for discrimination under complex conditions such as the multicancer scenario.

  4. Spectroscopic correlation analysis of NMR-based metabonomics in exercise science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Gemma M; Coffey, Vernon G; Niere, Julie O; Hawley, John A; Adams, Michael J

    2009-10-12

    Spectroscopic studies of complex clinical fluids have led to the application of a more holistic approach to their chemical analysis becoming more popular and widely employed. The efficient and effective interpretation of multidimensional spectroscopic data relies on many chemometric techniques and one such group of tools is represented by so-called correlation analysis methods. Typical of these techniques are two-dimensional correlation analysis and statistical total correlation spectroscopy (STOCSY). Whilst the former has largely been applied to optical spectroscopic analysis, STOCSY was developed and has been applied almost exclusively to NMR metabonomic studies. Using a (1)H NMR study of human blood plasma, from subjects recovering from exhaustive exercise trials, the basic concepts and applications of these techniques are examined. Typical information from their application to NMR-based metabonomics is presented and their value in aiding interpretation of NMR data obtained from biological systems is illustrated. Major energy metabolites are identified in the NMR spectra and the dynamics of their appearance and removal from plasma during exercise recovery are illustrated and discussed. The complementary nature of two-dimensional correlation analysis and statistical total correlation spectroscopy are highlighted.

  5. THE FIRST SPECTROSCOPICALLY RESOLVED SUB-PARSEC ORBIT OF A SUPERMASSIVE BINARY BLACK HOLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bon, E.; Jovanovic, P.; Bon, N.; Popovic, L. C. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia); Marziani, P. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Padova (Italy); Shapovalova, A. I. [Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian AS, Nizhnij Arkhyz, Karachaevo-Cherkesia 369167 (Russian Federation); Borka Jovanovic, V.; Borka, D. [Isaac Newton Institute of Chile, Yugoslavia Branch, Belgrade (Serbia); Sulentic, J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Apdo. 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

    2012-11-10

    One of the most intriguing scenarios proposed to explain how active galactic nuclei are triggered involves the existence of a supermassive binary black hole (BH) system in their cores. Here, we present an observational evidence for the first spectroscopically resolved sub-parsec orbit of a such system in the core of Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151. Using a method similar to those typically used for spectroscopic binary stars, we obtained radial velocity curves of the supermassive binary system, from which we calculated orbital elements and made estimates about the masses of the components. Our analysis shows that periodic variations in the light and radial velocity curves can be accounted for by an eccentric, sub-parsec Keplerian orbit with a 15.9 year period. The flux maximum in the light curve corresponds to the approaching phase of the secondary component toward the observer. According to the obtained results, we speculate that the periodic variations in the observed H{alpha} line shape and flux are due to shock waves generated by the supersonic motion of the components through the surrounding medium. Given the large observational effort needed to reveal this spectroscopically resolved binary orbital motion, we suggest that many such systems may exist in similar objects even if they are hard to find. Detecting more of them will provide us with insight into the BH mass growth process.

  6. Gauss-Newton based kurtosis blind deconvolution of spectroscopic data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinghe Yuan; Ziqiang Hu

    2006-01-01

    @@ The spectroscopic data recorded by dispersion spectrophotometer are usually degraded by the response function of the instrument. To improve the resolving power, double or triple cascade spectrophotometer and narrow slits have been employed, but the total flux of the radiation decreases accordingly, resulting in a lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and a longer measuring time. However, the spectral resolution can be improved by mathematically removing the effect of the instrument response function. Based on the ShalviWeinstein criterion, a Gauss-Newton based kurtosis blind deconvolution algorithm for spectroscopic data is proposed. Experiments with some real measured Raman spectroscopic data show that this algorithm has excellent deconvolution capability.

  7. Stellar Abundance and Galactic Chemical Evolution through LAMOST Spectroscopic Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Zhao; Yu-Qin Chen; Jian-RongShi; Yan-Chun Liang; Jin-Liang Hou; Li Chen; Hua-Wei Zhang; Ai-Gen Li

    2006-01-01

    A project of a spectroscopic survey of Galactic structure and evolution with a Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) is presented. The spectroscopic survey consists of two observational modes for various targets in our Galaxy. One is a major survey of the Milky Way aimed at a systematic study of the stellar abundance and Galactic chemical evolution through low resolution (R=1000 - 2000) spectroscopy.Another is a follow-up observation with medium resolution (R=10000) spectrographs aimed at detailed studies of the selected stars with different chemical composition, kinematicsand dynamics.

  8. Unique identification code for medical fundus images using blood vessel pattern for tele-ophthalmology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anushikha; Dutta, Malay Kishore; Sharma, Dilip Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Identification of fundus images during transmission and storage in database for tele-ophthalmology applications is an important issue in modern era. The proposed work presents a novel accurate method for generation of unique identification code for identification of fundus images for tele-ophthalmology applications and storage in databases. Unlike existing methods of steganography and watermarking, this method does not tamper the medical image as nothing is embedded in this approach and there is no loss of medical information. Strategic combination of unique blood vessel pattern and patient ID is considered for generation of unique identification code for the digital fundus images. Segmented blood vessel pattern near the optic disc is strategically combined with patient ID for generation of a unique identification code for the image. The proposed method of medical image identification is tested on the publically available DRIVE and MESSIDOR database of fundus image and results are encouraging. Experimental results indicate the uniqueness of identification code and lossless recovery of patient identity from unique identification code for integrity verification of fundus images. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Distinct Urban Mines: Exploiting secondary resources in unique anthropogenic spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongondo, F O; Williams, I D; Whitlock, G

    2015-11-01

    Fear of scarcity of resources highlight the need to exploit secondary materials from urban mines in the anthroposphere. Analogous to primary mines rich in one type of material (e.g. copper, gold, etc.), some urban mines are unique/distinct. We introduce, illustrate and discuss the concept of Distinct Urban Mines (DUM). Using the example of a university DUM in the UK, analogous to a primary mine, we illustrate potential product/material yields in respect of size, concentration and spatial location of the mine. Product ownership and replacement cycles for 17 high-value electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) among students showed that 20 tonnes of valuable e-waste were in stockpile in this DUM and a further 87 tonnes would 'soon' be available for exploitation. We address the opportunities and challenges of exploiting DUMs and conclude that they are readily available reservoirs for resource recovery. Two original contributions arise from this work: (i) a novel approach to urban mining with a potential for maximising resource recovery within the anthroposphere is conceptualised; and (ii) previously unavailable data for high-value products for a typical university DUM are presented and analysed.

  10. Spectroscopic Studies of Molecular Systems relevant in Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    In the Astrobiology context, the study of the physico-chemical interactions involving "building blocks of life" in plausible prebiotic and space-like conditions is fundamental to shed light on the processes that led to emergence of life on Earth as well as to molecular chemical evolution in space. In this PhD Thesis, such issues have been addressed both experimentally and computationally by employing vibrational spectroscopy, which has shown to be an effective tool to investigate the variety of intermolecular interactions that play a key role in self-assembling mechanisms of nucleic acid components and their binding to mineral surfaces. In particular, in order to dissect the contributions of the different interactions to the overall spectroscopic signals and shed light on the intricate experimental data, feasible computational protocols have been developed for the characterization of the spectroscopic properties of such complex systems. This study has been carried out through a multi-step strategy, starting the investigation from the spectroscopic properties of the isolated nucleobases, then studying the perturbation induced by the interaction with another molecule (molecular dimers), towards condensed phases like the molecular solid, up to the case of nucleic acid components adsorbed on minerals. A proper modeling of these weakly bound molecular systems has required, firstly, a validation of dispersion-corrected Density Functional Theory methods for simulating anharmonic vibrational properties. The isolated nucleobases and some of their dimers have been used as benchmark set for identifying a general, reliable and effective computational procedure based on fully anharmonic quantum mechanical computations of the vibrational wavenumbers and infrared intensities within the generalized second order vibrational perturbation theory (GVPT2) approach, combined with the cost-effective dispersion-corrected density functional B3LYP-D3, in conjunction with basis sets of

  11. Uniqueness of the differential Mueller matrix of uniform homogeneous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlaminck, Vincent; Ossikovski, Razvigor

    2014-06-01

    We show that the differential matrix of a uniform homogeneous medium containing birefringence may not be uniquely determined from its Mueller matrix, resulting in the potential existence of an infinite set of elementary polarization properties parameterized by an integer parameter. The uniqueness depends on the symmetry properties of a special differential matrix derived from the eigenvalue decomposition of the Mueller matrix. The conditions for the uniqueness of the differential matrix are identified, physically discussed, and illustrated in examples from the literature.

  12. Existence and uniqueness theorem for ODE: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Poria, Swarup; Dhiman, Aman

    2016-01-01

    The study of existence and uniqueness of solutions became important due to the lack of general formula for solving nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Compact form of existence and uniqueness theory appeared nearly 200 years after the development of the theory of differential equation. In the article, we shall discuss briefly the differences between linear and nonlinear first order ODE in context of existence and uniqueness of solutions. Special emphasis is given on the Lipschit...

  13. Synthesis and Spectroscopic Analysis of Schiff Bases of Imesatin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Keywords: Schiff bases, isatin, imesatin, spectroscopic analysis, biological activity. Isatin (1H-indole-2, 3-Dione) ... groups during complex or sensitive reactions (Raman et al., 2007). ..... Derivatives for Antimicrobial Activity, Journal of. Sciences ...

  14. Spectroscopic Classification of PS16ccj with Mayall/KOSMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-05-01

    We report the classification of PS16ccj from spectroscopic observation with KOSMOS on the Mayall telescope. The observation was made on 2016 May 05 UT. We classify PS16ccj as a SN Ia near maximum light.

  15. Spectroscopic factors for two-proton radioactive nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chinmay Basu

    2004-11-01

    Spectroscopic factors for two-proton emitting nuclei are discussed in the framework of the BCS (Bardeen–Cooper–Schriefer) model. Calculations carried out for the two-proton unstable 45Fe, 48Ni and 54Zn nuclei are presented.

  16. SALT Spectroscopic classification of nuclear transient Gaia16cac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanowicz, A.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Buckley, David; Whitelock, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of a nuclear transient Gaia16cac discovered by Gaia. The spectrum was obtained using the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) on the South African Large Telescope (SALT).

  17. A Comparison of Galaxy Counting Techniques in Spectroscopically Undersampled Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specian, Mike A.; Szalay, Alex S.

    2016-11-01

    Accurate measures of galactic overdensities are invaluable for precision cosmology. Obtaining these measurements is complicated when members of one’s galaxy sample lack radial depths, most commonly derived via spectroscopic redshifts. In this paper, we utilize the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Main Galaxy Sample to compare seven methods of counting galaxies in cells when many of those galaxies lack redshifts. These methods fall into three categories: assigning galaxies discrete redshifts, scaling the numbers counted using regions’ spectroscopic completeness properties, and employing probabilistic techniques. We split spectroscopically undersampled regions into three types—those inside the spectroscopic footprint, those outside but adjacent to it, and those distant from it. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the preferred counting techniques are a function of region type, cell size, and redshift. We conclude by reporting optimal counting strategies under a variety of conditions.

  18. ITER perspective on fusion reactor diagnostics - A spectroscopic view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bock, M. F. M.; Barnsley, R.; Bassan, M.

    2016-01-01

    challenges to the development of spectroscopic (but also other) diagnostics. This contribution presents an overview of recent achievements in 4 topical areas: First mirror protection and cleaning, Nuclear confinement, Radiation mitigation strategy for optical and electronic components and Calibration...

  19. Theorems on Positive Data: On the Uniqueness of NMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Laurberg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the conditions for which nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF is unique and introduce several theorems which can determine whether the decomposition is in fact unique or not. The theorems are illustrated by several examples showing the use of the theorems and their limitations. We have shown that corruption of a unique NMF matrix by additive noise leads to a noisy estimation of the noise-free unique solution. Finally, we use a stochastic view of NMF to analyze which characterization of the underlying model will result in an NMF with small estimation errors.

  20. Maximum entropy estimation of glutamate and glutamine in MR spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Yogesh; Ning, Lipeng; Michailovich, Oleg; Liao, HuiJun; Gagoski, Borjan; Grant, P Ellen; Shenton, Martha E; Stern, Robert; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Lin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is often used to estimate the concentration of several brain metabolites. Abnormalities in these concentrations can indicate specific pathology, which can be quite useful in understanding the disease mechanism underlying those changes. Due to higher concentration, metabolites such as N-acetylaspartate (NAA), Creatine (Cr) and Choline (Cho) can be readily estimated using standard Fourier transform techniques. However, metabolites such as Glutamate (Glu) and Glutamine (Gln) occur in significantly lower concentrations and their resonance peaks are very close to each other making it difficult to accurately estimate their concentrations (separately). In this work, we propose to use the theory of 'Spectral Zooming' or high-resolution spectral analysis to separate the Glutamate and Glutamine peaks and accurately estimate their concentrations. The method works by estimating a unique power spectral density, which corresponds to the maximum entropy solution of a zero-mean stationary Gaussian process. We demonstrate our estimation technique on several physical phantom data sets as well as on in-vivo brain spectroscopic imaging data. The proposed technique is quite general and can be used to estimate the concentration of any other metabolite of interest.

  1. Effects of 5f-elements on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of gold superatom model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    5f-elements encaged in a gold superatomic cluster are capable of giving rise to unique optical properties due to their hyperactive valence electrons and great radial components of 5f/6d orbitals. Herein, we review our first-principles studies on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of a series of actinide-embedded gold superatomic clusters with different dimensions. The three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) superatom clusters possess the 18-electron configuration of 1S21P61D10 and 10-electron configuration of 1S21P41D4, respectively. Importantly, their electronic absorption spectra can also be effectively explained by the superatom orbitals. Specifically, the charge transfer (CT) transitions involved in surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra for 3D and 2D structures are both from the filled 1D orbitals, providing the enhancement factors of the order of ˜ 104 at 488 nm and ˜ 105 at 456 nm, respectively. This work implies that the superatomic orbital transitions involved in 5f-elements can not only lead to a remarkable spectroscopic performance, but also a new direction for optical design in the future. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374004), the Science and Technology Development Program of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 20150519021JH), the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation, China (Grant No. 142001), and the Support from the High Performance Computing Center (HPCC) of Jilin University, China.

  2. GriF: an infrared 3D spectroscopic mode for KIR/PUEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clenet, Yann; Arsenault, Robin; Beuzit, Jean-Luc; Chalabaev, Almas; Delage, Claude; Joncas, Gilles; Lacombe, Francois; Lai, Olivier; Le Coarer, Etienne; Le Mignant, David; Pau, Sylvain; Rabou, Patrick; Rouan, Daniel

    2000-07-01

    When combined with Adaptive Optics, integral field spectroscopy, i.e. observation of a sky field simultaneously in a number of spectral passbands, is the most efficient way to perform spectro-imaging at high angular resolution. GriF will provide the CFHT community with such a capability in the near infrared K-band. This extension will be completed by means of two simple optical devices to be installed in the KIR cryostat (the infrared camera of PUEO): a cooled grism in the filter-wheel and a cold aperture on an entrance focal plane wheel. They will be completed by a room-temperature Fabry- Perot (FP) interferometer in front of KIR. The FP selects narrow bandpass images while the grism spatially separates them, giving a 3-D spectroscopic capacity within a compact and light design. At each exposure, several (up to 9) monochromatic images of a rectangular field of about 36 arcseconds X 4 arc-seconds will be simultaneously acquired, allowing a precise subtraction of continuum and background. The cooled grism will guarantee a low background environment, thus a good sensitivity at K. The medium spectral resolution (about 2600) will fit to a number of programs and will represent a considerable improvement on imaging with narrow- band filters. Thus, combining high angular resolution with the spectroscopic diagnosis, GriF will allow the study of a large class of compact objects or structures, especially in the extragalactic domain where its sensitivity should be unique.

  3. The massive stellar population of W49: A spectroscopic survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shi-Wei; Bik, Arjan; Bestenlehner, Joachim M.; Henning, Thomas; Pasquali, Anna; Brandner, Wolfgang; Stolte, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Context. Massive stars form on different scales that range from large, dispersed OB associations to compact, dense starburst clusters. The complex structure of regions of massive star formation and the involved short timescales provide a challenge for our understanding of their birth and early evolution. As one of the most massive and luminous star-forming region in our Galaxy, W49 is the ideal place to study the formation of the most massive stars. Aims: By classifying the massive young stars that are deeply embedded in the molecular cloud of W49, we aim to investigate and trace the star formation history of this region. Methods: We analyse near-infrared K-band spectroscopic observations of W49 from LBT/LUCI combined with JHK images obtained with NTT/SOFI and LBT/LUCI. Based on JHK-band photometry and K-band spectroscopy, the massive stars are placed in a Hertzsprung Russell diagram. By comparison with evolutionary models, their age and hence the star formation history of W49 can be investigated. Results: Fourteen O-type stars, as well as two young stellar objects (YSOs), are identified by our spectroscopic survey. Eleven O stars are main sequence stars with subtypes ranging from O3 to O9.5 and masses ranging from ~20 M⊙ to ~120 M⊙. Three of the O stars show strong wind features and are considered to be Of-type supergiants with masses beyond 100 M⊙. The two YSOs show CO emission, which is indicative of the presence of circumstellar disks in the central region of the massive cluster. The age of the cluster is estimated as ~1.5 Myr, with star formation continuing in different parts of the region. The ionising photons from the central massive stars have not yet cleared the molecular cocoon surrounding the cluster. W49 is comparable to extragalactic star-forming regions, and it provides us with a unique chance to study a starburst in detail. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among

  4. New infrared spectroscopic database for bromine nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Georg; Birk, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared measurements of bromine nitrate have been performed in the spectral region 675-1400 cm-1 at 0.014 cm-1 spectral resolution. Absorption cross sections were derived from 38 spectra covering the temperature range from 203 to 296 K and air pressure range from 0 to 190 mbar. For line-by-line analysis, further spectra were recorded at 0.00094 cm-1 spectral resolution at 223 and 293 K. The sample was synthesized from ClONO2 and Br2. Band strengths of the bands ν3 around 803 cm-1 and ν2 around 1286 cm-1 were determined from three pure BrONO2 measurements at different temperatures and pressures. Number densities in the absorption cell were derived from pressure measurements of the purified sample taking into account small amounts of impurities determined spectroscopically. Resulting band strengths are Sν3 = 2.872(52) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1 and Sν2 = 3.63(15) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1. Absorption cross sections of all measurements were scaled to these band strengths. Further data reduction was achieved with an interpolation scheme based on two-dimensional polynomials in ln(pressure) and temperature. The database is well-suited for remote-sensing application and should reduce the atmospheric bromine nitrate error budget substantially.

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopic behaviour of folic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, A. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2010-02-08

    The fluorescence spectroscopic behaviour of folic acid (FA) in 4 M HCl (dominant bi-cationic form), 0.1 M HCl (bi-cationic and cationic form), citric acid-NaOH pH 6 buffer (neutral form), 0.1 M and 4 M KOH (anionic form), and trifluoroacetic acid is studied. The thermal stability is investigated. Absolute absorption cross-section spectra are determined and compared with fluorescence excitation spectra. Intrinsic fluorescence quantum distributions and fluorescence quantum yields are extracted from fluorescence spectra measurements. The temporal fluorescence decay after picosecond pulse excitation is studied. The fluorescence quenching mechanisms for the different ionic forms of FA are discussed: excited-state proton release for bi-cationic FA, photo-physical non-radiative relaxation for cationic FA, and photo-induced intra-molecular electron transfer for neutral and anionic FA. Aerobic FA in 4 M KOH at elevated temperature dehydrated to 9,10-dehydro-folic acid. Its photo-dynamics was governed by twisted intra-molecular charge transfer and photo-isomerisation.

  6. HEXA: a machine for spectroscopic cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrado, D.; Aceituno, J.; Galadí, D.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2013-05-01

    We have performed a conceptual and viability study for HEXA, a 6.5 m aperture, wide-field telescope, with high multiplexing factor, framed in the strategic plan for the Calar Alto observatory in 2014-2018 and beyond, centred on the scientific cases arisen from the current need for wide-field spectroscopic surveys with very large multiplexing capability. The baseline design considers a field-of-view of 1.5°, multiplexing factor around or over 500 and possible spectral resolutions in the interval R = 5000 - 50 000, with instruments placed on two Nasmyth platforms. Other variants are also considered, including Ritchey-Chrétien and prime-focus solutions. The telescope concept is described, together with the instruments that have already undergone, or that are still undergoing, the conceptual design process: CEO, an innovative Imaging Fourier Transform spectrograph. GEA, a Gaia-inspired drift-scanning slitless spectrograph. BRONTESS, a fast and simple camera for guiding and ToO work. A PMAS-based multi-IFU, highly multiplexed spectrograph. And the multi-fibre spectrograph GYGES. Some of the instrument concepts analysed are based on the versatile fiber-positioner HECATE (with a minimum of 361 positioners). Some of the fibre-based instruments would allow, too, fibres entering a battery of CAF{É}-type high-res spectrographs.

  7. The spectroscopic Hertzsprung-Russell diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Langer, N

    2014-01-01

    The Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is an essential diagnostic diagram for stellar structure and evolution, which has now been in use for more than 100 years. Our spectroscopic Hertzsprung-Russell (sHR) diagram shows the inverse of the flux-mean gravity versus the effective temperature. Observed stars whose spectra have been quantitatively analyzed can be entered in this diagram without the knowledge of the stellar distance or absolute brightness. Observed stars can be as conveniently compared to stellar evolution calculations in the sHR diagram as in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. However, at the same time, our ordinate is proportional to the stellar mass-to-luminosity ratio, which can thus be directly determined. For intermediate- and low-mass star evolution at constant mass, we show that the shape of an evolutionary track in the sHR diagram is identical to that in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We also demonstrate that for hot stars, their stellar Eddington factor can be directly read off the sHR diagram. ...

  8. Spectroscopic studies in open quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rotter, I; Pichugin, K N; Seba, P

    2000-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of an open quantum system are determined by theeigenvalues and eigenfunctions of an effective Hamiltonian H consisting of theHamiltonian H_0 of the corresponding closed system and a non-Hermitiancorrection term W arising from the interaction via the continuum of decaychannels. The eigenvalues E_R of H are complex. They are the poles of theS-matrix and provide both the energies and widths of the states. We illustratethe interplay between Re(H) and Im(H) by means of the different interferencephenomena between two neighboured resonance states. Level repulsion along thereal axis appears if the interaction is caused mainly by Re(H) while abifurcation of the widths appears if the interaction occurs mainly due toIm(H). We then calculate the poles of the S-matrix and the correspondingwavefunctions for a rectangular microwave resonator with a scatter as afunction of the area of the resonator as well as of the degree of opening to aguide. The calculations are performed by using the method o...

  9. The FORS Deep Field Spectroscopic Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Noll, S; Appenzeller, I; Bender, R; Böhm, A; Gabasch, A; Heidt, J; Hopp, U; Jäger, K; Seitz, S; Stahl, O; Tapken, C; Ziegler, B L

    2004-01-01

    We present a catalogue and atlas of low-resolution spectra of a well defined sample of 341 objects in the FORS Deep Field. All spectra were obtained with the FORS instruments at the ESO VLT with essentially the same spectroscopic setup. The observed extragalactic objects cover the redshift range 0.1 to 5.0. 98 objects are starburst galaxies and QSOs at z > 2. Using this data set we investigated the evolution of the characteristic spectral properties of bright starburst galaxies and their mutual relations as function of the redshift. Significant evolutionary effects were found for redshifts 2 < z < 4. Most conspicuous are the increase of the average C IV absorption strength, of the dust reddening, and of the intrinsic UV luminosity, and the decrease of the average Ly alpha emission strength with decreasing redshift. In part the observed evolutionary effects can be attributed to an increase of the metallicity of the galaxies with cosmic age. Moreover, the increase of the total star-formation rates and the...

  10. Multiparameter fluorescence spectroscopic imaging of cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Gary R.

    1994-08-01

    The ability to quantitate physiological parameters in single living cells using fluorescence spectroscopic imaging has expanded our understanding of many cell regulatory processes. Previous studies have focussed on the measurement of single parameters, such as the concentration of calcium, and more recently two parameters, such as calcium and pH using fluorescence ratio imaging. The complexity of the interrelationships among cell biochemical reactions suggests a need to extend the measurement scheme to several parameters. Expansion of the number of parameters involves several complexities associated with fluorescent probe selection and instrumentation design as well as the processing and management of the data. A system has been assembled which provides maximum flexibility in multiparameter fluorescence imaging measurements. The system provides multiple combinations of excitation, dichroic mirror, and emission wavelengths. It has automatic acquisition of any number of parameters. The number of parameters is primarily limited by the selection of fluorescent probes with nonoverlapping spectra. We demonstrate the utility of the system by the coordinated monitoring of stimulated changes in the concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and pH using fluorescence ratio imaging coupled with a conventional transmitted light image of single smooth muscle cells. The results demonstrate coordinated changes in some instances but uncoordinated changes in others.

  11. Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer: Scientific Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara; Ninkov, Zoran; Robberto, Massimo; Hull, Tony; Purves, Lloyd

    2016-01-01

    GESE is a mission concept consisting of a 1.5-m space telescope and UV multi-object slit spectrograph designed to help understand galaxy evolution in a critical era in the history of the universe, where the rate of star-formation stopped increasing and started to decline. To isolate and identify the various processes driving the evolution of these galaxies, GESE will obtain rest-frame far-UV spectra of 100,000 galaxies at redshifts, z approximately 1-2. To obtain such a large number of spectra, multiplexing over a wide field is an absolute necessity. A slit device such as a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) or a micro-shutter array (MSA) enables spectroscopy of a hundred or more sources in a single exposure while eliminating overlapping spectra of other sources and blocking unwanted background like zodiacal light. We find that a 1.5-m space telescope with a MSA slit device combined with a custom orbit enabling long, uninterrupted exposures (approximately 10 hr) are optimal for this spectroscopic survey. GESE will not be operating alone in this endeavor. Together with x-ray telescopes and optical/near-IR telescopes like Subaru/Prime Focus Spectrograph, GESE will detect "feedback" from young massive stars and massive black holes (AGN's), and other drivers of galaxy evolution.

  12. Spectroscopic variability of two Oe stars

    CERN Document Server

    Rauw, G; Naze, Y; Eversberg, T; Alves, F; Arnold, W; Bergmann, T; Viegas, N G Correia; Fahed, R; Fernando, A; Gonzalez-Perez, J N; Carreira, L F Gouveia; Hempelmann, A; Hunger, T; Knapen, J H; Leadbeater, R; Dias, F Marques; Mittag, M; Moffat, A F J; Reinecke, N; Ribeiro, J; Romeo, N; Gallego, J Sanchez; Santos, E M Dos; Schanne, L; Schmitt, J H M M; Schroeder, K -P; Stahl, O; Stober, Ba; Stober, Be; Vollmann, K

    2015-01-01

    The Oe stars HD45314 and HD60848 have recently been found to exhibit very different X-ray properties: whilst HD60848 has an X-ray spectrum and emission level typical of most OB stars, HD45314 features a much harder and brighter X-ray emission, making it a so-called gamma Cas analogue. Monitoring the optical spectra could provide hints towards the origin of these very different behaviours. We analyse a large set of spectroscopic observations of HD45314 and HD60848, extending over 20 years. We further attempt to fit the H-alpha line profiles of both stars with a simple model of emission line formation in a Keplerian disk. Strong variations in the strengths of the H-alpha, H-beta, and He I 5876 emission lines are observed for both stars. In the case of HD60848, we find a time lag between the variations in the equivalent widths of these lines. The emission lines are double peaked with nearly identical strengths of the violet and red peaks. The H-alpha profile of this star can be successfully reproduced by our mod...

  13. Spectroscopic survey of M--type asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Fornasier, S; Dotto, E; Migliorini, A; Ockert-Bell, M; Barucci, M A

    2010-01-01

    M-type asteroids, as defined in the Tholen taxonomy (Tholen, 1984), are medium albedo bodies supposed to have a metallic composition and to be the progenitors both of differentiated iron-nickel meteorites and enstatite chondrites. We carried out a spectroscopic survey in the visible and near infrared wavelength range (0.4-2.5 micron) of 30 asteroids chosen from the population of asteroids initially classified as Tholen M -types, aiming to investigate their surface composition. The data were obtained during several observing runs during the years 2004-2007 at the TNG, NTT, and IRTF telescopes. We computed the spectral slopes in several wavelength ranges for each observed asteroid, and we searched for diagnostic spectral features. We confirm a large variety of spectral behaviors for these objects as their spectra are extended into the near-infrared, including the identification of weak absorption bands, mainly of the 0.9 micron band tentatively attributed to orthopyroxene, and of the 0.43 micron band that may b...

  14. Spectroscopic subsystems in nearby wide binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Radial velocity (RV) monitoring of solar-type visual binaries has been conducted at the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5-m telescope to study short-period systems. Data reduction is described, mean and individual RVs of 163 observed objects are given. New spectroscopic binaries are discovered or suspected in 17 objects, for some of them orbital periods could be determined. Subsystems are efficiently detected even in a single observation by double lines and/or by the RV difference between the components of visual binaries. The potential of this detection technique is quantified by simulation and used for statistical assessment of 96 wide binaries within 67pc. It is found that 43 binaries contain at least one subsystem and the occurrence of subsystems is equally probable in either primary or secondary components. The frequency of subsystems and their periods match the simple prescription proposed by the author (2014, AJ, 147, 87). The remaining 53 simple wide binaries with a median projected separation of 1300AU have the distri...

  15. Proton MR spectroscopic imaging in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedeschi, G.; Bonavita, S. [Istituto di Scienze Neurologiche, Seconda Universita di Napoli (Italy); Department of Neuroimaging, National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); McFarland, H.F.; Richert, N. [Department of Neuroimmunology, National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Duyn, J.H.; Frank, J.A. [Laboratory of Diagnostic Radiology Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2002-01-01

    We studied 24 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H-MRSI) to assess the neurochemical pathology of the white-matter lesions (WML) and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM). Our 1H-MRSI technique allowed simultaneous measurement of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline-containing compounds (Cho), and creatine plus phosphocreatine (Cr) signal intensities from four 15-mm slices divided into 0.84 ml single-volume elements. In WML we found significantly lower NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios and a significantly higher Cho/Cr ratio than in NAWM or control white matter. In NAWM, NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr were significantly lower than in control white matter. 1H-MRSI was compatible with damage to myelin in WML, and with axonal damage and/or dysfunction in WML and NAWM. These findings extend data on involvement of NAWM in MS beyond the abnormalities visible on MRI. (orig.)

  16. Spectroscopic Signatures Related to a Sunquake

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, Sarah A; Zharkov, Sergei; Green, Lucie M

    2015-01-01

    The presence of flare related acoustic emission (sunquakes) in some flares represents a severe challenge to our current understanding of flare energy transport processes. We present a comparison of new spectral observations from Hinode's EUV imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the atmosphere above a sunquake, and compare them to the spectra observed in a part of the flaring region with no acoustic signature. Evidence for the sunquake is determined using both time-distance and acoustic holography methods, and we find that, unlike many previous sunquake detections, the signal is rather dispersed, but that the time-distance and 6 and 7 mHz sources converge at the same spatial location. We also see some evidence for different evolution at different frequencies, with an earlier peak at 7 mHz than at 6 mHz. Using spectroscopic measurements we find that in this location at the time of the 7 mHz peak the spectral emission is significantly more intense, shows larger veloc...

  17. Galaxy evolution spectroscopic explorer: scientific rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara; Ninkov, Zoran; Robberto, Massimo; Hull, Tony; Purves, Lloyd

    2016-07-01

    GESE is a mission concept consisting of a 1.5-m space telescope and UV multi-object slit spectrograph designed to help understand galaxy evolution in a critical era in the history of the universe, where the rate of star-formation stopped increasing and started to decline. To isolate and identify the various processes driving the evolution of these galaxies, GESE will obtain rest-frame far-UV spectra of 100,000 galaxies at redshifts, z 1-2. To obtain such a large number of spectra, multiplexing over a wide field is an absolute necessity. A slit device such as a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) or a micro-shutter array (MSA) enables spectroscopy of a hundred or more sources in a single exposure while eliminating overlapping spectra of other sources and blocking unwanted background like zodiacal light. We find that a 1.5-m space telescope with a MSA slit device combined with a custom orbit enabling long, uninterrupted exposures ( 10 hr) are optimal for this spectroscopic survey. GESE will not be operating alone in this endeavor. Together with x-ray telescopes and optical/near-IR telescopes like Subaru/Prime Focus Spectrograph, GESE will detect "feedback" from young massive stars and massive black holes (AGN's), and other drivers of galaxy evolution.

  18. Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer: Scientific Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara; Ninkov, Zoran; Robberto, Massimo; Hull, Tony; Purves, Lloyd

    2016-01-01

    GESE is a mission concept consisting of a 1.5-m space telescope and UV multi-object slit spectrograph designed to help understand galaxy evolution in a critical era in the history of the universe, where the rate of star-formation stopped increasing and started to decline. To isolate and identify the various processes driving the evolution of these galaxies, GESE will obtain rest-frame far-UV spectra of 100,000 galaxies at redshifts, z approximately 1-2. To obtain such a large number of spectra, multiplexing over a wide field is an absolute necessity. A slit device such as a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) or a micro-shutter array (MSA) enables spectroscopy of a hundred or more sources in a single exposure while eliminating overlapping spectra of other sources and blocking unwanted background like zodiacal light. We find that a 1.5-m space telescope with a MSA slit device combined with a custom orbit enabling long, uninterrupted exposures (approximately 10 hr) are optimal for this spectroscopic survey. GESE will not be operating alone in this endeavor. Together with x-ray telescopes and optical/near-IR telescopes like Subaru/Prime Focus Spectrograph, GESE will detect "feedback" from young massive stars and massive black holes (AGN's), and other drivers of galaxy evolution.

  19. Impedance spectroscopic analysis of nanoparticle functionalized graphene/p-Si Schottky diode sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md Ahsan; Singh, Amol; Daniels, Kevin; Vogt, Thomas; Chandrashekhar, M. V. S.; Koley, Goutam

    2016-11-01

    Metallic nanoparticle (NP) functionalized graphene/p-Si Schottky diode (chemidiode) sensors have been investigated through dc amperometric and ac impedance spectroscopic (IS) measurements. Four fold sensitivity enhancement for NH3 is demonstrated after Pt nanoparticle functionalization of graphene/p-Si Schottky diode sensor, and the response is also orders of magnitude higher compared to functionalized graphene chemiresistor. Experimentally obtained impedance spectra were modeled utilizing an equivalent circuit for both sensor types, and the junction resistance and capacitance were extracted for various gaseous analytes exposure. Variations in junction resistance, capacitance and 3-dB cut-off frequency plotted in three-dimensional (3D) enables extraction of unique signatures for various analyte gases.

  20. A Spectroscopic Survey of the Fields of 28 Strong Gravitational Lenses: The Redshift Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Momcheva, Ivelina; Cool, Richard J; Keeton, Charles R; Zabludoff, Ann I

    2015-01-01

    We present the spectroscopic redshift catalog from a wide-field survey of the fields of 28 galaxy-mass strong gravitational lenses. We discuss the acquisition and reduction of the survey data, collected over 40 nights of 6.5m MMT and Magellan time, employing four different multi-object spectrographs. We determine that no biases are introduced by combining datasets obtained with different instrument/spectrograph combinations. Special care is taken to determine redshift uncertainties using repeat observations. The redshift catalog consists of 9768 new and unique galaxy redshifts. 82.4% of the catalog redshifts are between z=0.1 and z=0.7, and the catalog median redshift is z=0.36. The data from this survey will be used to study the lens environments and line-of-sight structures to gain a better understanding of the effects of large scale structure on lens statistics and lens-derived parameters.

  1. Raman and terahertz spectroscopical investigation of cocrystal formation process of piracetam and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Zhang, Huili; Xue, Jiadan; Fang, Hongxia; Zhang, Qi; Xia, Yi; Li, Yafang; Hong, Zhi

    2015-03-01

    Cocrystallization can improve physical and chemical properties of active pharmaceutical ingredient, and this feature has great potential in pharmaceutical development. In this study, the cocrystal of piracetam and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid under grinding condition has been characterized by Raman and terahertz spectroscopical techniques. The major vibrational modes of individual starting components and cocrystal are obtained and assigned. Spectral results show that the vibrational modes of the cocrystal are different from those of the corresponding parent materials. The dynamic process of such pharmaceutical cocrystal formation has also been monitored directly with Raman and THz spectra. The formation rate is pretty fast in first several 20 min grinding time, and then it becomes slow. After ∼35 min, such process has been almost completed. These results offer us the unique means and benchmark for characterizing the cocrystal conformation from molecule-level and also provide us rich information about the reaction dynamic during cocrystal formation process in pharmaceutical fields.

  2. Optical characterizations of complete TFT-LCD display devices by phase modulated spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillet, Melanie [HORIBA Jobin Yvon SAS, Thin Film Division, ZA de la Vigne aux Loups-5 avenue Arago, 91 380 Chilly-Mazarin (France); Yan Yi [HORIBA Jobin Yvon Inc., 3880 Park Ave., Edison, NJ 08820-3012 (United States)], E-mail: Li.Yan@jobinyvon.com; Teboul, Eric [HORIBA Jobin Yvon Inc., 3880 Park Ave., Edison, NJ 08820-3012 (United States)

    2007-12-03

    A commercially available phase modulated spectroscopic ellipsometer (PMSE) has been used to characterize a full thin film transistor-liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) structure, including the glass substrates coated with transparent conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) layers, the twisted liquid crystal (LC) layer sandwiched in between, and the amorphous silicon (a-Si) TFT device which controls the luminance of a pixel. Due to its unique optical design, PMSE presents an unparallel capability to measure very accurately ultra thin films on transparent substrates as often found in display applications. Results show that the ITO layer is inhomogeneous in depth, corresponding to a graded microstructure. In addition, strong uniaxial anisotropy was determined for the liquid crystal device over the entire measured spectral range. Finally, doping effects on the optical properties of the a-Si layer of the TFT device were also measured.

  3. Genome comparison without alignment using shortest unique substrings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Möller Friedrich

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence comparison by alignment is a fundamental tool of molecular biology. In this paper we show how a number of sequence comparison tasks, including the detection of unique genomic regions, can be accomplished efficiently without an alignment step. Our procedure for nucleotide sequence comparison is based on shortest unique substrings. These are substrings which occur only once within the sequence or set of sequences analysed and which cannot be further reduced in length without losing the property of uniqueness. Such substrings can be detected using generalized suffix trees. Results We find that the shortest unique substrings in Caenorhabditis elegans, human and mouse are no longer than 11 bp in the autosomes of these organisms. In mouse and human these unique substrings are significantly clustered in upstream regions of known genes. Moreover, the probability of finding such short unique substrings in the genomes of human or mouse by chance is extremely small. We derive an analytical expression for the null distribution of shortest unique substrings, given the GC-content of the query sequences. Furthermore, we apply our method to rapidly detect unique genomic regions in the genome of Staphylococcus aureus strain MSSA476 compared to four other staphylococcal genomes. Conclusion We combine a method to rapidly search for shortest unique substrings in DNA sequences and a derivation of their null distribution. We show that unique regions in an arbitrary sample of genomes can be efficiently detected with this method. The corresponding programs shustring (SHortest Unique subSTRING and shulen are written in C and available at http://adenine.biz.fh-weihenstephan.de/shustring/.

  4. Spectroscopic detection, characterization and dynamics of free radicals relevant to combustion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Terry [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-06-04

    Combustion chemistry is enormously complex. The chemical mechanisms involve a multitude of elementary reaction steps and a comparable number of reactive intermediates, many of which are free radicals. Computer simulations based upon these mechanisms are limited by the validity of the mechanisms and the parameters characterizing the properties of the intermediates and their reactivity. Spectroscopy can provide data for sensitive and selective diagnostics to follow their reactions. Spectroscopic analysis also provides detailed parameters characterizing the properties of these intermediates. These parameters serve as experimental gold standards to benchmark predictions of these properties from large-scale, electronic structure calculations. This work has demonstrated the unique capabilities of near-infrared cavity ringdown spectroscopy (NIR CRDS) to identify, characterize and monitor intermediates of key importance in complex chemical reactions. Our studies have focussed on the large family of organic peroxy radicals which are arguably themost important intermediates in combustion chemistry and many other reactions involving the oxidation of organic compounds. Our spectroscopic studies have shown that the NIR Ã - ˜X electronic spectra of the peroxy radicals allows one to differentiate among chemical species in the organic peroxy family and also determine their isomeric and conformic structure in many cases. We have clearly demonstrated this capability on saturated and unsaturated peroxy radicals and β-hydroxy peroxy radicals. In addition we have developed a unique dual wavelength CRDS apparatus specifically for the purpose of measuring absolute absorption cross section and following the reaction of chemical intermediates. The utility of the apparatus has been demonstrated by measuring the cross-section and self-reaction rate constant for ethyl peroxy.

  5. The UNIQUe Label: Supporting a Culture of Innovation and Quality in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonen, Annemie; Bijnens, Helena

    European higher education institutions will need significant reforms, in order to guarantee their leading role in a globalized knowledge economy. These reforms can be enhanced by improving the way in which traditional universities integrate new technologies both in their educational activities and throughout their strategic and operational processes. The UNIQUe institutional accreditation scheme, analyzed and described in this chapter, intends to support this process of integrating the use of new technologies in higher education. With its specific open approach to quality in e-Learning, UNIQUe emphasizes innovation and creativity in a process that includes self-assessment and constructive dialog with peers and stakeholders involved. UNIQUe intends to use the institutional quality label as a catalyst for continuous improvement and change while setting up collaborative bench learning processes among universities for the adoption and integration of e-Learning.

  6. A generator for unique quantum random numbers based on vacuum states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, C.; Wittmann, C.; Sych, D.

    2010-01-01

    unpredictability of quantum mechanics(4-11). However, most approaches do not consider that a potential adversary could have knowledge about the generated numbers, so the numbers are not verifiably random and unique(12-15). Here we present a simple experimental setup based on homodyne measurements that uses...... the purity of a continuous-variable quantum vacuum state to generate unique random numbers. We use the intrinsic randomness in measuring the quadratures of a mode in the lowest energy vacuum state, which cannot be correlated to any other state. The simplicity of our source, combined with its verifiably...... unique randomness, are important attributes for achieving high-reliability, high-speed and low-cost quantum random number generators....

  7. A generator for unique quantum random numbers based on vacuum states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Christian; Wittmann, Christoffer; Sych, Denis; Dong, Ruifang; Mauerer, Wolfgang; Andersen, Ulrik L.; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2010-10-01

    Random numbers are a valuable component in diverse applications that range from simulations over gambling to cryptography. The quest for true randomness in these applications has engendered a large variety of different proposals for producing random numbers based on the foundational unpredictability of quantum mechanics. However, most approaches do not consider that a potential adversary could have knowledge about the generated numbers, so the numbers are not verifiably random and unique. Here we present a simple experimental setup based on homodyne measurements that uses the purity of a continuous-variable quantum vacuum state to generate unique random numbers. We use the intrinsic randomness in measuring the quadratures of a mode in the lowest energy vacuum state, which cannot be correlated to any other state. The simplicity of our source, combined with its verifiably unique randomness, are important attributes for achieving high-reliability, high-speed and low-cost quantum random number generators.

  8. Prognosis, prospecting and development of gas fields in the far north of Siberia - as a single methodological approach to an optimal development of the territorial resources; Prevision, prospection et developpement des champs de gaz naturel du grand nord Siberien - approche methodologique unique pour un developpement optimal des ressources du territoire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remizov, V.V.; Dmitrievsky, A.N.; Ermilov, O.M.; Neelov, Y.V.; Chugunov, L.S.; Gurari, F.G.; Goldin, S.V.; Karagodin, Y.N. [OJSC Gaprom, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    This presentation realizes a systems approach to the study of the oil and gas complex of the Far North of Siberia as a single sophisticated system starting from prognosis and prospecting of fields to their development at different stages of operation. This paper shows for the first time the whole complex of studies, including the methodology of systems studies of the structure, evolution and genesis of oil and gas reservoirs, the model of geologic structure and the evaluation of oil and gas resources, the technique of prospecting and surveys of oil and gas fields, techniques and methods of an effective system of prospecting and development, particularly at the stage of achieving maximum and the onset of production decrease. (authors)

  9. Uniqueness and existence for bounded boundary value problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehme, J.; Lanz, A.

    2006-01-01

    The existence and uniqueness of solutions for the boundary value problems with general linear point evaluation boundary conditions is established. We assume that f is bounded and that there is uniqueness on a homogeneous problem and on the linear variational problems. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All righ

  10. Existence and Uniqueness of Solution to ODEs: Lipschitz Continuity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swarup Poria; Aman Dhiman

    2017-05-01

    The study of existence and uniqueness of solution of ordinarydifferential equation (ODE) became important due to the lack ofgeneral formula for solving nonlinear ODEs. In this article, weshall discuss briefly about the existence and uniqueness of solutionof a first order ODE. A special emphasis is given on theLipschitz continuous functions in the discussion.

  11. Theorems on Positive Data: On the Uniqueness of NMF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauerberg, Hans; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Pumbley, Mark;

    2008-01-01

    have shown that corruption of a unique NMF matrix by additive noise leads to a noisy estimation of the noise-free unique solution. Finally, we use a stochastic view of NMF to analyze which characterization of the underlying model will result in an NMF with small estimation errors....

  12. Morphological Awareness Uniquely Predicts Young Children's Chinese Character Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride-Chang, Catherine; Shu, Hua; Zhou, Aibao; Wat, Chun Pong; Wagner, Richard K.

    2003-01-01

    Two unique measures of morphological awareness were orally administered to kindergarten and 2nd-grade Hong Kong Chinese children. Both tasks of morphological awareness predicted unique variance in Chinese character recognition in these children, after controlling for age, phonological awareness, speeded naming, speed of processing, and vocabulary.…

  13. Can facial uniqueness be inferred from impostor scores?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutta, A.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    2013-01-01

    In Biometrics, facial uniqueness is commonly inferred from impostor similarity scores. In this paper, we show that such uniqueness measures are highly unstable in the presence of image quality variations like pose, noise and blur. We also experimentally demonstrate the instability of a recently

  14. Unique Protein Signature of Circulating Microparticles in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer; Iversen, Line V

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the unique qualities of proteins associated with circulating subcellular material in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with healthy controls and patients with other chronic autoimmune diseases.......To characterize the unique qualities of proteins associated with circulating subcellular material in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with healthy controls and patients with other chronic autoimmune diseases....

  15. Uniqueness of limiting solution to a strongly competing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avetik Arakelyan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We prove a uniqueness for the positive solution to a strongly competing system of Lotka-Volterra type problem in the limiting configuration, when the competition rate tends to infinity. We give an alternate proof of uniqueness based on properties of limiting solutions.

  16. The Uniqueness of Optimal Solution for Linear Programming Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QuanlingWei; HongYan; JunWang

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates an old problem in operations research, the uniqueness of the optimal solution to a linear programming problem. We discuss the problem on a general polyhedron, give some equivalent conditions for uniqueness testing. In addition, we discuss the implementation issues for linear programming based decision making procedures,which motivated this research.

  17. The CoRoT-GES Collaboration: Improving red giants spectroscopic surface gravitity and abundances with asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, M.; Chiappini, C.; Miglio, A.; Montalbán, J.; Rodrigues, T.; Mosser, B.; Anders, F.; the CoRoT RG Group; GES Consortium, the

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays large spectroscopic surveys, like the Gaia-ESO Survey (GES), provide unique stellar databases for better investigating the formation and evolution of our Galaxy. Great attention must be paid to the accuracy of the basic stellar properties derived: large uncertainties in stellar parameters lead to large uncertainties in abundances, distances and ages. Asteroseismology has a key role in this context: when seismic information is combined with information derived from spectroscopic analysis, highly precise constraints on distances, masses, extinction and ages of red giants can be obtained. In the light of this promising joint action, we started the CoRoT-GES collaboration. We present a set of 1111 CoRoT stars, observed by GES from December 2011 to July 2014, these stars belong to the CoRoT field LRc01, pointing at the inner Galactic disk. Among these stars, 534 have reliable global seismic parameters. By combining seismic informations and spectroscopy, we derived precise stellar parameters, ages, kinematic and orbital parameters and detailed element abundances for this sample of stars. We also show that, thanks to asteroseismology, we are able to obtain a higher precision than what can be achieved by the standard spectroscopic means. This sample of CoRoT red giants, spanning Galactocentric distances from 5 to 8 kpc and a wide age interval (1-13 Gyr), provides us a representative sample for the inner disk population.

  18. Denoising spectroscopic data by means of the improved least-squares deconvolution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, A.; Van Reeth, T.; Tsymbal, V.; Aerts, C.; Kochukhov, O.; Debosscher, J.

    2013-12-01

    Context. The MOST, CoRoT, and Kepler space missions have led to the discovery of a large number of intriguing, and in some cases unique, objects among which are pulsating stars, stars hosting exoplanets, binaries, etc. Although the space missions have delivered photometric data of unprecedented quality, these data are lacking any spectral information and we are still in need of ground-based spectroscopic and/or multicolour photometric follow-up observations for a solid interpretation. Aims: The faintness of most of the observed stars and the required high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of spectroscopic data both imply the need to use large telescopes, access to which is limited. In this paper, we look for an alternative, and aim for the development of a technique that allows the denoising of the originally low S/N (typically, below 80) spectroscopic data, making observations of faint targets with small telescopes possible and effective. Methods: We present a generalization of the original least-squares deconvolution (LSD) method by implementing a multicomponent average profile and a line strengths correction algorithm. We tested the method on simulated and real spectra of single and binary stars, among which are two intrinsically variable objects. Results: The method was successfully tested on the high-resolution spectra of Vega and a Kepler star, KIC 04749989. Application to the two pulsating stars, 20 Cvn and HD 189631, showed that the technique is also applicable to intrinsically variable stars: the results of frequency analysis and mode identification from the LSD model spectra for both objects are in good agreement with the findings from literature. Depending on the S/N of the original data and spectral characteristics of a star, the gain in S/N in the LSD model spectrum typically ranges from 5 to 15 times. Conclusions: The technique introduced in this paper allows an effective denoising of the originally low S/N spectroscopic data. The high S/N spectra obtained

  19. Time resolved spectroscopic studies on some nanophosphors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harish Chander; Santa Chawla

    2008-06-01

    Time resolved spectroscopy is an important tool for studying photophysical processes in phosphors. Present work investigates the steady state and time resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic characteristics of ZnS, ZnO and (Zn, Mg)O nanophosphors both in powder as well as thin film form. Photoluminescence (PL) of ZnS nanophosphors typically exhibit a purple/blue emission peak termed as self activated (SA) luminescence and emission at different wavelengths arising due to dopant impurities e.g. green emission for ZnS : Cu, orange emission for ZnS : Mn and red emission for ZnS : Eu. The lifetimes obtained from decay curves range from ns to ms level and suggest the radiative recombination path involving donor–acceptor pair recombination or internal electronic transitions of the impurity atom. A series of ZnMgO nanophosphor thin films with varied Zn : Mg ratios were prepared by chemical bath deposition. Photoluminescence (PL) excitation and emission spectra exhibit variations with changing Mg ratio. Luminescence lifetime as short as 10-10 s was observed for ZnO and ZnMgO (100 : 10) nanophosphors. With increasing Mg ratio, PL decay shifts into microsecond range. ZnO and ZnMgO alloys up to 50% Mg were prepared as powder by solid state mixing and sintering at high temperature in reducing atmosphere. Time resolved decay of PL indicated lifetime in the microsecond time scale. The novelty of the work lies in clear experimental evidence of dopants (Cu, Mn, Eu and Mg) in the decay process and luminescence life times in II–VI semiconductor nanocrystals of ZnS and ZnO. For ZnS, blue self activated luminescence decays faster than Cu and Mn related emission. For undoped ZnO nanocrystals, PL decay is in the nanosecond range whereas with Mg doping the decay becomes much slower in the microsecond range.

  20. The SPHEREx All-Sky Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; SPHEREx Science Team, SPHEREx Project Team

    2016-06-01

    SPHEREx is a mission to conduct an optical-near-IR survey of the entire sky with a spectrum at every pixel location. It was selected by NASA for a Phase A study in its Small Explorer Program; if selected, development would begin in 2016, and the observatory would start a 2-year prime mission in 2020. An all-sky spectroscopic survey can be used to tackle a wide range of science questions. The SPHEREx science team is focusing on three: (1) Probing the physics of inflation through measuring non-Gaussianity from the study of large-scale structure; (2) Studying the origin of water and biogenic molecules in a wide range of physical and chemical environments via ice absorption spectra; (3) Charting the history of star formation in the universe through intensity mapping of the large-scale spatial power. The instrument is a small wide-field telescope operating in the range of 0.75 - 4.8 µm at a spectral resolution of 41.5 in the optical and 150 at the long-wavelength end. It observes in a sun-sync low-earth orbit, covering the sky like WISE and COBE. SPHEREx is a simple instrument that requires no new technology. The Phase A design has substantial technical and resource margins and can be built with low risk. It is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, with Ball Aerospace and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute as major partners. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.