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Sample records for unfolding intermediates observed

  1. Dry molten globule intermediates and the mechanism of protein unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Robert L; Frieden, Carl; Rose, George D

    2010-10-01

    New experimental results show that either gain or loss of close packing can be observed as a discrete step in protein folding or unfolding reactions. This finding poses a significant challenge to the conventional two-state model of protein folding. Results of interest involve dry molten globule (DMG) intermediates, an expanded form of the protein that lacks appreciable solvent. When an unfolding protein expands to the DMG state, side chains unlock and gain conformational entropy, while liquid-like van der Waals interactions persist. Four unrelated proteins are now known to form DMGs as the first step of unfolding, suggesting that such an intermediate may well be commonplace in both folding and unfolding. Data from the literature show that peptide amide protons are protected in the DMG, indicating that backbone structure is intact despite loss of side-chain close packing. Other complementary evidence shows that secondary structure formation provides a major source of compaction during folding. In our model, the major free-energy barrier separating unfolded from native states usually occurs during the transition between the unfolded state and the DMG. The absence of close packing at this barrier provides an explanation for why phi-values, derived from a Brønsted-Leffler plot, depend primarily on structure at the mutational site and not on specific side-chain interactions. The conventional two-state folding model breaks down when there are DMG intermediates, a realization that has major implications for future experimental work on the mechanism of protein folding. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Unfolding Simulations of Holomyoglobin from Four Mammals: Identification of Intermediates and β-Sheet Formation from Partially Unfolded States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2013-01-01

    simulations of holoMb and the first comparative study of unfolding of protein orthologs from different species (sperm whale, pig, horse, and harbor seal). We also provide new interpretations of experimental mean molecular ellipticities of myoglobin intermediates, notably correcting for random coil and number...... of helices in intermediates. The simulated holoproteins at 310 K displayed structures and dynamics in agreement with crystal structures (Rg ,1.48–1.51 nm, helicity ,75%). At 400 K, heme was not lost, but some helix loss was observed in pig and horse, suggesting that these helices are less stable......Myoglobin (Mb) is a centrally important, widely studied mammalian protein. While much work has investigated multi-step unfolding of apoMb using acid or denaturant, holomyoglobin unfolding is poorly understood despite its biological relevance. We present here the first systematic unfolding...

  3. High-energy intermediates in protein unfolding characterized by thiol labeling under nativelike conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Pooja; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2014-06-10

    A protein unfolding reaction usually appears to be so dominated by a large free energy barrier that identifying and characterizing high-energy intermediates and, hence, dissecting the unfolding reaction into multiple structural transitions have proven to be a challenge. In particular, it has been difficult to identify any detected high-energy intermediate with the dry (DMG) and wet (WMG) molten globules that have been implicated in the unfolding reactions of at least some proteins. In this study, a native-state thiol labeling methodology was used to identify high-energy intermediates, as well as to delineate the barriers to the disruption of side chain packing interactions and to site-specific solvent exposure in different regions of the small protein, single-chain monellin (MNEI). Labeling studies of four single-cysteine-containing variants of MNEI have identified three high-energy intermediates, populated to very low extents under nativelike conditions. A significant dispersion in the opening rates of the cysteine side chains has allowed multiple steps, leading to the loss of side chain packing, to be resolved temporally. A detailed structural analysis of the positions of the four cysteine residue positions, which are buried to different depths within the protein, has suggested a direct correlation with the structure of a DMG, detected in previous studies. It is observed that side chain packing within the core of the protein is maintained, while that at the surface is disrupted, in the DMG. The core of the protein becomes solvent-exposed only in a WMG populated after the rate-limiting step of unfolding at high denaturant concentrations.

  4. Unfolding intermediates of the mutant His-107-Tyr of human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srabani Taraphder

    We present in this article a detailed analysis of representative structures and proton transfer activity of .... cal molecular dynamics simulations to identify potential unfolding ... clustering parameters to carry out K-means cluster- ing of different ...

  5. Mechanical unfolding reveals stable 3-helix intermediates in talin and α-catenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl V Mykuliak

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical stability is a key feature in the regulation of structural scaffolding proteins and their functions. Despite the abundance of α-helical structures among the human proteome and their undisputed importance in health and disease, the fundamental principles of their behavior under mechanical load are poorly understood. Talin and α-catenin are two key molecules in focal adhesions and adherens junctions, respectively. In this study, we used a combination of atomistic steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulations, polyprotein engineering, and single-molecule atomic force microscopy (smAFM to investigate unfolding of these proteins. SMD simulations revealed that talin rod α-helix bundles as well as α-catenin α-helix domains unfold through stable 3-helix intermediates. While the 5-helix bundles were found to be mechanically stable, a second stable conformation corresponding to the 3-helix state was revealed. Mechanically weaker 4-helix bundles easily unfolded into a stable 3-helix conformation. The results of smAFM experiments were in agreement with the findings of the computational simulations. The disulfide clamp mutants, designed to protect the stable state, support the 3-helix intermediate model in both experimental and computational setups. As a result, multiple discrete unfolding intermediate states in the talin and α-catenin unfolding pathway were discovered. Better understanding of the mechanical unfolding mechanism of α-helix proteins is a key step towards comprehensive models describing the mechanoregulation of proteins.

  6. Probing force-induced unfolding intermediates of a single staphylococcal nuclease molecule and the effect of ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Takaaki; Murayama, Yoshihiro; Katano, Atsuto; Maki, Kosuke; Kuwajima, Kunihiro; Sano, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    Single-molecule manipulation techniques have given experimental access to unfolding intermediates of proteins that are inaccessible in conventional experiments. A detailed characterization of the intermediates is a challenging problem that provides new possibilities for directly probing the energy landscape of proteins. We investigated single-molecule mechanical unfolding of a small globular protein, staphylococcal nuclease (SNase), using atomic force microscopy. The unfolding trajectories of the protein displayed sub-molecular and stochastic behavior with typical lengths corresponding to the size of the unfolded substructures. Our results support the view that the single protein unfolds along multiple pathways as suggested in recent theoretical studies. Moreover, we found the drastic change, caused by the ligand and inhibitor bindings, in the mechanical unfolding dynamics

  7. Identification of an Unfolding Intermediate for a DNA Lesion Bypass Polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrer, Shanen M.; Maxwell, Brian A.; Pack, Lindsey R.; Fiala, Kevin A.; Fowler, Jason D.; Zhang, Jun; Suo, Zucai

    2012-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricusDNA Polymerase IV (Dpo4), a prototype Y-family DNA polymerase, has been well characterized biochemically and biophysically at 37 °C or lower temperatures. However, the physiological temperature of the hyperthermophile S. solfataricus is approximately 80 °C. With such a large discrepancy in temperature, the in vivo relevance of these in vitro studies of Dpo4 has been questioned. Here, we employed circular dichroism spectroscopy and fluorescence-based thermal scanning to investigate the secondary structural changes of Dpo4 over a temperature range from 26 to 119 °C. Dpo4 was shown to display a high melting temperature characteristic of hyperthermophiles. Unexpectedly, the Little Finger domain of Dpo4, which is only found in the Y-family DNA polymerases, was shown to be more thermostable than the polymerase core. More interestingly, Dpo4 exhibited a three-state cooperative unfolding profile with an unfolding intermediate. The linker region between the Little Finger and Thumb domains of Dpo4 was found to be a source of structural instability. Through site-directed mutagenesis, the interactions between the residues in the linker region and the Palm domain were identified to play a critical role in the formation of the unfolding intermediate. Notably, the secondary structure of Dpo4 was not altered when the temperature was increased from 26 to 87.5 °C. Thus, in addition to providing structural insights into the thermal stability and an unfolding intermediate of Dpo4, our work also validated the relevance of the in vitro studies of Dpo4 performed at temperatures significantly lower than 80 °C. PMID:22667759

  8. Stable intermediates determine proteins' primary unfolding sites in the presence of surfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steen Vang; Andersen, Kell kleiner; Enghild, Jan J.

    2009-01-01

    Despite detailed knowledge of the overall structural changes and stoichiometries of surfactant binding, little is known about which protein regions constitute the preferred sites of attack for initial unfolding. Here we have exposed three proteins to limited proteolysis at anionic (SDS) and catio......Despite detailed knowledge of the overall structural changes and stoichiometries of surfactant binding, little is known about which protein regions constitute the preferred sites of attack for initial unfolding. Here we have exposed three proteins to limited proteolysis at anionic (SDS......) and cationic (DTAC) surfactant concentrations corresponding to specific conformational transitions, using the surfactant-robust broad-specificity proteases Savinase and Alcalase. Cleavage sites are identified by SDS-PAGE and N-terminal sequencing. We observe well-defined cleavage fragments, which suggest......, cleavage sites can be rationalized from the structure of the protein's folding transition state and the position of loops in the native state. Nevertheless, they are more sensitive to choice of surfactant and protease, probably reflecting a heterogeneous and fluctuating ensemble of partially unfolded...

  9. Cotranslocational processing of the protein substrate calmodulin by an AAA+ unfoldase occurs via unfolding and refolding intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, Rafal; Kay, Lewis E

    2018-05-22

    Protein remodeling by AAA+ enzymes is central for maintaining proteostasis in a living cell. However, a detailed structural description of how this is accomplished at the level of the substrate molecules that are acted upon is lacking. Here, we combine chemical cross-linking and methyl transverse relaxation-optimized NMR spectroscopy to study, at atomic resolution, the stepwise unfolding and subsequent refolding of the two-domain substrate calmodulin by the VAT AAA+ unfoldase from Thermoplasma acidophilum By engineering intermolecular disulphide bridges between the substrate and VAT we trap the substrate at different stages of translocation, allowing structural studies throughout the translocation process. Our results show that VAT initiates substrate translocation by pulling on intrinsically unstructured N or C termini of substrate molecules without showing specificity for a particular amino acid sequence. Although the B1 domain of protein G is shown to unfold cooperatively, translocation of calmodulin leads to the formation of intermediates, and these differ on an individual domain level in a manner that depends on whether pulling is from the N or C terminus. The approach presented generates an atomic resolution picture of substrate unfolding and subsequent refolding by unfoldases that can be quite different from results obtained via in vitro denaturation experiments.

  10. GdnHCl-induced unfolding intermediate in the mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Danish; Prakash, Amresh; Haque, Md Anzarul; Islam, Asimul; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2016-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase VA (CAVA) is a mitochondrial enzyme belonging to the α-family of CAs, which is involved in several physiological processes including ureagenesis, lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis and neuronal transmission. Here, we have tried to understand the folding mechanism of CAVA using guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl)-induced denaturation at pH 8.0 and 25°C. The conformational stability was measured from the GdnHCl-induced denaturation study of CAVA monitored by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence measurements. On increasing the concentration of GdnHCl up to 5.0, a stable intermediate was observed between the concentrations 3.25M to 3.40M of the denaturant. However, CAVA gets completely denatured at 4.0M GdnHCl. The existence of a stable intermediate state was validated by 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS binding) fluorescence and near-UV CD measurements. In silico studies were also performed to analyse the effect of GdnHCl on the structure and stability of CAVA under explicit conditions. Molecular dynamics simulations for 40ns were carried out and a well-defined correlation was established for both in vitro and in silico studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The inverted chevron plot measured by NMR relaxation reveals a native-like unfolding intermediate in acyl-CoA binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Poulsen, F. M.; Akke, M.

    2006-01-01

    those from stopped-flow kinetics and define an "inverted chevron" plot. The combination of NMR relaxation and stopped-flow kinetic measurements allowed determination of k f and k u in the range from 0.48 M GuHCl to 1.28 M GuHCl. Individually, the stopped-flow and NMR data fit two-state models...... for folding. However, although the values of k f determined by the two methods agree, the values of k u do not. As a result, a combined analysis of all data does not comply with a two-state model but indicates that an unfolding intermediate exists on the native side of the dominant energy barrier...

  12. Macromolecular crowding compacts unfolded apoflavodoxin and causes severe aggregation of the off-pathway intermediate during apoflavodoxin folding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, R.; Westphal, A.H.; Huberts, D.; Nabuurs, S.M.; Lindhoud, S.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    To understand how proteins fold in vivo, it is important to investigate the effects of macromolecular crowding on protein folding. Here, the influence of crowding on in vitro apoflavodoxin folding, which involves a relatively stable off-pathway intermediate with molten globule characteristics, is

  13. Unfolding Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna; Halskov, Kim; Eriksson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the Unfolding Participation workshop is to outline an agenda for the next 10 years of participatory design (PD) and participatory human computer interaction (HCI) research. We will do that through a double strategy: 1) by critically interrogating the concept of participation (unfolding...... the concept itself), while at the same time, 2) reflecting on the way that participation unfolds across different participatory configurations. We invite researchers and practitioners from PD and HCI and fields in which information technology mediated participation is embedded (e.g. in political studies......, urban planning, participatory arts, business, science and technology studies) to bring a plurality of perspectives and expertise related to participation....

  14. PATTERNS OF FLOWS IN AN INTERMEDIATE PROMINENCE OBSERVED BY HINODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Kwangsu; Chae, Jongchul; Cao Wenda; Goode, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    The investigation of plasma flows in filaments/prominences gives us clues to understanding their magnetic structures. We studied the patterns of flows in an intermediate prominence observed by Hinode/SOT. By examining a time series of Hα images and Ca II H images, we have found horizontal flows in the spine and vertical flows in the barb. Both of these flows have a characteristic speed of 10-20 km s -1 . The horizontal flows displayed counterstreaming. Our detailed investigation revealed that most of the moving fragments in fact reversed direction at the end point of the spine near a footpoint close to the associated active region. These returning flows may be one possible explanation of the well-known counterstreaming flows in prominences. In contrast, we have found vertical flows-downward and upward-in the barb. Most of the horizontal flows in the spine seem to switch into vertical flows when they approach the barb, and vice versa. We propose that the net force resulting from a small deviation from magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, where magnetic fields are predominantly horizontal, may drive these patterns of flow. In the prominence studied here, the supposed magnetohydrostatic configuration is characterized by magnetic field lines sagging with angles of 13 0 and 39 0 in the spine and the barb, respectively.

  15. Spin observables in proton-neutron scattering at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinka, H.

    1986-05-01

    A summary of np elastic scattering spin measurements at intermediate energy is given. Preliminary results from a LAMPF experiment to measure free neutron-proton elastic scattering spin-spin correlation parameters are presented. A longitudinally polarized proton target was used. These measurements are part of a program to determine the neutron-proton amplitudes in a model independent fashion at 500, 650, and 800 MeV. Some new proton-proton total cross sections in pure helicity states (Δσ/sub L/(pp)) near 3 GeV/c are also given. 37 refs., 2 figs

  16. Unfolding mechanism of thrombin-binding aptamer revealed by molecular dynamics simulation and Markov State Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaojun; Zhang, Liyun; Xiao, Xiuchan; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Guo, Yanzhi; Yu, Xinyan; Pu, Xuemei; Li, Menglong

    2016-04-05

    Thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) with the sequence 5'GGTTGGTGTGGTTGG3' could fold into G-quadruplex, which correlates with functionally important genomic regionsis. However, unfolding mechanism involved in the structural stability of G-quadruplex has not been satisfactorily elucidated on experiments so far. Herein, we studied the unfolding pathway of TBA by a combination of molecular dynamics simulation (MD) and Markov State Model (MSM). Our results revealed that the unfolding of TBA is not a simple two-state process but proceeds along multiple pathways with multistate intermediates. One high flux confirms some observations from NMR experiment. Another high flux exhibits a different and simpler unfolding pathway with less intermediates. Two important intermediate states were identified. One is similar to the G-triplex reported in the folding of G-quadruplex, but lack of H-bonding between guanines in the upper plane. More importantly, another intermediate state acting as a connector to link the folding region and the unfolding one, was the first time identified, which exhibits higher population and stability than the G-triplex-like intermediate. These results will provide valuable information for extending our understanding the folding landscape of G-quadruplex formation.

  17. Many channel spectrum unfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najzer, M.; Glumac, B.; Pauko, M.

    1980-01-01

    The principle of the ITER unfolding code as used for the many channel spectrum unfolding is described. Its unfolding ability is tested on seven typical neutron spectra. The effect of the initial spectrum approximation upon the solution is discussed

  18. Partially folded intermediates during trypsinogen denaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins N.F.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium unfolding of bovine trypsinogen was studied by circular dichroism, differential spectra and size exclusion HPLC. The change in free energy of denaturation was = 6.99 ± 1.40 kcal/mol for guanidine hydrochloride and = 6.37 ± 0.57 kcal/mol for urea. Satisfactory fits of equilibrium unfolding transitions required a three-state model involving an intermediate in addition to the native and unfolded forms. Size exclusion HPLC allowed the detection of an intermediate population of trypsinogen whose Stokes radii varied from 24.1 ± 0.4 Å to 26.0 ± 0.3 Å for 1.5 M and 2.5 M guanidine hydrochloride, respectively. During urea denaturation, the range of Stokes radii varied from 23.9 ± 0.3 Å to 25.7 ± 0.6 Å for 4.0 M and 6.0 M urea, respectively. Maximal intrinsic fluorescence was observed at about 3.8 M urea with 8-aniline-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS binding. These experimental data indicate that the unfolding of bovine trypsinogen is not a simple transition and suggest that the equilibrium intermediate population comprises one intermediate that may be characterized as a molten globule. To obtain further insight by studying intermediates representing different stages of unfolding, we hope to gain a better understanding of the complex interrelations between protein conformation and energetics.

  19. Lack of negative charge in the E46Q mutant of photoactive yellow protein prevents partial unfolding of the blue shifted intermediate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derix, N.M.; Wechselberger, R.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829005; van der Horst, M.A.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; Boelens, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070151407; Kaptein, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074334603; van Nuland, N.A.J.

    2003-01-01

    The long-lived light-induced intermediate (pB) of the E46Q mutant (glutamic acid is replaced by glutamine at position 46) of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) has been investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The ground state of this mutant is very similar to that of wild-type PYP (WT), whereas the pB

  20. Intermediate polars observed from Brazil in the last eight years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablonski, F.

    1988-01-01

    The results of observations done, in the last eight years, of the Intermidiate Polars (IP): EX Hya, V1223 Sgr, FO Agr and Ao Psc, are presented. The IP define a subclass of cataclysmic variable stars that present coherent oscillations in their optical and/or X-ray emission. The observations were done from Laboratorio Nacional de Astrofisica, in Itajuba (Brazil). The stability of oscillations in IP was analysed to study the nature of compact stars. (M.C.K.) [pt

  1. An RXTE observation of the intermediate polar XY Arietis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellier, Coel

    1999-01-01

    RXTE's observation of XY Ari covered more eclipses of this close binary at a higher count rate than ever before. The eclipses located the accretion regions on the white dwarf and showed that they covered < 0.002 of the white dwarf surface. Additionally we recorded the first outburst of XY Ari seen, allowing us to watch as an unstable accretion disk overwhelmed the magnetic field of the white dwarf and pushed inwards, cutting off our line-of-sight to the lower accretion pole. We also find limits on the mass of the white dwarf

  2. Unfolding of cytochrome c immobilized on self-assembled monolayers. An electrochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monari, Stefano; Ranieri, Antonio; Bortolotti, Carlo Augusto; Peressini, Silvia; Tavagnacco, Claudio; Borsari, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Denaturation involves intermediate and partially unfolded forms. → An unfolded species displaying the haem with Fe coordinated by two His is observed. → Under unfolding conditions the nature of the SAM influences conformation of protein. → Concentration of the unfolding agent affects redox properties of immobilized protein. - Abstract: The electron transfer (ET) process of progressively unfolded bovine cytochrome c immobilized on different self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was investigated. Insight is gained on the role of the SAM surface on the functionality of the partially unfolded and non-native forms of the adsorbed protein. Direct electrochemical measurements were performed on cytochrome c adsorbed on mercaptopyridine (MP) and mixed 11-mercapto-1-undecanoic acid/11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MUA/MU) at varying temperature, in the presence of urea as unfolding agent. Under strongly unfolding conditions, a non-native form of cytochrome c, in which the methionine ligand is replaced by a histidine, was observed on both MP and MUA/MU SAMs. The E o ' of the native form, in which the haem is axially coordinated by methionine and histidine, slightly shifts to negative values upon increasing urea concentration. However, the non-native bis-histidinate species shows a much lower E o ' value (by approximately 0.4 V) which is by far enthalpic in origin and largely determined by axial ligand swapping. Analysis of the reduction enthalpies and entropies and of the ET rate constants indicate that the nature of the SAM (hydrophilic or anionic) results in changes in the conformational rearrangement of the cytochrome c under unfolding conditions.

  3. Unfolding of cytochrome c immobilized on self-assembled monolayers. An electrochemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monari, Stefano; Ranieri, Antonio; Bortolotti, Carlo Augusto; Peressini, Silvia [Department of Chemistry, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, via Campi 183, 41125 Modena (Italy); Tavagnacco, Claudio [Department of Chemistry, University of Trieste, via Giorgieri 1, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Borsari, Marco, E-mail: marco.borsari@unimore.it [Department of Chemistry, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, via Campi 183, 41125 Modena (Italy)

    2011-08-01

    Highlights: > Denaturation involves intermediate and partially unfolded forms. > An unfolded species displaying the haem with Fe coordinated by two His is observed. > Under unfolding conditions the nature of the SAM influences conformation of protein. > Concentration of the unfolding agent affects redox properties of immobilized protein. - Abstract: The electron transfer (ET) process of progressively unfolded bovine cytochrome c immobilized on different self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was investigated. Insight is gained on the role of the SAM surface on the functionality of the partially unfolded and non-native forms of the adsorbed protein. Direct electrochemical measurements were performed on cytochrome c adsorbed on mercaptopyridine (MP) and mixed 11-mercapto-1-undecanoic acid/11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MUA/MU) at varying temperature, in the presence of urea as unfolding agent. Under strongly unfolding conditions, a non-native form of cytochrome c, in which the methionine ligand is replaced by a histidine, was observed on both MP and MUA/MU SAMs. The E{sup o}' of the native form, in which the haem is axially coordinated by methionine and histidine, slightly shifts to negative values upon increasing urea concentration. However, the non-native bis-histidinate species shows a much lower E{sup o}' value (by approximately 0.4 V) which is by far enthalpic in origin and largely determined by axial ligand swapping. Analysis of the reduction enthalpies and entropies and of the ET rate constants indicate that the nature of the SAM (hydrophilic or anionic) results in changes in the conformational rearrangement of the cytochrome c under unfolding conditions.

  4. An Observational Study of Intermediate Band Students' Self-Regulated Practice Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksza, Peter; Prichard, Stephanie; Sorbo, Diana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate intermediate musicians' self-regulated practice behaviors. Thirty sixth- through eighth-grade students were observed practicing band repertoire individually for 20 min. Practice sessions were coded according to practice frame frequency and duration, length of musical passage selected, most prominent…

  5. Observation of an intermediate state in psi (3684) radiative cascade decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanenbaum, W.; Whitaker, J.S.; Abrams, G.S.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Bulos, F.; Chinowsky, W.; Feldman, G.J.; Friedberg, C.E.; Fryberger, D.; Goldhaber, G.; Hanson, G.; Hartill, D.L.; Jean-Marie, B.; Kadyk, J.A.; Larsen, R.R.; Litke, A.M.; Luke, D.; Lulu, B.A.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H.L.; Morehouse, C.C.; Paterson, J.M.; Perl, M.L.; Pierre, F.M.; Pun, T.P.; Rapidis, P.; Richter, B.; Sadoulet, B.; Schwitters, R.F.; Trilling, G.H.; Vannucci, F.; Winkelmann, F.C.; Wiss, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    We present evidence for the existence of an intermediate state observed in the decay sequence psi(3684) → psi(3095)γγ. The mass of the state is either 3500+-10 or 3270+-10 MeV. The branching fraction of the sequence is (3.6+-0.7)%

  6. The intermediate layers and associated tidal motions observed by a digisonde in the equatorial anomaly region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Lee

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This investigation presents an initial attempt to analyze a full year of daily ionosonde observations relevant to the determination of plasma densities, tidal structures, and ion transports in the equatorial anomaly region of the lower ionosphere. Particular focus is on the intermediate layers, their seasonal and diurnal variations, and cause-effect relationships. The ionogram database was recorded using a digisonde portable sounder (DPS at National Central University (NCU, 24 °58' N, 121°11' E during 1996. Statistical results indicate that the intermediate layers appear primarily during the daytime of the spring/winter months. The monthly median height characteristics reveal that the layers descend from high to low altitudes and different tidal motions control the layers in different months. Generally, the semi-diurnal and quarter-diurnal tides, which cause ionization convergence, are mainly in the spring/winter and summer/autumn months, respectively. Variations in the electron densities of the layers also indicate that the density increases could result from a great number of molecular and metallic ions. Furthermore, a novel approach to ionogram presentation is introduced to investigate the intermediate layers. This approach allows the DPS to characterize the detailed daily information of the intermediate layers.Key words. Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere; ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; ionospheric irregularities

  7. Osmolyte Effects on the Unfolding Pathway of β-Lactoglobulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Wei; Pan Hai; Qin Meng; Cao Yi; Wang Wei

    2013-01-01

    There are large amounts of osmolytes inside cells, which impact many physiological processes by complicated mechanisms. The osmolyte effects on the stability and folding of proteins have been studied in detail using simple two-state folding proteins. However, many important functional proteins fold in complex pathways involving various intermediates. Little is known about the osmolyte effects on the folding and unfolding of these proteins. It is noted that β-lactoglobulin (BLG) is an example of such proteins, whose unfolding involves an obvious intermediate state. Using equilibrium chemical denaturation and stopped-flow kinetics, we investigate the unfolding of BLG in the presence of different osmolytes, e.g., glycerol, ethylene glycol (EG) and poly(ethylene glycol)400 (PEG400). It is found that all these osmolytes can stabilize the unfolding intermediate by modulating the relative unfolding kinetics of the native and the intermediate states. The stabilization effects are similar for EG and PEG400 but distinct for glycerol. Since the unfolding intermediates of many proteins are directly related to protein misfolding diseases, evaluation of the osmolyte effects for the unfolding of these proteins in vitro should be beneficial for the understanding of the occurrence of the related diseases in vivo

  8. Search for intermediate mass black hole binaries in the first observing run of Advanced LIGO

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barish, B. C.; Berger, B. K.; Billingsley, G.; Blackburn, J. K.; Bork, R.; Brooks, A. F.

    2017-01-01

    During their first observational run, the two Advanced LIGO detectors attained an unprecedented sensitivity, resulting in the first direct detections of gravitational-wave signals produced by stellar-mass binary black hole systems. This paper reports on an all-sky search for gravitational waves (GWs) from merging intermediate mass black hole binaries (IMBHBs). The combined results from two independent search techniques were used in this study: the first employs a matched-filter algorithm that...

  9. Observations of Intermediate-mass Black Holes and Ultra-Luminous X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, E. J. M.

    2003-12-01

    I will review various observations that suggest that intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) with masses ˜102-104 M⊙ exist in our Universe. I will also discuss some of the limitations of these observations. HST Observations of excess dark mass in globular cluster cores suggest IMBHs may be responsible, and some mass estimates from lensing experiments are nearly in the IMBH range. The intriguing Ultra-Luminous X-ray sources (ULXs, or IXOs) are off-nuclear X-ray point sources with X-ray luminosities LX ≳ 1039 erg s-1. ULXs are typically rare (1 in every 5 galaxies), and the nature of their ultra-luminous emission is currently debated. I will discuss the evidence for IMBHs in some ULXs, and briefly outline some phenomenology. Finally, I will discuss future observations that can be made to search for IMBHs.

  10. Intermediate inflation in light of the three-year WMAP observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow, John D.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Pahud, Cedric

    2006-01-01

    The three-year observations from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe have been hailed as giving the first clear indication of a spectral index n s s =1 and allowing the tensor-to-scalar ratio r to be nonzero. The combination n s =1 and r>0 is given (within the slow-roll approximation) by a version of the intermediate inflation model with expansion rate H(t)∝t -1/3 . We assess the status of this model in light of the WMAP3 data

  11. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2005-01-03

    Jan 3, 2005 ... covering all the systems, so far discovered.5,7,8,12. With the increasing ... Structural investigations on proteins by NMR are, currently ... rapid analysis of unfolded proteins. ...... and hence help in design of drugs against them.

  12. Conformational fluctuation dynamics of domain I of human serum albumin in the course of chemically and thermally induced unfolding using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajeev; Sengupta, Bhaswati; Sen, Pratik

    2014-05-22

    The present study elucidates the involvement of conformational fluctuation dynamics during chemically and thermally induced unfolding of human serum albumin (HSA) by fluorescence correlation spectroscopic (FCS) study, time-resolved fluorescence measurements, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic methods. Two fluorescent probes, tetramethylrhodamine-5-maleimide (TMR) and N-(7-dimethylamino-4-methylcoumarin-3-yl) iodoacetamide (DACIA) were used to selectively label the domain I of HSA through the reaction with cys-34 for these studies. The guanidine hydrochloride (GnHCl) induced global structural change of HSA is monitored through its hydrodynamic radius (r(H)) and CD response, which is found to be two step in nature. In FCS experiment, along with the diffusion time component we have observed an exponential relaxation time component (τ(R)) that has been ascribed to the concerted chain dynamics of HSA. Unlike in the global structural change, we found that the τ(R) value changes in a different manner in the course of the unfolding. The dependence of τ(R) on the concentration of GnHCl was best fitted with a four state model, indicating the involvement of two intermediate states during the unfolding process, which were not observed through the CD response and r(H) data. The fluorescence lifetime measurement also supports our observation of intermediate states during the unfolding of HSA. However, no such intermediate states were observed during thermally induced unfolding of HSA.

  13. Spin observables at intermediate energies: a tool in viewing the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClelland, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper attempts to summarize some of the advances made in intermediate nuclear physics through measurements of spin observables, notably in the range of bombarding energies from 100 to 1000 MeV. Relative to measurements of cross section, spin observables offer a highly selective filter in viewing the nucleus. Their general utility is found in their sensitivity to particular nuclear transitions and is further augmented by their simple connections to the NN force. The advantage of higher energies is apparent from the dominance of single-step mechanisms even at large energy losses where general nuclear spin responses may be made. Experimentally, this is an energy range where efficient, high-analyzing-power polarimeters can be coupled with high resolution detection techniques. 29 refs., 5 figs

  14. Multistage unfolding of an SH3 domain: an initial urea-filled dry molten globule precedes a wet molten globule with non-native structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Amrita; Udgaonkar, Jayant B; Das, Payel

    2014-06-19

    The unfolding of the SH3 domain of the PI3 kinase in aqueous urea has been studied using a synergistic experiment-simulation approach. The experimental observation of a transient wet molten globule intermediate, IU, with an unusual non-native burial of the sole Trp residue, W53, provides the benchmark for the unfolding simulations performed (eight in total, each at least 0.5 μs long). The simulations reveal that the partially unfolded IU ensemble is preceded by an early native-like molten globule intermediate ensemble I*. In the very initial stage of unfolding, dry globule conformations with the protein core filled with urea instead of water are transiently observed within the I* ensemble. Water penetration into the urea-filled core of dry globule conformations is frequently accompanied by very transient burial of W53. Later during gradual unfolding, W53 is seen to again become transiently buried in the IU ensemble for a much longer time. In the structurally heterogeneous IU ensemble, conformational flexibility of the C-terminal β-strands enables W53 burial by the formation of non-native, tertiary contacts with hydrophobic residues, which could serve to protect the protein from aggregation during unfolding.

  15. Observation of the muonic decay of the charged intermediate vector boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnison, G.; Astbury, A.; Grayer, G.; Haynes, W.J.; Nandi, A.K.; Roberts, C.; Scott, W.; Shah, T.P.; Bezaguet, A.; Bock, R.K.; Calvetti, M.; Cennini, P.; Cittolin, S.; Dallman, D.; Demoulin, M.; DiBitonto, D.; Ellis, N.; Hoffmann, H.; Jank, W.; Jorat, G.; Leveque, A.; Maurin, G.; Muller, F.; Naumann, L.; Norton, A.; Pauss, F.; Placci, A.; Porte, J.P.; Revol, J.P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rossi, P.; Rubbia, C.; Sadoulet, B.; Schinzel, D.; Sumorok, K.; Timmer, J.; Vuillemin, V.; Xie, Y.G.; Zurfluh, E.; Kryn, D.; Cochet, C.; DeBeer, M.; Denegri, D.; Givernaud, A.; Laugier, J.P.; Locci, E.; Malosse, J.J.; Rich, J.; Sass, J.; Saudraix, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spiro, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Fontaine, G.; Ghesquiere, C.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Mendiburu, J.P.; Orkin-Lecourtois, A.; Sajot, G.; Tao, C.; Vrana, J.; Hertzberger, L.O.; Holthuizen, D.J.; Eijk, B. van; Bacci, C.; Ceradini, F.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Lacava, F.; Moricca, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Piano Mortari, G.; Salvini, G.; Bauer, G.; Cline, D.; Markiewicz, T.; Mohammadi, M.; Centro, S.; Corden, M.; Dowell, J.D.; Garvey, J.; Homer, R.J.; Kenyon, I.; McMahon, T.; Streets, J.; Watkins, P.; Wilson, J.; Eggert, K.; Erhard, P.; Faissner, H.; Giboni, K.L.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hoffmann, D.; Lehmann, H.; Leuchs, R.; Radermacher, E.; Reithler, H.; Tscheslog, E.; Fincke, M.; Muirhead, H.; Frey, R.; Kernan, A.; Kozanecki, W.; Morgan, K.; Ransdell, J.; Smith, D.; Fruehwirth, R.; Dallman, D.; Strauss, J.; Szoncso, F.; Wahl, H.D.; Wulz, C.E.; Geer, S.; Rohlf, J.; Karimaeki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Pietarinen, E.; Pimiae, M.; Tuominiemi, J.

    1984-01-01

    Muons of high transverse momentum psub(T)sup(μ) have been observed in the large drift chambers surrounding the UA1 detector at the CERN 540 GeV panti p collider. For an integrated luminosity of 108 nb -1 , 14 isolated muons have been found with psub(T) > 15 GeV/c. They are correlated with a large imbalance in total transverse energy, and show a kinematic behaviour consistent with the muonic decay of the Intermediate Vector Boson Wsup(+-) of weak interactions. The partial cross section is in agreement with previous measurements for electronic decays and with muon-electron universality. The W mass is determined to be msub(W) = 81sub(-7) +6 GeV/c 2 . (orig.)

  16. Observation of near and intermediate infrared galactic radiation by the rocket K-10-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Satio; Matsumoto, Toshio; Mizuno, Tomohisa; Murakami, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Kunio

    1981-01-01

    The spatial and the energy spectra of near and intermediate infrared radiation were observed by using a detector system loaded on a rocket. The detector system is a He-cooled infrared telescope, and consists of an optical system, a cryostat, an electronic system, and a star sensor. The system was loaded on the rocket K-10-14, and the observation was made for about 400 second on August 27, 1980. For the radiation with wavelength of 2.4 mu m and 4.6 mu m, the intensity of galactic light around 338, 9, 15 and 12 degree of galactic longitude was observed. For the wavelength of 7.6, 10.1 and 14.7 mu m, the data around 340 and 10 degree of galactic longitude were obtained. The latitudinal distribution of radiation of 2.4 and 4.6 mu m was measured. After the correction for interstellar absorption, it can be said that the galactic radiation of wavelength between 2.4 mu m and 7.6 mu m was mainly composed of the radiation from light balls of late type stars. (Kato, T.)

  17. Mechanics of collective unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruel, M.; Allain, J.-M.; Truskinovsky, L.

    2015-03-01

    Mechanically induced unfolding of passive crosslinkers is a fundamental biological phenomenon encountered across the scales from individual macro-molecules to cytoskeletal actin networks. In this paper we study a conceptual model of athermal load-induced unfolding and use a minimalistic setting allowing one to emphasize the role of long-range interactions while maintaining full analytical transparency. Our model can be viewed as a description of a parallel bundle of N bistable units confined between two shared rigid backbones that are loaded through a series spring. We show that the ground states in this model correspond to synchronized, single phase configurations where all individual units are either folded or unfolded. We then study the fine structure of the wiggly energy landscape along the reaction coordinate linking the two coherent states and describing the optimal mechanism of cooperative unfolding. Quite remarkably, our study shows the fundamental difference in the size and the structure of the folding-unfolding energy barriers in the hard (fixed displacements) and soft (fixed forces) loading devices which persists in the continuum limit. We argue that both, the synchronization and the non-equivalence of the mechanical responses in hard and soft devices, have their origin in the dominance of long-range interactions. We then apply our minimal model to skeletal muscles where the power-stroke in acto-myosin crossbridges can be interpreted as passive folding. A quantitative analysis of the muscle model shows that the relative rigidity of myosin backbone provides the long-range interaction mechanism allowing the system to effectively synchronize the power-stroke in individual crossbridges even in the presence of thermal fluctuations. In view of the prototypical nature of the proposed model, our general conclusions pertain to a variety of other biological systems where elastic interactions are mediated by effective backbones.

  18. Intermediate layer observed by the impedance probe on board the S-310-3 sounding rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Y; Obayashi, T [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Space and Aeronautical Science

    1977-08-01

    The intermediate layer (or M layer) was detected at the height of 150-170 km in the nighttime ionospheric electron density profile measured by impedance probe on board the S-310-3 sounding rocket. This M layer was interpreted to be generated by the convergence effect of the ionization due to the west-east component of the solar tidal wind as suggested by K.Fujitaka. The altitude variation of the M layer during the course of a night is studied at three other locations with different latitudes. At Boulder (40/sup 0/N, 105/sup 0/W) and Wallops Island (38/sup 0/N, 75/sup 0/W) which have higher latitude than that of KSC(31/sup 0/N, 131/sup 0/E), the altitude of the observed M layers seems to be determined by the north-south component of the wind above about 150 km, by the west-east component of the wind below about 130 km in agreement with the drift theory. The altitude of the observed M layers at Arecibo (19/sup 0/N, 67/sup 0/W) located at lower latitude than that of KSC also coincides with the theoretical estimate when the direction of the north-south wind is assumed to be opposite to that prevailing in middle latitudes. Thus, M layer observations at these stations are consistent with the view that around the latitude range of KSC the north-south wind reverses direction and the west-east component of the wind has the dominant effect on the formation of the M layer.

  19. Clinical observation of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization combined with sorafenib on intermediate-advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Zhaoguang; Lu Ligong; Shao Peijian; Hu Baoshan; Li Yong; Zhang Lei; He Xu; Yu Xianyi; Luo Xiaoning

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the treatment effect and security of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) combined with sorafenib for intermediate-advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods: From July 2008 to November 2010,the treatment effects of two groups of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma were retrospectively analyzed and compared, including 44 patients treated by sorafenib combined with TACE (test group) and the other 44 patients treated only with TACE (control group). To assess the treatment effect based on mRECIST, the time for patients' tumor progression (TTP), overall survival (OS) time and adverse events were recorded. Survival rate were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier method and Log-rank analysis in SPSS 18.0. Results: Till January 2011, 24 patients (54.5%) survived and 20 patients (include patients lost to visit) died (45.5%) among the test group, 13 patients survived (29.5 %) and 31 patients (include patients lost to visit) died (70.5 %) among the control group. No complete remission condition was observed in all patients. Among the test group, 1 patient got partial remission, 24 ones remain stable and 19 patients got progression. While among the control group, conditions remained stable in 21 patients and progressed in rest 23 ones. The disease control rate (DCR) in the test group and control group were 56.8% (25/44) and 47.7% (21/44) respectively, with no statistical significance (χ 2 =0.729, P=0.393). The median overall survival time (mOS) of test group and control group were 21.0 (95% CI: 14.9-27.1)months and 10.0 (95% CI: 6.4-13.6) months respectively, and the difference reached statistical significance (χ 2 =7.436, P=0.006). The median time to tumor progression (mTTP) of test group and control group was 11.0 (95% CI: 8.7-13.3) and 6.0 (95% CI: 3.9-8.1) months respectively, and the difference had statistical significance (χ 2 =10.437, P=0.001). The adverse events of test group mainly included hand-foot skin reaction, loss of

  20. Regularization and error assignment to unfolded distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Zech, Gunter

    2011-01-01

    The commonly used approach to present unfolded data only in graphical formwith the diagonal error depending on the regularization strength is unsatisfac-tory. It does not permit the adjustment of parameters of theories, the exclusionof theories that are admitted by the observed data and does not allow the com-bination of data from different experiments. We propose fixing the regulariza-tion strength by a p-value criterion, indicating the experimental uncertaintiesindependent of the regularization and publishing the unfolded data in additionwithout regularization. These considerations are illustrated with three differentunfolding and smoothing approaches applied to a toy example.

  1. Review of unfolding methods for neutron flux dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stallmann, F.W.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1975-01-01

    The primary method in reactor dosimetry is the foil activation technique. To translate the activation measurements into neutron fluxes, a special data processing technique called unfolding is needed. Some general observations about the problems and the reliability of this approach to reactor dosimetry are presented. Current unfolding methods are reviewed. 12 references. (auth)

  2. ATCA observations of the MACS-Planck Radio Halo Cluster Project. II. Radio observations of an intermediate redshift cluster sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Aviles, G.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Ferrari, C.; Venturi, T.; Democles, J.; Dallacasa, D.; Cassano, R.; Brunetti, G.; Giacintucci, S.; Pratt, G. W.; Arnaud, M.; Aghanim, N.; Brown, S.; Douspis, M.; Hurier, J.; Intema, H. T.; Langer, M.; Macario, G.; Pointecouteau, E.

    2018-04-01

    Aim. A fraction of galaxy clusters host diffuse radio sources whose origins are investigated through multi-wavelength studies of cluster samples. We investigate the presence of diffuse radio emission in a sample of seven galaxy clusters in the largely unexplored intermediate redshift range (0.3 http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/611/A94

  3. Thermal unfolding of barstar and the properties of interfacial water around the unfolded forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Somedatta; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy, E-mail: sanjoy@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in [Molecular Modeling Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur - 721302 (India)

    2013-12-21

    Identification of the intermediates along the folding-unfolding pathways and probing their interactions with surrounding solvent are two important but relatively unexplored issues in protein folding. In this work, we have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the thermal unfolding of barstar in aqueous solution from its folded native form at two different temperatures (400 K and 450 K). The calculations at 400 K reveal partial unfolding of two α-helices (helix-1 and helix-2) and their interconnecting loop. At 450 K, on the other hand, the entire protein attains an expanded flexible conformation due to disruption of a large fraction of tertiary contacts and breaking of almost all the secondary structures. These two disordered structures obtained at such high temperatures are then studied around room temperature to probe their influence on the properties of surrounding solvent. It is found that though the unfolding of the protein in general leads to increasingly hydrated interface, but new structural motifs with locally dehydrated interface may also form during the structural transition. Additionally, independent of the conformational state of the protein, its influence on surrounding solvent has been found to be restricted to the first hydration layer.

  4. Unfolding Green Defense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian Knus

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many states have developed and implemented green solutions for defense. Building on these initiatives NATO formulated the NATO Green Defence Framework in 2014. The framework provides a broad basis for cooperation within the Alliance on green solutions for defense. This report aims...... to inform and support the further development of green solutions by unfolding how green technologies and green strategies have been developed and used to handle current security challenges. The report, initially, focuses on the security challenges that are being linked to green defense, namely fuel...... consumption in military operations, defense expenditure, energy security, and global climate change. The report then proceeds to introduce the NATO Green Defence Framework before exploring specific current uses of green technologies and green strategies for defense. The report concludes that a number...

  5. Observation of intermediate bands in Eu3+ doped YPO4 host: Li+ ion effect and blue to pink light emitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Kareem Parchur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the tuning of blue to pink colour generation from Li+ ion co-doped YPO4:5Eu nanoparticles prepared by polyol method at ∼100-120 °C with ethylene glycol (EG as a capping agent. Interaction of EG molecules capped on the surface of the nanoparticles and/or created oxygen vacancies induces formation of intermediate/mid gap bands in the host structure, which is supported by UV-Visible absorption data. Strong blue and pink colors can be observed in the cases of as-prepared and 500 °C annealed samples, respectively. Co-doping of Li+ enhances the emission intensities of intermediate band as well as Eu3+. On annealing as-prepared sample to 500 °C, the intermediate band emission intensity decreases, whereas Eu3+ emission intensity increases suggesting increase of extent of energy transfer from the intermediate band to Eu3+ on annealing. Emission intensity ratio of electric to magnetic dipole transitions of Eu3+ can be varied by changing excitation wavelength. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS study of as-prepared samples confirms the presence of oxygen vacancies and Eu3+ but absence of Eu2+. Dispersed particles in ethanol and polymer film show the strong blue color, suggesting that these materials will be useful as probes in life science and also in light emitting device applications.

  6. Kidney transplantation: a systematic review of interventional and observational studies of physical activity on intermediate outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Jamie Hugo; Kirkman, Danielle; Jibani, Mahdi

    2009-11-01

    Kidney transplant patients have decreased quality and longevity of life. Whether exercise can positively affect associated outcomes such as physical functioning, metabolic syndrome, kidney function, and immune function, has only been addressed in relatively small studies. Thus the aim of this systematic review was to determine effects of physical activity level on these intermediate outcomes in kidney transplant patients. We electronically and hand searched to identify 21 studies (6 retrospective assessments of habitual physical activity and 15 intervention studies including 6 controlled trials). After study quality assessment, intermediate outcomes associated with quality and longevity of life were expressed as correlations or percentage changes in addition to effect sizes. Habitual physical activity level was positively associated with quality of life and aerobic fitness and negatively associated with body fat (medium to large effect sizes). Exercise interventions also showed medium to large positive effects on aerobic capacity (10%-114% increase) and muscle strength (10%-22% increase). However, exercise programs had minimal or contradictory effects on metabolic syndrome and immune and kidney function. In kidney transplant patients, physical activity intervention is warranted to enhance physical functioning. Whether exercise impacts on outcomes associated with longevity of life requires further study.

  7. Verification of unfold error estimates in the unfold operator code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehl, D.L.; Biggs, F.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral unfolding is an inverse mathematical operation that attempts to obtain spectral source information from a set of response functions and data measurements. Several unfold algorithms have appeared over the past 30 years; among them is the unfold operator (UFO) code written at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition to an unfolded spectrum, the UFO code also estimates the unfold uncertainty (error) induced by estimated random uncertainties in the data. In UFO the unfold uncertainty is obtained from the error matrix. This built-in estimate has now been compared to error estimates obtained by running the code in a Monte Carlo fashion with prescribed data distributions (Gaussian deviates). In the test problem studied, data were simulated from an arbitrarily chosen blackbody spectrum (10 keV) and a set of overlapping response functions. The data were assumed to have an imprecision of 5% (standard deviation). One hundred random data sets were generated. The built-in estimate of unfold uncertainty agreed with the Monte Carlo estimate to within the statistical resolution of this relatively small sample size (95% confidence level). A possible 10% bias between the two methods was unresolved. The Monte Carlo technique is also useful in underdetermined problems, for which the error matrix method does not apply. UFO has been applied to the diagnosis of low energy x rays emitted by Z-pinch and ion-beam driven hohlraums. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  8. A statistical approach to the estimation of mechanical unfolding parameters from the unfolding patterns of protein heteropolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddard, G S; Brockwell, D J

    2010-01-01

    A statistical calculation is described with which the saw-tooth-like unfolding patterns of concatenated heteropolymeric proteins can be used to estimate the forced unfolding parameters of a previously uncharacterized protein. The chance of observing the various sequences of unfolding events, such as ABAABBB or BBAAABB etc, for two proteins of types A and B is calculated using proteins with various ratios of A and B and at different values of effective unfolding rate constants. If the experimental rate constant for forced unfolding, k 0 , and distance to the transition state x u are known for one protein, then the calculation allows an estimation of values for the other. The predictions are compared with Monte Carlo simulations and experimental data. (communication)

  9. Unfolding study of a trimeric membrane protein AcrB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Cui; Wang, Zhaoshuai; Lu, Wei; Wei, Yinan

    2014-07-01

    The folding of a multi-domain trimeric α-helical membrane protein, Escherichia coli inner membrane protein AcrB, was investigated. AcrB contains both a transmembrane domain and a large periplasmic domain. Protein unfolding in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and urea was monitored using the intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The SDS denaturation curve displayed a sigmoidal profile, which could be fitted with a two-state unfolding model. To investigate the unfolding of separate domains, a triple mutant was created, in which all three Trp residues in the transmembrane domain were replaced with Phe. The SDS unfolding profile of the mutant was comparable to that of the wild type AcrB, suggesting that the observed signal change was largely originated from the unfolding of the soluble domain. Strengthening of trimer association through the introduction of an inter-subunit disulfide bond had little effect on the unfolding profile, suggesting that trimer dissociation was not the rate-limiting step in unfolding monitored by fluorescence emission. Under our experimental condition, AcrB unfolding was not reversible. Furthermore, we experimented with the refolding of a monomeric mutant, AcrBΔloop , from the SDS unfolded state. The CD spectrum of the refolded AcrBΔloop superimposed well onto the spectra of the original folded protein, while the fluorescence spectrum was not fully recovered. In summary, our results suggested that the unfolding of the trimeric AcrB started with a local structural rearrangement. While the refolding of secondary structure in individual monomers could be achieved, the re-association of the trimer might be the limiting factor to obtain folded wild-type AcrB. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  10. Evidence for a Shared Mechanism in the Formation of Urea-Induced Kinetic and Equilibrium Intermediates of Horse Apomyoglobin from Ultrarapid Mixing Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Takuya; Abe, Yukiko; Maki, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the equivalence of the kinetic mechanisms of the formation of urea-induced kinetic folding intermediates and non-native equilibrium states was investigated in apomyoglobin. Despite having similar structural properties, equilibrium and kinetic intermediates accumulate under different conditions and via different mechanisms, and it remains unknown whether their formation involves shared or distinct kinetic mechanisms. To investigate the potential mechanisms of formation, the refolding and unfolding kinetics of horse apomyoglobin were measured by continuous- and stopped-flow fluorescence over a time range from approximately 100 μs to 10 s, along with equilibrium unfolding transitions, as a function of urea concentration at pH 6.0 and 8°C. The formation of a kinetic intermediate was observed over a wider range of urea concentrations (0–2.2 M) than the formation of the native state (0–1.6 M). Additionally, the kinetic intermediate remained populated as the predominant equilibrium state under conditions where the native and unfolded states were unstable (at ~0.7–2 M urea). A continuous shift from the kinetic to the equilibrium intermediate was observed as urea concentrations increased from 0 M to ~2 M, which indicates that these states share a common kinetic folding mechanism. This finding supports the conclusion that these intermediates are equivalent. Our results in turn suggest that the regions of the protein that resist denaturant perturbations form during the earlier stages of folding, which further supports the structural equivalence of transient and equilibrium intermediates. An additional folding intermediate accumulated within ~140 μs of refolding and an unfolding intermediate accumulated in <1 ms of unfolding. Finally, by using quantitative modeling, we showed that a five-state sequential scheme appropriately describes the folding mechanism of horse apomyoglobin. PMID:26244984

  11. A new perspective on origin of the East Sea Intermediate Water: Observations of Argo floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, JongJin; Lim, Byunghwan

    2018-01-01

    The East Sea Intermediate Water (ESIW), defined as the salinity minimum in the East Sea (hereafter ES) (Sea of Japan), is examined with respect to its overall characteristics and its low salinity origin using historical Argo float data from 1999 to 2015. Our findings suggest that the ESIW is formed in the western Japan Basin (40-42°N, 130-133°E), especially west of the North Korean front in North Korean waters, where strong negative surface wind stress curl resides in wintertime. The core ESIW near the formation site has temperatures of 3-4 °C and less than 33.98 psu salinity, warmer and fresher than that in the southern part of the ES. In order to trace the origin of the warmer and fresher water at the sea surface in winter, we analyzed the data in three different ways: (1) spatial distribution of surface water properties using monthly climatology from the Argo float data, (2) seasonal variation of heat and salt contents at the formation site, and (3) backtracking of surface drifter trajectories. Based on these analyses, it is likely that the warmer and fresher surface water properties found in the ESIW formation site are attributed to the low-salinity surface water advected from the southern part of the ES in autumn.

  12. Search for intermediate mass black hole binaries in the first observing run of Advanced LIGO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Allen, B.; Allen, G; Allocca, A.; Almoubayyed, H.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bawaj, M.; Bazzan, M.; Becsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, D J; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, H. -P.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Corley, K. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, Laura; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Deelman, E; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devenson, J.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M. Di; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Alvarez, M. Dovale; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Duncan, J.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fong, H.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gabel, M.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.J.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, A.S.P.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.E.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, W.; Kim, S.W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kraemer, H.C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang-Cheol, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, W. H.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lueck, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Hernandez, I. Magana; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mayani, R.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P.G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Castro-Perez, J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Rynge, M.; Sachdev, Perminder S; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shao, L.P.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahi, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y. -F.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, G.W.K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y. -H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2017-01-01

    During their first observational run, the two Advanced LIGO detectors attained an unprecedented sensitivity, resulting in the first direct detections of gravitational-wave signals produced by stellar-mass binary black hole systems. This paper reports on an all-sky search for gravitational waves

  13. Spin observables in inelastic proton-nucleus scattering at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    This dissertation is a study of spin observables in inelastic proton-nucleus reactions for incident proton energies near 1 GeV. At this energy, the dominant reaction mechanisms are (1) quasi-free knockout of one or more nucleons, and (2) pion production through the Δ resonance. The cross section due to quasi-free knockout can be reasonably well understood theoretically in a multiple scattering picture, which uses measured NN amplitudes as input. Calculations of this sort were carried out in reference [10] using scalar NN amplitudes parameterized as Gaussians. The author has extended this picture to include spin dependent NN amplitudes. This allows calculation of all the spin observables, Ay, DLL, DSS, DNN, DLS, and DSL, as well as the cross section dsigma/dOmegadp due to quasi-free knockout of one or more particles. The cross section and polarization Ay have been measured at the LAMPF High Resolution Spectrometer at T/sub L/ = 800 MeV on 12 C. The theoretical results agree well with the data in the quasi-free region. The results for the remaining spin observables provide predictions for experiments which can be performed at LAMPF. By comparing the calculations with the data, it may be possible to separate the contribution due to a quasi-free knockout, and see a signature of quasi-free Δ production in the spin observables

  14. Planck intermediate results XXIX. All-sky dust modelling with Planck, IRAS, and WISE observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.

    2016-01-01

    We present all-sky modelling of the high resolution Planck, IRAS, andWISE infrared (IR) observations using the physical dust model presented by Draine & Li in 2007 (DL, ApJ, 657, 810). We study the performance and results of this model, and discuss implications for future dust modelling....... The present work extends the DL dust modelling carried out on nearby galaxies using Herschel and Spitzer data to Galactic dust emission. We employ the DL dust model to generate maps of the dust mass surface density Sigma(Md), the dust optical extinction A(V), and the starlight intensity heating the bulk...... of the dust, parametrized by U-min. The DL model reproduces the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) satisfactorily over most of the sky, with small deviations in the inner Galactic disk and in low ecliptic latitude areas, presumably due to zodiacal light contamination. In the Andromeda galaxy (M31...

  15. New Observations of the Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water Intrusion into the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, A.; Abualnaja, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The three-layer exchange flow between the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean during summer is characterized by a thick, northward intrusion of relatively cold, low-salinity and low in dissolved oxygen (Water (GAIW), sandwiched between two thin layers of outflow water. The flux of GAIW into the Red Sea is important in the heat, freshwater and nutrient budgets of the Red Sea, but the structure and pathways of the intrusion are not well-known due to a paucity of hydrographic and direct velocity observations. A research cruise was executed at the eastern side of the Red Sea during September-October 2011 to conduct the first large-scale survey of the intrusion. This mission is part of a series of expeditions in the Red Sea designed to investigate the seasonal Red Sea circulation. Surprisingly, the GAIW intrusion was observed to stretch nearly the entire length of the Red Sea (~1500 km) as a narrow eastern boundary current with subsurface velocity maximum of 0.1-0.3 m/s in the depth range 50-100 m. The intruding layer is weakly stratified compared to the background, possibly an indication of strong vertical mixing as it flows through the strait. Some GAIW was observed to enter deep channels in a coral reef bank (Farasan Banks) located in the southeastern Red Sea, and to enter the Red Sea interior, the latter possibly due to interactions between the boundary current and mesoscale eddies. The pathways and erosion of the GAIW intrusion will likely have major implications for the spatial distribution of biological productivity.

  16. Unfolding of hemoglobin variants--insights from urea gradient gel electrophoresis photon correlation spectroscopy and zeta potential measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Jaydeep; GhoshMoulick, Ranjita; Choudhuri, Utpal; Chakrabarty, Prantar; Bhattacharya, Pranab K.; Lahiri, Prabir; Chakraborti, Bikas; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr.

    2004-01-01

    The unfolding pattern of crystal human hemoglobin and variants of hemoglobin obtained from hemolysate were studied using transverse urea gradient gel electrophoresis (TUGGE). A smooth sigmoid like increase of electrophoretic mobility was observed with increasing urea concentrations. A decrease in electrophoretic mobility resulted, if the protein was unfolded with guanidium hydrochloride (GdnHCl). The anomaly was resolved after the Stoke's radii (obtained using the photon correlation spectroscopy) and zeta potential (measured using laser Doppler velocimetry) measurements were made at different denaturant concentrations. Addition of denaturant led to formation of extended structure, irrespective of the nature of the denaturant, as indicated by increase in Stoke's radii in both cases (urea and GdnHCl). The unexpected increase in electrophoretic mobility in case of urea could be explained in terms of a critical redistribution of negative charge at intermediate stages of the unfolding process. In case of GdnHCl, the higher ionic strength masked the charge effect. The mobility, being solely dependent on size, decreased at higher denaturant concentration. Incidentally, folding loci of other hemoglobin variants (e.g. HbE) or that of post-translationally modified hemoglobin (e.g. HbA1c) could be determined by studying the charge distribution and hydrodynamic radius at varying denaturing stress and in each case the gel migration profile could be approximately scaled by the ratio of charge and hydrodynamic diameter of the protein. While unfolding induced charge effect was most pronounced in HbA0 (and crystal ferrous hemoglobin), the unfolding induced aggregation (manifested by the increase in Stoke's radii) was predominantly observed in the variant forms HbE and HbA1c. Representing the proteins by a plot, in which charge and hydrodynamic diameter are on independent axes, may be a useful way of characterizing protein variants having similar migration profiles on native gels

  17. Unfolding of hemoglobin variants--insights from urea gradient gel electrophoresis photon correlation spectroscopy and zeta potential measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Jaydeep; GhoshMoulick, Ranjita; Choudhuri, Utpal; Chakrabarty, Prantar; Bhattacharya, Pranab K.; Lahiri, Prabir; Chakraborti, Bikas; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr

    2004-09-27

    The unfolding pattern of crystal human hemoglobin and variants of hemoglobin obtained from hemolysate were studied using transverse urea gradient gel electrophoresis (TUGGE). A smooth sigmoid like increase of electrophoretic mobility was observed with increasing urea concentrations. A decrease in electrophoretic mobility resulted, if the protein was unfolded with guanidium hydrochloride (GdnHCl). The anomaly was resolved after the Stoke's radii (obtained using the photon correlation spectroscopy) and zeta potential (measured using laser Doppler velocimetry) measurements were made at different denaturant concentrations. Addition of denaturant led to formation of extended structure, irrespective of the nature of the denaturant, as indicated by increase in Stoke's radii in both cases (urea and GdnHCl). The unexpected increase in electrophoretic mobility in case of urea could be explained in terms of a critical redistribution of negative charge at intermediate stages of the unfolding process. In case of GdnHCl, the higher ionic strength masked the charge effect. The mobility, being solely dependent on size, decreased at higher denaturant concentration. Incidentally, folding loci of other hemoglobin variants (e.g. HbE) or that of post-translationally modified hemoglobin (e.g. HbA1c) could be determined by studying the charge distribution and hydrodynamic radius at varying denaturing stress and in each case the gel migration profile could be approximately scaled by the ratio of charge and hydrodynamic diameter of the protein. While unfolding induced charge effect was most pronounced in HbA0 (and crystal ferrous hemoglobin), the unfolding induced aggregation (manifested by the increase in Stoke's radii) was predominantly observed in the variant forms HbE and HbA1c. Representing the proteins by a plot, in which charge and hydrodynamic diameter are on independent axes, may be a useful way of characterizing protein variants having similar migration profiles on

  18. Early Events, Kinetic Intermediates and the Mechanism of Protein Folding in Cytochrome c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Kliger

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic studies of the early events in cytochrome c folding are reviewed with a focus on the evidence for folding intermediates on the submillisecond timescale. Evidence from time-resolved absorption, circular dichroism, magnetic circular dichroism, fluorescence energy and electron transfer, small-angle X-ray scattering and amide hydrogen exchange studies on the t £ 1 ms timescale reveals a picture of cytochrome c folding that starts with the ~ 1-ms conformational diffusion dynamics of the unfolded chains. A fractional population of the unfolded chains collapses on the 1 – 100 ms timescale to a compact intermediate IC containing some native-like secondary structure. Although the existence and nature of IC as a discrete folding intermediate remains controversial, there is extensive high time-resolution kinetic evidence for the rapid formation of IC as a true intermediate, i.e., a metastable state separated from the unfolded state by a discrete free energy barrier. Final folding to the native state takes place on millisecond and longer timescales, depending on the presence of kinetic traps such as heme misligation and proline mis-isomerization. The high folding rates observed in equilibrium molten globule models suggest that IC may be a productive folding intermediate. Whether it is an obligatory step on the pathway to the high free energy barrier associated with millisecond timescale folding to the native state, however, remains to be determined.

  19. Observational tests of convective core overshooting in stars of intermediate to high mass in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1991-01-01

    This study presents the results of 14 tests for the presence of convective overshooting in large convecting stellar cores for stars with masses of 4-17 solar masses which are members of detached close binary systems and of open clusters in the Galaxy. A large body of theoretical and observational data is scrutinized and subjected to averaging in order to minimize accidental and systematic errors. A conservative upper limit of d/HP less than 0.4 is found from at least four tests, as well as a tighter upper limit of d/HP less than 0.2 from one good test that is subject to only mild restrictions and is based on the maximum observed effective temperature of evolved blue supergiants. It is concluded that any current uncertainty about the distance scale for these stars is unimportant in conducting the present tests for convective core overshooting. The correct effective temperature scale for the B0.5-B2 stars is almost certainly close to one of the proposed hot scales.

  20. Observations of resonance-like structures for positron-atom scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, L.

    1993-01-01

    Absolute values of elastic differential cross sections (DCS's) are measured for position (e + ) scattering by argon (8.7-300 eV) krypton (6.7-400 eV) and also neon (13.6-400 eV) using a crossed-beam experimental setup. When the DCS's are plotted at fixed scattering angles of 30 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees and 120 degrees versus energy it has been found that well-defined resonance-like structures are found at an energy of 55-60 eV for argon and at 25 and 200 eV for krypton, with a broader structure found between 100-200 eV for neon. These observed resonance-like structures are unusual because they occur at energies well above the known inelastic thresholds for these atoms. They may represent examples of open-quotes coupled channel shape resonancesclose quotes, first predicted by Higgins and Burke [1] for e + -H scattering in the vicinity of 36 eV (width ∼ 4 eV), which occurs only when both the elastic and positronium formation scattering channels are considered together. A more recent e + -H calculation by Hewitt et al. [2] supports the Higgins and Burke prediction. These predictions and the present observations suggest the existence of a new type of atomic scattering resonance

  1. Observations of resonance-like structures for positron-atom elastic scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, L.; Kauppila, W.E.; Kwan, C.K.; Stein, T.S.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured absolute values of elastic differential cross sections (DCS's) for positron (e + ) scattering by argon (8.7-300 eV), krypton (6.7-400 eV), and also neon (13.6-400 eV) using a crossed-beam experimental setup. When the DCS's are plotted at fixed scattering angles of 30 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees, and 120 degrees versus energy it has been found that well-defined resonance-like structures were found at an energy of 55-60 eV for argon and at 25 and 200 eV for krypton, with a broader structure found between 100-200 eV for neon. These observed resonance-like structures are unusual because they occur at energies well above the known inelastic thresholds for these atoms. They may represent examples of open-quotes coupled channel shape resonancesclose quotes, first predicted by Higgins and Burke for e + -H scattering in the vicinity of 36 eV (width ∼ 4 eV), which occurs only when both the elastic and positronium formation scattering channels are considered together. A more recent e + -H calculation by Hewitt et al. supports the Higgins and Burke prediction. These predictions and the present observations suggest the existence of a new type of atomic scattering resonance

  2. Radio Observations of Ultra-Luminous X-Ray Sources ---Microblazars or Intermediate-Mass Black Holes?---

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körding, E.; Colbert, E.; Falcke, H.

    In recent years Ultra-Luminous X-Ray sources (ULXs) received wide attention, however, their true nature is not yet understood. Many explanations have been suggested, including intermediate-mass black holes, super-Eddington accretion flows, anisotropic emission, and relativistic beaming of microquasars. We model the logN-logS distribution of ULXs assuming that each neutron star or black hole XRB can be described by an accretion disk plus jet model, where the jet is relativistically beamed. The distribution can be either fit by intermediate-mass black holes or by stellar mass black holes with mildly relativistic jets. Even though the jet is intrinsically weaker than the accretion disk, relativistic beaming can in the latter approach lead to the high fluxes observed. To further explore the possibility of microblazars contributing to the ULX phenomenon, we have embarked on a radio-monitoring study of ULXs in nearby galaxies with the VLA. However, up to now no radio flare has been detected. Using the radio/X-ray correlation the upper limits on the radio flux can be converted into upper limits for the black hole masses of MBH ≲ 10^3 M⊙.

  3. Systematic study of intermediate-scale structures of equatorial plasma irregularities in the ionosphere based on CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann eLühr

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Equatorial spread-F ionospheric plasma irregularities on the night-side, commonly called equatorial plasma bubbles (EPB, include electron density variations over a wide range of spatial scales. Here we focus on intermediate-scale structures ranging from 100 m to 10 km, which play an important role in the evolution of EPBs. High-resolution CHAMP magnetic field measurements sampled along north-south track at 50 Hz are interpreted in terms of diamagnetic effect for illustrating the details of electron density variations. We provide the first comprehensive study on intermediate-scale density structures associated with EPBs, covering a whole solar cycle from 2000 to 2010. The large number of detected events, almost 9000, allows us to draw a detailed picture of the plasma fine structure. The occurrence of intermediate-scale events is strongly favoured by high solar flux. During times of F10.7 < 100 sfu practically no events were observed. The longitudinal distribution of our events with respect to season or local time agrees well with that of the EPBs, qualifying the fine structure as a common feature, but the occurrence rates are smaller by a factor of 4 during the period 2000-2005. Largest amplitude electron density variations appear at the poleward boundaries of plasma bubbles. Above the dip-equator recorded amplitudes are small and fall commonly below our resolution. Events can generally be found at local times between 19 and 24 LT, with a peak lasting from 20 to 22 LT. The signal spectrum can be approximated by a power law. Over the frequency range 1 – 25 Hz we observe spectral indices between -1.4 and -2.6 with peak occurrence rates around -1.9. There is a weak dependence observed of the spectral index on local time. Towards later hours the spectrum becomes shallower. Similarly for the latitude dependence, there is a preference of shallower spectra for latitudes poleward of the ionisation anomaly crest. Our data suggest that the generation of

  4. Applied multidimensional scaling and unfolding

    CERN Document Server

    Borg, Ingwer; Mair, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    This book introduces multidimensional scaling (MDS) and unfolding as data analysis techniques for applied researchers. MDS is used for the analysis of proximity data on a set of objects, representing the data as distances between points in a geometric space (usually of two dimensions). Unfolding is a related method that maps preference data (typically evaluative ratings of different persons on a set of objects) as distances between two sets of points (representing the persons and the objects, resp.). This second edition has been completely revised to reflect new developments and the coverage of unfolding has also been substantially expanded. Intended for applied researchers whose main interests are in using these methods as tools for building substantive theories, it discusses numerous applications (classical and recent), highlights practical issues (such as evaluating model fit), presents ways to enforce theoretical expectations for the scaling solutions, and addresses the typical mistakes that MDS/unfoldin...

  5. Iterative nonlinear unfolding code: TWOGO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajnal, F.

    1981-03-01

    a new iterative unfolding code, TWOGO, was developed to analyze Bonner sphere neutron measurements. The code includes two different unfolding schemes which alternate on successive iterations. The iterative process can be terminated either when the ratio of the coefficient of variations in terms of the measured and calculated responses is unity, or when the percentage difference between the measured and evaluated sphere responses is less than the average measurement error. The code was extensively tested with various known spectra and real multisphere neutron measurements which were performed inside the containments of pressurized water reactors

  6. Neutron spectrum unfolding: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matiullah; Wiyaja, D.S.; Berzonis, M.A.; Bondars, H.; Lapenas, A.A.; Kudo, K.; Majeed, A.; Durrani, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described the use of the computer code SAIPS in neutron spectrum unfolding. Here in Part II, we present our experimental work carried out to study the shape of the neutron spectrum in different experimental channels of a 5 MW light-water cooled and moderated research reactor. The spectral neutron flux was determined using various fission foils (placed in close contact with mica track detectors) and activation detectors. From the measured activities, the neutron spectrum was unfolded by SAIPS. (author)

  7. Daytime descending intermediate layers observed over a sub-tropical Indian station Waltair during low-solar activity period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Niranjan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Study on daytime descending intermediate layer over subtropical Indian station Waltair (17.7° N, 83.3° E geographic, 6.4° N, 10° E geomagnetic, 20° N dip located in the equatorial anomaly transition region, using an IPS 42 Digital Ionosonde during the low solar activity year 2004 showed that the layers occur in the altitude range of 140–160 km with maximum occurrence during winter solstice. The layers observed during daytime occur with a double peak variation throughout the year with less occurrence probability and shorter duration presence during forenoon hours. The morning layer descent was associated with a density increase where as during afternoon hours a decrease in density was observed. The downward drift velocity was about 8 km/h during morning hours and between 7–11 km/h during afternoon hours, with a low descent rate of around 4.5 km/h during summer morning hours. The results indicate the presence of a 6 h tide at this location as observed from the characteristics of the descending layers, unlike at majority of locations where a significant semi diurnal trend is observed. The study brings out the complex nature of the tidal interaction at different locations.

  8. History, rare, and multiple events of mechanical unfolding of repeat proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbul, Fidan; Marchesi, Arin; Rico, Felix

    2018-03-01

    Mechanical unfolding of proteins consisting of repeat domains is an excellent tool to obtain large statistics. Force spectroscopy experiments using atomic force microscopy on proteins presenting multiple domains have revealed that unfolding forces depend on the number of folded domains (history) and have reported intermediate states and rare events. However, the common use of unspecific attachment approaches to pull the protein of interest holds important limitations to study unfolding history and may lead to discarding rare and multiple probing events due to the presence of unspecific adhesion and uncertainty on the pulling site. Site-specific methods that have recently emerged minimize this uncertainty and would be excellent tools to probe unfolding history and rare events. However, detailed characterization of these approaches is required to identify their advantages and limitations. Here, we characterize a site-specific binding approach based on the ultrastable complex dockerin/cohesin III revealing its advantages and limitations to assess the unfolding history and to investigate rare and multiple events during the unfolding of repeated domains. We show that this approach is more robust, reproducible, and provides larger statistics than conventional unspecific methods. We show that the method is optimal to reveal the history of unfolding from the very first domain and to detect rare events, while being more limited to assess intermediate states. Finally, we quantify the forces required to unfold two molecules pulled in parallel, difficult when using unspecific approaches. The proposed method represents a step forward toward more reproducible measurements to probe protein unfolding history and opens the door to systematic probing of rare and multiple molecule unfolding mechanisms.

  9. Salt bridge as a gatekeeper against partial unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzman, Mark W; Essex, Morgan E; Park, Chiwook

    2016-05-01

    Salt bridges are frequently observed in protein structures. Because the energetic contribution of salt bridges is strongly dependent on the environmental context, salt bridges are believed to contribute to the structural specificity rather than the stability. To test the role of salt bridges in enhancing structural specificity, we investigated the contribution of a salt bridge to the energetics of native-state partial unfolding in a cysteine-free version of Escherichia coli ribonuclease H (RNase H*). Thermolysin cleaves a protruding loop of RNase H(*) through transient partial unfolding under native conditions. Lys86 and Asp108 in RNase H(*) form a partially buried salt bridge that tethers the protruding loop. Investigation of the global stability of K86Q/D108N RNase H(*) showed that the salt bridge does not significantly contribute to the global stability. However, K86Q/D108N RNase H(*) is greatly more susceptible to proteolysis by thermolysin than wild-type RNase H(*) is. The free energy for partial unfolding determined by native-state proteolysis indicates that the salt bridge significantly increases the energy for partial unfolding by destabilizing the partially unfolded form. Double mutant cycles with single and double mutations of the salt bridge suggest that the partially unfolded form is destabilized due to a significant decrease in the interaction energy between Lys86 and Asp108 upon partial unfolding. This study demonstrates that, even in the case that a salt bridge does not contribute to the global stability, the salt bridge may function as a gatekeeper against partial unfolding that disturbs the optimal geometry of the salt bridge. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  10. Cometary ion dynamics observed in the close vicinity of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the intermediate activity period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berčič, L.; Behar, E.; Nilsson, H.; Nicolaou, G.; Wieser, G. Stenberg; Wieser, M.; Goetz, C.

    2018-06-01

    Aims: Cometary ions are constantly produced in the coma, and once produced they are accelerated and eventually escape the coma. We describe and interpret the dynamics of the cometary ion flow, of an intermediate active comet, very close to the nucleus and in the terminator plane. Methods: We analysed in situ ion and magnetic field measurements, and characterise the velocity distribution functions (mostly using plasma moments). We propose a statistical approach over a period of one month. Results: On average, two populations were observed, separated in phase space. The motion of the first is governed by its interaction with the solar wind farther upstream, while the second one is accelerated in the inner coma and displays characteristics compatible with an ambipolar electric field. Both populations display a consistent anti-sunward velocity component. Conclusions: Cometary ions born in different regions of the coma are seen close to the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with distinct motions governed in one case by the solar wind electric field and in the other case by the position relative to the nucleus. A consistent anti-sunward component is observed for all cometary ions. An asymmetry is found in the average cometary ion density in a solar wind electric field reference frame, with higher density in the negative (south) electric field hemisphere. There is no corresponding signature in the average magnetic field strength.

  11. Enthalpy-entropy compensation in protein unfolding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Enthalpy-entropy compensation was found to be a universal law in protein unfolding based on over 3 000 experimental data. Water molecular reorganization accompanying the protein unfolding was suggested as the origin of the enthalpy-entropy compensation in protein unfolding. It is indicated that the enthalpy-entropy compensation constitutes the physical foundation that satisfies the biological need of the small free energy changes in protein unfolding, without the sacrifice of the bio-diversity of proteins. The enthalpy-entropy compensation theory proposed herein also provides valuable insights into the Privalov's puzzle of enthalpy and entropy convergence in protein unfolding.

  12. Observations of low and intermediate-frequency-peaked BL Lacs above 100 GeV with VERITAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Errando M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of the ~ 50 blazars detected to date at TeV energies (E > 0.1 TeV are high-frequency-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs. Only a handful episodic detections of low- and intermediate-frequency-peaked BL Lacs (LBL/IBLs, with synchrotron peak frequencies in the infrared and optical regime have been reported by ground-based gamma-ray telescopes, typically during high-flux states. The VERITAS array located in southern Arizona has observed five known TeV LBL/IBLs since 2009: 3C 66A, WComae, PKS 1424+240, S5 0716+714 and BL Lacertae, with exposures of 5-10 hours/year, which so far resulted in the detection of a bright, sub-hour timescale gamma-ray flare of BL Lacertae in June 2011. We also report the detection and characterization of two new IBLs: VER J0521+211 and B2 1215+30.

  13. Solving inverse problems with the unfolding program TRUEE: Examples in astroparticle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milke, N.; Doert, M.; Klepser, S.; Mazin, D.; Blobel, V.; Rhode, W.

    2013-01-01

    The unfolding program TRUEE is a software package for the numerical solution of inverse problems. The algorithm was first applied in the FORTRAN 77 program RUN. RUN is an event-based unfolding algorithm which makes use of the Tikhonov regularization. It has been tested and compared to different unfolding applications and stood out with notably stable results and reliable error estimation. TRUEE is a conversion of RUN to C++, which works within the powerful ROOT framework. The program has been extended for more user-friendliness and delivers unfolding results which are identical to RUN. Beside the simplicity of the installation of the software and the generation of graphics, there are new functions, which facilitate the choice of unfolding parameters and observables for the user. In this paper, we introduce the new unfolding program and present its performance by applying it to two exemplary data sets from astroparticle physics, taken with the MAGIC telescopes and the IceCube neutrino detector, respectively.

  14. Unfolding four-helix bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.; Kozak, John J.

    2011-03-01

    A geometrical model has been developed to describe the early stages of unfolding of cytochromes c‧ and c-b562 . Calculations are based on a step-wise extension of the polypeptide chain subject to the constraint that the spatial relationship among the residues of each triplet is fixed by the native-state crystallographic data. The response of each protein to these structural perturbations allows the evolution of each of the four helices in these two proteins to be differentiated. It is found that the two external helices in c‧ unfold before its two internal helices, whereas exactly the opposite behaviour is demonstrated by c-b562 . Each of these cytochromes has an extended, internal, non-helical ('turning') region that initially lags behind the most labile helix but then, at a certain stage (identified for each cytochrome), unravels before any of the four helices present in the native structure. It is believed that these predictions will be useful in guiding future experimental studies on the unfolding of these two cytochromes.

  15. Deep Unfolding for Topic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Jen-Tzung; Lee, Chao-Hsi

    2018-02-01

    Deep unfolding provides an approach to integrate the probabilistic generative models and the deterministic neural networks. Such an approach is benefited by deep representation, easy interpretation, flexible learning and stochastic modeling. This study develops the unsupervised and supervised learning of deep unfolded topic models for document representation and classification. Conventionally, the unsupervised and supervised topic models are inferred via the variational inference algorithm where the model parameters are estimated by maximizing the lower bound of logarithm of marginal likelihood using input documents without and with class labels, respectively. The representation capability or classification accuracy is constrained by the variational lower bound and the tied model parameters across inference procedure. This paper aims to relax these constraints by directly maximizing the end performance criterion and continuously untying the parameters in learning process via deep unfolding inference (DUI). The inference procedure is treated as the layer-wise learning in a deep neural network. The end performance is iteratively improved by using the estimated topic parameters according to the exponentiated updates. Deep learning of topic models is therefore implemented through a back-propagation procedure. Experimental results show the merits of DUI with increasing number of layers compared with variational inference in unsupervised as well as supervised topic models.

  16. Influence of cross-section structure on unfolded neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertek, C.; Vlasov, M.F.; Cross, B.; Smith, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of cross-section structure on neutron spectra unfolded by multiple foil activation technique, SAND-II case, has been studied. For three reactions with evident structure in neutron cross-section above threshold: 27Al(n,α)24Na, 31P(n,p)31Si and 32S(n,p)32P, two remarkably different sets of evaluated data were selected from the available evaluations; one set of data was ''smooth'', the structure having been averaged over by a smooth curve; the other set was ''sharp'' with structure given in detail. These data were used in unfolding procedure together with other reactions, the same in both cases (as well as input spectra and measured reaction rates). It was found that during unfolding calculations less iteration steps were needed to unfold the neutron flux spectrum with the set of ''sharp'' data. In case of ''smooth'' data it was difficult to obtain an agreement between measured and calculated activity values even by increasing the number of iteration steps. Contrary to expectations, considerable deformation of unfolded neutron flux spectrum has been observed in the case of the ''smooth'' data set. (author)

  17. BUMS--Bonner sphere Unfolding Made Simple an HTML based multisphere neutron spectrometer unfolding package

    CERN Document Server

    Sweezy, J; Veinot, K

    2002-01-01

    A new multisphere neutron spectrometer unfolding package, Bonner sphere Unfolding Made Simple (BUMS) has been developed that uses an HTML interface to simplify data input and code execution for the novice and the advanced user. This new unfolding package combines the unfolding algorithms contained in other popular unfolding codes under one easy to use interface. The interface makes use of web browsing software to provide a graphical user interface to the unfolding algorithms. BUMS integrates the SPUNIT, BON, MAXIET, and SAND-II unfolding algorithms into a single package. This package also includes a library of 14 response matrices, 58 starting spectra, and 24 dose and detector responses. BUMS has several improvements beyond the addition of unfolding algorithms. It has the ability to search for the most appropriate starting spectra. Also, plots of the unfolded neutron spectra are automatically generated. The BUMS package runs via a web server and may be accessed by any computer with access to the Internet at h...

  18. Early-type galaxies at intermediate redshift observed with Hubble space telescope WFC3: perspectives on recent star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, Michael J. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Jeong, Hyunjin; Yi, Sukyoung K. [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University 134, Shinchon-dong, Sudaemun-gu, Seoul 120-179 (Korea, Republic of); Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Kaviraj, Sugata [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Ryan, Russell E. Jr.; Koekemoer, Anton [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hathi, Nimish P. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM, UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Dopita, Michael A. [Research School of Physics and Astronomy, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2014-12-01

    We present an analysis of the stellar populations of 102 visually selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) with spectroscopic redshifts (0.35 ≲ z ≲ 1.5) from observations in the Early Release Science program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We fit one- and two-component synthetic stellar models to the ETGs UV-optical-near-IR spectral energy distributions and find that a large fraction (∼40%) are likely to have experienced a minor (f{sub YC} ≲ 10% of stellar mass) burst of recent (t{sub YC} ≲ 1 Gyr) star formation. The measured age and mass fraction of the young stellar populations do not strongly trend with measurements of galaxy morphology. We note that massive (M > 10{sup 10.5} M {sub ☉}) recent star-forming ETGs appear to have larger sizes. Furthermore, high-mass, quiescent ETGs identified with likely companions populate a distinct region in the size-mass parameter space, in comparison with the distribution of massive ETGs with evidence of recent star formation (RSF). We conclude that both mechanisms of quenching star formation in disk-like ETGs and (gas-rich, minor) merger activity contribute to the formation of young stars and the size-mass evolution of intermediate redshift ETGs. The number of ETGs for which we have both HST WFC3 panchromatic (especially UV) imaging and spectroscopically confirmed redshifts is relatively small, therefore, a conclusion about the relative roles of both of these mechanisms remains an open question.

  19. Origin and pathways of Winter Intermediate Water in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea using observations and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juza, Mélanie; Renault, Lionel; Ruiz, Simon; Tintoré, Joaquin

    2013-12-01

    The study of water masses worldwide (their formation, spreading, mixing, and impact on general circulation) is essential for a better understanding of the ocean circulation and variability. In this paper, the formation and main pathways of Winter Intermediate Water (WIW) in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea (NWMED) are investigated during the winter-spring 2011 using observations and numerical simulation. The main results show that the WIW, formed along the continental shelves of the Gulf of Lion and Balearic Sea, circulates southward following five preferential pathways depending on the WIW formation site location and the oceanic conditions. WIW joins the northeastern part of the Balearic Sea, or flows along the continental shelves until joining the Balearic Current (maximum of 0.33 Sv in early-April) or further south until the Ibiza Channel entrance. Two additional trajectories, contributing to water mass exchanges with the southern part of the Western Mediterranean Sea, bring the WIW through the Ibiza and Mallorca Channels (maxima of 0.26 Sv in late-March and 0.1 Sv in early-April, respectively). The circulation of WIW over the NWMED at 50-200 m depth, its mixing and spreading over the Western Mediterranean Sea (reaching the south of the Balearic Islands, the Algero-Provencal basin, the Ligurian and the Alboran Seas) suggest that the WIW may have an impact on the ocean circulation by eddy blocking effect, exchange of water masses between north and south subbasins of Western Mediterranean Sea through the Ibiza Channel or modification of the ocean stratification.

  20. Detection and characterization of partially unfolded oligomers of the SH3 domain of α-Spectrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casares, S.; Sadqi, M.; López-Mayorga, O.; Conejero-Lara, F.; van Nuland, N.A.J.

    2004-01-01

    For the purpose of equilibrium and kinetic folding-unfolding studies, the SH3 domain of α-spectrin (spc-SH3) has long been considered a classic two-state folding protein. In this work we have indeed observed that the thermal unfolding curves of spc-SH3 measured at pH 3.0 by differential scanning

  1. Directly observing catalytic intermediates of methane dry reforming (MDR) on model Ni(111) catalyst via in operando surface techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kaidi

    In this work, near ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to trace the in operando catalytic intermediates of methane dry reforming on model Ni(111) catalyst. The following reactive carbon intermediates have been characterized from dissociation of CH4: *CH, *C1 (Ni3C), *Cn (n≥2) and clock-reconstructed Ni2C. They can develop into inert graphene, and the conditions for this transition have been explored. One the other hand, the oxygen intermediates from CO2 dissociation were also studied, which play an important role on restraining graphene growth. Their dynamic coverage decreases with increasing temperature, which is suggested the fundamental mechanism of regional carbon overspill and causes irreversible graphene formation. Therefore, solutions based on Ni-O stabilization were proposed in developing coking resisting catalysts.

  2. Redox Thermodynamics of Cytochromes c Subjected to Urea Induced Unfolding

    OpenAIRE

    Monari, S.; Ranieri, A.; Di Rocco, G.; van der Zwan, G.; Peressini, S.; Tavagnacco, C.; Millo, D.; Borsari, M.

    2009-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the electron transfer (ET) process for beef heart and yeast cytochromes c and the Lys72Ala/Lys73Ala/Lys79Ala mutant of the latter species subjected to progressive urea-induced unfolding was determined electrochemically. The results indicate the presence of at least three protein forms which were assigned to a low-temperature and a high-temperature His-Met intermediate species and a bis-histidinate form (although the presence of a His-Lys form cannot be excluded). The muc...

  3. Neutron spectrum unfolding using computer code SAIPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, S.

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this project was to study the neutron energy spectrum at rabbit station-1 in Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-I). To do so, multiple foils activation method was used to get the saturated activities. The computer code SAIPS was used to unfold the neutron spectra from the measured reaction rates. Of the three built in codes in SAIPS, only SANDI and WINDOWS were used. Contribution of thermal part of the spectra was observed to be higher than the fast one. It was found that the WINDOWS gave smooth spectra while SANDII spectra have violet oscillations in the resonance region. The uncertainties in the WINDOWS results are higher than those of SANDII. The results show reasonable agreement with the published results. (author)

  4. Kinetics of protein unfolding at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Yohko F

    2012-01-01

    The conformation of protein molecules is determined by a balance of various forces, including van der Waals attraction, electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding, and conformational entropy. When protein molecules encounter an interface, they are often adsorbed on the interface. The conformation of an adsorbed protein molecule strongly depends on the interaction between the protein and the interface. Recent time-resolved investigations have revealed that protein conformation changes during the adsorption process due to the protein-protein interaction increasing with increasing interface coverage. External conditions also affect the protein conformation. This review considers recent dynamic observations of protein adsorption at various interfaces and their implications for the kinetics of protein unfolding at interfaces. (topical review)

  5. Evolution and thermodynamics of the slow unfolding of hyperstable monomeric proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koga Yuichi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unfolding speed of some hyperthermophilic proteins is dramatically lower than that of their mesostable homologs. Ribonuclease HII from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis (Tk-RNase HII is stabilized by its remarkably slow unfolding rate, whereas RNase HI from the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus (Tt-RNase HI unfolds rapidly, comparable with to that of RNase HI from Escherichia coli (Ec-RNase HI. Results To clarify whether the difference in the unfolding rate is due to differences in the types of RNase H or differences in proteins from archaea and bacteria, we examined the equilibrium stability and unfolding reaction of RNases HII from the hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima (Tm-RNase HII and Aquifex aeolicus (Aa-RNase HII and RNase HI from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii (Sto-RNase HI. These proteins from hyperthermophiles are more stable than Ec-RNase HI over all the temperature ranges examined. The observed unfolding speeds of all hyperstable proteins at the different denaturant concentrations studied are much lower than those of Ec-RNase HI, which is in accordance with the familiar slow unfolding of hyperstable proteins. However, the unfolding rate constants of these RNases H in water are dispersed, and the unfolding rate constant of thermophilic archaeal proteins is lower than that of thermophilic bacterial proteins. Conclusions These results suggest that the nature of slow unfolding of thermophilic proteins is determined by the evolutionary history of the organisms involved. The unfolding rate constants in water are related to the amount of buried hydrophobic residues in the tertiary structure.

  6. A linear iterative unfolding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    László, András

    2012-01-01

    A frequently faced task in experimental physics is to measure the probability distribution of some quantity. Often this quantity to be measured is smeared by a non-ideal detector response or by some physical process. The procedure of removing this smearing effect from the measured distribution is called unfolding, and is a delicate problem in signal processing, due to the well-known numerical ill behavior of this task. Various methods were invented which, given some assumptions on the initial probability distribution, try to regularize the unfolding problem. Most of these methods definitely introduce bias into the estimate of the initial probability distribution. We propose a linear iterative method (motivated by the Neumann series / Landweber iteration known in functional analysis), which has the advantage that no assumptions on the initial probability distribution is needed, and the only regularization parameter is the stopping order of the iteration, which can be used to choose the best compromise between the introduced bias and the propagated statistical and systematic errors. The method is consistent: 'binwise' convergence to the initial probability distribution is proved in absence of measurement errors under a quite general condition on the response function. This condition holds for practical applications such as convolutions, calorimeter response functions, momentum reconstruction response functions based on tracking in magnetic field etc. In presence of measurement errors, explicit formulae for the propagation of the three important error terms is provided: bias error (distance from the unknown to-be-reconstructed initial distribution at a finite iteration order), statistical error, and systematic error. A trade-off between these three error terms can be used to define an optimal iteration stopping criterion, and the errors can be estimated there. We provide a numerical C library for the implementation of the method, which incorporates automatic

  7. Uncertainty analysis of dosimetry spectrum unfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perey, F.G.

    1977-01-01

    The propagation of uncertainties in the input data is analyzed for the usual dosimetry unfolding solution. A new formulation of the dosimetry unfolding problem is proposed in which the most likely value of the spectrum is obtained. The relationship of this solution to the usual one is discussed

  8. Intermediate treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Jones; Wayne D. Shepperd

    1985-01-01

    Intermediate treatments are those applied after a new stand is successfully established and before the final harvest. These include not only intermediate cuttings - primarily thinning - but also fertilization, irrigation, and protection of the stand from damaging agents.

  9. Protein unfolding with a steric trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Tracy M; Hong, Heedeok; Kim, Tae H; Bowie, James U

    2009-10-07

    The study of protein folding requires a method to drive unfolding, which is typically accomplished by altering solution conditions to favor the denatured state. This has the undesirable consequence that the molecular forces responsible for configuring the polypeptide chain are also changed. It would therefore be useful to develop methods that can drive unfolding without the need for destabilizing solvent conditions. Here we introduce a new method to accomplish this goal, which we call steric trapping. In the steric trap method, the target protein is labeled with two biotin tags placed close in space so that both biotin tags can only be bound by streptavidin when the protein unfolds. Thus, binding of the second streptavidin is energetically coupled to unfolding of the target protein. Testing the method on a model protein, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), we find that streptavidin binding can drive unfolding and that the apparent binding affinity reports on changes in DHFR stability. Finally, by employing the slow off-rate of wild-type streptavidin, we find that DHFR can be locked in the unfolded state. The steric trap method provides a simple method for studying aspects of protein folding and stability in native solvent conditions, could be used to specifically unfold selected domains, and could be applicable to membrane proteins.

  10. Experience with using unfolding procedures in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Biondi, Silvia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In ATLAS, several unfolding methods are used to correct experimental measurements for detector effects, like acceptance and resolution. These methods use as input the raw experimental distributions, as well as Monte Carlo simulation for the description of the detector effects. The systematic uncertainties associated to the various unfolding methods are evaluated. The statistical and systematic uncertainties affecting the raw measurements and/or the simulation are propagated through the unfolding procedure. The resulting corrected measurements with their uncertainties can be directly compared with the corresponding theoretical predictions.

  11. Experience with using unfolding procedures in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00407321; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In the ATLAS experiment, several unfolding methods are used to correct experimental measurements for detector effects, like acceptance and resolution. These methods use as input the raw experimental distributions, as well as Monte Carlo simulation for the description of the detector effects. The systematic uncertainties associated to the various unfolding methods are evaluated. The statistical and systematic uncertainties affecting the raw measurements and/or the simulation are propagated through the unfolding procedure. The resulting corrected measurements with their uncertainties can be directly compared with the corresponding theoretical predictions.

  12. UNFOLDED REGULAR AND SEMI-REGULAR POLYHEDRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IONIŢĂ Elena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a presentation unfolding regular and semi-regular polyhedra. Regular polyhedra are convex polyhedra whose faces are regular and equal polygons, with the same number of sides, and whose polyhedral angles are also regular and equal. Semi-regular polyhedra are convex polyhedra with regular polygon faces, several types and equal solid angles of the same type. A net of a polyhedron is a collection of edges in the plane which are the unfolded edges of the solid. Modeling and unfolding Platonic and Arhimediene polyhedra will be using 3dsMAX program. This paper is intended as an example of descriptive geometry applications.

  13. Thermal dissociation and unfolding of insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huus, Kasper; Havelund, Svend; Olsen, Helle B

    2005-01-01

    The thermal stability of human insulin was studied by differential scanning microcalorimetry and near-UV circular dichroism as a function of zinc/protein ratio, to elucidate the dissociation and unfolding processes of insulin in different association states. Zinc-free insulin, which is primarily...... dimeric at room temperature, unfolded at approximately 70 degrees C. The two monomeric insulin mutants Asp(B28) and Asp(B9),Glu(B27) unfolded at higher temperatures, but with enthalpies of unfolding that were approximately 30% smaller. Small amounts of zinc caused a biphasic thermal denaturation pattern...... of insulin. The biphasic denaturation is caused by a redistribution of zinc ions during the heating process and results in two distinct transitions with T(m)'s of approximately 70 and approximately 87 degrees C corresponding to monomer/dimer and hexamer, respectively. At high zinc concentrations (>or=5 Zn(2...

  14. A highly compliant protein native state with a spontaneous-like mechanical unfolding pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri; Valpapuram, Immanuel; Camilloni, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical properties of proteins and their force-induced structural changes play key roles in many biological processes. Previous studies have shown that natively folded proteins are brittle under tension, unfolding after small mechanical deformations, while partially folded intermediate...... states, such as molten globules, are compliant and can deform elastically a great amount before crossing the transition state barrier. Moreover, under tension proteins appear to unfold through a different sequence of events than during spontaneous unfolding. Here, we describe the response to force...... of the four-α-helix acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) in the low-force regime using optical tweezers and ratcheted molecular dynamics simulations. The results of our studies reveal an unprecedented mechanical behavior of a natively folded protein. ACBP displays an atypical compliance along two nearly orthogonal...

  15. BUMS--Bonner sphere Unfolding Made Simple: an HTML based multisphere neutron spectrometer unfolding package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweezy, Jeremy; Hertel, Nolan; Veinot, Ken

    2002-01-01

    A new multisphere neutron spectrometer unfolding package, Bonner sphere Unfolding Made Simple (BUMS) has been developed that uses an HTML interface to simplify data input and code execution for the novice and the advanced user. This new unfolding package combines the unfolding algorithms contained in other popular unfolding codes under one easy to use interface. The interface makes use of web browsing software to provide a graphical user interface to the unfolding algorithms. BUMS integrates the SPUNIT, BON, MAXIET, and SAND-II unfolding algorithms into a single package. This package also includes a library of 14 response matrices, 58 starting spectra, and 24 dose and detector responses. BUMS has several improvements beyond the addition of unfolding algorithms. It has the ability to search for the most appropriate starting spectra. Also, plots of the unfolded neutron spectra are automatically generated. The BUMS package runs via a web server and may be accessed by any computer with access to the Internet at http://nukeisit.gatech.edu/bums

  16. Multistate observations of the Galactic black hole XTE J1752-223: evidence for an intermediate black hole spin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reis, R.C.; Miller, J.M.; Fabian, A.C.; Cackett, E.M.; Maitra, D.; Reynolds, C.S.; Rupen, M.; Steeghs, D.T.H.; Wijnands, R.

    2011-01-01

    The Galactic black hole candidate XTE J1752−223 was observed during the decay of its 2009 outburst with the Suzaku and XMM-Newton observatories. The observed spectra are consistent with the source being in the ‘intermediate’ and ‘low-hard’ states, respectively. The presence of a strong, relativistic

  17. TFE-induced local unfolding and fibrillation of SOD1: bridging the experiment and simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijay; Prakash, Amresh; Pandey, Preeti; Lynn, Andrew M; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2018-05-18

    Misfolding and aggregation of Cu, Zn Superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is involved in the neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Many studies have shown that metal-depleted, monomeric form of SOD1 displays substantial local unfolding dynamics and is the precursor for aggregation. Here, we have studied the structure and dynamics of different apo monomeric SOD1 variants associated with unfolding and aggregation in aqueous trifluoroethanol (TFE) through experiments and simulation. TFE induces partially unfolded β-sheet-rich extended conformations in these SOD1 variants, which subsequently develops aggregates with fibril-like characteristics. Fibrillation was achieved more easily in disulfide-reduced monomeric SOD1 when compared with wild-type and mutant monomeric SOD1. At higher concentrations of TFE, a native-like structure with the increase in α-helical content was observed. The molecular dynamics simulation results illustrate distinct structural dynamics for different regions of SOD1 variants and show uniform local unfolding of β-strands. The strands protected by the zinc-binding and electrostatic loops were found to unfold first in 20% (v/v) TFE, leading to a partial unfolding of β-strands 4, 5, and 6 which are prone to aggregation. Our results thus shed light on the role of local unfolding and conformational dynamics in SOD1 misfolding and aggregation. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  18. Individual globular domains and domain unfolding visualized in overstretched titin molecules with atomic force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Mártonfalvi

    Full Text Available Titin is a giant elastomeric protein responsible for the generation of passive muscle force. Mechanical force unfolds titin's globular domains, but the exact structure of the overstretched titin molecule is not known. Here we analyzed, by using high-resolution atomic force microscopy, the structure of titin molecules overstretched with receding meniscus. The axial contour of the molecules was interrupted by topographical gaps with a mean width of 27.7 nm that corresponds well to the length of an unfolded globular (immunoglobulin and fibronectin domain. The wide gap-width distribution suggests, however, that additional mechanisms such as partial domain unfolding and the unfolding of neighboring domain multimers may also be present. In the folded regions we resolved globules with an average spacing of 5.9 nm, which is consistent with a titin chain composed globular domains with extended interdomain linker regions. Topographical analysis allowed us to allocate the most distal unfolded titin region to the kinase domain, suggesting that this domain systematically unfolds when the molecule is exposed to overstretching forces. The observations support the prediction that upon the action of stretching forces the N-terminal ß-sheet of the titin kinase unfolds, thus exposing the enzyme's ATP-binding site and hence contributing to the molecule's mechanosensory function.

  19. Equilibrium unfolding of A. niger RNase: pH dependence of chemical and thermal denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gundampati Ravi; Sharma, Anurag; Kumari, Moni; Jagannadham, Medicherla V; Debnath, Mira

    2011-08-01

    Equilibrium unfolding of A. niger RNase with chemical denaturants, for example GuHCl and urea, and thermal unfolding have been studied as a function of pH using fluorescence, far-UV, near-UV, and absorbance spectroscopy. Because of their ability to affect electrostatic interactions, pH and chemical denaturants have a marked effect on the stability, structure, and function of many globular proteins. ANS binding studies have been conducted to enable understanding of the folding mechanism of the protein in the presence of the denaturants. Spectroscopic studies by absorbance, fluorescence, and circular dichroism and use of K2D software revealed that the enzyme has α + β type secondary structure with approximately 29% α-helix, 24% β-sheet, and 47% random coil. Under neutral conditions the enzyme is stable in urea whereas GuHCl-induced equilibrium unfolding was cooperative. A. niger RNase has little ANS binding even under neutral conditions. Multiple intermediates were populated during the pH-induced unfolding of A. niger RNase. Urea and temperature-induced unfolding of A. niger RNase into the molten globule-like state is non-cooperative, in contrast to the cooperativity seen with the native protein, suggesting the presence of two parts/domains, in the molecular structure of A. niger RNase, with different stability that unfolds in steps. Interestingly, the GuHCl-induced unfolding of the A state (molten globule state) of A. niger RNase is unique, because a low concentration of denaturant not only induces structural change but also facilitates transition from one molten globule like state (A(MG1)) into another (I(MG2)).

  20. FERDO/FERD, Unfolding of Pulse-Height Spectrometer Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, B.W.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Burrus, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: FERDO and FERD are unfolding codes which can be used to correct observed pulse-height distributions for the non-ideal response of a pulse-height spectrometer or to solve poorly conditioned linear equations. 2 - Method of solution: It is assumed that the response of the spectrometer is given by Ax = b, where A is the spectrometer response function matrix, x is the unknown spectrum, and b is the pulse-height distribution. FERDO does not resolve directly for x but instead solves for p = Wx, where W is a 'window function matrix'. Typically, W is the resolution function of an ideal spectrometer which has a single Gaussian response. The effective resolution of the unfolding solution may be varied by the choice of W. Confidence intervals are found for each element of the solution p

  1. The identification of unfolding facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentini, Chiara; Schmidt, Susanna; Viviani, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We asked whether the identification of emotional facial expressions (FEs) involves the simultaneous perception of the facial configuration or the detection of emotion-specific diagnostic cues. We recorded at high speed (500 frames s-1) the unfolding of the FE in five actors, each expressing six emotions (anger, surprise, happiness, disgust, fear, sadness). Recordings were coded every 10 frames (20 ms of real time) with the Facial Action Coding System (FACS, Ekman et al 2002, Salt Lake City, UT: Research Nexus eBook) to identify the facial actions contributing to each expression, and their intensity changes over time. Recordings were shown in slow motion (1/20 of recording speed) to one hundred observers in a forced-choice identification task. Participants were asked to identify the emotion during the presentation as soon as they felt confident to do so. Responses were recorded along with the associated response times (RTs). The RT probability density functions for both correct and incorrect responses were correlated with the facial activity during the presentation. There were systematic correlations between facial activities, response probabilities, and RT peaks, and significant differences in RT distributions for correct and incorrect answers. The results show that a reliable response is possible long before the full FE configuration is reached. This suggests that identification is reached by integrating in time individual diagnostic facial actions, and does not require perceiving the full apex configuration.

  2. FAINT RADIO-SOURCES WITH PEAKED SPECTRA .1. VLA OBSERVATIONS OF A NEW SAMPLE WITH INTERMEDIATE FLUX-DENSITIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SNELLEN, IAG; ZHANG, M; SCHILIZZI, RT; ROTTGERING, HJA; DEBRUYN, AG; MILEY, GK

    We present 2 and 20 cm observations with the VLA of 25 candidate peaked spectrum radio sources. These data combined with those from earlier surveys have allowed us to construct radio spectra spanning a range of frequency from 0.3 to 15 GHz. Ten of the 25 sources are found to be variable with no

  3. The fluorescence intensities ratio is not a reliable parameter for evaluation of protein unfolding transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žoldák, Gabriel; Jancura, Daniel; Sedlák, Erik

    2017-06-01

    Monitoring the fluorescence of proteins, particularly the fluorescence of intrinsic tryptophan residues, is a popular method often used in the analysis of unfolding transitions (induced by temperature, chemical denaturant, and pH) in proteins. The tryptophan fluorescence provides several suitable parameters, such as steady-state fluorescence intensity, apparent quantum yield, mean fluorescence lifetime, position of emission maximum that are often utilized for the observation of the conformational/unfolding transitions of proteins. In addition, the fluorescence intensities ratio at different wavelengths (usually at 330 nm and 350 nm) is becoming an increasingly popular parameter for the evaluation of thermal transitions. We show that, under certain conditions, the use of this parameter for the analysis of unfolding transitions leads to the incorrect determination of thermodynamic parameters characterizing unfolding transitions in proteins (e.g., melting temperature) and, hence, can compromise the hit identification during high-throughput drug screening campaigns. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  4. Detailed EXOSAT and optical observations of the intermediate polar 3A0729+103: discovery of two medium energy X-ray emission regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHardy, I.M.; Pye, J.P.; Fairall, A.P.; Menzies, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    EXOSAT observations of the intermediate polar cataclysmic variable 3A0729+103 reveal a strong orbital modulation, with the 2-4KeV X-rays being significantly more modulated than the 4-6keV X-rays, indicative of photoelectric absorption. The 913 second modulation which is very prominent in the optical light curve, is weakly detected in the medium-energy X-ray light curve, confirming that it represents the white dwarf spin period. These observations are well explained by a combination of two sources of medium-energy X-ray emission. The presence of two emission regions is also clearly seen in the optical spectroscopy, particularly in the intensity of the He II4686 line which has two peaks during the orbit. The authors identify the two optical emission regions with the two X-ray emission regions. (author)

  5. FIRST OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURE OF ROTATIONAL DECELERATION IN A MASSIVE, INTERMEDIATE-AGE STAR CLUSTER IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaohan [School of Physics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Chengyuan; De Grijs, Richard [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics and Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Deng, Licai, E-mail: grijs@pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2016-07-20

    While the extended main-sequence turnoffs (eMSTOs) found in almost all 1–2 Gyr old star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds are often explained by postulating extended star formation histories (SFHs), the tight subgiant branches (SGBs) seen in some clusters challenge this popular scenario. Puzzlingly, the SGB of the eMSTO cluster NGC 419 is significantly broader at bluer than at redder colors. We carefully assess and confirm the reality of this observational trend. If we would assume that the widths of the features in color–magnitude space were entirely owing to a range in stellar ages, the SFHs of the eMSTO stars and the blue SGB region would be significantly more prolonged than that of the red part of the SGB. This cannot be explained by assuming an internal age spread. We show that rotational deceleration of a population of rapidly rotating stars, a currently hotly debated alternative scenario, naturally explains the observed trend along the SGB. Our analysis shows that a “converging” SGB could be produced if the cluster is mostly composed of rapidly rotating stars that slow down over time owing to the conservation of angular momentum during their evolutionary expansion from main-sequence turnoff stars to red giants.

  6. Direct observation of unimolecular decay of CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CHOO Criegee intermediates to OH radical products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yi; Liu, Fang; Lester, Marsha I., E-mail: milester@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6323 (United States); Klippenstein, Stephen J. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    The unimolecular decay of carbonyl oxide intermediates, known as Criegee intermediates, produced in alkene ozonolysis is a significant source of OH radicals in the troposphere. Here, the rate of appearance of OH radical products is examined directly in the time-domain for a prototypical alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediate, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CHOO, following vibrational activation under collision-free conditions. Complementary statistical Rice–Ramsperger–Kassel–Marcus calculations of the microcanonical unimolecular decay rate for CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CHOO are also carried out at energies in the vicinity of the barrier for 1,4 hydrogen atom transfer that leads to OH products. Tunneling through the barrier, derived from high level electronic structure calculations, contributes significantly to the decay rate. Infrared transitions of CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CHOO are identified in the CH stretch overtone region, which are detected by ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence of the resultant OH products. The features observed are attributed to CH vibrational excitations and conformational forms utilizing insights from theory. Both experiment and theory yield unimolecular decay rates for CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CHOO of ca. 10{sup 7} s{sup −1}, which are slower than those obtained for syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO or (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}COO reported previously [Fang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 061102 (2016)] at similar energies. Master equation modeling is also utilized to predict the thermal decay rate of CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CHOO under atmospheric conditions, giving a rate of 279 s{sup −1} at 298 K.

  7. NEUPAC, Experimental Neutron Spectra Unfolding with Sensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Makoto; Nakazawa, Masaharu

    1986-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The code is able to determine the integral quantities and their sensitivities, together with an estimate of the unfolded spectrum and integral quantities. The code also performs a chi-square test of the input/output data, and contains many options for the calculational routines. 2 - Method of solution: The code is based on the J1-type unfolding method, and the estimated neutron flux spectrum is obtained as its solution. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The maximum number of energy groups used for unfolding is 620. The maximum number of reaction rates and the window functions given as input is 20. The total storage requirement depends on the amount of input data

  8. Unfolding energetics and stability of banana lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Garima; Sinha, Sharmistha; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2008-08-01

    The unfolding pathway of banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca was determined by isothermal denaturation induced by the chaotrope GdnCl. The unfolding was found to be a reversible process. The data obtained by isothermal denaturation provided information on conformational stability of banana lectin. The high values of DeltaG of unfolding at various temperatures indicated the strength of intersubunit interactions. It was found that banana lectin is a very stable and denatures at high chaotrope concentrations only. The basis of the stability may be attributed to strong hydrogen bonds of the order 2.5-3.1 A at the dimeric interface along with the presence of water bridges. This is perhaps very unique example in proteins where subunit association is not a consequence of the predominance of hydrophobic interactions. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. SEM observation of grain boundary structures in quartz-iron oxide rocks deformed at intermediate metamorphic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Lagoeiro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated the effect of a second phase on the distribution of fluid phase and dissolution of quartz grains. However, as most observations came from aggregates deformed under hydrostatic stress conditions and mica-bearing quartz rocks, 3-D distribution of pores on quartz-quartz (QQB and quartz-hematite boundaries (QHB has been studied. Several fracture surfaces oriented according to finite strain ellipsoid were analyzed. The pore distribution characterizes the porosity and grain shape as highly anisotropic, which results from the nature and orientation of boundaries. QHB have physical/chemical properties very different from QQB, once the hematite plates have strong effect on wetting behavior of fluid, likewise micas in quartzites. They are pore-free flat surfaces, normal to compression direction, suggesting that they were once wetted with a continuous fluid film acting as faster diffusion pathway. At QQB, the pores are faceted, isolated, close to its edges reflecting the crystallographic control and an interconnected network of fluid along grain junctions. The QQB facing the extension direction are sites of fluid concentration. As consequence, the anisotropic dissolution and grain growth were responsible for the formation of hematite plates and tabular quartz grains significantly contributing for the generation of the foliation observed in the studied rocks.Muitos estudos têm demonstrado o efeito de uma segunda fase sobre a distribuição de fase fluida e dissolução de grãos de quartzo. Entretanto, como a maioria das observações vêm de agregados deformados sob condições de tensão hidrostática e em rochas quartzosas ricas em mica, a distribuição 3D de poros e bordas quartzo-quartzo (BQQ e quartzo-hematita (BQH tem sido estudada. Várias superfícies de fraturas orientadas segundo o elipsóide de deformação finita foram analisadas. A distribuição dos poros caracteriza a porosidade e a forma dos grãos como

  10. Intermediate Fragment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This text and its connected exhibition are aiming to reflect both on the thoughts, the processes and the outcome of the design and production of the artefact ‘Intermediate Fragment’ and making as a contemporary architectural tool in general. Intermediate Fragment was made for the exhibition ‘Enga...... of realising an exhibition object was conceived, but expanded, refined and concretised through this process. The context of the work shown here is an interest in a tighter, deeper connection between experimentally obtained material knowledge and architectural design....

  11. Guanidine hydrochloride denaturation of human serum albumin originates by local unfolding of some stable loops in domain III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Basir; Ahmed, Md Zulfazal; Haq, Soghra Khatun; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2005-06-15

    The effect of guanidine hydrochloride (GnHCl) on the global stability of human serum albumin (HSA) has been studied by fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic measurements. The differential stability of native conformation of three HSA domains were explored by using domain-specific ligands, hemin (domain I), chloroform (domain II), bilirubin (at domain I/domain II interface) and diazepam (domain III). GnHCl induced unfolding transition curves as monitored by probes for secondary and tertiary structures were cooperative but noncoincidental. A strong ANS binding to the protein was observed around 1.8 M GnHCl, suggesting existence of intermediate states in the unfolding pathway of HSA. A gradual decrease (in the GnHCl concentration range 0.0-1.8 M) in the binding of diazepam indicates that domain III is the most labile to GnHCl denaturation. A significant increase in the binding of bilirubin up to 1.4 M GnHCl and decrease thereafter leading to complete abolishment of bilirubin binding at around 2.0 M GnHCl suggest favorable rearrangement and separation of domains I and II at 1.4 and 2.0 M GnHCl concentration, respectively. Above 1.6 M GnHCl, decrease of the binding of hemin, a ligand for domain I, chloroform, which binds in domain II and lone tryptophanyl fluorescence (Trp-214 located in domain II) indicate that at higher concentration of GnHCl domains I and II start unfolding simultaneously but the stability of domain I (7.4 Kcal/mol) is much more than domain II (4.3 Kcal/mol). A pictorial model for the unfolding of HSA domains, consistent with all these results, has been formulated, suggesting that domain III is the most labile followed by domain II while domain I is the most stable. A molten globule like state of domain III around 1.8 M GnHCl has also been identified and characterized.

  12. Cooperative unfolding of apolipoprotein A-1 induced by chemical denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, D; Li-Blatter, X; Schönfeld, H-J; Heerklotz, H; Seelig, J

    2018-05-25

    Apolipoprotein A-1 (Apo A-1) plays an important role in lipid transfer and obesity. Chemical unfolding of α-helical Apo A-1 is induced with guanidineHCl and monitored with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and CD spectroscopy. The unfolding enthalpy and the midpoint temperature of unfolding decrease linearly with increasing guanidineHCl concentration, caused by the weak binding of denaturant. At room temperature, binding of 50-60 molecules guanidineHCl leads to a complete Apo A-1 unfolding. The entropy of unfolding decreases to a lesser extent than the unfolding enthalpy. Apo A-1 chemical unfolding is a dynamic multi-state equilibrium that is analysed with the Zimm-Bragg theory modified for chemical unfolding. The chemical Zimm-Bragg theory predicts the denaturant binding constant K D and the protein cooperativity σ. Chemical unfolding of Apo A-1 is two orders of magnitude less cooperative than thermal unfolding. The free energy of thermal unfolding is ~0.2 kcal/mol per amino acid residue and ~1.0 kcal/mol for chemical unfolding at room temperature. The Zimm-Bragg theory calculates conformational probabilities and the chemical Zimm-Bragg theory predicts stretches of α-helical segments in dynamic equilibrium, unfolding and refolding independently and fast. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of neutron spectrum unfolding codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijp, W.

    1979-02-01

    This final report contains a set of four ECN-reports. The first is dealing with the comparison of the neutron spectrum unfolding codes CRYSTAL BALL, RFSP-JUL, SAND II and STAY'SL. The other three present the results of calculations about the influence of statistical weights in CRYSTAL BALL, SAND II and RFSP-JUL

  14. FERD and FERDOR type unfolding codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrus, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    FERD and FERDO are unfolding codes which were developed at the Neutron Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1965 and 1966. FERDO variants such as FERDOR and FORIST have been widely used, and many useful supplementary procedures have been developed for neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy and other diverse applications. Algorithms for the codes are discussed

  15. Peripheral Protein Unfolding Drives Membrane Bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siaw, Hew Ming Helen; Raghunath, Gokul; Dyer, R Brian

    2018-06-20

    Dynamic modulation of lipid membrane curvature can be achieved by a number of peripheral protein binding mechanisms such as hy-drophobic insertion of amphipathic helices and membrane scaffolding. Recently, an alternative mechanism was proposed in which crowding of peripherally bound proteins induces membrane curvature through steric pressure generated by lateral collisions. This effect was enhanced using intrinsically disordered proteins that possess high hydrodynamic radii, prompting us to explore whether membrane bending can be triggered by the folding-unfolding transition of surface-bound proteins. We utilized histidine-tagged human serum albumin bound to Ni-NTA-DGS containing liposomes as our model system to test this hypothesis. We found that reduction of the disulfide bonds in the protein resulted in unfolding of HSA, which subsequently led to membrane tubule formation. The frequency of tubule formation was found to be significantly higher when the proteins were unfolded while being localized to a phase-separated domain as opposed to randomly distributed in fluid phase liposomes, indicating that the steric pressure generated from protein unfolding is directly responsible for membrane deformation. Our results are critical for the design of peripheral membrane protein-immobilization strategies and open new avenues for exploring mechanisms of membrane bending driven by conformational changes of peripheral membrane proteins.

  16. Kinetic evidence for the formation of discrete 1,4-dehydrobenzene intermediates. Trapping by inter- and intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer and observation of high-temperature CIDNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockhart, Thomas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Comita, Paul B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Bergman, Robert G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1981-07-01

    Upon heating, alkyl-substituted cis-1,2-diethynyl olefins undergo cyclization to yield reactive 1,4-dehydrobenzenes; the products isolated may be derived from either unimolecular or bimolecular reactions of the intermediate. (Z)-4,5-Diethynyl-4-octene (4) undergoes rearrangement to yield 2,3-di-n-propyl-1,4-dehydrobenzene (17). Solution pyrolysis of 4 in inert aromatic solvents produces three unimolecular products, (Z)-dodeca-4,8-diyn-6-ene (7), benzocyclooctene (9), and o-allyl-n-propylbenzene (10), in high yield. When 1,4-cyclohexadiene is added to the pyrolysis solution as a trapping agent, high yields of the reduced product o-di-n-propylbenzene (12) are obtained. The kinetics of solution pyrolysis of 4 in the presence and absence of trapping agent establish that 2,3-di-n-propyl-1,4-dehydrobenzene is a discrete intermediate on the pathway leading to products. When the reaction was run in the heated probe of an NMR spectrometer, CIDNP was observed in 10. This observation, along with kinetic and chemical trapping evidence, indicates the presence of two additional intermediates, formed from 17 by sequential intramolecular [1,5] hydrogen transfer, on the pathway to products. The observation of CIDNP, coupled with the reactivity exhibited by 17 and the other two intermediates, implicate a biradical description of these molecules. Biradical 17 has been estimated to have a lifetime of about 10-9 s at 200°C and to lie in a well of about 5 kcal/mol with respect to the lowest energy unimolecular pathway ([1,5] hydrogen transfer). Ring opening (expected to be the lowest energy process for 1,4-dehydrobenzenes in which intramolecular hydrogen transfer is unlikely) to the isomeric diethynyl olefin 7 appears to have an activation enthalpy of about 10 kcal/moL Upon thermal reaction in the gas phase (400°C) or in solution in inert solvents (Z)-hexa-2,3-diethyl-1,5-diyn-3-ene (5) rearranges in good yield to the isomeric diethynyl olefin (Z)-deca-3,7-diyn-5-ene (8

  17. Microscopic dynamics of water around unfolded structures of barstar at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Somedatta; Chakraborty, Kaushik; Khatua, Prabir; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy, E-mail: sanjoy@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in [Molecular Modeling Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2015-02-07

    The breaking of the native structure of a protein and its influences on the dynamic response of the surrounding solvent is an important issue in protein folding. In this work, we have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to unfold the protein barstar at two different temperatures (400 K and 450 K). The two unfolded forms obtained at such high temperatures are further studied at room temperature to explore the effects of nonuniform unfolding of the protein secondary structures along two different pathways on the microscopic dynamical properties of the surface water molecules. It is demonstrated that though the structural transition of the protein in general results in less restricted water motions around its segments, but there are evidences of formation of new conformational motifs upon unfolding with increasingly confined environment around them, thereby resulting in further restricted water mobility in their hydration layers. Moreover, it is noticed that the effects of nonuniform unfolding of the protein segments on the relaxation times of the protein–water (PW) and the water–water (WW) hydrogen bonds are correlated with hindered hydration water motions. However, the kinetics of breaking and reformation of such hydrogen bonds are found to be influenced differently at the interface. It is observed that while the effects of unfolding on the PW hydrogen bond kinetics seem to be minimum, but the kinetics involving the WW hydrogen bonds around the protein segments exhibit noticeably heterogeneous characteristics. We believe that this is an important observation, which can provide valuable insights on the origin of heterogeneous influence of unfolding of a protein on the microscopic properties of its hydration water.

  18. Guanidinium chloride induction of partial unfolding in amide proton exchange in RNase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, S L; Baldwin, R L

    1993-11-05

    Amide (NH) proton exchange rates were measured in 0.0 to 0.7 M guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) for 23 slowly exchanging peptide NH protons of ribonuclease A (RNase A) at pH* 5.5 (uncorrected pH measured in D2O), 34 degrees C. The purpose was to find out whether GdmCl induces exchange through binding to exchange intermediates that are partly or wholly unfolded. It was predicted that, when the logarithm of the exchange rate is plotted as a function of the molarity of GdmCl, the slope should be a measure of the amount of buried surface area exposed to GdmCl in the exchange intermediate. The results indicate that these concentrations of GdmCl do induce exchange by means of a partial unfolding mechanism for all 23 protons; this implies that exchange reactions can be used to study the unfolding and stability of local regions. Of the 23 protons, nine also show a second mechanism of exchange at lower concentrations of GdmCl, a mechanism that is nearly independent of GdmCl concentration and is termed "limited structural fluctuation."

  19. Reversible Unfolding of Rhomboid Intramembrane Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Arutyunova, Elena; Panwar, Pankaj; Gimpl, Katharina; Keller, Sandro; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2016-03-29

    Denaturant-induced unfolding of helical membrane proteins provides insights into their mechanism of folding and domain organization, which take place in the chemically heterogeneous, anisotropic environment of a lipid membrane. Rhomboid proteases are intramembrane proteases that play key roles in various diseases. Crystal structures have revealed a compact helical bundle with a buried active site, which requires conformational changes for the cleavage of transmembrane substrates. A dimeric form of the rhomboid protease has been shown to be important for activity. In this study, we examine the mechanism of refolding for two distinct rhomboids to gain insight into their secondary structure-activity relationships. Although helicity is largely abolished in the unfolded states of both proteins, unfolding is completely reversible for HiGlpG but only partially reversible for PsAarA. Refolding of both proteins results in reassociation of the dimer, with a 90% regain of catalytic activity for HiGlpG but only a 70% regain for PsAarA. For both proteins, a broad, gradual transition from the native, folded state to the denatured, partly unfolded state was revealed with the aid of circular dichroism spectroscopy as a function of denaturant concentration, thus arguing against a classical two-state model as found for many globular soluble proteins. Thermal denaturation has irreversible destabilizing effects on both proteins, yet reveals important functional details regarding substrate accessibility to the buried active site. This concerted biophysical and functional analysis demonstrates that HiGlpG, with a simple six-transmembrane-segment organization, is more robust than PsAarA, which has seven predicted transmembrane segments, thus rendering HiGlpG amenable to in vitro studies of membrane-protein folding. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bosonic Fradkin-Tseytlin equations unfolded

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaynkman, O.V. [I.E.Tamm Theory Department, Lebedev Physical Institute,Leninski prospect 53, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-22

    We test infinite-dimensional extension of algebra su(k,k) proposed by Fradkin and Linetsky as the candidate for conformal higher spin algebra. Adjoint and twisted-adjoint representations of su(k,k) on the space of this algebra are carefully explored. For k=2 corresponding unfolded system is analyzed and it is shown to encode Fradkin-Tseytlin equations for the set of all integer spins 1,2,… with infinite multiplicity.

  1. Geometrical analysis of cytochrome c unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urie, Kristopher G.; Pletneva, Ekaterina; Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.; Kozak, John J.

    2011-01-01

    A geometrical model has been developed to study the unfolding of iso-1 cytochrome c. The model draws on the crystallographic data reported for this protein. These data were used to calculate the distance between specific residues in the folded state, and in a sequence of extended states defined by n = 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 15 residue units. Exact calculations carried out for each of the 103 residues in the polypeptide chain demonstrate that different regions of the chain have different unfolding histories. Regions where there is a persistence of compact structures can be identified, and this geometrical characterization is fully consistent with analyses of time-resolved fluorescence energy-transfer (TrFET) data using dansyl-derivatized cysteine side-chain probes at positions 39, 50, 66, 85, and 99. The calculations were carried out assuming that different regions of the polypeptide chain unfold synchronously. To test this assumption, lattice Monte Carlo simulations were performed to study systematically the possible importance of asynchronicity. Calculations show that small departures from synchronous dynamics can arise if displacements of residues in the main body of the chain are much more sluggish than near-terminal residues.

  2. Effects of retarded electrical fields on observables sensitive to the high-density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Gao-Feng; Li, Bao-An; Yong, Gao-Chan; Ou, Li; Cao, Xin-Wei; Liu, Xu-Yang

    2018-03-01

    Within the isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model IBUU11, we examine the relativistic retardation effects of electrical fields on the π-/π+ ratio and neutron-proton differential transverse flow in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies. Compared to the static Coulomb fields, the retarded electric fields of fast-moving charges are known to be anisotropic and the associated relativistic corrections can be significant. They are found to increase the number of energetic protons in the participant region at the maximum compression by as much as 25% but that of energetic neutrons by less than 10% in 197Au+197Au reactions at a beam energy of 400 MeV/nucleon. Consequently, more π+ and relatively fewer π- mesons are produced, leading to an appreciable reduction of the π-/π+ ratio compared to calculations with the static Coulomb fields. Also, the neutron-proton differential transverse flow, as another sensitive probe of high-density symmetry energy, is also decreased appreciably due to the stronger retarded electrical fields in directions perpendicular to the velocities of fast-moving charges compared to calculations using the isotropic static electrical fields. Moreover, the retardation effects on these observables are found to be approximately independent of the reaction impact parameter.

  3. Exploring the Unfolding Pathway of Maltose Binding Proteins: An Integrated Computational Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Guardiani, Carlo; Marino, Daniele Di; Tramontano, Anna; Chinappi, Mauro; Cecconi, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Recent single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments on the Maltose Binding Proteins (MBPs) identified four stable structural units, termed unfoldons, that resist mechanical stress and determine the intermediates of the unfolding pathway. In this work, we analyze the topological origin and the dynamical role of the unfoldons using an integrated approach which combines a graph-theoretical analysis of the interaction network of the MBP native-state with steered molecular dynamics simulations. The topological analysis of the native state, while revealing the structural nature of the unfoldons, provides a framework to interpret the MBP mechanical unfolding pathway. Indeed, the experimental pathway can be effectively predicted by means of molecular dynamics simulations with a simple topology-based and low-resolution model of the MBP. The results obtained from the coarse-grained approach are confirmed and further refined by all-atom molecular dynamics.

  4. Exploring the Unfolding Pathway of Maltose Binding Proteins: An Integrated Computational Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Guardiani, Carlo

    2014-09-09

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Recent single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments on the Maltose Binding Proteins (MBPs) identified four stable structural units, termed unfoldons, that resist mechanical stress and determine the intermediates of the unfolding pathway. In this work, we analyze the topological origin and the dynamical role of the unfoldons using an integrated approach which combines a graph-theoretical analysis of the interaction network of the MBP native-state with steered molecular dynamics simulations. The topological analysis of the native state, while revealing the structural nature of the unfoldons, provides a framework to interpret the MBP mechanical unfolding pathway. Indeed, the experimental pathway can be effectively predicted by means of molecular dynamics simulations with a simple topology-based and low-resolution model of the MBP. The results obtained from the coarse-grained approach are confirmed and further refined by all-atom molecular dynamics.

  5. The flaws in the detail of an observational study on transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement in intermediate-risks patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barili, Fabio; Freemantle, Nick; Folliguet, Thierry; Muneretto, Claudio; de Bonis, Michele; Czerny, Martin; Obadia, Jean Francois; Al-Attar, Nawwar; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Kluin, Jolanda; Lorusso, Roberto; Punjabi, Prakash; Sadaba, Rafael; Suwalski, Piotr; Benedetto, Umberto; Böning, Andreas; Falk, Volkmar; Sousa-Uva, Miguel; Kappetein, Pieter A.; Menicanti, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The PARTNER group recently published a comparison between the latest generation SAPIEN 3 transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) system (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in intermediate-risk patients, apparently demonstrating superiority of

  6. Predictors of natively unfolded proteins: unanimous consensus score to detect a twilight zone between order and disorder in generic datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deiana Antonio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natively unfolded proteins lack a well defined three dimensional structure but have important biological functions, suggesting a re-assignment of the structure-function paradigm. To assess that a given protein is natively unfolded requires laborious experimental investigations, then reliable sequence-only methods for predicting whether a sequence corresponds to a folded or to an unfolded protein are of interest in fundamental and applicative studies. Many proteins have amino acidic compositions compatible both with the folded and unfolded status, and belong to a twilight zone between order and disorder. This makes difficult a dichotomic classification of protein sequences into folded and natively unfolded ones. In this work we propose an operational method to identify proteins belonging to the twilight zone by combining into a consensus score good performing single predictors of folding. Results In this methodological paper dichotomic folding indexes are considered: hydrophobicity-charge, mean packing, mean pairwise energy, Poodle-W and a new global index, that is called here gVSL2, based on the local disorder predictor VSL2. The performance of these indexes is evaluated on different datasets, in particular on a new dataset composed by 2369 folded and 81 natively unfolded proteins. Poodle-W, gVSL2 and mean pairwise energy have good performance and stability in all the datasets considered and are combined into a strictly unanimous combination score SSU, that leaves proteins unclassified when the consensus of all combined indexes is not reached. The unclassified proteins: i belong to an overlap region in the vector space of amino acidic compositions occupied by both folded and unfolded proteins; ii are composed by approximately the same number of order-promoting and disorder-promoting amino acids; iii have a mean flexibility intermediate between that of folded and that of unfolded proteins. Conclusions Our results show that

  7. Intermediate uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate uveitis (IU is described as inflammation in the anterior vitreous, ciliary body and the peripheral retina. In the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN working group′s international workshop for reporting clinical data the consensus reached was that the term IU should be used for that subset of uveitis where the vitreous is the major site of the inflammation and if there is an associated infection (for example, Lyme disease or systemic disease (for example, sarcoidosis. The diagnostic term pars planitis should be used only for that subset of IU where there is snow bank or snowball formation occurring in the absence of an associated infection or systemic disease (that is, "idiopathic". This article discusses the clinical features, etiology, pathogenesis, investigations and treatment of IU.

  8. Unfolding neutron spectra obtained from BS–TLD system using genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, J.A.L.; Silva, E.R.; Ferreira, T.A.E; Vilela, E.C.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the variability of neutron spectrum within the same environment, it is essential that the spectral distribution as a function of energy should be characterized. The precise information allows radiological quantities establishment related to that spectrum, but it is necessary that a spectrometric system covers a large interval of energy and an unfolding process is appropriate. This paper proposes use of a technique of Artificial Intelligence (AI) called genetic algorithm (GA), which uses bio-inspired mathematical models with the implementation of a specific matrix to unfolding data obtained from a combination of TLDs embedded in a BS system to characterize the neutron spectrum as a function of energy. The results obtained with this method were in accordance with reference spectra, thus enabling this technique to unfold neutron spectra with the BS–TLD system. - Highlights: ► The unfolding code used the artificial intelligence technique called genetic algorithms. ► A response matrix specific to the unfolding data obtained with the BS–TLD system is used by the AGLN. ► The observed results demonstrate the potential use of genetic algorithms in solving complex nuclear problems.

  9. Clinical evaluation of coronary territory map by using unfolded map of Tl-201 myocardial SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Toshiisa; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Yamagami, Hidetoshi; Kumita, Shinichirou; Hayashida, Kohei; Hayashi, Makoto

    1990-01-01

    Coronary territory map was developed on unfolded map of exercise Tl-201 myocardial SPECT. Each coronary territory was determined by summing the each unfolded map of 54 cases of single vessel disease respectively, and standardizing with normal pattern obtained from normal patients. The diagnostic accuracy of coronary territory map to identify the diseased coronary artery was analyzed in 104 clinical cases and was compared with that of planar and SPECT visual diagnosis, simple unfolded map (raw map) and extent and severity map. The results were as follows. (1) Territory map showed excellent diagnostic accuracy in single or double vessel disease, especially in diagnosis of left circumflex coronary artery lesion. (2) In triple vessel disease, the diagnostic accuracy of territory map or other unfolded maps was 30% at best, and was inferior to planar or SPECT visual analysis. The cause of this inferiority seemed that the quantitatively analyzed map had no information about the degree of Tl-uptake into lung or myocardium, which give useful information in visual diagnosis. (3) The diagnostic agreement ratio in two observers was the highest in territory map diagnosis, so that the territory map diagnosis seemed to be the most objective one. (4) The unfolded map diagnosis with apical display obtained from long-axis tomogram was useful to diagnose left anteior descending coronary (LAD) lesion, which improve not only the sensitivity of LAD but also specificity of right coronary artery single vessel disease. (author)

  10. Heat, Acid and Chemically Induced Unfolding Pathways, Conformational Stability and Structure-Function Relationship in Wheat α-Amylase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritika Singh

    Full Text Available Wheat α-amylase, a multi-domain protein with immense industrial applications, belongs to α+β class of proteins with native molecular mass of 32 kDa. In the present study, the pathways leading to denaturation and the relevant unfolded states of this multi-domain, robust enzyme from wheat were discerned under the influence of temperature, pH and chemical denaturants. The structural and functional aspects along with thermodynamic parameters for α-amylase unfolding were probed and analyzed using fluorescence, circular dichroism and enzyme assay methods. The enzyme exhibited remarkable stability up to 70°C with tendency to aggregate at higher temperature. Acid induced unfolding was also incomplete with respect to the structural content of the enzyme. Strong ANS binding at pH 2.0 suggested the existence of a partially unfolded intermediate state. The enzyme was structurally and functionally stable in the pH range 4.0-9.0 with 88% recovery of hydrolytic activity. Careful examination of biophysical properties of intermediate states populated in urea and GdHCl induced denaturation suggests that α-amylase unfolding undergoes irreversible and non-coincidental cooperative transitions, as opposed to previous reports of two-state unfolding. Our investigation highlights several structural features of the enzyme in relation to its catalytic activity. Since, α-amylase has been comprehensively exploited for use in a range of starch-based industries, in addition to its physiological significance in plants and animals, knowledge regarding its stability and folding aspects will promote its biotechnological applications.

  11. Declining global warming effects on the phenology of spring leaf unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yongshuo H; Zhao, Hongfang; Piao, Shilong; Peaucelle, Marc; Peng, Shushi; Zhou, Guiyun; Ciais, Philippe; Huang, Mengtian; Menzel, Annette; Peñuelas, Josep; Song, Yang; Vitasse, Yann; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Janssens, Ivan A

    2015-10-01

    Earlier spring leaf unfolding is a frequently observed response of plants to climate warming. Many deciduous tree species require chilling for dormancy release, and warming-related reductions in chilling may counteract the advance of leaf unfolding in response to warming. Empirical evidence for this, however, is limited to saplings or twigs in climate-controlled chambers. Using long-term in situ observations of leaf unfolding for seven dominant European tree species at 1,245 sites, here we show that the apparent response of leaf unfolding to climate warming (ST, expressed in days advance of leaf unfolding per °C warming) has significantly decreased from 1980 to 2013 in all monitored tree species. Averaged across all species and sites, ST decreased by 40% from 4.0 ± 1.8 days °C(-1) during 1980-1994 to 2.3 ± 1.6 days °C(-1) during 1999-2013. The declining ST was also simulated by chilling-based phenology models, albeit with a weaker decline (24-30%) than observed in situ. The reduction in ST is likely to be partly attributable to reduced chilling. Nonetheless, other mechanisms may also have a role, such as 'photoperiod limitation' mechanisms that may become ultimately limiting when leaf unfolding dates occur too early in the season. Our results provide empirical evidence for a declining ST, but also suggest that the predicted strong winter warming in the future may further reduce ST and therefore result in a slowdown in the advance of tree spring phenology.

  12. Inactivation and unfolding of protein tyrosine phosphatase from Thermus thermophilus HB27 during urea and guanidine hydrochloride denaturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yejing Wang

    Full Text Available The effects of urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl on the activity, conformation and unfolding process of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase, a thermostable low molecular weight protein from Thermus thermophilus HB27, have been studied. Enzymatic activity assays showed both urea and GdnHCl resulted in the inactivation of PTPase in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Inactivation kinetics analysis suggested that the inactivation of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl were both monophasic and reversible processes, and the effects of urea and GdnHCl on PTPase were similar to that of mixed-type reversible inhibitors. Far-ultraviolet (UV circular dichroism (CD, Tryptophan and 1-anilinonaphthalene -8-sulfonic acid (ANS fluorescence spectral analyses indicated the existence of a partially active and an inactive molten globule-like intermediate during the unfolding processes induced by urea and GdnHCl, respectively. Based on the sequence alignment and the homolog Tt1001 protein structure, we discussed the possible conformational transitions of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl and compared the conformations of these unfolding intermediates with the transient states in bovine PTPase and its complex structures in detail. Our results may be able to provide some valuable clues to reveal the relationship between the structure and enzymatic activity, and the unfolding pathway and mechanism of PTPase.

  13. Reversibility and two state behaviour in the thermal unfolding of oligomeric TIM barrel proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Romero, Sergio; Costas, Miguel; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela; Alejandro Fernández-Velasco, D

    2015-08-28

    Temperature is one of the main variables that modulate protein function and stability. Thermodynamic studies of oligomeric proteins, the dominant protein natural form, have been often hampered because irreversible aggregation and/or slow reactions are common. There are no reports on the reversible equilibrium thermal unfolding of proteins composed of (β/α)8 barrel subunits, albeit this "TIM barrel" topology is one of the most abundant and versatile in nature. We studied the eponymous TIM barrel, triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), belonging to five species of different bacterial taxa. All of them were found to be catalytically efficient dimers. The three-dimensional structure of four enzymes was solved at high/medium resolution. Irreversibility and kinetic control were observed in the thermal unfolding of two TIMs, while for the other three the thermal unfolding was found to follow a two-state equilibrium reversible process. Shifts in the global stability curves of these three proteins are related to the organismal temperature range of optimal growth and modulated by variations in maximum stability temperature and in the enthalpy change at that temperature. Reversibility appears to correlate with the low isoelectric point, the absence of a residual structure in the unfolded state, small cavity volume in the native state, low conformational stability and a low melting temperature. Furthermore, the strong coupling between dimer dissociation and monomer unfolding may reduce aggregation and favour reversibility. It is therefore very thought-provoking to find that a common topological ensemble, such as the TIM barrel, can unfold/refold in the Anfinsen way, i.e. without the help of the cellular machinery.

  14. Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines Predict Relapse-Free Survival after One Month of Interferon-α but Not Observation in Intermediate Risk Melanoma Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad A Tarhini

    Full Text Available E1697 was a phase III trial of adjuvant interferon (IFN-α2b for one month (Arm B versus observation (Arm A in patients with resected melanoma at intermediate risk. We evaluated the levels of candidate serum cytokines, the HLA genotype, polymorphisms of CTLA4 and FOXP3 genes and the development of autoantibodies for their association with relapse free survival (RFS in Arm A and Arm B among 268 patients with banked biospecimens.ELISA was used to test 5 autoantibodies. Luminex/One Lambda LABTypeRSSO was used for HLA Genotyping. Selected CTLA4 and FOXP3 Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and microsatellites were tested for by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Sixteen serum cytokines were tested at baseline and one month by Luminex xMAP multiplex technology. Cox Proportional Hazards model was applied and the Wald test was used to test the marginal association of each individual marker and RFS. We used the Lasso approach to select the markers to be included in a multi-marker Cox Proportional Hazards model. The ability of the resulting models to predict one year RFS was evaluated by the time-dependent ROC curve. The leave-one-out method of cross validation (LOOCV was used to avoid over-fitting of the data.In the multi-marker modeling analysis conducted in Arm B, one month serum IL2Rα, IL-12p40 and IFNα levels predicted one year RFS with LOOCV AUC = 82%. Among the three markers selected, IL2Rα and IFNα were the most stable (selected in all the cross validation cycles. The risk score (linear combination of the 3 markers separated the RFS curves of low and high risk groups well (p = 0.05. This model did not hold for Arm A, indicating a differential marker profile in Arm B linked to the intervention (adjuvant therapy.Early on-treatment proinflammatory serum markers (IL2Rα, IL-12p40, IFNα significantly predict RFS in our cohort of patients treated with adjuvant IFN-α2b and warrant further study.

  15. Circuit topology of self-interacting chains: implications for folding and unfolding dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugler, Andrew; Tans, Sander J; Mashaghi, Alireza

    2014-11-07

    Understanding the relationship between molecular structure and folding is a central problem in disciplines ranging from biology to polymer physics and DNA origami. Topology can be a powerful tool to address this question. For a folded linear chain, the arrangement of intra-chain contacts is a topological property because rearranging the contacts requires discontinuous deformations. Conversely, the topology is preserved when continuously stretching the chain while maintaining the contact arrangement. Here we investigate how the folding and unfolding of linear chains with binary contacts is guided by the topology of contact arrangements. We formalize the topology by describing the relations between any two contacts in the structure, which for a linear chain can either be in parallel, in series, or crossing each other. We show that even when other determinants of folding rate such as contact order and size are kept constant, this 'circuit' topology determines folding kinetics. In particular, we find that the folding rate increases with the fractions of parallel and crossed relations. Moreover, we show how circuit topology constrains the conformational phase space explored during folding and unfolding: the number of forbidden unfolding transitions is found to increase with the fraction of parallel relations and to decrease with the fraction of series relations. Finally, we find that circuit topology influences whether distinct intermediate states are present, with crossed contacts being the key factor. The approach presented here can be more generally applied to questions on molecular dynamics, evolutionary biology, molecular engineering, and single-molecule biophysics.

  16. β-sheet-like formation during the mechanical unfolding of prion protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Weiwei; Cao, Penghui; Park, Harold S.; Yoon, Gwonchan; Eom, Kilho

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule experiments and simulations have been widely used to characterize the unfolding and folding pathways of different proteins. However, with few exceptions, these tools have not been applied to study prion protein, PrP C , whose misfolded form PrP Sc can induce a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we apply novel atomistic modeling based on potential energy surface exploration to study the constant force unfolding of human PrP at time scales inaccessible with standard molecular dynamics. We demonstrate for forces around 100 pN, prion forms a stable, three-stranded β-sheet-like intermediate configuration containing residues 155-214 with a lifetime exceeding hundreds of nanoseconds. A mutant without the disulfide bridge shows lower stability during the unfolding process but still forms the three-stranded structure. The simulations thus not only show the atomistic details of the mechanically induced structural conversion from the native α-helical structure to the β-rich-like form but also lend support to the structural theory that there is a core of the recombinant PrP amyloid, a misfolded form reported to induce transmissible disease, mapping to C-terminal residues ≈160-220

  17. β-sheet-like formation during the mechanical unfolding of prion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Weiwei; Cao, Penghui; Park, Harold S., E-mail: parkhs@bu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Yoon, Gwonchan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Kilho [Biomechanics Laboratory, College of Sport Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-28

    Single molecule experiments and simulations have been widely used to characterize the unfolding and folding pathways of different proteins. However, with few exceptions, these tools have not been applied to study prion protein, PrP{sup C}, whose misfolded form PrP{sup Sc} can induce a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we apply novel atomistic modeling based on potential energy surface exploration to study the constant force unfolding of human PrP at time scales inaccessible with standard molecular dynamics. We demonstrate for forces around 100 pN, prion forms a stable, three-stranded β-sheet-like intermediate configuration containing residues 155-214 with a lifetime exceeding hundreds of nanoseconds. A mutant without the disulfide bridge shows lower stability during the unfolding process but still forms the three-stranded structure. The simulations thus not only show the atomistic details of the mechanically induced structural conversion from the native α-helical structure to the β-rich-like form but also lend support to the structural theory that there is a core of the recombinant PrP amyloid, a misfolded form reported to induce transmissible disease, mapping to C-terminal residues ≈160-220.

  18. β-sheet-like formation during the mechanical unfolding of prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Weiwei; Yoon, Gwonchan; Cao, Penghui; Eom, Kilho; Park, Harold S.

    2015-09-01

    Single molecule experiments and simulations have been widely used to characterize the unfolding and folding pathways of different proteins. However, with few exceptions, these tools have not been applied to study prion protein, PrPC, whose misfolded form PrPSc can induce a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we apply novel atomistic modeling based on potential energy surface exploration to study the constant force unfolding of human PrP at time scales inaccessible with standard molecular dynamics. We demonstrate for forces around 100 pN, prion forms a stable, three-stranded β-sheet-like intermediate configuration containing residues 155-214 with a lifetime exceeding hundreds of nanoseconds. A mutant without the disulfide bridge shows lower stability during the unfolding process but still forms the three-stranded structure. The simulations thus not only show the atomistic details of the mechanically induced structural conversion from the native α-helical structure to the β-rich-like form but also lend support to the structural theory that there is a core of the recombinant PrP amyloid, a misfolded form reported to induce transmissible disease, mapping to C-terminal residues ≈160-220.

  19. THE SURFACE-MEDIATED UNFOLDING KINETICS OF GLOBULAR PROTEINS IS DEPENDENT ON MOLECULAR WEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patananan, A.N.; Goheen, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and unfolding pathways of proteins on rigid surfaces are essential in numerous complex processes associated with biomedical engineering, nanotechnology, and chromatography. It is now well accepted that the kinetics of unfolding are characterized by chemical and physical interactions dependent on protein deformability and structure, as well as environmental pH, temperature, and surface chemistry. Although this fundamental process has broad implications in medicine and industry, little is known about the mechanism because of the atomic lengths and rapid time scales involved. Therefore, the unfolding kinetics of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin were investigated by adsorbing the globular proteins to non-porous cationic polymer beads. The protein fractions were adsorbed at different residence times (0, 9, 10, 20, and 30 min) at near-physiological conditions using a gradient elution system similar to that in high-performance liquid chromatography. The elution profi les and retention times were obtained by ultraviolet/visible spectrophotometry. A decrease in recovery was observed with time for almost all proteins and was attributed to irreversible protein unfolding on the non-porous surfaces. These data, and those of previous studies, fi t a positively increasing linear trend between percent unfolding after a fi xed (9 min) residence time (71.8%, 31.1%, and 32.1% of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin, respectively) and molecular weight. Of all the proteins examined so far, only myoglobin deviated from this trend with higher than predicted unfolding rates. Myoglobin also exhibited an increase in retention time over a wide temperature range (0°C and 55°C, 4.39 min and 5.74 min, respectively) whereas ovalbumin and β-glucosidase did not. Further studies using a larger set of proteins are required to better understand the physiological and physiochemical implications of protein unfolding kinetics. This study confi rms that surface

  20. RPA-mediated unfolding of systematically varying G-quadruplex structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sujay; Qureshi, Mohammad H; Malcolm, Dominic W; Budhathoki, Jagat B; Celik, Uğur; Balci, Hamza

    2013-05-21

    G-quadruplex (GQ) is a noncanonical nucleic acid structure that is formed by guanine rich sequences. Unless it is destabilized by proteins such as replication protein A (RPA), GQ could interfere with DNA metabolic functions, such as replication or repair. We studied RPA-mediated GQ unfolding using single-molecule FRET on two groups of GQ structures that have different loop lengths and different numbers of G-tetrad layers. We observed a linear increase in the steady-state stability of the GQ against RPA-mediated unfolding with increasing number of layers or decreasing loop length. The stability demonstrated by different GQ structures varied by at least three orders of magnitude. Those with shorter loops (less than three nucleotides long) or a greater number of layers (more than three layers) maintained a significant folded population even at physiological RPA concentration (≈1 μM), raising the possibility of physiological viability of such GQ structures. Finally, we measured the transition time between the start and end of the RPA-mediated GQ unfolding process to be 0.35 ± 0.10 s for all GQ constructs we studied, despite significant differences in their steady-state stabilities. We propose a two-step RPA-mediated GQ unfolding mechanism that is consistent with our observations. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Solvent Effects on Protein Folding/Unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, A. E.; Hillson, N.; Onuchic, J. N.

    Pressure effects on the hydrophobic potential of mean force led Hummer et al. to postulate a model for pressure denaturation of proteins in which denaturation occurs by means of water penetration into the protein interior, rather than by exposing the protein hydrophobic core to the solvent --- commonly used to describe temperature denaturation. We study the effects of pressure in protein folding/unfolding kinetics in an off-lattice minimalist model of a protein in which pressure effects have been incorporated by means of the pair-wise potential of mean force of hydrophobic groups in water. We show that pressure slows down the kinetics of folding by decreasing the reconfigurational diffusion coefficient and moves the location of the folding transition state.

  2. Unfolding in particle physics: A window on solving inverse problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spano, F.

    2013-01-01

    Unfolding is the ensemble of techniques aimed at resolving inverse, ill-posed problems. A pedagogical introduction to the origin and main problems related to unfolding is presented and used as the the stepping stone towards the illustration of some of the most common techniques that are currently used in particle physics experiments. (authors)

  3. Defining a methodology for benchmarking spectrum unfolding codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.; Kirmser, P.G.; Miller, W.H.; Hu, K.K.

    1976-01-01

    It has long been recognized that different neutron spectrum unfolding codes will produce significantly different results when unfolding the same measured data. In reviewing the results of such analyses it has been difficult to determine which result if any is the best representation of what was measured by the spectrometer detector. A proposal to develop a benchmarking procedure for spectrum unfolding codes is presented. The objective of the procedure will be to begin to develop a methodology and a set of data with a well established and documented result that could be used to benchmark and standardize the various unfolding methods and codes. It is further recognized that development of such a benchmark must involve a consensus of the technical community interested in neutron spectrum unfolding

  4. Common features in the unfolding and misfolding of PDZ domains and beyond: the modulatory effect of domain swapping and extra-elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murciano-Calles, Javier; Güell-Bosch, Jofre; Villegas, Sandra; Martinez, Jose C

    2016-01-12

    PDZ domains are protein-protein interaction modules sharing the same structural arrangement. To discern whether they display common features in their unfolding/misfolding behaviour we have analyzed in this work the unfolding thermodynamics, together with the misfolding kinetics, of the PDZ fold using three archetypical examples: the second and third PDZ domains of the PSD95 protein and the Erbin PDZ domain. Results showed that all domains passed through a common intermediate, which populated upon unfolding, and that this in turn drove the misfolding towards worm-like fibrillar structures. Thus, the unfolding/misfolding behaviour appears to be shared within these domains. We have also analyzed how this landscape can be modified upon the inclusion of extra-elements, as it is in the nNOS PDZ domain, or the organization of swapped species, as happens in the second PDZ domain of the ZO2 protein. Although the intermediates still formed upon thermal unfolding, the misfolding was prevented to varying degrees.

  5. The Unfolding of Value Sources During Online Business Model Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Hoßbach

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the magazine publishing industry, viable online business models are still rare to absent. To prepare for the ‘digital future’ and safeguard their long-term survival, many publishers are currently in the process of transforming their online business model. Against this backdrop, this study aims to develop a deeper understanding of (1 how the different building blocks of an online business model are transformed over time and (2 how sources of value creation unfold during this transformation process. Methodology: To answer our research question, we conducted a longitudinal case study with a leading German business magazine publisher (called BIZ. Data was triangulated from multiple sources including interviews, internal documents, and direct observations. Findings: Based on our case study, we nd that BIZ used the transformation process to differentiate its online business model from its traditional print business model along several dimensions, and that BIZ’s online business model changed from an efficiency- to a complementarity- to a novelty-based model during this process. Research implications: Our findings suggest that different business model transformation phases relate to different value sources, questioning the appropriateness of value source-based approaches for classifying business models. Practical implications: The results of our case study highlight the need for online-offline business model differentiation and point to the important distinction between service and product differentiation. Originality: Our study contributes to the business model literature by applying a dynamic and holistic perspective on the link between online business model changes and unfolding value sources.

  6. Complete all-atom hydrodynamics of protein unfolding in uniform flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Guan M; Sandberg, William C

    2010-01-01

    The unfolding dynamics of a protein, ubiquitin, pinned in several uniform flows, was studied at low and high flow rates in an all-atom style through a non-equilibrium molecular dynamics approach with explicit water molecules included. Atomic hydrodynamic force components on individual amino acids, as a function of time, due to the collisional interactions with the flowing water molecules were calculated explicitly. The protein conformational change in response to those time-varying forces was computed completely at the high flow rate up to nanosecond until the fully stretched state was reached. The end-to-end length of the single ubiquitin protein molecule at high flow rate is smoothly increasing. The step-like jumps between metastable states that describe the μm ms -1 scale force pulling experiments conducted on polyubiquitins at low flow rates, are not seen at the high flow speeds necessary to computationally probe the ns nm -1 scale regime. No unfolding was observed in the low flow rate atomic computations at nanosecond scale while partial and complete unfolding was observed in the coarse-grained low flow rate computations at microsecond scale. Examination of the all-atom computation of the time variation of the hydrodynamic forces on, and the velocity components of, the protein molecule unveiled to some extent the details of the complexity of the hydrodynamic friction variation in the nm ns -1 regime of high rate flow-driven protein unfolding. This demonstrates quantitatively that all-atom computations are more suitable than the Langevin equation or Brownian dynamics methods for probing the interaction dynamics and resulting conformational dynamics of protein unfolding in strong flows on nm ns -1 time/length scales while the reverse is true for investigation of slow, diffusively driven systems.

  7. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central “hubs”. Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates. PMID:26394388

  8. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central "hubs". Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates.

  9. Sensitivity of gravitational wave searches to the full signal of intermediate-mass black hole binaries during the first observing run of Advanced LIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón Bustillo, Juan; Salemi, Francesco; Dal Canton, Tito; Jani, Karan P.

    2018-01-01

    The sensitivity of gravitational wave searches for binary black holes is estimated via the injection and posterior recovery of simulated gravitational wave signals in the detector data streams. When a search reports no detections, the estimated sensitivity is then used to place upper limits on the coalescence rate of the target source. In order to obtain correct sensitivity and rate estimates, the injected waveforms must be faithful representations of the real signals. Up to date, however, injected waveforms have neglected radiation modes of order higher than the quadrupole, potentially biasing sensitivity and coalescence rate estimates. In particular, higher-order modes are known to have a large impact in the gravitational waves emitted by intermediate-mass black holes binaries. In this work, we evaluate the impact of this approximation in the context of two search algorithms run by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration in their search for intermediate-mass black hole binaries in the O1 LIGO Science Run data: a matched filter-based pipeline and a coherent unmodeled one. To this end, we estimate the sensitivity of both searches to simulated signals for nonspinning binaries including and omitting higher-order modes. We find that omission of higher-order modes leads to biases in the sensitivity estimates which depend on the masses of the binary, the search algorithm, and the required level of significance for detection. In addition, we compare the sensitivity of the two search algorithms across the studied parameter space. We conclude that the most recent LIGO-Virgo upper limits on the rate of coalescence of intermediate-mass black hole binaries are conservative for the case of highly asymmetric binaries. However, the tightest upper limits, placed for nearly equal-mass sources, remain unchanged due to the small contribution of higher modes to the corresponding sources.

  10. The flaws in the detail of an observational study on transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement in intermediate-risks patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barili, Fabio; Freemantle, Nick; Folliguet, Thierry; Muneretto, Claudio; De Bonis, Michele; Czerny, Martin; Obadia, Jean Francois; Al-Attar, Nawwar; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Kluin, Jolanda; Lorusso, Roberto; Punjabi, Prakash; Sadaba, Rafael; Suwalski, Piotr; Benedetto, Umberto; Böning, Andreas; Falk, Volkmar; Sousa-Uva, Miguel; Kappetein, Pieter A; Menicanti, Lorenzo

    2017-06-01

    The PARTNER group recently published a comparison between the latest generation SAPIEN 3 transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) system (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in intermediate-risk patients, apparently demonstrating superiority of the TAVI and suggesting that TAVI might be the preferred treatment method in this risk class of patients. Nonetheless, assessment of the non-randomized methodology used in this comparison reveals challenges that should be addressed in order to elucidate the validity of the results. The study by Thourani and colleagues showed several major methodological concerns: suboptimal methods in propensity score analysis with evident misspecification of the propensity scores (PS; no adjustment for the most significantly different covariates: left ventricular ejection fraction, moderate-severe mitral regurgitation and associated procedures); use of PS quintiles rather than matching; inference on not-adjusted Kaplan-Meier curves, although the authors correctly claimed for the need of balancing score adjusting for confounding factors in order to have unbiased estimates of the treatment effect; evidence of poor fit; lack of data on valve-related death.These methodological flaws invalidate direct comparison between treatments and cannot support authors' conclusions that TAVI with SAPIEN 3 in intermediate-risk patients is superior to surgery and might be the preferred treatment alternative to surgery. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  11. A genetic algorithm based method for neutron spectrum unfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suman, Vitisha; Sarkar, P.K.

    2013-03-01

    An approach to neutron spectrum unfolding based on a stochastic evolutionary search mechanism - Genetic Algorithm (GA) is presented. It is tested to unfold a set of simulated spectra, the unfolded spectra is compared to the output of a standard code FERDOR. The method was then applied to a set of measured pulse height spectrum of neutrons from the AmBe source as well as of emitted neutrons from Li(p,n) and Ag(C,n) nuclear reactions carried out in the accelerator environment. The unfolded spectra compared to the output of FERDOR show good agreement in the case of AmBe spectra and Li(p,n) spectra. In the case of Ag(C,n) spectra GA method results in some fluctuations. Necessity of carrying out smoothening of the obtained solution is also studied, which leads to approximation of the solution yielding an appropriate solution finally. Few smoothing techniques like second difference smoothing, Monte Carlo averaging, combination of both and gaussian based smoothing methods are also studied. Unfolded results obtained after inclusion of the smoothening criteria are in close agreement with the output obtained from the FERDOR code. The present method is also tested on a set of underdetermined problems, the outputs of which is compared to the unfolded spectra obtained from the FERDOR applied to a completely determined problem, shows a good match. The distribution of the unfolded spectra is also studied. Uncertainty propagation in the unfolded spectra due to the errors present in the measurement as well as the response function is also carried out. The method appears to be promising for unfolding the completely determined as well as underdetermined problems. It also has provisions to carry out the uncertainty analysis. (author)

  12. Prediction and analysis of structure, stability and unfolding of thermolysin-like proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Gert; Eijsink, Vincent

    1993-08-01

    of the NP by a large amount are located in a relatively weak region (or more precisely, they affect a local unfolding pathway with a relatively low free energy of activation). One weak region, that is supposedly important in the early steps of NP unfolding, has been determined in the NP of B. stearothermophilus. After eliminating this weakest link a drastic increase in thermostability was observed and the search for the second-weakest link, or the second-lowest energy local unfolding pathway is now in progress. Hopefully, this approach can be used to unravel the entire early phase of unfolding.

  13. Neutron spectrum unfolding using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Manzanares A, E.

    2004-01-01

    An artificial neural network has been designed to obtain the neutron spectra from the Bonner spheres spectrometer's count rates. The neural network was trained using a large set of neutron spectra compiled by the International Atomic Energy Agency. These include spectra from iso- topic neutron sources, reference and operational neutron spectra obtained from accelerators and nuclear reactors. The spectra were transformed from lethargy to energy distribution and were re-binned to 31 energy groups using the MCNP 4C code. Re-binned spectra and UTA4 matrix were used to calculate the expected count rates in Bonner spheres spectrometer. These count rates were used as input and correspondent spectrum was used as output during neural network training. The network has 7 input nodes, 56 neurons as hidden layer and 31 neurons in the output layer. After training the network was tested with the Bonner spheres count rates produced by twelve neutron spectra. The network allows unfolding the neutron spectrum from count rates measured with Bonner spheres. Good results are obtained when testing count rates belong to neutron spectra used during training, acceptable results are obtained for count rates obtained from actual neutron fields; however the network fails when count rates belong to monoenergetic neutron sources. (Author)

  14. Folding and unfolding phylogenetic trees and networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Katharina T; Moulton, Vincent; Steel, Mike; Wu, Taoyang

    2016-12-01

    Phylogenetic networks are rooted, labelled directed acyclic graphswhich are commonly used to represent reticulate evolution. There is a close relationship between phylogenetic networks and multi-labelled trees (MUL-trees). Indeed, any phylogenetic network N can be "unfolded" to obtain a MUL-tree U(N) and, conversely, a MUL-tree T can in certain circumstances be "folded" to obtain aphylogenetic network F(T) that exhibits T. In this paper, we study properties of the operations U and F in more detail. In particular, we introduce the class of stable networks, phylogenetic networks N for which F(U(N)) is isomorphic to N, characterise such networks, and show that they are related to the well-known class of tree-sibling networks. We also explore how the concept of displaying a tree in a network N can be related to displaying the tree in the MUL-tree U(N). To do this, we develop aphylogenetic analogue of graph fibrations. This allows us to view U(N) as the analogue of the universal cover of a digraph, and to establish a close connection between displaying trees in U(N) and reconciling phylogenetic trees with networks.

  15. Unfolding Visual Lexical Decision in Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barca, Laura; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Visual lexical decision is a classical paradigm in psycholinguistics, and numerous studies have assessed the so-called “lexicality effect" (i.e., better performance with lexical than non-lexical stimuli). Far less is known about the dynamics of choice, because many studies measured overall reaction times, which are not informative about underlying processes. To unfold visual lexical decision in (over) time, we measured participants' hand movements toward one of two item alternatives by recording the streaming x,y coordinates of the computer mouse. Participants categorized four kinds of stimuli as “lexical" or “non-lexical:" high and low frequency words, pseudowords, and letter strings. Spatial attraction toward the opposite category was present for low frequency words and pseudowords. Increasing the ambiguity of the stimuli led to greater movement complexity and trajectory attraction to competitors, whereas no such effect was present for high frequency words and letter strings. Results fit well with dynamic models of perceptual decision-making, which describe the process as a competition between alternatives guided by the continuous accumulation of evidence. More broadly, our results point to a key role of statistical decision theory in studying linguistic processing in terms of dynamic and non-modular mechanisms. PMID:22563419

  16. Catalogue to select the initial guess spectrum during unfolding

    CERN Document Server

    Vega-Carrillo, H R

    2002-01-01

    A new method to select the initial guess spectrum is presented. Neutron spectra unfolded from Bonner sphere data are dependent on the initial guess spectrum used in the unfolding code. The method is based on a catalogue of detector count rates calculated from a set of reported neutron spectra. The spectra of three isotopic neutron sources sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf, sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 PuBe and sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf/D sub 2 O, were measured to test the method. The unfolding was carried out using the three initial guess options included in the BUNKIUT code. Neutron spectra were also calculated using MCNP code. Unfolded spectra were compared with those calculated; in all the cases our method gives the best results.

  17. Unfolding methods in high-energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blobel, V.

    1985-01-01

    Distributions measured in high-energy physics experiments are often distorted or transformed by limited acceptance and finite resolution of the detectors. The unfolding of measured distributions is an important, but due to inherent instabilities a very difficult problem. Methods for unfolding, applicable for the analysis of high-energy physics experiments, and their properties are discussed. An introduction is given to the method of regularization. (orig.)

  18. Unfolding methods in high-energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blobel, V.

    1984-12-01

    Distributions measured in high-energy physics experiments are often distorted or transformed by limited acceptance and finite resolution of the detectors. The unfolding of measured distributions is an important, but due to inherent instabilities a very difficult problem. Methods for unfolding, applicable for the analysis of high-energy physics experiments, and their properties are discussed. An introduction is given to the method of regularization. (orig.)

  19. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Wenjun, E-mail: wjzheng@buffalo.edu; Glenn, Paul [Department of Physics, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  20. Branches of Triangulated Origami Near the Unfolded State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Gin-ge Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Origami structures are characterized by a network of folds and vertices joining unbendable plates. For applications to mechanical design and self-folding structures, it is essential to understand the interplay between the set of folds in the unfolded origami and the possible 3D folded configurations. When deforming a structure that has been folded, one can often linearize the geometric constraints, but the degeneracy of the unfolded state makes a linear approach impossible there. We derive a theory for the second-order infinitesimal rigidity of an initially unfolded triangulated origami structure and use it to study the set of nearly unfolded configurations of origami with four boundary vertices. We find that locally, this set consists of a number of distinct “branches” which intersect at the unfolded state, and that the number of these branches is exponential in the number of vertices. We find numerical and analytical evidence that suggests that the branches are characterized by choosing each internal vertex to either “pop up” or “pop down.” The large number of pathways along which one can fold an initially unfolded origami structure strongly indicates that a generic structure is likely to become trapped in a “misfolded” state. Thus, new techniques for creating self-folding origami are likely necessary; controlling the popping state of the vertices may be one possibility.

  1. Branches of Triangulated Origami Near the Unfolded State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bryan Gin-ge; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2018-01-01

    Origami structures are characterized by a network of folds and vertices joining unbendable plates. For applications to mechanical design and self-folding structures, it is essential to understand the interplay between the set of folds in the unfolded origami and the possible 3D folded configurations. When deforming a structure that has been folded, one can often linearize the geometric constraints, but the degeneracy of the unfolded state makes a linear approach impossible there. We derive a theory for the second-order infinitesimal rigidity of an initially unfolded triangulated origami structure and use it to study the set of nearly unfolded configurations of origami with four boundary vertices. We find that locally, this set consists of a number of distinct "branches" which intersect at the unfolded state, and that the number of these branches is exponential in the number of vertices. We find numerical and analytical evidence that suggests that the branches are characterized by choosing each internal vertex to either "pop up" or "pop down." The large number of pathways along which one can fold an initially unfolded origami structure strongly indicates that a generic structure is likely to become trapped in a "misfolded" state. Thus, new techniques for creating self-folding origami are likely necessary; controlling the popping state of the vertices may be one possibility.

  2. OPERATOR NORM INEQUALITIES BETWEEN TENSOR UNFOLDINGS ON THE PARTITION LATTICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miaoyan; Duc, Khanh Dao; Fischer, Jonathan; Song, Yun S

    2017-05-01

    Interest in higher-order tensors has recently surged in data-intensive fields, with a wide range of applications including image processing, blind source separation, community detection, and feature extraction. A common paradigm in tensor-related algorithms advocates unfolding (or flattening) the tensor into a matrix and applying classical methods developed for matrices. Despite the popularity of such techniques, how the functional properties of a tensor changes upon unfolding is currently not well understood. In contrast to the body of existing work which has focused almost exclusively on matricizations, we here consider all possible unfoldings of an order- k tensor, which are in one-to-one correspondence with the set of partitions of {1, …, k }. We derive general inequalities between the l p -norms of arbitrary unfoldings defined on the partition lattice. In particular, we demonstrate how the spectral norm ( p = 2) of a tensor is bounded by that of its unfoldings, and obtain an improved upper bound on the ratio of the Frobenius norm to the spectral norm of an arbitrary tensor. For specially-structured tensors satisfying a generalized definition of orthogonal decomposability, we prove that the spectral norm remains invariant under specific subsets of unfolding operations.

  3. Evidence of non-coincidence of normalized sigmoidal curves of two different structural properties for two-state protein folding/unfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahaman, Hamidur; Khan, Md. Khurshid Alam; Hassan, Md. Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Ahmad, Faizan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Non-coincidence of normalized sigmoidal curves of two different structural properties is consistence with the two-state protein folding/unfolding. ► DSC measurements of denaturation show a two-state behavior of g-cyt-c at pH 6.0. ► Urea-induced denaturation of g-cyt-c is a variable two- state process at pH 6.0. ► GdmCl-induced denaturation of g-cyt-c is a fixed two- state process at pH 6.0. -- Abstract: In practice, the observation of non-coincidence of normalized sigmoidal transition curves measured by two different structural properties constitutes a proof of existence of thermodynamically stable intermediate(s) on the folding ↔ unfolding pathway of a protein. Here we give first experimental evidence that this non-coincidence is also observed for a two-state protein denaturation. Proof of this evidence comes from our studies of denaturation of goat cytochrome-c (g-cyt-c) at pH 6.0. These studies involve differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements in the absence of urea and measurements of urea-induced denaturation curves monitored by observing changes in absorbance at 405, 530, and 695 nm and circular dichroism (CD) at 222, 405, and 416 nm. DSC measurements showed that denaturation of the protein is a two-state process, for calorimetric and van’t Hoff enthalpy changes are, within experimental errors, identical. Normalization of urea-induced denaturation curves monitored by optical properties leads to noncoincident sigmoidal curves. Heat-induced transition of g-cyt-c in the presence of different urea concentrations was monitored by CD at 222 nm and absorption at 405 nm. It was observed that these two different structural probes gave not only identical values of T m (transition temperature), ΔH m (change in enthalpy at T m ) and ΔC p (constant-pressure heat capacity change), but these thermodynamic parameters in the absence of urea are also in agreement with those obtained from DSC measurements

  4. Ethanol cellular defense induce unfolded protein response in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet eNavarro-Tapia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is a valuable industrial product and a common metabolite used by many cell types. However, this molecule produces high levels of cytotoxicity affecting cellular performance at several levels. In the presence of ethanol, cells must adjust some of their components, such as the membrane lipids to maintain homeostasis. In the case of microorganism as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol is one of the principal products of their metabolism and is the main stress factor during fermentation. Although many efforts have been made, mechanisms of ethanol tolerance are not fully understood and very little evidence is available to date for specific signaling by ethanol in the cell. This work studied two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, CECT10094 and Temohaya-MI26, isolated from flor wine and agave fermentation (a traditional fermentation from Mexico respectively, which differ in ethanol tolerance, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the ethanol stress response and the reasons for different ethanol tolerance. The transcriptome was analyzed after ethanol stress and, among others, an increased activation of genes related with the unfolded protein response (UPR and its transcription factor, Hac1p, was observed in the tolerant strain CECT10094. We observed that this strain also resist more UPR agents than Temohaya-MI26 and the UPR-ethanol stress correlation was corroborated observing growth of 15 more strains and discarding UPR correlation with other stresses as thermal or oxidative stress. Furthermore, higher activation of UPR pathway in the tolerant strain CECT10094 was observed using a UPR mCherry reporter. Finally, we observed UPR activation in response to ethanol stress in other S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerant strains as the wine strains T73 and EC1118. This work demonstrates that the UPR pathway is activated under ethanol stress occurring in a standard fermentation and links this response to an enhanced ethanol tolerance. Thus

  5. Observing the sun a pocket field guide

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Jamey L

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive solar observing guide for use at the telescope by amateur astronomers at all three levels: beginning, intermediate, and advanced. Users will find invaluable information for identifying features through photos, charts, diagrams in a logical, orderly fashion and then interpreting the observations. Because the Sun is a dynamic celestial body in constant flux, astronomers rarely know for certain what awaits them at the eyepiece. All features of the Sun are transient and sometimes rather fleeting. Given the number of features and the complex life cycles of some solar features, it can be a challenging hobby, and this guide provides all of the guidance necessary to inform observers about the sights and events unfolding before their eyes on the most active and powerful member of our Solar System.

  6. Transient intermediates are populated in the folding pathways of single-domain two-state folding protein L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Hiranmay; Reddy, Govardhan

    2018-04-01

    Small single-domain globular proteins, which are believed to be dominantly two-state folders, played an important role in elucidating various aspects of the protein folding mechanism. However, recent single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments [H. Y. Aviram et al. J. Chem. Phys. 148, 123303 (2018)] on a single-domain two-state folding protein L showed evidence for the population of an intermediate state and it was suggested that in this state, a β-hairpin present near the C-terminal of the native protein state is unfolded. We performed molecular dynamics simulations using a coarse-grained self-organized-polymer model with side chains to study the folding pathways of protein L. In agreement with the experiments, an intermediate is populated in the simulation folding pathways where the C-terminal β-hairpin detaches from the rest of the protein structure. The lifetime of this intermediate structure increased with the decrease in temperature. In low temperature conditions, we also observed a second intermediate state, which is globular with a significant fraction of the native-like tertiary contacts satisfying the features of a dry molten globule.

  7. Exploring the role of internal friction in the dynamics of unfolded proteins using simple polymer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ryan R.; Hawk, Alexander T.; Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2013-02-01

    Recent experiments showed that the reconfiguration dynamics of unfolded proteins are often adequately described by simple polymer models. In particular, the Rouse model with internal friction (RIF) captures internal friction effects as observed in single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) studies of a number of proteins. Here we use RIF, and its non-free draining analog, Zimm model with internal friction, to explore the effect of internal friction on the rate with which intramolecular contacts can be formed within the unfolded chain. Unlike the reconfiguration times inferred from FCS experiments, which depend linearly on the solvent viscosity, the first passage times to form intramolecular contacts are shown to display a more complex viscosity dependence. We further describe scaling relationships obeyed by contact formation times in the limits of high and low internal friction. Our findings provide experimentally testable predictions that can serve as a framework for the analysis of future studies of contact formation in proteins.

  8. Molecular origin of urea driven hydrophobic polymer collapse and unfolding depending on side chain chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Divya; Folberth, Angelina; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2017-07-19

    Osmolytes affect hydrophobic collapse and protein folding equilibria. The underlying mechanisms are, however, not well understood. We report large-scale conformational sampling of two hydrophobic polymers with secondary and tertiary amide side chains using extensive molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated free energy of unfolding increases with urea for the secondary amide, yet decreases for the tertiary amide, in agreement with experiment. The underlying mechanism is rooted in opposing entropic driving forces: while urea screens the hydrophobic macromolecular interface and drives unfolding of the tertiary amide, urea's concomitant loss in configurational entropy drives collapse of the secondary amide. Only at sufficiently high urea concentrations bivalent urea hydrogen bonding interactions with the secondary amide lead to further stabilisation of its collapsed state. The observations provide a new angle on the interplay between side chain chemistry, urea hydrogen bonding, and the role of urea in attenuating or strengthening the hydrophobic effect.

  9. Solvent-Exposed Salt Bridges Influence the Kinetics of α-Helix Folding and Unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuzelaar, Heleen; Tros, Martijn; Huerta-Viga, Adriana; van Dijk, Chris N; Vreede, Jocelyne; Woutersen, Sander

    2014-03-06

    Salt bridges are known to play an essential role in the thermodynamic stability of the folded conformation of many proteins, but their influence on the kinetics of folding remains largely unknown. Here, we investigate the effect of Glu-Arg salt bridges on the kinetics of α-helix folding using temperature-jump transient-infrared spectroscopy and steady-state UV circular dichroism. We find that geometrically optimized salt bridges (Glu - and Arg + are spaced four peptide units apart, and the Glu/Arg order is such that the side-chain rotameric preferences favor salt-bridge formation) significantly speed up folding and slow down unfolding, whereas salt bridges with unfavorable geometry slow down folding and slightly speed up unfolding. Our observations suggest a possible explanation for the surprising fact that many biologically active proteins contain salt bridges that do not stabilize the native conformation: these salt bridges might have a kinetic rather than a thermodynamic function.

  10. First results of Minimum Fisher Regularisation as unfolding method for JET NE213 liquid scintillator neutron spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynar, Jan; Adams, John M.; Bertalot, Luciano; Conroy, Sean

    2005-01-01

    At JET, the NE213 liquid scintillator is being validated as a diagnostic tool for spectral measurements of neutrons emitted from the plasma. Neutron spectra have to be unfolded from the measured pulse-height spectra, which is an ill-conditioned problem. Therefore, use of two independent unfolding methods allows for less ambiguity on the interpretation of the data. In parallel to the routine algorithm MAXED based on the Maximum Entropy method, the Minimum Fisher Regularisation (MFR) method has been introduced at JET. The MFR method, known from two-dimensional tomography applications, has proved to provide a new transparent tool to validate the JET neutron spectra measured with the NE213 liquid scintillators. In this article, the MFR method applicable to spectra unfolding is briefly explained. After a mention of MFR tests on phantom spectra experimental neutron spectra are presented that were obtained by applying MFR to NE213 data in selected JET experiments. The results tend to confirm MAXED observations

  11. Induction of the unfolded protein response by constitutive G-protein signaling in rod photoreceptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tian; Chen, Jeannie

    2014-10-17

    Phototransduction is a G-protein signal transduction cascade that converts photon absorption to a change in current at the plasma membrane. Certain genetic mutations affecting the proteins in the phototransduction cascade cause blinding disorders in humans. Some of these mutations serve as a genetic source of "equivalent light" that activates the cascade, whereas other mutations lead to amplification of the light response. How constitutive phototransduction causes photoreceptor cell death is poorly understood. We showed that persistent G-protein signaling, which occurs in rod arrestin and rhodopsin kinase knock-out mice, caused a rapid and specific induction of the PERK pathway of the unfolded protein response. These changes were not observed in the cGMP-gated channel knock-out rods, an equivalent light condition that mimics light-stimulated channel closure. Thus transducin signaling, but not channel closure, triggers rapid cell death in light damage caused by constitutive phototransduction. Additionally, we show that in the albino light damage model cell death was not associated with increase in global protein ubiquitination or unfolded protein response induction. Taken together, these observations provide novel mechanistic insights into the cell death pathway caused by constitutive phototransduction and identify the unfolded protein response as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Unfolded Protein Response, and Cancer Cell Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Corazzari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Perturbation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis results in a stress condition termed “ER stress” determining the activation of a finely regulated program defined as unfolded protein response (UPR and whose primary aim is to restore this organelle’s physiological activity. Several physiological and pathological stimuli deregulate normal ER activity causing UPR activation, such as hypoxia, glucose shortage, genome instability, and cytotoxic compounds administration. Some of these stimuli are frequently observed during uncontrolled proliferation of transformed cells, resulting in tumor core formation and stage progression. Therefore, it is not surprising that ER stress is usually induced during solid tumor development and stage progression, becoming an hallmark of such malignancies. Several UPR components are in fact deregulated in different tumor types, and accumulating data indicate their active involvement in tumor development/progression. However, although the UPR program is primarily a pro-survival process, sustained and/or prolonged stress may result in cell death induction. Therefore, understanding the mechanism(s regulating the cell survival/death decision under ER stress condition may be crucial in order to specifically target tumor cells and possibly circumvent or overcome tumor resistance to therapies. In this review, we discuss the role played by the UPR program in tumor initiation, progression and resistance to therapy, highlighting the recent advances that have improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the survival/death switch.

  13. Unfolding code for neutron spectrometry based on neural nets technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz R, J. M.; Vega C, H. R.

    2012-10-01

    The most delicate part of neutron spectrometry, is the unfolding process. The derivation of the spectral information is not simple because the unknown is not given directly as a result of the measurements. The drawbacks associated with traditional unfolding procedures have motivated the need of complementary approaches. Novel methods based on Artificial Neural Networks have been widely investigated. In this work, a neutron spectrum unfolding code based on neural nets technology is presented. This unfolding code called Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry by means of Artificial Neural Networks was designed in a graphical interface under LabVIEW programming environment. The core of the code is an embedded neural network architecture, previously optimized by the R obust Design of Artificial Neural Networks Methodology . The main features of the code are: is easy to use, friendly and intuitive to the user. This code was designed for a Bonner Sphere System based on a 6 Lil(Eu) neutron detector and a response matrix expressed in 60 energy bins taken from an International Atomic Energy Agency compilation. The main feature of the code is that as entrance data, only seven rate counts measurement with a Bonner spheres spectrometer are required for simultaneously unfold the 60 energy bins of the neutron spectrum and to calculate 15 dosimetric quantities, for radiation protection porpoises. This code generates a full report in html format with all relevant information. (Author)

  14. Unfolding code for neutron spectrometry based on neural nets technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz R, J. M.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: morvymm@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The most delicate part of neutron spectrometry, is the unfolding process. The derivation of the spectral information is not simple because the unknown is not given directly as a result of the measurements. The drawbacks associated with traditional unfolding procedures have motivated the need of complementary approaches. Novel methods based on Artificial Neural Networks have been widely investigated. In this work, a neutron spectrum unfolding code based on neural nets technology is presented. This unfolding code called Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry by means of Artificial Neural Networks was designed in a graphical interface under LabVIEW programming environment. The core of the code is an embedded neural network architecture, previously optimized by the {sup R}obust Design of Artificial Neural Networks Methodology{sup .} The main features of the code are: is easy to use, friendly and intuitive to the user. This code was designed for a Bonner Sphere System based on a {sup 6}Lil(Eu) neutron detector and a response matrix expressed in 60 energy bins taken from an International Atomic Energy Agency compilation. The main feature of the code is that as entrance data, only seven rate counts measurement with a Bonner spheres spectrometer are required for simultaneously unfold the 60 energy bins of the neutron spectrum and to calculate 15 dosimetric quantities, for radiation protection porpoises. This code generates a full report in html format with all relevant information. (Author)

  15. Reactions of stabilized Criegee Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, Luc; Harder, Hartwig; Novelli, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl oxides (Criegee intermediates) were proposed as key intermediates in the gas phase ozonolysis of alkenes in 1975 by Rudolf Criegee. Despite the importance of ozonolysis in atmospheric chemistry, direct observation of these intermediates remained elusive, with only indirect experimental evidence for their role in the oxidation of hydrocarbons, e.g. through scavenging experiments. Direct experimental observation of stabilized CI has only been achieved since 2008. Since then, a concerted effort using experimental and theoretical means is in motion to characterize the chemistry and kinetics of these reactive intermediates. We present the results of theoretical investigations of the chemistry of Criegee intermediates with a series of coreactants which may be of importance in the atmosphere, in experimental setups, or both. This includes the CI+CI cross-reaction, which proceeds with a rate coefficient near the collision limit and can be important in experimental conditions. The CI + alkene reactions show strong dependence of the rate coefficient depending on the coreactants, but is generally found to be rather slow. The CI + ozone reaction is sufficiently fast to occur both in experiment and the free troposphere, and acts as a sink for CI. The reaction of CI with hydroperoxides, ROOH, is complex, and leads both to the formation of oligomers, as to the formation of reactive etheroxides, with a moderately fast rate coefficient. The importance of these reactions is placed in the context of the reaction conditions in different atmospheric environments ranging from unpolluted to highly polluted.

  16. On the production of He, C, and N by low- and intermediate-mass stars: a comparison of observed and model-predicted planetary nebula abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, R. B. C.; Stephenson, B. G.; Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Kwitter, K. B.; Balick, B.

    2018-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to make a direct comparison between the measured and model-predicted abundances of He, C, and N in a sample of 35 well-observed Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe). All observations, data reductions, and abundance determinations were performed in house to ensure maximum homogeneity. Progenitor star masses (M ≤ 4 M⊙) were inferred using two published sets of post-asymptotic giant branch model tracks and L and Teff values. We conclude the following: (1) the mean values of N/O across the progenitor mass range exceeds the solar value, indicating significant N enrichment in the majority of our objects; (2) the onset of hot bottom burning appears to begin around 2 M⊙, i.e. lower than ∼5 M⊙ implied by theory; (3) most of our objects show a clear He enrichment, as expected from dredge-up episodes; (4) the average sample C/O value is 1.23, consistent with the effects of third dredge up; and (5) model grids used to compare to observations successfully span the distribution over metallicity space of all C/O and many He/H data points but mostly fail to do so in the case of N/O. The evident enrichment of N in PN and the general discrepancy between the observed and model-predicted N/O abundance ratios signal the need for extra mixing as an effect of rotation and/or thermohaline mixing in the models. The unexpectedly high N enrichment that is implied here for low-mass stars, if confirmed, will likely impact our conclusions about the source of N in the Universe.

  17. [Unfolding item response model using best-worst scaling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Kazuya

    2015-02-01

    In attitude measurement and sensory tests, the unfolding model is typically used. In this model, response probability is formulated by the distance between the person and the stimulus. In this study, we proposed an unfolding item response model using best-worst scaling (BWU model), in which a person chooses the best and worst stimulus among repeatedly presented subsets of stimuli. We also formulated an unfolding model using best scaling (BU model), and compared the accuracy of estimates between the BU and BWU models. A simulation experiment showed that the BWU modell performed much better than the BU model in terms of bias and root mean square errors of estimates. With reference to Usami (2011), the proposed models were apllied to actual data to measure attitudes toward tardiness. Results indicated high similarity between stimuli estimates generated with the proposed models and those of Usami (2011).

  18. Intermediate statistics in quantum maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraud, Olivier [H H Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Marklof, Jens [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TW (United Kingdom); O' Keefe, Stephen [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TW (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-16

    We present a one-parameter family of quantum maps whose spectral statistics are of the same intermediate type as observed in polygonal quantum billiards. Our central result is the evaluation of the spectral two-point correlation form factor at small argument, which in turn yields the asymptotic level compressibility for macroscopic correlation lengths. (letter to the editor)

  19. Material Voices: Intermediality and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimingham, Melissa; Shaughnessy, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Autism continues to be regarded enigmatically; a community that is difficult to access due to perceived disruptions of interpersonal connectedness. Through detailed observations of two children participating in the Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project "Imagining Autism: Drama, Performance and Intermediality as Interventions for…

  20. Quantum corrections to conductivity observed at intermediate magnetic fields in a high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2-dimensional electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboryski, R.; Veje, E.; Lindelof, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetoresistance with the field perpendicular to the 2-dimensional electron gas in a high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure at low temperatures is studied. At the lowest magnetic field we observe the weak localization. At magnetic fields, where the product of the mobility and the magnetic field is of the order of unity, the quantum correction to conductivity due to the electron-electron interaction is as a source of magnetoresistance. A consistent analysis of experiments in this regime is for the first time performed. In addition to the well known electron-electron term with the expected temperature dependence, we find a new type of temperature independent quantum correction, which varies logarithmically with mobility. (orig.)

  1. The unfolding effects on the protein hydration shell and partial molar volume: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Galdo, Sara; Amadei, Andrea

    2016-10-12

    In this paper we apply the computational analysis recently proposed by our group to characterize the solvation properties of a native protein in aqueous solution, and to four model aqueous solutions of globular proteins in their unfolded states thus characterizing the protein unfolded state hydration shell and quantitatively evaluating the protein unfolded state partial molar volumes. Moreover, by using both the native and unfolded protein partial molar volumes, we obtain the corresponding variations (unfolding partial molar volumes) to be compared with the available experimental estimates. We also reconstruct the temperature and pressure dependence of the unfolding partial molar volume of Myoglobin dissecting the structural and hydration effects involved in the process.

  2. Intermediality and media change

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This book is about intermediality as an approach to analysing and understanding media change. Intermediality and Media Change is critical of technological determinism that characterises 'new media discourse' about the ongoing digitalization, framed as a revolution and creating sharp contrasts between old and new media. Intermediality instead emphasises paying attention to continuities between media of all types and privileges a comparative perspective on technological changes in media over ti...

  3. Structural Insights of the Cysteine Protease Heynein from Induction and Characterization of Non-native Intermediate States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant K. Patel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are vital to cell physiology and many plants secrete these proteases for defense purposes. Many recent studies have reported unusually high stabilities for several plant cysteine proteases which possibly enable these proteases to function under adverse environmental conditions. Here, we have examined the conformational features of a new plant cysteine protease heynein using spectroscopic tools to understand the basis for its robust functional stability. The studies revealed structural integrity over a wide range of pH (2.5-12.0, temperature (65 oC and urea (8M. However, at pH 2.0, the protein gets acid-unfolded (UA -state with exposed hydrophobic patches, which upon addition of more protons (pH 0.5 or anions (0.5 M KCl and 0.2 M Na2 SO4 yields conformationally distinct refolded intermediates respectively termed: A-, I 1 - and I 2 -states. Strikingly, a high methanol level drives the UA -state into a predominantly -sheet rich conformation (O-state. We observed three-state unfolding kinetics of the I 2 -state by urea, possibly suggesting presence of two domains in the heynein molecule.

  4. Inclusive neutral current ep cross sections with HERA II and two-dimensional unfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, David-Johannes

    2011-06-01

    procedures (regularization). Different methods have been tested in the analysis. Among those are an algebraic method, a method exploiting the notion of global correlation and the standard L curve method. All three methods give similar results, which are consistent with the result from the standard bin-by-bin efficiency correction. However, the statistical uncertainties from unfolding are larger than those from the standard bin-by-bin method for all tested regularization prescriptions. For the algebraic method, the statistical uncertainty is of the order of 1-2% and the total error of the order of 2-3% throughout the kinematic range of this analysis. The statistical uncertainties from unfolding and from the bin-by-bin method has been compared. This is done by choosing a rather strong smoothing prescription for the unfolding, which leads to a minimum of correlations between the data points. A difference of the order of 20-30% in the error is found. This reflects the additional effect of migration on the statistical error, a contribution that has not been accounted for by the bin-by-bin method. To summarize, the propagation from the standard bin-by-bin efficiency correction to a full two dimensional unfolding treatment does not result in an observable change of the measured cross sections, thus establishing trust in previous measurements. However, a significant impact on the statistical uncertainties is observed, which seem to be clearly underestimated by the traditional (bin-by-bin) error treatment. (orig.)

  5. Inclusive neutral current ep cross sections with HERA II and two-dimensional unfolding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, David-Johannes

    2011-06-15

    typically exhibit strong fluctuations and correlations between the data points. This issue can be addressed by smoothing procedures (regularization). Different methods have been tested in the analysis. Among those are an algebraic method, a method exploiting the notion of global correlation and the standard L curve method. All three methods give similar results, which are consistent with the result from the standard bin-by-bin efficiency correction. However, the statistical uncertainties from unfolding are larger than those from the standard bin-by-bin method for all tested regularization prescriptions. For the algebraic method, the statistical uncertainty is of the order of 1-2% and the total error of the order of 2-3% throughout the kinematic range of this analysis. The statistical uncertainties from unfolding and from the bin-by-bin method has been compared. This is done by choosing a rather strong smoothing prescription for the unfolding, which leads to a minimum of correlations between the data points. A difference of the order of 20-30% in the error is found. This reflects the additional effect of migration on the statistical error, a contribution that has not been accounted for by the bin-by-bin method. To summarize, the propagation from the standard bin-by-bin efficiency correction to a full two dimensional unfolding treatment does not result in an observable change of the measured cross sections, thus establishing trust in previous measurements. However, a significant impact on the statistical uncertainties is observed, which seem to be clearly underestimated by the traditional (bin-by-bin) error treatment. (orig.)

  6. Nonintegrability of the unfolding of the fold-Hopf bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Kazuyuki

    2018-02-01

    We consider the unfolding of the codimension-two fold-Hopf bifurcation and prove its meromorphic nonintegrability in the meaning of Bogoyavlenskij for almost all parameter values. Our proof is based on a generalized version of the Morales-Ramis-Simó theory for non-Hamiltonian systems and related variational equations up to second order are used.

  7. Redox Thermodynamics of Cytochromes c Subjected to Urea Induced Unfolding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monari, S.; Ranieri, A.; Di Rocco, G.; van der Zwan, G.; Peressini, S.; Tavagnacco, C.; Millo, D.; Borsari, M.

    2009-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the electron transfer (ET) process for beef heart and yeast cytochromes c and the Lys72Ala/Lys73Ala/Lys79Ala mutant of the latter species subjected to progressive urea-induced unfolding was determined electrochemically. The results indicate the presence of at least three

  8. Becoming a Peroxidase: Cardiolipin-Induced Unfolding of Cytochrome c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenzner, Julia; Toffey, Jason R.; Hong, Yuning; Pletneva, Ekaterina V.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions of cytochrome c (cyt c) with a unique mitochondrial glycerophospholipid cardiolipin (CL) are relevant for the protein’s function in oxidative phosphorylation and apoptosis. Binding to CL-containing membranes promotes cyt c unfolding and dramatically enhances the protein’s peroxidase activity, which is critical in early stages of apoptosis. We have employed a collection of seven dansyl variants of horse heart cyt c to probe the sequence of steps in this functional transformation. Kinetic measurements have unraveled four distinct processes during CL-induced cyt c unfolding: rapid protein binding to CL liposomes; rearrangements of protein substructures with small unfolding energies; partial insertion of the protein into the lipid bilayer; and extensive protein restructuring leading to “open” extended structures. While early rearrangements depend on a hierarchy of foldons in the native structure, the later process of large-scale unfolding is influenced by protein interactions with the membrane surface. The opening of the cyt c structure exposes the heme group, which enhances the protein’s peroxidase activity and also frees the C-terminal helix to aid in the translocation of the protein through CL membranes. PMID:23713573

  9. Unfolding the phenomenon of inter-rater agreement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slaug, Bjørn; Schilling, Oliver; Helle, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The overall objective was to unfold the phenomenon of inter-rater agreement: to identify potential sources of variation in agreement data and to explore how they can be statistically accounted for. The ultimate aim was to propose recommendations for in-depth examination of agreement, i...

  10. PPARγ Ligand-Induced Unfolded Protein Responses in Monocytes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High levels of oxLDL lead to cell dysfunction and apoptosis, a phenomenon known as lipotoxicity. Disturbing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function results in ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), which tends to restore ER homeostasis but switches to apoptosis when ER stress is prolonged. In the present study the ...

  11. Dante-unfolding code for energy spectra evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petilli, M.

    1979-01-01

    The code DANTE, using the last square method in unfolding for dosimetry purpose, solves the neutron spectra evaluation problem starting by activity measurements. The code DANTE introduced for the first time the correlation between available data by mean of flux and activity variance-covariance matrices and the error propagation. In the present report the solution method is detailed described

  12. PPARγ Ligand-Induced Unfolded Protein Responses in Monocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Disturbing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function results in ER stress and unfolded protein response. (UPR), which tends to ... in mnocyte/macrophage cell lines as evident of the activation/up-regulation of ER stress/UPR genes. Cholesterol does not seem to exert ... inflammation (Tiwari et al., 2008). One prominent feature of ...

  13. Structural changes during the unfolding of Bovine serum albumin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The native form of serum albumin is the most important soluble protein in the body plasma. In order to investigate the structural changes of Bovine serum albumin (BSA) during its unfolding in the presence of urea, a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) study was performed. The scattering curves of dilute solutions of BSA ...

  14. Towards data warehousing and mining of protein unfolding simulation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrar, Daniel; Stahl, Frederic; Silva, Candida; Rodrigues, J Rui; Brito, Rui M M; Dubitzky, Werner

    2005-10-01

    The prediction of protein structure and the precise understanding of protein folding and unfolding processes remains one of the greatest challenges in structural biology and bioinformatics. Computer simulations based on molecular dynamics (MD) are at the forefront of the effort to gain a deeper understanding of these complex processes. Currently, these MD simulations are usually on the order of tens of nanoseconds, generate a large amount of conformational data and are computationally expensive. More and more groups run such simulations and generate a myriad of data, which raises new challenges in managing and analyzing these data. Because the vast range of proteins researchers want to study and simulate, the computational effort needed to generate data, the large data volumes involved, and the different types of analyses scientists need to perform, it is desirable to provide a public repository allowing researchers to pool and share protein unfolding data. To adequately organize, manage, and analyze the data generated by unfolding simulation studies, we designed a data warehouse system that is embedded in a grid environment to facilitate the seamless sharing of available computer resources and thus enable many groups to share complex molecular dynamics simulations on a more regular basis. To gain insight into the conformational fluctuations and stability of the monomeric forms of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin (TTR), molecular dynamics unfolding simulations of the monomer of human TTR have been conducted. Trajectory data and meta-data of the wild-type (WT) protein and the highly amyloidogenic variant L55P-TTR represent the test case for the data warehouse. Web and grid services, especially pre-defined data mining services that can run on or 'near' the data repository of the data warehouse, are likely to play a pivotal role in the analysis of molecular dynamics unfolding data.

  15. Development of the unfolding procedures in fast neutron scintillation spectrometry; Razvoj unfolding procedura u scintilacionoj spektrometriji brzih neutrona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinkovic, P [Elektrotehnicki fakultet, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1988-07-01

    Two unfolding procedures have been developed for obtaining fast neutron spectrum from proton-recoil spectrum assigned for spectrometry with organic scintillators. First is the method of differentiation of proton-recoil spectrum, and the second is the method based on solution of integral equation of Fredholm of first kind. (author)

  16. Unfolding of Ubiquitin Studied by Picosecond Time-Resolved Fluorescence of the Tyrosine Residue

    OpenAIRE

    Noronha, Melinda; Lima, João C.; Bastos, Margarida; Santos, Helena; Maçanita, António L.

    2004-01-01

    The photophysics of the single tyrosine in bovine ubiquitin (UBQ) was studied by picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, as a function of pH and along thermal and chemical unfolding, with the following results: First, at room temperature (25°C) and below pH 1.5, native UBQ shows single-exponential decays. From pH 2 to 7, triple-exponential decays were observed and the three decay times were attributed to the presence of tyrosine, a tyrosine-carboxylate hydrogen-bonded complex, and...

  17. Correlated Default and Financial Intermediation

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory Phelan

    2015-01-01

    Financial intermediation naturally arises when knowledge about the aggregate state is valuable for managing investments and lenders cannot easily observe the aggregate state. I show this using a costly enforcement model in which lenders need ex-post incentives to enforce payments from defaulted loans and borrowers' payoffs are correlated. When projects have correlated outcomes, learning the state of one project (via enforcement) provides information about the states of other projects. A large...

  18. An unfolding method for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blobel, V.

    2002-06-01

    Finite detector resolution and limited acceptance require one to apply unfolding methods in high energy physics experiments. Information on the detector resolution is usually given by a set of Monte Carlo events. Based on the experience with a widely used unfolding program (RUN) a modified method has been developed. The first step of the method is a maximum likelihood fit of the Monte Carlo distributions to the measured distribution in one, two or three dimensions; the finite statistics of the Monte Carlo events is taken into account by the use of Barlow's method with a new method of solution. A clustering method is used before combining bins in sparsely populated areas. In the second step a regularization is applied to the solution, which introduces only a small bias. The regularization parameter is determined from the data after a diagonalization and rotation procedure. (orig.)

  19. Amyloid protein unfolding and insertion kinetics on neuronal membrane mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kwan

    2010-03-01

    Atomistic details of beta-amyloid (Aβ ) protein unfolding and lipid interaction kinetics mediated by the neuronal membrane surface are important for developing new therapeutic strategies to prevent and cure Alzheimer's disease. Using all-atom MD simulations, we explored the early unfolding and insertion kinetics of 40 and 42 residue long Aβ in binary lipid mixtures with and without cholesterol that mimic the cholesterol-depleted and cholesterol-enriched lipid nanodomains of neurons. The protein conformational transition kinetics was evaluated from the secondary structure profile versus simulation time plot. The extent of membrane disruption was examined by the calculated order parameters of lipid acyl chains and cholesterol fused rings as well as the density profiles of water and lipid headgroups at defined regions across the lipid bilayer from our simulations. Our results revealed that both the cholesterol content and the length of the protein affect the protein-insertion and membrane stability in our model lipid bilayer systems.

  20. Plant transducers of the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response

    KAUST Repository

    Iwata, Yuji; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2012-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) activates a set of genes to overcome accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a condition termed ER stress, and constitutes an essential part of ER protein quality control that ensures efficient maturation of secretory and membrane proteins in eukaryotes. Recent studies on Arabidopsis and rice identified the signaling pathway in which the ER membrane-localized ribonuclease IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) catalyzes unconventional cytoplasmic splicing of mRNA, thereby producing the active transcription factor Arabidopsis bZIP60 (basic leucine zipper 60) and its ortholog in rice. Here we review recent findings identifying the molecular components of the plant UPR, including IRE1/bZIP60 and the membrane-bound transcription factors bZIP17 and bZIP28, and implicating its importance in several physiological phenomena such as pathogen response. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Plant transducers of the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response

    KAUST Repository

    Iwata, Yuji

    2012-12-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) activates a set of genes to overcome accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a condition termed ER stress, and constitutes an essential part of ER protein quality control that ensures efficient maturation of secretory and membrane proteins in eukaryotes. Recent studies on Arabidopsis and rice identified the signaling pathway in which the ER membrane-localized ribonuclease IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) catalyzes unconventional cytoplasmic splicing of mRNA, thereby producing the active transcription factor Arabidopsis bZIP60 (basic leucine zipper 60) and its ortholog in rice. Here we review recent findings identifying the molecular components of the plant UPR, including IRE1/bZIP60 and the membrane-bound transcription factors bZIP17 and bZIP28, and implicating its importance in several physiological phenomena such as pathogen response. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. an intermediate moisture meat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... traditional SM muscle without compromising quality. ... technique is intermediate moisture food processing. ... Traditionally, most tsire suya producers use ..... quality of Chinese purebred and European X Chinese crossbred ...

  3. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...

  4. Mapping Intermediality in Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Mapping Intermediality in Performance benadert het vraagstuk van intermedialiteit met betrekking tot performance (vooral theater) vanuit vijf verschillende invalshoeken: performativiteit en lichaam; tijd en ruimte; digitale cultuur en posthumanisme; netwerken; pedagogiek en praxis. In deze boeiende

  5. Intermediate algebra & analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gondin, William R

    1967-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra & Analytic Geometry Made Simple focuses on the principles, processes, calculations, and methodologies involved in intermediate algebra and analytic geometry. The publication first offers information on linear equations in two unknowns and variables, functions, and graphs. Discussions focus on graphic interpretations, explicit and implicit functions, first quadrant graphs, variables and functions, determinate and indeterminate systems, independent and dependent equations, and defective and redundant systems. The text then examines quadratic equations in one variable, system

  6. Unfolding education for sustainable development as didactic thinking and practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Katrine Dahl

    2013-01-01

    This article’s primary objective is to unfold how teachers translate education for sustainable development (ESD) in a school context. The article argues that exploring tensions, ruptures and openings apparent in this meeting is crucial for the development of existing teaching practices in relatio...... the analytical foundation; thus it is the practices as seen from the ‘inside’. Furthermore, ESD practices are considered in a broader societal perspective, pointing to the critical power of the practice lens....

  7. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS, GEOMETRY AND STATICS OF A COACH UNFOLDING MECHANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu ANTONESCU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the constructive scheme of the mechanism, the kinematic scheme is drawn in three distinct positions (folded, middle and unfolded. By means of this scheme the mobility of the mechanism is calculated and the structural-topological formula of it is obtained. In the last section of the paper an algorithm of geometric calculus has been elaborated, starting from a kinematic link articulated to the base, element which is considered the driving component.

  8. Joint mapping of genes and conditions via multidimensional unfolding analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelen Kristof

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray compendia profile the expression of genes in a number of experimental conditions. Such data compendia are useful not only to group genes and conditions based on their similarity in overall expression over profiles but also to gain information on more subtle relations between genes and conditions. Getting a clear visual overview of all these patterns in a single easy-to-grasp representation is a useful preliminary analysis step: We propose to use for this purpose an advanced exploratory method, called multidimensional unfolding. Results We present a novel algorithm for multidimensional unfolding that overcomes both general problems and problems that are specific for the analysis of gene expression data sets. Applying the algorithm to two publicly available microarray compendia illustrates its power as a tool for exploratory data analysis: The unfolding analysis of a first data set resulted in a two-dimensional representation which clearly reveals temporal regulation patterns for the genes and a meaningful structure for the time points, while the analysis of a second data set showed the algorithm's ability to go beyond a mere identification of those genes that discriminate between different patient or tissue types. Conclusion Multidimensional unfolding offers a useful tool for preliminary explorations of microarray data: By relying on an easy-to-grasp low-dimensional geometric framework, relations among genes, among conditions and between genes and conditions are simultaneously represented in an accessible way which may reveal interesting patterns in the data. An additional advantage of the method is that it can be applied to the raw data without necessitating the choice of suitable genewise transformations of the data.

  9. Directional Unfolded Source Term (DUST) for Compton Cameras.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Mitchell, Dean J.; Horne, Steven M.; O' Brien, Sean; Thoreson, Gregory G

    2018-03-01

    A Directional Unfolded Source Term (DUST) algorithm was developed to enable improved spectral analysis capabilities using data collected by Compton cameras. Achieving this objective required modification of the detector response function in the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS). Experimental data that were collected in support of this work include measurements of calibration sources at a range of separation distances and cylindrical depleted uranium castings.

  10. Measurement of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in monocytes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomás P

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the primary function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is to synthesize and assemble membrane and secreted proteins. As the main site of protein folding and posttranslational modification in the cell, the ER operates a highly conserved quality control system to ensure only correctly assembled proteins exit the ER and misfolded and unfolded proteins are retained for disposal. Any disruption in the equilibrium of the ER engages a multifaceted intracellular signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response (UPR) to restore normal conditions in the cell. A variety of pathological conditions can induce activation of the UPR, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson\\'s disease, metabolic disorders such as atherosclerosis, and conformational disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Conformational disorders are characterized by mutations that modify the final structure of a protein and any cells that express abnormal protein risk functional impairment. The monocyte is an important and long-lived immune cell and acts as a key immunological orchestrator, dictating the intensity and duration of the host immune response. Monocytes expressing misfolded or unfolded protein may exhibit UPR activation and this can compromise the host immune system. Here, we describe in detail methods and protocols for the examination of UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. This guide should provide new investigators to the field with a broad understanding of the tools required to investigate the UPR in the monocyte.

  11. Measurement of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in monocytes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomas P

    2012-02-01

    In mammalian cells, the primary function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is to synthesize and assemble membrane and secreted proteins. As the main site of protein folding and posttranslational modification in the cell, the ER operates a highly conserved quality control system to ensure only correctly assembled proteins exit the ER and misfolded and unfolded proteins are retained for disposal. Any disruption in the equilibrium of the ER engages a multifaceted intracellular signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response (UPR) to restore normal conditions in the cell. A variety of pathological conditions can induce activation of the UPR, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson\\'s disease, metabolic disorders such as atherosclerosis, and conformational disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Conformational disorders are characterized by mutations that modify the final structure of a protein and any cells that express abnormal protein risk functional impairment. The monocyte is an important and long-lived immune cell and acts as a key immunological orchestrator, dictating the intensity and duration of the host immune response. Monocytes expressing misfolded or unfolded protein may exhibit UPR activation and this can compromise the host immune system. Here, we describe in detail methods and protocols for the examination of UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. This guide should provide new investigators to the field with a broad understanding of the tools required to investigate the UPR in the monocyte.

  12. Neutron spectra unfolding in Bonner spheres spectrometry using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kardan, M.R.; Setayeshi, S.; Koohi-Fayegh, R.; Ghiassi-Nejad, M.

    2003-01-01

    The neural network method has been used for the unfolding of neutron spectra in neutron spectrometry by Bonner spheres. A back propagation algorithm was used for training of neural networks 4mm x 4 mm bare LiI(Eu) and in a polyethylene sphere set: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 18 inch diameter have been used for unfolding of neutron spectra. Neural networks were trained by 199 sets of neutron spectra, which were subdivided into 6, 8, 10, 12, 15 and 20 energy bins and for each of them an appropriate neural network was designed and trained. The validation was performed by the 21 sets of neutron spectra. A neural network with 10 energy bins which had a mean value of error of 6% for dose equivalent estimation of spectra in the validation set showed the best results. The obtained results show that neural networks can be applied as an effective method for unfolding neutron spectra especially when the main target is neutron dosimetry. (author)

  13. Tapping mode AFM study on the surface dynamics of a single glucose oxidase molecule on a Au(1 1 1) surface in water with implication for a surface-induced unfolding pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Ichiro; Yaoita, Masashi; Higano, Michi; Nagashima, Seiiichi; Kataoka, Ryoichi

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated a surface-induced unfolding dynamics of a single glucose oxidase (GO) molecule on Au(1 1 1) in air-saturated water, using tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM). We followed the unfolding process by measuring the maximum height of a well-isolated GO molecule on a terrace near a step-edge of the surface as a function of contact time. We find three linear portions with two intersections in a power-law fit to the selected values of the observed heights. The kinetic TMAFM result implies that there exist at least two distinct dynamic regimes in the unfolding

  14. Intermediate valence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsson, O.; Schoenhammer, K.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopic properties of intermediate valence compounds are studied using the Anderson model. Due to the large orbital and spin degeneracy N/sub f/ of the 4f-level, 1/N/sub f/ can be treated as a small parameter. This approach provides exact T = 0 results for the Anderson impurity model in the limit N/sub f/ → ∞, and by adding 1/N/sub f/ corrections some properties can be calculated accurately even for N/sub f/ = 1 or 2. In particular valence photoemission and resonance photoemission spectroscopies are studied. A comparison of theoretical and experimental spectra provides an estimate of the parameters in the model. Core level photoemission spectra provide estimates of the coupling between the f-level and the conduction states and of the f-level occupancy. With these parameters the model gives a fair description of other electron spectroscopies. For typical parameters the model predicts two structures in the f-spectrum, namely one structure at the f-level and one at the Fermi energy. The resonance photoemission calculation gives a photon energy dependence for these two peaks in fair agreement with experiment. The peak at the Fermi energy is partly due to a narrow Kondo resonance, resulting from many-body effects and the presence of a continuous, partly filled conduction band. This resonance is related to a large density of low-lying excitations, which explains the large susceptibility and specific heat observed for these systems at low temperatures. 38 references, 11 figures, 2 tables

  15. [Therapy of intermediate uveitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doycheva, D; Deuter, C; Zierhut, M

    2014-12-01

    Intermediate uveitis is a form of intraocular inflammation in which the vitreous body is the major site of inflammation. Intermediate uveitis is primarily treated medicinally and systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy. When recurrence of uveitis or side effects occur during corticosteroid therapy an immunosuppressive treatment is required. Cyclosporine A is the only immunosuppressive agent that is approved for therapy of uveitis in Germany; however, other immunosuppressive drugs have also been shown to be effective and well-tolerated in patients with intermediate uveitis. In severe therapy-refractory cases when conventional immunosuppressive therapy has failed, biologics can be used. In patients with unilateral uveitis or when the systemic therapy is contraindicated because of side effects, an intravitreal steroid treatment can be carried out. In certain cases a vitrectomy may be used.

  16. Mobile communication and intermediality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helles, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    communicative affordances of mobile devices in order to understand how people choose between them for different purposes. It is argued that mobile communication makes intermediality especially central, as the choice of medium is detached from the location of stationary media and begins to follow the user across......The article argues the importance of intermediality as a concept for research in mobile communication and media. The constant availability of several, partially overlapping channels for communication (texting, calls, email, Facebook, etc.) requires that we adopt an integrated view of the various...

  17. Money distribution with intermediation

    OpenAIRE

    Teles, Caio Augusto Colnago

    2013-01-01

    This pap er analyzes the distribution of money holdings in a commo dity money search-based mo del with intermediation. Intro ducing heterogeneity of costs to the Kiyotaki e Wright ( 1989 ) mo del, Cavalcanti e Puzzello ( 2010) gives rise to a non-degenerated distribution of money. We extend further this mo del intro ducing intermediation in the trading pro cess. We show that the distribution of money matters for savings decisions. This gives rises to a xed p oint problem for the ...

  18. Impacts of global warming on phenology of spring leaf unfolding remain stable in the long run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanjiong; Rutishauser, This; Tao, Zexing; Zhong, Shuying; Ge, Quansheng; Dai, Junhu

    2017-02-01

    The impact of spring temperature forcing on the timing of leaf unfolding of plants (temperature sensitivity, S T ) is one important indicator of how and to what degree plant species track climate change. Fu et al. (Nature 526:104-107, 2015) found that S T has significantly decreased from the 1980-1994 to the 1999-2013 period for seven mid-latitude tree species in Europe. However, long-term changes in S T over the past 60 years are still not clear. Here, using in situ observations of leaf unfolding for seven dominant European tree species, we analyze the temporal change in S T over decadal time scales extending the data series back to 1951. Our results demonstrate that S T shows no statistically significant change within shifting 30-year windows from 1951 to 2013 and remains stable between 1951-1980 and 1984-2013 (3.6 versus 3.7 days °C -1 ). This result suggests that the significant decrease in S T over the past 33 years could not be sustained when examining the trends of phenological responses in the long run. Therefore, we could not conclude that tree spring phenology advances will slow down in the future, and the S T changes in warming scenarios are still uncertain.

  19. Unfolded protein response is required for Aspergillus oryzae growth under conditions inducing secretory hydrolytic enzyme production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Mizuki; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2015-12-01

    Unfolded protein response (UPR) is an intracellular signaling pathway for adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In yeast UPR, Ire1 cleaves the unconventional intron of HAC1 mRNA, and the functional Hac1 protein translated from the spliced HAC1 mRNA induces the expression of ER chaperone genes and ER-associated degradation genes for the refolding or degradation of unfolded proteins. In this study, we constructed an ireA (IRE1 ortholog) conditionally expressing strain of Aspergillus oryzae, a filamentous fungus producing a large amount of amylolytic enzymes, and examined the contribution of UPR to ER stress adaptation under physiological conditions. Repression of ireA completely blocked A. oryzae growth under conditions inducing the production of hydrolytic enzymes, such as amylases and proteases. This growth defect was restored by the introduction of unconventional intronless hacA (hacA-i). Furthermore, UPR was observed to be induced by amylolytic gene expression, and the disruption of the transcriptional activator for amylolytic genes resulted in partial growth restoration of the ireA-repressing strain. In addition, a homokaryotic ireA disruption mutant was successfully generated using the strain harboring hacA-i as a parental host. These results indicated that UPR is required for A. oryzae growth to alleviate ER stress induced by excessive production of hydrolytic enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Distribution, transition and thermodynamic stability of protein conformations in the denaturant-induced unfolding of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Liujiao; Ji, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Extensive and intensive studies on the unfolding of proteins require appropriate theoretical model and parameter to clearly illustrate the feature and characteristic of the unfolding system. Over the past several decades, four approaches have been proposed to describe the interaction between proteins and denaturants, but some ambiguity and deviations usually occur in the explanation of the experimental data. In this work, a theoretical model was presented to show the dependency of the residual activity ratio of the proteins on the molar denaturant concentration. Through the characteristic unfolding parameters ki and Δmi in this model, the distribution, transition and thermodynamic stability of protein conformations during the unfolding process can be quantitatively described. This model was tested with the two-state unfolding of bovine heart cytochrome c and the three-state unfolding of hen egg white lysozyme induced by both guanidine hydrochloride and urea, the four-state unfolding of bovine carbonic anhydrase b induced by guanidine hydrochloride and the unfolding of some other proteins induced by denaturants. The results illustrated that this model could be used accurately to reveal the distribution and transition of protein conformations in the presence of different concentrations of denaturants and to evaluate the unfolding tendency and thermodynamic stability of different conformations. In most denaturant-induced unfolding of proteins, the unfolding became increasingly hard in next transition step and the proteins became more unstable as they attained next successive stable conformation. This work presents a useful method for people to study the unfolding of proteins and may be used to describe the unfolding and refolding of other biopolymers induced by denaturants, inducers, etc.

  1. Evaluation of spectral unfolding techniques for neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunden, Erik Andersson; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Giacomelli, L.; Hellesen, C.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Ronchi, E.; Sjoestrand, H.; Weiszflog, M.; Kaellne, J.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.

    2008-01-01

    The precision of the JET installations of MAXED, GRAVEL and the L-curve version of MAXED has been evaluated by using synthetic neutron spectra. We have determined the number of counts needed for the detector systems NE213 and MPR to get an error below 10% of the MAXED unfolded neutron spectra is determined to be ∼10 6 and ∼10 4 , respectively. For GRAVEL the same number is ∼10 7 and ∼3·10 4 for NE213 and MPR, respectively

  2. Unfolding of neutron spectra from Godiva type critical assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, J.T.; Meason, J.L.; Wright, H.L.

    1976-01-01

    The results from three experiments conducted at the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor Facility are discussed. The experiments were designed to measure the ''free-field'' neutron leakage spectrum and the neutron spectra from mildly perturbed environments. SAND-II was used to calculate the neutron spectrum utilizing several different trial input spectra for each experiment. Comparisons are made between the unfolded neutron spectrum for each trial input on the basis of the following parameters: average neutron energy (above 10 KeV), integral fluence (above 10 KeV), spectral index and the hardness parameter, phi/sub eq//phi

  3. Uncertainties related to numerical methods for neutron spectra unfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glodic, S.; Ninkovic, M.; Adarougi, N.A.

    1987-10-01

    One of the often used techniques for neutron detection in radiation protection utilities is the Bonner multisphere spectrometer. Besides its advantages and universal applicability for evaluating integral parameters of neutron fields in health physics practices, the outstanding problems of the method are data analysis and the accuracy of the results. This paper briefly discusses some numerical problems related to neutron spectra unfolding, such as uncertainty of the response matrix as a source of error, and the possibility of real time data reduction using spectrometers. (author)

  4. Unfolding of Vortices into Topological Stripes in a Multiferroic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Mostovoy, M.; Han, M. G.; Horibe, Y.; Aoki, T.; Zhu, Y.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2014-06-01

    Multiferroic hexagonal RMnO3 (R =rare earths) crystals exhibit dense networks of vortex lines at which six domain walls merge. While the domain walls can be readily moved with an applied electric field, the vortex cores so far have been impossible to control. Our experiments demonstrate that shear strain induces a Magnus-type force pulling vortices and antivortices in opposite directions and unfolding them into a topological stripe domain state. We discuss the analogy between this effect and the current-driven dynamics of vortices in superconductors and superfluids.

  5. Model based rib-cage unfolding for trauma CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Berg, Jens; Klinder, Tobias; Lorenz, Cristian

    2018-03-01

    A CT rib-cage unfolding method is proposed that does not require to determine rib centerlines but determines the visceral cavity surface by model base segmentation. Image intensities are sampled across this surface that is flattened using a model based 3D thin-plate-spline registration. An average rib centerline model projected onto this surface serves as a reference system for registration. The flattening registration is designed so that ribs similar to the centerline model are mapped onto parallel lines preserving their relative length. Ribs deviating from this model appear deviating from straight parallel ribs in the unfolded view, accordingly. As the mapping is continuous also the details in intercostal space and those adjacent to the ribs are rendered well. The most beneficial application area is Trauma CT where a fast detection of rib fractures is a crucial task. Specifically in trauma, automatic rib centerline detection may not be guaranteed due to fractures and dislocations. The application by visual assessment on the large public LIDC data base of lung CT proved general feasibility of this early work.

  6. Constrained Unfolding of a Helical Peptide: Implicit versus Explicit Solvents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailey R Bureau

    Full Text Available Steered Molecular Dynamics (SMD has been seen to provide the potential of mean force (PMF along a peptide unfolding pathway effectively but at significant computational cost, particularly in all-atom solvents. Adaptive steered molecular dynamics (ASMD has been seen to provide a significant computational advantage by limiting the spread of the trajectories in a staged approach. The contraction of the trajectories at the end of each stage can be performed by taking a structure whose nonequilibrium work is closest to the Jarzynski average (in naive ASMD or by relaxing the trajectories under a no-work condition (in full-relaxation ASMD--namely, FR-ASMD. Both approaches have been used to determine the energetics and hydrogen-bonding structure along the pathway for unfolding of a benchmark peptide initially constrained as an α-helix in a water environment. The energetics are quite different to those in vacuum, but are found to be similar between implicit and explicit solvents. Surprisingly, the hydrogen-bonding pathways are also similar in the implicit and explicit solvents despite the fact that the solvent contact plays an important role in opening the helix.

  7. Understanding how biodiversity unfolds through time under neutral theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missa, Olivier; Dytham, Calvin; Morlon, Hélène

    2016-04-05

    Theoretical predictions for biodiversity patterns are typically derived under the assumption that ecological systems have reached a dynamic equilibrium. Yet, there is increasing evidence that various aspects of ecological systems, including (but not limited to) species richness, are not at equilibrium. Here, we use simulations to analyse how biodiversity patterns unfold through time. In particular, we focus on the relative time required for various biodiversity patterns (macroecological or phylogenetic) to reach equilibrium. We simulate spatially explicit metacommunities according to the Neutral Theory of Biodiversity (NTB) under three modes of speciation, which differ in how evenly a parent species is split between its two daughter species. We find that species richness stabilizes first, followed by species area relationships (SAR) and finally species abundance distributions (SAD). The difference in timing of equilibrium between these different macroecological patterns is the largest when the split of individuals between sibling species at speciation is the most uneven. Phylogenetic patterns of biodiversity take even longer to stabilize (tens to hundreds of times longer than species richness) so that equilibrium predictions from neutral theory for these patterns are unlikely to be relevant. Our results suggest that it may be unwise to assume that biodiversity patterns are at equilibrium and provide a first step in studying how these patterns unfold through time. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. Inhibition of the Unfolded Protein Response Mechanism Prevents Cardiac Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody Groenendyk

    Full Text Available Cardiac fibrosis attributed to excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins is a major cause of heart failure and death. Cardiac fibrosis is extremely difficult and challenging to treat in a clinical setting due to lack of understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to cardiac fibrosis and effective anti-fibrotic therapies. The objective in this study was to examine whether unfolded protein response (UPR pathway mediates cardiac fibrosis and whether a pharmacological intervention to modulate UPR can prevent cardiac fibrosis and preserve heart function.We demonstrate here that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse with increased expression of calreticulin, a model of heart failure, stems from impairment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis, transient activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR pathway and stimulation of the TGFβ1/Smad2/3 signaling pathway. Remarkably, sustained pharmacologic inhibition of the UPR pathway by tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA is sufficient to prevent cardiac fibrosis, and improved exercise tolerance.We show that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse model of heart failure stems from transient activation of UPR pathway leading to persistent remodelling of cardiac tissue. Blocking the activation of the transiently activated UPR pathway by TUDCA prevented cardiac fibrosis, and improved prognosis. These findings offer a window for additional interventions that can preserve heart function.

  9. Network Unfolding Map by Vertex-Edge Dynamics Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verri, Filipe Alves Neto; Urio, Paulo Roberto; Zhao, Liang

    2018-02-01

    The emergence of collective dynamics in neural networks is a mechanism of the animal and human brain for information processing. In this paper, we develop a computational technique using distributed processing elements in a complex network, which are called particles, to solve semisupervised learning problems. Three actions govern the particles' dynamics: generation, walking, and absorption. Labeled vertices generate new particles that compete against rival particles for edge domination. Active particles randomly walk in the network until they are absorbed by either a rival vertex or an edge currently dominated by rival particles. The result from the model evolution consists of sets of edges arranged by the label dominance. Each set tends to form a connected subnetwork to represent a data class. Although the intrinsic dynamics of the model is a stochastic one, we prove that there exists a deterministic version with largely reduced computational complexity; specifically, with linear growth. Furthermore, the edge domination process corresponds to an unfolding map in such way that edges "stretch" and "shrink" according to the vertex-edge dynamics. Consequently, the unfolding effect summarizes the relevant relationships between vertices and the uncovered data classes. The proposed model captures important details of connectivity patterns over the vertex-edge dynamics evolution, in contrast to the previous approaches, which focused on only vertex or only edge dynamics. Computer simulations reveal that the new model can identify nonlinear features in both real and artificial data, including boundaries between distinct classes and overlapping structures of data.

  10. A neutron spectrum unfolding code based on iterative procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz R, J. M.; Vega C, H. R.

    2012-10-01

    In this work, the version 3.0 of the neutron spectrum unfolding code called Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry from Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas (NSDUAZ), is presented. This code was designed in a graphical interface under the LabVIEW programming environment and it is based on the iterative SPUNIT iterative algorithm, using as entrance data, only the rate counts obtained with 7 Bonner spheres based on a 6 Lil(Eu) neutron detector. The main features of the code are: it is intuitive and friendly to the user; it has a programming routine which automatically selects the initial guess spectrum by using a set of neutron spectra compiled by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Besides the neutron spectrum, this code calculates the total flux, the mean energy, H(10), h(10), 15 dosimetric quantities for radiation protection porpoises and 7 survey meter responses, in four energy grids, based on the International Atomic Energy Agency compilation. This code generates a full report in html format with all relevant information. In this work, the neutron spectrum of a 241 AmBe neutron source on air, located at 150 cm from detector, is unfolded. (Author)

  11. Spectrum unfolding by the least-squares methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perey, F.G.

    1977-01-01

    The method of least squares is briefly reviewed, and the conditions under which it may be used are stated. From this analysis, a least-squares approach to the solution of the dosimetry neutron spectrum unfolding problem is introduced. The mathematical solution to this least-squares problem is derived from the general solution. The existence of this solution is analyzed in some detail. A chi 2 -test is derived for the consistency of the input data which does not require the solution to be obtained first. The fact that the problem is technically nonlinear, but should be treated in general as a linear one, is argued. Therefore, the solution should not be obtained by iteration. Two interpretations are made for the solution of the code STAY'SL, which solves this least-squares problem. The relationship of the solution to this least-squares problem to those obtained currently by other methods of solving the dosimetry neutron spectrum unfolding problem is extensively discussed. It is shown that the least-squares method does not require more input information than would be needed by current methods in order to estimate the uncertainties in their solutions. From this discussion it is concluded that the proposed least-squares method does provide the best complete solution, with uncertainties, to the problem as it is understood now. Finally, some implications of this method are mentioned regarding future work required in order to exploit its potential fully

  12. Mapping of unfolding states of integral helical membrane proteins by GPS-NMR and scattering techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calcutta, Antonello; Jessen, Christian M; Behrens, Manja Annette

    2012-01-01

    induced by unfolding of an integral membrane protein, namely TFE-induced unfolding of KcsA solubilized by the n-dodecyl ß-d-maltoside (DDM) surfactant is investigated by the recently introduced GPS-NMR (Global Protein folding State mapping by multivariate NMR) (Malmendal et al., PlosONE 5, e10262 (2010......)) along with dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). GPS-NMR is used as a tool for fast analysis of the protein unfolding processes upon external perturbation, and DLS and SAXS are used for further structural characterization of the unfolding states. The combination allows...

  13. Experimental parameterization of an energy function for the simulation of unfolded proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, A.B.; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Lindorff-Larsen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The determination of conformational preferences in unfolded and disordered proteins is an important challenge in structural biology. We here describe an algorithm to optimize energy functions for the simulation of unfolded proteins. The procedure is based on the maximum likelihood principle and e...... and can be applied to a range of experimental data and energy functions including the force fields used in molecular dynamics simulations.......The determination of conformational preferences in unfolded and disordered proteins is an important challenge in structural biology. We here describe an algorithm to optimize energy functions for the simulation of unfolded proteins. The procedure is based on the maximum likelihood principle...

  14. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, C.; Ankowski, A.M.; Asaadi, J.A.; Ashenfelter, J.; Axani, S.N.; Babu, K.; Backhouse, C.; Band, H.R.; Barbeau, P.S.; Barros, N.; Bernstein, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bishai, M.; Blucher, E.; Bouffard, J.; Bowden, N.; Brice, S.; Bryan, C.; Camilleri, L.; Cao, J.; Carlson, J.; Carr, R.E.; Chatterjee, A.; Chen, M.; Chen, S.; Chiu, M.; Church, E.D.; Collar, J.I.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Convery, M.R.; Cooper, R.L.; Cowen, D.; Davoudiasl, H.; de Gouvea, A.; Dean, D.J.; Deichert, G.; Descamps, F.; DeYoung, T.; Diwan, M.V.; Djurcic, Z.; Dolinski, M.J.; Dolph, J.; Donnelly, B.; Dwyer, D.A.; Dytman, S.; Efremenko, Y.; Everett, L.L.; Fava, A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fleming, B.; Friedland, A.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Gaisser, T.K.; Galeazzi, M.; Galehouse, D.C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Garvey, G.T.; Gautam, S.; Gilje, K.E.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.; Goodman, M.C.; Gordon, H.; Gramellini, E.; Green, M.P.; Guglielmi, A.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hackenburg, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Harris, D.; Heeger, K.M.; Herman, M.; Hill, R.; Holin, A.; Huber, P.; Jaffe, D.E.; Johnson, R.A.; Joshi, J.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kaufman, L.J.; Kayser, B.; Kettell, S.H.; Kirby, B.J.; Klein, J.R.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kriske, R.M.; Lane, C.E.; Langford, T.J.; Lankford, A.; Lau, K.; Learned, J.G.; Ling, J.; Link, J.M.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B.R.; Lockwitz, S.; Lokajicek, M.; Louis, W.C.; Luk, K.; Lykken, J.; Marciano, W.J.; Maricic, J.; Markoff, D.M.; Martinez Caicedo, D.A.; Mauger, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; McCluskey, E.; McKeen, D.; McKeown, R.; Mills, G.; Mocioiu, I.; Monreal, B.; Mooney, M.R.; Morfin, J.G.; Mumm, P.; Napolitano, J.; Neilson, R.; Nelson, J.K.; Nessi, M.; Norcini, D.; Nova, F.; Nygren, D.R.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Palamara, O.; Parsa, Z.; Patterson, R.; Paul, P.; Pocar, A.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J.L.; Rameika, R.; Ranucci, G.; Ray, H.; Reyna, D.; Rich, G.C.; Rodrigues, P.; Romero, E.Romero; Rosero, R.; Rountree, S.D.; Rybolt, B.; Sanchez, M.C.; Santucci, G.; Schmitz, D.; Scholberg, K.; Seckel, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shrock, R.; Smy, M.B.; Soderberg, M.; Sonzogni, A.; Sousa, A.B.; Spitz, J.; St. John, J.M.; Stewart, J.; Strait, J.B.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Szelc, A.M.; Tayloe, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Toups, M.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Van de Water, R.G.; Vogelaar, R.B.; Weber, M.; Weng, W.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; White, B.R.; Whitehead, L.; Whittington, D.W.; Wilking, M.J.; Wilson, R.J.; Wilson, P.; Winklehner, D.; Winn, D.R.; Worcester, E.; Yang, L.; Yeh, M.; Yokley, Z.W.; Yoo, J.; Yu, B.; Yu, J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  15. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C.; et al.

    2015-03-23

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  16. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Alonso, J. R. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ankowski, A. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Asaadi, J. A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Ashenfelter, J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Axani, S. N. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Babu, K [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Backhouse, C. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Band, H. R. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Barbeau, P. S. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Barros, N. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Betancourt, M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bishai, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blucher, E. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Bouffard, J. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Albany, NY (United States); Bowden, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brice, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bryan, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Camilleri, L. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cao, J. [Inst. of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Carlson, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carr, R. E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Chatterjee, A. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Chen, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Chen, S. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Chiu, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Church, E. D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Collar, J. I. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Collin, G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Conrad, J. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Convery, M. R. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cooper, R. L. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Cowen, D. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Davoudiasl, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gouvea, A. D. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dean, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Deichert, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Descamps, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); DeYoung, T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Diwan, M. V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Djurcic, Z. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dolinski, M. J. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dolph, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Donnelly, B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Dwyer, D. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dytman, S. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Efremenko, Y. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Everett, L. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Fava, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Figueroa-Feliciano, E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Fleming, B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Friedland, A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fujikawa, B. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gaisser, T. K. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Galeazzi, M. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States); Galehouse, DC [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States); Galindo-Uribarri, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Garvey, G. T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gautam, S. [Tribhuvan Univ., Kirtipur (Nepal); Gilje, K. E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gonzalez-Garcia, M. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Goodman, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gordon, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gramellini, E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Green, M. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guglielmi, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Hackenburg, R. W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hackenburg, A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Halzen, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Han, K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hans, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Harris, D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Heeger, K. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Herman, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hill, R. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Holin, A. [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom); Huber, P. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Jaffe, D. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Johnson, R. A. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Joshi, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karagiorgi, G. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Kaufman, L. J. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Kayser, B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Kettell, S. H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kirby, B. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Klein, J. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Kolomensky, Y. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kriske, R. M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Lane, C. E. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Langford, T. J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Lankford, A. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lau, K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Learned, J. G. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Ling, J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Link, J. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Lissauer, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littenberg, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littlejohn, B. R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lockwitz, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lokajicek, M. [Inst. of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Louis, W. C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Luk, K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lykken, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Marciano, W. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Maricic, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Markoff, D. M. [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Caicedo, D. A. M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mauger, C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mavrokoridis, K. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); McCluskey, E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); McKeen, D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); McKeown, R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Mills, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mocioiu, I. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Monreal, B. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Mooney, M. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Morfin, J. G. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mumm, P. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Napolitano, J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neilson, R. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nelson, J. K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Nessi, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Norcini, D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Nova, F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Nygren, D. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Gann, GDO [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Palamara, O. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Parsa, Z. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Patterson, R. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Paul, P. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Pocar, A. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Qian, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Raaf, J. L. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Rameika, R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ranucci, G. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Milano (Italy); Ray, H. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Reyna, D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rich, G. C. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Rodrigues, P. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Romero, E. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rosero, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rountree, S. D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Rybolt, B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sanchez, M. C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Santucci, G. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Schmitz, D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Scholberg, K. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Seckel, D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Shaevitz, M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Shrock, R. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Smy, M. B. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Soderberg, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Sonzogni, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sousa, A. B. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Spitz, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); John, J. M. S. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Stewart, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Strait, J. B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Sullivan, G. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Svoboda, R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Szelc, A. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Tayloe, R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Thomson, M. A. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Toups, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Vacheret, A. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Vagins, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Water, R. G. V. D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogelaar, R. B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Weber, M. [Bern (Switzerland); Weng, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wetstein, M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); White, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); White, B. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Whitehead, L. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Whittington, D. W. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Wilking, M. J. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Wilson, R. J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Wilson, P. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Winklehner, D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Winn, D. R. [Fairfield Univ., CT (United States); Worcester, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yang, L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Yeh, M [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yokley, Z. W. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yoo, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Yu, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yu, J. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Zhang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-04-03

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  17. Intermediate energy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Fukahori, T.; Hasegawa, A.

    1998-01-01

    Subgroup 13 (SG13) on Intermediate Energy Nuclear data was formed by NEA Nuclear Science Committee to solve common problems of these types of data for nuclear applications. An overview is presented in this final report of the present activities of SG13, including data needs, high-priority nuclear data request list (nuclides), compilation of experimental data, specialists meetings and benchmarks, data formats and data libraries. Some important accomplishments are summarized, and recommendations are presented. (R.P.)

  18. Grandpaternal-induced transgenerational dietary reprogramming of the unfolded protein response in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alm, Petter S; de Castro Barbosa, Thais; Barrès, Romain

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Parental nutrition and lifestyle impact the metabolic phenotype of the offspring. We have reported that grandpaternal chronic high-fat diet (HFD) transgenerationally impairs glucose metabolism in subsequent generations. Here we determined whether grandpaternal diet transgenerationally....... Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was performed to determine pathways reprogrammed by grandpaternal diet. RESULTS: GSEA revealed an enrichment of the unfolded protein response pathway in skeletal muscle of grand-offspring from HFD-fed grandfathers compared to grand-offspring of chow-fed males....... Activation of the stress sensor (ATF6α), may be a pivotal point whereby this pathway is activated. Interestingly, skeletal muscle from F1-offspring was not affected in a similar manner. No major changes were observed in the skeletal muscle lipidome profile due to grandpaternal diet. CONCLUSIONS...

  19. Tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response in the developing mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin; Ke, Zun-Ji; Comer, Ashley L.; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal days (PDs) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1–CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. - Highlights: • Tunicamycin caused a development-dependent UPR in the mouse brain. • Immature brain was more susceptible to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. • Tunicamycin caused more neuronal death in immature brain than mature brain. • Tunicamycin-induced neuronal death is region-specific

  20. Tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response in the developing mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke, Zun-Ji [Department of Biochemistry, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 1200 Cailun Road, Shanghai 201203 (China); Comer, Ashley L.; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A. [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo, Jia, E-mail: jialuo888@uky.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal days (PDs) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1–CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. - Highlights: • Tunicamycin caused a development-dependent UPR in the mouse brain. • Immature brain was more susceptible to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. • Tunicamycin caused more neuronal death in immature brain than mature brain. • Tunicamycin-induced neuronal death is region-specific.

  1. The intermediate state in Patd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) Jesus had assumed. (concerning the 'intermediate state') as existing, anything which does not exist. Three basic things about the intermediate state emerge from the parable: (a) Jesus recognizes that at the moment of death, in ipso articulo.

  2. Thermal unfolding of a Ca- and Lanthanide-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahmy, Karim [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biophysics; Goettfert, M. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Knoeppel, J.

    2017-06-01

    The MIIA (metal ion-induced autocleavage)-domain of the protein Vic001052 from the pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus, comprises 173 amino acids and exhibits Ca-dependent autoproteolytic activity. It shows homology to nodulation proteins which are secreted by Rhizobiacea into plant host cells where they exert Ca-dependent functions. We have studied the structural and energetic aspects of metal protein interactions of the MIIA domain which appear attractive for engineering metal-binding synthetic peptides. Using a non-cleavable MIIA domain construct, we detected very similar structural changes upon binding to Ca{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+}. The thermal denaturation of the Ca-bound state was studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The metal-bound folded state unfolds reversibly into an unstructured metal-free state similar to the metal-free state at room temperature.

  3. Unfolding and Refolding Embodiment into the Landscape of Ubiquitous Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schick, Lea; Malmborg, Lone

    2009-01-01

    This paper advocates the future of the body as a distributed and shared embodiment; an unfolded body that doesn’t end at one's skin, but emerges as intercorporeality between bodies and the technological environment. Looking at new tendencies within interaction design and ubiquitous computing to see...... how these are to an increasing extent focusing on sociality, context-awareness, relations, affects, connectedness, and collectivity we will examine how these new technological movements can change our perception of embodiment towards a distributed and shared one. By examining interactive textiles...... as part of a future rising landscape of multi-sensory networks we will exemplify how the new technologies can shutter dichotomies and challenge traditional notions of embodiment and the subject. Finally, we show how this ‘new embodiment’ manifests Deleuze’s philosophy of the body as something unstable...

  4. Neutron spectra unfolding with maximum entropy and maximum likelihood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shikoh; Tsunoda, Toshiharu

    1989-01-01

    A new unfolding theory has been established on the basis of the maximum entropy principle and the maximum likelihood method. This theory correctly embodies the Poisson statistics of neutron detection, and always brings a positive solution over the whole energy range. Moreover, the theory unifies both problems of overdetermined and of underdetermined. For the latter, the ambiguity in assigning a prior probability, i.e. the initial guess in the Bayesian sense, has become extinct by virtue of the principle. An approximate expression of the covariance matrix for the resultant spectra is also presented. An efficient algorithm to solve the nonlinear system, which appears in the present study, has been established. Results of computer simulation showed the effectiveness of the present theory. (author)

  5. DANTE, Activation Analysis Neutron Spectra Unfolding by Covariance Matrix Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petilli, M.

    1981-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The program evaluates activation measurements of reactor neutron spectra and unfolds the results for dosimetry purposes. Different evaluation options are foreseen: absolute or relative fluxes and different iteration algorithms. 2 - Method of solution: A least-square fit method is used. A correlation between available data and their uncertainties has been introduced by means of flux and activity variance-covariance matrices. Cross sections are assumed to be constant, i.e. with variance-covariance matrix equal to zero. The Lagrange multipliers method has been used for calculating the solution. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: 9 activation experiments can be analyzed. 75 energy groups are accepted

  6. The Unfolded Protein Response and Cell Fate Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetz, Claudio; Papa, Feroz R

    2018-01-18

    The secretory capacity of a cell is constantly challenged by physiological demands and pathological perturbations. To adjust and match the protein-folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to changing secretory needs, cells employ a dynamic intracellular signaling pathway known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). Homeostatic activation of the UPR enforces adaptive programs that modulate and augment key aspects of the entire secretory pathway, whereas maladaptive UPR outputs trigger apoptosis. Here, we discuss recent advances into how the UPR integrates information about the intensity and duration of ER stress stimuli in order to control cell fate. These findings are timely and significant because they inform an evolving mechanistic understanding of a wide variety of human diseases, including diabetes mellitus, neurodegeneration, and cancer, thus opening up the potential for new therapeutic modalities to treat these diverse diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Emerging Role of the Unfolded Protein Response in Tumor Immunosurveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacker, Hélène; Vetters, Jessica; Moudombi, Lyvia; Caux, Christophe; Janssens, Sophie; Michallet, Marie-Cécile

    2017-07-01

    Disruption of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis results in ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). This response alleviates cell stress, and is activated in both tumor cells and tumor infiltrating immune cells. The UPR plays a dual function in cancer biology, acting as a barrier to tumorigenesis at the premalignant stage, while fostering cancer maintenance in established tumors. In infiltrating immune cells, the UPR has been involved in both immunosurveillance and immunosuppressive functions. This review aims to decipher the role of the UPR at different stages of tumorigenesis and how the UPR shapes the balance between immunosurveillance and immune escape. This knowledge may improve existing UPR-targeted therapies and the design of novel strategies for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Unfolded Protein Response in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Steven G

    2016-04-01

    Accumulation of nonfunctional and potentially cytotoxic, misfolded proteins in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is believed to contribute to lung cell apoptosis, inflammation, and autophagy. Because of its fundamental role as a quality control system in protein metabolism, the "unfolded protein response" (UPR) is of potential importance in the pathogenesis of COPD. The UPR comprises a series of transcriptional, translational, and post-translational processes that decrease protein synthesis while enhancing protein folding capacity and protein degradation. Several studies have suggested that the UPR contributes to lung cell apoptosis and lung inflammation in at least some subjects with human COPD. However, information on the prevalence of the UPR in subjects with COPD, the lung cells that manifest a UPR, and the role of the UPR in the pathogenesis of COPD is extremely limited and requires additional study.

  9. Higher order antibunching in intermediate states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Amit; Sharma, Navneet K.; Pathak, Anirban

    2008-01-01

    Since the introduction of binomial state as an intermediate state, different intermediate states have been proposed. Different nonclassical effects have also been reported in these intermediate states. But till now higher order antibunching is predicted in only one type of intermediate state, which is known as shadowed negative binomial state. Recently we have shown that the higher order antibunching is not a rare phenomenon [P. Gupta, P. Pandey, A. Pathak, J. Phys. B 39 (2006) 1137]. To establish our earlier claim further, here we have shown that the higher order antibunching can be seen in different intermediate states, such as binomial state, reciprocal binomial state, hypergeometric state, generalized binomial state, negative binomial state and photon added coherent state. We have studied the possibility of observing the higher order subpoissonian photon statistics in different limits of intermediate states. The effects of different control parameters on the depth of non classicality have also been studied in this connection and it has been shown that the depth of nonclassicality can be tuned by controlling various physical parameters

  10. [Intermediate energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report summarizes work in experimental Intermediate Energy Nuclear Physics carried out between October 1, 1988 and October 1, 1989 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under grant DE-FG02-86ER-40269 with the United States Department of Energy. The experimental program is very broadly based, including pion-nucleon studies at TRIUMF, inelastic pion scattering and charge exchange reactions at LAMPF, and nucleon charge exchange at LAMPF/WNR. In addition, a number of other topics related to accelerator physics are described in this report

  11. The construction of periodic unfolding operators on some compact Riemannian manifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobberschütz, Sören; Böhm, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The notion of periodic unfolding has become a standard tool in the theory of periodic homogenization. However, all the results obtained so far are only applicable to the "flat" Euclidean space R n. In this paper, we present a generalization of the method of periodic unfolding applicable to struct...

  12. Immobilized unfolded cytochrome c acts as a catalyst for dioxygen reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavagnacco, Claudio; Monari, Stefano; Ranieri, Antonio; Bortolotti, Carlo Augusto; Peressini, Silvia; Borsari, Marco

    2011-10-21

    Unfolding turns immobilized cytochrome c into a His-His ligated form endowed with catalytic activity towards O(2), which is absent in the native protein. Dioxygen could be used by naturally occurring unfolded cytochrome c as a substrate for the production of partially reduced oxygen species (PROS) contributing to the cell oxidative stress.

  13. Non-leftmost Unfolding in Partial Evaluation of Logic Programs with Impure Predicates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Elvira; Puebla, German; Gallagher, John Patrick

    2006-01-01

    -leftmost unfolding steps can result in incorrect results since the independence of the computation rule no longer holds in the presence of impure predicates. Existing proposals allow non-leftmost unfolding steps, but at the cost of accuracy: bindings and failure are not propagated backwards to predicates which...

  14. Comparison of intra-organellar chaperone capacity for dealing with stress-induced protein unfolding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, Jurre; Vos, Michel J.; van Waarde, Maria A. W. H.; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are essential for cells to prevent that partially unfolded proteins form non-functional, toxic aggregates. This requirement is increased when cells experience protein unfolding stresses and such could affect all compartments in the eukaryotic cell. Whether all organelles are

  15. The criteria for selecting a method for unfolding neutron spectra based on the information entropy theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Qingjun; Song, Fengquan; Ren, Jie; Chen, Xueyong; Zhou, Bin

    2014-01-01

    To further expand the application of an artificial neural network in the field of neutron spectrometry, the criteria for choosing between an artificial neural network and the maximum entropy method for the purpose of unfolding neutron spectra was presented. The counts of the Bonner spheres for IAEA neutron spectra were used as a database, and the artificial neural network and the maximum entropy method were used to unfold neutron spectra; the mean squares of the spectra were defined as the differences between the desired and unfolded spectra. After the information entropy of each spectrum was calculated using information entropy theory, the relationship between the mean squares of the spectra and the information entropy was acquired. Useful information from the information entropy guided the selection of unfolding methods. Due to the importance of the information entropy, the method for predicting the information entropy using the Bonner spheres' counts was established. The criteria based on the information entropy theory can be used to choose between the artificial neural network and the maximum entropy method unfolding methods. The application of an artificial neural network to unfold neutron spectra was expanded. - Highlights: • Two neutron spectra unfolding methods, ANN and MEM, were compared. • The spectrum's entropy offers useful information for selecting unfolding methods. • For the spectrum with low entropy, the ANN was generally better than MEM. • The spectrum's entropy was predicted based on the Bonner spheres' counts

  16. Application of long-range order to predict unfolding rates of two-state proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harihar, B; Selvaraj, S

    2011-03-01

    Predicting the experimental unfolding rates of two-state proteins and models describing the unfolding rates of these proteins is quite limited because of the complexity present in the unfolding mechanism and the lack of experimental unfolding data compared with folding data. In this work, 25 two-state proteins characterized by Maxwell et al. (Protein Sci 2005;14:602–616) using a consensus set of experimental conditions were taken, and the parameter long-range order (LRO) derived from their three-dimensional structures were related with their experimental unfolding rates ln(k(u)). From the total data set of 30 proteins used by Maxwell et al. (Protein Sci 2005;14:602–616), five slow-unfolding proteins with very low unfolding rates were considered to be outliers and were not included in our data set. Except all beta structural class, LRO of both the all-alpha and mixed-class proteins showed a strong inverse correlation of r = -0.99 and -0.88, respectively, with experimental ln(k(u)). LRO shows a correlation of -0.62 with experimental ln(k(u)) for all-beta proteins. For predicting the unfolding rates, a simple statistical method has been used and linear regression equations were developed for individual structural classes of proteins using LRO, and the results obtained showed a better agreement with experimental results. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Unfolding Semantics of the Untyped λ-Calculus with lectrec-Calculus with letrec

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rochel, J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between finite terms in lambda-letrec, the lambda calculus with letrec, and the infinite lambda terms they express. We say that a lambda-letrec term expresses a lambda term if the latter can be obtained as an infinite unfolding of the former. Unfolding is the process

  18. Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. Coleman; Colbert, E. J. M.

    2004-01-01

    The mathematical simplicity of black holes, combined with their links to some of the most energetic events in the universe, means that black holes are key objects for fundamental physics and astrophysics. Until recently, it was generally believed that black holes in nature appear in two broad mass ranges: stellar-mass (M~3 20 M⊙), which are produced by the core collapse of massive stars, and supermassive (M~106 1010 M⊙), which are found in the centers of galaxies and are produced by a still uncertain combination of processes. In the last few years, however, evidence has accumulated for an intermediate-mass class of black holes, with M~102 104 M⊙. If such objects exist they have important implications for the dynamics of stellar clusters, the formation of supermassive black holes, and the production and detection of gravitational waves. We review the evidence for intermediate-mass black holes and discuss future observational and theoretical work that will help clarify numerous outstanding questions about these objects.

  19. The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro A. De-Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Classic galactosemia is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene (GAL7 in yeast, which encodes the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Here we show that the unfolded protein response pathway is triggered by galactose in two yeast models of galactosemia: lithium-treated cells and the gal7Δ mutant. The synthesis of galactose-1-phosphate is essential to trigger the unfolded protein response under these conditions because the deletion of the galactokinase-encoding gene GAL1 completely abolishes unfolded protein response activation and galactose toxicity. Impairment of the unfolded protein response in both yeast models makes cells even more sensitive to galactose, unmasking its cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced under galactosemic conditions and underscores the importance of the unfolded protein response pathway to cellular adaptation in these models of classic galactosemia.

  20. Folding and unfolding pathway of chaperonin GroEL monomer and elucidation of thermodynamic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Sarita; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2017-03-01

    The conformation and thermodynamic stability of monomeric GroEL were studied by CD and fluorescence spectroscopy. GroEL denaturation with urea and dilution in buffer leads to formation of a folded GroEL monomer. The monomeric nature of this protein was verified by size-exclusion chromatography and native PAGE. It has a well-defined secondary and tertiary structure, folding activity (prevention of aggregation) for substrate protein and is resistant to proteolysis. Being a properly folded and reversibly refoldable, monomeric GroEL is amenable for the study of thermodynamic stability by unfolding transition methods. We present the equilibrium unfolding of monomeric GroEL as studied by urea and heat mediated unfolding processes. The urea mediated unfolding shows two transitions and a single transition in the heat mediated unfolding process. In the case of thermal unfolding, some residual structure unfolds at a higher temperature (70-75°C). The process of folding/unfolding is reversible in both cases. Analysis of folding/unfolding data provides a measure of ΔG NU H 2 O , T m , ΔH van and ΔS van of monomeric GroEL. The thermodynamic stability parameter ΔG NU H 2 O is similar with both CD and intrinsic fluorescence i.e. 7.10±1.0kcal/mol. The calculated T m , ΔH van and ΔS van from the thermal unfolding transition is 46±0.5°C, 43.3±0.1kcal/mol and 143.9±0.1cal/mol/k respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sorafenib enhances proteasome inhibitor-mediated cytotoxicity via inhibition of unfolded protein response and keratin phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, Yuichi; Harada, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is highly resistant to conventional systemic therapies and prognosis for advanced HCC patients remains poor. Recent studies of the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumor initiation and progression have identified several potential molecular targets in HCC. Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor shown to have survival benefits in advanced HCC. It acts by inhibiting the serine/threonine kinases and the receptor type tyrosine kinases. In preclinical experiments sorafenib had anti-proliferative activity in hepatoma cells and it reduced tumor angiogenesis and increased apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib include its inhibitory effects on protein ubiquitination, unfolded protein response (UPR) and keratin phosphorylation in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Moreover, we show that combined treatment with sorafenib and proteasome inhibitors (PIs) synergistically induced a marked increase in cell death in hepatoma- and hepatocyte-derived cells. These observations may open the way to potentially interesting treatment combinations that may augment the effect of sorafenib, possibly including drugs that promote ER stress. Because sorafenib blocked the cellular defense mechanisms against hepatotoxic injury not only in hepatoma cells but also in hepatocyte-derived cells, we must be careful to avoid severe liver injury. -- Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •We examined the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib in hepatoma cells. •Sorafenib induces cell death via apoptotic and necrotic fashion. •Sorafenib inhibits protein ubiquitination and unfolded protein response. •Autophagy induced by sorafenib may affect its cytotoxicity. •Sorafenib inhibits keratin phosphorylation and cytoplasmic inclusion formation

  2. Investigating the structural origin of trpzip2 temperature dependent unfolding fluorescence line shape based on a Markov state model simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jian; Gao, Fang; Cui, Raymond Z; Shuang, Feng; Liang, Wanzhen; Huang, Xuhui; Zhuang, Wei

    2012-10-25

    Vibrationally resolved fluorescence spectra of the β-hairpin trpzip2 peptide at two temperatures as well as during a T-jump unfolding process are simulated on the basis of a combination of Markov state models and quantum chemistry schemes. The broad asymmetric spectral line shape feature is reproduced by considering the exciton-phonon couplings. The temperature dependent red shift observed in the experiment has been attributed to the state population changes of specific chromophores. Through further theoretical study, it is found that both the environment's electric field and the chromophores' geometry distortions are responsible for tryptophan fluorescence shift.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime components reveal kinetic intermediate states upon equilibrium denaturation of carbonic anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtseva, Elena V; Lashchuk, Olesya O; Gerasimova, Marina A; Melnik, Tatiana N; Nagibina, Galina S; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2017-12-21

    In most cases, intermediate states of multistage folding proteins are not 'visible' under equilibrium conditions but are revealed in kinetic experiments. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used in equilibrium denaturation studies. The technique allows for detecting changes in the conformation and environment of tryptophan residues in different structural elements of carbonic anhydrase II which in its turn has made it possible to study the intermediate states of carbonic anhydrase II under equilibrium conditions. The results of equilibrium and kinetic experiments using wild-type bovine carbonic anhydrase II and its mutant form with the substitution of leucine for alanine at position 139 (L139A) were compared. The obtained lifetime components of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence allowed for revealing that, the same as in kinetic experiments, under equilibrium conditions the unfolding of carbonic anhydrase II ensues through formation of intermediate states.

  4. Intermediate filament protein evolution and protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisner, Harald; Habicht, Jörn; Garg, Sriram G; Gould, Sven B

    2018-03-23

    Metazoans evolved from a single protist lineage. While all eukaryotes share a conserved actin and tubulin-based cytoskeleton, it is commonly perceived that intermediate filaments (IFs), including lamin, vimentin or keratin among many others, are restricted to metazoans. Actin and tubulin proteins are conserved enough to be detectable across all eukaryotic genomes using standard phylogenetic methods, but IF proteins, in contrast, are notoriously difficult to identify by such means. Since the 1950s, dozens of cytoskeletal proteins in protists have been identified that seemingly do not belong to any of the IF families described for metazoans, yet, from a structural and functional perspective fit criteria that define metazoan IF proteins. Here, we briefly review IF protein discovery in metazoans and the implications this had for the definition of this protein family. We argue that the many cytoskeletal and filament-forming proteins of protists should be incorporated into a more comprehensive picture of IF evolution by aligning it with the recent identification of lamins across the phylogenetic diversity of eukaryotic supergroups. This then brings forth the question of how the diversity of IF proteins has unfolded. The evolution of IF proteins likely represents an example of convergent evolution, which, in combination with the speed with which these cytoskeletal proteins are evolving, generated their current diversity. IF proteins did not first emerge in metazoa, but in protists. Only the emergence of cytosolic IF proteins that appear to stem from a nuclear lamin is unique to animals and coincided with the emergence of true animal multicellularity. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Highly Perturbed pKa Values in the Unfolded State of Hen Egg White Lysozyme

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, John; O'Meara, Fergal; Farrell, Damien; Nielsen, Jens Erik

    2012-01-01

    The majority of pKa values in protein unfolded states are close to the amino acid model pKa values, thus reflecting the weak intramolecular interactions present in the unfolded ensemble of most proteins. We have carried out thermal denaturation measurements on the WT and eight mutants of HEWL from pH 1.5 to pH 11.0 to examine the unfolded state pKa values and the pH dependence of protein stability for this enzyme. The availability of accurate pKa values for the folded state of HEWL and separa...

  6. NSDUAZ unfolding package for neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with Bonner spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Martinez B, M. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Ortiz R, J. M., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica, Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde 801, Col. Centro, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    NSDUAZ (Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry for the Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas) is a user friendly neutron unfolding package for Bonner sphere spectrometer with {sup 6}Lil(Eu) developed under Lab View environment. Unfolding is carried out using a recursive iterative procedure with the SPUNIT algorithm, where the starting spectrum is obtained from a library initial guess spectrum to start the iterations, the package include a statistical procedure based on the count rates relative to the count rate in the 8 inches-diameter sphere to select the initial spectrum. Neutron spectrum is unfolded in 32 energy groups ranging from 10{sup -8} up to 231.2 MeV. (Author)

  7. Unfolded equations for massive higher spin supermultiplets in AdS{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchbinder, I.L. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tomsk State Pedagogical University,60 Kievskaya Str., Tomsk, 634061 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University,36 Lenina Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Snegirev, T.V. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tomsk State Pedagogical University,60 Kievskaya Str., Tomsk, 634061 (Russian Federation); Department of Higher Mathematics and Mathematical Physics,National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenina Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Zinoviev, Yu.M. [Department of Theoretical Physics,Institute for High Energy Physics of National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, 1 Pobedy Str., Protvino, Moscow Region, 142280 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-10

    In this paper we give an explicit construction of unfolded equations for massive higher spin supermultiplets of the minimal (1,0) supersymmetry in AdS{sub 3} space. For that purpose we use an unfolded formulation for massive bosonic and fermionic higher spins and find supertransformations leaving appropriate set of unfolded equations invariant. We provide two general supermultiplets (s,s+1/2) and (s,s−1/2) with arbitrary integer s, as well as a number of lower spin examples.

  8. Multiscale unfolding of real networks by geometric renormalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, Guillermo; Boguñá, Marián; Serrano, M. Ángeles

    2018-06-01

    Symmetries in physical theories denote invariance under some transformation, such as self-similarity under a change of scale. The renormalization group provides a powerful framework to study these symmetries, leading to a better understanding of the universal properties of phase transitions. However, the small-world property of complex networks complicates application of the renormalization group by introducing correlations between coexisting scales. Here, we provide a framework for the investigation of complex networks at different resolutions. The approach is based on geometric representations, which have been shown to sustain network navigability and to reveal the mechanisms that govern network structure and evolution. We define a geometric renormalization group for networks by embedding them into an underlying hidden metric space. We find that real scale-free networks show geometric scaling under this renormalization group transformation. We unfold the networks in a self-similar multilayer shell that distinguishes the coexisting scales and their interactions. This in turn offers a basis for exploring critical phenomena and universality in complex networks. It also affords us immediate practical applications, including high-fidelity smaller-scale replicas of large networks and a multiscale navigation protocol in hyperbolic space, which betters those on single layers.

  9. Effects of ubiquilin 1 on the unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Alice; Hiltunen, Mikko; Romano, Donna M; Soininen, Hilkka; Hyman, Bradley T; Bertram, Lars; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2009-05-01

    Previous studies have implicated the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We previously reported that DNA variants in the ubiquilin 1 (UBQLN1) gene increase the risk for AD. Since UBQLN1 has been shown to play a role in the UPR, we assessed the effects of overexpression and downregulation of UBQLN1 splice variants during tunicamycin-induced ER stress. In addition to previously described transcript variants, TV1 and TV2, we identified two novel transcript variants of UBQLN1 in brain: TV3 (lacking exons 2-4) and TV4 (lacking exon 4). Overexpression of TV1-3, but not TV4 significantly decreased the mRNA induction of UPR-inducible genes, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), BiP/GRP78, and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) during the UPR. Stable overexpression of TV1-3, but not TV4, also significantly decreased the induction of CHOP protein and increased cell viability during the UPR. In contrast, downregulation of UBQLN1 did not affect CHOP mRNA induction, but instead increased PDI mRNA levels. These findings suggest that overexpression UBQLN1 transcript variants TV1-3, but not TV4, exert a protective effect during the UPR by attenuating CHOP induction and potentially increasing cell viability.

  10. An Expansion Method to Unfold Proton Recoil Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kockum, J

    1970-07-01

    A method is given to obtain a good estimate of the input neutron spectrum from a pulse-height distribution measured with proportional counters filled with a hydrogenous gas. The method consists of expanding the sought estimate as a product of two functions where one is obtained by differentiating the pulse-height distribution and the other is a power series of the neutron energy. The coefficients of this series are determined by a least-squares fit of the calculated pulse-height distribution to the measured one. The method has been tested on pulse-height distributions obtained by calculations from a realistic neutron spectrum and response functions for a spherical counter 3. 94 cm in diameter and filled with 7 atm. of methane and 1 atm. of hydrogen, respectively. In the former case it is possible with the method described, to unfold pulse-height distributions up to a neutron energy of about 3 MeV to within 10 % of the input spectrum. The differentiating procedure included in the method ensures that all spectral details not smoothed out by the finite resolution of the counter, are kept in the spectrum estimate. A realistic estimate of the statistical uncertainty of each neutron spectrum value is given. Some of the possible systematical errors caused by uncertainties in input data have been investigated.

  11. The Myocardial Unfolded Protein Response during Ischemic Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward B. Thorp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is a progressive and disabling disease. The incidence of heart failure is also on the rise, particularly in the elderly of industrialized societies. This is in part due to an increased ageing population, whom initially benefits from improved, and life-extending cardiovascular therapy, yet ultimately succumb to myocardial failure. A major cause of heart failure is ischemia secondary to the sequence of events that is dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction. In the case of heart failure postmyocardial infarction, ischemia can lead to myocardial cell death by both necrosis and apoptosis. The extent of myocyte death postinfarction is associated with adverse cardiac remodeling that can contribute to progressive heart chamber dilation, ventricular wall thinning, and the onset of loss of cardiac function. In cardiomyocytes, recent studies indicate that myocardial ischemic injury activates the unfolded protein stress response (UPR and this is associated with increased apoptosis. This paper focuses on the intersection of ischemia, the UPR, and cell death in cardiomyocytes. Targeting of the myocardial UPR may prove to be a viable target for the prevention of myocyte cell loss and the progression of heart failure due to ischemic injury.

  12. Unfolded protein response in filamentous fungi-implications in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimel, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) represents a mechanism to preserve endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis that is conserved in eukaryotes. ER stress caused by the accumulation of potentially toxic un- or misfolded proteins in the ER triggers UPR activation and the induction of genes important for protein folding in the ER, ER expansion, and transport from and to the ER. Along with this adaptation, the overall capacity for protein secretion is markedly increased by the UPR. In filamentous fungi, various approaches to employ the UPR for improved production of homologous and heterologous proteins have been investigated. As the effects on protein production were strongly dependent on the expressed protein, generally applicable strategies have to be developed. A combination of transcriptomic approaches monitoring secretion stress and basic research on the UPR mechanism provided novel and important insight into the complex regulatory cross-connections between UPR signalling, cellular physiology, and developmental processes. It will be discussed how this increasing knowledge on the UPR might stimulate the development of novel strategies for using the UPR as a tool in biotechnology.

  13. Resolution unfolding with limits imposed by statistical experimental errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, D.W.

    1977-02-01

    A typical form of the resolution equation is derived by considering the physical measurement of an energy dependent spectrum. It is shown that the information contained in a data set may be expressed by writing the spectrum as a linear combination of a set of resolution functions. Introduction of other functions to describe the spectrum involves extra physical information. An iterative conjugate gradient technique to obtain a spectrum consistent with the data is described. At each iteration the residual discrepancy between the currently predicted yield and the measured data is used to generate the form and mangitude of the next term to be added to the spectrum. Other unfolding techniques are described and analysed, some faster than the conjugate gradient technique in special cases, but restricted in usefulness by implicit assumptions about the resolution functions. The nature of residual errors is considered. The variations of independently measured data sets are discussed, and hence, the variations of the sequence of terms appearing in a consequent conjugate gradient analysis. An approximate measure is obtained for the expected variation of independently obtained spectra. Refinements are briefly considered which apply to a resolution function that is not known precisely or which make use of a requirement that the spectrum be positive throughout its range. It is concluded that a conjugate gradient technique is best if sufficient computer facilities are available, and that, of the less demanding techniques, the best is one that is essentially a more slowly convergent version of a conjugate gradient method. (author)

  14. The unfolded protein response is required for dendrite morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xing; Howell, Audrey S; Dong, Xintong; Taylor, Caitlin A; Cooper, Roshni C; Zhang, Jianqi; Zou, Wei; Sherwood, David R; Shen, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Precise patterning of dendritic fields is essential for the formation and function of neuronal circuits. During development, dendrites acquire their morphology by exuberant branching. How neurons cope with the increased load of protein production required for this rapid growth is poorly understood. Here we show that the physiological unfolded protein response (UPR) is induced in the highly branched Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neuron PVD during dendrite morphogenesis. Perturbation of the IRE1 arm of the UPR pathway causes loss of dendritic branches, a phenotype that can be rescued by overexpression of the ER chaperone HSP-4 (a homolog of mammalian BiP/ grp78). Surprisingly, a single transmembrane leucine-rich repeat protein, DMA-1, plays a major role in the induction of the UPR and the dendritic phenotype in the UPR mutants. These findings reveal a significant role for the physiological UPR in the maintenance of ER homeostasis during morphogenesis of large dendritic arbors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06963.001 PMID:26052671

  15. The Unfolded Protein Response in Amelogenesis and Enamel Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Brookes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available During the secretory phase of their life-cycle, ameloblasts are highly specialized secretory cells whose role is to elaborate an extracellular matrix that ultimately confers both form and function to dental enamel, the most highly mineralized of all mammalian tissues. In common with many other “professional” secretory cells, ameloblasts employ the unfolded protein response (UPR to help them cope with the large secretory cargo of extracellular matrix proteins transiting their ER (endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi complex and so minimize ER stress. However, the UPR is a double-edged sword, and, in cases where ER stress is severe and prolonged, the UPR switches from pro-survival to pro-apoptotic mode. The purpose of this review is to consider the role of the ameloblast UPR in the biology and pathology of amelogenesis; specifically in respect of amelogenesis imperfecta (AI and fluorosis. Some forms of AI appear to correspond to classic proteopathies, where pathological intra-cellular accumulations of protein tip the UPR toward apoptosis. Fluorosis also involves the UPR and, while not of itself a classic proteopathic disease, shares some common elements through the involvement of the UPR. The possibility of therapeutic intervention by pharmacological modulation of the UPR in AI and fluorosis is also discussed.

  16. The Unfolded Protein Response in Amelogenesis and Enamel Pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Steven J; Barron, Martin J; Dixon, Michael J; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    During the secretory phase of their life-cycle, ameloblasts are highly specialized secretory cells whose role is to elaborate an extracellular matrix that ultimately confers both form and function to dental enamel, the most highly mineralized of all mammalian tissues. In common with many other "professional" secretory cells, ameloblasts employ the unfolded protein response (UPR) to help them cope with the large secretory cargo of extracellular matrix proteins transiting their ER (endoplasmic reticulum)/Golgi complex and so minimize ER stress. However, the UPR is a double-edged sword, and, in cases where ER stress is severe and prolonged, the UPR switches from pro-survival to pro-apoptotic mode. The purpose of this review is to consider the role of the ameloblast UPR in the biology and pathology of amelogenesis; specifically in respect of amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) and fluorosis. Some forms of AI appear to correspond to classic proteopathies, where pathological intra-cellular accumulations of protein tip the UPR toward apoptosis. Fluorosis also involves the UPR and, while not of itself a classic proteopathic disease, shares some common elements through the involvement of the UPR. The possibility of therapeutic intervention by pharmacological modulation of the UPR in AI and fluorosis is also discussed.

  17. Discourses and Models of Intermediality

    OpenAIRE

    Schröter, Jens

    2011-01-01

    In his article "Discourses and Models of Intermediality" Jens Schröter discusses the question as to what relations do different discourses pose between different "media." Schröter identifies four models of discourse: 1) synthetic intermediality: a "fusion" of different media to super-media, a model with roots in the Wagnerian concept of Gesamtkunstwerk with political connotations, 2) formal (or transmedial) intermediality: a concept based on formal structures not "specific" to one medium but ...

  18. Information acquisition and financial intermediation

    OpenAIRE

    Boyarchenko, Nina

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of information acquisition in an intermediated market, where the specialists have access to superior technology for acquiring information. These informational advantages of specialists relative to households lead to disagreement between the two groups, changing the shape of the intermediation-constrained region of the economy and increasing the frequency of periods when the intermediation constraint binds. Acquiring the additional information is, however, cost...

  19. Spontaneous Unfolding-Refolding of Fibronectin Type III Domains Assayed by Thiol Exchange: THERMODYNAMIC STABILITY CORRELATES WITH RATES OF UNFOLDING RATHER THAN FOLDING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Riddhi; Ohashi, Tomoo; Erickson, Harold P; Oas, Terrence G

    2017-01-20

    Globular proteins are not permanently folded but spontaneously unfold and refold on time scales that can span orders of magnitude for different proteins. A longstanding debate in the protein-folding field is whether unfolding rates or folding rates correlate to the stability of a protein. In the present study, we have determined the unfolding and folding kinetics of 10 FNIII domains. FNIII domains are one of the most common protein folds and are present in 2% of animal proteins. FNIII domains are ideal for this study because they have an identical seven-strand β-sandwich structure, but they vary widely in sequence and thermodynamic stability. We assayed thermodynamic stability of each domain by equilibrium denaturation in urea. We then assayed the kinetics of domain opening and closing by a technique known as thiol exchange. For this we introduced a buried Cys at the identical location in each FNIII domain and measured the kinetics of labeling with DTNB over a range of urea concentrations. A global fit of the kinetics data gave the kinetics of spontaneous unfolding and refolding in zero urea. We found that the folding rates were relatively similar, ∼0.1-1 s -1 , for the different domains. The unfolding rates varied widely and correlated with thermodynamic stability. Our study is the first to address this question using a set of domains that are structurally homologous but evolved with widely varying sequence identity and thermodynamic stability. These data add new evidence that thermodynamic stability correlates primarily with unfolding rate rather than folding rate. The study also has implications for the question of whether opening of FNIII domains contributes to the stretching of fibronectin matrix fibrils. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. The MHD intermediate shock interaction with an intermediate wave: Are intermediate shocks physical?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    Contrary to the usual belief that MHD intermediate shocks are extraneous, the authors have recently shown by numerical solutions of dissipative MHD equations that intermediate shocks are admissible and can be formed through nonlinear steepening from a continuous wave. In this paper, he clarifies the differences between the conventional view and the results by studying the interaction of an MHD intermediate shock with an intermediate wave. The study reaffirms his results. In addition, the study shows that there exists a larger class of shocklike solutions in the time-dependent dissiaptive MHD equations than are given by the MHD Rankine-Hugoniot relations. it also suggests a mechanism for forming rotational discontinuities through the interaction of an intermediate shock with an intermediate wave. The results are of importance not only to the MHD shock theory but also to studies such as magnetic field reconnection models

  1. 中频中药离子导入治疗脑卒中后吞咽障碍疗效观察%Effect observation of traditional Chinese medicine ion introduction by intermediate frequency ultrasoundon dysphagia after stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱峰; 张晨祥

    2002-01-01

    @@ Background: Dysphagia caused by stroke is common, but there is still no good therapy. After stroke, cerebral function is damaged severely, control function of V, VII, IX, X cranial nerve are disorder, swallow muscles can't complete swallow coordinately. Traditional Chinese medicine consider yin yang were damaged, damage of yang influence impel function of viscera and transmission function of meridian and collateral, damage of yin lead to blockage of meridian and collateral and qi blood, then dysphagia. Traditional Chinese medicine ion introduction and intermediate ultrasound combined with acupoint therapy is a kind method to treat dysphagia after stroke. It makes use of traditional Chinese medical theory and modern technique and gains good effect.

  2. Moessbauer spectroscopic evidence on the heme binding to the proximal histidine in unfolded carbonmonoxy myoglobin by guanidine hydrochloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harami, Taikan, E-mail: harami.taikan@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Kitao, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro [Kyoto University, Research Reactor Institute (Japan); Mitsui, Takaya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    The unfolded heme structure in myoglobin is controversial because of no chance of direct X-ray structure analyses. The unfolding of carbonmonoxy myoglobin (MbCO) by guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) was studied by the Moessbauer spectroscopy. The spectra show the presence of a sort of spectrum in the unfolded MbCO, independent on the concentration of GdnHCl from 1 to 6 M and the increase of the fraction of unfolded MbCO, depending on the GdnHCl concentration. The isomer shift of the iron of heme in the unfolded MbCO was identified to be different from that of the native MbCO as the globin structure in Mb collapses under the unfolded conditions. This result and the existing related Moessbauer data proved that the heme in the unfolded MbCO may remain coordinated to the proximal histidine.

  3. BONDI-97 A novel neutron energy spectrum unfolding tool using a genetic algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, B

    1999-01-01

    The neutron spectrum unfolding procedure using the count rate data obtained from a set of Bonner sphere neutron detectors requires the solution of the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind by using complex mathematical methods. This paper reports a new approach for the unfolding of neutron spectra using the Genetic Algorithm tool BONDI-97 (BOnner sphere Neutron DIfferentiation). The BONDI-97 was used as the input for Genetic Algorithm engine EVOLVER to search for a globally optimised solution vector from a population of randomly generated solutions. This solution vector corresponds to the unfolded neutron energy spectrum. The Genetic Algorithm engine emulates the Darwinian 'Survival of the Fittest' strategy, the key ingredient of the 'Theory of Evolution'. The spectra of sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am/Be (alpha,n) and sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu/Be (alpha,n) neutron sources were unfolded using the BONDI-97 tool. (author)

  4. Genetic algorithms - A new technique for solving the neutron spectrum unfolding problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, David W.; Edwards, D. Ray; Bolon, Albert E.

    1999-01-01

    A new technique utilizing genetic algorithms has been applied to the Bonner sphere neutron spectrum unfolding problem. Genetic algorithms are part of a relatively new field of 'evolutionary' solution techniques that mimic living systems with computer-simulated 'chromosome' solutions. Solutions mate and mutate to create better solutions. Several benchmark problems, considered representative of radiation protection environments, have been evaluated using the newly developed UMRGA code which implements the genetic algorithm unfolding technique. The results are compared with results from other well-established unfolding codes. The genetic algorithm technique works remarkably well and produces solutions with relatively high spectral qualities. UMRGA appears to be a superior technique in the absence of a priori data - it does not rely on 'lucky' guesses of input spectra. Calculated personnel doses associated with the unfolded spectra match benchmark values within a few percent

  5. Inter-regulation of the unfolded protein response and auxin signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chen, Y.N.; Aung, K.; Rolčík, Jakub; Walicki, K.; Friml, J.; Brandizzi, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 1 (2014), s. 97-107 ISSN 0960-7412 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : endoplasmic reticulum stress * unfolded protein response * auxin response Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 5.972, year: 2014

  6. Protein unfolding versus β-sheet separation in spider silk nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Parvez

    2014-01-01

    In this communication a mechanism for spider silk strain hardening is proposed. Shear failure of β-sheet nanocrystals is the first failure mode that gives rise to the creation of smaller nanocrystals, which are of higher strength and stiffness. β-sheet unfolding requires more energy than nanocrystal separation in a shear mode of failure. As a result, unfolding occurs after the nanocrystals separate in shear. β-sheet unfolding yields a secondary strain hardening effect once the β-sheet conformation is geometrically stable and acts like a unidirectional fibre in a fibre reinforced composite. The mechanism suggested herein is based on molecular dynamics calculations of residual inter-β-sheet separation strengths against residual intra-β-sheet unfolding strengths. (paper)

  7. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  8. Intermediate structure and threshold phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hategan, Cornel

    2004-01-01

    The Intermediate Structure, evidenced through microstructures of the neutron strength function, is reflected in open reaction channels as fluctuations in excitation function of nuclear threshold effects. The intermediate state supporting both neutron strength function and nuclear threshold effect is a micro-giant neutron threshold state. (author)

  9. Deciphering hierarchical features in the energy landscape of adenylate kinase folding/unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. Nicholas; Pirchi, Menahem; Haran, Gilad; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2018-03-01

    Hierarchical features of the energy landscape of the folding/unfolding behavior of adenylate kinase, including its dependence on denaturant concentration, are elucidated in terms of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) measurements in which the proteins are encapsulated in a lipid vesicle. The core in constructing the energy landscape from single-molecule time-series across different denaturant concentrations is the application of rate-distortion theory (RDT), which naturally considers the effects of measurement noise and sampling error, in combination with change-point detection and the quantification of the FRET efficiency-dependent photobleaching behavior. Energy landscapes are constructed as a function of observation time scale, revealing multiple partially folded conformations at small time scales that are situated in a superbasin. As the time scale increases, these denatured states merge into a single basin, demonstrating the coarse-graining of the energy landscape as observation time increases. Because the photobleaching time scale is dependent on the conformational state of the protein, possible nonequilibrium features are discussed, and a statistical test for violation of the detailed balance condition is developed based on the state sequences arising from the RDT framework.

  10. The ribosome can prevent aggregation of partially folded protein intermediates: studies using the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bani Kumar Pathak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular chaperones that support de novo folding of proteins under non stress condition are classified as chaperone 'foldases' that are distinct from chaperone' holdases' that provide high affinity binding platform for unfolded proteins and prevent their aggregation specifically under stress conditions. Ribosome, the cellular protein synthesis machine can act as a foldase chaperone that can bind unfolded proteins and release them in folding competent state. The peptidyl transferase center (PTC located in the domain V of the 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli ribosome (bDV RNA is the chaperoning center of the ribosome. It has been proposed that via specific interactions between the RNA and refolding proteins, the chaperone provides information for the correct folding of unfolded polypeptide chains. RESULTS: We demonstrate using Escherichia coli ribosome and variants of its domain V RNA that the ribosome can bind to partially folded intermediates of bovine carbonic anhydrase II (BCAII and lysozyme and suppress aggregation during their refolding. Using mutants of domain V RNA we demonstrate that the time for which the chaperone retains the bound protein is an important factor in determining its ability to suppress aggregation and/or support reactivation of protein. CONCLUSION: The ribosome can behave like a 'holdase' chaperone and has the ability to bind and hold back partially folded intermediate states of proteins from participating in the aggregation process. Since the ribosome is an essential organelle that is present in large numbers in all living cells, this ability of the ribosome provides an energetically inexpensive way to suppress cellular aggregation. Further, this ability of the ribosome might also be crucial in the context that the ribosome is one of the first chaperones to be encountered by a large nascent polypeptide chains that have a tendency to form partially folded intermediates immediately following their synthesis.

  11. Intermediate neutron spectrum problems and the intermediate neutron spectrum experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaegers, P.J.; Sanchez, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    Criticality benchmark data for intermediate energy spectrum systems does not exist. These systems are dominated by scattering and fission events induced by neutrons with energies between 1 eV and 1 MeV. Nuclear data uncertainties have been reported for such systems which can not be resolved without benchmark critical experiments. Intermediate energy spectrum systems have been proposed for the geological disposition of surplus fissile materials. Without the proper benchmarking of the nuclear data in the intermediate energy spectrum, adequate criticality safety margins can not be guaranteed. The Zeus critical experiment now under construction will provide this necessary benchmark data

  12. Co-expression of cytokeratins and vimentin by highly invasive trophoblast in the white-winged vampire bat, Diaemus youngi, and the black mastiff bat, Molossus ater, with observations on intermediate filament proteins in the decidua and intraplacental trophoblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badwaik, N K; Rasweiler, J J; Muradali, F

    1998-11-01

    Histological and immunocytochemical studies of gravid reproductive tracts obtained from the white-winged vampire bat (Diaemus youngi) and the black mastiff bat (Molossus ater) have established that both species develop unusually invasive trophoblast. This is released by the developing discoidal haemochorial placenta, expresses both cytokeratins and vimentin, and invades the myometrium and adjacent tissues (including the ovaries) via interstitial migration within the walls of maternal blood vessels. Hence, this trophoblast is noteworthy for the extent to which it undergoes an epithelial-mesenchymal transformation. In Molossus, it originates from the cytotrophoblastic shell running along the base of the placenta, is mononuclear, and preferentially invades maternal arterial vessels serving the discoidal placenta. This trophoblast may have a role in dilatation of these vessels when the discoidal placenta becomes functional. In Diaemus, the highly invasive trophoblast appears to originate instead from a layer of syncytiotrophoblast on the periphery of the placenta is multinucleated, and vigorously invades both arterial and venous vessels. During late pregnancy, it becomes extensively branched and sends attenuated processes around many of the myometrial smooth muscle fibres. In view of its distribution, this trophoblast could have important influences upon myometrial contractility and the function of blood vessels serving the gravid tract. Other aspects of intermediate filament expression in the uteri and placentae of these bats are also noteworthy. Many of the decidual giant cells in Molossus co-express cytokeratins and vimentin, while the syncytiotrophoblast lining the placental labyrinth in Diaemus late in pregnancy expresses little cytokeratin.

  13. RAVEN AND THE CENTER OF MAFFEI 1: MULTI-OBJECT ADAPTIVE OPTICS OBSERVATIONS OF THE CENTER OF A NEARBY ELLIPTICAL GALAXY AND THE DETECTION OF AN INTERMEDIATE AGE POPULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidge, T. J.; Andersen, D. R. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Lardière, O.; Bradley, C.; Blain, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P2 (Canada); Oya, S. [Subaru Telescope, National Optical Observatory of Japan Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Akiyama, M.; Ono, Y. H., E-mail: tim.davidge@nrc.ca, E-mail: david.andersen@nrc.ca, E-mail: lardiere@uvic.ca, E-mail: cbr@uvic.ca, E-mail: celia.blain@gmail.com, E-mail: oya@subaru.naoj.org, E-mail: akiyama@astr.tohoku.ac.jp, E-mail: yo-2007@astr.tohoku.ac.jp [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University 6–3 Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sedai, 980-8578 Japan (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectra that have an angular resolution of ∼0.15 arcsec are used to examine the stellar content of the central regions of the nearby elliptical galaxy Maffei 1. The spectra were recorded at the Subaru Telescope, with wavefront distortions corrected by the RAVEN Multi-object Adaptive Optics science demonstrator. The Ballick–Ramsey C{sub 2} absorption bandhead near 1.76 μm is detected, and models in which ∼10%–20% of the light near 1.8 μm originates from stars of spectral type C5 reproduce the depth of this feature. Archival NIR and mid-infrared images are also used to probe the structural and photometric properties of the galaxy. Comparisons with models suggest that an intermediate age population dominates the spectral energy distribution between 1 and 5 μm near the galaxy center. This is consistent not only with the presence of C stars, but also with the large Hβ index that has been measured previously for Maffei 1. The J − K color is more or less constant within 15 arcsec of the galaxy center, suggesting that the brightest red stars are well-mixed in this area.

  14. Intermediate mass dimuon events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, H.-G.

    1985-01-01

    We report the observation of 67 dimuon events at the CERN p anti p collider with the UA1 detector. The events will be interpreted in terms of the Drell-Yan mechanism, J/PSI and UPSILON decays and heavy flavour production. (author)

  15. Validation of intermediate end points in cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzkin, A; Freedman, L S; Schiffman, M H; Dawsey, S M

    1990-11-21

    Investigations using intermediate end points as cancer surrogates are quicker, smaller, and less expensive than studies that use malignancy as the end point. We present a strategy for determining whether a given biomarker is a valid intermediate end point between an exposure and incidence of cancer. Candidate intermediate end points may be selected from case series, ecologic studies, and animal experiments. Prospective cohort and sometimes case-control studies may be used to quantify the intermediate end point-cancer association. The most appropriate measure of this association is the attributable proportion. The intermediate end point is a valid cancer surrogate if the attributable proportion is close to 1.0, but not if it is close to 0. Usually, the attributable proportion is close to neither 1.0 nor 0; in this case, valid surrogacy requires that the intermediate end point mediate an established exposure-cancer relation. This would in turn imply that the exposure effect would vanish if adjusted for the intermediate end point. We discuss the relative advantages of intervention and observational studies for the validation of intermediate end points. This validation strategy also may be applied to intermediate end points for adverse reproductive outcomes and chronic diseases other than cancer.

  16. The unfolded protein response in melanocytes: activation in response to chemical stressors of the endoplasmic reticulum and tyrosinase misfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Prashiela; Bis, Sabina; Knoll, Kristen; Perez, Beremis; Orlow, Seth J

    2010-10-01

    Accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR), comprising three signaling pathways initiated by Ire1, Perk and Atf6 respectively. Unfolded protein response activation was compared in chemically stressed murine wildtype melanocytes and mutant melanocytes that retain tyrosinase in the ER. Thapsigargin, an ER stressor, activated all pathways in wildtype melanocytes, triggering Caspase 12-mediated apoptosis at toxic doses. Albino melanocytes expressing mutant tyrosinase showed evidence of ER stress with increased Ire1 expression, but the downstream effector, Xbp1, was not activated even following thapsigargin treatment. Attenuation of Ire1 signaling was recapitulated in wildtype melanocytes treated with thapsigargin for 8 days, with diminished Xbp1 activation observed after 4 days. Atf6 was also activated in albino melanocytes, with no response to thapsigargin, while the Perk pathway was not activated and thapsigargin treatment elicited robust expression of the downstream effector CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein. Thus, melanocytes adapt to ER stress by attenuating two UPR pathways.

  17. Binding properties of a streptavidin layer formed on a biotinylated Langmuir–Schaefer film of unfolded protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuno, Taiji, E-mail: t_furuno@a8.keio.jp

    2016-04-01

    A Langmuir monolayer of carbonic anhydrase (CA) unfolded at an air/water interface was transferred onto the hydrophobic surface of a silicon wafer by means of the Langmuir–Schaefer technique. The transferred CA film was biotinylated and was incubated in a streptavidin (SAv) solution to obtain a densely packed SAv layer by biotin–SAv linkage. Biotinylated proteins including ferritin, catalase, alcohol dehydrogenase, and carbonic anhydrase were incubated with the SAv layer and binding of these proteins was examined by atomic force microscopy. High-density binding of the biotinylated proteins was observed, whereas the amount of adsorbed non-biotinylated proteins was low or negligible. The SAv layer on the Langmuir–Schaefer film of unfolded protein could become a basic architecture for protein immobilization studies. - Highlights: • Langmuir–Schaefer film of carbonic anhydrase (LSF-CA) was biotinylated. • A densely packed streptavidin (SAv) layer was formed on the biotinylated LSF-CA. • Biotinylated proteins were bound to the SAv layer at high density. • Nonspecific adsorption of intact proteins to the SAv layer was weak. • Atomic force microscopy showed the binding of proteins at molecular resolution.

  18. Arctigenin suppresses unfolded protein response and sensitizes glucose deprivation-mediated cytotoxicity of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shengrong; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Changhua; Nawaz, Ahmed; Wei, Wen; Li, Juanjuan; Wang, Lijun; Yu, De-Hua

    2011-01-01

    The involvement of unfolded protein response (UPR) activation in tumor survival and resistance to chemotherapies suggests a new anticancer strategy targeting UPR pathway. Arctigenin, a natural product, has been recently identified for its antitumor activity with selective toxicity against cancer cells under glucose starvation with unknown mechanism. Here we found that arctigenin specifically blocks the transcriptional induction of two potential anticancer targets, namely glucose-regulated protein-78 (GRP78) and its analog GRP94, under glucose deprivation, but not by tunicamycin. The activation of other UPR pathways, e.g., XBP-1 and ATF4, by glucose deprivation was also suppressed by arctigenin. A further transgene experiment showed that ectopic expression of GRP78 at least partially rescued arctigenin/glucose starvation-mediated cell growth inhibition, suggesting the causal role of UPR suppression in arctigenin-mediated cytotoxicity under glucose starvation. These observations bring a new insight into the mechanism of action of arctigenin and may lead to the design of new anticancer therapeutics. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Spectroscopic and MD simulation studies on unfolding processes of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA induced by urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Danish; Prakash, Amresh; Haque, Md Anzarul; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-09-01

    Carbonic anhydrase VA (CAVA) is primarily expressed in the mitochondria and involved in numerous physiological processes including lipogenesis, insulin secretion from pancreatic cells, ureagenesis, gluconeogenesis and neuronal transmission. To understand the biophysical properties of CAVA, we carried out a reversible urea-induced isothermal denaturation at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Spectroscopic probes, [θ]222 (mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm), F344 (Trp-fluorescence emission intensity at 344 nm) and Δε280 (difference absorption at 280 nm) were used to monitor the effect of urea on the structure and stability of CAVA. The urea-induced reversible denaturation curves were used to estimate [Formula: see text], Gibbs free energy in the absence of urea; Cm, the mid-point of the denaturation curve, i.e. molar urea concentration ([urea]) at which ΔGD = 0; and m, the slope (=∂ΔGD/∂[urea]). Coincidence of normalized transition curves of all optical properties suggests that unfolding/refolding of CAVA is a two-state process. We further performed 40 ns molecular dynamics simulation of CAVA to see the dynamics at different urea concentrations. An excellent agreement was observed between in silico and in vitro studies.

  20. Intrauterine Growth Restriction Increases TNFα and Activates the Unfolded Protein Response in Male Rat Pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily S. Riddle

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR programs adult disease, including obesity and insulin resistance. Our group previously demonstrated that IUGR dysregulates adipose deposition in male, but not female, weanling rats. Dysregulated adipose deposition is often accompanied by the release of proinflammatory signaling molecules, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα. TNFα contributes to adipocyte inflammation and impaired insulin signaling. TNFα has also been implicated in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR, which impairs insulin signaling. We hypothesized that, in male rat pups, IUGR would increase TNFα, TNFR1, and components of the UPR (Hspa5, ATF6, p-eIF2α, and Ddit3 prior to the onset of obesity. We further hypothesized that impaired glucose tolerance would occur after the onset of adipose dysfunction in male IUGR rats. To test this hypothesis, we used a well-characterized rat model of uteroplacental insufficiency-induced IUGR. Our primary findings are that, in male rats, IUGR (1 increased circulating and adipose TNFα, (2 increased mRNA levels of UPR components as well as p-eIF2a, and (3 impaired glucose tolerance after observed TNFα increased and after UPR activation. We speculate that programmed dysregulation of TNFα and UPR contributed to the development of glucose intolerance in male IUGR rats.

  1. Native Mass Spectrometry, Ion mobility, and Collision-Induced Unfolding Categorize Malaria Antigen/Antibody Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yining; Salinas, Nichole D.; Chen, Edwin; Tolia, Niraj H.; Gross, Michael L.

    2017-09-01

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) is a promising vaccine candidate for P. vivax malaria. Recently, we reported the epitopes on PvDBP region II (PvDBP-II) for three inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (2D10, 2H2, and 2C6). In this communication, we describe the combination of native mass spectrometry and ion mobility (IM) with collision induced unfolding (CIU) to study the conformation and stabilities of three malarial antigen-antibody complexes. These complexes, when collisionally activated, undergo conformational changes that depend on the location of the epitope. CIU patterns for PvDBP-II in complex with antibody 2D10 and 2H2 are highly similar, indicating comparable binding topology and stability. A different CIU fingerprint is observed for PvDBP-II/2C6, indicating that 2C6 binds to PvDBP-II on an epitope different from 2D10 and 2H2. This work supports the use of CIU as a means of classifying antigen-antibody complexes by their epitope maps in a high throughput screening workflow. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Action adaptation during natural unfolding social scenes influences action recognition and inferences made about actor beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Bruce D; Wincenciak, Joanna; Jellema, Tjeerd; Ward, James W; Barraclough, Nick E

    2016-07-01

    When observing another individual's actions, we can both recognize their actions and infer their beliefs concerning the physical and social environment. The extent to which visual adaptation influences action recognition and conceptually later stages of processing involved in deriving the belief state of the actor remains unknown. To explore this we used virtual reality (life-size photorealistic actors presented in stereoscopic three dimensions) to see how visual adaptation influences the perception of individuals in naturally unfolding social scenes at increasingly higher levels of action understanding. We presented scenes in which one actor picked up boxes (of varying number and weight), after which a second actor picked up a single box. Adaptation to the first actor's behavior systematically changed perception of the second actor. Aftereffects increased with the duration of the first actor's behavior, declined exponentially over time, and were independent of view direction. Inferences about the second actor's expectation of box weight were also distorted by adaptation to the first actor. Distortions in action recognition and actor expectations did not, however, extend across different actions, indicating that adaptation is not acting at an action-independent abstract level but rather at an action-dependent level. We conclude that although adaptation influences more complex inferences about belief states of individuals, this is likely to be a result of adaptation at an earlier action recognition stage rather than adaptation operating at a higher, more abstract level in mentalizing or simulation systems.

  3. Sensitivity to Heavy-Metal Ions of Unfolded Fullerene Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Ciotta

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel type of graphene-like quantum dots, synthesized by oxidation and cage-opening of C60 buckminsterfullerene, has been studied as a fluorescent and absorptive probe for heavy-metal ions. The lattice structure of such unfolded fullerene quantum dots (UFQDs is distinct from that of graphene since it includes both carbon hexagons and pentagons. The basic optical properties, however, are similar to those of regular graphene oxide quantum dots. On the other hand, UFQDs behave quite differently in the presence of heavy-metal ions, in that multiple sensitivity to Cu2+, Pb2+ and As(III was observed through comparable quenching of the fluorescent emission and different variations of the transmittance spectrum. By dynamic light scattering measurements and transmission electron microscope (TEM images we confirmed, for the first time in metal sensing, that this response is due to multiple complexation and subsequent aggregation of UFQDs. Nonetheless, the explanation of the distinct behaviour of transmittance in the presence of As(III and the formation of precipitate with Pb2+ require further studies. These differences, however, also make it possible to discriminate between the three metal ions in view of the implementation of a selective multiple sensor.

  4. A neutron spectrum unfolding computer code based on artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rodríguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2014-02-01

    The Bonner Spheres Spectrometer consists of a thermal neutron sensor placed at the center of a number of moderating polyethylene spheres of different diameters. From the measured readings, information can be derived about the spectrum of the neutron field where measurements were made. Disadvantages of the Bonner system are the weight associated with each sphere and the need to sequentially irradiate the spheres, requiring long exposure periods. Provided a well-established response matrix and adequate irradiation conditions, the most delicate part of neutron spectrometry, is the unfolding process. The derivation of the spectral information is not simple because the unknown is not given directly as a result of the measurements. The drawbacks associated with traditional unfolding procedures have motivated the need of complementary approaches. Novel methods based on Artificial Intelligence, mainly Artificial Neural Networks, have been widely investigated. In this work, a neutron spectrum unfolding code based on neural nets technology is presented. This code is called Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry with Artificial Neural networks unfolding code that was designed in a graphical interface. The core of the code is an embedded neural network architecture previously optimized using the robust design of artificial neural networks methodology. The main features of the code are: easy to use, friendly and intuitive to the user. This code was designed for a Bonner Sphere System based on a 6LiI(Eu) neutron detector and a response matrix expressed in 60 energy bins taken from an International Atomic Energy Agency compilation. The main feature of the code is that as entrance data, for unfolding the neutron spectrum, only seven rate counts measured with seven Bonner spheres are required; simultaneously the code calculates 15 dosimetric quantities as well as the total flux for radiation protection purposes. This code generates a full report with all information of the unfolding in

  5. Unfolding Studies of the Cysteine Protease Baupain, a Papain-Like Enzyme from Leaves of Bauhinia forficata: Effect of pH, Guanidine Hydrochloride and Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemeire A. Silva-Lucca

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Baupain belongs to the α+β class of proteins with a secondary structure-content of 44% α-helix, 16% β-sheet and 12% β-turn. The structural transition induced by pH was found to be noncooperative, with no important differences observed in the pH range from 3.0 to 10.5. At pH 2.0 the protein presented substantial non-native structure with strong ANS binding. Guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl-induced unfolding did not change the protein structure significantly until 4.0 M, indicating the high rigidity of the molecule. The unfolding was cooperative, as seen by the sigmoidal transition curves with midpoints at 4.7 ± 0.2 M and 5.0 ± 0.2 M GdnHCl, as measured by CD and fluorescence spectroscopy. A red shift of 7 nm in intrinsic fluorescence was observed with 6.0 M GdnHCl. Temperature-induced unfolding of baupain was incomplete, and at least 35% of the native structure of the protein was retained, even at high temperature (90 °C. Baupain showed characteristics of a molten globule state, due to preferential ANS binding at pH 2.0 in comparison to the native form (pH 7.0 and completely unfolded (6.0 M GdnHCl state. Combined with information about N-terminal sequence similarity, these results allow us to include baupain in the papain superfamily.

  6. Unfolding studies of the cysteine protease baupain, a papain-like enzyme from leaves of Bauhinia forficata: effect of pH, guanidine hydrochloride and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Lucca, Rosemeire A; Andrade, Sheila S; Ferreira, Rodrigo Silva; Sampaio, Misako U; Oliva, Maria Luiza V

    2013-12-24

    Baupain belongs to the α+β class of proteins with a secondary structure-content of 44% α-helix, 16% β-sheet and 12% β-turn. The structural transition induced by pH was found to be noncooperative, with no important differences observed in the pH range from 3.0 to 10.5. At pH 2.0 the protein presented substantial non-native structure with strong ANS binding. Guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl)-induced unfolding did not change the protein structure significantly until 4.0 M, indicating the high rigidity of the molecule. The unfolding was cooperative, as seen by the sigmoidal transition curves with midpoints at 4.7±0.2 M and 5.0±0.2 M GdnHCl, as measured by CD and fluorescence spectroscopy. A red shift of 7 nm in intrinsic fluorescence was observed with 6.0 M GdnHCl. Temperature-induced unfolding of baupain was incomplete, and at least 35% of the native structure of the protein was retained, even at high temperature (90 °C). Baupain showed characteristics of a molten globule state, due to preferential ANS binding at pH 2.0 in comparison to the native form (pH 7.0) and completely unfolded (6.0 M GdnHCl) state. Combined with information about N-terminal sequence similarity, these results allow us to include baupain in the papain superfamily.

  7. Intermediate Levels of Visual Processing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nakayama, Ken

    1998-01-01

    ...) surface representation, here we have shown that there is an intermediate level of visual processing, between the analysis of the image and higher order representations related to specific objects; (2...

  8. [Comparison of Physico-chemical Aspects between E. coli and Human Dihydrofolate Reductase: an Equilibrium Unfolding Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapliyal, Charu; Jain, Neha; Chaudhuri, Pratima

    2015-01-01

    A protein, differing in origin, may exhibit variable physicochemical behaviour, difference in sequence homology, fold and function. Thus studying structure-function relationship of proteins from altered sources is meaningful in the sense that it may give rise to comparative aspects of their sequence-structure-function relationship. Dihydrofolate reductase is an enzyme involved in cell cycle regulation. It is a significant enzyme as.a target for developing anticancer drugs. Hence, detailed understanding of structure-function relationships of wide variants of the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase would be important for developing an inhibitor or an antagonist against the enzyme involved in the cellular developmental processes. In this communication, we have reported the comparative structure-function relationship between E. coli and human dihydrofolate reductase. The differences in the unfolding behaviour of these two proteins have been investigated to understand various properties of these two proteins like relative' stability differences and variation in conformational changes under identical denaturing conditions. The equilibrium unfolding mechanism of dihydrofolate reductase proteins using guanidine hydrochloride as a denaturant in the presence of various types of osmolytes has been monitored using loss in enzymatic activity, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and an extrinsic fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid as probes. It has been observed that osmolytes, such as 1M sucrose, and 30% glycerol, provided enhanced stability to both variants of dihydrofolate reductase. Their level of stabilisation has been observed to be dependent on intrinsic protein stability. It was observed that 100 mM proline does not show any 'significant stabilisation to either of dihydrofolate reductases. In the present study, it has been observed that the human protein is relatively less stable than the E.coli counterpart.

  9. A neutron spectrum unfolding computer code based on artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Rodríguez, J.M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Cervantes Viramontes, J.M.; Vega-Carrillo, H.R.

    2014-01-01

    The Bonner Spheres Spectrometer consists of a thermal neutron sensor placed at the center of a number of moderating polyethylene spheres of different diameters. From the measured readings, information can be derived about the spectrum of the neutron field where measurements were made. Disadvantages of the Bonner system are the weight associated with each sphere and the need to sequentially irradiate the spheres, requiring long exposure periods. Provided a well-established response matrix and adequate irradiation conditions, the most delicate part of neutron spectrometry, is the unfolding process. The derivation of the spectral information is not simple because the unknown is not given directly as a result of the measurements. The drawbacks associated with traditional unfolding procedures have motivated the need of complementary approaches. Novel methods based on Artificial Intelligence, mainly Artificial Neural Networks, have been widely investigated. In this work, a neutron spectrum unfolding code based on neural nets technology is presented. This code is called Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry with Artificial Neural networks unfolding code that was designed in a graphical interface. The core of the code is an embedded neural network architecture previously optimized using the robust design of artificial neural networks methodology. The main features of the code are: easy to use, friendly and intuitive to the user. This code was designed for a Bonner Sphere System based on a 6 LiI(Eu) neutron detector and a response matrix expressed in 60 energy bins taken from an International Atomic Energy Agency compilation. The main feature of the code is that as entrance data, for unfolding the neutron spectrum, only seven rate counts measured with seven Bonner spheres are required; simultaneously the code calculates 15 dosimetric quantities as well as the total flux for radiation protection purposes. This code generates a full report with all information of the unfolding

  10. Conformational dynamics of a protein in the folded and the unfolded state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitter, Joerg

    2003-08-01

    In a quasielastic neutron scattering experiment, the picosecond dynamics of {alpha}-amylase was investigated for the folded and the unfolded state of the protein. In order to ensure a reasonable interpretation of the internal protein dynamics, the protein was measured in D{sub 2}O-buffer solution. The much higher structural flexibility of the pH induced unfolded state as compared to the native folded state was quantified using a simple analytical model, describing a local diffusion inside a sphere. In terms of this model the conformational volume, which is explored mainly by confined protein side-chain movements, is parameterized by the radius of a sphere (folded state, r=1.2 A; unfolded state, 1.8 A). Differences in conformational dynamics between the folded and the unfolded state of a protein are of fundamental interest in the field of protein science, because they are assumed to play an important role for the thermodynamics of folding/unfolding transition and for protein stability.

  11. Spectrum unfolding in X-ray spectrometry using the maximum entropy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Jorge E.; Scot, Viviana; Di Giulio, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The solution of the unfolding problem is an ever-present issue in X-ray spectrometry. The maximum entropy technique solves this problem by taking advantage of some known a priori physical information and by ensuring an outcome with only positive values. This method is implemented in MAXED (MAXimum Entropy Deconvolution), a software code contained in the package UMG (Unfolding with MAXED and GRAVEL) developed at PTB and distributed by NEA Data Bank. This package contains also the code GRAVEL (used to estimate the precision of the solution). This article introduces the new code UMESTRAT (Unfolding Maximum Entropy STRATegy) which applies a semi-automatic strategy to solve the unfolding problem by using a suitable combination of MAXED and GRAVEL for applications in X-ray spectrometry. Some examples of the use of UMESTRAT are shown, demonstrating its capability to remove detector artifacts from the measured spectrum consistently with the model used for the detector response function (DRF). - Highlights: ► A new strategy to solve the unfolding problem in X-ray spectrometry is presented. ► The presented strategy uses a suitable combination of the codes MAXED and GRAVEL. ► The applied strategy provides additional information on the Detector Response Function. ► The code UMESTRAT is developed to apply this new strategy in a semi-automatic mode

  12. Isoporphyrin Intermediate in Heme Oxygenase Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John P.; Niemevz, Fernando; Buldain, Graciela; de Montellano, Paul Ortiz

    2008-01-01

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the O2- and NADPH-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The first step involves regiospecific insertion of an oxygen atom at the α-meso carbon by a ferric hydroperoxide and is predicted to proceed via an isoporphyrin π-cation intermediate. Here we report spectroscopic detection of a transient intermediate during oxidation by hHO-1 of α-meso-phenylheme-IX, α-meso-(p-methylphenyl)-mesoheme-III, and α-meso-(p-trifluoromethylphenyl)-mesoheme-III. In agreement with previous experiments (Wang, J., Niemevz, F., Lad, L., Huang, L., Alvarez, D. E., Buldain, G., Poulos, T. L., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 42593–42604), only the α-biliverdin isomer is produced with concomitant formation of the corresponding benzoic acid. The transient intermediate observed in the NADPH-P450 reductase-catalyzed reaction accumulated when the reaction was supported by H2O2 and exhibited the absorption maxima at 435 and 930 nm characteristic of an isoporphyrin. Product analysis by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the product generated with H2O2 identified it as an isoporphyrin that, on quenching, decayed to benzoylbiliverdin. In the presence of H218O2, one labeled oxygen atom was incorporated into these products. The hHO-1-isoporphyrin complexes were found to have half-lives of 1.7 and 2.4 h for the p-trifluoromethyl- and p-methyl-substituted phenylhemes, respectively. The addition of NADPH-P450 reductase to the H2O2-generated hHO-1-isoporphyrin complex produced α-biliverdin, confirming its role as a reaction intermediate. Identification of an isoporphyrin intermediate in the catalytic sequence of hHO-1, the first such intermediate observed in hemoprotein catalysis, completes our understanding of the critical first step of heme oxidation. PMID:18487208

  13. Hγ Line Spectrum of Intermediate Polars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggi Kim

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Kim & Beuermann (1995, 1996 have developed a model for the propagation of X-rays from the accreting white dwarf through the infalling material and the re-emission of the energy deposited by photo-absorption in the optical (and UV spectral range. By using this model, we calculate the profiles of the Hγ emission-line spectrum of intermediate polars. Photoabsorption of X-rays by the infalling material is the dominant process in forming the observed energy-dependent rotational modulation of the X-ray flux. X-ray and optical modulations are sensitive to model parameters in different ways. In principle, these dependencies allow us to obtain improved insight into the accretion geometry of the intermediate polars. We present results of our calculations and compare them with the Hβ line spectrum (Kim & Beuermann 1996.

  14. Carbon monosulfide: a useful synthetic intermediate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    The physical properties of carbon monosulfide, CS, are well documented. The molecule has been observed in interstellar space and is found to be a common intermediate in the thermal decomposition of carbon disulfide and other sulfur compounds. Interestingly enough, the chemistry of carbon monosulfide, a molecule that is isovalent with carbon monoxide, has received little attention. The explosive nature of the carbon monosulfide monomer, which hindered previous workers, was overcome by the development of special handling techniques. The ability to produce carbon monosulfide in gram quantities had lead to synthesis of novel compounds and to a more direct synthetic route for certain known compounds. Specifically, the following general reaction demonstrates the capabilities of carbon monosulfide on the synthetic scale. CS + RXY → RXC(S)Y;(X = N,S), (Y = H, Cl). Note: The initial product formed in the reaction can be an unstable intermediate

  15. Glutamate Induced Thermal Equilibrium Intermediate and Counteracting Effect on Chemical Denaturation of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anumalla, Bramhini; Prabhu, N Prakash

    2018-01-25

    When organisms are subjected to stress conditions, one of their adaptive responses is accumulation of small organic molecules called osmolytes. These osmolytes affect the structure and stability of the biological macromolecules including proteins. The present study examines the effect of a negatively charged amino acid osmolyte, glutamate (Glu), on two model proteins, ribonuclease A (RNase A) and α-lactalbumin (α-LA), which have positive and negative surface charges at pH 7, respectively. These proteins follow two-state unfolding transitions during both heat and chemical induced denaturation processes. The addition of Glu stabilizes the proteins against temperature and induces an early equilibrium intermediate during unfolding. The stability is found to be enthalpy-driven, and the free energy of stabilization is more for α-LA compared to RNase A. The decrease in the partial molar volume and compressibility of both of the proteins in the presence of Glu suggests that the proteins attain a more compact state through surface hydration which could provide a more stable conformation. This is also supported by molecule dynamic simulation studies which demonstrate that the water density around the proteins is increased upon the addition of Glu. Further, the intermediates could be completely destabilized by lower concentrations (∼0.5 M) of guanidinium chloride and salt. However, urea subverts the Glu-induced intermediate formed by α-LA, whereas it only slightly destabilizes in the case of RNase A which has a positive surface charge and could possess charge-charge interactions with Glu. This suggests that, apart from hydration, columbic interactions might also contribute to the stability of the intermediate. Gdm-induced denaturation of RNase A and α-LA in the absence and the presence of Glu at different temperatures was carried out. These results also show the Glu-induced stabilization of both of the proteins; however, all of the unfolding transitions followed two

  16. An Auto sequence Code to Integrate a Neutron Unfolding Code with thePC-MCA Accuspec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darsono

    2000-01-01

    In a neutron spectrometry using proton recoil method, the neutronunfolding code is needed to unfold the measured proton spectrum to become theneutron spectrum. The process of the unfolding neutron in the existingneutron spectrometry which was successfully installed last year was doneseparately. This manuscript reports that the auto sequence code to integratethe neutron unfolding code UNFSPEC.EXE with the software facility of thePC-MCA Accuspec has been made and run successfully so that the new neutronspectrometry become compact. The auto sequence code was written based on therules in application program facility of PC-MCA Accuspec and then it wascompiled using AC-EXE. Result of the test of the auto sequence code showedthat for binning width 20, 30, and 40 giving a little different spectrumshape. The binning width around 30 gives a better spectrum in mean of givingsmall error compared to the others. (author)

  17. A high-resolution neutron spectra unfolding method using the Genetic Algorithm technique

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, B

    2002-01-01

    The Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSS) are commonly used to determine the neutron spectra within various nuclear facilities. Sophisticated mathematical tools are used to unfold the neutron energy distribution from the output data of the BSS. This paper highlights a novel high-resolution neutron spectra-unfolding method using the Genetic Algorithm (GA) technique. The GA imitates the biological evolution process prevailing in the nature to solve complex optimisation problems. The GA method was utilised to evaluate the neutron energy distribution, average energy, fluence and equivalent dose rates at important work places of a DIDO class research reactor and a high-energy superconducting heavy ion cyclotron. The spectrometer was calibrated with a sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am/Be (alpha,n) neutron standard source. The results of the GA method agreed satisfactorily with the results obtained by using the well-known BUNKI neutron spectra unfolding code.

  18. Proving the correctness of unfold/fold program transformations using bisimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton, Geoff W.; Jones, Neil

    2011-01-01

    by a labelled transition system whose bisimilarity relation is a congruence that coincides with contextual equivalence. Labelled transition systems are well-suited to represent global program behaviour. On the other hand, unfold/fold program transformations use generalization and folding, and neither is easy......This paper shows that a bisimulation approach can be used to prove the correctness of unfold/fold program transformation algorithms. As an illustration, we show how our approach can be use to prove the correctness of positive supercompilation (due to Sørensen et al). Traditional program equivalence...... to describe contextually, due to use of non-local information. We show that weak bisimulation on labelled transition systems gives an elegant framework to prove contextual equivalence of original and transformed programs. One reason is that folds can be seen in the context of corresponding unfolds....

  19. On unfolding counting-rate spectra of recoil-proton neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeivin, Yehuda

    1983-01-01

    This note proposes a possible scheme for unfolding recoil-proton neutron detector data, in which at first the undistorted proton source spectrum is derived. The main argument in favour of this scheme is that, compared with the conventional scheme, it necessitates somewhat weaker assumptions with respect to the unknown spectrum above the detector's upper energy cutoff, and would therefore be more reliable. We also demonstrate a simple, elementary proof of the wall effect correction for spherical detectors, and, in order to gain insight of the potential merits of the proposed unfolding scheme, illustrate our main argument by considering a hypothetic linear range-energy relation, in which case complete unfolding becomes possible with no assumptions at all on the proton spectrum above the cutoff energy. (author)

  20. Dynamic coarse-graining fills the gap between atomistic simulations and experimental investigations of mechanical unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoch, Fabian; Schäfer, Ken; Diezemann, Gregor; Speck, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    We present a dynamic coarse-graining technique that allows one to simulate the mechanical unfolding of biomolecules or molecular complexes on experimentally relevant time scales. It is based on Markov state models (MSMs), which we construct from molecular dynamics simulations using the pulling coordinate as an order parameter. We obtain a sequence of MSMs as a function of the discretized pulling coordinate, and the pulling process is modeled by switching among the MSMs according to the protocol applied to unfold the complex. This way we cover seven orders of magnitude in pulling speed. In the region of rapid pulling, we additionally perform steered molecular dynamics simulations and find excellent agreement between the results of the fully atomistic and the dynamically coarse-grained simulations. Our technique allows the determination of the rates of mechanical unfolding in a dynamical range from approximately 10-8/ns to 1/ns thus reaching experimentally accessible time regimes without abandoning atomistic resolution.

  1. Performance of artificial neural networks and genetical evolved artificial neural networks unfolding techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz R, J. M.; Martinez B, M. R.; Vega C, H. R.; Gallego D, E.; Lorente F, A.; Mendez V, R.; Los Arcos M, J. M.; Guerrero A, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    With the Bonner spheres spectrometer neutron spectrum is obtained through an unfolding procedure. Monte Carlo methods, Regularization, Parametrization, Least-squares, and Maximum Entropy are some of the techniques utilized for unfolding. In the last decade methods based on Artificial Intelligence Technology have been used. Approaches based on Genetic Algorithms and Artificial Neural Networks (Ann) have been developed in order to overcome the drawbacks of previous techniques. Nevertheless the advantages of Ann still it has some drawbacks mainly in the design process of the network, vg the optimum selection of the architectural and learning Ann parameters. In recent years the use of hybrid technologies, combining Ann and genetic algorithms, has been utilized to. In this work, several Ann topologies were trained and tested using Ann and Genetically Evolved Artificial Neural Networks in the aim to unfold neutron spectra using the count rates of a Bonner sphere spectrometer. Here, a comparative study of both procedures has been carried out. (Author)

  2. Unfolding, aggregation, and seeded amyloid formation of lysine-58-cleaved beta(2)-microglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Jørgensen, T.J.D.; Rozlosnik, N.

    2005-01-01

    . Using amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry, we show that Delta K58-beta(2)m has increased unfolding rates compared to wt-beta(2)m and that unfolding is highly temperature dependent. The unfolding rate is I order of magnitude faster in Delta K58-beta(2)M than in wt-beta(2)m...... in the circulation of dialysis patients. This beta(2)M variant, Delta K58-beta(2)m, is a disulfide-linked two-chain molecule consisting of amino acid residues 1-57 and 59-99 of intact beta(2)m, and we here demonstrate and characterize its decreased conformational stability as compared to wild-type (wt) beta(2)M...

  3. Considerably Unfolded Transthyretin Monomers Preceed and Exchange with Dynamically Structured Amyloid Protofibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groenning, Minna; Campos, Raul I; Hirschberg, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    describe an unexpectedly dynamic TTR protofibril structure which exchanges protomers with highly unfolded monomers in solution. The protofibrils only grow to an approximate final size of 2,900 kDa and a length of 70 nm and a comparative HXMS analysis of native and aggregated samples revealed a much higher...... average solvent exposure of TTR upon fibrillation. With SAXS, we reveal the continuous presence of a considerably unfolded TTR monomer throughout the fibrillation process, and show that a considerable fraction of the fibrillating protein remains in solution even at a late maturation state. Together......, these data reveal that the fibrillar state interchanges with the solution state. Accordingly, we suggest that TTR fibrillation proceeds via addition of considerably unfolded monomers, and the continuous presence of amyloidogenic structures near the protofibril surface offers a plausible explanation...

  4. Motional properties of unfolded ubiquitin: a model for a random coil protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirmer, Julia [Johann Wolfgang GoeUniversityFrankfurt, Institute for Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany); Peti, Wolfgang [Brown University, Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology and Biotechnology (United States); Schwalbe, Harald [Johann Wolfgang GoeUniversityFrankfurt, Institute for Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany)], E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de

    2006-07-15

    The characterization of unfolded states of proteins has recently attracted considerable interest, as the residual structure present in these states may play a crucial role in determining their folding and misfolding behavior. Here, we investigated the dynamics in the denatured state of ubiquitin in 8 M urea at pH2. Under these conditions, ubiquitin does not have any detectable local residual structure, and uniform {sup 15}N relaxation rates along the sequence indicate the absence of motional restrictions caused by residual secondary structure and/or long-range interactions. A comparison of different models to predict relaxation data in unfolded proteins suggests that the subnanosecond dynamics in unfolded states depend on segmental motions only and do not show a dependence on the residue type but for proline and glycine residues.

  5. Positioning the Intracellular Salt Potassium Glutamate in the Hofmeister Series by Chemical Unfolding Studies of NTL9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Rituparna; Pantel, Adrian; Cheng, Xian; Shkel, Irina; Peran, Ivan; Stenzoski, Natalie; Raleigh, Daniel P; Record, M Thomas

    2016-04-19

    In vitro, replacing KCl with potassium glutamate (KGlu), the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic salt and osmolyte, stabilizes folded proteins and protein-nucleic acid complexes. To understand the chemical basis for these effects and rank Glu- in the Hofmeister anion series for protein unfolding, we quantify and interpret the strong stabilizing effect of KGlu on the ribosomal protein domain NTL9, relative to the effects of other stabilizers (KCl, KF, and K2SO4) and destabilizers (GuHCl and GuHSCN). GuHSCN titrations at 20 ° C, performed as a function of the concentration of KGlu or another salt and monitored by NTL9 fluorescence, are analyzed to obtain R-values quantifying the Hofmeister salt concentration (m3) dependence of the unfolding equilibrium constant K(obs) [r-value = −d ln K(obs)/dm3 = (1/RT) dΔG(obs) ° /dm3 = m-value/RT]. r-Values for both stabilizing K+ salts and destabilizing GuH+ salts are compared with predictions from model compound data. For two-salt mixtures, we find that contributions of stabilizing and destabilizing salts to observed r-values are additive and independent. At 20 ° C, we determine a KGlu r-value of 3.22 m(−1) and K2SO4, KF, KCl, GuHCl, and GuHSCN r-values of 5.38, 1.05, 0.64, −1.38, and −3.00 m(−1), respectively. The KGlu r-value represents a 25-fold (1.9 kcal) stabilization per molal KGlu added. KGlu is much more stabilizing than KF, and the stabilizing effect of KGlu is larger in magnitude than the destabilizing effect of GuHSCN. Interpretation of the data reveals good agreement between predicted and observed relative r-values and indicates the presence of significant residual structure in GuHSCN-unfolded NTL9 at 20 ° C.

  6. Thermal, chemical and pH induced unfolding of turmeric root lectin: modes of denaturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himadri Biswas

    Full Text Available Curcuma longa rhizome lectin, of non-seed origin having antifungal, antibacterial and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities, forms a homodimer with high thermal stability as well as acid tolerance. Size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering show it to be a dimer at pH 7, but it converts to a monomer near pH 2. Circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence emission maxima are virtually indistinguishable from pH 7 to 2, indicating secondary and tertiary structures remain the same in dimer and monomer within experimental error. The tryptophan environment as probed by acrylamide quenching data yielded very similar data at pH 2 and pH 7, implying very similar folding for monomer and dimer. Differential scanning calorimetry shows a transition at 350.3 K for dimer and at 327.0 K for monomer. Thermal unfolding and chemical unfolding induced by guanidinium chloride for dimer are both reversible and can be described by two-state models. The temperatures and the denaturant concentrations at which one-half of the protein molecules are unfolded, are protein concentration-dependent for dimer but protein concentration-independent for monomer. The free energy of unfolding at 298 K was found to be 5.23 Kcal mol-1 and 14.90 Kcal mol-1 for the monomer and dimer respectively. The value of change in excess heat capacity upon protein denaturation (ΔCp is 3.42 Kcal mol-1 K-1 for dimer. The small ΔCp for unfolding of CLA reflects a buried hydrophobic core in the folded dimeric protein. These unfolding experiments, temperature dependent circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering for the dimer at pH 7 indicate its higher stability than for the monomer at pH 2. This difference in stability of dimeric and monomeric forms highlights the contribution of inter-subunit interactions in the former.

  7. Search for intermediate vector bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, D.B.; Rubbia, C.; van der Meer, S.

    1982-01-01

    Over the past 15 years a new class of unified theories has been developed to describe the forces acting between elementary particles. The most successful of the new theories establishes a link between electromagnetism and the weak force. A crucial prediction of this unified electroweak theory is the existence of three massive particles called intermediate vector bosons. If these intermediate vector bosons exist and if they have properties attributed to them by electroweak theory, they should soon be detected, as the world's first particle accelerator with enough energy to create such particles has recently been completed at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva. The accelerator has been converted to a colliding beam machine in which protons and antiprotons collide head on. According to electroweak theory, intermediate vector bosons can be created in proton-antiproton collisions. (SC)

  8. Search for intermediate vector bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klajn, D.B.; Rubbia, K.; Meer, S.

    1983-01-01

    Problem of registration and search for intermediate vector bosons is discussed. According to weak-current theory there are three intermediate vector bosons with +1(W + )-1(W - ) and zero (Z 0 ) electric charges. It was suggested to conduct the investigation into particles in 1976 by cline, Rubbia and Makintair using proton-antiproton beams. Major difficulties of the experiment are related to the necessity of formation of sufficient amount of antiparticles and the method of antiproton beam ''cooling'' for the purpose of reduction of its random movements. The stochastic method was suggested by van der Meer in 1968 as one of possible cooling methods. Several large detectors were designed for searching intermediate vector bosons

  9. Gravity with Intermediate Goods Trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Jang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper derives the gravity equation with intermediate goods trade. We extend a standard monopolistic competition model to incorporate intermediate goods trade, and show that the gravity equation with intermediates trade is identical to the one without it except in that gross output should be used as the output measure instead of value added. We also show that the output elasticity of trade is significantly underestimated when value added is used as the output measure. This implies that with the conventional gravity equation, the contribution of output growth can be substantially underestimated and the role of trade costs reduction can be exaggerated in explaining trade expansion, as we demonstrate for the case of Korea's trade growth between 1995 and 2007.

  10. UNFOLDINGS OF THE CYLINDRICA L SURFACES USED IN THE INDUSTRIAL INSTALLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VASILE GHEORGHITA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The connections in the construction of the various industrial installations: pipes, boilers, joints elements and fittings have a cylindrical configuration, or similar cylindrical shape. The execution and their installation require knowledge of the unfolding and intersection curves, which compose them. The graphical solving of the problems of tech nical representation has enabled the formation of abstract geometric of the pieces forms and the ability to see into space. The paper proposes to establish the unfolding of a connection, used in the industrial equipments, by the classical method of the des criptive geometry and mathematics, using appropriate software

  11. Neutron response matrix for unfolding NE-213 measurements to 21 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Wehring, B.W.; Johnson, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    A neutron response matrix from measured neutron responses of NE-213 in the energy range of 0.2 to 22 MeV is presented. An interpolation scheme was used to construct an 81-column matrix from the data of Verbinski, Burrus, Love, Zobel, and Hill. As a test of the new response matrix, the Cf-252 neutron spectrum was measured and unfolded using the new response matrix and the FORIST unfolding code. The spectrum agrees well with previous measurements at lower energies, while providing new information above 8 MeV

  12. RDANN a new methodology to solve the neutron spectra unfolding problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz R, J.M.; Martinez B, M.R.; Vega C, H.R.

    2006-01-01

    The optimization processes known as Taguchi method and DOE methodology are applied to the design, training and testing of Artificial Neural Networks in the neutron spectrometry field, which offer potential benefits in the evaluation of the behavior of the net as well as the ability to examine the interaction of the weights and neurons inside the same one. In this work, the Robust Design of Artificial Neural Networks methodology is used to solve the neutron spectra unfolding problem, designing, training and testing an ANN using a set of 187 neutron spectra compiled by the International Atomic Energy Agency, to obtain the better neutron spectra unfolded from the Bonner spheres spectrometer's count rates. (Author)

  13. Multifragmentation in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacak, B.V.; Britt, H.C.; Claesson, G.

    1986-01-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in the production of intermediate mass fragments (A > 4) in intermediate and high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. The mechanism for production of these fragments is not well understood and has been described by models employing a variety of assumptions. Some examples are: disassembly of a system in thermal equilibrium into nucleons and nuclear fragments, liquid-vapor phase transitions in nuclear matter, final state coalescence of nucleons and dynamical correlations between nucleons at breakup. Previous studies of fragment production, with one exception, have been single particle inclusive measurements; the observed fragment mass (or charge) distributions can be described by all of the models above. To gain insight into the fragment production mechanism, the authors used the GSI/LBL Plastic Ball detector system to get full azimuthal coverage for intermediate mass fragments in the forward hemisphere in the center of mass system while measuring all the light particles in each event. The authors studied the systems 200 MeV/nucleon Au + Au and Au + Fe

  14. UMG 3.3, Analysis of data measured with spectrometers using unfolding techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reginatto, Marcel; Wiegel, Burkhard; Zimbal, Andreas; Langner, Frank

    2004-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: UMG (Unfolding with MAXED and GRAVEL) is a package of seven programs written for the analysis of data measured with spectrometers that require the use of unfolding techniques. The program MAXED applies the maximum entropy principle to the unfolding problem, and the program GRAVEL uses a modified SAND-II algorithm to do the unfolding. There are two versions of each: MXD F C33 and GRV F C33 for 'few-channel' unfolding (e.g., Bonner sphere spectrometers) and MXD M C33 and GRV M C33 for 'multi-channel' unfolding (e.g., NE-213). The program IQU can be used to calculate integral quantities for both MAXED and GRAVEL solution spectra and, in the case of MAXED solutions, it can also be used to calculate the uncertainty in these values as well as the uncertainty in the solution spectrum. The uncertainty calculation is handled in the following way: given a solution spectrum generated by MAXED, the program IQU considers variations in the measured data and in the default spectrum and uses standard Methods to do sensitivity analysis and uncertainty propagation. There are two versions: IQU F C33 for 'few-channel' unfolding and IQU M C33 for 'multi-channel' unfolding. The program UMGPlot can be used to display the results from the unfolding programs MAXED and GRAVEL in graphical form in a quick and easy way. 2 - Methods: MAXED is based on the maximum entropy principle. The solution to the unfolding problem is obtained by maximisation of the relative entropy (used here in the form due to Skilling, which is a generalisation of the usual expression to distributions that are not necessarily normalized) subject to constraints imposed by the measurements. This approach permits the inclusion of prior information in a well-defined and mathematically consistent way, and it leads to a solution spectrum that is a non-negative function which can be written in closed form. This last feature permits the use of standard Methods for sensitivity analysis and

  15. Larval helminths in intermediate hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Poulin, R

    2005-01-01

    Density-dependent effects on parasite fitness have been documented from adult helminths in their definitive hosts. There have, however, been no studies on the cost of sharing an intermediate host with other parasites in terms of reduced adult parasite fecundity. Even if larval parasites suffer a ...

  16. Intermediality and the Child Performer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    This report details examples of praxis in the creation and presentation of "Joy Fear and Poetry": an intermedial theatre performance in which children aged 7-12 years generated aesthetic gestures using a range of new media forms. The impetus for the work's development was a desire to make an intervention into habituated patterns of…

  17. Reduced Sleep During Social Isolation Leads to Cellular Stress and Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Marishka K; Strus, Ewa; Naidoo, Nirinjini

    2017-07-01

    Social isolation has a multitude of negative consequences on human health including the ability to endure challenges to the immune system, sleep amount and efficiency, and general morbidity and mortality. These adverse health outcomes are conserved in other social species. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, social isolation leads to increased aggression, impaired memory, and reduced amounts of daytime sleep. There is a correlation between molecules affected by social isolation and those implicated in sleep in Drosophila. We previously demonstrated that acute sleep loss in flies and mice induced the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive signaling pathway. One mechanism indicating UPR upregulation is elevated levels of the endoplasmic reticular chaperone BiP/GRP78. We previously showed that BiP overexpression in Drosophila led to increased sleep rebound. Increased rebound sleep has also been demonstrated in socially isolated (SI) flies. D. melanogaster were used to study the effect of social isolation on cellular stress. SI flies displayed an increase in UPR markers; there were higher BiP levels, increased phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α, and increased splicing of xbp1. These are all indicators of UPR activation. In addition, the effects of isolation on the UPR were reversible; pharmacologically and genetically altering sleep in the flies modulated the UPR. The reduction in sleep observed in SI flies is a cellular stressor that results in UPR induction. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of the Sleep Research Society]. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. Lysosomes and unfolded protein response, determinants of differential resistance of melanoma cells to vinca alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Laure-Anais; Attaoua, Chaker; Bellis, Michel; Rozkydalova, Lucie; Hadj-Kaddour, Kamel; Vian, Laurence; Cuq, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    On account of its strong ability to become chemoresistant after a primary response to drugs, malignant melanoma (MM) remains a therapeutic challenge. This study focuses on acquired resistance to vinca alkaloids (VAs) using VA-resistant MM cell lines (CAL1R-VCR, CAL1R-VDS, and CAL1R-VRB), established by long-term continuous exposure of parental CAL1-wt cells to vincristine (VCR), vindesine (VDS), or vinorelbine (VRB), respectively. Transcriptomic profiling using rma and rdam methods led to distinguish two cell groups: CAL1R-VCR and CAL1R-VDS, CAL1R-VRB, and CAL1-wt. mgsa of the specifically altered genes in the first group evidenced the GO terms 'lysosomal lumen' and 'vacuolar lumen' linked to underexpressed genes, and 'endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response' associated with overexpressed genes. A specific reduction of lysosomal enzymes, independent of acidic vacuole organelle (AVO) turnover, was observed (LTG probe) in CAL1R-VCR and CAL1R-VDS cells. It was associated with the specific lowering of cathepsin B and L, known to be involved in the lysosomal pathway of apoptosis. Confirming gene profiling, the same groups (CAL1R-VCR and CAL1R-VDS, CAL1-wt and CAL1R-VRB) could be distinguished regarding the VA-mediated changes on mean size areas and on acidic compartment volumes. These two parameters were reduced in CAL1R-VCR and CAL1R-VDS cells, suggesting a smaller AVO accumulation and thus a reduced sensitivity to lysosomal membrane permeabilization-mediated apoptosis. In addition, 'ER stress response' inhibition by tauroursodeoxycholic acid induced a higher VA sensitization of the first cell group. In conclusion, lysosomes and unfolded protein response could be key determinants of the differential resistance of MM to VAs. © 2015 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  19. Classical model of intermediate statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniadakis, G.

    1994-01-01

    In this work we present a classical kinetic model of intermediate statistics. In the case of Brownian particles we show that the Fermi-Dirac (FD) and Bose-Einstein (BE) distributions can be obtained, just as the Maxwell-Boltzmann (MD) distribution, as steady states of a classical kinetic equation that intrinsically takes into account an exclusion-inclusion principle. In our model the intermediate statistics are obtained as steady states of a system of coupled nonlinear kinetic equations, where the coupling constants are the transmutational potentials η κκ' . We show that, besides the FD-BE intermediate statistics extensively studied from the quantum point of view, we can also study the MB-FD and MB-BE ones. Moreover, our model allows us to treat the three-state mixing FD-MB-BE intermediate statistics. For boson and fermion mixing in a D-dimensional space, we obtain a family of FD-BE intermediate statistics by varying the transmutational potential η BF . This family contains, as a particular case when η BF =0, the quantum statistics recently proposed by L. Wu, Z. Wu, and J. Sun [Phys. Lett. A 170, 280 (1992)]. When we consider the two-dimensional FD-BE statistics, we derive an analytic expression of the fraction of fermions. When the temperature T→∞, the system is composed by an equal number of bosons and fermions, regardless of the value of η BF . On the contrary, when T=0, η BF becomes important and, according to its value, the system can be completely bosonic or fermionic, or composed both by bosons and fermions

  20. A complete quasar sample at intermediate redshift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristiani, S.; La Franca, F.; Barbieri, C.; Iovino, A.

    1991-01-01

    A search for intermediate-redshift quasars has been carried out with slitless spectroscopy in the central 21.07 deg 2 of the SA 94, where the existence of a large database of objects for which slit spectroscopy was already available provided a valuable opportunity of testing the properties of our selection technique. Fifty candidates have been observed with slit spectroscopy, confirming 34 quasars and two H II galaxies. The completeness of this survey as a function of magnitude and redshift has been analysed, and an effective area of 16.9 deg 2 has been evaluated. (author)

  1. Intermediate filaments and gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traub, P

    1995-01-01

    The biological role of intermediate filaments (IFs) of eukaryotic cells is still a matter of conjecture. On the basis of immunofluorescence and electron microscopic observations, they appear to play a cytoskeletal role in that they stabilize cellular structure and organize the distribution and interactions of intracellular organelles and components. The expression of a large number of cell type-specific and developmentally regulated subunit proteins is believed to provide multicellular organisms with different IF systems capable of differential interactions with the various substructures and components of their multiple, differentiated cells. However, the destruction of distinct IF systems by manipulation of cultured cells or by knock-out mutation of IF subunit proteins in transgenic mice exerts relatively little influence on cellular morphology and physiology and on development of mutant animals. In order to rationalize this dilemma, the cytoskeletal concept of IF function has been extended to purport that cytoplasmic (c) IFs and their subunit proteins also play fundamental roles in gene regulation. It is based on the in vitro capacity of cIF(protein)s to interact with guanine-rich, single-stranded DNA, supercoiled DNA and histones, as well as on their close structural relatedness to gene-regulatory DNA-binding and nuclear matrix proteins. Since cIF proteins do not possess classical nuclear localization signals, it is proposed that cIFs directly penetrate the double nuclear membrane, exploiting the amphiphilic, membrane-active character of their subunit proteins. Since they can establish metastable multisite contacts with nuclear matrix structures and/or chromatin areas containing highly repetitive DNA sequence elements at the nuclear periphery, they are supposed to participate in chromosome distribution and chromatin organization in interphase nuclei of differentiated cells. Owing to their different DNA-binding specificities, the various cIF systems may in this

  2. The impact of urea-induced unfolding on the redox process of immobilised cytochrome c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monari, S.; Millo, D.; Ranieri, A.; di Rocco, G.; van der Zwan, G.; Gooijer, C.; Peressini, S.; Tavagnacco, C.; Hildebrandt, P.; Borsari, M.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the effect of urea-induced unfolding on the electron transfer process of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c and its mutant K72AK73AK79A adsorbed on electrodes coated by mixed 11-mercapto-1-undecanoic acid/11-mercapto-1-undecanol self-assembled monolayers. Electrochemical measurements,

  3. Sequence-dependent unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins studied by nanopore force spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renner, Stephan; Bessonov, Andrey; Simmel, Friedrich C; Gerland, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Nanopore force spectroscopy is used to study the unzipping kinetics of two DNA hairpin molecules with a 12 base pair long stem containing two contiguous stretches of six GC and six AT base pairs in interchanged order. Even though the thermodynamic stabilities of the two structures are nearly the same, they differ greatly in their unzipping kinetics. When the GC segment has to be broken before the AT segment, the unfolding rate is orders of magnitude smaller than in the opposite case. We also investigated hairpins with stem regions consisting only of AT or GC base pairs. The pure AT hairpins translocate much faster than the other hairpins, whereas the pure GC hairpins translocate on similar timescales to the hairpins with only an initial GC segment. For each hairpin, nanopore force spectroscopy is performed for different loading rates and the resulting unzipping distributions are mathematically transformed to a master curve that yields the unfolding rate as a function of applied voltage. This is compared with a stochastic model of the unfolding process for the two sequences for different voltages. The results can be rationalized in terms of the different natures of the free energy landscapes for the unfolding process.

  4. A novel neutron energy spectrum unfolding code using particle swarm optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahabinejad, H.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2017-01-01

    A novel neutron Spectrum Deconvolution using Particle Swarm Optimization (SDPSO) code has been developed to unfold the neutron spectrum from a pulse height distribution and a response matrix. The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) imitates the bird flocks social behavior to solve complex optimization problems. The results of the SDPSO code have been compared with those of the standard spectra and recently published Two-steps Genetic Algorithm Spectrum Unfolding (TGASU) code. The TGASU code have been previously compared with the other codes such as MAXED, GRAVEL, FERDOR and GAMCD and shown to be more accurate than the previous codes. The results of the SDPSO code have been demonstrated to match well with those of the TGASU code for both under determined and over-determined problems. In addition the SDPSO has been shown to be nearly two times faster than the TGASU code. - Highlights: • Introducing a novel method for neutron spectrum unfolding. • Implementation of a particle swarm optimization code for neutron unfolding. • Comparing results of the PSO code with those of recently published TGASU code. • Match results of the PSO code with those of TGASU code. • Greater convergence rate of implemented PSO code than TGASU code.

  5. Seeking Educational Quality in the Unfolding of Classroom Discourse: A Focus on Microtransitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameli, Consuelo; Molinari, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we argue the importance of conceptualizing educational quality as located in everyday talk, and to search for it in the unfolding of classroom discourse and interactions. More specifically, we argue that for the discursive classroom process to be qualitatively effective it should be open and accessible by a series of…

  6. The Unfolding MD Simulations of Cyclophilin: Analyzed by Surface Contact Networks and Their Associated Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sourav; Basu, Sankar; Dasgupta, Dipak; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Banerjee, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Currently, considerable interest exists with regard to the dissociation of close packed aminoacids within proteins, in the course of unfolding, which could result in either wet or dry moltenglobules. The progressive disjuncture of residues constituting the hydrophobic core ofcyclophilin from L. donovani (LdCyp) has been studied during the thermal unfolding of the molecule, by molecular dynamics simulations. LdCyp has been represented as a surface contactnetwork (SCN) based on the surface complementarity (Sm) of interacting residues within themolecular interior. The application of Sm to side chain packing within proteins make it a very sensitive indicator of subtle perturbations in packing, in the thermal unfolding of the protein. Network based metrics have been defined to track the sequential changes in the disintegration ofthe SCN spanning the hydrophobic core of LdCyp and these metrics prove to be highly sensitive compared to traditional metrics in indicating the increased conformational (and dynamical) flexibility in the network. These metrics have been applied to suggest criteria distinguishing DMG, WMG and transition state ensembles and to identify key residues involved in crucial conformational/topological events during the unfolding process. PMID:26545107

  7. Microsecond simulations of the folding/unfolding thermodynamics of the Trp-cage mini protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Ryan; Paschek, Dietmar; Garcia, Angel E.

    2012-01-01

    We study the unbiased folding/unfolding thermodynamics of the Trp-cage miniprotein using detailed molecular dynamics simulations of an all-atom model of the protein in explicit solvent, using the Amberff99SB force field. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations are used to sample the protein ensembles over a broad range of temperatures covering the folded and unfolded states, and at two densities. The obtained ensembles are shown to reach equilibrium in the 1 μs per replica timescale. The total simulation time employed in the calculations exceeds 100 μs. Ensemble averages of the fraction folded, pressure, and energy differences between the folded and unfolded states as a function of temperature are used to model the free energy of the folding transition, ΔG(P,T), over the whole region of temperature and pressures sampled in the simulations. The ΔG(P,T) diagram describes an ellipse over the range of temperatures and pressures sampled, predicting that the system can undergo pressure induced unfolding and cold denaturation at low temperatures and high pressures, and unfolding at low pressures and high temperatures. The calculated free energy function exhibits remarkably good agreement with the experimental folding transition temperature (Tf = 321 K), free energy and specific heat changes. However, changes in enthalpy and entropy are significantly different than the experimental values. We speculate that these differences may be due to the simplicity of the semi-empirical force field used in the simulations and that more elaborate force fields may be required to describe appropriately the thermodynamics of proteins. PMID:20408169

  8. Singlet channel coupling in deuteron elastic scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Khalili, J.S.; Tostevin, J.A.; Johnson, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Intermediate energy deuteron elastic scattering is investigated in a three-body model incorporating relativistic kinematics. The effects of deuteron breakup to singlet spin intermediate states, on the elastic scattering observables for the 58 Ni(d vector, d) 58 Ni reaction at 400 and 700 MeV, are studied quantitatively. The singlet-breakup contributions to the elastic amplitude are estimated within an approximate two-step calculation. The calculation makes an adiabatic approximation in the intermediate states propagator which allows the use of closure over the np intermediate states continuum. The singlet channel coupling is found to produce large effects on the calculated reaction tensor analysing power A yy , characteristic of a dynamically induced second-rank tensor interaction. By inspection of the calculated breakup amplitudes we show this induced interaction to be of the T L tensor type. (orig.)

  9. Fission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, T.; Boissevain, J.; Fowler, M.M.; Gavron, A.; Jacak, B.V.; Lysaght, P.S.; Britt, H.C.; Fields, D.J.; Hansen, L.F.; Lanier, R.G.; Massoletti, D.J.; Namboodiri, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Sangster, T.C.; Struble, G.L.; Webb, M.L.; Chan, Y.D.; Dacai, A.; Harmon, A.; Leyba, J.; Pouliot, J.; Stokstad, R.G.; Hansen, O.; Levine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Trautmann, W.; Dichter, B.; Kaufman, S.; Videbaek, F.; Fraenkel, Z.; Mamane, G.; Cebra, D.; Westfall, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic study of reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies (50-100 MeV/A) has been performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's BeValac using medium weight projectiles on medium and heavy element targets. A gas and plastic phoswich detector system was employed which gave large geometric coverage and a wide dynamic response. The particles identified with the gas detectors could be characterized into three components - intermediate mass fragments (IMF), fission fragments (FF) and heavy residues (HR). Major observed features are: The reaction yields are similar in the 50 to 100 MeV/A range, central collisions have high multiplicty of IMF's with broad angular correlations consistent with a large participant region, effects of final state Coulomb interactions are observed and give information on the size and temporal behavior of the source, true fission yields are dependent on target fissility and correlated with relatively peripheral collisions. Analysis of fission and evaporation yields implies limiting conditions for which fission decay remains a viable deexcitation channel. (orig.)

  10. Fission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, T.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic study of reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies (50--100 MeV/A) has been performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's BeValac using medium weight projectiles on medium and heavy element targets. A gas and plastic phoswich detector system was employed which gave large geometric coverage and a wide dynamic response. The particles identified with the gas detectors could be characterized into three components - intermediate mass fragments (IMF), fission fragments (FF) and heavy residues (HR). Major observed features are: the reaction yields are similar in the 50 to 100 MeV/A range, central collisions have high multiplicity of IMF's with broad angular correlations consistent with a large participant region, effects of final state Coulomb interactions are observed and give information on the size and temporal behavior of the source, true fission yields are dependent on target fissility and correlated with relatively peripheral collisions. Analysis of fission and evaporation yields implies limiting conditions for which fission decay remains a viable deexcitation channel. 7 figs

  11. Unfolding the assessment process in a whole class mathematics setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radišić Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment activities in the class are an important aspect of classroom practice, while there is much debate with respect to the formative vs. summative assessment routines and the outcomes that each of them provides for students' learning. As classroom assessment does not occur in seclusion of other aspects of classroom life, the process is seen as rather complex. In this study we wished to explore how assessment serves the function of supporting students' learning and whether this evidence is used to adapt teacher's practices in meeting different learning needs in the mathematics classroom. The authors observed assessment practices of an experienced math teacher in a grammar school in Belgrade. Teacher's assessment practices were observed during a three week period. The analysis has shown the teacher to hold a somewhat complex perception of assessment, yet the perception is largely detached from teaching, which is in line with the previously reported results. However, the elements of formative assessment do emerge, thus contributing to the assessment being in service of learning. In spite of this, a narrow set of practices are visible when observing how the teacher keeps track of students' progress. A mismatch is visible between students' and teacher's perceptions of the assessment as a whole and some of the practices exercised in the process. The teacher struggled to verbalize some aspects of own assessment practices, especially those related to more formative aspects.

  12. MHD intermediate shock discontinuities: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, C.F.; Blandford, R.D.; Coppi, P.

    1989-01-01

    Recent numerical investigations have focused attention once more on the role of intermediate shocks in MHD. Four types of intermediate shock are identified using a graphical representation of the MHD Rankine-Hugoniot conditions. This same representation can be used to exhibit the close relationship of intermediate shocks to switch-on shocks and rotational discontinuities. The conditions under which intermediate discontinuities can be found are elucidated. The variations in velocity, pressure, entropy and magnetic-field jumps with upstream parameters in intermediate shocks are exhibited graphically. The evolutionary arguments traditionally advanced against intermediate shocks may fail because the equations of classical MHD are not strictly hyperbolic. (author)

  13. Intermediate Filaments as Organizers of Cellular Space: How They Affect Mitochondrial Structure and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Nicole; Leube, Rudolf E

    2016-07-05

    Intermediate filaments together with actin filaments and microtubules form the cytoskeleton, which is a complex and highly dynamic 3D network. Intermediate filaments are the major mechanical stress protectors but also affect cell growth, differentiation, signal transduction, and migration. Using intermediate filament-mitochondrial crosstalk as a prominent example, this review emphasizes the importance of intermediate filaments as crucial organizers of cytoplasmic space to support these functions. We summarize observations in different mammalian cell types which demonstrate how intermediate filaments influence mitochondrial morphology, subcellular localization, and function through direct and indirect interactions and how perturbations of these interactions may lead to human diseases.

  14. Effective electrochemical method for investigation of hemoglobin unfolding based on the redox property of heme groups at glassy carbon electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianchan; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Limin; Yu, Ping; Lin, Yuqing; Su, Lei; Mao, Lanqun

    2009-10-15

    This study demonstrates a facile and effective electrochemical method for investigation of hemoglobin (Hb) unfolding based on the electrochemical redox property of heme groups in Hb at bare glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. In the native state, the heme groups are deeply buried in the hydrophobic pockets of Hb with a five-coordinate high-spin complex and thus show a poor electrochemical property at bare GC electrodes. Upon the unfolding of Hb induced by the denaturant of guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), the fifth coordinative bond between the heme groups and the residue of the polypeptides (His-F8) is broken, and as a result, the heme groups initially buried deeply in the hydrophobic pockets dissociate from the polypeptide chains and are reduced electrochemically at GC electrodes, which can be used to probe the unfolding of Hb. The results on the GdnHCl-induced Hb unfolding obtained with the electrochemical method described here well coincide with those studied with other methods, such as UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism. The application of the as-established electrochemical method is illustrated to study the kinetics of GdnHCl-induced Hb unfolding, the GdnHCl-induced unfolding of another kind of hemoprotein, catalase, and the pH-induced Hb unfolding/refolding.

  15. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Margiotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway.

  16. COOLC, Ne-213 Liquid Scintillation Detector Neutron Spectra Unfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: COOLC is designed to calculate a neutron energy spectrum from a pulse-height spectrum produced by a detector system using the liquid scintillator NE-213. 2 - Method of solution: The program estimates the counts which would be observed in an ideal detector system having a response which is specified by the user. The solution implicitly takes into account the non-negativity of the desired neutron spectrum. The solution is obtained by finding a nearly optimal combination of slices through the spectrometer response functions such that their sum approximates the response of a channel of the ideal analyzer, and then uses the coefficients so determined to obtain an estimate of the desired neutron spectrum. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: There are none noted

  17. ESL intermediate/advanced writing

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz Page, Mary Ellen; Jaskiewicz, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Master ESL (English as a Second Language) Writing with the study guide designed for non-native speakers of English. Skill-building lessons relevant to today's topics help ESL students write complete sentences, paragraphs, and even multi-paragraph essays. It's perfect for classroom use or self-guided writing preparation.DETAILS- Intermediate drills for improving skills with parallel structure, mood, correct shifting errors & dangling participles- Advanced essay drills focusing on narrative, descriptive, process, reaction, comparison and contrast- Superb preparation for students taking the TOEFL

  18. Photonuclear reactions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The dominant feature of photonuclear reactions at intermediate energies is the excitation of the δ resonance and one can therefore use such reactions to study the dynamics of δ propagation in a nucleus. Following an introductory section the author comments on photoabsorption on a single nucleon in Section II. A review of the δ-n Greens function and of the photonuclear amplitude is given in Section III. Results for photoabsorption on 4 He are shown in Section IV and compared with the data. Coherent π 0 photoproduction is discussed in Section V and calculations for 12 C are compared to recent measurements. (Auth.)

  19. Pelamis WEC - intermediate scale demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yemm, R.

    2003-07-01

    This report describes the successful building and commissioning of an intermediate 1/7th scale model of the Pelamis Wave Energy Converter (WEC) and its testing in the wave climate of the Firth of Forth. Details are given of the design of the semi-submerged articulated structure of cylindrical elements linked by hinged joints. The specific programme objectives and conclusions, development issues addressed, and key remaining risks are discussed along with development milestones to be passed before the Pelamis WEC is ready for full-scale prototype testing.

  20. Experience – Information – Image: A Historiography of Unfolding. Arab Cinema as Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura U. Marks

    2011-04-01

    Many artworks can be illuminated by this process. My examples will be drawn from contemporary Arab cinema. In the heavily politicized Arab milieu, the Image world is constructed as a selective unfolding of only those aspects of Experience that are deemed to be useful or profitable. Some Arab filmmakers, rather than deconstruct the resulting ideological images, prefer to carry out their own unfoldings:  explicating hitherto latent events, knowledges, and sensations. Thus what official history deems merely personal, absurd, micro-events, or no events at all, becomes the stuff of a rich alternative historiography. This process characterizes the work of, among others, Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige, Nisrine Khodr, Mohammed Soueid, and Akram Zaatari (Lebanon, Azza El-Hassan, Elia Suleiman, and Sobhi Al-Zobaidi (Palestine, and Mohamad Khan (Egypt.

  1. Simulation study on unfolding methods for diagnostic X-rays and mixed gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Ohtaka, Masahiko; Ara, Kuniaki; Kanno, Ikuo; Imamura, Ryo; Mikami, Kenta; Nomiya, Seiichiro; Onabe, Hideaki

    2009-01-01

    A photon detector operating in current mode that can sense X-ray energy distribution has been reported. This detector consists of a row of several segment detectors. The energy distribution is derived using an unfolding technique. In this paper, comparisons of the unfolding techniques among error reduction, spectrum surveillance, and neural network methods are discussed through simulation studies on the detection of diagnostic X-rays and gamma rays emitted by a mixture of 137 Cs and 60 Co. For diagnostic X-ray measurement, the spectrum surveillance and neural network methods appeared promising, while the error reduction method yielded poor results. However, in the case of measuring mixtures of gamma rays, the error reduction method was both sufficient and effective. (author)

  2. Spectrum unfolding, sensitivity analysis and propagation of uncertainties with the maximum entropy deconvolution code MAXED

    CERN Document Server

    Reginatto, M; Neumann, S

    2002-01-01

    MAXED was developed to apply the maximum entropy principle to the unfolding of neutron spectrometric measurements. The approach followed in MAXED has several features that make it attractive: it permits inclusion of a priori information in a well-defined and mathematically consistent way, the algorithm used to derive the solution spectrum is not ad hoc (it can be justified on the basis of arguments that originate in information theory), and the solution spectrum is a non-negative function that can be written in closed form. This last feature permits the use of standard methods for the sensitivity analysis and propagation of uncertainties of MAXED solution spectra. We illustrate its use with unfoldings of NE 213 scintillation detector measurements of photon calibration spectra, and of multisphere neutron spectrometer measurements of cosmic-ray induced neutrons at high altitude (approx 20 km) in the atmosphere.

  3. Unfolding measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino spectrum using IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, Mathis; Ruhe, Tim; Meier, Maximilian; Schlunder, Philipp; Menne, Thorben; Fuchs, Tomasz [Dept. of Physics, Technical University of Dortmund, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    IceCube is a cubic kilometer neutrino observatory located at the geographic South Pole. With its huge volume, the detector is well suited for measurements of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum. Over the last years, several unfolding analyses for single years were able to provide model independent measurements for the northern hemisphere in an energy region between 200 GeV and 3.2 PeV. In this talk, the extension of the analyses to four additional years of data is presented. With this significant enlargement of the data basis, it is possible to reanalyze the full northern hemisphere with smaller statistical errors. Moreover, the spectrum can be unfolded in several small zenith bands. Measurements of the energy spectrum for different zenith regions provide further information on the composition and the shape of the flux.

  4. On the unfolding of the fundamental region in integrals of modular invariant amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trapletti, Michele

    2003-01-01

    We study generic one-loop (string) amplitudes where an integration over the fundamental region F of the modular group is needed. We show how the known lattice-reduction technique used to unfold F to a more suitable region S can be modified to rearrange generic modular invariant amplitudes. The main aim is to unfold F to the strip and, at the same time, to simplify the form of the integrand when it is a sum over a finite number of terms, like in one-loop amplitudes for closed strings compactified on orbifolds. We give a general formula and a recipe to compute modular invariant amplitudes. As an application of the technique we compute the one-loop vacuum energy ρ n for a generic Z n freely acting orbifold, generalizing the result that this energy is less than zero and drives the system to a tachyonic divergence, and that ρ n m if n>m. (author)

  5. Situated peer coaching and unfolding cases in the fundamentals skills laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himes, Deborah O; Ravert, Patricia K

    2012-09-03

    Using unfolding case studies and situated peer coaching for the Fundamentals Skills Laboratory provides students with individualized feedback and creates a realistic clinical learning experience. A quasi-experimental design with pre- and post-intervention data was used to evaluate changes in student ratings of the course. An instrument was used to examine students' self-ratings and student comments about each lab. We found that students' ratings of the lab remained high with the new method and self-evaluations of their performance were higher as the semester progressed. Students appreciated the personalized feedback associated with peer coaching and demonstrated strong motivation and self-regulation in learning. By participating in unfolding case studies with situated peer coaching, students focus on safety issues, practice collaborative communication, and critical thinking in addition to performing psychomotor skills.

  6. NEWSPEC: A computer code to unfold neutron spectra from Bonner sphere data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemley, E.C.; West, L.

    1996-01-01

    A new computer code, NEWSPEC, is in development at the University of Arkansas. The NEWSPEC code allows a user to unfold, fold, rebin, display, and manipulate neutron spectra as applied to Bonner sphere measurements. The SPUNIT unfolding algorithm, a new rebinning algorithm, and the graphical capabilities of Microsoft (MS) Windows and MS Excel are utilized to perform these operations. The computer platform for NEWSPEC is a personal computer (PC) running MS Windows 3.x or Win95, while the code is written in MS Visual Basic (VB) and MS VB for Applications (VBA) under Excel. One of the most useful attributes of the NEWSPEC software is the link to Excel allowing additional manipulation of program output or creation of program input

  7. RDANN a new methodology to solve the neutron spectra unfolding problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz R, J.M.; Martinez B, M.R.; Vega C, H.R. [UAZ, Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde No. 801, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The optimization processes known as Taguchi method and DOE methodology are applied to the design, training and testing of Artificial Neural Networks in the neutron spectrometry field, which offer potential benefits in the evaluation of the behavior of the net as well as the ability to examine the interaction of the weights and neurons inside the same one. In this work, the Robust Design of Artificial Neural Networks methodology is used to solve the neutron spectra unfolding problem, designing, training and testing an ANN using a set of 187 neutron spectra compiled by the International Atomic Energy Agency, to obtain the better neutron spectra unfolded from the Bonner spheres spectrometer's count rates. (Author)

  8. Intermediality: Bridge to Critical Media Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailliotet, Ann Watts; Semali, Ladislaus; Rodenberg, Rita K.; Giles, Jackie K.; Macaul, Sherry L.

    2000-01-01

    Defines "intermediality" as the ability to critically read and write with and across varied symbol systems. Relates it to critical media literacy. Offers rationales for teaching critical media literacy in general, and intermedial instruction in particular. Identifies seven guiding intermedial elements: theory, texts, processes, contexts,…

  9. Physics of intermediate shocks: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimabadi, H.

    1995-01-01

    Intermediate shocks (ISs) lead to a transition from super-Alfvenic to sub-Alfvenic flow and are different from slow and fast shocks in that an IS rotates the component of the magnetic field tangent to the shock plane by 180 deg. Another peculiarity of ISs is that for the same upstream conditions an IS can have two different downstream states. There also exist a second class of ISs which rotate the magnetic field by an angle other than 180 deg. Due to their noncoplanar nature they cannot be time-stationary and are referred to as time-dependent intermediate shocks (TDIS). The existence of ISs has been the subject of much controversy over the years. Early studies questioned the physical reality of ISs. However, the studies of ISs found a new impetus when C.C. Wu showed that ISs do exist and are stable within the resistive MHD framework. In this paper, after a brief historical overview of the subject, we will review the latest developments in the study of ISs. In particular, we will address the questions of stability and structure of ISs and the relationship between ISs and other discontinuities. One of the recent developments has been the finding that ISs can be unsteady, reforming in time. Details of this process will be discussed. Finally, we examine the effect of anisotropy on the resolutions and discuss the relevance of ISs to the observed field rotations at the Earth's magnetopause.

  10. Descriptive and Computer Aided Drawing Perspective on an Unfolded Polyhedral Projection Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwierzynska, Jolanta

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the herby study is to develop a method of direct and practical mapping of perspective on an unfolded prism polyhedral projection surface. The considered perspective representation is a rectilinear central projection onto a surface composed of several flat elements. In the paper two descriptive methods of drawing perspective are presented: direct and indirect. The graphical mapping of the effects of the representation is realized directly on the unfolded flat projection surface. That is due to the projective and graphical connection between points displayed on the polyhedral background and their counterparts received on the unfolded flat surface. For a significant improvement of the construction of line, analytical algorithms are formulated. They draw a perspective image of a segment of line passing through two different points determined by their coordinates in a spatial coordinate system of axis x, y, z. Compared to other perspective construction methods that use information about points, for computer vision and the computer aided design, our algorithms utilize data about lines, which are applied very often in architectural forms. Possibility of drawing lines in the considered perspective enables drawing an edge perspective image of an architectural object. The application of the changeable base elements of perspective as a horizon height and a station point location enable drawing perspective image from different viewing positions. The analytical algorithms for drawing perspective images are formulated in Mathcad software, however, they can be implemented in the majority of computer graphical packages, which can make drawing perspective more efficient and easier. The representation presented in the paper and the way of its direct mapping on the flat unfolded projection surface can find application in presentation of architectural space in advertisement and art.

  11. Urea-temperature phase diagrams capture the thermodynamics of denatured state expansion that accompany protein unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Alexander; Auton, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the thermodynamic properties of the von Willebrand factor (VWF) A3 domain using urea-induced unfolding at variable temperature and thermal unfolding at variable urea concentrations to generate a phase diagram that quantitatively describes the equilibrium between native and denatured states. From this analysis, we were able to determine consistent thermodynamic parameters with various spectroscopic and calorimetric methods that define the urea–temperature parameter plane from cold denaturation to heat denaturation. Urea and thermal denaturation are experimentally reversible and independent of the thermal scan rate indicating that all transitions are at equilibrium and the van't Hoff and calorimetric enthalpies obtained from analysis of individual thermal transitions are equivalent demonstrating two-state character. Global analysis of the urea–temperature phase diagram results in a significantly higher enthalpy of unfolding than obtained from analysis of individual thermal transitions and significant cross correlations describing the urea dependence of and that define a complex temperature dependence of the m-value. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy illustrates a large increase in secondary structure content of the urea-denatured state as temperature increases and a loss of secondary structure in the thermally denatured state upon addition of urea. These structural changes in the denatured ensemble make up ∼40% of the total ellipticity change indicating a highly compact thermally denatured state. The difference between the thermodynamic parameters obtained from phase diagram analysis and those obtained from analysis of individual thermal transitions illustrates that phase diagrams capture both contributions to unfolding and denatured state expansion and by comparison are able to decipher these contributions. PMID:23813497

  12. Unfolding of true distributions from experimental data distorted by detectors with finite resolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagunashvili, N.D.

    1993-01-01

    A new procedure for unfolding the true distribution from experimental data distorted by a detector is proposed. For the given detector a result can be found by the least squares method, hence, without bias and involving minimal statistical errors. Stability of the result is achieved at the expense of its information content and/or using additional information on the shape of the distributions to be measured. The method may be applied for detectors with linear or nonlinear distortions. 8 refs.; 5 figs

  13. Unfolded Protein Response Signaling and MAP Kinase Pathways Underlie Pathogenesis of Arsenic-induced Cutaneous Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Changzhao; Xu, Jianmin; Li, Fugui; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Weng, Zhiping; Wen, Jianming; Elmets, Craig A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Athar, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic exposure through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with an enhanced risk of various cancers including skin cancer. In human skin, arsenic induces precancerous melanosis and keratosis, which may progress to basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma. However, the mechanism by which these pathophysiological alterations occur remains elusive. In this study, we showed that sub-chronic arsenic exposure to SKH-1 mice induced unfolded protein response (UPR)...

  14. STRANGE ATTRACTORS IN SYMMETRIC UNFOLDINGS OF A SINGULARITY WITH THREE-FOLD ZERO EIGENVALUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghua Zhou

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Sil'nikov heteroclinic bifurcations, which display strange attractors, for the symmetric versal unfoldings of the singularity at the origin with a nilpotent Linear part and 3-jet, using the normal form, the blow-up and the ge-neralized Mel'nikov methods of heteroclinic orbits to two hyperbolic or nonhyperbolic equilibria in a high-dimensional space.

  15. Thermal- and urea-induced unfolding processes of glutathione S-transferase by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahuang; Chen, Yuan; Yang, Jie; Hua, Zichun

    2015-05-01

    The Schistosoma juponicum 26 kDa glutathione S-transferase (sj26GST) consists of the N-terminal domain (N-domain), containing three alpha-helices (named H1-H3) and four anti-parallel beta-strands (S1-S4), and the C-terminal domain (C-domain), comprising five alpha-helices (named H4-H8). In present work, molecular dynamics simulations and fluorescence spectroscopic were used to gain insights into the unfolding process of sj26GST. The molecular dynamics simulations on sj26GST subunit both in water and in 8 M urea were carried out at 300 K, 400 K and 500 K, respectively. Spectroscopic measurements were employed to monitor structural changes. Molecular dynamics simulations of sj26GST subunit induced by urea and temperature showed that the initial unfolding step of sj26GST both in water and urea occurred on N-domain, involving the disruption of helices H2, H3 and strands S3 and S4, whereas H6 was the last region exposed to solution and was the last helix to unfold. Moreover, simulations analyses combining with fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra indicated that N-domain could not fold independent, suggesting that correct folding of N-domain depended on its interactions with C-domain. We further proposed that the folding of GSTs could begin with the hydrophobic collapse of C-domain whose H4, H5, H6 and H7 could move close to each other and form a hydrophobic core, especially H6 wrapped in the hydrophobic center and beginning spontaneous formation of the helix. S3, S4, H3, and H2 could form in the wake of the interaction between C-domain and N-domain. The paper can offer insights into the molecular mechanism of GSTs unfolding. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Unfolding neutron spectra with BS-TLD system using genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Joelan A.L.; Silva, Everton R.; Vilela, Eudice C.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the variability of neutron spectrum within the same environment, it is essential that the spectral distribution as function of energy to be characterized. To perform this task, the neutron spectrometer has a primary role in determining the neutron flux (Φ E (E)). Precise information allows radiological quantities establishment related to that spectrum but it is necessary, however, a series of steps with a spectrometric system that can cover a large interval of energy and whose answer is isotropic. The most widely used for accomplishing this task is the spectrometric Bonner spheres system. One of the biggest problems related to neutron spectrometry is the process of data analysis, known as unfolding. Most of the work undertaken to implement new techniques of this process, using data obtained with the scintillator 6 LiI(I). However, characteristics related to the dead time make it not be so effective when used in high flow neutron fields. An alternative to this problem is the use of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD), but the codes used do not provide a more specific response matrix to unfolding the information obtained through these materials, which makes the development of a specific response matrix important to adequately characterize the response obtained by them. This paper proposes using a technique of artificial intelligence called genetic algorithm, which uses bio-inspired mathematical models and through the implementation of a specific matrix to unfolding data obtained from a combination of TLDs embedded in a system of Bonner spheres, such as thermal neutron detectors, to characterize the neutron spectrum as a function of energy. The results obtained with this method were in accordance with reference spectra, thus enables of this technique to unfolding neutrons spectra with BS-TLD system. (author)

  17. Unfolding and smoothing applied to the quality enhancement of neutron tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Silvani, Maria I.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2008-01-01

    Resolution and contrast are the major parameters defining the quality of a computer-aided tomographic image. These parameters depend upon several features of the image acquisition system, such as detector resolution, geometrical arrangement of the source-object-detector, beam divergence, source strength, detector efficiency and counting time. Roughly, the detector finite resolution is the main source of systematic errors affecting the separation power of the image acquisition system, while the electronic noise and statistical fluctuation are responsible for the data dispersion, which spoils the contrast. An algorithm has been developed in this work aiming at the improvement of the image quality through the minimization of both types of errors. The systematic ones are reduced by a mathematical unfolding of the position spectra - used as projections to reconstruct the 2D-images - using the Line Spread Function - LSF of the neutron tomographic system. The principle behind this technique is that every single channel contains information about all channels of the spectrum, but it is concealed due to the automatic integration carried out by the detector. Therefore, knowing the shape of this curve, it is possible to retrieve the original spectra. These spectra are unfortunately corrupted by the unavoidable statistical fluctuation, and by oscillations arising from the unfolding process, which strongly affects the quality of the final unfolded image. In order to reduce this impact, the spectra have been filtered by a Fourier transform technique or smoothed with a least square fitting procedure. The algorithm has been applied to spectra of some test-bodies generated by an earlier developed tomographic simulator, which reproduces the spectra furnished by a thermal neutron tomographic system employing a position sensitive detector. The obtained results have shown that the unfolded spectra produce final images capable to resolve features otherwise not achievable with the

  18. Unfolding neutron spectra with BS-TLD system using genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Joelan A.L., E-mail: jasantos@cnen.gov.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Silva, Everton R. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Informatica; Ferreira, Tiago A.E. [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Estatistica e Informatica; Fonseca, Evaldo S. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Vilela, Eudice C., E-mail: ecvilela@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Due to the variability of neutron spectrum within the same environment, it is essential that the spectral distribution as function of energy to be characterized. To perform this task, the neutron spectrometer has a primary role in determining the neutron flux ({Phi}{sub E}(E)). Precise information allows radiological quantities establishment related to that spectrum but it is necessary, however, a series of steps with a spectrometric system that can cover a large interval of energy and whose answer is isotropic. The most widely used for accomplishing this task is the spectrometric Bonner spheres system. One of the biggest problems related to neutron spectrometry is the process of data analysis, known as unfolding. Most of the work undertaken to implement new techniques of this process, using data obtained with the scintillator {sup 6}LiI(I). However, characteristics related to the dead time make it not be so effective when used in high flow neutron fields. An alternative to this problem is the use of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD), but the codes used do not provide a more specific response matrix to unfolding the information obtained through these materials, which makes the development of a specific response matrix important to adequately characterize the response obtained by them. This paper proposes using a technique of artificial intelligence called genetic algorithm, which uses bio-inspired mathematical models and through the implementation of a specific matrix to unfolding data obtained from a combination of TLDs embedded in a system of Bonner spheres, such as thermal neutron detectors, to characterize the neutron spectrum as a function of energy. The results obtained with this method were in accordance with reference spectra, thus enables of this technique to unfolding neutrons spectra with BS-TLD system. (author)

  19. Dysregulation of the unfolded protein response in db/db mice with diet induced steatohepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Rinella, Mary E.; Siddiqui, M. Shaddab; Gardikiotes, Konstantina; Gottstein, Jeanne; Elias, Marc; Green, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    In humans with non-alcoholic fatty liver, diabetes is associated with more advanced disease. We have previously shown that diabetic db/db mice are highly susceptible to methionine choline deficient diet (MCD) induced hepatic injury. Since activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) is an important adaptive cellular mechanism in diabetes, obesity and fatty liver, we hypothesized that dysregulation of the UPR may partially explain how diabetes could promote liver injury.

  20. The l z ( p ) * Person-Fit Statistic in an Unfolding Model Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendeiro, Jorge N

    2017-01-01

    Although person-fit analysis has a long-standing tradition within item response theory, it has been applied in combination with dominance response models almost exclusively. In this article, a popular log likelihood-based parametric person-fit statistic under the framework of the generalized graded unfolding model is used. Results from a simulation study indicate that the person-fit statistic performed relatively well in detecting midpoint response style patterns and not so well in detecting extreme response style patterns.

  1. Regulation of Cytokine Production by the Unfolded Protein Response; Implications for Infection and Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Judith A. Smith; Judith A. Smith

    2018-01-01

    Protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an essential cell function. To safeguard this process in the face of environmental threats and internal stressors, cells mount an evolutionarily conserved response known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). Invading pathogens induce cellular stress that impacts protein folding, thus the UPR is well situated to sense danger and contribute to immune responses. Cytokines (inflammatory cytokines and interferons) critically mediate host defen...

  2. Netrin-1 Protects Hepatocytes Against Cell Death Through Sustained Translation During the Unfolded Protein Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahlali, Thomas; Plissonnier, Marie-Laure; Romero-López, Cristina; Michelet, Maud; Ducarouge, Benjamin; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; Zoulim, Fabien; Mehlen, Patrick; Parent, Romain

    2016-05-01

    Netrin-1, a multifunctional secreted protein, is up-regulated in cancer and inflammation. Netrin-1 blocks apoptosis induced by the prototypical dependence receptors deleted in colorectal carcinoma and uncoordinated phenotype-5. Although the unfolded protein response (UPR) triggers apoptosis on exposure to stress, it first attempts to restore endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis to foster cell survival. Importantly, UPR is implicated in chronic liver conditions including hepatic oncogenesis. Netrin-1's implication in cell survival on UPR in this context is unknown. Isolation of translational complexes, determination of RNA secondary structures by selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation and primer extension/dimethyl sulfate, bicistronic constructs, as well as conventional cell biology and biochemistry approaches were used on in vitro-grown hepatocytic cells, wild-type, and netrin-1 transgenic mice. HepaRG cells constitute a bona fide model for UPR studies in vitro through adequate activation of the 3 sensors of the UPR (protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK)), inositol requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α), and activated transcription factor 6 (ATF6). The netrin-1 messenger RNA 5'-end was shown to fold into a complex double pseudoknot and bear E-loop motifs, both of which are representative hallmarks of related internal ribosome entry site regions. Cap-independent translation of netrin 5' untranslated region-driven luciferase was observed on UPR in vitro. Unlike several structurally related oncogenic transcripts (l-myc, c-myc, c-myb), netrin-1 messenger RNA was selected for translation during UPR both in human hepatocytes and in mice livers. Depletion of netrin-1 during UPR induces apoptosis, leading to cell death through an uncoordinated phenotype-5A/C-mediated involvement of protein phosphatase 2A and death-associated protein kinase 1 in vitro and in netrin transgenic mice. UPR-resistant, internal ribosome entry site-driven netrin-1 translation leads to

  3. Novel insights into the unfolded protein response using Pichia pastoris specific DNA microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreil David P

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA Microarrays are regarded as a valuable tool for basic and applied research in microbiology. However, for many industrially important microorganisms the lack of commercially available microarrays still hampers physiological research. Exemplarily, our understanding of protein folding and secretion in the yeast Pichia pastoris is presently widely dependent on conclusions drawn from analogies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To close this gap for a yeast species employed for its high capacity to produce heterologous proteins, we developed full genome DNA microarrays for P. pastoris and analyzed the unfolded protein response (UPR in this yeast species, as compared to S. cerevisiae. Results By combining the partially annotated gene list of P. pastoris with de novo gene finding a list of putative open reading frames was generated for which an oligonucleotide probe set was designed using the probe design tool TherMODO (a thermodynamic model-based oligoset design optimizer. To evaluate the performance of the novel array design, microarrays carrying the oligo set were hybridized with samples from treatments with dithiothreitol (DTT or a strain overexpressing the UPR transcription factor HAC1, both compared with a wild type strain in normal medium as untreated control. DTT treatment was compared with literature data for S. cerevisiae, and revealed similarities, but also important differences between the two yeast species. Overexpression of HAC1, the most direct control for UPR genes, resulted in significant new understanding of this important regulatory pathway in P. pastoris, and generally in yeasts. Conclusion The differences observed between P. pastoris and S. cerevisiae underline the importance of DNA microarrays for industrial production strains. P. pastoris reacts to DTT treatment mainly by the regulation of genes related to chemical stimulus, electron transport and respiration, while the overexpression of HAC1 induced many genes

  4. Activation of the cellular unfolded protein response by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Balakrishnan

    Full Text Available The unfolded protein response (UPR is a stress-induced cyto-protective mechanism elicited towards an influx of large amount of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In the present study, we evaluated if AAV manipulates the UPR pathways during its infection. We first examined the role of the three major UPR axes, namely, endoribonuclease inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1α, activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6 and PKR-like ER kinase (PERK in AAV infected cells. Total RNA from mock or AAV infected HeLa cells were used to determine the levels of 8 different ER-stress responsive transcripts from these pathways. We observed a significant up-regulation of IRE1α (up to 11 fold and PERK (up to 8 fold genes 12-48 hours after infection with self-complementary (scAAV2 but less prominent with single-stranded (ssAAV2 vectors. Further studies demonstrated that scAAV1 and scAAV6 also induce cellular UPR in vitro, with AAV1 vectors activating the PERK pathway (3 fold while AAV6 vectors induced a significant increase on all the three major UPR pathways [6-16 fold]. These data suggest that the type and strength of UPR activation is dependent on the viral capsid. We then examined if transient inhibition of UPR pathways by RNA interference has an effect on AAV transduction. siRNA mediated silencing of PERK and IRE1α had a modest effect on AAV2 and AAV6 mediated gene expression (∼1.5-2 fold in vitro. Furthermore, hepatic gene transfer of scAAV2 vectors in vivo, strongly elevated IRE1α and PERK pathways (2 and 3.5 fold, respectively. However, when animals were pre-treated with a pharmacological UPR inhibitor (metformin during scAAV2 gene transfer, the UPR signalling and its subsequent inflammatory response was attenuated concomitant to a modest 2.8 fold increase in transgene expression. Collectively, these data suggest that AAV vectors activate the cellular UPR pathways and their selective inhibition may be beneficial during AAV mediated gene transfer.

  5. Post-crisis financial intermediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilie MIHAI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent financial crisis that begun in 2007 in the US, which then swept around the world, has left deep scars on the already wrinkled face of the global economy. Some national and regional economies, which had money for expensive makeup, or created money[1], managed to blur or hide the scars left by the crisis, others are still facing difficulties in overcoming the effects of this. The rapacity of banks, their greed and risk ignorance, were the origin of the outbreak of the last major economic and financial crisis but unfortunately those who were responsible or, rather, irresponsible, paid little or nothing at all for the burden of their bad loan portfolio. This cost has been supported by the population, either directly by paying high interest and fees [Mihai I., 2007], or indirectly, through the use of public budgets to cover the losses of banks, most of which had private capital. In this context, we intend to examine the state of financial intermediation in Romania in the post-crisis period, and to primarily follow: (i The structure and evolution of the banking system; (ii Non-government credit situation; (iii The level of savings; (iiii Loan-deposit ratio; (v The degree of financial intermediation and disintegration phenomenon etc., and to articulate some conclusions and suggestions on the matters that have been explored.

  6. The Unfolded Protein Response in Homeostasis and Modulation of Mammalian Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ana Sofia; Alves, Inês; Helguero, Luisa; Domingues, Maria Rosário; Neves, Bruno Miguel

    2016-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in eukaryotic protein folding and lipid biosynthesis. Several exogenous and endogenous cellular sources of stress can perturb ER homeostasis leading to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the lumen. Unfolded protein accumulation triggers a signal-transduction cascade known as the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive mechanism which aims to protect cells from protein aggregates and to restore ER functions. Further to this protective mechanism, in immune cells, UPR molecular effectors have been shown to participate in a wide range of biological processes such as cell differentiation, survival and immunoglobulin and cytokine production. Recent findings also highlight the involvement of the UPR machinery in the maturational program and antigen presentation capacities of dendritic cells. UPR is therefore a key element in immune system homeostasis with direct implications on both adaptive and innate immune responses. The present review summarizes the knowledge on the emerging roles of UPR signaling cascades in mammalian immune cells as well as the consequences of their dysregulation in relation to the pathogenesis of several diseases.

  7. Characteristics of SiC neutron sensor spectrum unfolding process based on Bayesian inference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cetnar, Jerzy; Krolikowski, Igor [Faculty of Energy and Fuels AGH - University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Ottaviani, L. [IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Aix-Marseille University, Case 231 -13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Lyoussi, A. [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2015-07-01

    This paper deals with SiC detector signal interpretation in neutron radiation measurements in mixed neutron gamma radiation fields, which is called the detector inverse problem or the spectrum unfolding, and it aims in finding a representation of the primary radiation, based on the measured detector signals. In our novel methodology we resort to Bayesian inference approach. In the developed procedure the resultant spectra is unfolded form detector channels reading, where the estimated neutron fluence in a group structure is obtained with its statistical characteristic comprising of standard deviation and correlation matrix. In the paper we present results of unfolding process for case of D-T neutron source in neutron moderating environment. Discussions of statistical properties of obtained results are presented as well as of the physical meaning of obtained correlation matrix of estimated group fluence. The presented works has been carried out within the I-SMART project, which is part of the KIC InnoEnergy R and D program. (authors)

  8. Neutron spectrum unfolding using genetic algorithm in a Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suman, Vitisha [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sarkar, P.K., E-mail: pksarkar02@gmail.com [Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal 576104 (India)

    2014-02-11

    A spectrum unfolding technique GAMCD (Genetic Algorithm and Monte Carlo based spectrum Deconvolution) has been developed using the genetic algorithm methodology within the framework of Monte Carlo simulations. Each Monte Carlo history starts with initial solution vectors (population) as randomly generated points in the hyper dimensional solution space that are related to the measured data by the response matrix of the detection system. The transition of the solution points in the solution space from one generation to another are governed by the genetic algorithm methodology using the techniques of cross-over (mating) and mutation in a probabilistic manner adding new solution points to the population. The population size is kept constant by discarding solutions having lesser fitness values (larger differences between measured and calculated results). Solutions having the highest fitness value at the end of each Monte Carlo history are averaged over all histories to obtain the final spectral solution. The present method shows promising results in neutron spectrum unfolding for both under-determined and over-determined problems with simulated test data as well as measured data when compared with some existing unfolding codes. An attractive advantage of the present method is the independence of the final spectra from the initial guess spectra.

  9. Contribution of long-range interactions to the secondary structure of an unfolded globin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyukina, Daria V; Rajagopalan, Senapathy; Sekhar, Ashok; Fulmer, Eric C; Eun, Ye-Jin; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2010-09-08

    This work explores the effect of long-range tertiary contacts on the distribution of residual secondary structure in the unfolded state of an alpha-helical protein. N-terminal fragments of increasing length, in conjunction with multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, were employed. A protein representative of the ubiquitous globin fold was chosen as the model system. We found that, while most of the detectable alpha-helical population in the unfolded ensemble does not depend on the presence of the C-terminal region (corresponding to the native G and H helices), specific N-to-C long-range contacts between the H and A-B-C regions enhance the helical secondary structure content of the N terminus (A-B-C regions). The simple approach introduced here, based on the evaluation of N-terminal polypeptide fragments of increasing length, is of general applicability to identify the influence of long-range interactions in unfolded proteins. Copyright 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Warhead verification as inverse problem: Applications of neutron spectrum unfolding from organic-scintillator measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Febbraro, Michael; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A.; Becchetti, F. D.

    2016-08-01

    Verification of future warhead-dismantlement treaties will require detection of certain warhead attributes without the disclosure of sensitive design information, and this presents an unusual measurement challenge. Neutron spectroscopy—commonly eschewed as an ill-posed inverse problem—may hold special advantages for warhead verification by virtue of its insensitivity to certain neutron-source parameters like plutonium isotopics. In this article, we investigate the usefulness of unfolded neutron spectra obtained from organic-scintillator data for verifying a particular treaty-relevant warhead attribute: the presence of high-explosive and neutron-reflecting materials. Toward this end, several improvements on current unfolding capabilities are demonstrated: deuterated detectors are shown to have superior response-matrix condition to that of standard hydrogen-base scintintillators; a novel data-discretization scheme is proposed which removes important detector nonlinearities; and a technique is described for re-parameterizing the unfolding problem in order to constrain the parameter space of solutions sought, sidestepping the inverse problem altogether. These improvements are demonstrated with trial measurements and verified using accelerator-based time-of-flight calculation of reference spectra. Then, a demonstration is presented in which the elemental compositions of low-Z neutron-attenuating materials are estimated to within 10%. These techniques could have direct application in verifying the presence of high-explosive materials in a neutron-emitting test item, as well as other for treaty verification challenges.

  11. Neutron spectrum unfolding using genetic algorithm in a Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suman, Vitisha; Sarkar, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    A spectrum unfolding technique GAMCD (Genetic Algorithm and Monte Carlo based spectrum Deconvolution) has been developed using the genetic algorithm methodology within the framework of Monte Carlo simulations. Each Monte Carlo history starts with initial solution vectors (population) as randomly generated points in the hyper dimensional solution space that are related to the measured data by the response matrix of the detection system. The transition of the solution points in the solution space from one generation to another are governed by the genetic algorithm methodology using the techniques of cross-over (mating) and mutation in a probabilistic manner adding new solution points to the population. The population size is kept constant by discarding solutions having lesser fitness values (larger differences between measured and calculated results). Solutions having the highest fitness value at the end of each Monte Carlo history are averaged over all histories to obtain the final spectral solution. The present method shows promising results in neutron spectrum unfolding for both under-determined and over-determined problems with simulated test data as well as measured data when compared with some existing unfolding codes. An attractive advantage of the present method is the independence of the final spectra from the initial guess spectra

  12. Geometrically engineering the standard model: Locally unfolding three families out of E8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourjaily, Jacob L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper extends and builds upon the results of [J. L. Bourjaily, arXiv:0704.0444.], in which we described how to use the tools of geometrical engineering to deform geometrically engineered grand unified models into ones with lower symmetry. This top-down unfolding has the advantage that the relative positions of singularities giving rise to the many 'low-energy' matter fields are related by only a few parameters which deform the geometry of the unified model. And because the relative positions of singularities are necessary to compute the superpotential, for example, this is a framework in which the arbitrariness of geometrically engineered models can be greatly reduced. In [J. L. Bourjaily, arXiv:0704.0444.], this picture was made concrete for the case of deforming the representations of an SU 5 model into their standard model content. In this paper we continue that discussion to show how a geometrically engineered 16 of SO 10 can be unfolded into the standard model, and how the three families of the standard model uniquely emerge from the unfolding of a single, isolated E 8 singularity

  13. The unfolding effects of transfer functions and processing of the pulse height distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avdić Senada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the improvements of the linear artificial neural network unfolding approach aimed at accurately determining the incident neutron spectrum. The effects of the transfer functions and pre-processing of the simulated pulse height distributions from liquid scintillation detectors on the artificial neural networks performance have been studied. A better energy resolution and higher reliability of the linear artificial neural network technique have been achieved after implementation of the results of this study. The optimized structure of the network was used to unfold both monoenergetic and continuous neutron energy spectra, such as the spectra of 252Cf and 241Am-Be sources, traditionally used in the nuclear safeguards experiments. We have demonstrated that the artificial neural network energy resolution of 0.1 MeV is comparable with the one obtained by the reference maximum likelihood expectation-maximization method which was implemented by using the one step late algorithm. Although the maximum likelihood algorithm provides the unfolded results of higher accuracy, especially for continuous neutron sources, the artificial neural network approach with the improved performances is more suitable for fast and robust determination of the neutron spectra with sufficient accuracy.

  14. Characteristic Investigation of Unfolded Neutron Spectra with Different Priori Information and Gamma Radiation Interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Hwan

    2006-01-01

    Neutron field spectrometry using multi spheres such as Bonner Spheres (BS) has been almost essential in radiation protection dosimetry for a long time at workplace in spite of poor energy resolution because it is not asking the fine energy resolution but requiring easy operation and measurement performance over a wide range of energy interested. KAERI has developed and used extended BS system based on a LiI(Eu) scintillator as the representative neutron spectrometry system for workplace monitoring as well as for the quantification of neutron calibration fields such as those recommended by ISO 8529. Major topics in using BS are how close the unfolded spectra is the real one and to minimize the interference of gamma radiation in neutron/gamma mixed fields in case of active instrument such as a BS with a LiI(Eu) scintillator. The former is related with choosing a priori information when unfolding the measured data and the latter is depend on how to discriminate it in intense gamma radiation fields. Influence of a priori information in unfolding and effect of counting loss due to pile-up of signals for the KAERI BS system were investigated analyzing the spectral measurement results of Scattered Neutron Calibration Fields (SNCF)

  15. Improved spectral data unfolding for radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy of laser-accelerated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schollmeier, M.; Geissel, M.; Sefkow, A. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Flippo, K. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    An improved method to unfold the space-resolved proton energy distribution function of laser-accelerated proton beams using a layered, radiochromic film (RCF) detector stack has been developed. The method takes into account the reduced RCF response near the Bragg peak due to a high linear energy transfer (LET). This LET dependence of the active RCF layer has been measured, and published data have been re-interpreted to find a nonlinear saturation scaling of the RCF response with stopping power. Accounting for the LET effect increased the integrated particle yield by 25% after data unfolding. An iterative, analytical, space-resolved deconvolution of the RCF response functions from the measured dose was developed that does not rely on fitting. After the particle number unfold, three-dimensional interpolation is performed to determine the spatial proton beam distribution for proton energies in-between the RCF data points. Here, image morphing has been implemented as a novel interpolation method that takes into account the energy-dependent, changing beam topology.

  16. Antibody-Unfolding and Metastable-State Binding in Force Spectroscopy and Recognition Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Parminder; Qiang-Fu; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Ros, Robert; Kutner, Linda Obenauer; Schneeweis, Lumelle A.; Navoa, Ryman; Steger, Kirby; Xie, Lei; Yonan, Christopher; Abraham, Ralph; Grace, Michael J.; Lindsay, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Force spectroscopy and recognition imaging are important techniques for characterizing and mapping molecular interactions. In both cases, an antibody is pulled away from its target in times that are much less than the normal residence time of the antibody on its target. The distribution of pulling lengths in force spectroscopy shows the development of additional peaks at high loading rates, indicating that part of the antibody frequently unfolds. This propensity to unfold is reversible, indicating that exposure to high loading rates induces a structural transition to a metastable state. Weakened interactions of the antibody in this metastable state could account for reduced specificity in recognition imaging where the loading rates are always high. The much weaker interaction between the partially unfolded antibody and target, while still specific (as shown by control experiments), results in unbinding on millisecond timescales, giving rise to rapid switching noise in the recognition images. At the lower loading rates used in force spectroscopy, we still find discrepancies between the binding kinetics determined by force spectroscopy and those determined by surface plasmon resonance—possibly a consequence of the short tethers used in recognition imaging. Recognition imaging is nonetheless a powerful tool for interpreting complex atomic force microscopy images, so long as specificity is calibrated in situ, and not inferred from equilibrium binding kinetics. PMID:21190677

  17. Replica exchange simulation of reversible folding/unfolding of the Trp-cage miniprotein in explicit solvent: on the structure and possible role of internal water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschek, Dietmar; Nymeyer, Hugh; García, Angel E

    2007-03-01

    We simulate the folding/unfolding equilibrium of the 20-residue miniprotein Trp-cage. We use replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of the AMBER94 atomic detail model of the protein explicitly solvated by water, starting from a completely unfolded configuration. We employ a total of 40 replicas, covering the temperature range between 280 and 538 K. Individual simulation lengths of 100 ns sum up to a total simulation time of about 4 micros. Without any bias, we observe the folding of the protein into the native state with an unfolding-transition temperature of about 440 K. The native state is characterized by a distribution of root mean square distances (RMSD) from the NMR data that peaks at 1.8A, and is as low as 0.4A. We show that equilibration times of about 40 ns are required to yield convergence. A folded configuration in the entire extended ensemble is found to have a lifetime of about 31 ns. In a clamp-like motion, the Trp-cage opens up during thermal denaturation. In line with fluorescence quenching experiments, the Trp-residue sidechain gets hydrated when the protein opens up, roughly doubling the number of water molecules in the first solvation shell. We find the helical propensity of the helical domain of Trp-cage rather well preserved even at very high temperatures. In the folded state, we can identify states with one and two buried internal water molecules interconnecting parts of the Trp-cage molecule by hydrogen bonds. The loss of hydrogen bonds of these buried water molecules in the folded state with increasing temperature is likely to destabilize the folded state at elevated temperatures.

  18. A helium-3 proportional counter technique for estimating fast and intermediate neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosako, Toshiso; Nakazawa, Masaharu; Sekiguchi, Akira; Wakabayashi, Hiroaki.

    1976-11-01

    3 He proportional counter was employed to determine the fast and intermediate neutron spectra of wide energy region. The mixed gas ( 3 He, Kr) type counter response and the spectrum unfolding code were prepared and applied to some neutron fields. The counter response calculation was performed by using the Monte Carlo code, paying regards to dealing of the particle range calculation of the mixed gas. An experiment was carried out by using the van de Graaff accelerator to check the response function. The spectrum unfolding code was prepared so that it may have the function of automatic evaluation of the higher energy spectrum's effect to the pulse hight distribution of the lower energy region. The neutron spectra of the various neutron fields were measured and compared with the calculations such as the discrete ordinate Sn calculations. It became clear that the technique developed here can be applied to the practical use in the neutron energy range from about 150 KeV to 5 MeV. (auth.)

  19. Characterization and error analysis of an N×N unfolding procedure applied to filtered, photoelectric x-ray detector arrays. II. Error analysis and generalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Fehl

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A five-channel, filtered-x-ray-detector (XRD array has been used to measure time-dependent, soft-x-ray flux emitted by z-pinch plasmas at the Z pulsed-power accelerator (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. The preceding, companion paper [D. L. Fehl et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 13, 120402 (2010PRABFM1098-4402] describes an algorithm for spectral reconstructions (unfolds and spectrally integrated flux estimates from data obtained by this instrument. The unfolded spectrum S_{unfold}(E,t is based on (N=5 first-order B-splines (histograms in contiguous unfold bins j=1,…,N; the recovered x-ray flux F_{unfold}(t is estimated as ∫S_{unfold}(E,tdE, where E is x-ray energy and t is time. This paper adds two major improvements to the preceding unfold analysis: (a Error analysis.—Both data noise and response-function uncertainties are propagated into S_{unfold}(E,t and F_{unfold}(t. Noise factors ν are derived from simulations to quantify algorithm-induced changes in the noise-to-signal ratio (NSR for S_{unfold} in each unfold bin j and for F_{unfold} (ν≡NSR_{output}/NSR_{input}: for S_{unfold}, 1≲ν_{j}≲30, an outcome that is strongly spectrally dependent; for F_{unfold}, 0.6≲ν_{F}≲1, a result that is less spectrally sensitive and corroborated independently. For nominal z-pinch experiments, the combined uncertainty (noise and calibrations in F_{unfold}(t at peak is estimated to be ∼15%. (b Generalization of the unfold method.—Spectral sensitivities (called here passband functions are constructed for S_{unfold} and F_{unfold}. Predicting how the unfold algorithm reconstructs arbitrary spectra is thereby reduced to quadratures. These tools allow one to understand and quantitatively predict algorithmic distortions (including negative artifacts, to identify potentially troublesome spectra, and to design more useful response functions.

  20. Targeting HSP90 and monoclonal protein trafficking modulates the unfolded protein response, chaperone regulation and apoptosis in myeloma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Born, E J; Hartman, S V; Holstein, S A

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is characterized by the production of substantial quantities of monoclonal protein. We have previously demonstrated that select inhibitors of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) induce apoptosis of myeloma cells via inhibition of Rab geranylgeranylation, leading to disruption of monoclonal protein trafficking and induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway. Heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitors disrupt protein folding and are currently under clinical investigation in myeloma. The effects of combining IBP and HSP90 inhibitors on cell death, monoclonal protein trafficking, the UPR and chaperone regulation were investigated in monoclonal protein-producing cells. An enhanced induction of cell death was observed following treatment with IBP and HSP90 inhibitors, which occurred through both ER stress and non-ER stress pathways. The HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the effects of the IBP inhibitors on intracellular monoclonal protein levels and localization as well as induction of the UPR in myeloma cells. Disparate effects on chaperone expression were observed in myeloma vs amyloid light chain cells. Here we demonstrate that the novel strategy of targeting MP trafficking in concert with HSP90 enhances myeloma cell death via a complex modulation of ER stress, UPR, and cell death pathways

  1. Intermediate length scale dynamics of polyisobutylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farago, B.; Arbe, A.; Colmenero, J.; Faust, R.; Buchenau, U.; Richter, D.

    2002-01-01

    We report on a neutron spin echo investigation of the intermediate scale dynamics of polyisobutylene studying both the self-motion and the collective motion. The momentum transfer (Q) dependences of the self-correlation times are found to follow a Q -2/β law in agreement with the picture of Gaussian dynamics. In the full Q range of observation, their temperature dependence is weaker than the rheological shift factor. The same is true for the stress relaxation time as seen in sound wave absorption. The collective times show both temperature dependences; at the structure factor peak, they follow the temperature dependence of the viscosity, but below the peak, one finds the stress relaxation behavior

  2. Modernisation of the intermediate physics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontro, Inkeri; Heino, Olga; Hendolin, Ilkka; Galambosi, Szabolcs

    2018-03-01

    The intermediate laboratory courses at the Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, were reformed using desired learning outcomes as the basis for design. The reformed laboratory courses consist of weekly workshops and small-group laboratory sessions. Many of the laboratory exercises are open-ended and have several possible ways of execution. They were designed around affordable devices, to allow for the purchase of multiple sets of laboratory equipment. This allowed students to work on the same problems simultaneously. Thus, it was possible to set learning goals which build on each other. Workshop sessions supported the course by letting the students solve problems related to conceptual and technical aspects of each laboratory exercise. The laboratory exercises progressed biweekly to allow for iterative problem solving. Students reached the learning goals well and the reform improved student experiences. Neither positive or negative changes in expert-like attitudes towards experimental physics (measured by E-CLASS questionnaire) were observed.

  3. Poetry in Transmedial Perspective: Rethinking Intermedial Literary Studies in the Digital Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaefer Heike

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the digital age. literary practice proliferates across different media platforms. Contemporary literary texts are written, circulated and rea|d in a variety of media, ranging from traditional print formats to online environments. This essay explores the implications that the transmedial dispersal of literary culture has for intermedial literary studies. If literature no longer functions as a unified single medium (if it ever did but unfolds in a multiplicity of media, concepts central to intermediality studies, such as media specificity, media boundaries and media change, have to be reconsidered. Taking as its test case the adaptation of E. E. Cummings’s experimental poetry in Alison Clifford’s new media artwork The Sweet Old Etcetera as well as in YouTube clips, the essay argues for a reconceptualization of contemporary literature as a transmedial configuration or network. Rather than think of literature as a single self-contained medium that engages in intermedial exchange and competition with other media, such as film or music, we can better understand how literature operates and develops in the digital age if we recognize the medial heterogeneity and transmedial distribution of literary practice.

  4. Joint enterprise and the role of the intermediator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Simonsen, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    , by analyzing the failure of inte-grating groupware into two global virtual teams within industry. We present an empirically driven interpretive case study conducted in a large distributed global or-ganization. Based on the empirical observations, we reveal two organizational factors challenging the inte......-gration process: The importance of joint enterprise and the role of the intermediator....

  5. Unfolding Utzon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Hvejsel, Marie Frier

    2014-01-01

    The Danish architect Jørn Utzon's architecture is a fusion of form and structure inspired by nature and the visual universe of different cultures. The organic conception of form is clearly evoked in much of Utzon’s architecture following his genesis idea of an “Additive Architecture” founded in h...... of the Sydney Opera House....

  6. Unfolding Utzon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2013-01-01

    For many, the architecture by j0rn Utzon is synonymous with the design of the Sydney Opera House (1973) that was made a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2007, being one of the 20th century's most distinctive buildings and one of the most famous concert halls in the world.......For many, the architecture by j0rn Utzon is synonymous with the design of the Sydney Opera House (1973) that was made a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2007, being one of the 20th century's most distinctive buildings and one of the most famous concert halls in the world....

  7. Sunshine Unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdrege, Craig; And Others

    Hinduism, yoga, transcendental meditation, traditional American Indian philosophies, far-Eastern philosophies (Taoism, Zen Buddhism, and Zen concepts), macrobiotics, and Judeo-Christian teachings are the topics discussed in this student developed book. Designed for use by both elementary and high school students, it was written with two major…

  8. Universe unfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, I.R.

    1976-01-01

    Topics covered the setting; looking at the stars; the earth; time, place and the sky; our satellite, the moon; orbits and motion; the motions of the planets; the Copernican revolution; the planets; the other bodies of the solar system; ages, origins, and life; introducing the stars; sorting out the stars; binary stars--two are better than one; variable stars--inconstancy as a virtue; the secrets of starlight--unraveling the spectrum; the sun--our own star; the structure of a star; interstellar material; the Milky Way, our home galaxy; galaxies--the stellar continents; cosmic violence--from radio galaxies to quasars; the universe; and epilogue. The primary emphasis is on how we have come to know what we know about the universe. Star maps are included

  9. An activated unfolded protein response promotes retinal degeneration and triggers an inflammatory response in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, T; Shinde, V M; Starr, C R; Kruglov, A A; Boitet, E R; Kotla, P; Zolotukhin, S; Gross, A K; Gorbatyuk, M S

    2014-12-18

    Recent studies on the endoplasmic reticulum stress have shown that the unfolded protein response (UPR) is involved in the pathogenesis of inherited retinal degeneration caused by mutant rhodopsin. However, the main question of whether UPR activation actually triggers retinal degeneration remains to be addressed. Thus, in this study, we created a mouse model for retinal degeneration caused by a persistently activated UPR to assess the physiological and morphological parameters associated with this disease state and to highlight a potential mechanism by which the UPR can promote retinal degeneration. We performed an intraocular injection in C57BL6 mice with a known unfolded protein response (UPR) inducer, tunicamycin (Tn) and examined animals by electroretinography (ERG), spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and histological analyses. We detected a significant loss of photoreceptor function (over 60%) and retinal structure (35%) 30 days post treatment. Analysis of retinal protein extracts demonstrated a significant upregulation of inflammatory markers including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IBA1. Similarly, we detected a strong inflammatory response in mice expressing either Ter349Glu or T17M rhodopsin (RHO). These mutant rhodopsin species induce severe retinal degeneration and T17M rhodopsin elicits UPR activation when expressed in mice. RNA and protein analysis revealed a significant upregulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory markers such as IL-1β, IL-6, p65 nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) and MCP-1, as well as activation of F4/80 and IBA1 microglial markers in both the retinas expressing mutant rhodopsins. We then assessed if the Tn-induced inflammatory marker IL-1β was capable of inducing retinal degeneration by injecting C57BL6 mice with a recombinant IL-1β. We observed ~19% reduction in ERG a-wave amplitudes and a 29% loss of photoreceptor cells compared with

  10. Study of Different Unfolding Methods of Kinematic Distributions of the WZ$\\,\\to\\,$WZ Scattering with Data and Simulations of the ATLAS Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2101612; Siegert, Frank

    It is analyzed in this work which unfolding methods are suited for the P-value calculation in statistical tests. It is analyzed for distributions of Vector Boson Scattering in the channel WZ$\\,\\to\\,$WZ for fully leptonic final states. WZ$\\,\\to\\,$WZ scattering is predicted by the most successful model of particle physics, the Standard Model of Particle Physics - but was not measured yet. It is scheduled to record $100~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ with the ATLAS detector in Run$~$2 at LHC. With that integrated luminosity an observation of that process, via a cross section measurement, is expected. The distributions of the transverse mass of the WZ system $M_T(WZ)$ and the transverse momentum of the Z boson $p_T^Z$ which are sensitive to deviations of the WZ$\\,\\to\\,$WZ scattering from the Standard Model are analyzed in this work. For comparisons between data and theory predictions detector effect have to be considered, for which the theory has to be folded or the data has to be unfolded. In this study, no significant advan...

  11. RHIZOME AND DISCOURSE OF INTERMEDIALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л Н Синельникова

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhizomaticity is a strategy and a regularity of text creation in a lot of modern commu-nicative discourse practices. What remains urgent is the problem of the systematic interdisciplinary de-scription of texts whose structure and language qualities are determined by the signs of the rhizome - a concept of post-modern philosophy introduced into the scientific field by the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze and the psychotherapist Félix Guattari (Deleuze, Guattari 1996. The rhizome (Fr. rhizome - rootstock, tuber, bulb, mycelium possesses the following qualities: it is non-linear, open and directed towards the unpredictability of discourse transformations through the possibilities of structure development in any direction; there is no centre or periphery in the rhizome, and any discourse element can become ‘a vital structure’ for text-creation. The rhizome does not have non-intersecting boundaries; and in the space of the rhizomatic discourse environment, an increase of reality facets takes place, non-standard associative con-nections appear, multiplication effects are formed, which create new meanings. Rhizomaticity is the quality of texts being organised by the laws of rhizomatic logic (V.F. Sharkov 2007, by the terms of which ‘su-perposition’ of discourses can take place, a transition from one semiotic system to another. The article makes an attempt to correlate the qualities of the rhizome with the signs of the intermedia discourse, which is built on the semiotic interaction of different media. The moving lines of the rhizome, its ‘branch-ing’ qualities can be found in poetic texts, in the evaluating segments of political discourse, in advertising discourse, in internet communications, which represent rhizomorphic environments. An analysis of examples from these spheres has shown that the rhizomatic approach opens new facets of intermediality. The author uses the methods of discourse analysis to prove that the openness and non

  12. FINANCIAL INTERMEDIATION, ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

    OpenAIRE

    Wenli Cheng

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a simple general equilibrium model of financial intermediation, entrepreneurship and economic growth. In this model, the role of financial intermediation is to pool savings and to lend the pooled funds to an entrepreneur, who in turn invests the funds in a new production technology. The adoption of the new production technology improves individual real income. Thus financial intermediation promotes economic growth through affecting individuals’ saving behaviour and enabl...

  13. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Chiral Pharmaceutical Intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh N. Patel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of single enantiomers of drug intermediates has become increasingly important in the pharmaceutical industry. Chiral intermediates and fine chemicals are in high demand from both the pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries for the preparation of bulk drug substances and agricultural products. The enormous potential of microorganisms and enzymes for the transformation of synthetic chemicals with high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivities has been demonstrated. In this article, biocatalytic processes are described for the synthesis of chiral pharmaceutical intermediates.

  14. Regularities of intermediate adsorption complex relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manukova, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental data, characterizing the regularities of intermediate adsorption complex relaxation in the polycrystalline Mo-N 2 system at 77 K are given. The method of molecular beam has been used in the investigation. The analytical expressions of change regularity in the relaxation process of full and specific rates - of transition from intermediate state into ''non-reversible'', of desorption into the gas phase and accumUlation of the particles in the intermediate state are obtained

  15. Folding and unfolding of large-size shell construction for application in Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Pestrenina, Irena; Pestrenin, Valery; Rusakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    A future exploration of space requires a technology of large module for biological, technological, logistic and other applications in Earth orbits [1-3]. This report describes the possibility of using large-sized shell structures deployable in space. Structure is delivered to the orbit in the spaceship container. The shell is folded for the transportation. The shell material is either rigid plastic or multilayer prepreg comprising rigid reinforcements (such as reinforcing fibers). The unfolding process (bringing a construction to the unfolded state by loading the internal pressure) needs be considered at the presence of both stretching and bending deformations. An analysis of the deployment conditions (the minimum internal pressure bringing a construction from the folded state to the unfolded state) of large laminated CFRP shell structures is formulated in this report. Solution of this mechanics of deformable solids (MDS) problem of the shell structure is based on the following assumptions: the shell is made of components whose median surface has a reamer; in the separate structural element relaxed state (not stressed and not deformed) its median surface coincides with its reamer (this assumption allows choose the relaxed state of the structure correctly); structural elements are joined (sewn together) by a seam that does not resist rotation around the tangent to the seam line. The ways of large shell structures folding, whose median surface has a reamer, are suggested. Unfolding of cylindrical, conical (full and truncated cones), and large-size composite shells (cylinder-cones, cones-cones) is considered. These results show that the unfolding pressure of such large-size structures (0.01-0.2 atm.) is comparable to the deploying pressure of pneumatic parts (0.001-0.1 atm.) [3]. It would be possible to extend this approach to investigate the unfolding process of large-sized shells with ruled median surface or for non-developable surfaces. This research was

  16. Neurodegeneration and unfolded-protein response in mice expressing a membrane-tethered flexible tail of PrP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Dametto

    Full Text Available The cellular prion protein (PrPC consists of a flexible N-terminal tail (FT, aa 23-128 hinged to a membrane-anchored globular domain (GD, aa 129-231. Ligation of the GD with antibodies induces rapid neurodegeneration, which is prevented by deletion or functional inactivation of the FT. Therefore, the FT is an allosteric effector of neurotoxicity. To explore its mechanism of action, we generated transgenic mice expressing the FT fused to a GPI anchor, but lacking the GD (PrPΔ141-225, or "FTgpi". Here we report that FTgpi mice develop a progressive, inexorably lethal neurodegeneration morphologically and biochemically similar to that triggered by anti-GD antibodies. FTgpi was mostly retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it triggered a conspicuous unfolded protein response specifically activating the PERK pathway leading to phosphorylation of eIF2α and upregulation of CHOP ultimately leading to neurodegeration similar to what was observed in prion infection.

  17. The stability and formation of native proteins from unfolded monomers is increased through interactions with unrelated proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Rodríguez-Almazán

    Full Text Available The intracellular concentration of protein may be as high as 400 mg per ml; thus it seems inevitable that within the cell, numerous protein-protein contacts are constantly occurring. A basic biochemical principle states that the equilibrium of an association reaction can be shifted by ligand binding. This indicates that if within the cell many protein-protein interactions are indeed taking place, some fundamental characteristics of proteins would necessarily differ from those observed in traditional biochemical systems. Accordingly, we measured the effect of eight different proteins on the formation of homodimeric triosephosphate isomerase from Trypanosoma brucei (TbTIM from guanidinium chloride unfolded monomers. The eight proteins at concentrations of micrograms per ml induced an important increase on active dimer formation. Studies on the mechanism of this phenomenon showed that the proteins stabilize the dimeric structure of TbTIM, and that this is the driving force that promotes the formation of active dimers. Similar data were obtained with TIM from three other species. The heat changes that occur when TbTIM is mixed with lysozyme were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry; the results provided direct evidence of the weak interaction between apparently unrelated proteins. The data, therefore, are strongly suggestive that the numerous protein-protein interactions that occur in the intracellular space are an additional control factor in the formation and stability of proteins.

  18. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-01-01

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers

  19. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-02-28

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers.

  20. Unfolded protein response and activated degradative pathways regulation in GNE myopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghao Li

    Full Text Available Although intracellular beta amyloid (Aβ accumulation is known as an early upstream event in the degenerative course of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE myopathy, the process by which Aβdeposits initiate various degradative pathways, and their relationship have not been fully clarified. We studied the possible secondary responses after amyloid beta precursor protein (AβPP deposition including unfolded protein response (UPR, ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS activation and its correlation with autophagy system. Eight GNE myopathy patients and five individuals with normal muscle morphology were included in this study. We performed immunofluorescence and immunoblotting to investigate the expression of AβPP, phosphorylated tau (p-tau and endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperones. Proteasome activities were measured by cleavage of fluorogenic substrates. The expression of proteasome subunits and linkers between proteasomal and autophagy systems were also evaluated by immunoblotting and relative quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Four molecular chaperones, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, calreticulin and calnexin and valosin containing protein (VCP were highly expressed in GNE myopathy. 20S proteasome subunits, three main proteasome proteolytic activities, and the factors linking UPS and autophagy system were also increased. Our study suggests that AβPP deposition results in endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS and highly expressed VCP deliver unfolded proteins from endoplasmic reticulum to proteosomal system which is activated in endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD in GNE myopathy. Excessive ubiquitinated unfolded proteins are exported by proteins that connect UPS and autophagy to autophagy system, which is activated as an alternative pathway for degradation.

  1. Glioblastoma and chemoresistance to alkylating agents: Involvement of apoptosis, autophagy, and unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Mehrpour, Maryam; Shojaei, Shahla; Harlos, Craig; Pitz, Marshall; Hamai, Ahmed; Siemianowicz, Krzysztof; Likus, Wirginia; Wiechec, Emilia; Toyota, Brian D; Hoshyar, Reyhane; Seyfoori, Amir; Sepehri, Zahra; Ande, Sudharsana R; Khadem, Forough; Akbari, Mohsen; Gorman, Adrienne M; Samali, Afshin; Klonisch, Thomas; Ghavami, Saeid

    2018-04-01

    Despite advances in neurosurgical techniques and radio-/chemotherapy, the treatment of brain tumors remains a challenge. This is particularly true for the most frequent and fatal adult brain tumor, glioblastoma (GB). Upon diagnosis, the average survival time of GB patients remains only approximately 15months. The alkylating drug temozolomide (TMZ) is routinely used in brain tumor patients and induces apoptosis, autophagy and unfolded protein response (UPR). Here, we review these cellular mechanisms and their contributions to TMZ chemoresistance in brain tumors, with a particular emphasis on TMZ chemoresistance in glioma stem cells and GB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of the neutron spectra unfolding method on the fast neutron dose determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, P.; Zavaljevski, N.

    1992-01-01

    Based on Shanon's information theory, a new unfolding method which gives non-negative spectrum values and a relatively low variance, is proposed, and a numerical code suitable for application in fast neutron spectroscopy based on proton recoil is developed. The principles of maximum entropy and maximum likelihood are jointly applied. According to the principle of maximum likelihood, the distribution functions around the mean value of the counts in the MCA channels are assumed to be Gaussians. The Lagrange parameter method is applied in the search for an optimal non-negative solution. The nonlinear system of equations is solved using the gradient and Newton iterative algorithms. (orig.)

  3. Bacteria, the endoplasmic reticulum and the unfolded protein response: friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, Jean; Tsolis, Renée M

    2015-02-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a cytoprotective response that is aimed at restoring cellular homeostasis following physiological stress exerted on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which also invokes innate immune signalling in response to invading microorganisms. Although it has been known for some time that the UPR is modulated by various viruses, recent evidence indicates that it also has multiple roles during bacterial infections. In this Review, we describe how bacteria interact with the ER, including how bacteria induce the UPR, how subversion of the UPR promotes bacterial proliferation and how the UPR contributes to innate immune responses against invading bacteria.

  4. Study of chemically unfolded {beta}-casein by means of small-angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschi, Adel [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Molle, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 1060, Tunis (Tunisia)]. E-mail: aschi13@yahoo.fr; Gharbi, Abdelhafidh [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Molle, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 1060, Tunis (Tunisia); Daoud, Mohamed [Service de Physique de l' Etat Condense. CEA Saclay. 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Douillard, Roger [Equipe de Biochimie des Macromolecules Vegetales, Centre de Recherche Agronomique, 2Esplanade R. Garros, BP 224, 51686 Reims cedex 2 (France); Calmettes, Patrick [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2007-01-01

    {beta}-casein is a flexible amphiphilic milk protein which forms an unfolded conformation in presence of very high denaturant concentrations. The structure of {beta}-casein formed at the bulk was studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The value of the second virial coefficient of the protein solutions indicates that the interactions between the polypeptide chain and solvent are repulsive. The protein conformation is similar to an excluded volume chain. The corresponding values of the contour length, L, the statistical length, b and the apparent radius of the chain cross-section, R{sub c} are given.

  5. Studying the applicability of densities mixture unfolding for heavy ion jet spectra in the ALICE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Hackstock, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The results of a three months summer project from July 4th 2016 to September 23rd are presented in this summer student report.\\\\ The method presented in the paper\\footnote{\\url{http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168900215000406}} on densities mixture unfolding by Nikolay Gagunashvili and its software implementation were studied. A mind map flowchart, plotting macros and documentation were produced and while an 18 fold performance boost trough parallelization could be achieved, the verdict on the applicability of this method for heavy ion jet spectra in the ALICE experiment remains inconclusive. This is mainly due to a lack of time and complexity of the method and its implementation.

  6. One Peptide Reveals the Two Faces of α-Helix Unfolding-Folding Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Catarina S H; Cruz, Pedro F; Arnaut, Luis G; Brito, Rui M M; Serpa, Carlos

    2018-04-12

    The understanding of fast folding dynamics of single α-helices comes mostly from studies on rationally designed peptides displaying sequences with high helical propensity. The folding/unfolding dynamics and energetics of α-helix conformations in naturally occurring peptides remains largely unexplored. Here we report the study of a protein fragment analogue of the C-peptide from bovine pancreatic ribonuclease-A, RN80, a 13-amino acid residue peptide that adopts a highly populated helical conformation in aqueous solution. 1 H NMR and CD structural studies of RN80 showed that α-helix formation displays a pH-dependent bell-shaped curve, with a maximum near pH 5, and a large decrease in helical content in alkaline pH. The main forces stabilizing this short α-helix were identified as a salt bridge formed between Glu-2 and Arg-10 and the cation-π interaction involving Tyr-8 and His-12. Thus, deprotonation of Glu-2 or protonation of His-12 are essential for the RN80 α-helix stability. In the present study, RN80 folding and unfolding were triggered by laser-induced pH jumps and detected by time-resolved photoacoustic calorimetry (PAC). The photoacid proton release, amino acid residue protonation, and unfolding/folding events occur at different time scales and were clearly distinguished using time-resolved PAC. The partial unfolding of the RN80 α-helix, due to protonation of Glu-2 and consequent breaking of the stabilizing salt bridge between Glu-2 and Arg-10, is characterized by a concentration-independent volume expansion in the sub-microsecond time range (0.8 mL mol -1 , 369 ns). This small volume expansion reports the cost of peptide backbone rehydration upon disruption of a solvent-exposed salt bridge, as well as backbone intrinsic expansion. On the other hand, RN80 α-helix folding triggered by His-12 protonation and subsequent formation of a cation-π interaction leads to a microsecond volume contraction (-6.0 mL mol -1 , ∼1.7 μs). The essential role of two

  7. Spectrum unfolding from activation measurements in a CTR-model blanket experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijpers, L.J.M.

    1977-07-01

    Neutron spectra in a lithium fusion reactor model blanket are determined experimentally by performing SAND II unfolding runs from measured activities. The principles of the iterative SAND II method are given and characteristics of the output are described. The spectra are calculated from available data with the aid of a Monte Carlo program, of which procedure numerical results are given. Both kinds of spectra are compared; when number of input data is varied or different cross section data sets are chosen, inconsistencies in activities or cross section data may be detected. (orig./WL) [de

  8. Unfolding and effective bandstructure calculations as discrete real- and reciprocal-space operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boykin, Timothy B., E-mail: boykin@ece.uah.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Ajoy, Arvind [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Ilatikhameneh, Hesameddin; Povolotskyi, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard [Network for Computational Nanotechnology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    In recent years, alloy electronic structure calculations based on supercell Brillouin zone unfolding have become popular. There are a number of formulations of the method which on the surface might appear different. Here we show that a discrete real-space description, based on discrete Fourier transforms, is fully general. Furthermore, such an approach can more easily show the effects of alloy scattering. We present such a method for treating the random alloy problem. This treatment features straightforward mathematics and a transparent physical interpretation of the calculated effective (i.e., approximate) energy bands.

  9. Catalogue of response spectra for unfolding in situ gamma-ray pulse-height distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymke, N.

    1982-01-01

    To unfold in situ gamma-ray pulse-height distributions by means of a response matrix technique, the matrix must be in keeping with the measurement geometry, detector size, and energy range to be covered by the measurements. A methodology has been described for determination of standard gamma-ray spectra needed in deriving response matrices and a spectrum catalogue compiled containing graphs and data for the 0-3 MeV (4 x 4 in. NaI(Tl)) and 0-8 MeV (1.5 x 1.5 in. NaI(Tl)) ranges. (author)

  10. The effect of the neutron spectra unfolding method on the fast neutron dose determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, P.; Avdic, S.; Pesic, M.; Zavaljevski, N

    1992-09-01

    Based on Shanon's information theory, a new unfolding method which gives non-negative spectrum values and a relatively low variance, is proposed, and a numerical code suitable for application in fast neutron spectroscopy based on proton recoil is developed. The principles of maximum entropy and maximum likelihood are jointly applied. According to the principle of maximum likelihood, the distribution functions around the mean value of the counts in the MCA channels are assumed to be Gaussians. The Lagrange parameter method is applied in the search for an optimal non-negative solution. The nonlinear system of equations is solved using the gradient and Newton iterative algorithms. (author)

  11. Study of chemically unfolded β-casein by means of small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschi, Adel; Gharbi, Abdelhafidh; Daoud, Mohamed; Douillard, Roger; Calmettes, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    β-casein is a flexible amphiphilic milk protein which forms an unfolded conformation in presence of very high denaturant concentrations. The structure of β-casein formed at the bulk was studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The value of the second virial coefficient of the protein solutions indicates that the interactions between the polypeptide chain and solvent are repulsive. The protein conformation is similar to an excluded volume chain. The corresponding values of the contour length, L, the statistical length, b and the apparent radius of the chain cross-section, R c are given

  12. Physics of the intermediate vector bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altavelli, G.; DiLella, L.

    1989-01-01

    The conversion of the CERN 450 GeV proton synchrotron (SPS) into a proton-antiproton collider was originally proposed in 1976 as a fast and relatively cheap way to produce and detect the weak intermediate Vector Bosons (IVB), W* and Z, by achieving hadronic collisions at an energy large enough to provide observable rates. The properties of such particles had been predicted already in the 60's in the framework of the so-called Standard Model of the unified electroweak theory developed; however, the interest in this theory arose only some years later, following the proof of renormalizability and the first experimental observation of neutrino interactions mediated by Z-exchange. In particular, the experiment obtained a measurement of the weak mixing angle, which allowed a quantitative prediction of the IVB mass values. The CERN Collider project was approved in 1978 and the first bar pp collisions at a total center-of-mass energy (√s) of 546 GeV were observed in 1981. The decay W → e ν was first observed among data collected at the end of 1982, and the decay Z → e + e - and Z → μ + μ - were observed a few months later. At present, following two more data-taking runs in 1984 and 1985 at a slightly increased center-of-mass energy (√s = 630 GeV), samples of ∼250 W → e ν and ∼30 Z → e + e - events are available from each of the two major experiments (UA1 and UA2), making possible a quantitative comparison of IVB properties with the predictions of the Standard Model. In this article the authors first describe the Standard Model of the unified electroweak theory, and the authors use the theoretical framework to derive the IVB mass values and their decay properties

  13. Low resolution structural X-ray studies of human FEZ1: a natively unfolded protein associated to the flower-like nuclei phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, Daniel Carlos Ferreira; Trindade, Daniel Maragno; Bressan, Gustavo Costa; Kobarg, Joerg

    2008-01-01

    The fasciculation and elongation protein Zeta1 (FEZ1) has been implicated in important functions in mammalian cells, ranging from molecular transport to transcriptional regulation. Theoretical predictions, circular dichroism spectroscopy and limiting proteolysis experiments all suggested that FEZ1 contains regions of low structural complexity and that it may belong to the growing family of natively unfolded proteins. We therefore performed Small Angle Scattering (SAXS) experiments which showed that FEZ1 is a dimer of elongated shape and that its conformation is mainly disordered. In parallel functional studies we observed that the overexpression of FEZ1 in human cells causes the so-called 'flower-like nuclei' phenotype, similar to what is observed in certain leukemic cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the FEZ1 dimer configuration may be critical to explain why its overexpression causes the formation of flower-like nuclei in human cells. (author)

  14. Intermediate L-K molecular orbital radiation from heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinig, K.H.; Jaeger, H.U.; Richter, H.; Woittennek, H.

    1975-09-01

    The structure of x-ray continua observed recently in violent collisions between intermediate mass atoms can be explained by a superposition of K molecular orbital (KMO) radiation and of an intermediate L-K molecular orbital (ILKMO) radiation of high intensity which is due to 2psigma vacancies. (author)

  15. Insights into the folding and unfolding processes of wild-type and mutated SH3 domain by molecular dynamics and replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ting Chu

    Full Text Available Src-homology regions 3 (SH3 domain is essential for the down-regulation of tyrosine kinase activity. Mutation A39V/N53P/V55L of SH3 is found to be relative to the urgent misfolding diseases. To gain insight, the human and gallus SH3 domains (PDB ID: 1NYG and 2LP5, including 58 amino acids in each protein, were selected for MD simulations (Amber11, ff99SB force field and cluster analysis to investigate the influence of mutations on the spatial structure of the SH3 domain. It is found that the large conformational change of mutations mainly exists in three areas in the vicinity of protein core: RT loop, N-src loop, distal β-hairpin to 310 helix. The C-terminus of the mutated gallus SH3 is disordered after simulation, which represents the intermediate state of aggregation. The disappeared strong Hbond net in the mutated human and gallus systems will make these mutated proteins looser than the wild-type proteins. Additionally, by performing the REMD simulations on the gallus SH3 domain, the mutated domain is found to have an obvious effect on the unfolding process. These studies will be helpful for further aggregation mechanisms investigations on SH3 family.

  16. Nuclear structure at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, B.E.; Mutchler, G.S.

    1991-01-01

    The theme that unites the sometimes seemingly disparate experiments undertaken by the Bonner Lab Medium Energy Group is a determination to understand in detail the many facets and manifestations of the strong interaction, that which is now referred to as nonperturbative QCD. Whether we are investigating the question of just what does carry the spin of baryons, or the extent of the validity of the SU(6) wavefunctions for the excited hyperons (as will be measured in their radiative decays in our CEBAF experiment), or questions associated with the formation of a new state of matter predicted by QCD (the subject of our BNL experiments E810, E854, as well as our approved experiment at RHIC), -- all these projects share this common goal. Our other experiments represent different approaches to the same broad undertaking. LAMPF E1097 will provide definitive answers to the question of the spin dependence of the inelastic channel of pion production in the n-p interaction. FNAL E683 may well open a new field of investigation in nuclear physics: that of just how quarks and gluons interact with nuclear matter as they transverse nuclei of different sizes. In most all of the experiments mentioned above, the Bonner Lab Group is playing major leadership roles as well as doing a big fraction of the hard work that such experiments require. We use many of the facilities that are unavailable to the intermediate energy physics community and we use our expertise to design and fabricate the detectors and instrumentation that are required to perform the measurements which we decide to do

  17. Early photolysis intermediates of gecko and bovine artificial visual pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J W; Liang, J; Ebrey, T G; Sheves, M; Livnah, N; Kuwata, O; Jäger, S; Kliger, D S

    1997-11-25

    Nanosecond laser photolysis measurements were conducted on digitonin extracts of artificial pigments prepared from the cone-type visual pigment, P521, of the Tokay gecko (Gekko gekko) retina. Artificial pigments were prepared by regeneration of bleached gecko photoreceptor membranes with 9-cis-retinal, 9-cis-14-methylretinal, or 9-cis-alpha-retinal. Absorbance difference spectra were recorded at a sequence of time delays from 30 ns to 60 microseconds following excitation with a pulse of 477-nm actinic light. Global analysis showed the kinetic data for all three artificial gecko pigments to be best fit by two-exponential processes. These two-exponential decays correspond to similar decays observed after photolysis of P521 itself, with the first process being the decay of the equilibrated P521 BathoP521 BSI mixture to P521 Lumi and the second process being the decay of P521 Lumi to P521 Meta I. In spite of its large blue shift relative to P521, iso-P521 displays a normal chloride depletion induced blue shift. Iso-P521's early intermediates up to Lumi were also blue-shifted, with the P521 BathoP521 BSI equilibrated mixture being 15 nm blue-shifted and P521 Lumi being 8 nm blue-shifted relative to the intermediates formed after P521 photolysis. The blue shift associated with the iso-pigment is reduced or disappears entirely by P521 Meta I. Similar blue shifts were observed for the early intermediates observed after photolysis of bovine isorhodopsin, with the Lumi intermediate blue-shifted 5 nm compared to the Lumi intermediate formed after photolysis of bovine rhodopsin. These shifts indicate that a difference exists between the binding sites of 9- and 11-cis pigments which persists for microseconds at 20 degrees C.

  18. Development of unfolding method to obtain pin-wise source strength distribution from PWR spent fuel assembly measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitompul, Yos Panagaman; Shin, Hee-Sung; Park, Se-Hwan; Oh, Jong Myeong; Seo, Hee; Kim, Ho Dong

    2013-01-01

    An unfolding method has been developed to obtain a pin-wise source strength distribution of a 14 × 14 pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel assembly. Sixteen measured gamma dose rates at 16 control rod guide tubes of an assembly are unfolded to 179 pin-wise source strengths of the assembly. The method calculates and optimizes five coefficients of the quadratic fitting function for X-Y source strength distribution, iteratively. The pin-wise source strengths are obtained at the sixth iteration, with a maximum difference between two sequential iterations of about 0.2%. The relative distribution of pin-wise source strength from the unfolding is checked using a comparison with the design code (Westinghouse APA code). The result shows that the relative distribution from the unfolding and design code is consistent within a 5% difference. The absolute value of the pin-wise source strength is also checked by reproducing the dose rates at the measurement points. The result shows that the pin-wise source strengths from the unfolding reproduce the dose rates within a 2% difference. (author)

  19. A broadband gamma-ray spectrometry using novel unfolding algorithms for characterization of laser wakefield-generated betatron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jong Ho, E-mail: jhjeon07@ibs.re.kr; Nakajima, Kazuhisa, E-mail: naka115@dia-net.ne.jp; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Yoo, Byung Ju; Shin, Kang Woo [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seung Ku; Choi, Il Woo [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Photonics Research Institute, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Yong Joo [Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jung Hun; Jo, Sung Ha [Advanced Photonics Research Institute, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Hojbota, Calin; Cho, Byeoung Ick; Nam, Chang Hee [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Photon Science, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We present a high-flux, broadband gamma-ray spectrometry capable of characterizing the betatron radiation spectrum over the photon energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV with respect to the peak photon energy, spectral bandwidth, and unique discrimination from background radiations, using a differential filtering spectrometer and the unfolding procedure based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. These properties are experimentally verified by measuring betatron radiation from a cm-scale laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven by a 1-PW laser, using a differential filtering spectrometer consisting of a 15-filter and image plate stack. The gamma-ray spectra were derived by unfolding the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) values recorded on the image plates, using the spectrometer response matrix modeled with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The accuracy of unfolded betatron radiation spectra was assessed by unfolding the test PSL data simulated with GEANT4, showing an ambiguity of less than 20% and clear discrimination from the background radiation with less than 10%. The spectral analysis of betatron radiation from laser wakefield-accelerated electron beams with energies up to 3 GeV revealed radiation spectra characterized by synchrotron radiation with the critical photon energy up to 7 MeV. The gamma-ray spectrometer and unfolding method presented here facilitate an in-depth understanding of betatron radiation from LWFA process and a novel radiation source of high-quality photon beams in the MeV regime.

  20. An approach to unfold the response of a multi-element system using an artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, E.; Fehrenbacher, G.; Schuetz, R.; Sprunck, M.; Hahn, K.; Hofmann, R.; Wahl, W.

    1998-01-01

    An unfolding procedure is proposed which aims at obtaining spectral information of a neutron radiation field by the analysis of the response of a multi-element system consisting of converter type semiconductors. For the unfolding procedure an artificial neural network (feed forward network), trained by the back-propagation method, was used. The response functions of the single elements to neutron radiation were calculated by application of a computational model for an energy range from 10 -2 eV to 10 MeV. The training of the artificial neural network was based on the computation of responses of a six-element system for a set of 300 neutron spectra and the application of the back-propagation method. The validation was performed by the unfolding of 100 computed responses. Two unfolding examples were pointed out for the determination of the neutron spectra. The spectra resulting from the unfolding procedure agree well with the original spectra used for the response computation

  1. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li+ ion beam-driven hohlraums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li + ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The UFO unfold code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time- resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies (≤ 100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum

  2. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li+ ion beam-driven hohlraums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li + ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies (≤100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time endash history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  3. Using Peephole Optimization on Intermediate Code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanenbaum, A.S.; van Staveren, H.; Stevenson, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Many portable compilers generate an intermediate code that is subsequently translated into the target machine's assembly language. In this paper a stack-machine-based intermediate code suitable for algebraic languages (e.g., PASCAL, C, FORTRAN) and most byte-addressed mini- and microcomputers is

  4. Gasoline Engine Mechanics. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Marion

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of six terminal objectives presented in this curriculum guide for an intermediate gasoline engine mechanics course at the secondary level. (For the beginning course guide see CE 010 947.) The materials were developed for a two-semester (2 hour…

  5. Some Intermediate-Level Violin Concertos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Contends that many violin students attempt difficult concertos before they are technically or musically prepared. Identifies a variety of concertos at the intermediate and advanced intermediate-level for students to study and master before attempting the advanced works by Bach and Mozart. Includes concertos by Vivaldi, Leclair, Viotti, Haydn,…

  6. 39 CFR 3001.39 - Intermediate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intermediate decisions. 3001.39 Section 3001.39 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Rules of General Applicability § 3001.39 Intermediate decisions. (a) Initial decision by presiding officer. In any proceedings in...

  7. Pair production of intermediate vector bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikaelian, K.O.

    1979-01-01

    The production of intermediate vector boson pairs W + W - , Z 0 Z 0 , W +- Z 0 and W +- γ in pp and p anti p collisions is discussed. The motivation is to detect the self-interactions among the four intermediate vector bosons

  8. The structural basis of urea-induced protein unfolding in β-catenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Zhongzhou; Hong, Xia; Ning, Fangkun; Liu, Haolin; Zang, Jianye; Yan, Xiaoxue; Kemp, Jennifer; Musselman, Catherine A.; Kutateladze, Tatinna G.; Zhao, Rui; Jiang, Chengyu; Zhang, Gongyi

    2014-01-01

    Although urea and guanidine hydrochloride are commonly used to denature proteins, the molecular underpinnings of this process have remained unclear for a century. To address this question, crystal structures of β-catenin were determined at various urea concentrations. These structures contained at least 105 unique positions that were occupied by urea molecules, each of which interacted with the protein primarily via hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen-bond competition experiments showed that the denaturing effects of urea were neutralized when polyethylene glycol was added to the solution. These data suggest that urea primarily causes proteins to unfold by competing and disrupting hydrogen bonds in proteins. Moreover, circular-dichroism spectra and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis revealed that a similar mechanism caused protein denaturation in the absence of urea at pH levels greater than 12. Taken together, the results led to the conclusion that the disruption of hydrogen bonds is a general mechanism of unfolding induced by urea, high pH and potentially other denaturing agents such as guanidine hydrochloride. Traditionally, the disruption of hydrophobic inter­actions instead of hydrogen bonds has been thought to be the most important cause of protein denaturation. PMID:25372676

  9. Influence of Neutron Spectra Unfolding Method on Fast Neutron Dose Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, P.

    1991-01-01

    Full text: Accuracy of knowing the fast neutron spectra has great influence on equivalent dose determination. In usual fast neutron spectrum measurements with scintillation detectors based on proton recoil, the main difficulty is confidence of unfolding method. In former ones variance of obtained result is usually great and negative values are possible too, which does means that we don't now exactly is obtained neutron spectrum real one. The new unfolding method based on Shanon's information theory, which gives non-negative spectrum and relative low variance, is obtained and appropriate numerical code for application in fast neutron spectrometry based on proton recoil is realized. In this method principle of maximum entropy and maximum likelihood are used together. Unknown group density distribution functions, which are considered as desired normalized mean neutron group flux, are constl u cted using only constrain of knowing mean value. Obtained distributions are consistent to available information (counts in NCA from proton recoil), while being maximally noncommittal with respect to all other unknown circumstances. For maximum likelihood principle, distribution functions around mean value of counts in the channels of MCA are taken to be Gauss function shape. Optimal non-negative solution is searched by means of Lagrange parameter method. Nonlinear system of equations, is solved using gradient and Newton iterative algorithm. Error covariance matrix is obtained too. (author)

  10. Local Order in the Unfolded State: Conformational Biases and Nearest Neighbor Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhan Toal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins, which contain significant levels of disorder yet perform complex biologically functions, as well as unwanted aggregation, has motivated numerous experimental and theoretical studies aimed at describing residue-level conformational ensembles. Multiple lines of evidence gathered over the last 15 years strongly suggest that amino acids residues display unique and restricted conformational preferences in the unfolded state of peptides and proteins, contrary to one of the basic assumptions of the canonical random coil model. To fully understand residue level order/disorder, however, one has to gain a quantitative, experimentally based picture of conformational distributions and to determine the physical basis underlying residue-level conformational biases. Here, we review the experimental, computational and bioinformatic evidence for conformational preferences of amino acid residues in (mostly short peptides that can be utilized as suitable model systems for unfolded states of peptides and proteins. In this context particular attention is paid to the alleged high polyproline II preference of alanine. We discuss how these conformational propensities may be modulated by peptide solvent interactions and so called nearest-neighbor interactions. The relevance of conformational propensities for the protein folding problem and the understanding of IDPs is briefly discussed.

  11. Optimization of expression and purification of human mortalin (Hsp70): Folding/unfolding analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Ahmed, Anwar; Tabrez, Shams; Islam, Badar ul; Rabbani, Nayyar; Malik, Ajamaluddin; Ismael, Mohamad A.; Alsenaidy, Mohammad A.; Alsenaidy, Abdulrahman M.

    2017-12-01

    Human mortalin is a Hsp70 mitochondrial protein that plays an essential role in the biogenesis of mitochondria. The deregulation of mortalin expression and its functions could lead to several age-associated disorders and some types of cancers. In the present study, we optimized the expression and purification of recombinant human mortalin by the use of two-step chromatography. Low temperature (18 °C) and 0.5 mM (IPTG) was required for optimum mortalin expression. Chaperone activity of mortalin was assessed by the citrate synthase and insulin protection assay, which suggested their protective role in mitochondria. Folding and unfolding assessments of mortalin were carried out in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) by intrinsic fluorescence measurement, ANS (8-analino 1-nephthlene sulfonic acid) binding and CD (circular dichroism) analysis. Under denaturing conditions, mortalin showed decrease in tryptophan fluorescence intensity along with a red shift of 11 nm. Moreover, ANS binding studies illustrated decrease in hydrophobicity. CD measurement of mortalin showed a predominant helical structure. However, the secondary structure was lost at low concentration of GdnHCl (1 M). We present a simple and robust method to produce soluble mortalin and warranted that chaperones are also susceptible to unfolding and futile to maintain protein homeostasis.

  12. Advances and New Concepts in Alcohol-Induced Organelle Stress, Unfolded Protein Responses and Organ Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Ji

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol is a simple and consumable biomolecule yet its excessive consumption disturbs numerous biological pathways damaging nearly all organs of the human body. One of the essential biological processes affected by the harmful effects of alcohol is proteostasis, which regulates the balance between biogenesis and turnover of proteins within and outside the cell. A significant amount of published evidence indicates that alcohol and its metabolites directly or indirectly interfere with protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER causing an accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins, which triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR leading to either restoration of homeostasis or cell death, inflammation and other pathologies under severe and chronic alcohol conditions. The UPR senses the abnormal protein accumulation and activates transcription factors that regulate nuclear transcription of genes related to ER function. Similarly, this kind of protein stress response can occur in other cellular organelles, which is an evolving field of interest. Here, I review recent advances in the alcohol-induced ER stress response as well as discuss new concepts on alcohol-induced mitochondrial, Golgi and lysosomal stress responses and injuries.

  13. Comparison of intra-organellar chaperone capacity for dealing with stress-induced protein unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Jurre; Vos, Michel J; van Waarde, Maria A W H; Kampinga, Harm H

    2007-11-23

    Molecular chaperones are essential for cells to prevent that partially unfolded proteins form non-functional, toxic aggregates. This requirement is increased when cells experience protein unfolding stresses and such could affect all compartments in the eukaryotic cell. Whether all organelles are equipped with comparable chaperone capacities is largely unknown, mainly due to the lack of suitable reporters that allow such a comparison. Here we describe the development of fluorescent luciferase reporters that are sorted to various cellular locations (nucleus, cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, and peroxisomes) and that differ minimally in their intrinsic thermal stability properties. When heating living cells, the rate of inactivation was most rapid for the nuclear-targeted luciferase, indicating that the nucleus is the most sensitive organelle toward heat-induced denaturing stress. Post-heat re-activation, however, occurred at equal kinetics irrespective of luciferase localization. Also, induction of thermotolerance by a priming heat treatment, that coordinately up-regulates all heat-inducible chaperones, resulted in a transient heat resistance of the luciferase in all organelles in a comparable manner. Overexpression of the main heat-inducible Hsp70 family member, HspA1A, protected only the cytosolic and nuclear, but not the other luciferases. Together, our data suggest that in each compartment investigated, including the peroxisome in which so far no chaperones could be detected, chaperone machines are present and can be induced with activities similar to those present in the cytosolic/nuclear compartment.

  14. Digital force-feedback for protein unfolding experiments using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bippes, Christian A.; Janovjak, Harald; Kedrov, Alexej; Muller, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    Since its invention in the 1990s single-molecule force spectroscopy has been increasingly applied to study protein (un-)folding, cell adhesion, and ligand-receptor interactions. In most force spectroscopy studies, the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is separated from a surface at a constant velocity, thus applying an increasing force to folded bio-molecules or bio-molecular bonds. Recently, Fernandez and co-workers introduced the so-called force-clamp technique. Single proteins were subjected to a defined constant force allowing their life times and life time distributions to be directly measured. Up to now, the force-clamping was performed by analogue PID controllers, which require complex additional hardware and might make it difficult to combine the force-feedback with other modes such as constant velocity. These points may be limiting the applicability and versatility of this technique. Here we present a simple, fast, and all-digital (software-based) PID controller that yields response times of a few milliseconds in combination with a commercial AFM. We demonstrate the performance of our feedback loop by force-clamp unfolding of single Ig27 domains of titin and the membrane proteins bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and the sodium/proton antiporter NhaA.

  15. Digital force-feedback for protein unfolding experiments using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bippes, Christian A; Janovjak, Harald; Kedrov, Alexej; Muller, Daniel J

    2007-01-01

    Since its invention in the 1990s single-molecule force spectroscopy has been increasingly applied to study protein (un-)folding, cell adhesion, and ligand-receptor interactions. In most force spectroscopy studies, the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is separated from a surface at a constant velocity, thus applying an increasing force to folded bio-molecules or bio-molecular bonds. Recently, Fernandez and co-workers introduced the so-called force-clamp technique. Single proteins were subjected to a defined constant force allowing their life times and life time distributions to be directly measured. Up to now, the force-clamping was performed by analogue PID controllers, which require complex additional hardware and might make it difficult to combine the force-feedback with other modes such as constant velocity. These points may be limiting the applicability and versatility of this technique. Here we present a simple, fast, and all-digital (software-based) PID controller that yields response times of a few milliseconds in combination with a commercial AFM. We demonstrate the performance of our feedback loop by force-clamp unfolding of single Ig27 domains of titin and the membrane proteins bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and the sodium/proton antiporter NhaA

  16. Methods for monitoring endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Samali, Afshin

    2010-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the site of folding of membrane and secreted proteins in the cell. Physiological or pathological processes that disturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum cause ER stress and activate a set of signaling pathways termed the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). The UPR can promote cellular repair and sustained survival by reducing the load of unfolded proteins through upregulation of chaperones and global attenuation of protein synthesis. Research into ER stress and the UPR continues to grow at a rapid rate as many new investigators are entering the field. There are also many researchers not working directly on ER stress, but who wish to determine whether this response is activated in the system they are studying: thus, it is important to list a standard set of criteria for monitoring UPR in different model systems. Here, we discuss approaches that can be used by researchers to plan and interpret experiments aimed at evaluating whether the UPR and related processes are activated. We would like to emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation and strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to verify UPR activation.

  17. Methods for Monitoring Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and the Unfolded Protein Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Samali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the site of folding of membrane and secreted proteins in the cell. Physiological or pathological processes that disturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum cause ER stress and activate a set of signaling pathways termed the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR. The UPR can promote cellular repair and sustained survival by reducing the load of unfolded proteins through upregulation of chaperones and global attenuation of protein synthesis. Research into ER stress and the UPR continues to grow at a rapid rate as many new investigators are entering the field. There are also many researchers not working directly on ER stress, but who wish to determine whether this response is activated in the system they are studying: thus, it is important to list a standard set of criteria for monitoring UPR in different model systems. Here, we discuss approaches that can be used by researchers to plan and interpret experiments aimed at evaluating whether the UPR and related processes are activated. We would like to emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation and strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to verify UPR activation.

  18. Acceptable solutions obtained by unfolding noisy data with a conjugate gradient technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    A linear resolution function in a physical measurement leads to data values and standard deviations at, say, N points. It is noted that the associated resolution functions may require that a number n of particular linear combinations of the data values be each not significantly different from zero. One is left with at most N-n parameters to evaluate. If the resolution functions are reasonably behaved, one can show that one sensible way to describe the underlying spectrum treats it as a linear combination of the given resolution functions and includes all the significant information from the data. An iterative search for the best component available to minimize the chi-square of the next fit to the data leads to a conjugate gradient technique. Programs based on the technique have been successfully used to obtain neutron spectra as a function of energy; in raw data from a pulse height analysis of proton recoils in a proportional counter, and where the raw data are time of flight spectra from a time dependent pulse of known form. It is planned to incorporate these, together with working programs respectively for photonuclear analysis and to explore the impurity concentration profile in a surface, into a single ''work-bench'' type program. A suitably difficult model unfolding problem has been developed and used to show the strengths and weaknesses of a number of other methods that have been used for unfolding

  19. Unfolding of a Temperature-Sensitive Domain Controls Voltage-Gated Channel Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, Cristina; Rohaim, Ahmed; Shaya, David; Findeisen, Felix; Stein, Richard A; Nurva, Shailika Reddy; Mishra, Smriti; Mchaourab, Hassane S; Minor, Daniel L

    2016-02-25

    Voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs) are outfitted with diverse cytoplasmic domains that impact function. To examine how such elements may affect VGIC behavior, we addressed how the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel (BacNa(V)) C-terminal cytoplasmic domain (CTD) affects function. Our studies show that the BacNa(V) CTD exerts a profound influence on gating through a temperature-dependent unfolding transition in a discrete cytoplasmic domain, the neck domain, proximal to the pore. Structural and functional studies establish that the BacNa(V) CTD comprises a bi-partite four-helix bundle that bears an unusual hydrophilic core whose integrity is central to the unfolding mechanism and that couples directly to the channel activation gate. Together, our findings define a general principle for how the widespread four-helix bundle cytoplasmic domain architecture can control VGIC responses, uncover a mechanism underlying the diverse BacNa(V) voltage dependencies, and demonstrate that a discrete domain can encode the temperature-dependent response of a channel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Electron-atom scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingston, A.E.; Walters, H.R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The problems of intermediate energy scattering are approached from the low and high energy ends. At low intermediate energies difficulties associated with the use of pseudostates and correlation terms are discussed, special consideration being given to nonphysical pseudoresonances. Perturbation methods appropriate to high intermediate energies are described and attempts to extend these high energy approximations down to low intermediate energies are studied. It is shown how the importance of electron exchange effects develops with decreasing energy. The problem of assessing the 'effective completeness' of pseudostate sets at intermediate energies is mentioned and an instructive analysis of a 2p pseudostate approximation to elastic e - -H scattering is given. It is suggested that at low energies the Pauli Exclusion Principle can act to hide short range defects in pseudostate approximations. (author)

  1. Application of unfolding transformation in the random matrix theory to analyze in vivo neuronal spike firing during awake and anesthetized conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risako Kato

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available General anesthetics decrease the frequency and density of spike firing. This effect makes it difficult to detect spike regularity. To overcome this problem, we developed a method utilizing the unfolding transformation which analyzes the energy level statistics in the random matrix theory. We regarded the energy axis as time axis of neuron spike and analyzed the time series of cortical neural firing in vivo. Unfolding transformation detected regularities of neural firing while changes in firing densities were associated with pentobarbital. We found that unfolding transformation enables us to compare firing regularity between awake and anesthetic conditions on a universal scale. Keywords: Unfolding transformation, Spike-timing, Regularity

  2. Intergalactic stellar populations in intermediate redshift clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, J.; Giraud, E.; Toledo, I.; Selman, F.; Quintana, H.

    2012-11-01

    A substantial fraction of the total stellar mass in rich clusters of galaxies resides in a diffuse intergalactic component usually referred to as the intracluster light (ICL). Theoretical models indicate that these intergalactic stars originate mostly from the tidal interaction of the cluster galaxies during the assembly history of the cluster, and that a significant fraction of these stars could have formed in situ from the late infall of cold metal-poor gas clouds on to the cluster. However, these models also overpredict the fraction of stellar mass in the ICL by a substantial margin, something that is still not well understood. The models also make predictions about the age distribution of the ICL stars, which may provide additional observational constraints. Here we present population synthesis models for the ICL of an intermediate redshift (z = 0.29) X-ray cluster that we have extensively studied in previous papers. The advantage of observing intermediate redshift clusters rather than nearby ones is that the former fit the field of view of multi-object spectrographs in 8-m telescopes and therefore permit us to encompass most of the ICL with only a few well-placed slits. In this paper we show that by stacking spectra at different locations within the ICL it is possible to reach sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratios to fit population synthesis models and derive meaningful results. The models provide ages and metallicities for the dominant populations at several different locations within the ICL and the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) halo, as well as measures of the kinematics of the stars as a function of distance from the BCG. We thus find that the ICL in our cluster is dominated by old metal-rich stars, at odds with what has been found in nearby clusters where the stars that dominate the ICL are old and metal poor. While we see weak evidence of a young, metal-poor component, if real, these young stars would amount to less than 1 per cent of the total ICL

  3. Effect of Intermediate Hosts on Emerging Zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jing-An; Chen, Fangyuan; Fan, Shengjie

    2017-08-01

    Most emerging zoonotic pathogens originate from animals. They can directly infect humans through natural reservoirs or indirectly through intermediate hosts. As a bridge, an intermediate host plays different roles in the transmission of zoonotic pathogens. In this study, we present three types of pathogen transmission to evaluate the effect of intermediate hosts on emerging zoonotic diseases in human epidemics. These types are identified as follows: TYPE 1, pathogen transmission without an intermediate host for comparison; TYPE 2, pathogen transmission with an intermediate host as an amplifier; and TYPE 3, pathogen transmission with an intermediate host as a vessel for genetic variation. In addition, we established three mathematical models to elucidate the mechanisms underlying zoonotic disease transmission according to these three types. Stability analysis indicated that the existence of intermediate hosts increased the difficulty of controlling zoonotic diseases because of more difficult conditions to satisfy for the disease to die out. The human epidemic would die out under the following conditions: TYPE 1: [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]; TYPE 2: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]; and TYPE 3: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] Simulation with similar parameters demonstrated that intermediate hosts could change the peak time and number of infected humans during a human epidemic; intermediate hosts also exerted different effects on controlling the prevalence of a human epidemic with natural reservoirs in different periods, which is important in addressing problems in public health. Monitoring and controlling the number of natural reservoirs and intermediate hosts at the right time would successfully manage and prevent the prevalence of emerging zoonoses in humans.

  4. A method for unfolding high-energy scintillation gamma-ray spectra up to 8 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymke, N.; Hofmann, B.

    1982-01-01

    In unfolding a high-energy scintillation gamma-ray spectrum up to 8 MeV with the help of a response matrix, the means of linear algebra fail if the matrix is ill conditioned. In such cases, unfolding could be accomplished by means of a mathematical method based on a priori knowledge of the photon spectrum to be expected. The method which belongs to the class of regularization techniques was tested on in-situ gamma-ray spectra of 16 N recorded in a nuclear power plant near the primary circuit, using an 1.5 x 1.5 in. NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. For one regularized unfolding the results were presented in the form of an energy and a dose-rate spectrum. (author)

  5. Influence of the initial guess spectrum in the unfolding of Bss data obtained inside a bunker of a PET cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benavente C, J. A.; Lacerda, M. A. S.; Guimaraes, A. M.; Da Silva, T. A. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    In a cyclotron facility is strongly advised the use of spectrometry techniques to support workplace neutron dosimetry. Bonner sphere spectrometer (Bss) is the most used for radiation protection applications. Bss data must be unfolded to determine the spectral particle fluence. Some computer codes have been utilized for this purpose. These codes allow unfolding the spectrum from the Bss count rates through different algorithms. Some iterative routines need an initial guess spectrum to start the unfolding. The adequate choice of this initial spectrum is a critical part of the process and can affect the final solution. In this work, we evaluate the influence of the initial guess spectrum in the unfolding of Bss data obtained in four points inside the bunker of a PET cyclotron. The measurements were done utilizing a modified Bss system with thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Codes BUNKIUT and NSDUAZ were utilized to unfold the Bss data. For the NSDUAZ the starting spectrum is automatically obtained from a library initial guess spectra. For the BUNKIUT code were utilized two different initial guess spectra: (a) a Maxwellian spectrum with temperature of 1.4 MeV and shape factor of 0.1, created with the MAXIET algorithm and; (b) the spectra obtained through simulation with the MCNPX code version 2.7. Spectra obtained with both unfold codes and with the different initial guess spectra presented epithermal and thermal neutrons due to room-return effects. However, the contribution of the fast neutron to the total fluence were quite different for the different cases studied. These differences highlight the importance of an appropriate choice of an initial guess spectra for the quality of the results. (Author)

  6. Influence of the initial guess spectrum in the unfolding of Bss data obtained inside a bunker of a PET cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavente C, J. A.; Lacerda, M. A. S.; Guimaraes, A. M.; Da Silva, T. A.; Vega C, H. R.

    2015-10-01

    In a cyclotron facility is strongly advised the use of spectrometry techniques to support workplace neutron dosimetry. Bonner sphere spectrometer (Bss) is the most used for radiation protection applications. Bss data must be unfolded to determine the spectral particle fluence. Some computer codes have been utilized for this purpose. These codes allow unfolding the spectrum from the Bss count rates through different algorithms. Some iterative routines need an initial guess spectrum to start the unfolding. The adequate choice of this initial spectrum is a critical part of the process and can affect the final solution. In this work, we evaluate the influence of the initial guess spectrum in the unfolding of Bss data obtained in four points inside the bunker of a PET cyclotron. The measurements were done utilizing a modified Bss system with thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Codes BUNKIUT and NSDUAZ were utilized to unfold the Bss data. For the NSDUAZ the starting spectrum is automatically obtained from a library initial guess spectra. For the BUNKIUT code were utilized two different initial guess spectra: (a) a Maxwellian spectrum with temperature of 1.4 MeV and shape factor of 0.1, created with the MAXIET algorithm and; (b) the spectra obtained through simulation with the MCNPX code version 2.7. Spectra obtained with both unfold codes and with the different initial guess spectra presented epithermal and thermal neutrons due to room-return effects. However, the contribution of the fast neutron to the total fluence were quite different for the different cases studied. These differences highlight the importance of an appropriate choice of an initial guess spectra for the quality of the results. (Author)

  7. Unfolding neutron spectra from simulated response of thermoluminescence dosimeters inside a polyethylene sphere using GRNN neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfalizadeh, F.; Faghihi, R.; Bahadorzadeh, B.; Sina, S.

    2017-07-01

    Neutron spectrometry using a single-sphere containing dosimeters has been developed recently, as an effective replacement for Bonner sphere spectrometry. The aim of this study is unfolding the neutron energy spectra using GRNN artificial neural network, from the response of thermoluminescence dosimeters, TLDs, located inside a polyethylene sphere. The spectrometer was simulated using MCNP5. TLD-600 and TLD-700 dosimeters were simulated at different positions in all directions. Then the GRNN was used for neutron spectra prediction, using the TLDs' readings. Comparison of spectra predicted by the network with the real spectra, show that the single-sphere dosimeter is an effective instrument in unfolding neutron spectra.

  8. Selected problems in experimental intermediate energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayes, B.W.; Hungerford, E.V.; Pinsky, L.S.

    1990-09-01

    The objectives of this research program are to: investigate forefront problems in experimental intermediate energy physics; educate students in this field of research; and, develop the instrumentation necessary to undertake this experimental program. Generally, the research is designed to search for physical processes which cannot be explained by conventional models of elementary interactions. This includes the use of nuclear targets where the nucleus provides a many body environment of strongly perturbation of a known interaction by this environment. Unfortunately, such effects may be masked by the complexity of the many body problem and may be difficult to observe. Therefore, experiments must be carefully chosen and analyzed for deviations from the more conventional models. There were three major thrusts of the program; strange particle physics, where a strange quark is embedded in the nuclear medium; muon electro-weak decay, which involves a search for a violation of the standard model of the electro-weak interaction; and measurement of the spin dependent structure function of the neutron

  9. On the Intermediate Line Region in AGNs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikari, Tek P.; Różańska, Agata; Hryniewicz, Krzysztof [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Czerny, Bozena [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Ferland, Gary J., E-mail: tek@camk.edu.pl [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2017-09-29

    In this paper we explore the intermediate line region (ILR) by using the photoionisation simulations of the gas clouds present at different radial distances from the center, corresponding to the locations from BLR out to NLR in four types of AGNs. We let for the presence of dust whenever conditions allow for dust existence. All spectral shapes are taken from the recent multi-wavelength campaigns. The cloud density decreases with distance as a power law. We found that the slope of the power law density profile does not affect the line emissivity radial profiles of major emission lines: Hβ, He II, Mg II, C III, and O III. When the density of the cloud at the sublimation radius is as high as 10{sup 11.5} cm{sup −3}, the ILR should clearly be seen in the observations independently of the shape of the illuminating radiation. Moreover, our result is valid for low ionization nuclear emission regions of active galaxies.

  10. Intermediate inflation from a non-canonical scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezazadeh, K.; Karami, K. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi, P., E-mail: rezazadeh86@gmail.com, E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.ir, E-mail: parvin.karimi67@yahoo.com [Center for Excellence in Astronomy and Astrophysics (CEAA-RIAAM), P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-01

    We study the intermediate inflation in a non-canonical scalar field framework with a power-like Lagrangian. We show that in contrast with the standard canonical intermediate inflation, our non-canonical model is compatible with the observational results of Planck 2015. Also, we estimate the equilateral non-Gaussianity parameter which is in well agreement with the prediction of Planck 2015. Then, we obtain an approximation for the energy scale at the initial time of inflation and show that it can be of order of the Planck energy scale, i.e. M{sub P} ∼ 10{sup 18}GeV. We will see that after a short period of time, inflation enters in the slow-roll regime that its energy scale is of order M{sub P}/100 ∼ 10{sup 16}GeV and the horizon exit takes place in this energy scale. We also examine an idea in our non-canonical model to overcome the central drawback of intermediate inflation which is the fact that inflation never ends. We solve this problem without disturbing significantly the nature of the intermediate inflation until the time of horizon exit.

  11. Language in use intermediate : classroom book

    CERN Document Server

    Doff, Adrian

    1995-01-01

    ach of the four levels comprises about 80 hours of class work, with additional time for the self-study work. The Teacher's Book contains all the pages from the Classroom Book, with interleaved teaching notes including optional activities to cater for different abilities. There is a video to accompany the Beginner, Pre-intermediate and Intermediate levels. Each video contains eight stimulating and entertaining short programmes, as well as a booklet of photocopiable activities. Free test material is available in booklet and web format for Beginner and Pre-intermediate levels. Visit www.cambridge.org/elt/liu or contact your local Cambridge University Press representative.

  12. Language in use intermediate : teacher's book

    CERN Document Server

    Doff, Adrian

    1998-01-01

    Each of the four levels comprises about 80 hours of class work, with additional time for the self-study work. The Teacher's Book contains all the pages from the Classroom Book, with interleaved teaching notes including optional activities to cater for different abilities. There is a video to accompany the Beginner, Pre-intermediate and Intermediate levels. Each video contains eight stimulating and entertaining short programmes, as well as a booklet of photocopiable activities. Free test material is available in booklet and web format for Beginner and Pre-intermediate levels. Visit www.cambridge.org/elt/liu or contact your local Cambridge University Press representative.

  13. Interference scattering effects on intermediate resonance absorption at operating temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, R.

    1975-01-01

    Resonance integrals may be accurately calculated using the intermediate resonance (IR) approximation. Results are summarized for the case of an absorber with given potential scattering cross sections and interference scattering parameter admixed with a non absorbing moderator of given cross section and located in a narrow resonance moderating medium. From the form of the IR solutions, it is possible to make some general observations about effects of interference scattering on resonance absorption. 2 figures

  14. Magnetic re-entrance in intermediate valence compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allub, R.; Machiavelli, O.; Balseiro, C.; Alascio, B.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility is explored of magnetic re-entrance in intermediate valence compounds. Using a simplified Anderson-Lattice model the pressure-temperature magnetic phase diagram is obtained. This diagram shows that for some value of the microscopic parameters the temperature induced two transitions (non-magnetic to magnetically ordered to paramagnetic). The magnetization and the average occupation number of the localized state are calculated. Estimations of the observability of the effect in systems like CeAl 2 are made. (author)

  15. Towards the Redefinition of the Global Stratigraphy of Mercury: The Case of Intermediate Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, V.; Rothery, D. A.; Massironi, M.; Ferranti, L.; Mercury Mapping Team

    2018-05-01

    Observations based on an average mapping scale of 1:400k provide context for the redefinition of the global stratigraphy of Mercury. Results show that the Intermediate Plains unit should be re-introduced as an official mappable terrain.

  16. The deterioration of intermediate moisture foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labruza, T. P.

    1971-01-01

    Deteriorative reactions are low and food quality high if intermediate moisture content of a food is held at a water activity of 0.6 to 0.75. Information is of interest to food processing and packaging industry.

  17. Intermediate/Advanced Research Design and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this module is To provide Institutional Researchers (IRs) with an understanding of the principles of advanced research design and the intermediate/advanced statistical procedures consistent with such designs

  18. Simplifying biochemical models with intermediate species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    techniques, we study systematically the effects of intermediate, or transient, species in biochemical systems and provide a simple, yet rigorous mathematical classification of all models obtained from a core model by including intermediates. Main examples include enzymatic and post-translational modification...... systems, where intermediates often are considered insignificant and neglected in a model, or they are not included because we are unaware of their existence. All possible models obtained from the core model are classified into a finite number of classes. Each class is defined by a mathematically simple...... canonical model that characterizes crucial dynamical properties, such as mono- and multistationarity and stability of steady states, of all models in the class. We show that if the core model does not have conservation laws, then the introduction of intermediates does not change the steady...

  19. On intermediate structures in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotter, I.

    1977-01-01

    The conceptions of the nuclear reaction theory are reinvestigated on the basis of the continuum shell model. The correlation of the resonance states via the continuum can lead to intermediate structures in the cross section. (Auth.)

  20. Unfolding a molecular trefoil derived from a zwitterionic metallopeptide to form self-assembled nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ye; Zhou, Ning; Shi, Junfeng; Pochapsky, Susan Sondej; Pochapsky, Thomas C.; Zhang, Bei; Zhang, Xixiang; Xu, Bing

    2015-01-01

    While used extensively by nature to control the geometry of protein structures, and dynamics of proteins, such as self-organization, hydration forces and ionic interactions received less attention for controlling the behaviour of small molecules. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of a novel zwitterionic metallopeptide consisting of a cationic core and three distal anionic groups linked by self-assembling peptide motifs. 2D NMR spectra, total correlated spectroscopy and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, show that the molecule exhibits a three-fold rotational symmetry and adopts a folded conformation in dimethyl sulfoxide due to Coulombic forces. When hydrated in water, the molecule unfolds to act as a self-assembling building block of supramolecular nanostructures. By combining ionic interactions with the unique geometry from metal complex and hydrophobic interactions from simple peptides, we demonstrate a new and effective way to design molecules for smart materials through mimicking a sophisticated biofunctional system using a conformational switch.

  1. Unfolding a molecular trefoil derived from a zwitterionic metallopeptide to form self-assembled nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ye

    2015-02-19

    While used extensively by nature to control the geometry of protein structures, and dynamics of proteins, such as self-organization, hydration forces and ionic interactions received less attention for controlling the behaviour of small molecules. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of a novel zwitterionic metallopeptide consisting of a cationic core and three distal anionic groups linked by self-assembling peptide motifs. 2D NMR spectra, total correlated spectroscopy and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, show that the molecule exhibits a three-fold rotational symmetry and adopts a folded conformation in dimethyl sulfoxide due to Coulombic forces. When hydrated in water, the molecule unfolds to act as a self-assembling building block of supramolecular nanostructures. By combining ionic interactions with the unique geometry from metal complex and hydrophobic interactions from simple peptides, we demonstrate a new and effective way to design molecules for smart materials through mimicking a sophisticated biofunctional system using a conformational switch.

  2. Honeycomb Actuators Inspired by the Unfolding of Ice Plant Seed Capsules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Guiducci

    Full Text Available Plant hydro-actuated systems provide a rich source of inspiration for designing autonomously morphing devices. One such example, the pentagonal ice plant seed capsule, achieves complex mechanical actuation which is critically dependent on its hierarchical organization. The functional core of this actuation system involves the controlled expansion of a highly swellable cellulosic layer, which is surrounded by a non-swellable honeycomb framework. In this work, we extract the design principles behind the unfolding of the ice plant seed capsules, and use two different approaches to develop autonomously deforming honeycomb devices as a proof of concept. By combining swelling experiments with analytical and finite element modelling, we elucidate the role of each design parameter on the actuation of the prototypes. Through these approaches, we demonstrate potential pathways to design/develop/construct autonomously morphing systems by tailoring and amplifying the initial material's response to external stimuli through simple geometric design of the system at two different length scales.

  3. ER Stress Causes Rapid Loss of Intestinal Epithelial Stemness through Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarom Heijmans

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells generate rapidly dividing transit-amplifying cells that have lost the capacity for self-renewal but cycle for a number of times until they exit the cell cycle and undergo terminal differentiation. We know very little of the type of signals that trigger the earliest steps of stem cell differentiation and mediate a stem cell to transit-amplifying cell transition. We show that in normal intestinal epithelium, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and activity of the unfolded protein response (UPR are induced at the transition from stem cell to transit-amplifying cell. Induction of ER stress causes loss of stemness in a Perk-eIF2α-dependent manner. Inhibition of Perk-eIF2α signaling results in stem cell accumulation in organoid culture of primary intestinal epithelium. Our findings show that the UPR plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal epithelial stem cell differentiation.

  4. [Partially unfolded state of lysozyme with a developed secondary structure in dimethylsulfoxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timchenko, A A; Kirkitadze, M D; Prokhorov, D A; Potekhin, S A; Serdiuk, I N

    1996-06-01

    The conformation of a chicken egg lysozyme molecule (dimensions, stoichiometry of its associates, and the degree of helicity) in DMSO was studied by small-angle neutron scattering, dynamic light scattering, and optical rotatory dispersion in the visible region of the spectrum. At high DMSO concentrations (70%), the protein was shown to exist as a dimer. The monomer molecules in the dimer adopt a partially unfolded conformation, with dimensions substantially greater than those in the native state and a high content of secondary structure (the degree of helicity is close to that of native lysozyme). This approach provides a unique possibility to assess the compactness of molecules in associates, which may be very useful in studying protein self-organization.

  5. Semantic Interoperable Electronic Patient Records: The Unfolding of Consensus based Archetypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Rune; Wynn, Rolf; Ellingsen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a status report from a large-scale openEHR-based EPR project from the North Norway Regional Health Authority encouraged by the unfolding of a national repository for openEHR archetypes. Clinicians need to engage in, and be responsible for the production of archetypes. The consensus processes have so far been challenged by a low number of active clinicians, a lack of critical specialties to reach consensus, and a cumbersome review process (3 or 4 review rounds) for each archetype. The goal is to have several clinicians from each specialty as a backup if one is hampered to participate. Archetypes and their importance for structured data and sharing of information has to become more visible for the clinicians through more sharpened information practice.

  6. Counting Unfolding Events in Stretched Helices with Induced Oscillation by Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacabac, Rommel Gaud; Otadoy, Roland

    Correlation measures based on embedded probe fluctuations, single or paired, are now widely used for characterizing the viscoelastic properties of biological samples. However, more robust applications using this technique are still lacking. Considering that the study of living matter routinely demonstrates new and complex phenomena, mathematical and experimental tools for analysis have to catch up in order to arrive at newer insights. Therefore, we derive ways of probing non-equilibrium events in helical biopolymers provided by stretching beyond thermal forces. We generalize, for the first time, calculations for winding turn probabilities to account for unfolding events in single fibrous biopolymers and globular proteins under tensile stretching using twin optical traps. The approach is based on approximating the ensuing probe fluctuations as originating from a damped harmonic oscillator under oscillatory forcing.

  7. Political-pedagogical unfoldings of bilingualism for deaf people: reflexions and directing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Fernandes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The article talks about bilingualism for deaf people, it’s implications in the educational process, as well as in some of the inclusive linguistic politics unfoldings proposed officially from the end of the decade of 1990 for this segment. The sociocultural and linguistic characteristics of the Brazilian deaf people communities are argued and also the importance of the same ones to be known and socially valued. Some lines of direction and challenges are pointed for the access and remaining of the deaf students in the school educational process. Finally, the text reflects about the bilingual education programs for deaf students, considering that these are complex, specially because it crosses economic ideological, cultural contradictory and heterogeneous interests.

  8. Communication: Role of explicit water models in the helix folding/unfolding processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzesi, Ferruccio; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Barducci, Alessandro; Parrinello, Michele

    2016-09-01

    In the last years, it has become evident that computer simulations can assume a relevant role in modelling protein dynamical motions for their ability to provide a full atomistic image of the processes under investigation. The ability of the current protein force-fields in reproducing the correct thermodynamics and kinetics systems behaviour is thus an essential ingredient to improve our understanding of many relevant biological functionalities. In this work, employing the last developments of the metadynamics framework, we compare the ability of state-of-the-art all-atom empirical functions and water models to consistently reproduce the folding and unfolding of a helix turn motif in a model peptide. This theoretical study puts in evidence that the choice of the water models can influence the thermodynamic and the kinetics of the system under investigation, and for this reason cannot be considered trivial.

  9. mtDNA, Metastasis, and the Mitochondrial Unfolded Protein Response (UPRmt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Timothy C; Germain, Doris

    2017-01-01

    While several studies have confirmed a link between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and cancer cell metastasis, much debate remains regarding the nature of the alternations in mtDNA leading to this effect. Meanwhile, the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR mt ) has gained much attention in recent years, with most studies of this pathway focusing on its role in aging. However, the UPR mt has also been studied in the context of cancer. More recent work suggests that rather than a single mutation or alternation, specific combinatorial mtDNA landscapes able to activate the UPR mt may be those that are selected by metastatic cells, while mtDNA landscapes unable to activate the UPR mt do not. This review aims at offering an overview of the confusing literature on mtDNA mutations and metastasis and the more recent work on the UPR mt in this setting.

  10. In-situ spectrometry of {sup 137}Cs in the soil by unfolding method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fueloep, M; Ragan, P [Inst. of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, 833301 Bratislava (Slovakia); Krnac, S [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    This contribution is aimed to the possibility of improving the in-situ gamma spectrometry to be independent on a knowledge about a depth distribution of {sup 137}Cs in soil and sufficiently sensitive for the measurement of the post-Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs at present, as well. The depth distribution of {sup 137}Cs averaged over a large area of soil is obtained by unfolding of the detector responses to primary and in soil forward scattered photons. The proposed method employs detector with and without collimator. The {sup 137}Cs distributions obtained in-situ measurements are analysed, and comparisons are made to the results obtained with soil sampling and with standard in-situ spectrometry, as well. 5 figs., 1 tab., 4 refs.

  11. An iterative method for unfolding time-resolved soft x-ray spectra of laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yongjian; Shen Kexi; Xu Hepin

    1991-01-01

    Dante-recorded temporal waveforms have been unfolded by using Fast Fourier transformation (FFT) and the inverted convolution theorem of Fourier analysis. The conversion of the signals to time-dependent soft x-ray spectra is accomplished on the IBM-PC/XT-286 microcomputer system with the code DTSP including SAND II reported by W.N.Mcelory et al.. An amplitude-limited iterative and periodic smoothing technique has been developed in the code DTSP. Time-resolved soft x-ray spectra with sixteen time-cell, and time-dependent radiation, [T R (t)], have been obtained for hohlraum targets irradiated with laser beams (λ = 1.06 μm) on LF-12 in 1989

  12. In-situ spectrometry of 137Cs in the soil by unfolding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueloep, M.; Ragan, P.; Krnac, S.

    1995-01-01

    This contribution is aimed to the possibility of improving the in-situ gamma spectrometry to be independent on a knowledge about a depth distribution of 137 Cs in soil and sufficiently sensitive for the measurement of the post-Chernobyl 137 Cs at present, as well. The depth distribution of 137 Cs averaged over a large area of soil is obtained by unfolding of the detector responses to primary and in soil forward scattered photons. The proposed method employs detector with and without collimator. The 137 Cs distributions obtained in-situ measurements are analysed, and comparisons are made to the results obtained with soil sampling and with standard in-situ spectrometry, as well. 5 figs., 1 tab., 4 refs

  13. Respiratory epithelial cell responses to cigarette smoke: the unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Steven G

    2012-12-01

    Cigarette smoking exposes the respiratory epithelium to highly toxic, reactive oxygen nitrogen species which damage lung proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the cell organelle in which all secreted and membrane proteins are processed. Accumulation of damaged or misfolded proteins in the ER, a condition termed ER stress, activates a complex cellular process termed the unfolded protein responses (UPR). The UPR acts to restore cellular protein homeostasis by regulating all aspects of protein metabolism including: protein translation and syntheses; protein folding; and protein degradation. However, activation of the UPR may also induce signaling pathways which induce inflammation and cell apoptosis. This review discusses the role of UPR in the respiratory epithelial cell response to cigarette smoke and the pathogenesis of lung diseases like COPD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Blimp-1 controls plasma cell function through regulation of immunoglobulin secretion and the unfolded protein response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, Julie; Shi, Wei; Minnich, Martina; Liao, Yang; Crawford, Simon; Smyth, Gordon K; Kallies, Axel; Busslinger, Meinrad; Nutt, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell differentiation requires silencing of B cell transcription, while establishing antibody-secretory function and long-term survival. The transcription factors Blimp-1 and IRF4 are essential for plasma cell generation, however their function in mature plasma cells has remained elusive. We have found that while IRF4 was essential for plasma cell survival, Blimp-1 was dispensable. Blimp-1-deficient plasma cells retained their transcriptional identity, but lost the ability to secrete antibody. Blimp-1 regulated many components of the unfolded protein response (UPR), including XBP-1 and ATF6. The overlap of Blimp-1 and XBP-1 function was restricted to the UPR, with Blimp-1 uniquely regulating mTOR activity and plasma cell size. Thus, Blimp-1 is required for the unique physiological capacity of plasma cells that enables the secretion of protective antibody. PMID:26779600

  15. Has Banks’ Financial Intermediation Improved in Russia?

    OpenAIRE

    Fungachova, Z.; Solanko, L.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the increasing importance of banks in the Russian economy over the period following the financial crisis of 1998. We use several measures to assess the role of banks in domestic financial intermediation in Russia. The traditional macro-level view is complemented by the analysis of sectoral financial flows as well as by insights from micro-level studies. All of these confirm that banks are becoming increasingly important in financial intermediation. We find ...

  16. Intermediate Inflation or Late Time Acceleration?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    The expansion rate of intermediate inflation lies between the exponential and power law expansion but corresponding accelerated expansion does not start at the onset of cosmological evolution. Present study of intermediate inflation reveals that it admits scaling solution and has got a natural exit form it at a later epoch of cosmic evolution, leading to late time acceleration. The corresponding scalar field responsible for such feature is also found to behave as a tracker field for gravity with canonical kinetic term.

  17. Altered trafficking and unfolded protein response induction as a result of M3 muscarinic receptor impaired N-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Fernandez, Wilber; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Alea, Mileidys Perez; Garcia-Mesa, Yoelvis; Garriga, Pere

    2011-12-01

    The human M(3) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor is present in both the central and peripheral nervous system, and it is involved in the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. We suggested a possible N-glycosylation map for the M(3) muscarinic receptor expressed in COS-7 cells. Here, we examined the role that N-linked glycans play in the folding and in the cell surface trafficking of this receptor. The five potential asparagine-linked glycosylation sites in the muscarinic receptor were mutated and transiently expressed in COS-7 cells. The elimination of N-glycan attachment sites did not affect the cellular expression levels of the receptor. However, proper receptor localization to the plasma membrane was affected as suggested by reduced [(3)H]-N-methylscopolamine binding. Confocal microscopy confirmed this observation and showed that the nonglycosylated receptor was primarily localized in the intracellular compartments. The mutant variant showed an increase in phosphorylation of the α-subunit of eukaryote initiation factor 2, and other well-known endoplasmic reticulum stress markers of the unfolded protein response pathway, which further supports the proposal of the improper intracellular accumulation of the nonglycosylated receptor. The receptor devoid of glycans showed more susceptibility to events that culminate in apoptosis reducing cell viability. Our findings suggest up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax protein, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, and cleavage of caspase-3 effectors. Collectively, our data provide experimental evidence of the critical role that N-glycan chains play in determining muscarinic receptor distribution, localization, as well as cell integrity. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  18. GLP-1 analogs reduce hepatocyte steatosis and improve survival by enhancing the unfolded protein response and promoting macroautophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shvetank Sharma

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a known outcome of hepatosteatosis. Free fatty acids (FFA induce the unfolded protein response (UPR or endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress that may induce apoptosis. Recent data indicate ER stress to be a major player in the progression of fatty liver to more aggressive lesions. Autophagy on the other hand has been demonstrated to be protective against ER stress-induced cell death. We hypothesized that exendin-4 (GLP-1 analog treatment of fat loaded hepatocytes can reduce steatosis by autophagy which leads to reduced ER stress-related hepatocyte apoptosis.Primary human hepatocytes were loaded with saturated, cis- and trans-unsaturated fatty acids (palmitic, oleic and elaidic acid respectively. Steatosis, induced with all three fatty acids, was significantly resolved after exendin-4 treatment. Exendin-4 sustained levels of GRP78 expression in fat-loaded cells when compared to untreated fat-loaded cells alone. In contrast, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein; the penultimate protein that leads to ER stress-related cell death was significantly decreased by exendin-4 in hepatocytes loaded with fatty acids. Finally, exendin-4 in fat loaded hepatocytes clearly promoted gene products associated with macroautophagy as measured by enhanced production of both Beclin-1 and LC3B-II, markers for autophagy; and visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Similar observations were made in mouse liver lysates after mice were fed with high fat high fructose diet and treated with a long acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide.GLP-1 proteins appear to protect hepatocytes from fatty acid-related death by prohibition of a dysfunctional ER stress response; and reduce fatty acid accumulation, by activation of both macro-and chaperone-mediated autophagy. These findings provide a novel role for GLP-1 proteins in halting the progression of more aggressive lesions from underlying steatosis in humans afflicted with NAFLD.

  19. Nuclear structure at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, B.E.; Mutchler, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: Σdegree C Spin Transfer Experiment; Strangeness Production in Heavy Ion Collisions; Search for a J PC Exotic Hybrid Meson; Antiproton-Nucleus Interactions; Single Pion Production in np Scattering; Two-and Three-Spin Measurements in pp-pp; Proton-Deuteron Elastic Scattering at 800 MeV Two- and Three-Spin Observables; pp Elastic Absolute Cross-Section Measurements; Single Pion Production in np Scattering; Photojets from Nuclei; CCD Development; Computer Acquisition and Computer Software

  20. Sodium 4-Phenylbutyrate Attenuates Myocardial Reperfusion Injury by Reducing the Unfolded Protein Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatori, Osamu; Usui, Soichiro; Okajima, Masaki; Kaneko, Shuichi; Ootsuji, Hiroshi; Takashima, Shin-Ichiro; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Murai, Hisayoshi; Furusho, Hiroshi; Takamura, Masayuki

    2017-05-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) plays a pivotal role in ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in various organs such as heart, brain, and liver. Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) reportedly acts as a chemical chaperone that reduces UPR. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of PBA on reducing the UPR and protecting against myocardial I/R injury in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 30-minute myocardial I/R, and were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (as a vehicle) or PBA. At 4 hours after reperfusion, mice treated with PBA had reduced serum cardiac troponin I levels and numbers of apoptotic cells in left ventricles (LVs) in myocardial I/R. Infarct size had also reduced in mice treated with PBA at 48 hours after reperfusion. At 2 hours after reperfusion, UPR markers, including eukaryotic initiation of the factor 2α-subunit, activating transcription factor-6, inositol-requiring enzyme-1, glucose-regulated protein 78, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein, and caspase-12, were significantly increased in mice treated with vehicle compared to sham-operated mice. Administration of PBA significantly reduced the I/R-induced increases of these markers. Cardiac function and dimensions were assessed at 21 days after I/R. Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate dedicated to the improvement of cardiac parameters deterioration including LV end-diastolic diameter and LV fractional shortening. Consistently, PBA reduced messenger RNA expression levels of cardiac remodeling markers such as collagen type 1α1, brain natriuretic peptide, and α skeletal muscle actin in LV at 21 days after I/R. Unfolded protein response mediates myocardial I/R injury. Administration of PBA reduces the UPR, apoptosis, infarct size, and preserved cardiac function. Hence, PBA may be a therapeutic option to attenuate myocardial I/R injury in clinical practice.