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Sample records for unexplained abdominal symptoms

  1. Medically Unexplained Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overview of three specific MUS’s: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome and discusses things you can do to minimize the symptoms and improve your quality of life. It is possible that these syndromes can all ...

  2. Laparoscopy in unexplained abdominal pain: surgeon's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, M.T.; Waqar, S.H.; Zahid, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Unexplained abdominal pain is a common but difficult presenting feature faced by the clinicians. Such patients can undergo a number of investigations with failure to reach any diagnosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of laparoscopy in the diagnosis and management of patients with unexplained abdominal pain. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences Islamabad from January 2009 to December 2013. This study included 91 patients of unexplained abdominal pain not diagnosed by routine clinical examination and investigations. These patients were subjected to diagnostic laparoscopy for evaluation of their conditions and to confirm the diagnosis. These patients presented 43% of patients undergoing investigations for abdominal pain. Patients diagnosed with gynaecological problems were excluded to see surgeon's perspective. The findings and the outcomes of the laparoscopy were recorded and data was analyzed. Results: Unexplained abdominal pain is common in females than in males. The most common laparoscopic findings were abdominal tuberculosis followed by appendicitis. Ninety percent patients achieved pain relief after laparoscopic intervention. Conclusion: Laparoscopy is both beneficial and safe in majority of patients with unexplained abdominal pain. General surgeons should acquire training and experience in laparoscopic surgery to provide maximum benefit to these difficult patients. (author)

  3. Unexplained lower abdominal pain associated with sacroiliac joint dysfunction: report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Daijiro; Isu, Toyohiko; Kim, Kyongsong; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Isobe, Masanori

    2011-01-01

    A 25-year-old woman and a 31-year-old man presented with chronic lower back pain and unexplained lower abdominal pain. Both patients had groin tenderness at the medial border of the anterior superior iliac spine. The results of radiographical and physical examinations suggested sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Sacroiliac joint injection relieved their symptoms, including groin tenderness. In our experience, groin tenderness is highly specific for sacroiliac joint dysfunction. We speculate that spasm of the iliac muscle can cause groin pain and tenderness. Groin pain and a history of unexplained abdominal pain, with lower back pain, are symptoms that suggest sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Additionally, compression of the iliac muscle is a simple and useful maneuver; therefore, it can be used as a screening test for sacroiliac joint dysfunction, alongside other provocation tests.

  4. The resource utilisation of medically unexplained physical symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: As patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms may present frequently to hospital settings and receive potentially unnecessary investigations and treatments, we aimed to assess the frequency and type of medically unexplained physical symptoms presentations to clinical services and estimate the associated direct healthcare costs. Methods: This study was undertaken at the largest district health board in New Zealand. All patients with a diagnosed presentation of medically unexplained physical symptoms in 2013 were identified using the district health board’s clinical coding system. The clinical records (medical and psychiatric of 49 patients were examined in detail to extricate all medically unexplained physical symptoms–related secondary care activity within 6 months before or after their medically unexplained physical symptoms presentation. Standardised national costing methodology was used to calculate the associated healthcare costs. Results: In all, 49% of patients attended hospital settings at least twice during 2013. The majority of presentations were for neurological or respiratory concerns. The total cost for the sample was GBP89,636 (median: GBP1,221. Costs were most significant in the areas of inpatient admissions and emergency care. Conclusion: Medically unexplained physical symptoms result in frequent presentations to hospital settings. The costs incurred are substantial and comparable to the costs of chronic medical conditions with identifiable pathology. Improving recognition and management of medically unexplained physical symptoms has potential to offer more appropriate and cost-effective healthcare outcomes.

  5. Patients with persistent medically unexplained physical symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A, Aamland; Malterud, Kirsti; Werner, E.

    2014-01-01

    for all variables and split analysis on gender and age. RESULTS: The GPs registered 526 patients among their total of 17 688 consultations, giving a consultation prevalence of persistent MUPS of 3%. The mean age of patients was 46 years, and 399 (76%) were women. The most frequent group of symptoms...... was musculoskeletal problems, followed by asthenia/fatigue. There was no significant gender difference in symptom pattern. Almost half of the patients were currently working (45%), significantly more men. The major GP management strategy was supportive counseling. CONCLUSION: A consultation prevalence rate of 3......% implies that patients with persistent MUPS are common in general practice. Our study disclosed heterogeneity among the patients such as differences in employment status, which emphasizes the importance of personalized focus rather than unsubstantiated stereotyping of "MUPS patients" as a group....

  6. Unexplained right upper quadrant abdominal pain? do not forget the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Right upper quadrant abdominal pain is a common reason for consulting a gastroenterologist. Commonly, it portends pathological processes occurring in the liver, gall bladder, or the gut however, unusual causes have been reported. We report cervical intervertebral disc prolapse causing right upper quadrant ...

  7. ''Medically unexplained" symptoms and symptom disorders in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Marianne; Hartman, Tim C. Olde; Aamland, Aase

    2017-01-01

    that better supports clinical decision-making, creates clearer communication and provides scientific underpinning of research to ensure effective interventions. Discussion: We propose a classification of symptoms that places greater emphasis on prognostic factors. Prognosis-based classification aims...

  8. Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms in Military Health (Symptomes physiques medicalement inexpliques dans la sante militaire)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    REPORT TR-HFM-175 Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms in Military Health (Symptômes physiques médicalement inexpliqués dans la santé militaire...STO TECHNICAL REPORT TR-HFM-175 Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms in Military Health (Symptômes physiques médicalement inexpliqués dans...The General Internist 10-7 10.5.1 The Health Psychologist 10-8 10.5.2 Medical Specialists 10-8 10.5.3 The Physiatrist 10-9 10.5.4 The Physical

  9. The cross-sectional relation between medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) and the Cortisol Awakening Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen-van Dessel, Nikki; van der Wouden, Johannes C.; Dekker, Joost; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.; van der Horst, Henriette E.

    Objectives: We aimed to assess the cross-sectional relation between levels of cortisol and specific symptom clusters, symptom severity and duration of symptoms in patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS). Methods: Baseline data of a cohort of MUPS patients were used. We chose the

  10. Identity work and illness careers of patients with medically unexplained symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossen, Camilla Blach; Buus, Niels; Stenager, Elsebeth

    2018-01-01

    often experience being met with mistrust and feel their identity threatened as a consequence of being illegitimately ill. There is a strong tendency in health care towards assessment thorough standardized so-called assessment packages. The study used a case study approach. Ethnographic fieldwork......This article reports a case study of the illness career and identity work of patients who have had medically unexplained symptoms for many years with a particular emphasis on their interactions with a specialized and standardized health care system. Patients with medically unexplained symptoms...... assessment with limited time can lead to a diagnostic limbo and that patients and health care professionals keep on searching for legitimate explanations for the patients' still unexplained symptoms. Consequently the patients were left in a constant identity negotiation....

  11. Frequency of Medically Unexplained Symptoms in Homeopathy References of

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    Yavari M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: 25-50 percent of all patients who are visited by GPs, have complains that are not medically explained. Their management is a challenge for GPs. In homeopathy (a method of alternative medicine these symptoms are important for selection of remedies and in an effort to treat them. This study aimed at describing this existing situation by investigating the frequency of such complaints in the patients under study.Methods: This study is a cross-sectional study conducted in Isfahan in 2008 on 240 Patients who were visited in some of the clinics affiliated to Isfahan university of medical sciences. The patients were selected by convenient method. Data were gathered by the questionnaire and analyzed via SPSS 13.5 software using Chi-Square test.Results: Out of 240 patients, 150 were women (%65.4 and 90 were men(34.6%. 75.4 percent were 20-40 years old. 1.7 percent had no symptoms, 31.3 had 1-5 symptoms and 40.8 percent had 6-10 symptoms. The females had more symptoms than males. Symptoms of mind, GI, sleep and miscellaneous ones were 81.3, 80.4, 72.1 and 87.1 percent, respectively. The most frequent symptoms in each group were intrusive thought, salivation in sleep, waking frequently and dyspnea wearing tight collared clothes. Only 10.97 percent of patient referred to the physicians for these symptoms.Conclusion: The symptoms registered in homeopathy references have notable prevalence in the society but most of people with such symptoms will not go to a doctor for examination and treatment Therefore, it is very important to carry out more research regarding these symptoms. General population should receive more information and physicians, in turn, should use appropriate methods of therapy for treating these patients.

  12. Why reassurance fails in patients with unexplained symptoms--an experimental investigation of remembered probabilities.

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    Winfried Rief

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Providing reassurance is one of physicians' most frequently used verbal interventions. However, medical reassurance can fail or even have negative effects. This is frequently the case in patients with medically unexplained symptoms. It is hypothesized that these patients are more likely than patients from other groups to incorrectly recall the likelihoods of medical explanations provided by doctors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Thirty-three patients with medically unexplained symptoms, 22 patients with major depression, and 30 healthy controls listened to an audiotaped medical report, as well as to two control reports. After listening to the reports, participants were asked to rate what the doctor thinks the likelihood is that the complaints are caused by a specific medical condition. Although the doctor rejected most of the medical explanations for the symptoms in his verbal report, the patients with medically unexplained complaints remembered a higher likelihood for medical explanations for their symptoms. No differences were found between patients in the other groups, and for the control conditions. When asked to imagine that the reports were applicable to themselves, patients with multiple medical complaints reported more concerns about their health state than individuals in the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians should be aware that patients with medically unexplained symptoms recall the likelihood of medical causes for their complaints incorrectly. Therefore, physicians should verify correct understanding by using check-back questions and asking for summaries, to improve the effect of reassurance.

  13. Unexplained somatic symptoms during major depression: prevalence and clinical impact in a national sample of Italian psychiatric outpatients.

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    Perugi, Giulio; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Carbonato, Paolo; Mencacci, Claudio; Muscettola, Giovanni; Pani, Luca; Torta, Riccardo; Vampini, Claudio; Fornaro, Michele; Parazzini, Fabio; Dumitriu, Arina

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and impact of unexplained somatic symptoms during major depression. A total of 560 consecutive outpatients with a major depressive episode according to the DSM-IV (text revision) were evaluated in 30 psychiatric facilities throughout Italy. 'Unexplained' somatic symptoms were evaluated using the 30-item Somatic Symptoms Checklist (SSCL-30). Somatic symptoms were considered explained if they were best accounted for as coming from a concomitant physical illness or side effects. Patients evaluated their own mood symptomatology using the Zung questionnaires for depression and anxiety and the Hypomania Checklist-32. According to the SSCL-30, only 90 subjects (16.1%) had no unexplained somatic symptoms, while 231 (41.3%) had 1-5 unexplained symptoms and 239 (42.7%) had more than 5. Asthenia was the most commonly observed unexplained somatic symptom (53% of patients). Unexplained somatic symptoms were more common in females and among those suffering from major depression and depression not otherwise specified rather than in patients with recurrent major depression and bipolar disorders. No relationship between unexplained somatic symptoms and hypomanic features was observed. The presence of a large number of unexplained somatic symptoms is associated with more severe depression and higher rates of misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Big Five personality traits and medically unexplained symptoms in later life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van S. D. M.; Hanssen, D. J. C.; Naarding, P.; Lucassen, P.; Comijs, H.; Voshaar, R. Oude

    2016-01-01

    Background: Personality dysfunction has been postulated as the most clinically salient problem of persons suffering from medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) but empirical studies are scarce. This study aims to compare the personality profile of older patients suffering from MUS with two comparison

  15. Screening for primary creatine deficiencies in French patients with unexplained neurological symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheillan, D.; Curt, M.J.; Briand, G.; Salomons, G.S.; Mention-Mulliez, K.; Dobbelaere, D.; Cuisset, J.M.; Lion-Francois, L.; Portes, V.D.; Chabli, A.; Valayannopoulos, V.; Benoist, J.F.; Pinard, J.M.; Simard, G.; Douay, O.; Deiva, K.; Afenjar, A.; Heron, D.; Rivier, F.; Chabrol, B.; Prieur, F.; Cartault, F.; Pitelet, G.; Goldenberg, A.; Bekri, S.; Gerard, M.; Delorme, R.; Tardieu, M.; Porchet, N.; Vianey-Saban, C.; Vamecq, J.

    2012-01-01

    A population of patients with unexplained neurological symptoms from six major French university hospitals was screened over a 28-month period for primary creatine disorder (PCD). Urine guanidinoacetate (GAA) and creatine:creatinine ratios were measured in a cohort of 6,353 subjects to identify PCD

  16. Patients with persistent medically unexplained physical symptoms: A descriptive study from Norwegian general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Aamland, Aase; Malterud, Kirsti; Werner, Erik L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Further research on effective interventions for patients with peristent Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (MUPS) in general practice is needed. Prevalence estimates of such patients are conflicting, and other descriptive knowledge is needed for development and evaluation of effective future interventions. In this study, we aimed to estimate the consultation prevalence of patients with persistent MUPS in general practice, including patients’ characteristics and...

  17. Medically unexplained physical symptoms: toward an alternative paradigm for diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballas, Christos A; Staab, Jeffrey P

    2003-12-01

    The treatment of patients with unexplained medical symptoms is difficult because there is neither a clear etiology for the symptoms, nor a useful paradigm with which to understand and treat them. Patients with such symptoms are often referred to psychiatry with vague diagnoses of "somatization" or "hypochondriasis." Rather than considering somatoform diagnoses based on the number or diversity of physical symptoms, evolving research suggests an emphasis on the type of physical symptom as an indicator of Axis I pathology. This article links specific symptomatic complaints, such as chronic pain, chest pain, and dizziness, to the respective Axis I disorders associated with them, such as depression, panic disorder, and anxiety disorders.

  18. Functional status in patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms : Coping styles and their relationship with depression and anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sempértegui, Gabriela A; Karreman, A.; van Hout, G.C.M.; Bekker, M.H.J.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined how coping styles are related to functional status in patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms and to what extent depression and anxiety account for this relationship. In 90 Dutch adult patients presenting medically unexplained physical symptoms, coping styles,

  19. General practitioners' views on reattribution for patients with medically unexplained symptoms: a questionnaire and qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmon Peter

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The successful introduction of new methods for managing medically unexplained symptoms in primary care is dependent to a large degree on the attitudes, experiences and expectations of practitioners. As part of an exploratory randomised controlled trial of reattribution training, we sought the views of participating practitioners on patients with medically unexplained symptoms, and on the value of and barriers to the implementation of reattribution in practice. Methods A nested attitudinal survey and qualitative study in sixteen primary care teams in north-west England. All practitioners participating in the trial (n = 74 were invited to complete a structured survey. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a purposive sub-sample of survey respondents, using a structured topic guide. Interview transcripts were used to identify key issues, concepts and themes, which were grouped to construct a conceptual framework: this framework was applied systematically to the data. Results Seventy (95% of study participants responded to the survey. Survey respondents often found it stressful to work with patients with medically unexplained symptoms, though those who had received reattribution training were more optimistic about their ability to help them. Interview participants trained in reattribution (n = 12 reported that reattribution increased their confidence to practice in a difficult area, with heightened awareness, altered perceptions of these patients, improved opportunities for team-building and transferable skills. However general practitioners also reported potential barriers to the implementation of reattribution in routine clinical practice, at the level of the patient, the doctor, the consultation, diagnosis and the healthcare context. Conclusion Reattribution training increases practitioners' sense of competence in managing patients with medically unexplained symptoms. However, barriers to its implementation are

  20. Confusion and abdominal symptoms following a rugby tackle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides, Demetris; Davies, Madeleine; Kluzek, Stefan

    2017-09-23

    A 19-year-old man was sent to the emergency department following a pitch-side assessment for suspected concussion, unexplained upper abdominal tenderness and vomiting, following a high-impact tackle during a rugby match. A Focussed Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) scan performed in the emergency department suggested intra-abdominal free fluid, and subsequent head and abdominal CT imaging showed no intracranial lesion but confirmed a significant haemoperitoneum due to large splenic tear and bleeding. An emergency splenectomy was performed, which confirmed the rupture of an enlarged spleen with blood loss of almost 2 L into the peritoneal cavity. The patient made a full recovery following surgery. A subsequent histological examination revealed granulomatous inflammation characteristic of infectious mononucleosis. This unique case illustrates that physically fit patients with early hypovolaemic shock can present with symptoms mimicking concussion. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Allergic Mastocytic Gastroenteritis and Colitis: An Unexplained Etiology in Chronic Abdominal Pain and Gastrointestinal Dysmotility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Akhavein M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pain, bloating, early satiety, and changes in bowel habits are common presenting symptoms in individuals with functional GI disorders. Emerging data suggests that these symptoms may be associated with mast cell excess and/or mast cell instability in the GI tract. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the contribution of mast cells to the aforementioned symptoms in individuals with a history of atopic disease. A retrospective chart review of individuals seen in a university GI practice was conducted and twenty-four subjects were identified. The majority had abdominal pain, early satiety, and nocturnal awakening. 66.7% and 37.5% had a history of environmental and/or food allergy. Solid gastric emptying was increased as were the mean number of mast cells reported on biopsies from the stomach, small bowel, and colon (>37/hpf by CD117 staining. Mean whole blood histamine levels were uniformly elevated. This study suggests that in individuals with these characteristics, consideration should be given to staining their gastrointestinal biopsies for mast cells as this may provide them with relatively non-toxic but highly targeted treatment options. Allergic gastroenteritis and colitis may represent a third type of GI mast cell disorder along with mast cell activation syndrome and mastocytic enterocolitis.

  2. Opinion paper: the role of work in the management of medically unexplained physical symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobback, Els; Mariman, An; Clauwaert, Lies; Godderis, Lode; Heytens, Stefan; Ruppol, Patrick; Spooren, Daniel; Tytgat, Rita; De Muynck, Martine; Vogelaers, Dirk

    2018-05-04

    Patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms suffer from chronic fatigue and/or pain in combination with a variety of other symptoms. A flexible, biopsychosocial approach is needed for diagnostic screening and global management. It is crucial to involve the direct patient environment, including family, friends, colleagues as well as health providers, evaluation, and reintegration sector. The aim of this paper is to review the importance of work in the management of medically unexplained physical symptoms. In this paper, different actors involved explain their views and handling concerning work in the management of MUPS. Symptom severity and lack of understanding from the environment can negatively impact on earning an independent income from labor for years. Work, whether or not paid, is however, an important life domain with positive effects on physical, psychological, and social well-being. Therefore, health actors are pivotal in starting the professional reintegration process as soon as possible and should discuss this item from the early stage onward. Support services can be consulted in mutual interaction as required. A case manager, acting as a central intermediator within this multidisciplinary approach, may promote effective communication and coordination between the patients and their surrounding actors. The professional reintegration process should start as soon as possible within the management of medically unexplained physical symptoms. As such, the care sector, the evaluation sector, and the professional integration sector should collaborate and effectively communicate with each other.

  3. Medically unexplained physical symptoms, misunderstood and wrongly treated? A semiotic perspective on chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busvold, Kari Irene H; Bondevik, Hilde

    2018-06-01

    Medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) are a significant and increasing health issue in the western world. Chronic pain constitutes a considerable element of these symptoms, and the lack of a biomedical explanation of their cause challenges the clinical encounter. The limitations of biomedicine become evident in these encounters and expose the need for an expanded understanding of body and symptom. Semiotics, as an anti-dualistic meta-theory, closes the gap between natural science and the humanities and views the human body in an evolutionary and existential perspective. By focusing on interpretation and communication of signs as ongoing processes at all levels of life, biology and experience, the subjective and the measurable will be integrated. A special type of sign, the self-referential, is part of the body's internal communication. These signs may be viewed as the body's warnings to itself, for instance when the individual's consciousness, thought and action run counter to the organism's physiological and psychological needs. In a semiotic perspective, existential conditions may also activate the body's defense systems. In this context, the unexplained pain may be understood as a functional warning sign. The enhanced understanding of body and symptom that a semiotic approach calls for is relevant for the work of physiotherapists and may lead to more constructive clinical encounters with patients with unexplained chronic pain.

  4. Blame, shame and hopelessness: medically unexplained symptoms and the 'heartsink' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Louise

    2014-04-01

    'Heartsink' patients present a moral dilemma. We recognise their suffering, but at the same time struggle with the feelings they trigger in us. Patients also experience negative feelings. Without a diagnosis they lack a narrative or vocabulary to make sense of their own suffering. This article explores some of the challenges faced and strategies utilised when managing patients with medically unexplained symptoms. Doctors and patients often experience frustration and helplessness in consultations around medically unexplained symptoms. Without a diagnosis, patients lack social legitimacy as 'sick' people with 'real' illnesses. They often describe feeling blamed for their own distress. Because of this, they can experience deep feelings of worthlessness and shame. Patients with a history of abuse can be particularly vulnerable. Management includes validating their suffering, helping them construct appropriate explanations for their distress and providing empathic interpersonal care, while minimising the risk of iatrogenic harm.

  5. Primary care consultations about medically unexplained symptoms: how do patients indicate what they want?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Peter; Ring, Adele; Humphris, Gerry M; Davies, John C; Dowrick, Christopher F

    2009-04-01

    Patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUS) are often thought to deny psychological needs when they consult general practitioners (GPs) and to request somatic intervention instead. We tested predictions from the contrasting theory that they are transparent in communicating their psychological and other needs. To test predictions that what patients tell GPs when they consult about MUS is related transparently to their desire for (1) emotional support, (2) symptom explanation and (3) somatic intervention. Prospective naturalistic study. Before consultation, patients indicated what they wanted from it using a self-report questionnaire measuring patients' desire for: emotional support, explanation and reassurance, and physical investigation and treatment. Their speech during consultation was audio-recorded, transcribed and coded utterance-by-utterance. Multilevel regression analysis tested relationships between what patients sought and what they said. Patients (N = 326) consulting 33 GPs about symptoms that the GPs designated as MUS. Patients who wanted emotional support spoke more about psychosocial problems, including psychosocial causes of symptoms and their need for psychosocial help. Patients who wanted explanation and reassurance suggested more physical explanations, including diseases, but did not overtly request explanation. Patients' wish for somatic intervention was associated only with their talk about details of such interventions and not with their requests for them. In general, patients with medically unexplained symptoms provide many cues to their desire for emotional support. They are more indirect or guarded in communicating their desire for explanation and somatic intervention.

  6. An experiential mind-body approach to the management of medically unexplained symptoms.

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    Bakal, D; Steiert, M; Coll, P; Schaefer, J

    2006-01-01

    This article outlines an experiential mind-body framework for understanding and treating patients with medically unexplained symptoms. The model relies on somatic awareness, a normal part of consciousness, to resolve the mind-body dualism inherent in conventional multidisciplinary approaches. Somatic awareness represents a guiding healing heuristic which allows for a linear treatment application of the biopsychosocial model. The heuristic acknowledges the validity of the patient's physical symptoms and identifies psychological and social factors needed for the healing process. Somatic awareness is used to direct changes in coping styles, illness beliefs, medication dependence and personal dynamics that are necessary to achieve symptom control. The mind-body concept is consistent with and supported by neurobiological models which draw on central nervous system mechanisms to explain medically unexplained symptoms. The concept is also supported by a recent hypothesis concerning the role peripheral connective tissue may play in influencing illness and well-being. Finally, somatic awareness is described as having potential to enhance understanding and conscious use of inner healing mechanisms at the basis of the placebo effect.

  7. Experiences of sickness absence, marginality and Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms - A focus group study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E.L., Werner; A, Aamland; Malterud, Kirsti

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) form a major cause of sickness absence. The purpose of this study was to explore factors which may influence further marginalization among patients with MUPS on long-term sickness absence. METHODS: Two focus-group discussions were conducted...... of objective findings were perceived as an additional burden to the sickness absence itself. Factors that could counteract further marginalization were a supportive social network, positive coping strategies such as keeping to the daily schedule and physical activity, and positive attention and confidence from...

  8. Medically unexplained symptom reports are associated with a decreased response to the rubber hand illusion.

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    Miles, Eleanor; Poliakoff, Ellen; Brown, Richard J

    2011-10-01

    Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) have been hypothesized to result from a distortion in perception, whereby top-down factors influence the process of body representation. Perceptual illusions provide a novel method of investigating this hypothesis. This study aimed to investigate whether self-reported unexplained symptoms are associated with altered experience of the rubber hand illusion (RHI). A non-clinical MUS group with high scores on the Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ), and a control group with low scores on this scale, were exposed to the RHI. Illusion experience was measured by self-reports and by proprioceptive alteration. After controlling for somatosensory amplification and trait anxiety, the low-SDQ group responded significantly more strongly to the RHI on both questionnaire and proprioceptive measures of the illusion. In contrast, the high-SDQ group scored significantly higher on the Perceptual Aberrations Scale, a measure of bodily distortions in daily life. These findings support the proposed link between MUS and disturbances in body representation, and suggest that a decreased reliance on current sensory inputs may contribute to symptom experience in susceptible individuals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The black box in somatization: unexplained physical symptoms, culture, and narratives of trauma.

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    Waitzkin, H; Magaña, H

    1997-09-01

    Stimulated by our clinical work with patients who manifest unexplained "somatoform" symptoms in the primary care setting, this article addresses a theoretical black box in our understanding of somatization: how does culture mediate severe stress to produce symptoms that cannot be explained by the presence of physical illness? Despite various problems in his explanation of hysteria, Freud broke new ground by emphasizing narratives of traumatic experiences in the development and treatment of unexplained physical symptoms. Except in anthropologically oriented cultural psychiatry, contemporary psychiatry has traveled away from a focus on narrative in the study of somatization. On the other hand, recent interest in narrative has spread across many intellectual disciplines, including the humanities and literary criticism, psychology, history, anthropology, and sociology. We operationally define narratives as attempts at storytelling that portray the interrelationships among physical symptoms and the psychologic, social, or cultural context of these symptoms. Regarding somatization and trauma, we focus on the ways that narrative integrates the cultural context with traumatic life events. In explaining the black box, we postulate that extreme stress (torture, rape, witnessing deaths of relatives, forced migration, etc.) is processed psychologically as a terrible, largely incoherent narrative of events too awful to hold in consciousness. Culture patterns the psychologic and somatic expression of the terrible narrative. Methodologically, we have developed some techniques for eliciting narratives of severe stress and somatic symptoms, which we illustrate with observations from an ongoing research project. In designing interventions to improve the care of somatizing patients, we are focusing on the creation of social situations where patients may feel empowered to express more coherent narratives of their prior traumatic experiences.

  10. Negotiating explanations: doctor-patient communication with patients with medically unexplained symptoms-a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Boeft, Madelon; Huisman, Daniëlle; Morton, LaKrista; Lucassen, Peter; van der Wouden, Johannes C; Westerman, Marjan J; van der Horst, Henriëtte E; Burton, Christopher D

    2017-02-01

    Patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) seek explanations for their symptoms, but often find general practitioners (GPs) unable to deliver these. Different methods of explaining MUPS have been proposed. Little is known about how communication evolves around these explanations. To examine the dialogue between GPs and patients related to explanations in a community-based clinic for MUPS. We categorized dialogue types and dialogue outcomes. Patients were ≥18 years with inclusion criteria for moderate MUPS: ≥2 referrals to specialists, ≥1 functional syndrome/symptoms, ≥10 on the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 and GP's judgement that symptoms were unexplained. We analysed transcripts of 112 audio-recorded consultations (39 patients and 5 GPs) from two studies on the Symptoms Clinic Intervention, a consultation intervention for MUPS in primary care. We used constant comparative analysis to code and classify dialogue types and outcomes. We extracted 115 explanation sequences. We identified four dialogue types, differing in the extent to which the GP or patient controlled the dialogue. We categorized eight outcomes of the sequences, ranging from acceptance to rejection by the patient. The most common outcome was holding (conversation suspended in an unresolved state), followed by acceptance. Few explanations were rejected by the patient. Co-created explanations by patient and GP were most likely to be accepted. We developed a classification of dialogue types and outcomes in relation to explanations offered by GPs for MUPS patients. While it requires further validation, it provides a framework, which can be used for teaching, evaluation of practice and research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Sickness absence, marginality, and medically unexplained physical symptoms: a focus-group study of patients' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamland, Aase; Werner, Erik L; Malterud, Kirsti

    2013-06-01

    Medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) form a major cause of sickness absence. The purpose of this study was to explore factors which may influence further marginalization among patients with MUPS on long-term sickness absence. Two focus-group discussions were conducted with a purposive sample of 12 participants, six men and six women, aged 24-59 years. Their average duration of sickness absence was 10.5 months. Participants were invited to share stories about experiences from the process leading to the ongoing sickness absence, with a focus on the causes being medically unexplained. Systematic text condensation was applied for analysis. Inspired by theories of marginalization and coping, the authors searched for knowledge of how patients' positive resources can be mobilized to counteract processes of marginality. Analysis revealed how invisible symptoms and lack of objective findings were perceived as an additional burden to the sickness absence itself. Factors that could counteract further marginalization were a supportive social network, positive coping strategies such as keeping to the daily schedule and physical activity, and positive attention and confidence from professionals. Confidence from both personal and professional contacts is crucial. GPs have an important and appreciated role in this aspect.

  12. Covert video monitoring in the assessment of medically unexplained symptoms in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Dustin P; Sim, Leslie A; Harrison, Tracy E; Bruce, Barbara K; Harbeck-Weber, Cynthia

    2012-04-01

    Diagnosis of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) occurs after thorough evaluations have failed to identify a physiological cause for symptoms. However, families and providers may wonder if something has been missed, leading to reduced confidence in behavioral treatment. Confidence may be improved through the use of technology such as covert video monitoring to better assess functioning across settings. A 12-year-old male presented with progressive neurological decline, precipitated by chronic pain. After thorough evaluation and the failure of standard treatments (medical, rehabilitative, and psychological) covert video monitoring revealed that the patient demonstrated greater abilities when alone in his room. Negative reinforcement was used to initiate recovery, accompanied by positive reinforcement and a rehabilitative approach. Covert video monitoring assisted in three subsequent cases over the following 3 years. In certain complex cases, video monitoring can inform the assessment and treatment of MUS. Discussion includes ethical and practical considerations.

  13. Big Five personality traits and medically unexplained symptoms in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, S D M; Hanssen, D; Naarding, P; Lucassen, P; Comijs, H; Oude Voshaar, R

    2016-10-01

    Personality dysfunction has been postulated as the most clinically salient problem of persons suffering from medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) but empirical studies are scarce. This study aims to compare the personality profile of older patients suffering from MUS with two comparison groups and a control group. Ninety-six older patients with MUS were compared with 153 frequent attenders in primary care suffering from medically explained symptoms (MES), 255 patients with a past-month depressive disorder (DSM-IV-TR), and a control group of 125 older persons. The Big Five personality domains (NEO-Five-Factor Inventory) were compared between groups by multiple ANCOVAs adjusted for age, sex, education, partner status and cognitive functioning. Linear regression analyses were applied to examine the association between health anxiety (Whitley Index) and somatization (Brief Symptom Inventory). The four groups differed with respect to neuroticism (Ppersonality profile. Health anxiety and somatization were associated with a higher level of neuroticism and a lower level of extraversion and conscientiousness, irrespective whether the physical symptom was explained or not. Older patients with MUS have a specific personality profile, comparable to MES patients. Health anxiety and somatization may be better indicators of psychopathology than whether a physical symptom is medically explained or not. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Implementing a Psychotherapy Service for Medically Unexplained Symptoms in a Primary Care Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Cooper

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS are known to be costly, complex to manage and inadequately addressed in primary care settings. In many cases, there are unresolved psychological and emotional processes underlying these symptoms, leaving traditional medical approaches insufficient. This paper details the implementation of an evidence-based, emotion-focused psychotherapy service for MUS across two family medicine clinics. The theory and evidence-base for using Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy (ISTDP with MUS is presented along with the key service components of assessment, treatment, education and research. Preliminary outcome indicators showed diverse benefits. Patients reported significantly decreased somatic symptoms in the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (d = 0.4. A statistically significant (23% decrease in family physicians’ visits was found in the 6 months after attending the MUS service compared to the 6 months prior. Both patients and primary care clinicians reported a high degree of satisfaction with the service. Whilst further research is needed, these findings suggest that a direct psychology service maintained within the family practice clinic may assist patient and clinician function while reducing healthcare utilization. Challenges and further service developments are discussed, including the potential benefits of re-branding the service to become a ‘Primary Care Psychological Consultation and Treatment Service’.

  15. Implementing a Psychotherapy Service for Medically Unexplained Symptoms in a Primary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Angela; Abbass, Allan; Town, Joel

    2017-11-29

    Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) are known to be costly, complex to manage and inadequately addressed in primary care settings. In many cases, there are unresolved psychological and emotional processes underlying these symptoms, leaving traditional medical approaches insufficient. This paper details the implementation of an evidence-based, emotion-focused psychotherapy service for MUS across two family medicine clinics. The theory and evidence-base for using Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy (ISTDP) with MUS is presented along with the key service components of assessment, treatment, education and research. Preliminary outcome indicators showed diverse benefits. Patients reported significantly decreased somatic symptoms in the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 ( d = 0.4). A statistically significant (23%) decrease in family physicians' visits was found in the 6 months after attending the MUS service compared to the 6 months prior. Both patients and primary care clinicians reported a high degree of satisfaction with the service. Whilst further research is needed, these findings suggest that a direct psychology service maintained within the family practice clinic may assist patient and clinician function while reducing healthcare utilization. Challenges and further service developments are discussed, including the potential benefits of re-branding the service to become a 'Primary Care Psychological Consultation and Treatment Service'.

  16. Training medical specialists to communicate better with patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS): a randomized, controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiland, A.; Blankenstein, A.H.; Saase, J.L.C.M. van; Molen, H.T. van der; Jacobs, M.E.; Abels, D.C.; Köse, N; Dulmen, S. van; Vernhout, R.M.; Arends, L.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) are prevalent 25–50% in general and specialist care. Medical specialists and residents often find patients without underlying pathology difficult to deal with, whereas patients sometimes don’t feel understood. We developed an

  17. Recognition of patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms by family physicians: results of a focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeft, M. den; Huisman, D.; Wouden, J.C. van der; Numans, M.E.; Horst, H.E. van der; Lucassen, P.L.B.J.; Olde Hartman, T.C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) form a heterogeneous group and frequently attend their family physician (FP). Little is known about how FPs recognize MUPS in their patients. We conducted a focus group study to explore how FPs recognize MUPS and whether they

  18. Improving GP communication in consultations on medically unexplained symptoms: a qualitative interview study with patients in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwen, S. van; Lucassen, P.; Stappers, H.W.; Assendelft, P.J.J.; Dulmen, S. van; Olde Hartman, T.C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many GPs find the care of patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) challenging. Patients themselves are often not satisfied with the care they receive. Aim: To explore the problems patients with MUS experience in communication during consultations, with the aim of improving

  19. The relationship between ataque de nervios and unexplained neurological symptoms: a preliminary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interian, Alejandro; Guarnaccia, Peter J; Vega, William A; Gara, Michael A; Like, Robert C; Escobar, Javier I; Díaz-Martínez, Angélica M

    2005-01-01

    Within somatization, unexplained neurological symptoms (UNSs) have been shown to mark a distinct subgroup with greater clinical severity. However, some UNSs resemble ataque de nervios somatic symptoms. This raises questions about cultural factors related to Hispanics with somatization characterized by UNSs. To examine cultural factors, preliminary analyses examined the relationship between Hispanic ethnicity, UNSs, and ataque de nervios. Data were obtained from 127 primary care patients (95 Hispanic, 32 European American) with somatization. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview provided somatization data, whereas the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders was used for data on Axis I disorders. Ataque de nervios was assessed via a proxy measure. Within each ethnic group, cross-tabs examined the relationship between ataque de nervios and multiple UNSs, and ataque de nervios and selected Axis I disorders. Only among Hispanics, a significant overlap was found between ataque de nervios and having four or more UNSs (p nervios and a diagnosis of panic disorder (p = .05). Although equal percentages of European Americans and Hispanics experience multiple UNSs, these results show that the presentation of UNSs among some Hispanics may be qualitatively different, because it may involve features related to ataque de nervios. A diagnosis of panic disorder also appears to interact with cultural factors.

  20. Illness explanations among patients with medically unexplained symptoms: different idioms for different contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risør, Mette Bech

    2009-09-01

    Patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) are often considered to be strictly confined to thinking about their symptoms as having only a physical etiology. However, several studies have shown, that the patients also apply other explanations for their sufferings. The aim of this study is to analyse the social construction of illness explanations among patients with MUS, and to illustrate the use of explanatory idioms as being dependent on space, time and setting, legitimizing each idiom. The study is based on repeated, semi-structured, qualitative interviews with nine informants during a period of 1.5 years. A thematic content analysis was performed on a pragmatic and phenomenological basis. We found, that patients with MUS employ at least four different explanatory idioms defined as: (1) the symptomatic idiom; (2) the personal idiom; (3) the social idiom; and (4) the moral idiom. All idioms play an important role in the process of creating meaning in the patients' everyday life. The symptomatic idiom is mainly used at clinical consultations in primary care, but it is not the only idiom of significance for the patients. Simultaneously other idioms exist and gradually become important for especially patients with MUS due to the lack of valid diagnoses and treatment opportunities. Clinical settings, however, call for the employment of the symptomatic idiom and a discrepancy is found between the general practitioners' notion of the bio-psycho-social model and the patients' everyday life idioms.

  1. Patients with persistent medically unexplained physical symptoms: a descriptive study from Norwegian general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamland, Aase; Malterud, Kirsti; Werner, Erik L

    2014-05-29

    Further research on effective interventions for patients with peristent Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (MUPS) in general practice is needed. Prevalence estimates of such patients are conflicting, and other descriptive knowledge is needed for development and evaluation of effective future interventions. In this study, we aimed to estimate the consultation prevalence of patients with persistent MUPS in general practice, including patients' characteristics and symptom pattern, employment status and use of social benefits, and the general practitioners' (GPs) management strategy. During a four-week period the participating Norwegian GPs (n=84) registered all consultations with patients who met a strict definition of MUPS (>3 months duration and function loss), using a questionnaire with simple tick-off questions. Analyses were performed with descriptive statistics for all variables and split analysis on gender and age. The GPs registered 526 patients among their total of 17 688 consultations, giving a consultation prevalence of persistent MUPS of 3%. The mean age of patients was 46 years, and 399 (76%) were women. The most frequent group of symptoms was musculoskeletal problems, followed by asthenia/fatigue. There was no significant gender difference in symptom pattern. Almost half of the patients were currently working (45%), significantly more men. The major GP management strategy was supportive counseling. A consultation prevalence rate of 3% implies that patients with persistent MUPS are common in general practice. Our study disclosed heterogeneity among the patients such as differences in employment status, which emphasizes the importance of personalized focus rather than unsubstantiated stereotyping of "MUPS patients" as a group.

  2. Relationship Between Abdominal Symptoms and Fructose Ingestion in Children with Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Veronika; Hammer, Katharina; Memaran, Nima; Huber, Wolf-Dietrich; Hammer, Karin; Hammer, Johann

    2018-05-01

    Limited valid data are available regarding the association of fructose-induced symptoms, fructose malabsorption, and clinical symptoms. To develop a questionnaire for valid symptom assessment before and during a carbohydrate breath test and to correlate symptoms with fructose breath test results in children/adolescents with functional abdominal pain. A Likert-type questionnaire assessing symptoms considered relevant for hydrogen breath test in children was developed and underwent initial validation. Fructose malabsorption was determined by increased breath hydrogen in 82 pediatric patients with functional abdominal pain disorders; fructose-induced symptoms were quantified by symptom score ≥2 and relevant symptom increase over baseline. The results were correlated with clinical symptoms. The time course of symptoms during the breath test was assessed. The questionnaire exhibited good psychometric properties in a standardized assessment of the severity of carbohydrate-related symptoms. A total of 40 % (n = 33) had malabsorption; symptoms were induced in 38 % (n = 31), but only 46 % (n = 15) with malabsorption were symptomatic. There was no significant correlation between fructose malabsorption and fructose-induced symptoms. Clinical symptoms correlated with symptoms evoked during the breath test (p Fructose-induced symptoms but not fructose malabsorption are related to increased abdominal symptoms and have distinct timing patterns.

  3. Lower urinary tract symptoms after subtotal versus total abdominal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lea Laird; Møller, Lars Mikael Alling; Gimbel, Helga

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common after hysterectomy and increase after menopause. We aimed to compare subtotal with total abdominal hysterectomy regarding LUTS, including urinary incontinence (UI) subtypes, 14 years after hysterectomy. Main results from...

  4. Abdominal epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, N.; Razzaq, A.

    2004-01-01

    Abdominal epilepsy (AE) is a rather uncommon clinical entity in children that might create diagnostic confusion especially when it lacks the typical manifestations of an epileptic seizure. We report the case of a young boy having apparently unexplained episodes of paroxysmal abdominal symptoms with no other suggestion of an underlying epileptic disorder. The case also explains how the clinical presentation can be misleading unless a high index of suspicion is maintained to reach the ultimate diagnosis. (author)

  5. Depressive Symptoms and Orthostatic Hypotension Are Risk Factors for Unexplained Falls in Community-Living Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menant, Jasmine C; Wong, Alfred K W; Trollor, Julian N; Close, Jacqueline C T; Lord, Stephen R

    2016-05-01

    To investigate risk factors for unexplained falls in older community-dwelling individuals. Prospective cohort study. Community population, Sydney, Australia. Older adults (N = 529; mean age 79.8 ± 4.4, 52.2% female). Participants provided information demographic, medical, and medication characteristics and completed cardiovascular (tilt table test, pulse wave velocity), cognitive, and sensorimotor assessments at baseline. Falls were then recorded in monthly fall diaries for 12 months. Unexplained fallers (UFs) were those who reported falls due to a blackout, dizziness, feeling faint, or "found themselves suddenly on the ground." Of the 523 participants available at follow-up, 238 (45.5%) reported one or more falls; 35 participants fulfilled the definition of UFs. UFs were more likely than balance-related fallers (BFs) (n = 203) and nonfallers (n = 291) to have orthostatic hypotension (39.4%, 20.5% and 22.4%, respectively) and depressive symptoms (24.2%, 10.1%, and 7.9% respectively). More UFs (88.6%) than BFs (70.9%) had injurious falls. A multivariate logistic regression model revealed that depressive symptoms and orthostatic hypotension were significant and independent determinants of UF status. Approximately 15% of fallers had unexplained falls, which were more likely to result in injuries. Depressive symptoms and orthostatic hypotension increased the risk of unexplained falls, whereas cognitive deficits and sensorimotor and balance impairments did not. Future research should investigate whether psychotherapy and physical exercise to improve mood and medication reviews and nonpharmacological therapies for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension and depression are effective at reducing the risk of unexplained falls in older people. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  6. Unexplained abdominal pain as a driver for inappropriate therapeutics: an audit on the use of intravenous proton pump inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Pauline Siew Mei; Wong, Yin Yen; Low, Yong Chia; Lau, Hui Ling; Chin, Kin-Fah; Mahadeva, Sanjiv

    2014-01-01

    Background. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are currently the most effective agents for acid-related disorders. However, studies show that 25-75% of patients receiving intravenous PPIs had no appropriate justification, indicating high rates of inappropriate prescribing. Objective. To examine the appropriate use of intravenous PPIs in accordance with guidelines and the efficacy of a prescribing awareness intervention at an Asian teaching institution. Setting. Prospective audit in a tertiary hospital in Malaysia. Method. Every 4th intravenous PPI prescription received in the pharmacy was screened against hospital guidelines. Interventions for incorrect indication/dose/duration were performed. Patients' demographic data, medical history and the use of intravenous PPI were collected. Included were all adult inpatients prescribed intravenous PPI. Main Outcome Measure. Proportion of appropriate IV PPI prescriptions. Results. Data for 106 patients were collected. Most patients were male [65(61.3%)], Chinese [50(47.2%)], with mean age ± SD = 60.3 ± 18.0 years. Most intravenous PPI prescriptions were initiated by junior doctors from the surgical [47(44.3%)] and medical [42(39.6%)] departments. Only 50/106(47.2%) patients had upper gastrointestinal endoscopy/surgery performed to verify the source of bleeding. Unexplained abdominal pain [81(76.4%)] was the main driver for prescribing intravenous PPIs empirically, out of which 73(68.9%) were for suspected upper gastrointestinal bleed. Overall, intravenous PPI was found to be inappropriately prescribed in 56(52.8%) patients for indication, dose or duration. Interventions on the use of intravenous PPI were most effective when performed by senior doctors (100%), followed by clinical pharmacists (50%), and inpatient pharmacists (37.5%, p = 0.027). Conclusion. Inappropriate intravenous PPI usage is still prevalent despite the enforcement of hospital guidelines. The promotion of prescribing awareness and evidence-based prescribing

  7. Unexplained abdominal pain as a driver for inappropriate therapeutics: an audit on the use of intravenous proton pump inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Siew Mei Lai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs are currently the most effective agents for acid-related disorders. However, studies show that 25–75% of patients receiving intravenous PPIs had no appropriate justification, indicating high rates of inappropriate prescribing.Objective. To examine the appropriate use of intravenous PPIs in accordance with guidelines and the efficacy of a prescribing awareness intervention at an Asian teaching institution.Setting. Prospective audit in a tertiary hospital in Malaysia.Method. Every 4th intravenous PPI prescription received in the pharmacy was screened against hospital guidelines. Interventions for incorrect indication/dose/duration were performed. Patients’ demographic data, medical history and the use of intravenous PPI were collected. Included were all adult inpatients prescribed intravenous PPI.Main Outcome Measure. Proportion of appropriate IV PPI prescriptions.Results. Data for 106 patients were collected. Most patients were male [65(61.3%], Chinese [50(47.2%], with mean age ± SD = 60.3 ± 18.0 years. Most intravenous PPI prescriptions were initiated by junior doctors from the surgical [47(44.3%] and medical [42(39.6%] departments. Only 50/106(47.2% patients had upper gastrointestinal endoscopy/surgery performed to verify the source of bleeding. Unexplained abdominal pain [81(76.4%] was the main driver for prescribing intravenous PPIs empirically, out of which 73(68.9% were for suspected upper gastrointestinal bleed. Overall, intravenous PPI was found to be inappropriately prescribed in 56(52.8% patients for indication, dose or duration. Interventions on the use of intravenous PPI were most effective when performed by senior doctors (100%, followed by clinical pharmacists (50%, and inpatient pharmacists (37.5%, p = 0.027.Conclusion. Inappropriate intravenous PPI usage is still prevalent despite the enforcement of hospital guidelines. The promotion of prescribing awareness and evidence

  8. Junior doctors' experiences of managing patients with medically unexplained symptoms: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yon, Katherine; Nettleton, Sarah; Walters, Kate; Lamahewa, Kethakie; Buszewicz, Marta

    2015-12-01

    To explore junior doctors' knowledge about and experiences of managing patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) and to seek their recommendations for improved future training on this important topic about which they currently receive little education. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews analysed using the framework method. Participants were recruited from three North Thames London hospitals within the UK. Twenty-two junior doctors undertaking the UK foundation two-year training programme (FY1/FY2). The junior doctors interviewed identified a significant gap in their training on the topic of MUS, particularly in relation to their awareness of the topic, the appropriate level of investigations, possible psychological comorbidities, the formulation of suitable explanations for patients' symptoms and longer term management strategies. Many junior doctors expressed feelings of anxiety, frustration and a self-perceived lack of competency in this area, and spoke of over-investigating patients or avoiding patient contact altogether due to the challenging nature of MUS and a difficulty in managing the accompanying uncertainty. They also identified the negative attitudes of some senior clinicians and potential role models towards patients with MUS as a factor contributing to their own attitudes and management choices. Most reported a need for more training during the foundation years, and recommended interactive case-based group discussions with a focus on providing meaningful explanations to patients for their symptoms. There is an urgent need to improve postgraduate training about the topics of MUS and avoiding over-investigation, as current training does not equip junior doctors with the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively and confidently manage patients in these areas. Training needs to focus on practical skill development to increase clinical knowledge in areas such as delivering suitable explanations, and to incorporate individual management

  9. Early response in cognitive-behavior therapy for syndromes of medically unexplained symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstäuber, Maria; Lambert, Michael J; Hiller, Wolfgang

    2017-05-25

    Early dramatic treatment response suggests a subset of patients who respond to treatment before most of it has been offered. These early responders tend to be over represented among those who are well at termination and at follow-up. Early response patterns in psychotherapy have been investigated only for a few of mental disorders so far. The main aim of the current study was to examine early response after five therapy-preparing sessions of a cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for syndromes of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS). In the context of a randomized, waiting-list controlled trial 48 patients who suffered from ≥3 MUS over ≥6 months received 5 therapy-preparing sessions and 20 sessions of CBT for somatoform disorders. They completed self-report scales of somatic symptom severity (SOMS-7 T), depression (BDI-II), anxiety (BSI), illness anxiety and behavior (IAS) at pre-treatment, after 5 therapy-preparing sessions (FU-5P) and at therapy termination (FU-20 T). The current analyses are based on data from the treatment arm only. Repeated measure ANOVAs revealed a significant decrease of depression (d = 0.34), anxiety (d = 0.60), illness anxiety (d = 0.38) and illness behavior (d = 0.42), but no change of somatic symptom severity (d = -0.03) between pre-treatment and FU-5P. Hierarchical linear multiple regression analyses showed that symptom improvements between pre-treatment and FU-5P predict a better outcome at therapy termination for depression and illness anxiety, after controlling for pre-treatment scores. Mixed-effect ANOVAs revealed significant group*time interaction effects indicating differences in the course of symptom improvement over the therapy between patients who fulfilled a reliable change (i.e., early response) during the 5 therapy-preparing sessions and patients who did not reach an early reliable change. Demographic or clinical variables at pre-treatment were not significantly correlated with differential scores between pre

  10. 11. Prevalence of psychiatric symptoms among patients with recurrent vasovagal and unexplained syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.W. Al-Johar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness and absence of postural tone followed by spontaneous recovery. Neurally mediated syncope (vasovagal and idiopathic unexplained syncope (US are the most common causes of syncope. Syncope is a very limiting disease that, if recurrent, affects the patients’ physical and psychological health. Our objective from this study is to measure the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms among patients with US. All patients (>12 years with vasovagal or US who were evaluated in King Khalid University Hospital were identified. Echocardiography and table tilt test reports were reviewed and patients who had cardiac syncope (due to arrhythmia or structural heart disease were excluded (N = 18. Ninety-four patients were included for further psychiatric assessment. The patients were contacted to fill the Symptoms Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R, which is a self-reporting questionnaire used to evaluate traits of depression, anxiety, somatization disorder and phobia. SCL-90-R scale has been translated to Arabic and validated in previous studies. Of the included cohort, 43 responded to fill the assessment scale, and 51 were excluded due to failure of communication (N = 41 or refusal to participate (N = 10. A control group was recruited with a case: control ratio of 1:3 matching for age, gender, and chronic illnesses.There were 43 patients and 129 control subjects, with predominance of females (67.4% and an average age of 33.8 (SD = 16. There was no difference in average scores of depression (13 vs. 14.53, P = 0.31, anxiety (11.3 vs. 10.4, P = 0.51, or phobia (5.4 vs. 5.2, P = 0.88. However, the syncope group had a higher average score for somatization disorder (18.53 vs. 13.66, P = 0.002. Binary logistic regression model was measured after grouping the cohort into above and below median scores. After adjusting for age, gender, and chronic illnesses, the association between syncope and somatization

  11. Screening for primary creatine deficiencies in French patients with unexplained neurological symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheillan David

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A population of patients with unexplained neurological symptoms from six major French university hospitals was screened over a 28-month period for primary creatine disorder (PCD. Urine guanidinoacetate (GAA and creatine:creatinine ratios were measured in a cohort of 6,353 subjects to identify PCD patients and compile their clinical, 1H-MRS, biochemical and molecular data. Six GAMT [N-guanidinoacetatemethyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.2] and 10 X-linked creatine transporter (SLC6A8 but no AGAT (GATM [L-arginine/glycine amidinotransferase (EC 2.1.4.1] deficient patients were identified in this manner. Three additional affected sibs were further identified after familial inquiry (1 brother with GAMT deficiency and 2 brothers with SLC6A8 deficiency in two different families. The prevalence of PCD in this population was 0.25% (0.09% and 0.16% for GAMT and SLC6A8 deficiencies, respectively. Seven new PCD-causing mutations were discovered (2 nonsense [c.577C > T and c.289C > T] and 1 splicing [c.391 + 15G > T] mutations for the GAMT gene and, 2 missense [c.1208C > A and c.926C > A], 1 frameshift [c.930delG] and 1 splicing [c.1393-1G > A] mutations for the SLC6A8 gene. No hot spot mutations were observed in these genes, as all the mutations were distributed throughout the entire gene sequences and were essentially patient/family specific. Approximately one fifth of the mutations of SLC6A8, but not GAMT, were attributed to neo-mutation, germinal or somatic mosaicism events. The only SLC6A8-deficient female patient in our series presented with the severe phenotype usually characterizing affected male patients, an observation in agreement with recent evidence that is in support of the fact that this X-linked disorder might be more frequent than expected in the female population with intellectual disability.

  12. Screening for primary creatine deficiencies in French patients with unexplained neurological symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A population of patients with unexplained neurological symptoms from six major French university hospitals was screened over a 28-month period for primary creatine disorder (PCD). Urine guanidinoacetate (GAA) and creatine:creatinine ratios were measured in a cohort of 6,353 subjects to identify PCD patients and compile their clinical, 1H-MRS, biochemical and molecular data. Six GAMT [N-guanidinoacetatemethyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.2)] and 10 X-linked creatine transporter (SLC6A8) but no AGAT (GATM) [L-arginine/glycine amidinotransferase (EC 2.1.4.1)] deficient patients were identified in this manner. Three additional affected sibs were further identified after familial inquiry (1 brother with GAMT deficiency and 2 brothers with SLC6A8 deficiency in two different families). The prevalence of PCD in this population was 0.25% (0.09% and 0.16% for GAMT and SLC6A8 deficiencies, respectively). Seven new PCD-causing mutations were discovered (2 nonsense [c.577C > T and c.289C > T] and 1 splicing [c.391 + 15G > T] mutations for the GAMT gene and, 2 missense [c.1208C > A and c.926C > A], 1 frameshift [c.930delG] and 1 splicing [c.1393-1G > A] mutations for the SLC6A8 gene). No hot spot mutations were observed in these genes, as all the mutations were distributed throughout the entire gene sequences and were essentially patient/family specific. Approximately one fifth of the mutations of SLC6A8, but not GAMT, were attributed to neo-mutation, germinal or somatic mosaicism events. The only SLC6A8-deficient female patient in our series presented with the severe phenotype usually characterizing affected male patients, an observation in agreement with recent evidence that is in support of the fact that this X-linked disorder might be more frequent than expected in the female population with intellectual disability. PMID:23234264

  13. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for children with functional abdominal pain and their parents decreases pain and other symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Rona L; Langer, Shelby L; Walker, Lynn S; Romano, Joan M; Christie, Dennis L; Youssef, Nader; DuPen, Melissa M; Feld, Andrew D; Ballard, Sheri A; Welsh, Ericka M; Jeffery, Robert W; Young, Melissa; Coffey, Melissa J; Whitehead, William E

    2010-04-01

    Unexplained abdominal pain in children has been shown to be related to parental responses to symptoms. This randomized controlled trial tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to improve outcomes in idiopathic childhood abdominal pain by altering parental responses to pain and children's ways of coping and thinking about their symptoms. Two hundred children with persistent functional abdominal pain and their parents were randomly assigned to one of two conditions-a three-session intervention of cognitive-behavioral treatment targeting parents' responses to their children's pain complaints and children's coping responses, or a three-session educational intervention that controlled for time and attention. Parents and children were assessed at pretreatment, and 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months post-treatment. Outcome measures were child and parent reports of child pain levels, function, and adjustment. Process measures included parental protective responses to children's symptom reports and child coping methods. Children in the cognitive-behavioral condition showed greater baseline to follow-up decreases in pain and gastrointestinal symptom severity (as reported by parents) than children in the comparison condition (time x treatment interaction, Pparents in the cognitive-behavioral condition reported greater decreases in solicitous responses to their child's symptoms compared with parents in the comparison condition (time x treatment interaction, Pparental responses and increasing child coping skills is effective in reducing children's pain and symptom levels compared with an educational control condition.

  14. What do patients choose to tell their doctors? Qualitative analysis of potential barriers to reattributing medically unexplained symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sarah; Rogers, Anne; Salmon, Peter; Gask, Linda; Dowrick, Chris; Towey, Maria; Clifford, Rebecca; Morriss, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Despite both parties often expressing dissatisfaction with consultations, patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) prefer to consult their general practitioners (GPs) rather than any other health professional. Training GPs to explain how symptoms can relate to psychosocial problems (reattribution) improves the quality of doctor-patient communication, though not necessarily patient health. To examine patient experiences of GPs' attempts to reattribute MUS in order to identify potential barriers to primary care management of MUS and improvement in outcome. Qualitative study. Patients consulting with MUS whose GPs had been trained in reattribution. A secondary sample of patients of control GPs was also interviewed to ascertain if barriers identified were specific to reattribution or common to consultations about MUS in general. Thematic analysis of in-depth interviews. Potential barriers include the complexity of patients' problems and patients' judgements about how to manage their presentation of this complexity. Many did not trust doctors with discussion of emotional aspects of their problems and chose not to present them. The same barriers were seen amongst patients whose GPs were not trained, suggesting the barriers are not particular to reattribution. Improving GP explanation of unexplained symptoms is insufficient to reduce patients' concerns. GPs need to (1) help patients to make sense of the complex nature of their presenting problems, (2) communicate that attention to psychosocial factors will not preclude vigilance to physical disease and (3) ensure a quality of doctor-patient relationship in which patients can perceive psychosocial enquiry as appropriate.

  15. Mental health care use in medically unexplained and explained physical symptoms: findings from a general population study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Eck van der Sluijs JF

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jonna F van Eck van der Sluijs,1,2 Margreet ten Have,3 Cees A Rijnders,4 Harm WJ van Marwijk,5,6 Ron de Graaf,3 Christina M van der Feltz-Cornelis1,2 1Clinical Centre of Excellence for Body, Mind and Health, GGz Breburg, 2Tranzo Department, Tilburg University, Tilburg, 3Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction, Utrecht, 4Department of Residency training, GGz Breburg, Tilburg, the Netherlands; 5Centre for Primary Care, Institute of Population Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; 6Department of General Practice and Elderly Care Medicine, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Objective: The aim of this study was to explore mental health care utilization patterns in primary and specialized mental health care of people with unexplained or explained physical symptoms. Methods: Data were derived from the first wave of the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2, a nationally representative face-to-face cohort study among the general population aged 18–64 years. We selected subjects with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS only (MUSonly; n=177, explained physical symptoms only (PHYonly, n=1,952, combined MUS and explained physical symptoms (MUS + PHY, n=209, and controls without physical symptoms (NONE, n=4,168. We studied entry into mental health care and the number of treatment contacts for mental problems, in both primary care and specialized mental health care. Analyses were adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and presence of any 12-month mental disorder assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 3.0. Results: At the primary care level, all three groups of subjects with physical symptoms showed entry into care for mental health problems significantly more often than controls. The adjusted odds ratios were 2.29 (1.33, 3.95 for MUSonly, 1.55 (1.13, 2.12 for PHYonly, and 2.25 (1.41, 3.57 for MUS + PHY. At the

  16. Effectiveness of a Blended Multidisciplinary Intervention for Patients with Moderate Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (PARASOL): Protocol for a Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Westrienen, Paula Elisabeth; Pisters, Martijn F; Toonders, Suze Aj; Gerrits, Marloes; Veenhof, Cindy; de Wit, Niek J

    2018-05-08

    Medically unexplained physical symptoms are an important health problem in primary care, with a spectrum from mild to chronic. The burden of chronic medically unexplained physical symptoms is substantial for patients, health care professionals, and society. Therefore, early identification of patients with moderate medically unexplained physical symptoms is needed in order to prevent chronicity. The preventive screening of medically unexplained physical symptoms (PRESUME) screening method was developed using data from the electronic medical record of the patients' general practitioner and demonstrated its prognostic accuracy to identify patients with moderate medically unexplained physical symptoms. In the next step, we developed a proactive blended and integrated mental health and physical therapy intervention program (PARASOL) to reduce complaints of moderate medically unexplained physical symptoms, stimulate self-management, and prevent chronicity. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of the blended PARASOL intervention on the impact of symptoms and quality of life in patients with moderate medically unexplained physical symptoms compared with usual care. Secondary objectives are to study the effect on severity of physical and psychosocial symptoms, general health, physical behavior, illness perception, and self-efficacy in patients with moderate medically unexplained physical symptoms as well as to determine the cost-effectiveness of the program. This paper presents the study protocol of a multicenter cluster randomized clinical trial. Adult patients with moderate medically unexplained physical symptoms will be identified from electronic medical record data using the PRESUME screening method and proactively recruited for participation in the study. Cluster randomization will be performed at the level of the participating health care centers. In total 248 patients with moderate medically unexplained physical symptoms (124

  17. Medically Unexplained Symptoms and the risk of loss of labor market participation - A prospective study in the Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løngaard, Katja; Bjorner, Jacob Bue; Fink, Per

    2015-01-01

    follow-up. MUS participants also showed an elevated RR with regard to risk of disability pensioning, however this association was not statistically significant (RR = 2.06, 95% CI = 0.77-5.52). CONCLUSION: MUS seem to have a negative effect on labor market participation defined by LTSA and unemployment......BACKGROUND: Medically Unexplained Symptoms (MUS) are frequently encountered in general practice. However, little is known whether MUS affects labor market participation. We investigated the prospective association between MUS at baseline and risk of long-term sickness absence (LTSA), unemployment...... treatment. Participants were classified with MUS if they: a) had reported three or more symptoms during the last month, and b) did not have a chronic condition, neither in the self-reported nor the register data. We assessed LTSA, unemployment, and disability pensioning by linking our data with National...

  18. The interpretation of low mood and worry by high users of secondary care with medically unexplained symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weller David

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Around 1% of adults are repeatedly referred from primary to secondary care with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS; many of these patients have depression and anxiety disorders which are unrecognized or inadequately treated. We aimed to investigate the ways patients with MUS and their General Practitioners (GPs interpret low mood and worry, whether they regard them as depressive or anxiety disorders and how they relate them causally to symptoms. Methods We carried out semi-structured interviews with 27 patients who had been repeatedly referred to specialists for MUS and their GPs and analysed transcripts by qualitative comparison. The analysis examined themes relating to low mood and worry, and their influence on symptoms. It drew on the concept of "otherness", whereby mental phenomena can be located either within the self or as separate entities. Results Both patients and GPs acknowledged the presence of low mood and worry. They viewed low mood as either an individual's personal response to circumstances (including their physical symptoms or as the illness called "depression"; only the latter was amenable to medical intervention. Worry was seen as a trait rather than as a symptom of an anxiety disorder. While low mood and worry were acknowledged to influence physical symptoms, they were considered insufficient to be the main cause by either the patients or their doctors. Conclusions Patients with MUS who are high users of secondary care services interpret low mood and worry in ways which allow them to be discussed with professionals, but not as the cause of their physical symptoms.

  19. Prevalence of somatoform disorders and medically unexplained symptoms in old age populations in comparison with younger age groups : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilderink, P. H.; Collard, R.; Rosmalen, J. G. M.; Voshaar, R. C. Oude

    Objective: To review current knowledge regarding the prevalence of somatization problems in later life by level of caseness (somatoform disorders and medically unexplained symptoms, MUS) and to compare these rates with those in middle-aged and younger age groups. Method: A systematic search of the

  20. Sick-listed employees with severe medically unexplained physical symptoms : burden or routine for the occupational health physician? A cross sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedeman, Rob; Krol, Boudien; Blankenstein, Annette H.; Koopmans, Petra C.; Groothoff, Johan W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The two primary objectives of this study were to the assess consultation load of occupational health physicians (OHPs), and their difficulties and needs with regard to their sickness certification tasks in sick-listed employees with severe medical unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS).

  1. Training specialists to write appropriate reply letters to general practitioners about patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms; A cluster-randomized trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Weiland (Anne); A.H. Blankenstein (Annette); M.H.A. Willems; J.L.C.M. van Saase (Jan); P.L.A. van Daele (Paul); H.T. van der Molen (Henk); G.B. Langbroek (Ginger B.); A. Bootsma (Aart); E.M. Vriens (Els M.); A. Oberndorff-Klein Woolthuis (Ardi); R. Vernhout (Rene); L.R. Arends (Lidia)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To evaluate effects of a communication training for specialists on the quality of their reply letters to general practitioners (GPs) about patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS). Methods: Before randomization, specialists included ≤3 MUPS patients in a

  2. Medically unexplained physical symptoms and work functioning over 2 years: their association and the influence of depressive and anxiety disorders and job characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeft, M. den; Twisk, J.W.; Hoekstra, T.; Terluin, B.; Penninx, B.W.; Wouden, J.C. van der; Numans, M.E.; Horst, H.E. van der

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) are highly prevalent and may affect work functioning. In this study we aimed to assess the longitudinal association between MUPS and work functioning over 2 years and the influence of job characteristics and depressive and anxiety disorders

  3. Medically unexplained physical symptoms and work functioning over 2 years : their association and the influence of depressive and anxiety disorders and job characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Boeft, Madelon; Twisk, Jos W R; Hoekstra, T.; Terluin, Berend; Penninx, Brenda W J H; van der Wouden, Johannes C; Numans, Mattijs E.; van der Horst, Henriette E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) are highly prevalent and may affect work functioning. In this study we aimed to assess the longitudinal association between MUPS and work functioning over 2 years and the influence of job characteristics and depressive and anxiety disorders

  4. Encounters between medical specialists and patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms; influences of communication on patient outcomes and use of health care: a literature overview.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiland, A.; Kraats, R.E. van de; Blankenstein, A.H.; Saase, J.L.C.M. van; Molen, H.T. van der; Bramer, W.M.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Arends, L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) burden patients and health services due to large quantities of consultations and medical interventions. The aim of this study is to determine which elements of communication in non-psychiatric specialist MUPS care influence health outcomes. Systematic

  5. Explanation and relations. How do general practitioners deal with patients with persistent medically unexplained symptoms: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Spaendonck Karel P

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent presentation of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS is troublesome for general practitioners (GPs and causes pressure on the doctor-patient relationship. As a consequence, GPs face the problem of establishing an ongoing, preferably effective relationship with these patients. This study aims at exploring GPs' perceptions about explaining MUS to patients and about how relationships with these patients evolve over time in daily practice. Methods A qualitative approach, interviewing a purposive sample of twenty-two Dutch GPs within five focus groups. Data were analyzed according to the principles of constant comparative analysis. Results GPs recognise the importance of an adequate explanation of the diagnosis of MUS but often feel incapable of being able to explain it clearly to their patients. GPs therefore indicate that they try to reassure patients in non-specific ways, for example by telling patients that there is no disease, by using metaphors and by normalizing the symptoms. When patients keep returning with MUS, GPs report the importance of maintaining the doctor-patient relationship. GPs describe three different models to do this; mutual alliance characterized by ritual care (e.g. regular physical examination, regular doctor visits with approval of the patient and the doctor, ambivalent alliance characterized by ritual care without approval of the doctor and non-alliance characterized by cutting off all reasons for encounter in which symptoms are not of somatic origin. Conclusion GPs feel difficulties in explaining the symptoms. GPs report that, when patients keep presenting with MUS, they focus on maintaining the doctor-patient relationship by using ritual care. In this care they meticulously balance between maintaining a good doctor-patient relationship and the prevention of unintended consequences of unnecessary interventions.

  6. Specific collaborative group intervention for patients with medically unexplained symptoms in general practice: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefert, R; Kaufmann, C; Wild, B; Schellberg, D; Boelter, R; Faber, R; Szecsenyi, J; Sauer, N; Guthrie, E; Herzog, W

    2013-01-01

    Patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) are frequent in primary care and substantially impaired in their quality of life (QoL). Specific training of general practitioners (GPs) alone did not demonstrate sustained improvement at later follow-up in current reviews. We evaluated a collaborative group intervention. We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial. Thirty-five GPs recruited 304 MUS patients (intervention group: 170; control group: 134). All GPs were trained in diagnosis and management of MUS (control condition). Eighteen randomly selected intervention GPs participated in training for a specific collaborative group intervention. They conducted 10 weekly group sessions and 2 booster meetings in their practices, together with a psychosomatic specialist. Six and 12 months after baseline, QoL was assessed with the Short-Form 36. The primary outcome was the physical composite score (PCS), and the secondary outcome was the mental composite score (MCS). At 12 months, intention-to-treat analyses showed a significant between-group effect for the MCS (p = 0.023) but not for the PCS (p = 0.674). This effect was preceded by a significant reduction of somatic symptom severity (15-item somatic symptom severity scale of the Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ-15) at 6 months (p = 0.008) that lacked significance at 12 months (p = 0.078). As additional between-group effects at 12 months, per-protocol analyses showed less health anxiety (Whiteley-7; p = 0.038) and less psychosocial distress (PHQ; p = 0.024); GP visits were significantly (p = 0.042) reduced in the intervention group. Compared to pure GP training, collaborative group intervention achieved a progressive, clinically meaningful improvement in mental but not physical QoL. It could bridge gaps between general practice and mental health care. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Training Medical Specialists to Communicate Better with Patients with Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (MUPS. A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Weiland

    Full Text Available Patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS are prevalent 25-50% in general and specialist care. Medical specialists and residents often find patients without underlying pathology difficult to deal with, whereas patients sometimes don't feel understood. We developed an evidence-based communication training, aimed to improve specialists' interviewing, information-giving and planning skills in MUPS consultations, and tested its effectiveness.The intervention group in this multi-center randomized controlled trial received a 14-hour training program to which experiential learning and feedback were essential. Using techniques from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, they were stimulated to seek interrelating factors (symptoms, cognitions, emotions, behavior, and social environment that reinforced a patient's symptoms. They were taught to explain MUPS understandably, reassure patients effectively and avoid unnecessary diagnostic testing. Before and after the intervention training, specialists videotaped a total of six consultations with different MUPS patients. These were evaluated to assess doctors' MUPS-focused communicating skills using an adapted version of the Four Habit Coding Scheme on five-point Likert scales. Participants evaluated the training by self-report on three-point Likert scales. Doctors in the control group received training after completion of the study.123 doctors (40% specialists, 60% residents and 478 MUPS patients from 11 specialties were included; 98 doctors completed the study (80% and 449 videotaped consultations were assessed. Trained doctors interviewed patients more effectively than untrained ones (p < 0.001, summarized information in a more patient-centered way (p = 0.001, and better explained MUPS and the role of perpetuating factors (p < 0.05. No effects on planning skills were found. On a 3-point scale the training was evaluated with 2.79.MUPS-focused communication training increases the interviewing and

  8. Chronic, unexplained pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic, unexplained pain (CUP) is a common clinical problem. The core symptom in this heterogeneous group of patients is pain for which no medical explanation is found. Patients also have many other characteristics (symptoms and psychosocial features) in common. Pathophysiologically, increased

  9. Can agonistic striving lead to unexplained illness? Implicit goals, pain tolerance, and somatic symptoms in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Craig K; Elder, Gavin J; Laird, Kelsey T; Shelby, Grace D; Walker, Lynn S

    2014-09-01

    We tested the social action theory hypotheses that (a) psychological stress induced by struggling to control others (agonistic striving) is associated with higher levels of subjective somatic symptoms than stress induced by struggling to control the self (transcendence striving); (b) the association between agonistic striving and symptoms is moderated by the ability to tolerate pain; and (c) associations among agonistic goals, pain tolerance, and subjective symptoms are not explained by personality and affective traits or negative emotional responses to personal stressors. Implicit motives and negative emotional reactivity to recurring personal stressors were assessed by Social Competence Interview in 333 adolescents and adults who participated in longitudinal research on functional abdominal pain at a university medical center. Pain tolerance was assessed by graduated thermal pain protocol; subjective somatic symptoms, and personality/affective traits assessed by questionnaires. The primary outcome measure was the self-reported severity of 35 somatic symptoms often experienced in the absence of diagnosable disease. All hypotheses were supported. Nonconscious agonistic strivings may increase the perceived frequency and severity of subjective somatic symptoms; this tendency is greatly magnified by difficulty in self-regulating responses to painful stimuli. Implicit agonistic motives and their associations with symptoms are not explained by individual differences in trait neuroticism, anxiety, depression, anger, or low self-esteem or by negative emotional reactivity to a personal stressor. These findings may afford fruitful insights into mechanisms by which stressful social environments undermine health and suggest promising directions for clinical intervention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Training tomorrow's doctors to explain 'medically unexplained' physical symptoms: An examination of UK medical educators' views of barriers and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Emmeline; Cowing, Jennifer; Lazarus, Candice; Smith, Charlotte; Zenzuck, Victoria; Peters, Sarah

    2018-05-01

    Co-occuring physical symptoms, unexplained by organic pathology (known as Functional Syndromes, FS), are common and disabling presentations. However, FS is absent or inconsistently taught within undergraduate medical training. This study investigates the reasons for this and identifies potential solutions to improved implementation. Twenty-eight medical educators from thirteen different UK medical schools participated in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis proceeded iteratively, and in parallel with data production. Barriers to implementing FS training are beliefs about the complexity of FS, tutors' negative attitudes towards FS, and FS being perceived as a low priority for the curriculum. In parallel participants recognised FS as ubiquitous within medical practice and erroneously assumed it must be taught by someone. They recommended that students should learn about FS through managed exposure, but only if tutors' negative attitudes and behaviour are also addressed. Negative attitudes towards FS by educators prevents designing and delivering effective education on this common medical presentation. Whilst there is recognition of the need to implement FS training, recommendations are multifaceted. Increased liaison between students, patients and educators is necessary to develop more informed and effective teaching methods for trainee doctors about FS and in order to minimise the impact of the hidden curriculum. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [A description of children and adolescents with somatic unexplained physical symptoms in a Dutch mental health care institution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouijzer, M E J; Loman, F; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C M

    2013-01-01

    Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) occur frequently in children and adolescents. Treatment of MUS in children and adolescents takes place mainly in mental health care (MHC) institutions, as does the treatment of adults with MUS. However, there is hardly any literature about the prevalence of MUS in children and adolescents in MHC. To study the prevalence of MUS in children and adolescents in Dutch MHC. Comparisons were drawn between children and adolescents with MUS and those without MUS who had been referred to a Dutch MHC institution. Children and adolescents with MUS had more anxiety and depression and more introvert personality characteristics than children and adolescents without MUS. However, the quality of life of children and adolescents with MUS was similar to that of children and adolescents without MUS. One in five children and adolescents in Dutch MHC had MUS. These children and adolescents had introverted personality characteristics and showed anxious and depressed behavior, withdrawn-depressed behavior, and thought problems. The quality of life of children and adolescents with MUS and those without MUS was below average.

  12. Medically unexplained symptoms and the risk of loss of labor market participation--a prospective study in the Danish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loengaard, Katja; Bjorner, Jakob Bue; Fink, Per Klausen; Burr, Hermann; Rugulies, Reiner

    2015-09-02

    Medically Unexplained Symptoms (MUS) are frequently encountered in general practice. However, little is known whether MUS affects labor market participation. We investigated the prospective association between MUS at baseline and risk of long-term sickness absence (LTSA), unemployment, and disability pensioning in a 5-year-follow-up study. In the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study 2005, 8187 randomly selected employees from the Danish general population answered a questionnaire on work and health. Responses were linked with national registers on prescribed medication and hospital treatment. Participants were classified with MUS if they: a) had reported three or more symptoms during the last month, and b) did not have a chronic condition, neither in the self-reported nor the register data. We assessed LTSA, unemployment, and disability pensioning by linking our data with National registers of social transfer payments. Of the 8187 participants, 272 (3.3%) were categorized with MUS. Compared to healthy participants, participants with MUS had an increased risk of LTSA (Rate ratio (RR) = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.28-2.42), and of unemployment (RR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.02-2.15) during follow-up. MUS participants also showed an elevated RR with regard to risk of disability pensioning, however this association was not statistically significant (RR = 2.06, 95% CI = 0.77-5.52). MUS seem to have a negative effect on labor market participation defined by LTSA and unemployment, whereas it is more uncertain whether MUS affects risk of disability pensioning.

  13. Training Medical Specialists to Communicate Better with Patients with Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (MUPS). A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Anne; Blankenstein, Annette H.; Van Saase, Jan L. C. M.; Van der Molen, Henk T.; Jacobs, Mariël E.; Abels, Dineke C.; Köse, Nedim; Van Dulmen, Sandra; Vernhout, René M.; Arends, Lidia R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) are prevalent 25–50% in general and specialist care. Medical specialists and residents often find patients without underlying pathology difficult to deal with, whereas patients sometimes don’t feel understood. We developed an evidence-based communication training, aimed to improve specialists’ interviewing, information-giving and planning skills in MUPS consultations, and tested its effectiveness. Methods The intervention group in this multi-center randomized controlled trial received a 14-hour training program to which experiential learning and feedback were essential. Using techniques from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, they were stimulated to seek interrelating factors (symptoms, cognitions, emotions, behavior, and social environment) that reinforced a patient’s symptoms. They were taught to explain MUPS understandably, reassure patients effectively and avoid unnecessary diagnostic testing. Before and after the intervention training, specialists videotaped a total of six consultations with different MUPS patients. These were evaluated to assess doctors’ MUPS-focused communicating skills using an adapted version of the Four Habit Coding Scheme on five-point Likert scales. Participants evaluated the training by self-report on three-point Likert scales. Doctors in the control group received training after completion of the study. Results 123 doctors (40% specialists, 60% residents) and 478 MUPS patients from 11 specialties were included; 98 doctors completed the study (80%) and 449 videotaped consultations were assessed. Trained doctors interviewed patients more effectively than untrained ones (p < 0.001), summarized information in a more patient-centered way (p = 0.001), and better explained MUPS and the role of perpetuating factors (p < 0.05). No effects on planning skills were found. On a 3-point scale the training was evaluated with 2.79. Conclusion MUPS-focused communication

  14. What's 'difficult'? A multi-stage qualitative analysis of secondary care specialists' experiences with medically unexplained symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maatz, Anke; Wainwright, Megan; Russell, Andrew J; Macnaughton, Jane; Yiannakou, Yan

    2016-11-01

    The term 'difficult' is pervasively used in relation to medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) and patients with MUS. This article scrutinises the use of the term by analysing interview data from a study of secondary care specialists' experiences with and attitudes towards patients suffering from MUS. Qualitative design employing semi-structured open-ended interviews systematically analysed in three stages: first, data were analysed according to the principles of content analysis. The analysis subsequently focused on the use of the term 'difficult'. Iterations of the term were extracted by summative analysis and thematic coding revealed its different meanings. Finally, alternative expressions were explored. Three NHS trust secondary care hospitals in North-East England. 17 senior clinicians from seven medical and two surgical specialities. Unsolicited use of the term 'difficult' was common. 'Difficult' was rarely used as a patient characteristic or to describe the therapeutic relationship. Participants used 'difficult' to describe their experience of diagnosing, explaining, communicating and managing these conditions and their own emotional reactions. Health care system deficits and the conceptual basis for MUS were other facets of 'difficult'. Participants also reported experiences that were rewarding and positive. This study shows that blanket statements such as 'difficult patients' mask the complexity of doctors' experiences in the context of MUS. Our nuanced analysis of the use of 'difficult' challenges preconceived attitudes. This can help counter the unreflexive perpetuation of negative evaluations that stigmatize patients with MUS, encourage greater acknowledgement of doctors' emotions, and lead to more appropriate conceptualizations and management of MUS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Managing the consultation with patients with medically unexplained symptoms: a grounded theory study of supervisors and registrars in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Louise

    2014-12-05

    Patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) commonly present in general practice. They often experience significant disability and have difficulty accessing appropriate care. Many feel frustrated and helpless. Doctors also describe feeling frustrated and helpless when managing these patients. These shared negative feelings can have a detrimental effect on the therapeutic relationship and on clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore how novice and experienced GPs manage patients with MUS and how these skills are taught and learned in GP training. A constructivist grounded theory study with 24 general practice registrars and supervisors in GP training practices across Australia. Registrars lacked a framework for managing patients with MUS. Some described negative feelings towards patients that were uncomfortable and confronting. Registrars also were uncertain about their clinical role: where their professional responsibilities began and ended. Supervisors utilised a range of strategies to address the practical, interpersonal and therapeutic challenges associated with the care of these patients. Negative feelings and a lack of diagnostic language and frameworks may prevent registrars from managing these patients effectively. Some of these negative feelings, such as frustration, shame and helplessness, are shared between doctors and patients. Registrars need assistance to identify and manage these difficult feelings so that consultations are more effective. The care of these patients also raises issues of professional identity, roles and responsibilities. Supervisors can assist their registrars by proactively sharing models of the consultation, strategies for managing their own feelings and frustrations, and ways of understanding and managing the therapeutic relationship in this difficult area of practice.

  16. The therapeutic impact of abdominal ultrasound in patients with acute abdominal symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhillon, S.; Halligan, S.; Goh, V.; Matravers, P.; Chambers, A.; Remedios, D.

    2002-01-01

    AIM: The technical performance of abdominal ultrasound in the investigation of acute abdominal pain has been thoroughly investigated but its therapeutic effects are less well understood. We aimed to determine the therapeutic effect of abdominal ultrasound in the investigation of acute abdominal pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A pre- and post-intervention observational study design was used to determine the diagnostic and therapeutic effects of abdominal ultrasound for acute abdominal pain. Referring clinicians completed a pre-ultrasound questionnaire that detailed their leading diagnosis, confidence in this and intended management in 100 consecutive adult patients. Following ultrasound a second questionnaire was completed. This again detailed the leading diagnosis, confidence in this and their intended management. Clinicians quantified the management contribution of ultrasound both for the individual case in question and in their clinical experience generally. RESULTS: The leading diagnosis was either confirmed or rejected in 72 patients and a new diagnosis provided where no prior differential diagnosis existed in 10. Diagnostic confidence increased significantly following ultrasound (mean score 6·5 pre-ultrasound vs 7·6 post-ultrasound, P < 0·001). Intended management changed following ultrasound in 22 patients; 15 intended laparotomies were halted and a further seven patients underwent surgery where this was not originally intended. Ultrasound was rated either 'very' or 'moderately' helpful in 87% of patients, with 99% of clinicians finding it either 'very' or 'moderately' helpful generally. CONCLUSION: Abdominal ultrasound has considerable diagnostic and therapeutic effect in the setting of acute abdominal pain. Dhillon, S. et al. (2002)

  17. Longitudinal Relationship of Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms With Dyslipidemia and Abdominal Obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dortland, Arianne K. B. van Reedt; Giltay, Erik J.; van Veen, Tineke; Zitman, Frans G.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    Objective: Previous research indicates that patients with severe symptoms of depression or anxiety are prone toward the development of dyslipidemia and abdominal obesity. We sought to study these associations longitudinally. Methods: Among 2126 Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

  18. Longitudinal relationship of depressive and anxiety symptoms with dyslipidemia and abdominal obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reedt Dortland, A.K.B.; Giltay, E.J.; van Veen, T.; Zitman, F. G.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Previous research indicates that patients with severe symptoms of depression or anxiety are prone toward the development of dyslipidemia and abdominal obesity. We sought to study these associations longitudinally. Methods: Among 2126 Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

  19. Severity of Giardia infection associated with post-infectious fatigue and abdominal symptoms two years after

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rortveit Guri

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high rate of post-infectious fatigue and abdominal symptoms two years after a waterborne outbreak of giardiasis in Bergen, Norway in 2004 has previously been reported. The aim of this report was to identify risk factors associated with such manifestations. Methods All laboratory confirmed cases of giardiasis (n = 1262 during the outbreak in Bergen in 2004 received a postal questionnaire two years after. Degree of post-infectious abdominal symptoms and fatigue, as well as previous abdominal problems, was recorded. In the statistical analyses number of treatment courses, treatment refractory infection, delayed education and sick leave were used as indices of protracted and severe Giardia infection. Age, gender, previous abdominal problems and symptoms during infection were also analysed as possible risk factors. Simple and multiple ordinal logistic regression models were used for the analyses. Results The response rate was 81% (1017/1262, 64% were women and median age was 31 years (range 3-93, compared to 61% women and 30 years (range 2-93 among all 1262 cases. Factors in multiple regression analysis significantly associated with abdominal symptoms two years after infection were: More than one treatment course, treatment refractory infection, delayed education, bloating and female gender. Abdominal problems prior to Giardia infection were not associated with post-infectious abdominal symptoms. More than one treatment course, delayed education, sick leave more than 2 weeks, and malaise at the time of infection, were significantly associated with fatigue in the multiple regression analysis, as were increasing age and previous abdominal problems. Conclusion Protracted and severe giardiasis seemed to be a risk factor for post-infectious fatigue and abdominal symptoms two years after clearing the Giardia infection.

  20. Abdominal pain symptoms are associated with anxiety and depression in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gontard, Alexander; Moritz, Anne-Michaela; Thome-Granz, Sigrid; Equit, Monika

    2015-11-01

    Abdominal pain symptoms and incontinence are common in childhood. The aim of this study was to analyse abdominal pain symptoms and their associations with incontinence and symptoms of anxiety and depression in young children. We examined 1130 children during the school entry check-up (mean age 6.2 years) and 951 participated in the study. Parents completed a questionnaire contained 11 items regarding Rome-III functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and incontinence and 14 items from the anxious/depressed scale of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Of the 951 children (55.6% boys) we recruited, 30.1% had experienced abdominal pain symptoms in the past two months and 14% had complained of them at least once a week. In addition, 2.6% had irritable bowel syndrome, 11.3% had childhood functional abdominal pain, 2.4% were affected by faecal incontinence, 2.1% were affected by daytime urinary incontinence, and 5.5% were affected by nocturnal enuresis. One in ten (10.6%) had symptoms of anxiety and depression, and these were significantly higher in the children with FGIDs, particularly if they were also incontinent. Nearly a third of the children (30.1%) had abdominal pain symptoms, and FGIDs were associated with significantly higher symptoms of anxiety and depression, especially if children were also incontinent. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Patients' 'thingification', unexplained symptoms and response-ability in the clinical context: in response to 'Patients' substantialization of disease, the hybrid symptom and the metaphysical care', by Alexandra Parvan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Thor Eirik; Kirkengen, Anna Luise

    2016-08-01

    The types of diseases, or categories of suffering, referred to as medically unexplained symptoms or syndromes (MUS) are the focus for the following commentary. Such cases seem to invite reflection. The very nature of such complex patterns of disease and suffering raises a number of fundamental epistemological and ontological issues. Furthermore, such health challenges can serve as the basis for an exploration of how the suffering person as well as the medical caretaker comes to grip with disease, incapacitation or suffering. We have structured our comments into two parts: first, we will describe medically unexplained health problems as the background for an inquiry into a process wherein patients reify their suffering in order to meet their doctors on equal terms, which carries a potential for alienation. Second, we will reflect on Alexandra Parvan's text as regards patients' 'substantialization' of their disease, the resulting 'hybrid symptom' and a proposed model for care and healing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Abdominal symptoms in general practice: frequency, cancer suspicions raised, and actions taken by GPs in six European countries. Cohort study with prospective registration of cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtedahl, K.; Vedsted, P.; Borgquist, L.; Donker, G.A.; Buntinx, F.; Weller, D.; Braaten, T.; Hjertholm, P.; Mansson, J.; Strandberg, E.L.; Campbell, C.; Ellegaard, L.; Parajuli, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Abdominal symptoms are diagnostically challenging to general practitioners (GPs): although common, they may indicate cancer. In a prospective cohort of patients, we examined abdominal symptom frequency, initial diagnostic suspicion, and actions of GPs in response to abdominal

  3. Validation of the Rome III criteria and alarm symptoms for recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsbers, Carolien F M; Benninga, Marc A; Schweizer, Joachim J; Kneepkens, C M Frank; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Büller, Hans A

    2014-06-01

    Rome criteria were formulated to define functional gastrointestinal disorders (Rome III criteria, 2006) excluding organic diagnoses when alarm symptoms were absent. The aims of the study were to validate the Rome III criteria as to their capacity to differentiate between organic and functional abdominal pain and to assess the role of alarm symptoms in this differentiation. During 2 years all of the patients (ages 4-16 years) presenting with recurrent abdominal pain (Apley criteria) and referred to secondary care were included. Clinical diagnoses were based on protocolized evaluation and intervention with 6-month follow-up. Alarm symptoms were registered. Rome III criteria for functional pain syndromes were assigned independently. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed. In 200 patients (87 boys, mean age 8.8 years), organic (17%), functional (40%), combined organic and functional (9%), spontaneous recovery (27%), and other (8%) clinical diagnoses were established. Alarm symptoms were found in 57.5% (organic causes 56%, functional causes 61%). The evaluation for Rome symptom clusters revealed symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome in 27%, functional dyspepsia in 15%, functional abdominal pain in 28%, functional abdominal pain syndrome in 14.5%, and no pain syndrome in 15.5%. Rome diagnoses, based on symptoms and absence of alarm symptoms, predicted functional clinical diagnosis with sensitivity 0.35 (95% confidence interval 0.27-0.43), specificity 0.60 (0.46-0.73), positive predictive value 0.71 (0.61-0.82), and negative predictive value of 0.24 (0.17-0.32). The Rome III criteria for abdominal pain are not specific enough to rule out organic causes. Alarm symptoms do not differentiate between organic and functional abdominal pain.

  4. Diagnostic testing for celiac disease among patients with abdominal symptoms a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, D.A.W.M.; Jellema, A.P.; Mulder, C.J.J.; Kneepkens, C.M.F.; van der Horst, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Context: The symptoms and consequences of celiac disease usually resolve with a lifelong gluten-free diet. However, clinical presentation is variable and most patients presenting with abdominal symptoms in primary care will not have celiac disease and unnecessary diagnostic testing should be

  5. Diagnostic testing for celiac disease among patients with abdominal symptoms: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, Daniëlle A. W. M.; Jellema, Petra; Mulder, Chris J.; Kneepkens, C. M. Frank; van der Horst, Henriëtte E.

    2010-01-01

    The symptoms and consequences of celiac disease usually resolve with a lifelong gluten-free diet. However, clinical presentation is variable and most patients presenting with abdominal symptoms in primary care will not have celiac disease and unnecessary diagnostic testing should be avoided. To

  6. CHRONIC UNEXPLAINED OROFACIAL PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Vesnaver

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic unexplained orofacial pain is frequently the cause of prolonged suffering for the patient and an unsolvable problem for the therapist. Pathophysiology of the onset of this type of pain is virtually unknown. Still, it is possible to divide chronic orofacial pain into several separate categories, according to its onset, symptoms and therapy. All forms of this type of pain have a strong psychological component.Methods. A retrograde review was conducted, in which patients’ records, treated in 1994 for chronic unexplained orofacial pain, were followed through a 5 year period. The modalities of treatment then and at present were compared.Conclusions. Except for trigeminal neuralgia, where carbamazepine remains the first choice drug, treatment of chronic facial pain has changed considerably.

  7. Blended care; development of a day treatment program for medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) in the Dutch Armed Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeylemaker, M. M. P.; Linn, F. H. H.; Vermetten, E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A subgroup of servicemen can be identified that seek a disproportionally amount of health care in comparison to diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives. This group can be identified on the basis of an absence of a structural medical explanation for their symptoms. The symptoms manifest

  8. Exertional abdominal pain as a symptom of secondary pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-21

    Apr 21, 2011 ... MS is a common valvular disease, the first manifestation of which is usually easy ... mechanisms explaining the signs and symptoms of MS.[1]. Pulmonary ... The tricuspid gradient was 50 mmHg, and a moderate tricuspid ...

  9. The treatment of patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms in China: a study comparing expectations and treatment satisfaction in psychosomatic medicine, biomedicine, and traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, Kurt; Xudong, Zhao; Anselm, Kathrin; Kern, Stephanie; Wirsching, Michael; Schaefert, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about treatment for patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) in China. This study investigates the treatment expectations and treatment satisfaction of patients with MUS in psychosomatic medicine, biomedicine, and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). In a cross-sectional survey, n = 96 (10.3%) out of 931 participating patients were screened positive for multiple somatoform symptoms. These patients answered questionnaires concerning symptom duration, number of doctor visits, functional impairment, emotional distress, treatment expectations, treatment satisfaction, and empathy in the consultation. The physicians filled in a questionnaire about applied or recommended treatment. Most of the patients from psychosomatic medicine wanted psychotherapy. In TCM, 55% of the patients had already received TCM treatment and most of them wanted to continue TCM treatment. Patients in biomedicine did not express clear expectations; most of them had had no previous treatment. A combination of treatment methods was most prevalent in biomedicine in comparison to psychosomatic medicine and TCM. The outcome from the patients' point of view was significantly better in TCM than in psychosomatic medicine and biomedicine. Psychosomatic medicine's strength was the empathetic physician-patient interaction. From a biopsychosocial perspective, these results suggest that various treatment approaches with various emphases can be effective depending on the patient's complaints, his illness beliefs, and what the physician offers. The results will be verified in a larger multicenter longitudinal study.

  10. Clinical value of DSM IV and DSM 5 criteria for diagnosing the most prevalent somatoform disorders in patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dessel, Nikki Claassen-; van der Wouden, Johannes C; Dekker, Joost; van der Horst, Henriette E

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed (1) to describe frequencies of DSM IV somatisation disorder, undifferentiated somatoform disorder and pain disorder versus DSM 5 somatic symptom disorder (SSD) in a multi-setting population of patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS), (2) to investigate differences in sociodemographic and (psycho)pathological characteristics between these diagnostic groups and (3) to explore the clinical relevance of the distinction between mild and moderate DSM 5 SSD. We used baseline data of a cohort of 325 MUPS patients. Measurements included questionnaires about symptom severity, physical functioning, anxiety, depression, health anxiety and illness perceptions. These questionnaires were used as proxy measures for operationalization of DSM IV and DSM 5 diagnostic criteria. 92.9% of participants fulfilled criteria of a DSM IV somatoform disorder, while 45.5% fulfilled criteria of DSM 5 SSD. Participants fulfilling criteria of DSM 5 SSD suffered from more severe symptoms than those only fulfilling criteria of a DSM IV somatoform disorder(mean PHQ-15 score of 13.98 (SD 5.17) versus 11.23 (SD 4.71), P-valuephysical functioning was significantly lower. Compared to patients with mild SSD, patients with moderate SSD suffered from significantly lower physical functioning and higher levels of depression. Within a population of MUPS patients DSM 5 SSD criteria are more restrictive than DSM IV criteria for somatoform disorders. They are associated with higher symptom severity and lower physical functioning. However, further specification of the positive psychological criteria of DSM 5 SSD may improve utility in research and practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hepatitis A - frequency in children with non-specific abdominal symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, R.; Ghafoor, T.; Sarfraz, M.; Hasan, N.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the frequency of subclinical hepatitis 'A' in children having non-specific abdominal symptoms. Subjects and Methods: Three hundred and sixty children of either gender, < 12 years of age, presenting with vague abdominal symptoms and no jaundice were evaluated for hepatitis. Eighty-eight (24.4%) children meeting the inclusion criteria of elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), twice the upper limits of normal (90 IU/L), and normal serum bilirubin were labeled as subclinical hepatitis. Results: A total of 360 children were evaluated for vague abdominal symptoms and 96 (26.7%) of them had hepatitis on laboratory profile. Eight patients developed early jaundice and were excluded from the study. Out of 88 (24.4%) cases of subclinical hepatitis, 82 (93.2%) had hepatitis-A, 03 (3.4%) had hepatitis-B, while no causative agent was found in 03 (3.4%) children. The common presenting symptoms were abdominal pain/discomfort, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, malaise, fatigue and fever. Hepatomegaly and splenomegaly was documented in 56% and 43% cases respectively. A history of exposure to a patient with hepatitis was present in 14/88 (15.9%) cases whereas no child was vaccinated against HAV. Serum ALT level declined to normal limits within 4 weeks for 77/88 (87.5%) cases and within 6 weeks for 84/88 (95.4%). All cases recovered spontaneously with out any complication. Conclusion: Hepatitis-A was rampant in children presenting with vague abdominal symptoms in our series. (author)

  12. Severe abdominal pain as a presenting symptom of probable catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskin, Orly; Amir, Jacob; Schwarz, Michael; Schonfeld, Tommy; Nahum, Elhanan; Ling, Galina; Prais, Dario; Harel, Liora

    2012-07-01

    Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in pediatric medicine is rare. We report 3 adolescents who presented with acute onset of severe abdominal pain as the first manifestation of probable catastrophic APS. The 3 patients, 2 male patients and 1 female patient were 14 to 18 years old. One had been diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus in the past, but the other 2 had no previous relevant medical history. All presented with excruciating abdominal pain without additional symptoms. Physical examination was noncontributory. Laboratory results were remarkable for high inflammatory markers. Abdominal ultrasonography was normal, and abdominal computed tomography scan showed nonspecific findings of liver infiltration. Only computed tomography angiography revealed evidence of extensive multiorgan thrombosis. All patients had elevated titers of antiphospholipid antibodies. The patients were treated with full heparinization, high-dose steroids, and intravenous immunoglobulin with a resolution of symptoms. One patient was resistant to the treatment and was treated with rituximab. In conclusion, severe acute abdominal pain can be the first manifestation of a thromboembolic event owing to catastrophic APS even in previously healthy adolescents. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion with prompt evaluation and treatment to prevent severe morbidity and mortality.

  13. Acute abdominal pain as the only symptom of a thoracic demyelinating lesion in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shohei; Shimakawa, Shuichi; Kashiwagi, Mitsuru; Tanabe, Takuya; Fukui, Miho; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a syndrome characterized by complex neurological symptoms resulting from demyelinating lesions in the central nervous system. We report a child with a relapse of MS whose only presenting symptom was severe abdominal pain. Dysfunctional intestinal mobility was assessed by abdominal computed tomography. Findings resembled paralytic ileus resulting from peritonitis. However, the patient demonstrated no other symptoms of peritonitis. A T2-weighted magnetic resonance image revealed a new demyelinating lesion localized to thoracic segments T4-T12. The lesion presumably affected autonomic efferents involved in intestinal mobility. Treatment with a pulse of methylprednisolone reduced both abdominal pain and lesion size. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a pediatric MS patient with a demyelinating lesion associated with an autonomic symptom of altered intestinal mobility in the absence of neurological symptoms. This atypical presentation of MS highlights the need for physicians' vigilance when treating this patient population. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of an educational intervention in family phisicians on self-rated quality of life in patients with medically unexplained symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivetić, Vojislav; Pašić, Klemen; Selič, Polona

    2017-06-01

    Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) are very common in family medicine, despite being a poorly-defined clinical entity. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an educational intervention (EI) on self-rated quality of life, treatment satisfaction, and the family physician-patient relationship in patients with MUS. In a multi-centre longitudinal intervention study, which was performed between 2012 and 2014, patients were asked to rate their quality of life, assess their depression, anxiety, stress and somatisation, complete the Hypochondriasis Index, the Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale and the Patient Enablement Instrument for assessing the physician-patient relationship, before and after the EI. The mean values before and after the intervention showed that after the EI, patients with MUS gave a lower (total) mean rating of their health issues and a higher rating of their quality of life, and they also had a more positive opinion of their relationship with the physician (p<0.05). However, there were no differences in the (total) rating of treatment satisfaction before and after the EI (p=0.423). Significant differences in the symptoms in patients with MUS before and after the intervention were confirmed for stress, somatisation and hypochondriasis (p<0.05). It could be beneficial to equip family physicians with the knowledge, skills and tools to reduce hypochondriasis and somatisation in MUS patients, which would improve patients' self-rated health status.

  15. The association of experience of violence and somatization, depression, and alexithymia: a sample of women with medically unexplained symptoms in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuk, Dilek; Bahadır, Güler

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between the levels of somatization, depression as well as alexithymia, and MUS in women going through violence experience in three contexts (childhood, adulthood, and both childhood and adulthood). The study was performed on 180 patients attending the Internal Medicine Department of Istanbul University Medical Faculty. The data of women with MUS (n = 50) were compared those of women with acute physical conditions (n = 46) and chronic physical conditions (n = 84). Semi-structured Interview Form, Childhood Abuse and Neglect Inventory, Brief Symptom Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, and the Toronto Alexithymia Scale were administered. The levels of somatization and depression were found to be higher in women who were exposed to emotional abuse (EA) and physical abuse (PA) in adulthood in the MUS group compared with those of the women exposed to EA and PA in adulthood in the other groups. The levels of somatization, depression, and alexithymia in the MUS group exposed to childhood emotional abuse (CEA) were also higher than those in the controls exposed to CEA. The levels of somatization and alexithymia in the MUS group who were exposed to childhood physical abuse (CPA) were higher than those in the controls exposed to CPA. The levels of somatization and depression in the MUS group who were exposed to violence both in childhood and in adulthood were higher than those in the controls who experienced violence both in childhood and in adulthood. Most women exposed to domestic violence present to health care institutions with various physical and psychological symptoms in Turkey. So, it is important that health caregivers also ask questions about experiences of violence and psychological symptoms in women presenting with medically unexplained symptoms.

  16. Prolonged unexplained fatigue in paediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged Unexplained Fatigue in Paediatrics. Fatigue, as the result of mental or physical exertion, will disappear after rest, drinks and food. Fatigue as a symptom of illness will recover with the recovering of the illness. But when fatigue is ongoing for a long time, and not the result of

  17. The association between medically unexplained physical symptoms and health care use over two years and the influence of depressive and anxiety disorders and personality traits: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Boeft, Madelon; Twisk, Jos W R; Terluin, Berend; Penninx, Brenda W J H; van Marwijk, Harm W J; Numans, Mattijs E; van der Wouden, Johannes C; van der Horst, Henriette E

    2016-03-22

    Medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) are highly prevalent and are associated with frequent health care use (HCU). MUPS frequently co-occur with psychiatric disorders. With this study we examined the longitudinal association between MUPS and HCU over 2 years and the influence of depressive and anxiety disorders and personality traits on this association. We analysed follow-up data from 2045 to 2981 participants from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA), a multisite cohort study. The study population included participants with a current depressive and/or anxiety disorder, participants with a lifetime risk and/or subthreshold symptoms for depressive and/or anxiety disorders and healthy controls. HCU, measured with the Trimbos and iMTA questionnaire on Costs associated with Psychiatric illness (TIC-P), was operationalized as the number of used medical services and the number of associated contacts. MUPS were measured with the Four Dimensional Symptoms Questionnaire, depressive and anxiety disorders with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and personality traits with the NEO Five-Factory Inventory. Measurements were taken at baseline, 1 and 2 years follow-up. We used generalized estimating equations (GEE), using HCU at all three measurements as (multivariate) outcome. GEE also takes into account the dependency of observations within participants. MUPS were positively associated with HCU over 2 years (medical services: RR 1.020, 95 % CI 1.017-1.022; contacts: RR 1.037, 95 % CI 1.030-1.044). Neuroticism and depression had the strongest influence on the associations. After adjustment for these factors, the associations between MUPS and HCU weakened, but remained significant (services: RR 1.011, 95 % CI 1.008-1.014; contacts: RR 1.023, 95 % CI 1.015-1.032). Our results show that MUPS were positively associated with HCU over 2 years, even after adjusting for depressive and anxiety disorders and personality traits.

  18. Sick-listed employees with severe medically unexplained physical symptoms: burden or routine for the occupational health physician? A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koopmans Petra C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The two primary objectives of this study were to the assess consultation load of occupational health physicians (OHPs, and their difficulties and needs with regard to their sickness certification tasks in sick-listed employees with severe medical unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS. Third objective was to determine which disease-, patient-, doctor- and practice-related factors are associated with the difficulties and needs of the OHPs. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 43 participating OHPs from 5 group practices assessed 489 sick-listed employees with and without severe MUPS. The OHPs filled in a questionnaire about difficulties concerning sickness certification tasks, consultation time, their needs with regard to consultation with or referral to a psychiatrist or psychologist, and communication with GPs. The OHPs also completed a questionnaire about their personal characteristics. Results OHPs only experienced task difficulties in employees with severe MUPS in relation to their communication with the treating physician. This only occured in cases in which the OHP attributed the physical symptoms to somatoform causes. If they attributed the physical symptoms to mental causes, the OHPs reported a need to consultate a psychiatrist about the diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions OHPs experience few difficulties with their sickness certification tasks and consultation load concerning employees with severe MUPS. However, they encounter problems if the diagnostic uncertainties of the treating physician interfere with the return to work process. OHPs have a need for psychiatric expertise whenever they are uncertain about the psychiatric causes of a delayed return to work process. We recommend further training programs for OHPs. They should also have more opportunity for consultation and referral to a psychiatrist, and their communication with treating physicians should be improved.

  19. Medically unexplained physical symptoms and work functioning over 2 years: their association and the influence of depressive and anxiety disorders and job characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Boeft, Madelon; Twisk, Jos W R; Hoekstra, Trynke; Terluin, Berend; Penninx, Brenda W J H; van der Wouden, Johannes C; Numans, Mattijs E; van der Horst, Henriette E

    2016-04-14

    Medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) are highly prevalent and may affect work functioning. In this study we aimed to assess the longitudinal association between MUPS and work functioning over 2 years and the influence of job characteristics and depressive and anxiety disorders on this association. We assessed the longitudinal association between MUPS and work functioning, operationalized in terms of absenteeism and disability at work, in 1887 working participants from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). The NESDA study population included participants with a current depressive and/or anxiety disorder, participants with a lifetime risk and/or subthreshold symptoms and healthy controls. Absenteeism was assessed with the Health and Labour Questionnaire Short Form and disability with the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II. MUPS were measured with the Four Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire. Measurements were taken at baseline and at 2 years follow-up. We used mixed model analyses to correct for the dependency of observations within participants. MUPS were positively associated with disability (regression coefficient 0.304; 95% CI 0.281-0.327) and with short and long-term absenteeism over 2 years (OR 1.030, 95% CI 1.016-1.045; OR 1.099, 95% CI 1.085-1.114). After adjusting for depressive disorders, anxiety disorders and job characteristics, associations weakened but remained significant. Our results show that MUPS were positively associated with disability and absenteeism over 2 years, even after adjusting for depressive and anxiety disorders and job characteristics. This suggests that early identification of MUPS and adequate management is important.

  20. Diagnostic testing for celiac disease among patients with abdominal symptoms: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Windt, Daniëlle A W M; Jellema, Petra; Mulder, Chris J; Kneepkens, C M Frank; van der Horst, Henriëtte E

    2010-05-05

    The symptoms and consequences of celiac disease usually resolve with a lifelong gluten-free diet. However, clinical presentation is variable and most patients presenting with abdominal symptoms in primary care will not have celiac disease and unnecessary diagnostic testing should be avoided. To summarize evidence on the performance of diagnostic tests for identifying celiac disease in adults presenting with abdominal symptoms in primary care or similar settings. A literature search via MEDLINE (beginning in January 1966) and EMBASE (beginning in January 1947) through December 2009 and a manual search of references for additional relevant studies. Diagnostic studies were selected if they had a cohort or nested case-control design, enrolled adults presenting with nonacute abdominal symptoms, the prevalence of celiac disease was 15% or less, and the tests used included gastrointestinal symptoms or serum antibody tests. Quality assessment using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool and data extraction were performed by 2 reviewers independently. Sensitivities and specificities were calculated for each study and pooled estimates were computed using bivariate analysis if there was clinical and statistical homogeneity. Sixteen studies were included in the review (N = 6085 patients). The performance of abdominal symptoms varied widely. The sensitivity of diarrhea, for example, ranged from 0.27 to 0.86 and specificity from 0.21 to 0.86. Pooled estimates for IgA antiendomysial antibodies (8 studies) were 0.90 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80-0.95) for sensitivity and 0.99 (95% CI, 0.98-1.00) for specificity (positive likelihood ratio [LR] of 171 and negative LR of 0.11). Pooled estimates for IgA antitissue transglutaminase antibodies (7 studies) were 0.89 (95% CI, 0.82-0.94) and 0.98 (95% CI, 0.95-0.99), respectively (positive LR of 37.7 and negative LR of 0.11). The IgA and IgG antigliadin antibodies showed variable results, especially for

  1. Symptom Profiles in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome or Functional Abdominal Pain Compared With Healthy Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varni, James W; Shulman, Robert J; Self, Mariella M; Nurko, Samuel; Saps, Miguel; Saeed, Shehzad A; Bendo, Cristiane B; Patel, Ashish S; Dark, Chelsea Vaughan; Zacur, George M; Pohl, John F

    2015-09-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures of gastrointestinal symptoms are recommended to determine treatment effects for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional abdominal pain (FAP). Study objectives were to compare the symptom profiles of pediatric patients with IBS or FAP with healthy controls and with each other using the PedsQL Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Gastrointestinal Worry Scales, and to establish clinical interpretability of PRO scale scores through identification of minimal important difference (MID) scores. Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Worry Scales were completed in a 9-site study by 154 pediatric patients and 161 parents (162 families; IBS n = 46, FAP n = 119). Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales measuring stomach pain, stomach discomfort when eating, food and drink limits, trouble swallowing, heartburn and reflux, nausea and vomiting, gas and bloating, constipation, blood in poop, and diarrhea were administered along with Gastrointestinal Worry Scales. A matched sample of 447 families with healthy children completed the scales. Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Worry Scales distinguished between patients with IBS or FAP compared with healthy controls (P 1.50) for symptoms indicative of IBS or FAP, demonstrating a broad multidimensional gastrointestinal symptom profile and clinical interpretability with MID scores for individual PRO scales. Patients with IBS manifested more symptoms of constipation, gas and bloating, and diarrhea than patients with FAP. Patients with IBS or FAP manifested a broad gastrointestinal symptom profile compared with healthy controls with large differences, indicating the critical need for more effective interventions to bring patient functioning within the range of healthy functioning.

  2. Hepatitis A--frequency in children with non-specific abdominal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Rahat; Ghafoor, Tariq; Sarfraz, Muhammad; Hasan, Najmul

    2004-06-01

    To study the frequency of subclinical hepatitis 'A' in children having non-specific abdominal symptoms. A descriptive study. This study was conducted at Combined Military Hospital (CMH), Peshawar from June to December 2000. Three hundred and sixty children of either gender, hepatitis. Eighty eight (24.4%) children meeting the inclusion criteria of elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), twice the upper limits of normal (90 IU/L), and normal serum bilirubin were labelled as subclinical hepatitis. A total of 360 children were evaluated for vague abdominal symptoms and 96 (26.7%) of them had hepatitis on laboratory profile. Eight patients developed early jaundice and were excluded from the study. Out of 88 (24.4%) cases of subclinical hepatitis, 82 (93.2%) had hepatitis-A, 03 (3.4%) had hepatitis-B, while no causative agent was found in 03 (3.4%) children. The common presenting symptoms were abdominal pain/discomfort, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, malaise, fatigue and fever. Hepatomegaly and splenomegaly was documented in 56% and 43% cases respectively. A history of exposure to a patient with hepatitis was present in 14/88 (15.9%) cases whereas no child was vaccinated against HAV. Serum ALT level declined to normal limits within 4 weeks for 77/88 (87.5%) cases and within 6 weeks for 84/88 (95.4%). All cases recovered spontaneously with out any complication. Hepatitis-A was rampant in children presenting with vague abdominal symptoms in our series.

  3. The effectiveness of empirical anti-parasitic treatment in returning travellers with persistent abdominal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, Batel; Lachish, Tamar; Schwartz, Eli

    2018-01-01

    Persistent abdominal symptoms (PAS) are common among returning-travellers. In the absence of sensitive tests to identify intestinal parasites, gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms often remain a diagnostic challenge. In this study we examined the effectiveness of empirical anti-parasitic treatment in returning-travellers with PAS despite no positive stool-test. A retrospective study among returning travellers who approached the clinic between the years 2014 and 2016 with GI complaints without a positive stool-test. The empirical treatment included broad-spectrum anti-parasitic agents-oral Tinidazole and Albendazole. A follow-up questionnaire was performed at least 6 months post-treatment. A total of 102 patients responded the questionnaire-50% women; average age 31.14 (±12.20) years. The average duration of complaints before treatment was 16.52 (±30.06) months. Common GI symptoms included abdominal pain (83.3%) and diarrhoea (78.4%); 67.6% of the patients complained of extreme fatigue. Overall, 69% of the patients reported an improvement in GI symptoms, 37% of them reported full recovery within a few weeks post-treatment. Furthermore, there was an improvement in the energy level and general well-being in 68% and 70% of the patients, respectively. Only 33% of the patients reported minor side effects related to the treatment. The improvement in GI symptoms, energy level and general well-being shortly after anti-parasitic treatment justifies this empirical approach in returning-travellers with PAS despite negative stool-tests. The association between fatigue and PAS post-travel and the improvement in both as a response to treatment defines fatigue as part of a new syndrome-'Post-travel fatigue and abdominal symptoms'. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Test-positive rate at CT colonography is increased by rectal bleeding and/or unexplained weight loss, unlike other common gastrointestinal symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hock, D.; Materne, R.; Ouhadi, R.; Mancini, I.; Aouachria, S.A.; Nchimi, A.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the rate of significant colonic and extra-colonic abnormalities at computed tomography colonography (CTC), according to symptoms and age. We retrospectively evaluated 7361 consecutive average-risk subjects (3073 males, average age: 60.3 ± 13.9; range 18–96 years) for colorectal cancer (CRC) who underwent CTC. They were divided into three groups according to clinical symptoms: 1343 asymptomatic individuals (group A), 899 patients with at least one “alarm” symptom for CRC, including rectal bleeding and unexplained weight loss (group C), and 5119 subjects with other gastrointestinal symptoms (group B). Diagnostic and test-positive rates of CTC were established using optical colonoscopy (OC) and/or surgery as reference standard. In addition, clinically significant extra-colonic findings were noted. 903 out of 7361 (12%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11–0.13) subjects had at least one clinically significant colonic finding at CTC. CTC true positive fraction and false positive fraction were respectively 637/642 (99.2%, 95%CI 0.98–0.99) and 55/692 (7.95%, 95%CI 0.05–0.09). The pooled test-positive rate in group C (138/689, 20.0%, 95%CI 0.17–0.23) was significantly higher than in both groups A (79/1343, 5.9%, 95%CI 0.04–0.07) and B (420/5329, 7.5%, 95%CI 0.07–0.08) (p < 0.001). Aging and male gender were associated to a higher test positive rate. The rate of clinically significant extra-colonic findings was significantly higher in group C (44/689, 6.4%, 95%CI 0.04–0.08) versus groups A (26/1343, 1.9%, 95%CI 0.01–0.02) and B (64/5329, 1.2%, 95%CI 0.01–0.02) (p < 0.001). Both test-positive and significant extra-colonic finding rates at CTC are significantly increased in the presence of “alarm” gastrointestinal symptoms especially in older patients

  5. The effectiveness of a training for patients with unexplained physical symptoms: protocol of a cognitive behavioral group training and randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passchier Jan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In primary care, up to 74% of physical symptoms is classified as unexplained. These symptoms can cause high levels of distress and healthcare utilization. Cognitive behavioral therapy has shown to be effective, but does not seem to be attractive to patients. An exception herein is a therapy based on the consequences model, which distinguishes itself by its labeling of psychosocial distress in terms of consequences rather than as causes of physical symptoms. In secondary care, 81% of the patients accepts this therapy, but in primary care the outcome is poor. We assume that positive outcome can also be reached in primary care, when the consequences model is modified and used bottom-up in an easily accessible group training, in which patients are relieved of being blamed for their symptoms. Our aim is to investigate the (cost-effectiveness of this training. Methods and design A randomized controlled trial is designed. One hundred patients are randomized to either the group training or the waiting list. Physicians in general practices and outpatients clinics of general hospitals refer patients. Referral leads to inclusion if patients are between 18 and 65 years old, understand Dutch, have no handicaps impeding participation and the principal DSM-IV-TR classification is undifferentiated somatoform disorder or chronic pain disorder. In contrast to other treatment effect studies, the co-morbidity of a personality disorder does not lead to exclusion. By this, we optimize the comparability between the study population and patients in daily practice enlarging the generalization possibilities. Also in contrast to other effect studies, we chose quality of life (SF-36 instead of physical symptoms as the primary outcome measure. The SF-6D is used to estimate Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs. Costs are measured with the Trimbos/iMTA Questionnaire for Costs associated with Psychiatric Illness. Measurements are scheduled at baseline, after

  6. Predicting the outcome of a cognitive-behavioral group training for patients with unexplained physical symptoms: a one-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonneveld Lyonne NL

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT is effective for Unexplained Physical Symptoms (UPS, some therapists in clinical practice seem to believe that CBT outcome will diminish if psychiatric comorbidity is present. The result is that patients with a psychiatric comorbidity are redirected from treatment for UPS into treatment for mental health problems. To explore whether this selection and allocation are appropriate, we explored whether CBT outcomes in UPS could be predicted by variables assessed at baseline and used in routine-practice assessments. Methods Patients (n=162 with UPS classified as undifferentiated somatoform disorder or chronic pain disorder were followed up until one year after they had attended a CBT group training. The time-points of the follow-up were at the end of CBT (immediate outcome, three months after CBT (short-term outcome, and one year after CBT (long-term outcome. CBT outcome was measured using the Physical Component Summary of the SF-36, which was the primary outcome measure in the randomized controlled trial that studied effectiveness of the CBT group training. Predictors were: 1. psychological symptoms (global severity score of SCL-90, 2. personality-disorder characteristics (sum of DSM-IV axis II criteria confirmed, 3. psychiatric history (past presence of DSM-IV axis I disorders, and 4. health-related quality of life in the mental domain (mental component summary of SF-36. The effect of this predictor set was explored using hierarchical multiple regression analyses into which these predictors had been entered simultaneously, after control for: a. pretreatment primary outcome scores, b. age, c. gender, d. marital status, and e. employment. Results The predictor set was significant only for short-term CBT outcome, where it explained 15% of the variance. A better outcome was predicted by more psychological symptoms, fewer personality-disorder characteristics, the presence of a psychiatric

  7. Neuroimmune interactions at different intestinal sites are related to abdominal pain symptoms in children with IBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nardo, G; Barbara, G; Cucchiara, S; Cremon, C; Shulman, R J; Isoldi, S; Zecchi, L; Drago, L; Oliva, S; Saulle, R; Barbaro, M R; Stronati, L

    2014-02-01

    Neuroimmune interactions and inflammation have been proposed as factors involved in sensory-motor dysfunction and symptom generation in adult irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. In children with IBS and healthy controls, we measured ileocolonic mast cell infiltration and fecal calprotectin and evaluated the relationships between these parameters and abdominal pain symptoms and stooling pattern. Irritable bowel syndrome patients diagnosed according to Pediatric Rome III criteria and healthy controls kept a 2-week pain/stooling diary. Ileocolonic mucosal mast cells (MC) and MC in close proximity to nerve fibers (MC-NF) were identified immunohistochemically and quantified. Fecal calprotectin concentration was measured. 21 IBS patients and 10 controls were enrolled. The MC-NF count was significantly higher in the ileum (p = 0.01), right colon (p = 0.04), and left colon (p Abdominal pain intensity score correlated with ileal MC count (r(s) = 0.47, p = 0.030) and right colon MC-NF count (r(s) = 0.52, p = 0.015). In addition, children with IBS with >3 abdominal pain episodes/week had greater ileal (p = 0.002) and right colonic (p = 0.01) MC counts and greater ileal (p = 0.05) and right colonic (p = 0.016) MC-NF counts than children with less frequent pain. No relationship was found between MC and MC-NF and fecal calprotectin or stooling pattern. Mast cells-nerve fibers counts are increased in the ileocolonic mucosa of children with IBS. Mast cells and MC-NF counts are related to the intensity and frequency of abdominal pain. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The Relaxation Exercise and Social Support Trial (RESST: a community-based randomized controlled trial to alleviate medically unexplained vaginal discharge symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobeissi Loulou

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptoms such as medically unexplained vaginal discharge (MUVD are common and bothersome, leading to potentially unnecessary use of resources. Methods A community-based individually randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a relatively simple, culturally appropriate multi-component intervention on reducing reported MUVD, among women suffering from low-moderate levels of common mental distress. The setting was a socio-economically deprived, informal settlement in the southern suburbs of Beirut, Lebanon. The intervention comprised up to 12 group sessions implemented over a six-week period, each divided into a psychosocial and a relaxation exercise component. The primary outcome was self-reported MUVD, which was defined as a complaint of vaginal discharge upon ruling out reproductive tract infections (RTIs, through lab analysis. Anxiety and/or depression symptoms were the secondary outcomes for this trial. These were assessed using an Arabic validated version of the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist-25 (HSCL-25. Assessments were done at baseline and six months using face-to face interviews, pelvic examinations and laboratory tests. Women were randomized into either intervention or control group. Blinding on the intervention status was not possible for both logistic and ethical reasons, especially as knowledge of involvement in the intervention was integral to its delivery. Intent to treat analysis was used. Results Of 75 women randomized to the intervention, 48% reported MUVD at 6 months compared with 63% of 73 in the control group (difference of -15%, 95% confidence interval (CI -31%, 0%, p=0.067. Adjustments for baseline imbalances and any factors relating to consent had no appreciable effect on these results. The risk of MUVD was reduced in absolute terms by 2.4% for each intervention session attended (95% CI -4.9%, 0.0%, p=0.049. While there was also marginal evidence of a beneficial effect on anxiety, there was

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... often used to determine the cause of unexplained pain. CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. ... help diagnose the cause of abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of the internal organs, small bowel ...

  10. Systematic unenhanced CT for acute abdominal symptoms in the elderly patients improves both emergency department diagnosis and prompt clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, Ingrid; Pages-Bouic, Emma; Curros-Doyon, Fernanda; Taourel, Patrice; Sebbane, Mustapha; Molinari, Nicolas; Riou, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    To assess the added-value of systematic unenhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) on emergency department (ED) diagnosis and management accuracy compared to current practice, in elderly patients with non-traumatic acute abdominal symptoms. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. This prospective study included 401 consecutive patients 75 years of age or older, admitted to the ED with acute abdominal symptoms, and investigated by early systematic unenhanced abdominal CT scan. ED diagnosis and intended management before CT, after unenhanced CT, and after contrast CT if requested, were recorded. Diagnosis and management accuracies were evaluated and compared before CT (clinical strategy) and for two conditional strategies (current practice and systematic unenhanced CT). An expert clinical panel assigned a final diagnosis and management after a 3-month follow-up. Systematic unenhanced CT significantly improved the accurate diagnosis (76.8% to 85%, p=1.1 x 10 -6 ) and management (88.5% to 95.8%, p=2.6 x 10 -6 ) rates compared to current practice. It allowed diagnosing 30.3% of acute unsuspected pathologies, 3.4% of which were unexpected surgical procedure requirement. Systematic unenhanced abdominal CT improves ED diagnosis accuracy and appropriate management in elderly patients presenting with acute abdominal symptoms compared to current practice. (orig.)

  11. Systematic unenhanced CT for acute abdominal symptoms in the elderly patients improves both emergency department diagnosis and prompt clinical management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millet, Ingrid; Pages-Bouic, Emma; Curros-Doyon, Fernanda; Taourel, Patrice [CHU Lapeyronie, Department of Medical Imaging, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Sebbane, Mustapha [Department of Emergency Medicine, CHU Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France); Molinari, Nicolas [Department of Medical Information and Statistics, CHU Montpellier (France); Riou, Bruno [GH Pitie-Salpetriere, APHP, Department of Emergency Medicine and Surgery, Paris (France)

    2017-02-15

    To assess the added-value of systematic unenhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) on emergency department (ED) diagnosis and management accuracy compared to current practice, in elderly patients with non-traumatic acute abdominal symptoms. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. This prospective study included 401 consecutive patients 75 years of age or older, admitted to the ED with acute abdominal symptoms, and investigated by early systematic unenhanced abdominal CT scan. ED diagnosis and intended management before CT, after unenhanced CT, and after contrast CT if requested, were recorded. Diagnosis and management accuracies were evaluated and compared before CT (clinical strategy) and for two conditional strategies (current practice and systematic unenhanced CT). An expert clinical panel assigned a final diagnosis and management after a 3-month follow-up. Systematic unenhanced CT significantly improved the accurate diagnosis (76.8% to 85%, p=1.1 x 10{sup -6}) and management (88.5% to 95.8%, p=2.6 x 10{sup -6}) rates compared to current practice. It allowed diagnosing 30.3% of acute unsuspected pathologies, 3.4% of which were unexpected surgical procedure requirement. Systematic unenhanced abdominal CT improves ED diagnosis accuracy and appropriate management in elderly patients presenting with acute abdominal symptoms compared to current practice. (orig.)

  12. Trajectories of Symptoms and Impairment for Pediatric Patients with Functional Abdominal Pain: A 5-Year Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvaney, Shelagh; Lambert, E. Warren; Garber, Judy; Walker, Lynn S.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This prospective study characterizes trajectories of symptoms and impairment in pediatric patients with abdominal pain not associated with identifiable organic disease. Method: The Children's Somatization Inventory and the Functional Disability Inventory were administered four times over 5 years to 132 patients (6-18 years old) seen in…

  13. Abdominal symptoms in general practice: Frequency, cancer suspicions raised, and actions taken by GPs in six European countries. Cohort study with prospective registration of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtedahl, Knut; Vedsted, Peter; Borgquist, Lars; Donker, Gé A; Buntinx, Frank; Weller, David; Braaten, Tonje; Hjertholm, Peter; Månsson, Jörgen; Strandberg, Eva Lena; Campbell, Christine; Ellegaard, Lisbeth; Parajuli, Ranjan

    2017-06-01

    Abdominal symptoms are diagnostically challenging to general practitioners (GPs): although common, they may indicate cancer. In a prospective cohort of patients, we examined abdominal symptom frequency, initial diagnostic suspicion, and actions of GPs in response to abdominal symptoms. Over a 10-day period, 493 GPs in Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Scotland, recorded consecutive consultations: sex, date of birth and any specified abdominal symptoms. For patients with abdominal symptoms, additional data on non-specific symptoms, GPs' diagnostic suspicion, and features of the consultation were noted. Data on all cancer diagnoses among all included patients were requested from the GPs eight months later. Consultations with 61802 patients were recorded. Abdominal symptoms were recorded in 6264 (10.1%) patients. A subsequent malignancy was reported in 511 patients (0.8%): 441 (86.3%) had a new cancer, 70 (13.7%) a recurrent cancer. Abdominal symptoms were noted in 129 (25.2%) of cancer patients ( P GPs noted a suspicion of cancer for 85 (65.9%) versus 1895 (30.9%) when there was no subsequent cancer ( P GPs' diagnostic thinking and referral practices.

  14. Opinions about 'unexplained subfertility'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batstra, L; van de Wiel, HBM; Schuiling, GA

    2002-01-01

    The term 'unexplained subfertility' applies to the situation in which a couple, despite serious attempts, does not achieve pregnancy, while according to current knowledge no physiological or anatomical abnormalities can be found. In this paper, possible causes of this phenomenon are reviewed and

  15. Sick leave and work disability in primary care patients with recent-onset multiple medically unexplained symptoms and persistent somatoform disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Mette T; Rosendal, Marianne; Fenger-Grøn, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Denne artikel undersøger karakteristika, sygefravær og førtidspension for patienter med multiple medicinsk uforklarede symptomer (MUS) og somatoforme lidelser og sammenligner disse med en gruppe af patienter med veldefineret fysisk sygdom. Resultaterne viser, at patienter med somatoforme lidelser...

  16. Dysautonomia: an Explanation for the Medically Unexplained?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Chandrasekaram

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify dysautonomia as a collection of conditions with variable presentation that may be mistaken for medically unexplained symptoms. Methods: Case series. Results: Tilt table testing and 24 h electrocardiographic monitoring provided useful diagnostic tools to confirm the diagnosis. Conclusion: A greater awareness and recognition of the disorders that result from dysautonomia and recognition of the disability that results from these disorders will improve patients’ quality of life.

  17. Abdominal obesity: causal factor or simply a symptom of obesity-related health risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sechang Oh,1 Kiyoji Tanaka,2 Jin-won Noh,3 Rina So,2,4 Takehiko Tsujimoto,2 Hiroyuki Sasai,1,4 Mijung Kim,5 Junichi Shoda11Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; 2Faculty of Health and Sports Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; 3Department of Healthcare Management, Eulji University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea; 4Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, Japan; 5Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, JapanBackground: Abdominal fat (AF reduction is advocated in the treatment of obesity-related diseases. Nonetheless, recent studies have shown additional beneficial effects against obesity-related health risks, independent of AF reduction. Therefore it is important to determine whether AF plays a causal role in promoting metabolic disorders or is simply a symptom of increased obesity-related health risk factors. Clarification of the primary role of AF in the pathogenesis of obesity-related disease is also important.Objective: This retrospective study was conducted with the objectives of 1 comparison between groups exhibiting equivalent amounts of AF loss that resulted from distinct treatments (exercise and dietary restriction with respect to degrees of improvement in obesity-related health risk factors and 2 determination of definite differences in the outcomes of obesity-related health risk in subjects receiving identical treatment (exercise but exhibiting a remarkable difference in AF reduction.Design: In 66 subjects who completed a 12-week exercise or dietary restriction program, 17 parameters (systolic blood pressure [SBP] and diastolic blood pressure [DBP]; high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP]; leptin, adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, interleukin [IL]-6; alanine aminotransferase [ALT], gamma glutamyl transpeptidase [γGT]; lipid profile: high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDLC], triglyceride [TG

  18. Could kinesiology taping help mitigate pain, breathlessness and abdominal-related symptoms in cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Gourav; Rose, Alison; Briggs, Michelle; Johnson, Mark I

    2017-02-24

    We present the case of a woman who was an amateur athlete diagnosed with primary breast cancer, and 10 years later with terminal metastatic cancer. This case report was prepared posthumously in co-operation with her next of kin (husband). The patient first presented to a sports physiotherapist (AR) for her pain-management and to help maintain physical fitness so that she could continue with sports and an active lifestyle. The patient continued with physiotherapy for several months to enable her to be active. However, when her health deteriorated significantly due to advancing cancer, the treatment was modified and aimed at improving the patient's general well-being. The physiotherapist applied kinesiology tape over the patient's lower rib cage, diaphragm and abdomen in an attempt to manage pain, breathlessness and abdominal bloating. The patient reported alleviation of pain, breathlessness, abdominal discomfort and nausea, accompanied by improvements in eating, drinking, energy levels and physical function. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  19. Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid, ameliorates acute inflammatory and nociceptive symptoms in gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jun Ho; Ha, Van Thai; Kim, Han Gyung; Yi, Young-Su; Kim, Ji Hye; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Sung, Nak Yoon; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-07-01

    Kaempferol (KF) is the most abundant polyphenol in tea, fruits, vegetables, and beans. However, little is known about its in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy and mechanisms of action. To study these, several acute mouse inflammatory and nociceptive models, including gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain were employed. Kaempferol was shown to attenuate the expansion of inflammatory lesions seen in ethanol (EtOH)/HCl- and aspirin-induced gastritis, LPS/caerulein (CA) triggered pancreatitis, and acetic acid-induced writhing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. An unusual cause of chronic abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass: Case report of a penetrating fish bone causing adhesions at the biliary-digestive junction resulting in partial obstruction and chronic symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Ochieng

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This case highlights the possibility of a missed fish bone perforation causing chronic postprandial abdominal pain and discomfort in a patient with a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass anatomy. Foreign body perforation is a rare cause of abdominal pain after gastric bypass that should be considered when evaluating chronic abdominal pain symptoms after LRYGP.

  1. Validation of the Rome III criteria and alarm symptoms for recurrent abdominal pain in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, Carolien F. M.; Benninga, Marc A.; Schweizer, Joachim J.; Kneepkens, C. M. Frank; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Büller, Hans A.

    2014-01-01

    Rome criteria were formulated to define functional gastrointestinal disorders (Rome III criteria, 2006) excluding organic diagnoses when alarm symptoms were absent. The aims of the study were to validate the Rome III criteria as to their capacity to differentiate between organic and functional

  2. RETRACTED: Treatment of postoperative emetic symptoms with granisetron in women undergoing abdominal hysterectomy: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MD Yoshitaka Fujii

    2004-07-01

    Fujii Y, Tanaka H, Somekawa Y. Treatment of postoperative emetic symptoms with granisetron in women undergoing abdominal hysterectomy: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study. Current Therapeutic Research 2004;65:321–9. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0011393X04800018

  3. Non-invasive neuromodulation as a new therapeutic strategy in the management of functional somatic symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, Elouise; van Belkum, Sjoerd; Hanekamp, Sandra; Noort, P.D.; Broersma, Marja; van Beilen, Marije

    2017-01-01

    Objective A large proportion of medical symptoms remain unexplained and inadequate medical management is the result of this. These unexplained symptoms include functional neurological symptoms, fibromyalgia, complex regional pain syndrome and other symptoms such as chronic pain, tinnitus and

  4. Pain symptoms and stooling patterns do not drive diagnostic costs for children with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in primary or tertiary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Mariella M; Weidler, Erica M; Czyzewski, Danita I; Shulman, Robert J

    2009-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) compare the cost of medical evaluation for children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome brought to a pediatric gastroenterologist versus children who remained in the care of their pediatrician, (2) compare symptom characteristics for the children in primary versus tertiary care, and (3) examine if symptom characteristics predicted the cost of medical evaluation. Eighty-nine children aged 7 to 10 years with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome seen by a gastroenterologist (n = 46) or seen only by a pediatrician (n = 43) completed daily pain and stool diaries for 2 weeks. Mothers provided retrospective reports of their children's symptoms in the previous year. Cost of medical evaluation was calculated via chart review of diagnostic tests and application of prices as if the patients were self-pay. Child-reported diary data reflected no significant group differences with respect to pain, interference with activities, or stool characteristics. In contrast, mothers of children evaluated by a gastroenterologist viewed their children as having higher maximum pain intensity in the previous year. Excluding endoscopy costs, cost of medical evaluation was fivefold higher for children evaluated by a gastroenterologist, with higher cost across blood work, stool studies, breath testing, and diagnostic imaging. Symptom characteristics did not predict cost of care for either group. Despite the lack of difference in symptom characteristics between children in primary and tertiary care, a notable differential in cost of evaluation exists in accordance with level of care. Symptom characteristics do not seem to drive diagnostic evaluation in either primary or tertiary care. Given the lack of differences in child-reported symptoms and the maternal perspective that children evaluated by a gastroenterologist had more severe pain, we speculate that parent perception of child symptoms may be a primary factor in

  5. Lead intoxication due to ayurvedic medications as a cause of abdominal pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Varun; Midha, Vandana; Mahajan, Ramit; Narang, Vikram; Wander, Praneet; Sood, Ridhi; Sood, Ajit

    2017-02-01

    Though a majority of cases of lead intoxication come from occupational exposures, traditional and folk remedies have also been reported to contain toxic amounts of lead. We present a large series of patients with lead poisoning due to intake of Ayurvedic medicines, all of whom presented with unexplained abdominal pain. This was a retrospective, observational case series from a tertiary care center in India. The charts of patients who underwent blood lead level (BLL) testing as a part of workup for unexplained abdominal pain between 2005 and 2013 were reviewed. The patients with lead intoxication (BLLs >25 μg/dl) were identified and demographics, history, possible risk factors, clinical presentation and investigations were reviewed. Treatment details, duration, time to symptomatic recovery, laboratory follow-up and adverse events during therapy were recorded. BLLs were tested in 786 patients with unexplained abdominal pain and high levels were identified in 75 (9.5%) patients, of which a majority (73 patients, 9.3%) had history of Ayurvedic medication intake and only two had occupational exposure. Five randomly chosen Ayurvedic medications were analyzed and lead levels were impermissibly high (14-34,950 ppm) in all of them. Besides pain in abdomen, other presenting complaints were constipation, hypertension, neurological symptoms and acute kidney injury. Anemia and abnormal liver biochemical tests were observed in all the 73 patients. Discontinuing the Ayurvedic medicines and chelation with d-penicillamine led to improvement in symptoms and reduction in BLLs in all patients within 3-4 months. The patients presenting with severe recurrent abdominal pain, anemia and history of use of Ayurvedic medicines should be evaluated for lead toxicity. Early diagnosis in such cases can prevent unnecessary investigations and interventions, and permits early commencement of the treatment.

  6. Lower urinary tract symptoms after subtotal versus total abdominal hysterectomy: exploratory analyses from a randomized clinical trial with a 14-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lea Laird; Møller, Lars Mikael Alling; Gimbel, Helga

    2015-12-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common after hysterectomy and increase after menopause. We aimed to compare subtotal with total abdominal hysterectomy regarding LUTS, including urinary incontinence (UI) subtypes, 14 years after hysterectomy. Main results from this randomized clinical trial have been published previously; the analyses covered in this paper are exploratory. We performed a long-term questionnaire follow-up of women in a randomized clinical trial (n = 319), from 1996 to 2000 comparing subtotal with total abdominal hysterectomy. Of the randomized women, ten had died and five had left Denmark; 304 women were contacted. For univariate analyses, a χ(2)-test was used, and for multivariate analyses, we used logistic regression. The questionnaire was answered by 197 (64.7 %) women (subtotal 97; total 100). More women had subjective stress UI (SUI) in the subtotal group (n = 60; 62.5 %) compared with the total group (n = 45; 45 %), with a relative risk (RR) of 1.39 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.81; P = 0.014]. No difference was seen between subtotal and total abdominal hysterectomy in other LUTS. Factors associated with UI were UI prior to hysterectomy, local estrogen treatment, and body mass index (BMI) > 25 kg/m(2). High BMI was primarily associated with mixed UI (MUI) and urgency symptoms. Predictors of bothersome LUTS were UI and incomplete bladder emptying. The difference in the frequency of subjectively assessed UI between subtotal and total abdominal hysterectomy (published previously) is caused by a difference in subjectively assessed SUI; UI prior to hysterectomy and high BMI are related to UI 14 years after hysterectomy. The trial is registered on clinicaltrials.gov under Nykoebing Falster County Hospital Record sj-268: Total versus subtotal hysterectomy: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01880710?term=hysterectomy&rank=27.

  7. Does a low FODMAPs diet reduce symptoms of functional abdominal pain disorders? A systematic review in adult and paediatric population, on behalf of Italian Society of Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Rossella; Salvatore, Silvia; Miele, Erasmo; Romano, Claudio; Marseglia, Gian Luigi; Staiano, Annamaria

    2018-05-15

    Despite the rising of the Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (FGIDs)' incidence in the last years, the etio-pathogenesis of FGIDs remains unclear. The diet seems to play an important role in these disorders. Indeed, at least two thirds of adult patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and of children with FGIDs perceive their GI symptoms to be food-related. In particular, in the last years, more interest has been focused in the low Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides, and Polyol (FODMAPs) diet. To provide a systematic review on the efficacy of a low FODMAPs diet in reducing symptoms associated with functional abdominal pain disorders. Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (via Pubmed), and EMBASE databases from inception to June 2017 were searched. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), prospective and retrospective studies, systematic reviews and meta-analyses, reporting the efficacy of the FODMAPs diet intervention in FGIDs patients. Nineteen studies were eligible. A FODMAPs-restricted diet is beneficial in 12/13 intervention trials. The low FODMAPs diet improves overall GI symptoms, especially abdominal pain and bloating. In children, only one study reported positive results of a low FODMAPs diet. No effect was found for the lactose free diet whilst fructose-restricted diet was effective in 3/4 studies. The duration of the intervention was very different among the studies, ranging from 2 days to 16 months, and from 3 and 9 weeks for the RCTs. The majority of the trials presented differences in symptoms scoring scales, diet, food diaries, and food frequencies questionnaire. The FODMAPs-restricted diet may be an effective dietary intervention for reducing IBS symptoms in adults. In children, there are promising data, although only one randomized double-blind study exists and further data are needed to better clarify the role of FODMAPs and fructose-restricted diet in IBS. The current evidence does not support the use of a lactose

  8. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  9. Undiagnosed pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and chronic pancreatitis in functional GI disorder patients with diarrhea or abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Nicholas J; Holtmann, Gerald; Nguyen, Quoc Nam; Gibson, Peter; Bampton, Peter; Veysey, Martin; Wong, James; Philcox, Stephen; Koloski, Natasha; Bunby, Lisa; Jones, Michael

    2017-11-01

    A previous UK study showed that 6.1% of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) had evidence of severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI), but these findings need replication. We aimed to identify the prevalence of PEI based on fecal elastase stool testing in consecutive outpatients presenting with chronic unexplained abdominal pain and/or diarrhea and/or IBS-D. Patients aged over 40 years presenting to hospital outpatient clinics from six sites within Australia with unexplained abdominal pain and/or diarrhea for at least 3 months and/or IBS-D were studied. Patients completed validated questionnaires and donated a stool sample in which elastase concentration was measured by ELISA. A concentration of abdominal CT. Two hundred eighteen patients (mean age of 60 years, 29.4% male) were studied. PEI was found in 4.6% (95% CI 2.2-8.3%) (n = 10), with five patients (2.3% (95% CI 0.8-5.3%) having severe PEI. Only male sex and heavy alcohol use were significantly associated with abnormal versus normal pancreatic functioning. Of seven patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound or CT, two had features indicative of chronic pancreatitis. One in 50 patients with IBS-D or otherwise unexplained abdominal pain or diarrhea have an abnormal fecal elastase, but unexpected pancreatic insufficiency was detected in only a minority of these. This study failed to confirm the high prevalence of PEI among patients with unexplained GI symptoms previously reported. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Abdominal angina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.J.; Stewart, J.; Holden, R.W.; Yune, H.Y.; Mail, J.T.; Klatte, E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Abdominal angina due to occlusive disease of the mesenteric arteries has been the to become clinically manifest only in the presence of severe disease in at least two of the following vessels: celiac, SMA, and IMA. Still, many patients who gradually develop significant two-vessel disease have few or no associated symptoms. Differences in collateral circulation and in cardiac index account for some of the clinical variation. The usual clinical manifestations include severe post-prandial pain, sitophobia (fear of eating because of the anticipated symptoms), and profound weight loss. Uncommonly, diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting may be encountered. Smoking is a common historical feature. Most series document a female predilection. Aside from occasional abdominal bruits and (more commonly) findings of peripheral vascular occlusive disease, the physical exam discloses only cachexia. But the differential diagnosis of profound weight loss is extensive. Therefore, abdominal angina has always created a diagnostic challenge. Multiple imaging modalities are often employed, and a seemingly negative evaluation often culminates in biplane aortography. The latter typically reveals stenoses and/or occlusions in at least two of the three mesenteric arteries. The authors discuss how a variety of surgical treatments, including thromboendarterectomy and bypass grafting, have evolved. Recently reported results have been excellent

  11. Abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raissaki, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: There are numerous conditions that affect mainly or exclusively the pediatric population. These constitute true emergencies, related to patient's health. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of abdominal non-traumatic emergencies may result in rapid deterioration, peritonitis, sepsis, even death or in severe complications with subsequent morbidity. Abdominal emergencies in children mostly present with pain, tenderness, occasionally coupled by vomiting, fever, abdominal distension, and failure to pass meconium or stools. Diarrhea, blood per rectum, abnormal laboratory tests and lethargy may also be manifestations of acute abdominal conditions. Abdominal emergencies have a different aetiology, depending on age and whether the pain is acute or chronic. Symptoms have to be matched with age and gender. Newborns up to 1 months of age may have congenital diseases: atresia, low obstruction including Hirschsprung's disease, meconium ileus. Meconium plug is one of the commonest cause of low obstruction in newborns that may also develop necrotizing enterocolitis, incarcerated inguinal hernia and mid-gut volvulus. Past the immediate postnatal period, any duodenal obstruction should be considered midgut volvulus until proven otherwise and patients should undergo ultrasonography and/or properly performed upper GI contrast study that records the exact position of the deduno-jejunal junction. Infants 6 months-2 years carry the risk of intussusception, mid-gut volvulus, perforation, acute pyelonephritis. Preschool and school-aged children 2-12 years carry the risk of appendicitis, genito-urinary abnormalities including torsion, urachal abnormalities, haemolytic uremic syndrome and Henoch-Schonlein purpura. Children above 12 years suffer from the same conditions as in adults. Most conditions may affect any age despite age predilection. Abdominal solid organ ultrasonography (US) coupled with gastrointestinal ultrasonography is the principle imaging modality in radiosensitive

  12. Tuberculosis abdominal Abdominal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    T. Rubio; M. T. Gaztelu; A. Calvo; M. Repiso; H. Sarasíbar; F. Jiménez Bermejo; A. Martínez Echeverría

    2005-01-01

    La tuberculosis abdominal cursa con un cuadro inespecífico, con difícil diagnóstico diferencial respecto a otras entidades de similar semiología. Presentamos el caso de un varón que ingresa por presentar dolor abdominal, pérdida progresiva y notoria de peso corporal y fiebre de dos meses de evolución. El cultivo de la biopsia de colon mostró presencia de bacilo de Koch.Abdominal tuberculosis develops according to a non-specific clinical picture, with a difficult differential diagnosis with re...

  13. Unexplained infertility: association with inherited thrombophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatini, Cinzia; Conti, Lucia; Turillazzi, Valentina; Sticchi, Elena; Romagnuolo, Ilaria; Milanini, Maria Novella; Cozzi, Cinzia; Abbate, Rosanna; Noci, Ivo

    2012-05-01

    Unexplained infertility represents one of the most common diagnoses in fertility care. Attention is being paid to the association between inherited thrombophilia and infertility causes. In this study we investigated the prevalence of inherited thrombophilia according to infertility causes. We studied Prothrombin gene G20210A mutation, Factor V Leiden, deficiencies in protein S and C and antithrombin in 930 Caucasian infertile women referred to Fertility Center of the Department of Sciences for Woman and Child's Health, University of Florence, of whom 230 with unexplained, 195 female and 283 male infertility, and in 240 women who have conceived naturally without hormonal stimulation therapy. A significant relationship between inherited thrombophilia [OR 95%CI 1.97 (1.05-3.68), p = 0.03] and unexplained infertility was observed, whereas no association between thrombophilia and female and male infertility was found. Significantly higher prevalence of prothrombin gene mutation in unexplained infertile women in comparison to that observed in fertile women was observed (5.7% vs 2.1% p = 0.04); the prevalence of the other thrombophilia determinants was higher, even if not significantly, in the unexplained infertile group. This study demonstrates the relationship between inherited thrombophilia and unexplained infertility, thus suggesting the contribution of genetic components in modulating unexplained infertility, behind anovulation, male and tubal factor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Child with Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rajalakshmi; Nallasamy, Karthi

    2018-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the common symptoms reported by children in urgent care clinics. While most children tend to have self-limiting conditions, the treating pediatrician should watch out for underlying serious causes like intestinal obstruction and perforation peritonitis, which require immediate referral to an emergency department (ED). Abdominal pain may be secondary to surgical or non-surgical causes, and will differ as per the age of the child. The common etiologies for abdominal pain presenting to an urgent care clinic are acute gastro-enteritis, constipation and functional abdominal pain; however, a variety of extra-abdominal conditions may also present as abdominal pain. Meticulous history taking and physical examination are the best tools for diagnosis, while investigations have a limited role in treating benign etiologies.

  15. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mussi Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82±7 years, range 65–101. Falls were defined “accidental” (fall explained by a definite accidental cause, “medical” (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease, “dementia-related” (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia, and “unexplained” (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause. According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  16. Elimination of CT-detected gas bubbles derived from decompression illness with abdominal symptoms after a short hyperbaric oxygen treatment in a monoplace chamber: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyaizu, Takuya; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Tsujimoto, Toshihide; Kojima, Yasushi; Okawa, Atsushi; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 54-year-old male compressed-air worker with gas bubbles detected by computed tomography (CT). He had complained of strong abdominal pain 30 minutes after decompression after working at a pressure equivalent to 17 meters of sea water for three hours. The initial CT images revealed gas bubbles in the intrahepatic portal vein, pulmonary artery and bilateral femoral vein. After the first hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBO₂ at 2.5 atmospheres absolute/ATA for 150 minutes), no bubbles were detected on repeat CT examination. The patient still exhibited abdominal distension, mild hypesthesia and slight muscle weakness in the upper extremities. Two sessions of U.S. Navy Treatment Table 6 (TT6) were performed on Days 6 and 7 after onset. The patient recovered completely on Day 7. This report describes the important role of CT imaging in evaluating intravascular gas bubbles as well as eliminating the diagnosis of other conditions when divers or compressed-air workers experience uncommon symptoms of decompression illness. In addition, a short treatment table of HBO₂ using non-TT6 HBO₂ treatment may be useful to reduce gas bubbles and the severity of decompression illness in emergent cases. Copyright© Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society.

  17. Endoscopic evaluation of upper abdominal symptoms in adult patients, Saudi Aramco-Ai Hasa Health Center, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah, K N

    2002-01-01

    Upper oesophago-gastro-duodenoscopies (UGI endoscopies) were performed on adult patients who attended Saudi Aramco Health Centre at Al Hasa, Saudi Arabia, between June 1986 and December 1993, with complaint of upper abdominal pain. During this period, three hundred and fifteen (315) patients were examined. Sixty one percent were females and the rest males. Peptic ulcer disease including gastritis was the most common diagnosis made. Helicobacter pylori-like organisms were documented historically in biopsy samples in 113 of 178 (63%) patients. Nearly all were associated with gastritis; no organisms were reported in normal histology specimens. This confirms the association of this organism with gastritis. Gastric cancer suspected radiologically were not confirmed endoscopically or histologically. It is important to endoscope and biopsy for histology suspected gastric cancer and ulcer; a negative result may save the patient from unnecessary surgery, ideally all normal looking gastric mucosa should be biopsied so that histological gastritis is not missed.

  18. Abdominal symptoms during physical exercise and the role of gastrointestinal ischaemia: a study in 12 symptomatic athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Steege, Rinze W F; Geelkerken, Robert H; Huisman, Ad B; Kolkman, Jeroen J

    2012-10-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during exercise may be caused by GI ischaemia. The authors report their experience with the diagnostic protocol and management of athletes with symptomatic exercise-induced GI ischaemia. The value of prolonged exercise tonometry in the diagnostic protocol of these patients was evaluated. Patients referred for GI symptoms during physical exercise underwent a standardised diagnostic protocol, including prolonged exercise tonometry. Indicators of GI ischaemia, as measured by tonometry, were related to the presence of symptoms during the exercise test (S+ and S- tests) and exercise intensity. 12 athletes were specifically referred for GI symptoms during exercise (five males and seven females; median age 29 years (range 15-46 years)). Type of sport was cycling, long-distance running and triathlon. Median duration of symptoms was 32 months (range 7-240 months). Splanchnic artery stenosis was found in one athlete. GI ischaemia was found in six athletes during submaximal exercise. All athletes had gastric and jejunal ischaemia during maximum intensity exercise. No significant difference was found in gastric and jejunal Pco(2) or gradients between S+ and S- tests during any phase of the exercise protocol. In S+ tests, but not in S- tests, a significant correlation between lactate and gastric gradient was found. In S+ tests, the regression coefficients of gradients were higher than those in S- tests. Treatment advice aimed at limiting GI ischaemia were successful in reducing complaints in the majority of the athletes. GI ischaemia was present in all athletes during maximum intensity exercise and in 50% during submaximal exercise. Athletes with GI symptoms had higher gastric gradients per mmol/l increase in lactate, suggesting an increased susceptibility for the development of ischaemia during exercise. Treatment advice aimed at limiting GI ischaemia helped the majority of the referred athletes to reduce their complaints. Our results suggest an

  19. Abdominal symptoms during physical exercise and the role of gastrointestinal ischaemia : a study in 12 symptomatic athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Steege, Rinze W. F.; Geelkerken, Robert H.; Huisman, Ad B.; Kolkman, Jeroen J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during exercise may be caused by GI ischaemia. The authors report their experience with the diagnostic protocol and management of athletes with symptomatic exercise-induced GI ischaemia. The value of prolonged exercise tonometry in the diagnostic protocol of

  20. Somatização na América Latina: uma revisão sobre a classificação de transtornos somatoformes, síndromes funcionais e sintomas sem explicação médica Somatization in Latin America: a review of the classification of somatoform disorders, functional syndromes and medically unexplained symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Fernando Tófoli

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Os sintomas sem explicação médica são frequentes e estão associados a sofrimento mental em vários contextos. Estudos prévios apontam que as populações latino-americanas são propensas à somatização. Diante da reformulação da Classificação Internacional de Doenças para sua 11ª edição, as particularidades dos nativos desta região do mundo devem ser levadas em consideração. O objetivo deste estudo é prover informações sobre somatização na população latino-americana para a tomada de decisões quanto às categorias diagnósticas ligadas a sintomas sem explicação médica na Classificação Internacional de Doenças-11ª edição. MÉTODO: Revisão extensa da produção de 1995 a 2011 sobre somatização em populações de origem latino-americana. RESULTADOS: A análise dos 106 estudos incluídos nesta revisão foi dividida em 15 categorias: revisões sistemáticas, revisões conceituais, prevalências, atenção primária, depressão e ansiedade, fatores de risco, violência, quadros orgânicos, relacionamento com profissionais e o sistema de saúde, etnia, síndromes ligadas à cultura, síndrome da fadiga crônica, fibromialgia, transtorno dismórfico corporal, e conversão e dissociação. CONCLUSÃO: Os estudos latino-americanos confirmam a dificuldade na definição categorial de quadros com sintomas sem explicação médica. O suposto "traço somatizador" das culturas latinas pode estar associado mais à expressão cultural e linguística do que a um caráter de natureza étnica, e tais particularidades devem estar na agenda na nova classificação destes fenômenos na Classificação Internacional de Doenças-11ª edição.OBJECTIVE: medically unexplained symptoms are common and associated with mental illness in various contexts. Previous studies show that Latin American populations are prone to somatization. Given the reformulation of the International Classification of Diseases towards its 11th

  1. Emotion awareness and coping in children with functional abdominal pain: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veek, Shelley M C; Derkx, H H F; de Haan, Else; Benninga, Marc A; Boer, Frits

    2012-01-01

    Literature on somatization suggests that patients suffering from medically unexplained symptoms are less aware of their emotions and use maladaptive coping strategies when coping with everyday problems. In addition, coping is hypothesized to mediate between emotion awareness and medically unexplained symptoms. Scientific evidence for the relevance of this hypothesis for children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) is, however, lacking. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate this hypothesis in Dutch children with functional abdominal pain (FAP), aged 7-18 years. Between April 2007 and April 2010, a total of 114 referred children with FAP, 235 schoolchildren without abdominal pain and 407 schoolchildren with some abdominal pain (AP) of diverse etiology filled out questionnaires concerning their pain, emotion awareness and coping. MANOVA was used to investigate group differences in emotional awareness and coping. Structural equation modeling was used to investigate the mediational role of coping. The results showed that children with FAP scored significantly lower on most aspects of emotion awareness than children without AP, although these differences were small. Contrary to expectations, children with FAP were more aware of a link between emotions and bodily sensations than children without AP. As for coping, we found that children with FAP used avoidant coping more often than children without AP. Overall, children with FAP mostly did not differ in their emotional awareness and coping compared to children with some AP. Problem focused coping had a small mediating effect for two aspects of emotion awareness. We conclude that children with FAP show only small differences in emotion awareness and coping compared to children without AP, and are practically no different from children with some AP. Contrary to common belief, it can be questioned whether emotion awareness and general coping are useful targets for psychological treatments of FAP to

  2. A Case Of Unexplained Dyspnoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushna Bavumon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 50 year old female, without any history of significant illness in the past, presented to our emergency department with episodic shortness of breath and generalized weakness of 3 weeks duration, more towards end of the day. She attributes that her symptoms developed following some mental stress. Over 3 weeks she had many emergency visits and was treated as asthma and anxiety disorder. She was even put on psychiatry drugs.

  3. Imaging in Tuberculosis abdominal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, Tatiana; Garcia, Vanessa; Tamara, Estrada; Acosta, Federico

    2010-01-01

    In this article we illustrate and discuss imaging features resulting from Tuberculosis abdominal affectation. We present patients evaluated with several imaging modalities who had abdominal symptoms and findings suggestive of granulomatous disease. Diagnosis was confirm including hystopatology and clinical outgoing. Cases involved presented many affected organs such as lymphatic system, peritoneum, liver, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, ureters, adrenal glands and pelvic organs Tuberculosis, Tuberculosis renal, Tuberculosis hepatic, Tuberculosis splenic Tomography, x-ray, computed

  4. Unexplained weight loss in an elderly patient. Delayed diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Because the presenting symptoms of hyperthyroidism are often misleading in elderly patients, diagnosis depends on a high degree of clinical suspicion. The presence of unexplained weight loss, atrial fibrillation, or heart failure (especially in a patient without a history of heart problems) justifies testing for thyrotoxicosis

  5. Unexplained weight loss in an elderly patient. Delayed diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, R.J. (Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Because the presenting symptoms of hyperthyroidism are often misleading in elderly patients, diagnosis depends on a high degree of clinical suspicion. The presence of unexplained weight loss, atrial fibrillation, or heart failure (especially in a patient without a history of heart problems) justifies testing for thyrotoxicosis.

  6. Medically unexplained illness and the diagnosis of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR in women’s medicine wards of Bangladeshi hospitals: a record review and qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall Emily A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frequent reporting of cases of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR among hospitalized female medical patients in Bangladesh’s public hospital system led us to explore the prevalence of “HCR” diagnoses within hospitals and the manner in which physicians identify, manage, and perceive patients whom they diagnose with HCR. Methods We reviewed admission records from women’s general medicine wards in two public hospitals to determine how often and at what point during hospitalization patients received diagnoses of HCR. We also interviewed 13 physicians about their practices and perceptions related to HCR. Results Of 2520 women admitted to the selected wards in 2008, 6% received diagnoses of HCR. HCR patients had wide-ranging symptoms including respiratory distress, headaches, chest pain, convulsions, and abdominal complaints. Most doctors diagnosed HCR in patients who had any medically-unexplained physical symptom. According to physician reports, women admitted to medical wards for HCR received brief diagnostic evaluations and initial treatment with short-acting tranquilizers or placebo agents. Some were referred to outpatient psychiatric treatment. Physicians reported that repeated admissions for HCR were common. Physicians noted various social factors associated with HCR, and they described failures of the current system to meet psychosocial needs of HCR patients. Conclusions In these hospital settings, physicians assign HCR diagnoses frequently and based on vague criteria. We recommend providing education to increase general physicians’ awareness, skill, and comfort level when encountering somatization and other common psychiatric issues. Given limited diagnostic capacity for all patients, we raise concern that when HCR is used as a "wastebasket" diagnosis for unexplained symptoms, patients with treatable medical conditions may go unrecognized. We also advocate introducing non-physician hospital personnel to address

  7. Use of Implantable Loop Recorders to Unravel the Cause of Unexplained Syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Aniket Puri, DM, FACC, FAPSIC, FSCAI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is a symptom of many underlying disease states, which range from the relatively benign to the life threatening. There are numerous investigations done for patients with recurrent unexplained syncope which may have very low yield when it comes to making a definitive diagnosis. Recently, the implantable loop recorder (ILR for continuous monitoring of the cardiac rhythm has been launched in India. This review will briefly discuss these current availabel strategies and focus on the usefulness of an ILR in the definitive diagnosis and treatment of patients with a recurrent unexplained syncope.

  8. An uncommon cause of unexplained nonbloody diarrhea: When mind knows eyes may see

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemanta Kumar Nayak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Collagenous colitis (CC is characterized by chronic secretory diarrhea with the apparently normal gross appearance of the colonic mucosa. A biopsy is usually diagnostic. The symptoms of CC appear most commonly in the elderly. In CC, the major microscopic characteristic is a thickened collagen layer beneath the colonic mucosa. The reported case represents unexplained nonbloody diarrhea of a systemic lupus erythematosus patient, on extensive evaluation found to have CC. This case highlights the importance of considering a rare possibility of CC as a differential in a patient of unexplained nonbloody diarrhea.

  9. Somatoform abdominal pain in surgery: is SD worthy of surgical attention? Case reports and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abd Elwahab, Sami Medani

    2012-08-01

    Somatoform disorders (SD) or medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) are a group of disorders that represent a group of symptoms that cannot be explained by an organic or physical pathology. These disorders are widely prevalent, and, if unrecognised, SD may lead medical professionals to embark on tests or procedures which may inflict unnecessary iatrogenic complications. Despite the high prevalence, they are only poorly included in medical training curricula, at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. In this article, we review the literature and present two cases. The first one presented with a recurrent acute abdomen had an unnecessary CT abdomen. The second case had laparoscopy for acute right-sided abdominal pain which turned out to be normal, and was readmitted again after a short period with acute urine retention which resolved spontaneously following discussion with the patient and family. Both cases were referred for psychiatric assessment and their family doctors were informed.

  10. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AAAs don’t cause symptoms unless they leak, tear, or rupture. If this happens, you may experience: sudden pain in your abdomen, groin, back, legs, or buttocks nausea and vomiting abnormal stiffness in your abdominal muscles problems with urination or bowel movements clammy, sweaty ...

  11. Investigation of Mental Health in Patients with Medically ‎Unexplained Physical Symptoms‎

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frough Riahi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Medically unexplained symptoms are physical symptoms, which cannot be explained by organic ‎causes. This study aimed to investigate mental health in patients with medically unexplained ‎physical symptoms. ‎Method: One hundred outpatients who were admitted to the Electro Diagnosis Clinic of Imam Khomeini ‎hospital, Ahvaz/Iran, participated in this study. Data were collected using physical examination, ‎paraclinical examinations, and SCL-90-R, and analyzed through multivariate analysis of variance ‎‎ (MANOVA, Chi-square test and Fisher’s exact test. ‎Results: The findings revealed significant differences between clients with medically explained and ‎unexplained symptoms in obsessive compulsive and somatization (p<0.05. Differences in ‎depression, anxiety, phobia, psychosis, aggression and paranoia were not significant (p>0.05.‎Conclusion: The present study suggested an association between some psychological problems and somatic ‎symptoms. Therefore, screening for psychological impairments can improve clinical outcomes.

  12. Kisspeptin, unexplained infertility and embryo implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaida Mumtaz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Kisspeptin (KP is a neuropeptide that causes the release of the gonadotropin releasing hormone, which controls hypothalamo pituitary ovarian axis and exerts a number of peripheral effects on reproductive organs. The primary objective of this study was to compare baseline KP levels in females with different types of infertility and identify possible correlations with risk of failure to conceive, preclinical abortion and pregnancy after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Materials and Methods A longitudinal cohort study was carried out from August 2014 until May 2015 by recruiting 124 female patients undergoing ICSI, after obtaining ethical approval from the Australian Concept Infertility Medical Center. Cause of infertility due to male, female and unexplained factors was at a frequency of 32 (24%, 33 (31% and 59 (45% among the individuals respectively. KP levels were measured by ELISA assay before the initiation of the ICSI treatment protocol. Outcome of ICSI was categorized into three groups of non-pregnant with beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG25 mIU/ml and no cardiac activity, and clinical pregnancy declared upon confirmation of cardiac activity. Results based on cause of infertility and outcome groups were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results Females with unexplained infertility had significantly lower levels of KP when compared with those with male factor infertility (176.69 ± 5.03 vs. 397.6 ± 58.2, P=0.001. Clinical pregnancy was observed in 28 (23% females of which 17 (71% had a female cause of infertility. In the non-pregnant group of 66 (53% females, common cause of infertility was unexplained 56(85%. A weak positive correlation of KP levels with fertilized oocytes and endometrial thickness was observed (P=0.04 and 0.01 respectively. Conclusion Deficiency of KP in females with unexplained infertility was associated with reduced chances of implantation after ICSI.

  13. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Faecal immunochemical tests to triage patients with lower abdominal symptoms for suspected colorectal cancer referrals in primary care: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, Marie; Corro Ramos, Isaac; Lang, Shona; Luyendijk, Marianne; Zaim, Remziye; Stirk, Lisa; Al, Maiwenn; Armstrong, Nigel; Kleijnen, Jos

    2017-05-01

    strategies; no triage (referral straight to colonoscopy) is the most expensive. Faecal immunochemical testing was cost-effective (cheaper and more, or only slightly less, effective) compared with no triage. Faecal immunochemical testing was more effective and costly than guaiac faecal occult blood testing, but remained cost-effective at a threshold incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £30,000. The results of scenario analyses did not differ substantively from the base-case. Results were better for faecal immunochemical testing when accuracy of the guaiac faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) was based on studies that were more representative of the correct population. Only one included study evaluated faecal immunochemical testing in primary care; however, all of the other studies evaluated faecal immunochemical testing at the point of referral. Further, validation data for the Faecal haemoglobin, Age and Sex Test (FAST) score, which includes faecal immunochemical testing, showed no significant difference in performance between primary and secondary care. There were insufficient data to adequately assess FOB Gold, RIDASCREEN Hb or RIDASCREEN Hb/Hp complex. No study compared FIT assays, or FIT assays versus gFOBT; all of the data included in this assessment refer to the clinical effectiveness of individual FIT methods and not their comparative effectiveness. Faecal immunochemical testing is likely to be a clinically effective and cost-effective strategy for triaging people who are presenting, in primary care settings, with lower abdominal symptoms and who are at low risk for CRC. Further research is required to confirm the effectiveness of faecal immunochemical testing in primary care practice and to compare the performance of different FIT assays. This study is registered as PROSPERO CRD42016037723. The National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme.

  15. Role of diagnostic laproscopy in evaluation and treatment of chronic abdominal pain in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talat, N.; Afzal, M.; Ahmad, S.; Rasool, N.; Wasti, A.R.; Saleem, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic abdominal Pain in children is a very common cause of hospital admission. Many of them are discharged without a diagnosis even after battery of investigations. Laparoscopy plays a significant role in diagnosis and management of many causes of acute and chronic abdominal pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of laparoscopy as an efficient diagnostic and management tool in children with chronic abdominal pain. Methods: A descriptive, prospective case series was collected in the department of Paediatric surgery Mayo Hospital Lahore, over the period of 5 years between Jan 2007- Dec 2013. The data of consecutive 50 patients, who were admitted in the department with the diagnosis of chronic abdominal pain, was recorded. All patients who had 2-3 admissions in hospital for last 2 months and failed to establish a definitive diagnosis after clinical examination and base line investigations underwent laparoscopy. The details of associated symptoms, finding of laparoscopy, laparoscopic procedures done, definitive diagnosis, histopathology, complications and relief of symptoms were collected and analysed and results were evaluated using SPSS17. Results: Out of 50 patients studies, 27/50 (54 percentage) were male, 23/50 (46 percentage) were female. Age ranged from 2-12 years, with the mean age of 7.24 year. Tuberculosis abdomen, adhesions, mesenteric lymphadenitis, appendicitis and cholecystitis were the final diagnosis. Five abdomens were found normal on laparoscopy. Complete pain relief was achieved in 30/50 (60 percentage), reduced intensity of pain was gained in 12/50 (24 percentage) cases while 16 percentage (8/50) still complained of pain. Conclusions: Laparoscopy is an efficient diagnostic and treatment tool in children with chronic unexplained abdominal pain. It avoids serial examinations; prolong admission, battery of investigations and unnecessary surgeries. (author)

  16. ROLE OF DIAGNOSTIC LAPAROSCOPY IN EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF CHRONIC ABDOMINAL PAIN IN CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talat, Nabila; Afzal, Muhammad; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Rasool, Naima; Wasti, Arsalan Raza; Saleem, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Chronic abdominal Pain in children is a very common cause of hospital admission. Many of them are discharged without a diagnosis even after battery of investigations. Laparoscopy plays a significant role in diagnosis and management of many causes of acute and chronic abdominal pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of laparoscopy as an efficient diagnostic and management tool in children with chronic abdominal pain. A descriptive, prospective case series was collected in the department of Paediatric surgery Mayo's Hospital Lahore, over the period of 5 years between Jan 2007-Dec 2013. The data of consecutive 50 patients, who were admitted in the department with the diagnosis of chronic abdominal pain, was recorded. All patients who had 2-3 admissions in hospital for last 2 months and failed to establish a definitive diagnosis after clinical examination and base line investigations underwent laparoscopy. The details of associated symptoms, finding of laparoscopy, laparoscopic procedures done, definitive diagnosis, histopathology, complications and relief of symptoms were collected and analysed and results were evaluated using SPSS-17. Out of 50 patients studies, 27/50 (54%) were male, 23/50 (46%) were female. Age ranged from 2-12 years, with the mean age of 7.24 year. Tuberculosis abdomen, adhesions, mesenteric lymphadenitis, appendicitis and cholecystitis were the final diagnosis. Five abdomens were found normal on laparoscopy. Complete pain relief was achieved in 30/50 (60%), reduced intensity of pain was gained in 12/50 (24%) cases while 16% (8/50) still complained of pain. Laparoscopy is an efficient diagnostic and treatment tool in children with chronic unexplained abdominal pain. It avoids serial examinations; prolong admission, battery of investigations and unnecessary surgeries.

  17. A Rare Cause of Postprandial Abdominal Pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    causes abdominal symptoms. Median ... compression of the coeliac artery by the median arcuate ligament. ... existing symptoms might cause frustration to patient and relatives. ... disease, chest pathology, etc., were excluded from the study.

  18. Magnetic poles and a still unexplained phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trower, W.P.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given of ideas about magnetic monopoles. Attention is drawn to the still unexplained observations of Schein, Haskin and Glasser (1954), in which electron-positron pairs were produced in large numbers by a cosmic-ray interaction. Their experiment has been simulated in 300 GeV pN interactions at Fermilab, giving a production limit of 10 -7 per proton interaction. The explanation for this phenomenon may lie in magnetic monopoles, or it may be similar to that invoked to explain the so-called Centauro events. (A.W.)

  19. Overtreatment in couples with unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, F A M; Hermens, R P G M; Braat, D D M; Hoek, A; Mol, B W J; Goddijn, M; Nelen, W L D M

    2015-01-01

    What is the percentage of overtreatment, i.e. fertility treatment started too early, in couples with unexplained infertility who were eligible for tailored expectant management? Overtreatment occurred in 36% of couples with unexplained infertility who were eligible for an expectant management of at least 6 months. Prognostic models in reproductive medicine can help to identify infertile couples that would benefit from fertility treatment. In couples with unexplained infertility with a good chance of natural conception within 1 year, based on the Hunault prediction model, an expectant management of 6-12 months, as recommended in international fertility guidelines, prevents unnecessary treatment. A retrospective cohort study in 25 participating clinics, with follow-up of all couples who were seen for infertility in 2011-2012. In all, 9818 couples were seen for infertility in the participating clinics. Couples were eligible to participate if they were diagnosed with unexplained infertility and had a good prognosis of natural conception (>30%) within 1 year based on the Hunault prediction model. Data to assess overtreatment were collected from medical records. Multilevel regression analyses were performed to investigate associations of overtreatment with patient and clinic characteristics. Five hundred and forty-four couples eligible for expectant management were included in this study. Among these, overtreatment, i.e. starting medically assisted reproduction within 6 months, occurred in 36%. The underlying quality indicators showed that in 34% no prognosis was calculated and that in 42% expectant management was not recommended. Finally, 16% of the couples for whom a correct recommendation of expectant management for at least 6 months was made, started treatment within 6 months anyway. Overtreatment was associated with childlessness, higher female age and a longer duration of infertility. No associations between overtreatment and clinic characteristics were found. The

  20. Abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordany, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    Abdominal injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Ten percent of trauma-related deaths are due to abdominal injury. Thousands of children are involved in auto accidents annually; many suffer severe internal injury. Child abuse is a second less frequent but equally serious cause of internal abdominal injury. The descriptions of McCort and Eisenstein and their associates in the 1960s first brought to attention the frequency and severity of visceral injury as important manifestations of the child abuse syndrome. Blunt abdominal trauma often causes multiple injuries; in the past, many children have been subjected to exploratory surgery to evaluate the extent of possible hidden injury. Since the advent of noninvasive radiologic imaging techniques including radionuclide scans and ultrasound and, especially, computed tomography (CT), the radiologist has been better able to assess (accurately) the extent of abdominal injury and thus allow conservative therapy in many cases. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs following gunshot wounds, stabbing, and other similar injury. This is fortunately, a relatively uncommon occurrence in most pediatric centers and will not be discussed specifically here, although many principles of blunt trauma diagnosis are valid for evaluation of penetrating abdominal trauma. If there is any question that a wound has extended intraperitonelly, a sinogram with water-soluble contrast material allows quick, accurate diagnosis. The presence of large amounts of free intraperitoneal gas suggests penetrating injury to the colon or other gas-containing viscus and is generally considered an indication for surgery

  1. Abdominal pregnancy - Case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohiltea, R; Radoi, V; Tufan, C; Horhoianu, I A; Bohiltea, C

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pregnancy, a rare diagnosis, belongs to the ectopic pregnancy group, the leading cause of pregnancy related exitus. The positive diagnosis is very difficult to establish most often in an acute setting, leading to a staggering percent of feto-maternal morbidity and mortality. We present the case of 26-weeks-old abdominal pregnancy with partial feto-placental detachment in a patient, after hysteroscopy and in vitro fertilization, which until the acute symptoms that led to emergency laparotomy went unrecognized. The patient recovered completely and satisfactorily after surgery and, due to the high risk of uterine rupture with regard to a second pregnancy, opted for a surrogate mother. Abdominal pregnancy can be regarded as a difficult to establish diagnosis, with a greater chance in case of increased awareness. It is compulsory to be well informed in order not to be surprised by the diagnosis and to apply the correct treatment immediately as the morbidity and mortality rate is elevated.

  2. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find more information and related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN). Gastro Kids , a ...

  3. [The usefullness of implantable loop recorders for evaluation of unexplained syncope and palpitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjánsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Reimarsdóttir, Guđrun; Arnar, Davíđ O

    2012-09-01

    Syncope is a common complaint and determining the underlying cause can be difficult despite extensive evaluation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of an implantable loop recorder for patients with unexplained syncope and palpitations. This was a retrospective analysis of 18 patients, five of whom still have the device implanted. All patients had undergone extensive evaluation for their symptoms before getting the loop recorder implanted and this was therefore a highly select group. Of the thirteen patients where use of the device was completed, the mean age was 65±20 years. The loop recorder was in use for a mean time of 20±13 months. Unexplained syncope, eleven of thirteen, was the most common indication. The other two received the loop recorder for unexplained palpitations. Four patients had sick sinus syndrome during monitoring, three had supraventricular tachycardia and one had ventricular tachycardia. Further three had typical symptoms but no arrhythmia was recorded and excluding that as a cause. Two patients had no symptoms the entire time they had the loop recorder. Of the five patients still with the device three had syncope as the indication for monitoring and two have the device as a means of evaluating the results of treatment for arrhythmia. This study on our initial experience with implantable loop recorders shows that these devices can be useful in the investigation of the causes of syncope and palpitations.

  4. Chronic abdominal wall pain misdiagnosed as functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Assen, Tijmen; de Jager-Kievit, Jenneke W A J; Scheltinga, Marc R; Roumen, Rudi M H

    2013-01-01

    The abdominal wall is often neglected as a cause of chronic abdominal pain. The aim of this study was to identify chronic abdominal wall pain syndromes, such as anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES), in a patient population diagnosed with functional abdominal pain, including irritable bowel syndrome, using a validated 18-item questionnaire as an identification tool. In this cross-sectional analysis, 4 Dutch primary care practices employing physicians who were unaware of the existence of ACNES were selected. A total of 535 patients ≥18 years old who were registered with a functional abdominal pain diagnosis were approached when they were symptomatic to complete the questionnaire (maximum 18 points). Responders who scored at least the 10-point cutoff value (sensitivity, 0.94; specificity, 0.92) underwent a diagnostic evaluation to establish their final diagnosis. The main outcome was the presence and prevalence of ACNES in a group of symptomatic patients diagnosed with functional abdominal pain. Of 535 patients, 304 (57%) responded; 167 subjects (31%) recently reporting symptoms completed the questionnaire. Of 23 patients who scored above the 10-point cutoff value, 18 were available for a diagnostic evaluation. In half of these subjects (n = 9) functional abdominal pain (including IBS) was confirmed. However, the other 9 patients were suffering from abdominal wall pain syndrome, 6 of whom were diagnosed with ACNES (3.6% prevalence rate of symptomatic subjects; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-7.6), whereas the remaining 3 harbored a painful lipoma, an abdominal herniation, and a painful scar. A clinically relevant portion of patients previously diagnosed with functional abdominal pain syndrome in a primary care environment suffers from an abdominal wall pain syndrome such as ACNES.

  5. Functional abdominal pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouse, Ray E; Mayer, Emeran A; Aziz, Qasim; Drossman, Douglas A; Dumitrascu, Dan L; Mönnikes, Hubert; Naliboff, Bruce D

    2006-04-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) differs from the other functional bowel disorders; it is less common, symptoms largely are unrelated to food intake and defecation, and it has higher comorbidity with psychiatric disorders. The etiology and pathophysiology are incompletely understood. Because FAPS likely represents a heterogeneous group of disorders, peripheral neuropathic pain mechanisms, alterations in endogenous pain modulation systems, or both may be involved in any one patient. The diagnosis of FAPS is made on the basis of positive symptom criteria and a longstanding history of symptoms; in the absence of alarm symptoms, an extensive diagnostic evaluation is not required. Management is based on a therapeutic physician-patient relationship and empirical treatment algorithms using various classes of centrally acting drugs, including antidepressants and anticonvulsants. The choice, dose, and combination of drugs are influenced by psychiatric comorbidities. Psychological treatment options include psychotherapy, relaxation techniques, and hypnosis. Refractory FAPS patients may benefit from a multidisciplinary pain clinic approach.

  6. Abdominal compartment syndrome with acute reperfusion syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleeva, A.

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome was recognized clinically in the 19th century when Marey and Burt observed its association with declines in respiratory function. Abdominal compartment syndrome is first used as a medical terminology from Fietsman in a case of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. A condition caused by abnormally increased pressure within the abdomen. Causes of abdominal compartment syndrome include trauma, surgery, or infection. Common symptoms: abdominal distension, fast heart rate, insufficient urine production, or low blood pressure Medical procedure: nasogastric intubation Surgery: laparotomy Specialists: radiologist, primary care provider (PCP), surgeon, and emergency medicine doctor [6, 10]. Keywords: Stomach. Gastroparesis . Diabetes Mellitus [bg

  7. Abdominal Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy.

  8. Clinical Correlates of Unexplained Infertility in Southeastern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: In the absence of any obvious aetiological factor, a couple is said to have unexplained infertility. It is desirable to identify factors associated with unexplained infertility in this environment and to ascertain if there is a causal relationship between infertility and uterine leiomyomata. Objective: The study is aimed at ...

  9. Functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Madhusudan; Drossman, Douglas A

    2010-10-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is a relatively less common functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder defined by the presence of constant or frequently recurring abdominal pain that is not associated with eating, change in bowel habits, or menstrual periods (Drossman Gastroenterology 130:1377-1390, 2006), which points to a more centrally targeted (spinal and supraspinal) basis for the symptoms. However, FAPS is frequently confused with irritable bowel syndrome and other functional GI disorders in which abdominal pain is associated with eating and bowel movements. FAPS also differs from chronic abdominal pain associated with entities such as chronic pancreatitis or chronic inflammatory bowel disease, in which the pain is associated with peripherally acting factors (eg, gut inflammation or injury). Given the central contribution to the pain experience, concomitant psychosocial disturbances are common and strongly influence the clinical expression of FAPS, which also by definition is associated with loss of daily functioning. These factors make it critical to use a biopsychosocial construct to understand and manage FAPS, because gut-directed treatments are usually not successful in managing this condition.

  10. Adult abdominal hernias.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-06-01

    Educational Objectives and Key Points. 1. Given that abdominal hernias are a frequent imaging finding, radiologists not only are required to interpret the appearances of abdominal hernias but also should be comfortable with identifying associated complications and postrepair findings. 2. CT is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of a known adult abdominal hernia in both elective and acute circumstances because of rapid acquisition, capability of multiplanar reconstruction, good spatial resolution, and anatomic depiction with excellent sensitivity for most complications. 3. Ultrasound is useful for adult groin assessment and is the imaging modality of choice for pediatric abdominal wall hernia assessment, whereas MRI is beneficial when there is reasonable concern that a patient\\'s symptoms could be attributable to a hernia or a musculoskeletal source. 4. Fluoroscopic herniography is a sensitive radiologic investigation for patients with groin pain in whom a hernia is suspected but in whom a hernia cannot be identified at physical examination. 5. The diagnosis of an internal hernia not only is a challenging clinical diagnosis but also can be difficult to diagnose with imaging: Closed-loop small-bowel obstruction and abnormally located bowel loops relative to normally located small bowel or colon should prompt assessment for an internal hernia.

  11. Childhood abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konen, Osnat; Rathaus, Valeria; Shapiro, Myra [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Meir General Hospital, Sapir Medical Centre, Kfar Saba (Israel); Dlugy, Elena [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Schneider Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Freud, Enrique [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sapir Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Kessler, Ada [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sourasky Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Horev, Gadi [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Schneider Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2002-02-01

    Background: Abdominal lymphangioma is a rare benign congenital malformation of the mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal lymphatics. Clinical presentation is variable and may be misleading; therefore, complex imaging studies are necessary in the evaluation of this condition. US and CT have a major role in the correct preoperative diagnosis and provide important information regarding location, size, adjacent organ involvement, and expected complications. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and imaging findings of seven children with proven abdominal cystic lymphangioma. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging files of seven children with pathologically proven abdominal lymphangioma, from three university hospitals, were retrospectively evaluated. Patient's ages ranged from 1 day to 6 years (mean, 2.2 years). Symptoms and signs included evidence of inflammation, abnormal prenatal US findings, chronic abdominal pain, haemorrhage following trauma, clinical signs of intestinal obstruction, and abdominal distension with lower extremities lymphoedema. Plain films of five patients, US of six patients and CT of five patients were reviewed. Sequential imaging examinations were available in two cases. Results: Abdominal plain films showed displacement of bowel loops by a soft tissue mass in five of six patients, two of them with dilatation of small bowel loops. US revealed an abdominal multiloculated septated cystic mass in five of six cases and a single pelvic cyst in one which changed in appearance over 2 months. Ascites was present in three cases. CT demonstrated a septated cystic mass of variable sizes in all available five cases. Sequential US and CT examinations in two patients showed progressive enlargement of the masses, increase of fluid echogenicity, and thickening of walls or septa in both cases, with multiplication of septa in one case. At surgery, mesenteric lymphangioma was found in five patients and retroperitoneal lymphangioma in the other two

  12. Childhood abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konen, Osnat; Rathaus, Valeria; Shapiro, Myra; Dlugy, Elena; Freud, Enrique; Kessler, Ada; Horev, Gadi

    2002-01-01

    Background: Abdominal lymphangioma is a rare benign congenital malformation of the mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal lymphatics. Clinical presentation is variable and may be misleading; therefore, complex imaging studies are necessary in the evaluation of this condition. US and CT have a major role in the correct preoperative diagnosis and provide important information regarding location, size, adjacent organ involvement, and expected complications. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and imaging findings of seven children with proven abdominal cystic lymphangioma. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging files of seven children with pathologically proven abdominal lymphangioma, from three university hospitals, were retrospectively evaluated. Patient's ages ranged from 1 day to 6 years (mean, 2.2 years). Symptoms and signs included evidence of inflammation, abnormal prenatal US findings, chronic abdominal pain, haemorrhage following trauma, clinical signs of intestinal obstruction, and abdominal distension with lower extremities lymphoedema. Plain films of five patients, US of six patients and CT of five patients were reviewed. Sequential imaging examinations were available in two cases. Results: Abdominal plain films showed displacement of bowel loops by a soft tissue mass in five of six patients, two of them with dilatation of small bowel loops. US revealed an abdominal multiloculated septated cystic mass in five of six cases and a single pelvic cyst in one which changed in appearance over 2 months. Ascites was present in three cases. CT demonstrated a septated cystic mass of variable sizes in all available five cases. Sequential US and CT examinations in two patients showed progressive enlargement of the masses, increase of fluid echogenicity, and thickening of walls or septa in both cases, with multiplication of septa in one case. At surgery, mesenteric lymphangioma was found in five patients and retroperitoneal lymphangioma in the other two. Conclusions: US

  13. Abdominal Adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants Definition & ...

  14. Medically Unexplained Pain Is Not Caused by Psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Gagliese

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights Professor Ronald Melzack's theoretical contributions to the understanding of psychological factors in pain. His work continues to have profound influences on pain theory, research, management and public policy. His ideas have been pivotal to the acceptance of the role of the brain and psychological factors in the experience of pain. This article briefly outlines the prevailing theories of the psychology of pain before the gate-control theory. Melzack's contributions argue against the simplistic linear thinking inherent in specificity theory, which leads to the attribution of pain to either 'organic' or 'psychogenic' causes. Nevertheless, Cartesian dualism continues to thrive. The authors illustrate the nature and extent to which dualistic thinking pervades the field, show that a dualistic conceptualization of pain introduces an element of distrust to the relationship between patient and health professional, and conclude that the available data fail to reach today's standards for an evidence-based approach to pain. The authors believe that medically unexplained pain is not a symptom of a psychological disorder and that it is time to abandon the thinking that separates mind and body. The challenge remains for proponents to provide the empirical evidence to prove that psychopathology causes pain and, in so doing, to specify the mechanisms by which it is generated.

  15. Clinical, epidemiologic, histopathologic and molecular features of an unexplained dermopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Michele L; Selby, Joseph V; Katz, Kenneth A; Cantrell, Virginia; Braden, Christopher R; Parise, Monica E; Paddock, Christopher D; Lewin-Smith, Michael R; Kalasinsky, Victor F; Goldstein, Felicia C; Hightower, Allen W; Papier, Arthur; Lewis, Brian; Motipara, Sarita; Eberhard, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    Morgellons is a poorly characterized constellation of symptoms, with the primary manifestations involving the skin. We conducted an investigation of this unexplained dermopathy to characterize the clinical and epidemiologic features and explore potential etiologies. A descriptive study was conducted among persons at least 13 years of age and enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) during 2006-2008. A case was defined as the self-reported emergence of fibers or materials from the skin accompanied by skin lesions and/or disturbing skin sensations. We collected detailed epidemiologic data, performed clinical evaluations and geospatial analyses and analyzed materials collected from participants' skin. We identified 115 case-patients. The prevalence was 3.65 (95% CI = 2.98, 4.40) cases per 100,000 enrollees. There was no clustering of cases within the 13-county KPNC catchment area (p = .113). Case-patients had a median age of 52 years (range: 17-93) and were primarily female (77%) and Caucasian (77%). Multi-system complaints were common; 70% reported chronic fatigue and 54% rated their overall health as fair or poor with mean Physical Component Scores and Mental Component Scores of 36.63 (SD = 12.9) and 35.45 (SD = 12.89), respectively. Cognitive deficits were detected in 59% of case-patients and 63% had evidence of clinically significant somatic complaints; 50% had drugs detected in hair samples and 78% reported exposure to solvents. Solar elastosis was the most common histopathologic abnormality (51% of biopsies); skin lesions were most consistent with arthropod bites or chronic excoriations. No parasites or mycobacteria were detected. Most materials collected from participants' skin were composed of cellulose, likely of cotton origin. This unexplained dermopathy was rare among this population of Northern California residents, but associated with significantly reduced health-related quality of life. No common underlying medical

  16. Clinical, epidemiologic, histopathologic and molecular features of an unexplained dermopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele L Pearson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Morgellons is a poorly characterized constellation of symptoms, with the primary manifestations involving the skin. We conducted an investigation of this unexplained dermopathy to characterize the clinical and epidemiologic features and explore potential etiologies. METHODS: A descriptive study was conducted among persons at least 13 years of age and enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC during 2006-2008. A case was defined as the self-reported emergence of fibers or materials from the skin accompanied by skin lesions and/or disturbing skin sensations. We collected detailed epidemiologic data, performed clinical evaluations and geospatial analyses and analyzed materials collected from participants' skin. RESULTS: We identified 115 case-patients. The prevalence was 3.65 (95% CI = 2.98, 4.40 cases per 100,000 enrollees. There was no clustering of cases within the 13-county KPNC catchment area (p = .113. Case-patients had a median age of 52 years (range: 17-93 and were primarily female (77% and Caucasian (77%. Multi-system complaints were common; 70% reported chronic fatigue and 54% rated their overall health as fair or poor with mean Physical Component Scores and Mental Component Scores of 36.63 (SD = 12.9 and 35.45 (SD = 12.89, respectively. Cognitive deficits were detected in 59% of case-patients and 63% had evidence of clinically significant somatic complaints; 50% had drugs detected in hair samples and 78% reported exposure to solvents. Solar elastosis was the most common histopathologic abnormality (51% of biopsies; skin lesions were most consistent with arthropod bites or chronic excoriations. No parasites or mycobacteria were detected. Most materials collected from participants' skin were composed of cellulose, likely of cotton origin. CONCLUSIONS: This unexplained dermopathy was rare among this population of Northern California residents, but associated with significantly reduced health

  17. GPIHBP1 autoantibodies in a patient with unexplained chylomicronemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Xuchen; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Hovingh, G. Kees

    2017-01-01

    into the frequency of the GPIHBP1 autoantibody syndrome in patients with unexplained chylomicronemia. Methods We used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to screen for GPIHBP1 autoantibodies in 33 patients with unexplained chylomicronemia and then used Western blots and immunocytochemistry studies to characterize....... The patient had no history of autoimmune disease, but his plasma was positive for antinuclear antibodies. Conclusions One of 33 patients with unexplained chylomicronemia had the GPIHBP1 autoantibody syndrome. Additional studies in large lipid clinics will be helpful for better defining the frequency...

  18. Unexplained mental retardation: is brain MRI useful?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decobert, Fabrice; Merzoug, Valerie; Kalifa, Gabriel; Adamsbaum, Catherine [Saint Vincent de Paul Hospital, Department of Radiology, 75674 Paris Cedex 14 (France); Grabar, Sophie [Cochin Hospital, Department of Biostatistics and Medical Information, Paris (France); Ponsot, Gerard [Saint Vincent de Paul Hospital, Department of Neuropaediatrics, Paris (France); Des Portes, Vincent [Saint Vincent de Paul Hospital, Department of Neuropaediatrics, Paris (France); Debrousse Hospital, Department of Neuropaediatrics, Lyon (France)

    2005-06-01

    Mental retardation (MR), defined as an IQ below 70, is a frequent cause of consultation in paediatrics. To evaluate the yield of brain MRI in the diagnostic work-up of unexplained MR in children. Patients and methods: The MRI features and clinical data of 100 patients (age 1-18 years) affected with non-progressive MR of unknown origin were compared to an age-matched control group (n=100). Two radiologists conducted an independent review of the MRI scans. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed a higher incidence of brain anomalies in the MR group than in the control group (53 vs 17, OR=5.7 [2.9-11.1]), for signal abnormalities within the periventricular white matter (OR=20.3 [2.6-155.3]), lateral ventricular dilatation (OR=15.6 [2.0-124]), mild corpus callosum abnormalities (shortness, atrophy) (OR=6.8 [1.8-25.6]) and subtle cerebellar abnormalities, including fissure enlargement (OR=5.2 [1.1-26.2]). The diagnostic value of MRI abnormalities was considered good in 5% of patients (Alexander disease n=1, diffuse cortical malformation n=1, leukomalacia n=1, vermian agenesis n=1, commissural agenesis n=1), and weak in 48% of patients, in whom non-specific abnormalities did not lead to a diagnosis. Some clinical features resulted in a significantly higher percentage of abnormal MRI scans: abnormal neurological examination (82% vs 47%, P=0.008), abnormal skull circumference (66% vs 49%, P=0.04). Motor delay was associated with cerebellar abnormalities (P=0.01). (orig.)

  19. Unexplained mental retardation: is brain MRI useful?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decobert, Fabrice; Merzoug, Valerie; Kalifa, Gabriel; Adamsbaum, Catherine; Grabar, Sophie; Ponsot, Gerard; Des Portes, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Mental retardation (MR), defined as an IQ below 70, is a frequent cause of consultation in paediatrics. To evaluate the yield of brain MRI in the diagnostic work-up of unexplained MR in children. Patients and methods: The MRI features and clinical data of 100 patients (age 1-18 years) affected with non-progressive MR of unknown origin were compared to an age-matched control group (n=100). Two radiologists conducted an independent review of the MRI scans. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed a higher incidence of brain anomalies in the MR group than in the control group (53 vs 17, OR=5.7 [2.9-11.1]), for signal abnormalities within the periventricular white matter (OR=20.3 [2.6-155.3]), lateral ventricular dilatation (OR=15.6 [2.0-124]), mild corpus callosum abnormalities (shortness, atrophy) (OR=6.8 [1.8-25.6]) and subtle cerebellar abnormalities, including fissure enlargement (OR=5.2 [1.1-26.2]). The diagnostic value of MRI abnormalities was considered good in 5% of patients (Alexander disease n=1, diffuse cortical malformation n=1, leukomalacia n=1, vermian agenesis n=1, commissural agenesis n=1), and weak in 48% of patients, in whom non-specific abnormalities did not lead to a diagnosis. Some clinical features resulted in a significantly higher percentage of abnormal MRI scans: abnormal neurological examination (82% vs 47%, P=0.008), abnormal skull circumference (66% vs 49%, P=0.04). Motor delay was associated with cerebellar abnormalities (P=0.01). (orig.)

  20. Abdominal Aortic Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Christie; Swaminathan, Anand

    2017-11-01

    This article discusses abdominal aortic emergencies. There is a common thread of risk factors and causes of these diseases, including age, male gender, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and connective tissue disorders. The most common presenting symptom of these disorders is pain, usually in the chest, flank, abdomen, or back. Computed tomography scan is the gold standard for diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the aorta in the hemodynamically stable patient. Treatment consists of a combination of blood pressure and heart rate control and, in many cases, emergent surgical intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Faecal immunochemical tests to triage patients with lower abdominal symptoms for suspected colorectal cancer referrals in primary care: A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Westwood (Marie); I. Corro Ramos (Isaac); Lang, S. (Shona); M. Luyendijk (Marianne); Zaim, R. (Remziye); Stirk, L. (Lisa); M.J. Al (Maiwenn); N. Armstrong (Nigel); J. Kleijnen (Jos)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the UK. Presenting symptoms that can be associated with CRC usually have another explanation. Faecal immunochemical tests (FITs) detect blood that is not visible to the naked eye and may help to select patients who

  2. Reduced E-cadherin expression is associated with abdominal pain and symptom duration in a study of alternating and diarrhea predominant IBS.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilcz-Villega, E

    2013-11-29

    Increased intestinal permeability and altered expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins may be implicated in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study aimed to investigate the expression of adherens junction (AJ) protein E-cadherin and TJ proteins zonula occludens (ZO)-1 and claudin (CLD)-1 and associations with IBS symptoms.

  3. Emotion awareness and coping in children with functional abdominal pain: A controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veek, Shelley M. C.; Derkx, H. H. F.; de Haan, Else; Benninga, Marc A.; Boer, Frits

    2012-01-01

    Literature on somatization suggests that patients suffering from medically unexplained symptoms are less aware of their emotions and use maladaptive coping strategies when coping with everyday problems. In addition, coping is hypothesized to mediate between emotion awareness and medically

  4. [Diagnostic imaging and acute abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-19

    Acute abdominal pain is a common clinical condition. Clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult to interpret, and diagnostic imaging may help to identify intra-abdominal disease. Conventional X-ray, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen vary in usability between common surgical causes of acute abdominal pain. Overall, conventional X-ray cannot confidently diagnose or rule out disease. US and CT are equally trustworthy for most diseases. US with subsequent CT may enhance diagnostic precision. Magnetic resonance seems promising for future use in acute abdominal imaging.

  5. Agreement between prospective diary data and retrospective questionnaire report of abdominal pain and stooling symptoms in children with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, M M; Williams, A E; Czyzewski, D I; Weidler, E M; Shulman, R J

    2015-08-01

    In functional gastrointestinal disorders, patient recall of symptoms drives diagnostic decisions and evaluation of treatment response, and research conclusions about potential treatments. In pediatrics, parent report also impacts assessment and care. Hence, identifying methods for accurately capturing patient and parent report of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms is important. This study evaluated correspondence between retrospective questionnaire (parent and child report) and prospective diary data for children and adolescents with IBS. Participants included 50 children/adolescents with IBS per Rome III criteria. Children completed a 2-week pain and stool diary. Children and parents subsequently completed a 2-week recall questionnaire, reporting number of pain days, maximum pain, days without bowel movement, and days with diarrhea during the diary interval. Intraclass correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots assessed agreement. For pain and days without bowel movement, overall agreement between child recall questionnaire and child diary was strong, although under conditions likely to facilitate agreement and with individual variation observed. Parent recall and child diary were less concordant, and agreement about diarrhea was poor for parent and child. Age did not significantly correlate with agreement. Child questionnaire with short recall interval may be a reasonable approximation for diary data, although this varies by individual and replication/investigation of lengthier recall are needed. Relying on parent questionnaire does not appear a suitable proxy, and recall of stool form by both parent and child appears more problematic. These results combined with existing literature support use of diary data whenever possible. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A case report of a successfully managed advanced abdominal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and developing outside the uterus but within the abdominal cavity. While it is a very rare ... Symptoms may include abdominal pain or vaginal bleeding during pregnancy. ... discovered during surgery to investigate the abnormal symptoms. ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a fetus lying freely in the peritoneal ...

  7. Risk of gastrointestinal cancer in patients with unexplained chest/epigastric pain and normal upper endoscopy: a Danish 10-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Estrid Muff; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Unexplained chest/epigastric pain is a common symptom in the general population. However, it has not previously been studied whether such pain could be a marker of subsequent gastrointestinal cancer. We aimed to estimate the risk of gastrointestinal cancers in a Danish 10-year follow-up study amo...

  8. Evidence of small-fiber polyneuropathy in unexplained, juvenile-onset, widespread pain syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaklander, Anne Louise; Klein, Max M

    2013-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that acquired small-fiber polyneuropathy (SFPN), previously uncharacterized in children, contributes to unexplained pediatric widespread pain syndromes. Forty-one consecutive patients evaluated for unexplained widespread pain beginning before age 21 had medical records comprehensively analyzed regarding objective diagnostic testing for SFPN (neurodiagnostic skin biopsy, nerve biopsy, and autonomic function testing), plus histories, symptoms, signs, other tests, and treatments. Healthy, demographically matched volunteers provided normal controls for SFPN tests. Age at illness onset averaged 12.3 ± 5.7 years; 73% among this poly-ethnic sample were female (P = .001). Sixty-eight percent were chronically disabled, and 68% had hospitalizations. Objective testing diagnosed definite SFPN in 59%, probable SFPN in 17%, and possible SFPN in 22%. Only 1 of 41 had entirely normal SFPN test results. Ninety-eight percent of patients had other somatic complaints consistent with SFPN dysautonomia (90% cardiovascular, 82% gastrointestinal, and 34% urologic), 83% reported chronic fatigue, and 63% had chronic headache. Neurologic examinations identified reduced sensation in 68% and vasomotor abnormalities in 55%, including 23% with erythromelalgia. Exhaustive investigations for SFPN causality identified only history of autoimmune illnesses in 33% and serologic markers of disordered immunity in 89%. Treatment with corticosteroids and/or intravenous immune globulin objectively and subjectively benefited 80% of patients (12/15). More than half among a large series of patients with childhood-onset, unexplained chronic widespread pain met rigorous, multitest, diagnostic criteria for SFPN, which extends the age range of acquired SFPN into early childhood. Some cases appeared immune-mediated and improved with immunomodulatory therapies.

  9. New parvovirus in child with unexplained diarrhea, Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Tung G; Sdiri-Loulizi, Khira; Aouni, Mahjoub; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Pothier, Pierre; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric

    2014-11-01

    A divergent parvovirus genome was the only eukaryotic viral sequence detected in feces of a Tunisian child with unexplained diarrhea. Tusavirus 1 shared 44% and 39% identity with the nonstructural protein 1 and viral protein 1, respectively, of the closest genome, Kilham rat parvovirus, indicating presence of a new human viral species in the Protoparvovirus genus.

  10. Value of hysteroscopy in management of unexplained infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha M. Elbareg

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: As a cause of unexplained infertility, subtle uterine abnormalities are diagnosed only during hysteroscopy and they are relatively common in infertility women. Although the presence of these abnormalities is not detected by the basic investigations for infertility, their correction seems to be necessary when infertility is desired and other infertility causes are excluded.

  11. Acute appendicitis after blunt abdominal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Joudi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Appendecitis is one of the most frequent surgeries. Inflammation of appendix may be due to variable causes such as fecalit, hypertrophy of Peyer’s plaques, seeds of fruits and parasites. In this study we presented an uncommon type of appendicitis which occurred after abdominal blunt trauma. In this article three children present who involved acute appendicitis after blunt abdominal trauma. These patients were 2 boys (5 and 6-year-old and one girl (8-year-old who after blunt abdominal trauma admitted to the hospital with abdominal pain and symptoms of acute abdomen and appendectomy had been done for them.Trauma can induce intramural hematoma at appendix process and may cause appendicitis. Therefore, physicians should be aware of appendicitis after blunt abdominal trauma

  12. Review article: the functional abdominal pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, A D; Drossman, D A

    2011-03-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is a debilitating disorder with constant or nearly constant abdominal pain, present for at least 6 months and loss of daily functioning. To review the epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of FAPS. A literature review using the keywords: functional abdominal pain, chronic abdominal pain, irritable bowel syndrome and functional gastrointestinal disorders. No epidemiological studies have focused specifically on FAPS. Estimates of prevalence range from 0.5% to 1.7% and tend to show a female predominance. FAPS pathophysiology appears unique in that the pain is caused primarily by amplified central perception of normal visceral input, rather than by enhanced peripheral stimulation from abdominal viscera. The diagnosis of FAPS is symptom-based in accordance with the Rome III diagnostic criteria. These criteria are geared to identify patients with severe symptoms as they require constant or nearly constant abdominal pain with loss of daily function and are differentiated from IBS based on their non-association with changes in bowel habit, eating or other gut-related events. As cure is not feasible, the aims of treatment are reduced suffering and improved quality of life. Treatment is based on a biopsychosocial approach with a therapeutic patient-physician partnership at its base. Therapeutic options include central nonpharmacological and pharmacological modalities and peripheral modalities. These can be combined to produce an augmentation effect. Although few studies have assessed functional abdominal pain syndrome or its treatment specifically, the treatment strategies outlined in this paper appear to be effective. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Radiologic findings of abdominal wall endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jung Wook [Inje Univ. Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-01

    To evaluate the imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis. In seven of 17 patients with surgically proven endometriosis of the abdominal wall, we retrospectively reviewed the findings of radiologic studies such as abdominal US (n=3), CT (n=4), and MRI (n=1). One patient under went more than one type of imaging, apparently. The surgical history of the seven, and their symptoms and preoperative diagnosis were reviewed, and the size, location, margin and nature of the mass, and the contrast enhancement patterns observed at radiologic studies, were assessed. The chief symptoms were palpable abdominal wall mass (n=5) and lower abdominal pain (n=2) around a surgical scar. Previous surgery included cesarean section (n=5), cesarean section with oophorectomy (n=1) and appendectomy (n=1). Masses were located in the subcutaneous fat layer (n=5) or rectus abdominis muscle (n=2), and their maximum diameter was 2.6 cm. Imaging findings, which correlated closely with the pathologic findings, included a well (n=5) or poorly marginated (n=2) solid mass, with a focal cystic area apparent in two cases. Although imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis may not be specific for diagnosis, the presence of a solid abdominal mass in female patients of reproductive age with a history of surgery is a diagnostic pointer.

  14. Radiologic findings of abdominal wall endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jung Wook

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis. In seven of 17 patients with surgically proven endometriosis of the abdominal wall, we retrospectively reviewed the findings of radiologic studies such as abdominal US (n=3), CT (n=4), and MRI (n=1). One patient under went more than one type of imaging, apparently. The surgical history of the seven, and their symptoms and preoperative diagnosis were reviewed, and the size, location, margin and nature of the mass, and the contrast enhancement patterns observed at radiologic studies, were assessed. The chief symptoms were palpable abdominal wall mass (n=5) and lower abdominal pain (n=2) around a surgical scar. Previous surgery included cesarean section (n=5), cesarean section with oophorectomy (n=1) and appendectomy (n=1). Masses were located in the subcutaneous fat layer (n=5) or rectus abdominis muscle (n=2), and their maximum diameter was 2.6 cm. Imaging findings, which correlated closely with the pathologic findings, included a well (n=5) or poorly marginated (n=2) solid mass, with a focal cystic area apparent in two cases. Although imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis may not be specific for diagnosis, the presence of a solid abdominal mass in female patients of reproductive age with a history of surgery is a diagnostic pointer

  15. Recurrent unexplained palpitations (RUP) study comparison of implantable loop recorder versus conventional diagnostic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giada, Franco; Gulizia, Michele; Francese, Maura; Croci, Francesco; Santangelo, Lucio; Santomauro, Maurizio; Occhetta, Eraldo; Menozzi, Carlo; Raviele, Antonio

    2007-05-15

    The aim of the study was to compare the diagnostic yield and the costs of implantable loop recorder (ILR) with those of the conventional strategy in patients with unexplained palpitations. In patients with unexplained palpitations, especially in those with infrequent symptoms, the conventional strategy, including short-term ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring and electrophysiological study, sometimes fails to establish a diagnosis. We studied 50 patients with infrequent (1 min) palpitations. Before enrollment, patients had a negative initial evaluation, including history, physical examination, and ECG. Patients were randomized either to conventional strategy (24-h Holter recording, a 4-week period of ambulatory ECG monitoring with an external recorder, and electrophysiological study) (n = 24) or to ILR implantation with 1-year monitoring (n = 26). Hospital costs of the 2 strategies were calculated. A diagnosis was obtained in 5 patients in the conventional strategy group, and in 19 subjects in the ILR group (21% vs. 73%, p < 0.001). Despite the higher initial cost, the cost per diagnosis in the ILR group was lower than in the conventional strategy group (euro 3,056 +/- euro 363 vs. euro 6,768 +/- euro 6,672, p = 0.012). In subjects without severe heart disease and with infrequent palpitations, ILR is a safe and more cost-effective diagnostic approach than conventional strategy.

  16. Acute abdomen in children due to extra-abdominal causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsalkidis, Aggelos; Gardikis, Stefanos; Cassimos, Dimitrios; Kambouri, Katerina; Tsalkidou, Evanthia; Deftereos, Savas; Chatzimichael, Athanasios

    2008-06-01

    Acute abdominal pain in children is a common cause for referral to the emergency room and for subsequent hospitalization to pediatric medical or surgical departments. There are rare occasions when the abdominal pain is derived from extra-abdominal organs or systems. The aim of the present study was to establish the most common extra-abdominal causes of acute abdominal pain. The notes of all children (1 month-14 years of age) examined for acute abdominal pain in the Accident and Emergency (A&E) Department of Alexandroupolis District University Hospital in January 2001-December 2005 were analyzed retrospectively. Demographic data, clinical signs and symptoms, and laboratory findings were recorded, as well as the final diagnosis and outcome. Of a total number of 28 124 children who were brought to the A&E department, in 1731 the main complaint was acute abdominal pain. In 51 children their symptoms had an extra-abdominal cause, the most frequent being pneumonia (n = 15), tonsillitis (n = 10), otitis media (n = 9), and acute leukemia (n = 5). Both abdominal and extra-abdominal causes should be considered by a pediatrician who is confronted with a child with acute abdominal pain.

  17. Dehydration related abdominal pain (drap)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, S.I.; Aurangzeb; Khan, I.; Bhatti, A.M.; Khan, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe the frequency of dehydration as a medical cause of acute abdomen. Subjects and Methods: All the patients reporting with abdominal pain to the surgical outpatient department or the emergency department were reviewed in the study. The clinical findings in all these cases were studied along with the mode of their management and outcome. Results: Of all the patients presenting with abdominal pain, 3.3% (n=68) were suffering from dehydration related abdominal pain. They were predominantly males in a ratio of 8.7: 1, mostly in the 2nd and 3rd decades of their lives. All these cases were suffering from acute or chronic dehydration were provisionally diagnosed by general practitioners as 'acute abdomen' and referred for surgical consultation. Associated symptoms included vomiting in 42.6%, backache in 91.2%, headache in 95.6%, and pain in lower limbs in 97.1 % of the cases. 83.8% required indoor management with intravenous fluids. All the patients became asymptomatic with rehydration therapy. Conclusion: Dehydration is a possible cause of severe abdominal pain. There is a need to educate the general public about the benefits of adequate fluid intake. (author)

  18. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  19. Unexplained infertility as primary presentation of celiac disease, a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Ghadir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac sprue (gluten sensitive enteropathy is an autoimmune disease which is hereditary and its pathology mainly bases on immunologic intolerance to gluten. It has a vast variety of signs and symptoms and its clinical features range from a silent disease to a typical gastrointestinal disorder. In this study we reviewed and summarized some other related issues about this disease and its relation with infertility.Case: The case is a 26 years old lady who had referred to a gynecologist because of infertility for 2 years and later it revealed that she has celiac sprue.Conclusion: Screening for its silent or subtle types especially among suspicious cases such as unexplained infertility seems to be a cost effective action. Meanwhile, in time administration of a gluten-free diet can lead to an almost complete cure

  20. Unexplained infertility: identification of anti sperm antibodies using radiometric immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megahed, Y.M.; Elnabarawy, F.; Hamada, T.; Ayiad, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    Several methods have been employed to measure anti sperm antibodies with variable sensitivity and specificity in serum and secretion of infertile patients. All of them are not precise means for identification of the presence of anti sperm antibodies for patients with unexplained infertility (Haas et al, 1980). Therefore, the modified radiolabelled anti globulin test, that has been used successfully to identify and quantitate the antibodies directed towards other human cell surfaces, was applied. A total number of 128 subjects in different groups were studied to quantitate the circulating anti sperm antibodies using the modified procedure. The present data revealed that the highest and the most significant incidence were found in the patients secretions (semen and cervical mucus) with unexplained infertility, as well as in the group of males with varicocele. Therefore it is greatly advisable to use the modified radiolabelled technique as a quantitative assay, which will be helpful in management of infertility in patients with unexplained and mediated infertility.3 tab., 4 fig

  1. [The diagnostic value of medical thoracoscopy for unexplained pleural effusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-juan; Mu, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Song; Su, Li-li; Ma, Wei-xia

    2013-05-01

    To explore the endoscopic features of patients with unexplained pleural effusion, and to evaluate the diagnostic value of medical thoracoscopy. A retrospective analysis of 2380 patients with unexplained pleural effusion (1320 males and 1060 females; age 15-94 years) in Shandong Provincial Hospital from 1992 to 2011 were performed .The diagnosis was confirmed by medical thoracoscopy. The endoscopic findings of malignant pleural effusion mostly showed nodules of varying sizes. The nodules could be grape-like, cauliflower-like, fused into masses, or diffused small nodules . The appearance of cancerous nodules was more diversified compared to tuberculous nodules. Tuberculous pleurisy was manifested as diffuse pleural congestion and miliary changes, multiple small gray-white nodules, fibrin deposition and adhesion in the pleural cavity, pleural thickening and loculation . The pathological diagnosis was as follows: pleural metastases in 899 (37.8%), primary pleural mesothelioma in 439 (18.4%), tuberculous pleurisy in 514 (21.6%), non-specific inflammation in 226 (9.5%), empyema in 190 (8.0%), hepatic pleural effusion in 36 (1.5%) and pleural effusion of unknown causes in 76 (3.2%) cases. The diagnostic positive rate of medical thoracoscopy was 96.8%. No serious complications were observed. Medical thoracoscopy is a relatively safe procedure and has an important application value in the diagnosis of unexplained pleural effusion.

  2. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... is the most common method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the ...

  3. Abdominal tuberculosis: clinical presentation and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; Saddique, M.; Iqbal, P.

    2007-01-01

    To study the clinical presentation and outcome of cases of Abdominal Tuberculosis. Fifty four patients of Abdominal Tuberculosis were seen during the study period. Four patients were lost to follow-up, which were excluded. Detailed information of all the patients including age, sex, symptoms, signs, investigations and management was recorded, analyzed and compared with local and international data. Out of the 50 patients with Abdominal Tuberculosis, 31 were females and 19 males. Their ages ranged from 17 to 63 years, with a mean age of 25.1 years. Thirty five cases were admitted through Emergency and 15 through Outpatients departments. Abdominal pain was the most common symptom found in 44 (88%) patients followed by vomiting in 33 (66%). Abdominal tenderness was seen in 22 (44%) patients, while 16 (32%) patients had rigidity and other features of peritonitis. Surgery was performed in all these patients, limited right hemicolectomy in 17 (34%), segmental resection and anastomosis in 12 (24%), ileostomy and strictureplasty in six (12%) each, repair of perforation in five (10%) and adhesiolysis in four (8%) patients. Overall mortality was 8% due to septicaemia and multiorgan failure. Abdominal Tuberculosis is a significant clinical entity with lethal complications in neglected cases. It affects a younger age group and is more common in females. Clinical features are rather non-specific but vague ill health, low grade fever, weight loss and anorexia may help to diagnose the case. (author)

  4. Abdominal Wall Endometriosis: An Overlooked but Possibly Preventable Complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Chih Teng

    2008-03-01

    Conclusion: Abdominal wall endometriosis may be caused by iatrogenic inoculation of the endometrium into the surgical wound. It is strongly recommended that, at the conclusion of the surgical procedure, the abdominal wound be cleaned thoroughly, particularly at both corner sites (especially the operator's side. If an abdominal wall endometriosis is encountered after CS but the patient plans to have future pregnancy and the symptoms are mild, excision of the endometrioma may be deferred until the next indicated CS.

  5. Evaluation of Forty-Nine Patients with Abdominal Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kilic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Abdominal tuberculosis is an uncommon form of extrapulmonary infection. In this study, we aimed to highlight the nonspecific clinical presentations and diagnostic difficulties of abdominal tuberculosis. Material and Method: Clinical features, diagnostic methods, and the therapeutic outcomes of 49 patients diagnosed as abdominal tuberculosis between 2003 and 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The patients were classified into four subgroups including peritoneal (28, nodal (14, intestinal (5, and solid organ tuberculosis (2. The most frequent symptoms were abdominal pain, abdominal distention and fatique. Ascites appeared to be the most frequent clinical finding. Ascites and enlarged abdominal lymph nodes were the most frequent findings on ultrasonography and tomography. Diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis was mainly depended on histopathology of ascitic fluid and biopsies from peritoneum, abdominal lymph nodes or colonoscopic materials. Forty patients healed with standart 6-month therapy while extended treatment for 9-12 months was needed in 8 whom had discontinued drug therapy and had persistent symptoms and signs. One patient died within the treatment period due to disseminated infection. Discussion: The diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis is often difficult due to diverse clinical presentations. The presence of ascites, personal/familial/contact history of tuberculosis, and coexisting active extraabdominal tuberculosis are the most significant marks in diagnosis. Diagnostic laparoscopy and tissue sampling seem to be the best diagnostic approach for abdominal tuberculosis.

  6. Asymptomatic renal cell carcinoma incidentally detected by abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Fumio; Miyake, Noriaki; Tsujimura, Haruhiro; Nakajima, Mikio; Akiyama, Hajime

    1987-01-01

    Four cases of renal cell carcinoma that were incidentally detected by abdominal CT are reported. Abdominal CT was performed during gastro-intestinal examination in two patients and for suspected liver disease in the other two. No patient had symptoms of renal cell carcinoma, or hematuria. In all cases, the histopathological diagnosis was renal cell carcinoma of a low stage. (author)

  7. [Implementationof a low FODMAP dietforfunctional abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranguán Castro, María Luisa; Ros Arnal, Ignacio; García Romero, Ruth; Rodríguez Martínez, Gerardo; Ubalde Sainz, Eduardo

    2018-04-20

    The low FODMAP diet (fermentable oligosaccharides, monosaccharides, disaccharides, and polyols) has shown to be effective in adult patients with irritable bowel syndrome, but there are few studies on paediatric patients. The aim of this study is to assess the implementation and the outcomes of a low FODMAP diet in the treatment of functional abdominal pain in children from a Mediterranean area. A table was designed in which foods were classified according to their FODMAP content, as well as a 'Symptoms and Stools Diary'. A prospective study was conducted on children with functional abdominal pain in our Paediatric Gastroenterology Unit. A total of 22 patients were enrolled in the trial, and 20 completed it. Data were collected of the abdominal pain features over a period of 3 days, and then patients followed a two-week low FODMAP diet. Afterwards, information about abdominal pain features was collected again. After the diet, they showed fewer daily abdominal pain episodes compared to baseline (1.16 [IQR: 0.41-3.33] versus 2 [IQR: 1.33-6.33] daily episodes, P=.024), less pain severity compared to baseline (1.41cm [IQR: 0.32-5.23] versus 4.63cm [IQR: 2.51-6.39] measured by 10-cm Visual Analogue Scale, P=.035), less interference with daily activities, and less gastrointestinal symptoms. Only 15% of patients found it difficult to follow the diet. The implementation of a low FODMAP diet for 2 weeks in a Mediterranean paediatric population diagnosed with functional abdominal pain is possible with adapted diets. It was highly valued by patients, and they showed an improvement in abdominal pain symptoms assessed by objective methods. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to help detect diseases of the small bowel, colon and other internal organs and is often used to determine the cause of unexplained pain. CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. ...

  9. Unexplained Drownings and the Cardiac Channelopathies: A Molecular Autopsy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester, David J.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Will, Melissa L.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and spectrum of mutations associated with long QT syndrome (LQTS) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) in a seemingly unexplained drowning cohort. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From September 1, 1998, through October 31, 2010, 35 unexplained drowning victims (23 male and 12 female; mean ± SD age, 17±12 years [range, 4-69 years]) were referred for a cardiac channel molecular autopsy. Of these, 28 (20 male and 8 female) drowned while swimming, and 7 (3 male and 4 female) were bathtub submersions. Polymerase chain reaction, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, and DNA sequencing were used for a comprehensive mutational analysis of the 3 major LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A), and a targeted analysis of the CPVT1-associated, RYR2-encoded cardiac ryanodine receptor was conducted. RESULTS: Of the 28 victims of swimming-related drowning, 8 (28.6%) were mutation positive, including 2 with KCNQ1 mutations (L273F, AAPdel71-73 plus V524G) and 6 with RYR2 mutations (R414C, I419F, R1013Q, V2321A, R2401H, and V2475F). None of the bathtub victims were mutation positive. Of the 28 victims who drowned while swimming, women were more likely to be mutation positive than men (5/8 [62.5%] vs 3/20 [15%]; P=.02). Although none of the mutation-positive, swimming-related drowning victims had a premortem diagnosis of LQTS or CPVT, a family history of cardiac arrest, family history of prior drowning, or QT prolongation was present in 50%. CONCLUSION: Nearly 30% of the victims of swimming-related drowning hosted a cardiac channel mutation. Genetic testing should be considered in the postmortem evaluation of an unexplained drowning, especially if a positive personal or family history is elicited. PMID:21964171

  10. Renal Angiomyolipoma Presenting as Acute Abdominal Emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 47-year-old woman presented as an acute abdominal emergency with rapid progression to shock following spontaneous rupture of a left renal angiomyolipoma. The diagnosis was missed clinically and on computerized tomographic scan. At different stages of management based on her pattern of symptoms, signs and ...

  11. Bugs on the brain; brain in the gut--seeking explanations for common gastrointestinal symptoms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M M

    2013-03-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms such as heartburn, indigestion (or dyspepsia), bloating, distension, constipation, abdominal pain, abdominal discomfort and diarrhoea are extremely common worldwide. For some, such symptoms can prove to be chronic and disabling.

  12. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Zeyneloğlu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Intraabdominal hypertension and Abdominal compartment syndrome are causes of morbidity and mortality in critical care patients. Timely diagnosis and treatment may improve organ functions. Intra-abdominal pressure monitoring is vital during evaluation of the patients and in the management algorithms. The incidence, definition and risk factors, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of intraabdominal hypertension and Abdominal compartment syndrome were reviewed here.

  13. Physicians' Abdominal Auscultation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    John, Gade; Peter, Kruse; Andersen, Ole Trier

    1998-01-01

    Background: Abdominal auscultation has an important position in the physical examination of the abdomen. Little is known about rater agreement. The aim of this study was to describe rater agreement and thus, indirectly, the value of the examination. Methods: In a semi-virtual setup 12 recordings...... subjects and in patients with intestinal obstruction was acceptable for a clinical examination. Abdominal auscultation is a helpful clinical examination in patients with acute abdominal pain....

  14. Common Functional Gastroenterologic Disorders Associated With Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Sletten, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Although abdominal pain is a symptom of several structural gastrointestinal disorders (eg, peptic ulcer disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the 4 most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with abdominal pain: functional dyspepsia, constipation-predominant and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, and functional abdominal pain syndrome. Together, these conditions affect approximately 1 in 4 people in the United States. They are associated with comorbid conditions (eg, fibromyalgia, depression), impaired quality of life, and increased health care utilization. Symptoms are explained by disordered gastrointestinal motility and sensation, which are implicated in a variety of peripheral (eg, postinfectious inflammation, luminal irritants) and/or central (eg, stress and anxiety) factors. These disorders are defined and can generally be diagnosed by symptoms alone. Often prompted by alarm features, selected testing is useful to exclude structural disease. Identifying the specific diagnosis (eg, differentiating between functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome) and establishing an effective patient-physician relationship are the cornerstones of therapy. Many patients with mild symptoms can be effectively managed with limited tests, sensible dietary modifications, and over-the-counter medications tailored to symptoms. If these measures are not sufficient, pharmacotherapy should be considered for bowel symptoms (constipation or diarrhea) and/or abdominal pain; opioids should not be used. Behavioral and psychological approaches (eg, cognitive behavioral therapy) can be very helpful, particularly in patients with chronic abdominal pain who require a multidisciplinary pain management program without opioids. PMID:27492916

  15. Sudden onset unexplained encephalopathy in infants: think of cannabis intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Eran; Rekhtman, David; Berkun, Yackov; Wexler, Isaiah

    2016-03-01

    The use of cannabis as both a therapeutic agent and recreational drug is common, and its availability is increasing as a result of legalization in many countries. Among older children, the manifestations of cannabis intoxication are numerous and include both neurological and systemic manifestations that are frequently non-specific. There have been only a few reports detailing cannabis intoxication in infants and toddlers. We describe three infants who presented to the emergency department with encephalopathic signs without prominent systemic manifestations. During the initial interview of caregivers, no history of exposure to neurotoxic agents was obtained. All three patients were subsequently diagnosed with cannabis intoxication based on urine toxic screens for delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The infants recovered with supportive care that included fluids and monitoring. The non-specific symptomatology of cannabis intoxication in infants together with the wide differential for unexplained acute onset encephalopathy may delay diagnosis and lead to inappropriate procedures and interventions such as antimicrobial treatments and imaging studies. Healthcare personnel of emergency rooms, urgent care centers, and general clinics should be aware of the potential risk of cannabis ingestion in young infants. A thorough medical history and toxic screen are warranted in all infants with unexplained decreased sensorium.

  16. Diagnosis of abdominal abscesses with 67gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguera, E.C.; Mothe, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty six patients were studied with 67 Gallium to detect and localize the site of intra-abdominal and intraperitoneal infection. They were divided in two groups: a) with and b) without physical symptoms that could localize an abcess in the abdominal cavity. All the patients with suppuration had persistent up-take of 67 Ga in one anatomic area of the abdomen, subsequently documented by computarized axial tomography (CAT) in 58% of the cases or by laparotomy in 88% of them. Scintigraphy with 67 Ga in the patients with recent surgery not only detected focal infection in 67% of the cases but excluded subphernic collection. In 78% of patients with prolonged fever, the infection was localized. There was no false positive result. The comparison in 56% of the cases with CAT demonstrated that both techniques are 100% sensitive for the diagnosis of abdominal suppurative processes. Three of the 26 patients, after six weeks of medical treatment, were restudied with 67 Ga and CAT, showing total resolution of their previous abnormalities. It is concluded that 67 Ga scintigraphy performed as the first study in febrile patients independent of the presence or absence of physical symptoms that could localize the abdominal infection, is sensitive for the detection and localization of an abdominal abscess and that a negative result excludes it. (Author) [es

  17. Vaginal symptoms of unknown etiology - a study in dutch general-practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Janny H.; Boeke, A. Joan P.; Janssens, J; van Eijk, J.Th.M.

    Vaginal symptoms are frequently presented by women to general practitioners. In many cases, the aetiology of these symptoms remains unknown. This study focused on the factors associated with microbiologically unexplained vaginal symptoms, the course of symptoms and signs in these cases, and factors

  18. Maintenance of Pain in Children With Functional Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzewski, Danita I; Self, Mariella M; Williams, Amy E; Weidler, Erica M; Blatz, Allison M; Shulman, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    A significant proportion of children with functional abdominal pain develop chronic pain. Identifying clinical characteristics predicting pain persistence is important in targeting interventions. We examined whether child anxiety and/or pain-stooling relations were related to maintenance of abdominal pain frequency and compared the predictive value of 3 methods for assessing pain-stooling relations (ie, diary, parent report, child report). Seventy-six children (7-10 years old at baseline) who presented for medical treatment of functional abdominal pain were followed up 18 to 24 months later. Baseline anxiety and abdominal pain-stooling relations based on pain and stooling diaries and child- and parent questionnaires were examined in relationship to the persistence of abdominal pain frequency. Children's baseline anxiety was not related to persistence of pain frequency. Children who, however, displayed irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms at baseline maintained pain frequency at follow-up, whereas in children in whom there was no relationship between pain and stooling, pain frequency decreased. Pain and stool diaries and parent report of pain-stooling relations were predictive of pain persistence but child-report questionnaires were not. The presence of IBS symptoms in school-age children with functional abdominal pain appears to predict persistence of abdominal pain over time, whereas anxiety does not. Prospective pain and stooling diaries and parent report of IBS symptoms were predictors of pain maintenance, but child report of symptoms was not.

  19. Functional Abdominal Pain: "Get" the Function, Loose the Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draeger-Muenke, Reinhild

    2015-07-01

    Functional abdominal pain is a mind-body, psychosocial, and self-reinforcing experience with significant consequences for the sufferer and the surrounding support network. The occurrence of unpredictable symptoms and their severity add an element of dread and feeling out-of-control to daily life and often reduce overall functioning in a downward spiral. Two clinical presentations of functional abdominal pain are offered in this article (composites to protect confidentiality) dealing with abdominal pain syndrome and abdominal migraines. The treatment demonstrates the use of hypnotic principles for self-regulation, exploration, and meaning-making. Hypnosis treatment is conducted in combination with mindfulness-based interventions and Traditional Chinese Medicine's (TCM) teachings regarding abdominal health and illness. The clinical examples illustrate medical findings that suggest children with early life stress and an early onset of gastrointestinal somatization may not simply outgrow their functional abdominal pain but may suffer into adulthood.

  20. Unexplained structure in (μ,π) invariant mass distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramm, C.A.

    2000-01-01

    Structures in invariant mass distributions from (μ,π) combinations in the range 0.380 μ -π 0.470 GeV from neutrino and kaon experiments are presented in comparable formats. No artifacts have been found to account for any part of the structure. Hypotheses that the similarities are due to recurrent statistical fluctuations are beyond credibility. My conclusion is that the similarities are overwhelming evidence that the structure is of an unexplained physical origin. It includes an enhancement which would accord with the decay of a narrow (μ,π) state of mass 0.429 GeV. The purpose of this report is to request and enable every experimenter with precise M μ , π distributions to investigate their degree of correspondence with these analyses (author)

  1. Multiple unexplained fractures in infants and child physical abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannell, John Jacob; Holick, Michael F

    2018-01-01

    When an infant presents with X-rays showing multiple unexplained fractures in various stages of healing (MUFVSH), the child is usually diagnosed with child abuse based on criteria of the Academy of Pediatrics' Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect (AAPCCAAN). Almost always, the infant is subsequently removed from the home and civil or criminal proceeding commence. It may be that healing infantile rickets or other poorly understood metabolic bone disorders of infancy are responsible for these x-rays. Activated vitamin D is a seco-steroid hormone, whose mechanism of action is genetic regulation. Lack of it can result in musculoskeletal defects known as rickets. Low calcium can also cause rickets. However, it is clear that experts for the state believe that the x-rays in these cases are so definitive as to be pathognomonic for child abuse. Therefore, if the caregivers deny abusing their infants, experts following American Academy of Pediatric's Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect. guidelines are essentially claiming that x-rays showing multiple unexplained fractures in various stages of healing are lie detector tests. However, it is not widely appreciated that the gold standard for the diagnosis of rickets is a bone biopsy, not x-rays, as radiologists miss biopsy proven rickets 80% of the time; that is, 4 out of 5 infants with rickets will have normal x-rays. In this article we provide reports of two cases and their outcomes. We discuss information about healing infantile rickets and an example of common sense medical conclusions in these cases. This information could lead to a significant reduction in the number of innocent parents having their infant removed or sent to prison. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiological Signs of Intra-abdominal Gossypiboma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Çengel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gossypiboma is a mass lesion at the site of surgery due to a forgotten surgical sponge. Forgotten foreign bodies are mostly retained in the abdominal cavity but there are some cases in the thorax, cranium, breast, and an extremity. Gossypiboma should be considered, especially by radiologists, in patients with a history of surgery, who present with non-specific symptoms and abdominal mass. In this report, we describe the case of a female patient who presented with non-specific abdominal discomfort and fever about six months after open cholecystectomy. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 47-9

  3. Chronic Abdominal Wall Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, Herbert; Koprdova, Simona; Schürmann, Christine

    2016-01-29

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a poorly recognized clinical problem despite being an important element in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. This review is based on pertinent articles that were retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and EMBASE employing the terms "abdominal wall pain" and "cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. In 2% to 3% of patients with chronic abdominal pain, the pain arises from the abdominal wall; in patients with previously diagnosed chronic abdominal pain who have no demonstrable pathological abnormality, this likelihood can rise as high as 30% . There have only been a small number of clinical trials of treatment for this condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, with the aid of Carnett's test. The characteristic clinical feature is strictly localized pain in the anterior abdominal wall, which is often mischaracterized as a "functional" complaint. In one study, injection of local anesthesia combined with steroids into the painful area was found to relieve pain for 4 weeks in 95% of patients. The injection of lidocaine alone brought about improvement in 83-91% of patients. Long-term pain relief ensued after a single lidocaine injection in 20-30% of patients, after repeated injections in 40-50% , and after combined lidocaine and steroid injections in up to 80% . Pain that persists despite these treatments can be treated with surgery (neurectomy). Chronic abdominal wall pain is easily diagnosed on physical examination and can often be rapidly treated. Any physician treating patients with abdominal pain should be aware of this condition. Further comparative treatment trials will be needed before a validated treatment algorithm can be established.

  4. Computer vision syndrome-A common cause of unexplained visual symptoms in the modern era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Sunil; Varghese, Ashley; Dhar-Munshi, Sushma

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the evidence and available literature on the clinical, pathogenetic, prognostic and therapeutic aspects of Computer vision syndrome. Information was collected from Medline, Embase & National Library of Medicine over the last 30 years up to March 2016. The bibliographies of relevant articles were searched for additional references. Patients with Computer vision syndrome present to a variety of different specialists, including General Practitioners, Neurologists, Stroke physicians and Ophthalmologists. While the condition is common, there is a poor awareness in the public and among health professionals. Recognising this condition in the clinic or in emergency situations like the TIA clinic is crucial. The implications are potentially huge in view of the extensive and widespread use of computers and visual display units. Greater public awareness of Computer vision syndrome and education of health professionals is vital. Preventive strategies should form part of work place ergonomics routinely. Prompt and correct recognition is important to allow management and avoid unnecessary treatments. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as lymphoma. kidney and bladder stones. abdominal aortic ... and properly administer radiation treatments for tumors as well as monitor response to chemotherapy. top of page ...

  6. CT of abdominal abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobkin, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    The imaging search for a suspected abdominal abscess is common in hospitalized patients, especially after recent abdominal surgery. This paper examines the role of CT in the detection, localization, and treatment of abdominal abscess. The accuracy, limitations, and technical aspects of CT in this clinical setting are discussed. The diagnosis of an abscess is based on the demonstration of a circumscribed abnormal fluid collection. Although percutaneous aspiration with gram stain and culture is usually indicated to differentiate abscess from other fluid collections, the CT-based detection of extraluminal gas bubbles makes the diagnosis of an abscess highly likely. CT is compared with conventional radiographic studies, US, and radio-nuclide imaging. Specific CT and clinical features of abscesses in the following sites are emphasized: subphrenic space, liver, pancreas, kidneys, psoas muscle, appendix, and colonic diverticula. Most abdominal abscesses can be successfully treated with percutaneous drainage techniques. The techniques, results, and limitations of percutaneous abscess drainage are reviewed

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 hours after contrast medium is ... preferred for evaluation of acute abdominal conditions in babies, such as vomiting or blood in stool. For ...

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... CT scan, an experienced radiologist can diagnose many causes of abdominal pain or injury from trauma with ...

  9. Abdominal x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdominal film; X-ray - abdomen; Flat plate; KUB x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  10. Abdominal cocoon: sonographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, S Boopathy; Palanivelu, Chinnusamy; Sendhilkumar, Karuppusamy; Parthasarathi, Ramakrishnan

    2003-07-01

    An abdominal cocoon is a rare condition in which the small bowel is encased in a membrane. The diagnosis is usually established at surgery. Here we describe the sonographic features of this condition.

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... GI) contrast exams and ultrasound are preferred for evaluation of acute abdominal conditions in babies, such as ...

  12. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abdominal conditions in babies, such as vomiting or blood in stool. For some conditions, including but not limited to some liver, kidney, pancreatic, uterine or ... Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for tumors as well as monitor response to chemotherapy. top of page How should I prepare? You ... of acute abdominal conditions in babies, such as vomiting or blood in stool. For some conditions, including ...

  15. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Jose M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: jmpjesus@yahoo.com; Madureira, Antonio J. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Vieira, Alberto [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Ramos, Isabel [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)

    2005-08-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis.

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as lymphoma. kidney and bladder stones. abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), injuries ...

  17. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Jose M.; Madureira, Antonio J.; Vieira, Alberto; Ramos, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis

  18. Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathi, Ramon; Sage, Michael; Slavotinek, John; Hanieh, Ahmad

    2004-01-01

    A case of an abdominal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pseudocyst in a patient with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt is reported to illustrate this known but rare complication. In the setting of a VP shunt, the frequency of abdominal CSF pseudocyst formation is approximately 3.2%, often being precipitated by a recent inflammatory or infective process or recent surgery. Larger pseudocysts tend to be sterile, whereas smaller pseudocysts are more often infected. Ultrasound and CTeach have characteristic findings Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  19. Abdominal tuberculosis. On-going challenge to gastroenterologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Mahgoub; Osuba, Abimbola

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to record the observations and experience on the diagnosis and management of abdominal tuberculosis (TB) and to highlight the difficulties in the diagnosis and management of this condition. Two hundred consecutive patients attending the Gastroenterology Department of the King Khalid National Guard Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between May 1991 and May 2001, suspected with abdominal TB were investigated. A detailed clinical history and physical examination were obtained. Data of 75 confirmed cases of abdominal TB were analyzed. The most common presenting symptoms were anorexia (84%), abdominal pain (84%) and weight loss (72%). Abdominal tenderness was the most common clinical finding, followed by ascites and abdominal mass (42%). The chest radiograph suggestive of pulmonary TB was diagnosed in 24 patients (32%). Computed tomographic (CT) scanning revealed abnormalities in all 51 patients who underwent the procedure, while positive findings were observed by abdominal ultrasound in 66% of the tested patients. Histopathological examination of patients showed tuberculosis granuloma, while acid fast bacilli were seen in 34%. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified by microbiological methods in 60% of patients. The most common presenting symptoms were anorexia (84%), abdominal pain (84%) and weight loss (72%). Abdominal tenderness was the most common clinical finding, followed by ascites and abdominal mass (42%). The chest radiograph suggestive of pulmonary TB was diagnosed in 24 patients (32%). Computed tomographic (CT) scanning revealed abnormalities in all 51 patients who underwent the procedure, while positive findings were observed by abdominal ultrasound in 66% of the tested patients. Histopathological examination of patients showed tuberculous granuloma, while acid fast bacilli were seen in 34%. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified by microbiological methods in 60% of patients. A high index of clinical suspicion is

  20. Abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty: A case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Izadpanah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominoplasty is among the most commonly performed aesthetic procedures in plastic surgery. Despite high complication rate, abdominal contouring procedures are expected to rise in popularity with the advent of bariatric surgery. Patients with a history of gastric bypass surgery have an elevated incidence of small bowel obstruction from internal herniation, which is associated with non-specific upper abdominal pain, nausea, and a decrease in appetite. Internal hernias, when subjected to elevated intra-abdominal pressures, have a high-risk of developing ischemic bowel. We present a case report of patient with previous laparoscopic Roux-en-y gastric bypass who developed acute ischemic bowel leading to abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in the literature. We herein emphasise on the subtle symptoms and signs that warrant further investigations in prospective patients for an abdominal contouring procedure with a prior history of gastric bypass surgery.

  1. Laparoscopic Bullet Removal in a Penetrating Abdominal Gunshot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Stefanou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Penetrating abdominal trauma has been traditionally treated by exploratory laparotomy. Nowadays laparoscopy has become an accepted practice in hemodynamically stable patient without signs of peritonitis. We report a case of a lower anterior abdominal gunshot patient treated laparoscopically. A 32-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department with complaint of gunshot penetrating injury at left lower anterior abdominal wall. The patient had no symptoms or obvious bleeding and was vitally stable. On examination we identified 1 cm diameter entry wound at the left lower abdominal wall. The imaging studies showed the bullet in the peritoneal cavity but no injured intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal viscera. We decided to remove the bullet laparoscopically. Twenty-four hours after the intervention the patient was discharged. The decision for managing gunshot patients should be based on clinical and diagnostic findings. Anterior abdominal injuries in a stable patient without other health problems can be managed laparoscopically.

  2. Plain abdominal radiographs in acute medical emergencies: an abused investigation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyler, S; Williamson, V; King, D

    2002-02-01

    Plain abdominal radiographs are commonly requested for acute medical emergencies on patients with non-specific abdominal symptoms and signs. In this study 131 plain abdominal radiographs performed on the day of admission were prospectively analysed. In only 16 cases (12%) the reasons for requests conformed to the recommended guidelines by the Royal College of Radiologists. The reason for the request was stated in the case notes in only three cases. In 62 cases (47%), there was no comment made on the film by the requesting clinician. There was a discrepancy in the interpretation of the radiograph between the clinician and the radiologist in 31 cases (24%). The clinical management was influenced by plain abdominal radiographs in only nine cases (7%). The majority of plain abdominal radiographs requested on acute medical emergencies is inappropriate. There is a need to ensure guidelines are followed to prevent unnecessary exposure of patients to radiation as well as preventing expenditure on irrelevant investigations.

  3. Functional abdominal pain syndrome treated with Korean medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Gue Son

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old female patient with chronic and stubborn abdominal pain had been hospitalized five times in three Western hospitals, but no effects were observed. No abnormalities were found in blood tests, gastrointestinal endoscopy, sonogram, and computed tomography of the abdomen, except mild paralytic ileus. The patient decided to rely on Korean medicine as an inpatient. She was diagnosed with functional abdominal pain syndrome, and her symptom differentiation was the “Yang deficiency of spleen and kidney.” A herbal drug, Hwangikyeji-tang, along with moxibustion and acupuncture, was given to the patient. Abdominal pain and related symptoms were reduced radically within 16 days of treatment. This report shows a therapeutic potential of Korean medicine-based treatment for functional abdominal pain syndrome.

  4. Functional abdominal pain syndrome treated with Korean medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chang-Gue

    2014-06-01

    A 37-year-old female patient with chronic and stubborn abdominal pain had been hospitalized five times in three Western hospitals, but no effects were observed. No abnormalities were found in blood tests, gastrointestinal endoscopy, sonogram, and computed tomography of the abdomen, except mild paralytic ileus. The patient decided to rely on Korean medicine as an inpatient. She was diagnosed with functional abdominal pain syndrome, and her symptom differentiation was the " Yang deficiency of spleen and kidney ." A herbal drug, Hwangikyeji-tang , along with moxibustion and acupuncture, was given to the patient. Abdominal pain and related symptoms were reduced radically within 16 days of treatment. This report shows a therapeutic potential of Korean medicine-based treatment for functional abdominal pain syndrome.

  5. The mysteries of leptons. New physics and unexplained phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merle, Alexander

    2009-12-09

    This doctoral thesis deals with the mysteries of the leptonic sector of the Standard Model of Elementary Particle Physics. After giving a short overview about the Standard Model itself, the text starts with introducing the so-called ''GSI anomaly'', the observation of a periodic modulation of the exponential decay law, which is still unexplained and has erroneously been attributed to neutrino oscillations. It is argued why this interpretation is incorrect and several further aspects of the phenomenon are discussed. Afterwards two topics of New Physics beyond the Standard Model are treated, double beta processes and lepton flavour violation. Some important phenomenological aspects of the former are discussed before performing a detailed calculation of the radiative process of neutrino-less double electron capture. In spite of the tiny rates, a detailed understanding of this process is important for setting proper experimental limits. The last part of the thesis starts with very general (and nearly model-independent) constraints for lepton flavour conservation, before discussing the interplay of structure and freedom in the Yukawa sector when a model is confronted with phenomenology. We also comment on a new mechanism that can indeed introduce some realistic structures leading to lepton flavour violating effects. (orig.)

  6. The mysteries of leptons. New physics and unexplained phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merle, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This doctoral thesis deals with the mysteries of the leptonic sector of the Standard Model of Elementary Particle Physics. After giving a short overview about the Standard Model itself, the text starts with introducing the so-called ''GSI anomaly'', the observation of a periodic modulation of the exponential decay law, which is still unexplained and has erroneously been attributed to neutrino oscillations. It is argued why this interpretation is incorrect and several further aspects of the phenomenon are discussed. Afterwards two topics of New Physics beyond the Standard Model are treated, double beta processes and lepton flavour violation. Some important phenomenological aspects of the former are discussed before performing a detailed calculation of the radiative process of neutrino-less double electron capture. In spite of the tiny rates, a detailed understanding of this process is important for setting proper experimental limits. The last part of the thesis starts with very general (and nearly model-independent) constraints for lepton flavour conservation, before discussing the interplay of structure and freedom in the Yukawa sector when a model is confronted with phenomenology. We also comment on a new mechanism that can indeed introduce some realistic structures leading to lepton flavour violating effects. (orig.)

  7. Functional abdominal pain syndrome treated with Korean medication

    OpenAIRE

    Chang-Gue Son

    2014-01-01

    A 37-year-old female patient with chronic and stubborn abdominal pain had been hospitalized five times in three Western hospitals, but no effects were observed. No abnormalities were found in blood tests, gastrointestinal endoscopy, sonogram, and computed tomography of the abdomen, except mild paralytic ileus. The patient decided to rely on Korean medicine as an inpatient. She was diagnosed with functional abdominal pain syndrome, and her symptom differentiation was the ?Yang deficiency of sp...

  8. Unexplained abdominal pain as a driver for inappropriate therapeutics: an audit on the use of intravenous proton pump inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Pauline Siew Mei Lai; Yin Yen Wong; Yong Chia Low; Hui Ling Lau; Kin-Fah Chin; Sanjiv Mahadeva

    2014-01-01

    Background. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are currently the most effective agents for acid-related disorders. However, studies show that 25–75% of patients receiving intravenous PPIs had no appropriate justification, indicating high rates of inappropriate prescribing. Objective. To examine the appropriate use of intravenous PPIs in accordance with guidelines and the efficacy of a prescribing awareness intervention at an Asian teaching institution. Setting. Prospective audit in a tertiary hosp...

  9. Lactose and Fructose Intolerance in Turkish Children with Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuce, Ozlem; Kalayci, Ayhan Gazi; Comba, Atakan; Eren, Esra; Caltepe, Gonul

    2016-05-08

    To investigate the prevalence of lactose and fructose intolerance in children with chronic abdominal pain. Hydrogen breath tests were done to detect lactose and fructose malabsorption in 86 children with chronic abdominal pain (44 irritable bowel syndrome, 24 functional abdominal pain and 17 functional abdominal pain syndrome as per Rome III criteria) presenting to a Pediatric Gastroentreology department. 14 (16.3%) of patients were diagnosed with lactose intolerance and 11 (12.8%) with fructose intolerance. Lactose and fructose intolerance in children can lead to chronic abdominal pain and symptoms improve with dietary modifications.

  10. A Randomized Double-Blind Controlled Trial Comparing Davanloo Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy as Internet-Delivered Vs Treatment as Usual for Medically Unexplained Pain: A 6-Month Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavooshi, Behzad; Mohammadkhani, Parvaneh; Dolatshahi, Behrouz

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy (ISTDP) can effectively decrease pain intensity and improve quality of life in patients with medically unexplained pain. Understanding that not all patients with medically unexplained pain have access to in-person ISTDP, this study aims to investigate the efficacy of an Internet-delivered ISTDP for individuals with medically unexplained pain using Skype in comparison with treatment as usual. In this randomized controlled trial, 100 patients were randomly allocated into Internet-delivered ISTDP (n = 50) and treatment-as- usual (n = 50) groups. Treatment intervention consisted of 16 weekly, hour-long therapy sessions. The primary outcome was perceived pain assessed using the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. The secondary outcome included Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21, Emotion Regulation Questionnaire, Mindful Attention Awareness Scale, and Quality-of-Life Inventory. Blind assessments were conducted at the baseline, posttreatment, and at a 6-month follow-up. In the intention-to-treat analysis, pain symptoms in the intervention group were significantly reduced (p Skype can significantly improve pain intensity and clinical symptoms of medically unexplained pain. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Predicting persistence of functional abdominal pain from childhood into young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Sara; Shelby, Grace; Anderson, Julia; Acra, Sari; Polk, D Brent; Saville, Benjamin R; Garber, Judy; Walker, Lynn S

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric functional abdominal pain has been linked to functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) in adulthood, but little is known about patient characteristics in childhood that increase the risk for FGID in young adulthood. We investigated the contribution of gastrointestinal symptoms, extraintestinal somatic symptoms, and depressive symptoms in pediatric patients with functional abdominal pain and whether these predicted FGIDs later in life. In a longitudinal study, consecutive new pediatric patients, diagnosed with functional abdominal pain in a subspecialty clinic, completed a comprehensive baseline evaluation of the severity of their physical and emotional symptoms. They were contacted 5 to 15 years later and evaluated, based on Rome III symptom criteria, for abdominal pain-related FGIDs, including irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, functional abdominal pain syndrome, and abdominal migraine. Controlling for age, sex, baseline severity of abdominal pain, and time to follow-up evaluation, multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of baseline gastrointestinal, extraintestinal somatic, and depressive symptoms in childhood with FGID in adolescence and young adulthood. Of 392 patients interviewed an average of 9.2 years after their initial evaluation, 41% (n = 162) met symptom criteria for FGID; most met the criteria for irritable bowel syndrome. Extraintestinal somatic and depressive symptoms at the initial pediatric evaluation were significant predictors of FGID later in life, after controlling for initial levels of GI symptoms. Age, sex, and abdominal pain severity at initial presentation were not significant predictors of FGID later in life. In pediatric patients with functional abdominal pain, assessment of extraintestinal and depressive symptoms may be useful in identifying those at risk for FGID in adolescence and young adulthood. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative gene expression profiling of placentas from patients with severe pre-eclampsia and unexplained fetal growth restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurahashi Hiroki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been well documented that pre-eclampsia and unexplained fetal growth restriction (FGR have a common etiological background, but little is known about their linkage at the molecular level. The aim of this study was to further investigate the mechanisms underlying pre-eclampsia and unexplained FGR. Methods We analyzed differentially expressed genes in placental tissue from severe pre-eclamptic pregnancies (n = 8 and normotensive pregnancies with or (n = 8 without FGR (n = 8 using a microarray method. Results A subset of the FGR samples showed a high correlation coefficient overall in the microarray data from the pre-eclampsia samples. Many genes that are known to be up-regulated in pre-eclampsia are also up-regulated in FGR, including the anti-angiogenic factors, FLT1 and ENG, believed to be associated with the onset of maternal symptoms of pre-eclampsia. A total of 62 genes were found to be differentially expressed in both disorders. However, gene set enrichment analysis for these differentially expressed genes further revealed higher expression of TP53-downstream genes in pre-eclampsia compared with FGR. TP53-downstream apoptosis-related genes, such as BCL6 and BAX, were found to be significantly more up-regulated in pre-eclampsia than in FGR, although the caspases are expressed at equivalent levels. Conclusions Our current data indicate a common pathophysiology for FGR and pre-eclampsia, leading to an up-regulation of placental anti-angiogenic factors. However, our findings also suggest that it may possibly be the excretion of these factors into the maternal circulation through the TP53-mediated early-stage apoptosis of trophoblasts that leads to the maternal symptoms of pre-eclampsia.

  13. [Clinical Approach to Abdominal Pain as Functional Origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Han Seung; Choi, Suck Chei

    2018-02-25

    Abdominal pain is a common symptom that patients refer to a hospital. Organic causes should be differentiated in patients with abdominal pain and treatment should be administered in accordance with the causes. A meticulous history taking and physical examination are highly useful in making a diagnosis, and blood tests, imaging modalities, and endoscopy are useful for confirming diagnosis. However, in many cases, patients have functional disorders with no obvious abnormal findings obtained even if many diagnostic tests are performed. Patients with functional disorders usually complain the vague abdominal pain located in the center and other portions of the abdominal area. Although the most representative disease is irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal pain syndrome is currently researched as a new disease entity of functional abdominal pain. As various receptors related to functional abdominal pain have been discovered, drugs associated with those receptors are used to treat the disorders, and additional new drugs are vigorously developed. In addition, medical therapy with pharmacological or non-pharmacological psychiatric treatment is effective for treating functional abdominal pain.

  14. Abdominal paracentesis and thoracocentesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ser Yee; Pormento, James G; Koong, Heng Nung

    2009-04-01

    Abdominal paracentesis and thoracocentesis are common bedside procedures with diagnostic, therapeutic and palliative roles. We describe a useful and familiar a useful and familiar technique with the use of a multiple lumen catheter commonly used for central venous line insertion for drainage of ascites or moderate to large pleural effusions. The use of a multiple lumen catheter allows easier and more rapid aspiration of fluid with a smaller probability of the side holes being blocked as compared to the standard needle or single catheter methods. This is particularly useful in situations where the dedicated commercial kits for thoracocentesis and abdominal paracentesis are not readily available.

  15. Ultrasonography in abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risi, D.; Alessi, G.; Meli, C.; Marzano, M.; Fiori, E.; Caterino, S.

    1989-01-01

    From February 1986 to March 1988 113 abdominal US exams were performed in emergency situation to evaluate the accuracy of this methodology: 13 were blunt traumas, 18 post-operative complications. A real-time scanner with a linear probe of 5 MHz was employed. The results were confirmed by surgical and/or clinical and instrumental evaluation. In 81% of the examinations, ultrasonography allowed a diagnosis to be made. Gallbladder and biliary pathologies were the most common findings. The results (sensibility 96%, specificity 88%, accuracy 95%) confirm the affidability of ultrasonography in abdominal emergencies, as shown in literature

  16. Cross-cultural differences in the epidemiology of unexplained fatigue syndromes in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapinakis, Petros; Lewis, Glyn; Mavreas, Venetsanos

    2003-03-01

    Unexplained fatigue has been extensively studied but most of the samples used were from Western countries. To present international data on the prevalence of unexplained fatigue and fatigue as a presenting complaint in primary care. Method Secondary analysis of the World Health Organization study of psychological problems in general health care. A total of 5438 primary care attenders from 14 countries were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. The prevalence of unexplained fatigue of 1-month duration differed across centres, with a range between 2.26 (95% CI 1.17-4.33) and 15.05 (95% CI 10.85-20.49). Subjects from more-developed countries were more likely to report unexplained fatigue but less likely to present with fatigue to physicians compared with subjects from less developed countries. In less-developed countries fatigue might be an indicator of unmet psychiatric need, but in more-developed countries it is probably a symbol of psychosocial distress.

  17. Platelet function in patients with a history of unexplained recurrent miscarriage who subsequently miscarry again.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dempsey, Mark Anthony

    2015-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate platelet aggregation in pregnant women with a history of unexplained recurrent miscarriage (RM) and to compare platelet function in such patients who go on to have either another subsequent miscarriage or a successful pregnancy.

  18. A new rapid and effective method for treatment of unexplained infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edelstam, G.; Sjosten, A.; Bjuresten, K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Artificial insemination (intrauterine insemination by husband or artificial insemination by husband) is often tried as first treatment for couples with unexplained infertility. Perturbation has previously proved to increase the chance of achieving pregnancy for these couples. The effe...

  19. Urinary tract infections in neonates with unexplained pathological indirect hyperbilirubinemia: Prevalence and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Bahat Ozdogan

    2018-06-01

    Conclusion: We suggest that the neonates with unexplained pathological jaundice should be tested for possible UTI. Consequently, all newborns with UTI shall be evaluated by the urinary US and followed up for recurrent UTI.

  20. Altered autonomic nervous system activity in women with unexplained recurrent pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kumie; Tomiya, Yumi; Sakamoto, Ai; Kamada, Yasuhiko; Hiramatsu, Yuji; Nakatsuka, Mikiya

    2015-06-01

    Autonomic nervous system activity was studied to evaluate the physical and mental state of women with unexplained recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). Heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of beat-to-beat temporal changes in heart rate and provides indirect insight into autonomic nervous system tone and can be used to assess sympathetic and parasympathetic tone. We studied autonomic nervous system activity by measuring HRV in 100 women with unexplained RPL and 61 healthy female volunteers as controls. The degree of mental distress was assessed using the Kessler 6 (K6) scale. The K6 score in women with unexplained RPL was significantly higher than in control women. HRV evaluated on standard deviation of the normal-to-normal interval (SDNN) and total power was significantly lower in women with unexplained RPL compared with control women. These indices were further lower in women with unexplained RPL ≥4. On spectral analysis, high-frequency (HF) power, an index of parasympathetic nervous system activity, was significantly lower in women with unexplained RPL compared with control women, but there was no significant difference in the ratio of low-frequency (LF) power to HF power (LF/HF), an index of sympathetic nervous system activity, between the groups. The physical and mental state of women with unexplained RPL should be evaluated using HRV to offer mental support. Furthermore, study of HRV may elucidate the risk of cardiovascular diseases and the mechanisms underlying unexplained RPL. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Staged abdominal re-operation for abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taviloglu, Korhan

    2003-07-01

    To review the current developments in staged abdominal re-operation for abdominal trauma. To overview the steps of damage control laparotomy. The ever increasing importance of the resuscitation phase with current intensive care unit (ICU) support techniques should be emphasized. General surgeons should be familiar to staged abdominal re-operation for abdominal trauma and collaborate with ICU teams, interventional radiologists and several other specialties to overcome this entity.

  2. Common Functional Gastroenterological Disorders Associated With Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharucha, Adil E; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Sletten, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Although abdominal pain is a symptom of several structural gastrointestinal disorders (eg, peptic ulcer disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the 4 most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with abdominal pain: functional dyspepsia, constipation-predominant and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, and functional abdominal pain syndrome. Together, these conditions affect approximately 1 in 4 people in the United States. They are associated with comorbid conditions (eg, fibromyalgia and depression), impaired quality of life, and increased health care utilization. Symptoms are explained by disordered gastrointestinal motility and sensation, which are implicated in various peripheral (eg, postinfectious inflammation and luminal irritants) and/or central (eg, stress and anxiety) factors. These disorders are defined and can generally be diagnosed by symptoms alone. Often prompted by alarm features, selected testing is useful to exclude structural disease. Identifying the specific diagnosis (eg, differentiating between functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome) and establishing an effective patient-physician relationship are the cornerstones of therapy. Many patients with mild symptoms can be effectively managed with limited tests, sensible dietary modifications, and over-the-counter medications tailored to symptoms. If these measures are not sufficient, pharmacotherapy should be considered for bowel symptoms (constipation or diarrhea) and/or abdominal pain; opioids should not be used. Behavioral and psychological approaches (eg, cognitive behavioral therapy) can be helpful, particularly in patients with chronic abdominal pain who require a multidisciplinary pain management program without opioids. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Abdominal Tuberculosis Mimicking Intra-abdominal Malignancy: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    BACKGROUND. Abdominal TB usually presents with nonspecific findings and may thus m.,mw a multitude of gastrointestinal disorders. Abdominal tuberculosis may therefore present as large and palpable intra-abdominal masses usually arising from lymphadenopathy which may mimic lymphomas and other malignancies.

  4. Abdominal tuberculosis mimicking intra-abdominal malignancy: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Abdominal TB usually presents with nonspecific findings and may thus mimic a multitude of gastrointestinal disorders. Abdominal tuberculosis may therefore present as large and palpable intra-abdominal masses usually arising from lymphadenopathy which may mimic lymphomas and other malignancies.

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease , pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as ... injuries to abdominal organs such as the spleen, liver, kidneys or other internal organs in cases of ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease , pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and ... abdominal conditions in babies, such as vomiting or blood in stool. For some conditions, including but not limited to some liver, kidney, pancreatic, uterine or ... Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  7. Abdominal wall surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as liposuction , which is another way to remove fat. But, abdominal wall surgery is sometimes combined with liposuction. ... from the middle and lower sections of your abdomen to make it firmer ... removes excess fat and skin (love handles) from the sides of ...

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an experienced radiologist can diagnose many causes of abdominal pain or injury from trauma with very high accuracy, ... Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes ... Ultrasound - Abdomen X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract X-ray ( ...

  9. Giant abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, V.; Florencio, I.; Boluda, F.

    1996-01-01

    We present a case of giant abdominal cystic lymphangioma in a 10-year-old boy. Despite numerous consultations with physicians to identify the underlying problem, it had originally been attributed to ascites of unknown cause. We review the characteristics of this lesion and the diagnostic features that aid in differentiating it from ascites

  10. Endometriosis Abdominal wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M.; Carriquiry, L.

    2003-01-01

    Endometriosis of abdominal wall is a rare entity wi ch frequently appears after gynecological surgery. Case history includes three cases of parietal endometriosis wi ch were treated in Maciel Hospital of Montevideo. The report refers to etiological diagnostic aspects and highlights the importance of total resection in order to achieve definitive healing

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic or scrotal pain in children. Preparation will depend on the type ... help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, abscesses or an ...

  12. AIDS, individual behaviour and the unexplained remaining variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Alison

    2002-01-01

    From the start of the AIDS pandemic, individual behaviour has been put forward, implicitly or explicitly, as the main explanatory concept for understanding the epidemiology of HIV infection and in particular for the rapid spread and high prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa. This has had enormous implications for the international response to AIDS and has heavily influenced public health policy and strategy and the design of prevention and care interventions at national, community and individual level. It is argued that individual behaviour alone cannot possibly account for the enormous variation in HIV prevalence between population groups, countries and regions and that the unexplained remaining variation has been neglected by the international AIDS community. Biological vulnerability to HIV due to seriously deficient immune systems has been ignored as a determinant of the high levels of infection in certain populations. This is in sharp contrast to well proven public health approaches to other infectious diseases. In particular, it is argued that poor nutrition and co-infection with the myriad of other diseases of poverty including tuberculosis, malaria, leishmaniasis and parasitic infections, have been neglected as root causes of susceptibility, infectiousness and high rates of transmission of HIV at the level of populations. Vulnerability in terms of non-biological factors such as labour migration, prostitution, exchange of sex for survival, population movements due to war and violence, has received some attention but the solutions proposed to these problems are also inappropriately focused on individual behaviour and suffer from the same neglect of economic and political root causes. As the foundation for the international community's response to the AIDS pandemic, explanations of HIV/AIDS epidemiology in terms of individual behaviour are not only grossly inadequate, they are highly stigmatising and may in some cases, be racist. They have diverted attention from

  13. Blastocystis Hominis and Chronic Abdominal Pain in Children: Is there an Association between Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro Monjaraz, Erick Manuel; Vichido Luna, Miguel Angel; Montijo Barrios, Ericka; Cervantes Bustamante, Roberto; Zárate Mondragón, Flora; Huante Anaya, Alfonso; Cadena León, José; Mendez, Monserrat Cazares; López Ugalde, Martha; Ramirez Mayans, Jaime A

    2017-08-03

    Chronic abdominal pain has many etiologies, one of them being parasites. The aim of this study was to find an association between chronic abdominal pain in children and Blastocystis hominis (Bh). Clinical files of patients with Bh and functional abdominal pain were reviewed. A comparison was made between patients who showed an improvement of their symptoms and those who did not. Out of the 138 patients who had functional abdominal pain and Bh, 37 patients did not receive any treatment (26.8%), while 101 received it and were treated with different antimicrobial agents (73.2%); regarding the improvement of symptoms, a statistically significant difference (p abdominal pain in children has different etiologies; however, we have documented through this work that it is appropriate to provide antimicrobial treatment for patients with Bh and chronic abdominal pain. © The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Permanent pacemaker implantation in octogenarians with unexplained syncope and positive electrophysiologic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannopoulos, Georgios; Kossyvakis, Charalampos; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Tsiachris, Dimitrios; Doudoumis, Konstantinos; Mavri, Maria; Vrachatis, Dimitrios; Letsas, Konstantinos; Efremidis, Michael; Katsivas, Apostolos; Lekakis, John; Deftereos, Spyridon

    2017-05-01

    Syncope is a common problem in the elderly, and a permanent pacemaker is a therapeutic option when a bradycardic etiology is revealed. However, the benefit of pacing when no association of symptoms to bradycardia has been shown is not clear, especially in the elderly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pacing on syncope-free mortality in patients aged 80 years or older with unexplained syncope and "positive" invasive electrophysiologic testing (EPT). This was an observational study. A positive EPT for the purposes of this study was defined by at least 1 of the following: a corrected sinus node recovery time of >525 ms, a basic HV interval of >55 ms, detection of infra-Hisian block, or appearance of second-degree atrioventricular block on atrial decremental pacing at a paced cycle length of >400 ms. Among the 2435 screened patients, 228 eligible patients were identified, 145 of whom were implanted with a pacemaker. Kaplan-Meier analysis determined that time to event (syncope or death) was 50.1 months (95% confidence interval 45.4-54.8 months) with a pacemaker vs 37.8 months (95% confidence interval 31.3-44.4 months) without a pacemaker (log-rank test, P = .001). The 4-year time-dependent estimate of the rate of syncope was 12% vs 44% (P pacemaker implantation was independently associated with longer syncope-free survival. Significant differences were also shown in the individual components of the primary outcome measure (syncope and death from any cause). Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Abdominal wall actinomycosis. A report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Pérez-Ezquerra, Beatriz; Guardia-Dodorico, Lorena; Arribas-Marco, Teresa; Ania-Lahuerta, Aldonza; González Ballano, Isabel; Chipana-Salinas, Margot; Carazo-Hernández, Belén

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal wall Actinomycosis is a rare disease associated with the use of intrauterine device and as a complication of abdominal surgery. Diagnosis is difficult because it is unusual and behaves like a malignant neoplasm. A case report is presented of a patient who had used an intrauterine device for four years and developed a stony tumour in the abdominal wall associated with a set of symptoms that, clinically and radiologically, was simulating a peritoneal carcinomatosis associated with paraneoplastic syndrome, even in the course of an exploratory laparotomy. The patient attended our hospital with a two-month history of abdominal pain and symptoms that mimic a paraneoplastic syndrome. The diagnosis of abdominal actinomycosis was suspected by the finding of the microorganism in cervical cytology together with other cultures and Actinomyces negative in pathological studies, confirming the suspicion of a complete cure with empirical treatment with penicillin. Actinomycosis should be considered in patients with pelvic mass or abdominal wall mass that mimics a malignancy. Antibiotic therapy is the first treatment choice and makes a more invasive surgical management unnecessary. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. [Rome III classification of functional gastrointestinal disorders in children with chronic abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plocek, Anna; Wasowska-Królikowska, Krystyna; Toporowska-Kowalska, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    The updated Rome III Classification of paediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) associated with abdominal pain comprises: functional dyspepsia (FD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), abdominal migraine, functional abdominal pain (FAP), functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS). To assess the value of the Rome criteria in identifying FGIDs in children with chronic abdominal pain. The study group consisted of 439 consecutive paediatric patients (192 boys and 247 girls) aged 4-18 years (mean age was 11.95 +/- 3.89 years) referred to the Paediatric Gastroenterology Department at Medical University of Lodz from January 2008 to June 2009 for evaluation of abdominal pain of at least 2 months' duration. After exclusion of organic disease children suspected of functional chronic abdominal pain were categorized with the use of Rome III criteria of FGIDs associated with abdominal pain (H2a-H2d1) and the Questionnaire on Paediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms (with the permission of doctor L. S. Walker). The patients with known nonabdominal organic disease, chronic illness or handicap were excluded. In 161 patients (36.58%) organic etiology was confirmed. Of the 278 children (63.42%) with functional chronic abdominal pain, 228 (82.02%) met the Rome III criteria for FGIDs associated with abdominal pain (FD, 15.5%; IBS, 21.6%; abdominal migraine, 5%; FAP 24.5%; FAPS, 15.9%). Fifty cases (17.98%) did not fulfill the criteria for subtypes of abdominal pain-related FGIDs--mainly due to different as defined by Rome III criteria (at least once per week) frequency of symptom presentation. (1) In the authors'investigations FGIDs was the most frequent cause of chronic abdominal pain in children. (2) The significant number of children with nonclassified FGIDs implies the need to modify the diagnostic criteria of Rome III classification concerning the prevalence of symptoms.

  17. Perforated peptic ulcer associated with abdominal compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Jiun-Jen; Weng, Yi-Ming; Weng, Chia-Sui

    2008-11-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is defined as an increased intra-abdominal pressure with adverse physiologic consequences. Abdominal compartment syndrome caused by perforated peptic ulcer is rare owing to early diagnosis and management. Delayed recognition of perforated peptic ulcer with pneumoperitoneum, bowel distension, and decreased abdominal wall compliance can make up a vicious circle and lead to ACS. We report a case of perforated peptic ulcer associated with ACS. A 74-year-old man with old stroke and dementia history was found to have distended abdomen, edema of bilateral legs, and cyanosis. Laboratory tests revealed deterioration of liver and kidney function. Abdominal compartment syndrome was suspected, and image study was arranged to find the cause. The study showed pneumoperitoneum, contrast stasis in heart with decreased caliber of vessels below the abdominal aortic level, and diffuse lymphedema at the abdominal walls. Emergent laparotomy was performed. Perforated peptic ulcer was noted and the gastrorrhaphy was done. The symptoms, and liver and kidney function improved right after emergent operation.

  18. Obesity-Associated Abdominal Elephantiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Kohli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal elephantiasis is a rare entity. Abdominal elephantiasis is an uncommon, but deformative and progressive cutaneous disease caused by chronic lymphedema and recurrent streptococcal or Staphylococcus infections of the abdominal wall. We present 3 cases of patients with morbid obesity who presented to our hospital with abdominal wall swelling, thickening, erythema, and pain. The abdominal wall and legs were edematous, with cobblestone-like, thickened, hyperpigmented, and fissured plaques on the abdomen. Two patients had localised areas of skin erythema, tenderness, and increased warmth. There was purulent drainage from the abdominal wall in one patient. They were managed with antibiotics with some initial improvement. Meticulous skin care and local keratolytic treatment for the lesions were initiated with limited success due to their late presentation. All three patients refused surgical therapy. Conclusion. Early diagnosis is important for the treatment of abdominal elephantiasis and prevention of complications.

  19. ABDOMINAL TRAUMA- CLINICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanaja Ratnakumari Billa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In the recent times there has been increased incidence of abdominal trauma cases due to several causes. Quick and prompt intervention is needed to decrease the mortality of the patients. So we conducted a study to assess the cause and the management of abdominal trauma cases in our institution. The aim of this study was to know the incidence of blunt and penetrating injuries and their causes, age and sex incidence, importance of various investigations, mode of treatment offered and post-operative complications. To study the cause of death and evolve better management. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study comprises of patients admitted to and operated in various surgical units in the Department of Surgery at Government General Hospital, attached to Guntur Medical College Guntur, from August 2014 to October 2016. RESULTS Increase incidence seen in age group 20-29 years (30%. Male predominance 77.5%. Mechanism of injury–road traffic accidents 65%. Isolated organ injury–colon and rectum 40%. Other associated injuries–chest injuries with rib fractures 7.5%. Complications–wound infection 17.5%. Duration of hospital stay 8–14 days. Bowel injury management–closure of perforation 84.6%. Resection anastomosis 15.38%. CONCLUSION Thorough clinical examination, diagnostic paracentesis, plain X-ray erect abdomen and ultrasound proved to be very helpful in the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries. Spleen is the commonest organ involved in blunt trauma and colon is the commonly injured organ in penetrating abdominal trauma, many patients have associated extremity and axial skeleton injuries. With advances in diagnosis and intensive care technologies, most patients of solid visceral injuries with hemodynamic stability can be managed conservatively. Surgical site infection is the most common complication following surgery. The mortality is high; reason might be patient reaching the hospital late, high incidence of postoperative septic

  20. CT of abdominal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Satoshi; Yamada, Kenji; Ito, Masatoshi; Ito, Hisao; Yamaura, Harutsugu

    1981-01-01

    CT findings in 33 patients who had an abdominal tumor were evaluated. CT revealed a tumor in 31 cases. The organ from which the tumor originated was correctly diagnosed in 18 patients. Whether the tumor was solid or cystic was correctly predicted in 28 patients. The diagnosis malignant or benign nature of tumor was correct, incorrect and impossible, in 23, 3, and five patiens, respectively. (Kondo, M.)

  1. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Detoxification in Abdominal Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Potapov

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To comparatively analyze the efficiency of methods for extracorporeal detoxification (ED of the body in abdominal sepsis (AS and to choose the optimum detoxifying methods in relation to the level of endotoxicosis.Material and methods. 56 patients (41 males and 15 females; mean age 39.4±12.2 years with surgical abdominal infection of various genesis, complicated by the development of sepsis whose treatment included ED methods, were examined. The level of intoxication and the efficiency of detoxification were evaluated by general clinical and biochemical blood parameters, the leukocytic intoxication index, the levels of low and medium molecular-weight substances in the body’s media. Hemosorption, plasmapheresis, hemodialysis, hemodiafiltration, and hemofiltration were used for detoxification.Results. Surgical abdominal infection is accompanied by endotoxemia that has no clear nosological specificity, but it depends on the pattern of a clinical course of the disease and is most pronounced in the septic syndrome. In AS, 80.4% of the patients are observed to have an irreversible decompensation phase and a terminal degree of endotoxicosis, which require detoxification. The use of different ED methods according to the level of intoxication may reduce the level of endotoxicosis and yield a persistent beneficial effect in 85.2% of cases of its application. Conclusion. Filtration and dialysis techniques (hemodialysis, hemofiltration, and hemodiafiltration are the methods of choice in AS. Hemosorption and plasmapheresis may be recommended for use at the early stages of endotoxicosis development and in preserved renal excretory function.

  3. Abdominal aspergillosis: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Suk Keu, E-mail: pagoda20@hanmail.net [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jin, E-mail: kimhyejin@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jae Ho, E-mail: jhbyun@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ah Young, E-mail: aykim@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Moon-Gyu, E-mail: mglee@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon, E-mail: hkha@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: In order to retrospectively evaluate the CT findings of abdominal aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. Materials and methods: CT scans were reviewed with regard to the sites, number, morphologic appearance, attenuation, and the contrast enhancement patterns of the lesions in six patients (5 women, 1 man; mean age, 43.4 years; range, 23-59 years) with pathologically proved abdominal aspergillosis by two gastrointestinal radiologists in consensus. Medical records were also reviewed to determine each patient's clinical status and outcome. Results: All patients were immunocompromised state: 4 patients received immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation and 2 patients received chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. Aspergillosis involved blood vessels (n = 3), liver (n = 2), spleen (n = 2), gastrointestinal tract (n = 2), native kidney (n = 1), transplanted kidney (n = 1), peritoneum (n = 1), and retroperitoneum (n = 1). CT demonstrated solid organ or bowel infarction or perforation secondary to vascular thrombosis or pseudoaneurysm, multiple low-attenuating lesions of solid organs presenting as abscesses, concentric bowel wall thickening mimicking typhlitis, or diffuse or nodular infiltration of the peritoneum and retroperitoneum. Conclusion: Familiarity with findings commonly presenting as angioinvasive features or abscesses on CT, may facilitate the diagnosis of rare and fatal abdominal aspergillosis.

  4. Abdominal Pain-Predominant Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Jordanian School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamimi, Eyad M; Al-Safadi, Mohammad H

    2014-12-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) is a common complaint in children. Significant portion of them are of functional origin. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of abdominal pain-predominant functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) and its types in Jordanian school children. This is a school-based survey at south Jordan. Information using the self-reporting form of the Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms-Rome III Version (QPGS-RIII) - the official Arabic translation - was collected. Classes from academic years (grades) 6 - 8 were selected. SPSS Statistical Package Version 17 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA) was used. Categorical data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test, and continuous data were analyzed using t -test. P abdominal pain-predominant FGID. Seventy-nine (68%) of them were females. Forty-seven (10.6%) had irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Thirty-six (8%), 17 (3.8%), 11 (2.4%) and five (1.1%) had abdominal migraine, functional abdominal pain, functional abdominal pain syndrome and functional dyspepsia, respectively. Abdominal pain-predominant FGID has become a major health issue in Jordanian children. One of four children between the ages of 11 and 15 years exhibits at least one abdominal pain-predominant FGID. The most common form of abdominal pain-predominant FGID in our children was IBS. Females are affected more often than males. Intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms are seen regularly with abdominal pain-predominant FGIDs.

  5. [The etiological aspects of acute abdominal pain in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinu, C A; Moraru, D

    2011-01-01

    The study of the etiological aspects of acute abdominal pain in children, in order to perceive the clinical-etiological correlations and the disorders distribution related to age, gender and the origin of the patients. The criteria for including patients were age (between 0 and 18 years) and the presence of acute abdominal pain before or during the consultation with the physician. The research on acute abdominal pain in children was performed on the level of the Surgery and Pediatrics II clinical departments of the "Sf. Ioan" Children's Emergency Clinical Hospital in Galati, between 01.01.2009 - 01.01.2011. The clinical study performed on the patients registered in the studied groups focused on the identification, the evaluation of the symptoms of acute abdominal pain in children, diagnosing and treating it. The criteria for excluding patients were an age older than 18 years or the absence of acute abdominal pain as a symptom before or during the examination. The statistical analysis used the descriptive and analytical methods. The data was centralized and statistically processed in M.S.EXCEL and S.P.S.S. databases. The patients with acute abdominal pain represent a percentage of 92.9% (2358 cases) of the total number of patients who suffer from abdominal pain (N=2537). The highest frequency of cases is represented by acute appendicitis (1056 cases - 44.8%). In the 5-18 years age group, acute appendicitis, mesenteric lymphadenitis, ovarian follicular cysts, acute pyelenophritis and salpingitis are predominant. In the 0-4 years age group gastroenteritis, acute pharyngitis, reactive hepatitis and lower digestive bleeding are predominant. In females, acute appendicitis, gastroenteritis, gastroduodenitis and cystitis are predominant, whereas in males, peritonitis, sepsis through E. coli, the contusion of the abdominal wall and acute pharyngitis are predominant.

  6. Sexual function in infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Michael P; Legro, Richard S; Coutifaris, Christos; Alvero, Ruben; Robinson, Randal D; Casson, Peter A; Christman, Gregory M; Huang, Hao; Hansen, Karl R; Baker, Valerie; Usadi, Rebecca; Seungdamrong, Aimee; Bates, G Wright; Rosen, R Mitchell; Schlaff, William; Haisenleder, Daniel; Krawetz, Stephen A; Barnhart, Kurt; Trussell, J C; Santoro, Nanette; Eisenberg, Esther; Zhang, Heping

    2017-08-01

    While female sexual dysfunction is a frequent occurrence, characteristics in infertile women are not well delineated. Furthermore, the impact of infertility etiology on the characteristics in women with differing androgen levels observed in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility has not been assessed. The objective of the study was to determine the characteristics of sexual dysfunction in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility. A secondary data analysis was performed on 2 of Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Cooperative Reproductive Medicine Networks clinical trials: Pregnancy in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Study II and Assessment of Multiple Intrauterine Gestations From Ovarian Stimulation. Both protocols assessed female sexual function using the Female Sexual Function Inventory and the Female Sexual Distress Scale. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome had higher weight and body mass index than women with unexplained infertility (each P polycystic ovary syndrome. The mean Female Sexual Function Inventory total score increased slightly as the free androgen index increased, mainly as a result of the desire subscore. This association was more pronounced in the women with unexplained infertility. Reproductive-age women with infertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility, despite phenotypic and biochemical differences in androgenic manifestations, do not manifest clinically significant differences in sexual function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Attributions of cancer 'alarm' symptoms in a community sample.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katriina L Whitaker

    Full Text Available Attribution of early cancer symptoms to a non-serious cause may lead to longer diagnostic intervals. We investigated attributions of potential cancer 'alarm' and non-alarm symptoms experienced in everyday life in a community sample of adults, without mention of a cancer context.A questionnaire was mailed to 4858 adults (≥50 years old, no cancer diagnosis through primary care, asking about symptom experiences in the past 3 months. The word cancer was not mentioned. Target 'alarm' symptoms, publicised by Cancer Research UK, were embedded in a longer symptom list. For each symptom experienced, respondents were asked for their attribution ('what do you think caused it', concern about seriousness ('not at all' to 'extremely', and help-seeking ('did you contact a doctor about it': Yes/No.The response rate was 35% (n = 1724. Over half the respondents (915/1724; 53% had experienced an 'alarm' symptom, and 20 (2% cited cancer as a possible cause. Cancer attributions were highest for 'unexplained lump'; 7% (6/87. Cancer attributions were lowest for 'unexplained weight loss' (0/47. A higher proportion (375/1638; 23% were concerned their symptom might be 'serious', ranging from 12% (13/112 for change in a mole to 41% (100/247 for unexplained pain. Just over half had contacted their doctor about their symptom (59%, although this varied by symptom. Alarm symptoms were appraised as more serious than non-alarm symptoms, and were more likely to trigger help-seeking.Consistent with retrospective reports from cancer patients, 'alarm' symptoms experienced in daily life were rarely attributed to cancer. These results have implications for understanding how people appraise and act on symptoms that could be early warning signs of cancer.

  8. Isolated gallbladder injury in a case of blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, Jeffrey; Jung, Melissa; Dearing, Mark

    2012-04-01

    The diagnosis of blunt injury to the gallbladder may constitute a significant challenge to the diagnostician. There is often a delay in presentation with non-specific clinical symptoms. In the absence of reliable clinical symptoms, diagnostic imaging becomes an invaluable tool in the rapid identification of gallbladder injury. We present a case of isolated gallbladder injury following blunt abdominal trauma which was diagnosed by computed tomography and subsequently confirmed by cholecystectomy.

  9. Isolated Gallbladder Injury in a Case of Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Birn, Jeffrey; Jung, Melissa; Dearing, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of blunt injury to the gallbladder may constitute a significant challenge to the diagnostician. There is often a delay in presentation with non-specific clinical symptoms. In the absence of reliable clinical symptoms, diagnostic imaging becomes an invaluable tool in the rapid identification of gallbladder injury. We present a case of isolated gallbladder injury following blunt abdominal trauma which was diagnosed by computed tomography and subsequently confirmed by cholecystectomy.

  10. Paediatric surgical abdominal emergencies in a north central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    5 days of onset of symptoms with abdominal pain/distension and/or vomiting as chief complaint. Fourteen (63.7%) of .... one was a duodenal perforation (in addition to rib and femoral fracture), one was an ileal perforation and one was a right ...

  11. An abdominal tuberculosis case mimicking an abdominal mass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An abdominal tuberculosis case mimicking an abdominal mass. Derya Erdog˘ an a. , Yasemin Ta ¸scı Yıldız b. , Esin Cengiz Bodurog˘lu c and Naciye Go¨nu¨l Tanır d. Abdominal tuberculosis is rare in childhood. It may be difficult to diagnose as it mimics various disorders. We present a 12-year-old child with an unusual ...

  12. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital - including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome) - compressive - including 'nutcracker' syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. (author)

  13. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: leandrocleite@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Mediciana. Departmento de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2016-07-15

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital - including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome) - compressive - including 'nutcracker' syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. (author)

  14. A new rapid and effective method for treatment of unexplained infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edelstam, G.; Sjosten, A.; Bjuresten, K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Artificial insemination (intrauterine insemination by husband or artificial insemination by husband) is often tried as first treatment for couples with unexplained infertility. Perturbation has previously proved to increase the chance of achieving pregnancy for these couples. The effect...... and insemination cycles for couples with unexplained infertility. METHODS: In a prospective, open study, the patients were randomized, the day before ovulation, during a clomiphene citrate stimulated cycle to either perturbation with low-dose local anaesthetic or no perturbation before insemination. RESULTS......: The perturbation treatment significantly enhanced the clinical pregnancy rate and was well tolerated. No complications were noted. The combined treatment of clomiphene citrate, perturbation and insemination can be used as a cost-effective, first-line treatment for couples with unexplained infertility...

  15. Ectopic Pelvic Kidney With Urinary Tract Infection Presenting as Lower Abdominal Pain in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Ching Lu; You-Lin Tain; Kwok-Wan Yeung; Mao-Meng Tiao

    2011-01-01

    Ectopic pelvic kidney is a rare developmental anomaly. Ectopic pelvic kidney can present without the characteristic symptoms associated with the urinary tract pathology. Ectopic pelvic kidney is usually unknown, and nonspecific vague abdominal comfort maybe the only symptom. Early detection and recognition of an ectopic kidney can prevent long-term complications. We report a 3-year-5-month-old girl with ectopic pelvic kidney who experienced intermittent episodes of lower abdominal pain for ab...

  16. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Pascal

    2015-09-02

    Despite the frequency of functional abdominal pain, potentially dangerous causes of abdominal pain need to be excluded. Medical history and clinical examination must focus on red flags and signs for imflammatory or malignant diseases. See the patient twice in the case of severe and acute abdominal pain if lab parameters or radiological examinations are normal. Avoid repeated and useless X-ray exposure whenever possible. In the case of subacute or chronic abdominal pain, lab tests such as fecal calprotectin, helicobacter stool antigen and serological tests for celiac disease are very useful. Elderly patients may show atypical or missing clinical signs. Take care of red herrings and be skeptical whether your initial diagnosis is really correct. Abdominal pain can frequently be an abdominal wall pain.

  17. Abdominal wall blocks in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børglum, Jens; Gögenür, Ismail; Bendtsen, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    been introduced with success. Future research should also investigate the effect of specific abdominal wall blocks on neuroendocrine and inflammatory stress response after surgery.  Summary USG abdominal wall blocks in adults are commonplace techniques today. Most abdominal wall blocks are assigned......Purpose of review Abdominal wall blocks in adults have evolved much during the last decade; that is, particularly with the introduction of ultrasound-guided (USG) blocks. This review highlights recent advances of block techniques within this field and proposes directions for future research.......  Recent findings Ultrasound guidance is now considered the golden standard for abdominal wall blocks in adults, even though some landmark-based blocks are still being investigated. The efficiency of USG transversus abdominis plane blocks in relation to many surgical procedures involving the abdominal wall...

  18. Atypical Vitamin B-6 Deficiency A Rare Cause of Unexplained Neonatal and Infantile Epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgart, A.; von Spiczak, S.; Verhoeven-Duif, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    ALDH7A1 and PNPO deficiencies are rare inborn errors of vitamin B-6 metabolism causing perinatal seizure disorders. The phenotypic variability, however, is broad. To assess the frequency of these deficiencies in unexplained infantile epilepsy, we screened 113 patients for mutations in both genes...... pyridoxine treatment. "Hidden" vitamin B-6 deficiencies might be rare but treatable causes of unexplained epilepsy extending beyond the classical phenotypes........ We identified 1 patient with an epilepsy phenotype resembling Dravet syndrome and likely pathogenic mutations in ALDH7A1. Presenting features were highly atypical of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy, including febrile seizures, response to anticonvulsive drugs, and periods of seizure freedom without...

  19. Congenital Abdominal Wall Defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risby, Kirsten; Jakobsen, Marianne Skytte; Qvist, Niels

    2016-01-01

    related complications; and post-discharge gastrointestinal surgery. RESULTS: GDM was placed in 34 (gastroschisis=27, omphalocele=7) patients during the study period. Complete closure of the fascia was obtained in one patient with omphalocele and in 22 patients with gastroschisis. Mesh related surgical...... complications were seen in five (15%) children: four had detachment of the mesh and one patient developed abdominal compartment syndrome. Mesh related clinical infection was observed in five children. In hospital mortality occurred in four cases (2 gastroschisis and 2 omphalocele) and was not procedure...

  20. Abdominal imaging: An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, M.P.; Feinberg, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    This nine-chapter book gives an overview of the integrated approach to abdominal imaging. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the physics used in medical imaging; chapter 2 is on the selection of imaging modalities. These are followed by four chapters that deal, respectively, with plain radiography, computed tomographic scanning, sonography, and nuclear imaging, as applied to the abdomen. Two chapters then cover contrast material-enhanced studies of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract: one focusing on technical considerations; the other, on radiologic study of disease processes. The final chapter is a brief account of different interventional procedures

  1. The value of the abdominal radiograph in children with functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongers, Marloes E.J. [Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Academic Medical Centre, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: mbongers@uva.amc.nl; Voskuijl, Wieger P. [Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Academic Medical Centre, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rijn, Rick R. van [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Emma Children' s Hospital/Academic Medical Centre, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Benninga, Marc A. [Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Academic Medical Centre, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2006-07-15

    Functional gastrointestinal disorder is a common problem in childhood. The symptoms vary from a relative mild gastrointestinal problem such as abdominal pain or infrequent defecation to severe problems with fecal impaction and fecal incontinence. The aim of this review is to describe and evaluate the value of the different existing methods to assess fecal loading on an abdominal radiograph with or without the use of radio-opaque markers in the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain, functional constipation and functional non-retentive fecal incontinence. In our opinion, the abdominal radiograph has limited value in the diagnostic work-up of children with functional gastrointestinal disorders.

  2. The value of the abdominal radiograph in children with functional gastrointestinal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongers, Marloes E.J.; Voskuijl, Wieger P.; Rijn, Rick R. van; Benninga, Marc A.

    2006-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorder is a common problem in childhood. The symptoms vary from a relative mild gastrointestinal problem such as abdominal pain or infrequent defecation to severe problems with fecal impaction and fecal incontinence. The aim of this review is to describe and evaluate the value of the different existing methods to assess fecal loading on an abdominal radiograph with or without the use of radio-opaque markers in the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain, functional constipation and functional non-retentive fecal incontinence. In our opinion, the abdominal radiograph has limited value in the diagnostic work-up of children with functional gastrointestinal disorders

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  4. Laparoscopic management of abdominal cocoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makam Ramesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available "Peritonitis fibrosa incapsulata", first described in 1907, is a condition characterized by encasement of the bowel with a thick fibrous membrane. This condition was renamed as "abdominal cocoon" in 1978. It presents as small bowel obstruction clinically. 35 cases of abdominal cocoon have been reported in the literature over the last three decades. Abdominal cocoon is more common in adolescent girls from tropical countries. Various etiologies have been described, including tubercular. It is treated surgically by releasing the entrapped bowel. We report a laparoscopic experience of tubercular abdominal cocoon and review the literature.

  5. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marincek, B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  6. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marincek, B.

    2002-01-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  7. Epidemiology and contemporary management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Brant W; Hallett, Richard L; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2018-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is most commonly defined as a maximal diameter of the abdominal aorta in excess of 3 cm in either anterior-posterior or transverse planes or, alternatively, as a focal dilation ≥ 1.5 times the diameter of the normal adjacent arterial segment. Risk factors for the development of AAA include age > 60, tobacco use, male gender, Caucasian race, and family history of AAA. Aneurysm growth and rupture risk appear to be associated with persistent tobacco use, female gender, and chronic pulmonary disease. The majority of AAAs are asymptomatic and detected incidentally on various imaging studies, including abdominal ultrasound, and computed tomographic angiography. Symptoms associated with AAA may include abdominal or back pain, thromboembolization, atheroembolization, aortic rupture, or development of an arteriovenous or aortoenteric fistula. The Screening Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Efficiently (SAAAVE) Act provides coverage for a one-time screening abdominal ultrasound at age 65 for men who have smoked at least 100 cigarettes and women who have family history of AAA disease. Medical management is recommended for asymptomatic patients with AAAs  5 mm/6 months), or presence of a fusiform aneurysm with maximum diameter of 5.5 cm or greater. Intervention for AAA includes conventional open surgical repair and endovascular aortic stent graft repair.

  8. Unusual initial abdominal presentations of invasive meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiddir, Tamazoust; Gros, Marion; Hong, Eva; Terrade, Aude; Denizon, Mélanie; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2018-03-28

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is recognized as septicemia and/or meningitis. However, early symptoms may vary and are frequently nonspecific. Early abdominal presentations have been increasingly described. We aimed to explore a large cohort of patients with initial abdominal presentations for association with particular meningococcal strains. Confirmed IMD cases in France between 1991-2016 were screened for the presence within the 24 hours before diagnosis of at least one of the following criteria (1) abdominal pain, (2) gastro-enteritis with diarrhea and vomiting, (3) diarrhea only. Whole genome sequencing was performed on all cultured isolates. We identified 105 cases (median age 19 years) of early abdominal presentations with a sharp increase since 2014. Early abdominal pain alone was the most frequent symptom (n=67, 64%), followed by gastro-enteritis (n=26, 25%) and diarrhea alone (n=12, 11%). Twenty patients (20%) had abdominal surgery. A higher case fatality rate (24%) was observed in these cases compared to 10.4% in all IMD in France (p=0.007) with high levels of inflammation markers in the blood. Isolates of group W were significantly more predominant in these cases compared to all IMD. Most of these isolates belonged to clonal complex ST-11 (cc11) of the sublineages of the South American-UK strain. Abdominal presentations are frequently provoked by hyperinvasive isolates of meningococci. Delay in the management of these cases and the virulence of the isolates may explain the high fatality rate. Rapid recognition is a key element to improve their management.

  9. The management of uterine fibroids in women with otherwise unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza-Mamane, Belina; Havelock, Jon; Hemmings, Robert

    2015-03-01

    addition to an assessment of fibroid size and location within the uterine cavity, evaluation of the degree of invasion of the cavity and thickness of residual myometrium to the serosa. A combination of hysteroscopy and transvaginal ultrasound or hysterosonography are the modalities of choice. (III-B) 3. Submucosal fibroids are managed hysteroscopically. The fibroid size should be women with otherwise unexplained infertility, submucosal fibroids should be removed in order to improve conception and pregnancy rates. (II-2A) 6. Removal of subserosal fibroids is not recommended. (III-D) 7. There is fair evidence to recommend against myomectomy in women with intramural fibroids (hysteroscopically confirmed intact endometrium) and otherwise unexplained infertility, regardless of their size. (II-2D) If the patient has no other options, the benefits of myomectomy should be weighed against the risks, and management of intramural fibroids should be individualized. (III-C) 8. If fibroids are removed abdominally, efforts should be made to use an anterior uterine incision to minimize the formation of postoperative adhesions. (II-2A) 9. Widespread use of the laparoscopic approach to myomectomy may be limited by the technical difficulty of this procedure. Patient selection should be individualized based on the number, size, and location of uterine fibroids and the skill of the surgeon. (III-A) 10. Women, fertile or infertile, seeking future pregnancy should not generally be offered uterine artery embolization as a treatment option for uterine fibroids. (II-3E).

  10. Gut-directed hypnotherapy in children with irritable bowel syndrome or functional abdominal pain (syndrome): A randomized controlled trial on self exercises at home using CD versus individual therapy by qualified therapists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.T.M. Rutten (Juliette); A.M. Vlieger (Arine M.); C. Frankenhuis (Carla); E.K. George (Elvira K.); M. Groeneweg (Michael); O.F. Norbruis (Obbe); W.E. Tjon A ten; H. Van Wering (Herbert); M.G.W. Dijkgraaf (Marcel); M.P. Merkus; M.A. Benninga (Marc)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional abdominal pain (syndrome) (FAP(S)) are common pediatric disorders, characterized by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain. Treatment is challenging, especially in children with persisting symptoms. Gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT)

  11. Neuroautonomic evaluation of patients with unexplained syncope: incidence of complex neurally mediated diagnoses in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafanelli M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Martina Rafanelli, Alessandro Morrione, Annalisa Landi, Emilia Ruffolo, Valentina M Chisciotti, Maria A Brunetti, Niccolò Marchionni, Andrea Ungar Syncope Unit, Cardiology and Geriatric Medicine, University of Florence and Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Florence, Italy Background: The incidence of syncope increases in individuals over the age of 70 years, but data about this condition in the elderly are limited. Little is known about tilt testing (TT, carotid sinus massage (CSM, or supine and upright blood pressure measurement related to age or about patients with complex diagnoses, for example, those with a double diagnosis, ie, positivity in two of these three tests. Methods: A total of 873 consecutive patients of mean age 66.5±18 years underwent TT, CSM, and blood pressure measurement in the supine and upright positions according to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines on syncope.1 Neuroautonomic evaluation was performed if the first-line evaluation (clinical history, physical examination, electrocardiogram was suggestive of neurally mediated syncope, or if the first-line evaluation was suggestive of cardiac syncope but this diagnosis was excluded after specific diagnostic tests according to European Society of Cardiology guidelines on syncope, or if certain or suspected diagnostic criteria were not present after the first-line evaluation. Results: A diagnosis was reached in 64.3% of cases. TT was diagnostic in 50.4% of cases, CSM was diagnostic in 11.8% of cases, and orthostatic hypotension was present in 19.9% of cases. Predictors of a positive tilt test were prodromal symptoms and typical situational syncope. Increased age and a pathologic electrocardiogram were predictors of carotid sinus syndrome. Varicose veins and alpha-receptor blockers, nitrates, and benzodiazepines were associated with orthostatic hypotension. Twenty-three percent of the patients had a complex diagnosis. The most frequent association was

  12. Helicobacter pylori gastritis in a child with sickle cell anemia and recurrent abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, L; Mahoney, D H; Redel, C A

    1997-01-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain is a common complaint in children with sickle cell disease. Helicobacter pylori gastritis has recently been described in association with recurrent abdominal pain in children. A case report is given of a 16-year-old black male with hemoglobin SS disease presenting with recurrent abdominal pain and hematemesis. Endoscopic exam of the upper gastrointestinal tract revealed gastritis, and biopsy confirmed H. pylori infection. Serology studies demonstrated increased anti-H. pylori antibody titers. The young man responded well to treatment, with resolution of his symptoms. Helicobacter pylori infection is a new diagnostic consideration for children with recurrent abdominal pain and should be included in the differential diagnosis of children with sickle cell disease, especially when abdominal pain is recurrent and accompanied by vomiting. Larger case studies will be necessary to determine the true incidence of H. pylori in children with sickle cell disease and recurrent abdominal pain.

  13. Health care costs before and after diagnosis of depression in patients with unexplained pain: a retrospective cohort study using the United Kingdom General Practice Research Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catherine Reed,1 Jihyung Hong,2 Diego Novick,1 Alan Lenox-Smith,3 Michael Happich41Global Health Outcomes, Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 2Personal Social Services Research Unit, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK; 3Eli Lilly UK, Basingstoke, UK; 4Eli Lilly and Company, Bad Homburg, GermanyPurpose: To assess the impact of pain severity and time to diagnosis of depression on health care costs for primary care patients with pre-existing unexplained pain symptoms who subsequently received a diagnosis of depression.Patients and methods: This retrospective cohort study analyzed 4000 adults with unexplained pain (defined as painful physical symptoms [PPS] without any probable organic cause and a subsequent diagnosis of depression, identified from the UK General Practice Research Database using diagnostic codes. Patients were categorized into four groups based on pain severity (milder or more severe; based on number of pain-relief medications and use of opioids and time to diagnosis of depression (≤1 year or >1 year from PPS index date. Annual health care costs were calculated (2009 values and included general practitioner (GP consultations, secondary care referrals, and prescriptions for pain-relief medications for the 12 months before depression diagnosis and in the subsequent 2 years. Multivariate models of cost included time period as a main independent variable, and adjusted for age, gender, and comorbidities.Results: Total annual health care costs before and after depression diagnosis for the four patient groups were higher for the groups with more severe pain (£819–£988 versus £565–£628; P < 0.001 for all pairwise comparisons and highest for the group with more severe pain and longer time to depression diagnosis in the subsequent 2 years (P < 0.05. Total GP costs were highest in the group with more severe pain and longer time to depression diagnosis both before and after depression diagnosis (P

  14. Perinatal outcomes of women with a prior history of unexplained recurrent miscarriage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dempsey, Mark

    2014-05-14

    Abstract Objective: We sought to determine subsequent pregnancy outcomes in a cohort of women with a history of unexplained RM who were not receiving medical treatment. Study Design: This was a prospective cohort study, of women with a history of three unexplained consecutive first trimester losses, who were recruited and followed in their subsequent pregnancy. Control patients were healthy pregnant patients with no previous adverse perinatal outcome. Results: A total of 42 patients with a history of unexplained RM were recruited to the study. 9 (21.4%) experienced a further first trimester miscarriage, 1 case of ectopic and 1 case of partial molar pregnancy. 74% (23\\/31) of the RM cohort had a vaginal delivery. There was one case of severe pre-eclampsia. The RM group delivered at a mean gestational age of 38+2 weeks and with a mean birth-weight of 3.23kg. None of the neonates were under the 10(th) centile for gestational age. Overall, there was no significant difference in pregnancy outcomes between the two cohorts. Conclusion: Our study confirms the reassuring prognosis for achieving a live birth in the unexplained RM population with a very low incidence of adverse events with the majority delivering appropriately grown fetuses at term.

  15. 'Could I be imagining this?' - the dialectic struggles of people with persistent unexplained back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toye, Francine; Barker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    To explore how patients with persistent unexplained pain interpret and utilise the biopsychosocial model. This might have an impact on the outcome from treatment programmes that adopts a biopsychosocial approach. We conducted three interviews with 20 patients attending a pain management programme for persistent unexplained back pain; prior to attending the course, immediately following the course and at 1 year. We used the methods of grounded theory. Patients battled through several dialectic tensions in an attempt to legitimise their pain: First, patients wanted a medical diagnosis but also recognised that psychosocial factors contributed to their pain. Second, although the outward appearance of pain was important to legitimacy, it was also important not to appear 'too ill'. Third, meeting others with unexplained pain reinforced credibility, but patients also described how they were not 'like the others'. Finally, although holding on to one's self was important, patients also described an acceptance of loss. These dialectic tensions are likely to have an impact on a person's decision to embrace the biopsychosocial model, and might therefore effect their outcome. Health care professionals should be sensitive to the cultural ambiguity of patients with persistent unexplained pain.

  16. Explained and unexplained tissue loss in corals from the Tropical Eastern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Villalobos, Jenny Carolina; Work, Thierry M.; Calderon-Aguilera, Luis Eduardo; Reyes-Bonilla, Hector; Hernández, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs rival rainforest in biodiversity, but are declining in part because of disease. Tissue loss lesions, a manifestation of disease, are present in dominant Pocillopora along the Pacific coast of Mexico. We characterized tissue loss in 7 species of Pocillopora from 9 locations (44 sites) spanning southern to northern Mexico. Corals were identified to species, and tissue loss lesions were photographed and classified as those explainable by predation and those that were unexplained. A focal predation study was done concurrently at 3 locations to confirm origin of explained lesions. Of 1054 cases of tissue loss in 7 species of corals, 84% were associated with predation (fish, snails, or seastar) and the remainder were unexplained. Types of tissue loss were not related to coral density; however there was significant geographic heterogeneity in type of lesion; one site in particular (Cabo Pulmo) had the highest prevalence of predator-induced tissue loss (mainly pufferfish predation). Crown-of-thorns starfish, pufferfish, and snails were the most common predators and preferred P. verrucosa, P. meandrina, and P. capitata, respectively. Of the 9 locations, 4 had unexplained tissue loss with prevalence ranging from 1 to 3% with no species predilection. Unexplained tissue loss was similar to white syndrome (WS) in morphology, indicating additional study is necessary to clarify the cause(s) of the lesions and the potential impacts to dominant corals along the Pacific coast of Mexico.

  17. Unexplained Absences and Risk of Death and Injury Among Nursing Home Residents: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, Marta H; Weller, Carolina; Ibrahim, Joseph E

    2017-04-01

    Unexplained absence of nursing home (NH) residents is one of the most challenging issues related to the care of older people. The aim of this review was to examine the death and injury outcomes of unexplained absence of NH residents. We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, AgeLine, and Cochrane Library to identify qualitative and quantitative studies published in the English language. Data on death and injury were collated, and aggregate proportions were calculated where possible. Nine studies were identified; most (n = 6) were conducted in the United States. Persons with dementia formed the study population in all studies. There were 1440 individual unexplained absences reported across the 9 studies. We calculated a rate of 82 deaths and 61 injuries per 1000 incidents of unexplained absence. Extreme temperatures were the most common cause of death. Most individuals left by foot, and were found within a 1-mile radius of place last seen in green vegetation and waterways. This review provides valuable insight into death and injury outcomes. Further studies are recommended to improve understanding and prevent adverse outcomes. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A unique and unexplained ricochet leak post PCI – Successfully treated with intra-coronary glue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin K. Goel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We herein describe a unique case of coronary artery perforation treated with covered stent with repeat cardiac tamponade resulting out of a fresh unexplained leak from a remote vessel (Ricochet and successfully treated with intra-coronary injection of sterile synthetic glue, cyanoacrylate.

  19. Influence of Watchful Waiting on Satisfaction and Anxiety Among Patients Seeking Care for Unexplained Complaints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bokhoven, Marloes A.; Koch, Hèlen; van der Weijden, Trudy; Grol, Richard P. T. M.; Kester, Arnold D.; Rinkens, Paula E. L. M.; Bindels, Patrick J. E.; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE We undertook a study to determine whether test-ordering strategy and other consultation-related factors influence satisfaction with and anxiety after a consultation among patients seeking care for unexplained complaints. METHODS A cluster-randomized clinical trial was conducted in family

  20. Cauda equina syndrome presenting as abdominal pain: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, Prasad

    2012-09-01

    Cauda equina syndrome (CES) is an uncommon entity. Symptoms include bowel and bladder dysfunction, saddle anesthesia, and varying degrees of lower limb motor and sensory disturbances. The consequences of delayed diagnosis can be devastating, resulting in bowel and bladder incontinence and lower limb paralysis. There is little in literature regarding abdominal pain as a significant feature of the initial presentation of CES. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman with CES who presented to the emergency department with gradually worsening lower abdominal pain.

  1. An Abdominal Presentation of Churg-Strauss Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. E. Rees

    2010-01-01

    inflammation necrotising systemic vasculitis and necrotising glomerulonephritis. We describe a case of Churg-Strauss syndrome presenting with abdominal pain and later during the hospital admission a mono-neuritis multiplex syndrome affecting the lower limbs. The patient presented in such an atypical fashion with abdominal signs and symptoms that they required laparotomy and the diagnosis was made after histological examination of tissue taken at the time of surgery. Treatment with immunosuppression and aggressive rehabilitation achieved a progressive recovery which continued on discharge from hospital.

  2. Pain following the repair of an abdominal hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mark Berner; Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Crawford, Michael Edward

    2010-01-01

    Pain and other types of discomfort are frequent symptoms following the repair of an abdominal hernia. After 1 year, the incidence of light to moderate pain following inguinal hernia repair is as high as 10% and 2% for severe disabling chronic pain. Postoperative chronic pain not only affects......, psychosocial characteristics, and surgical procedures) related to the postoperative pain conditions. Furthermore, the mechanisms for both acute and chronic pain are presented. We focus on inguinal hernia repair, which is the most frequent type of abdominal hernia surgery that leads to chronic pain. Finally...

  3. Clinical and CT imaging features of abdominal fat necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jinkun; Bai Renju

    2013-01-01

    Fat necrosis is a common pathological change at abdominal cross-sectional imaging, and it may cause abdominal pain, mimic pathological change of acute abdomen, or be asymptomatic and accompany other pathophysiologic processes. Fat necrosis is actually the result of steatosis by metabolism or mechanical injury. Common processes that are present in fat necrosis include epiploic appendagitis, infarction of the greater omentum, pancreatitis, and fat necrosis related to trauma or ischemia. As a common fat disease, fat necrosis should be known by clinicians and radiologists. Main content of this text is the clinical symptoms and CT findings of belly fat necrosis and related diseases. (authors)

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes S.

    2010-01-01

    Although the number of elective operations for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is increasing, the sex- and age-standardised mortality rate of AAAs continues to rise, especially among men aged 65 years or more. The lethality of ruptured AAA continues to be 80-95%, compared with 5-7% by elective...... surgery of symptomfree AAA. In order to fulfil all WHO, European, and Danish criteria for screening, a randomised hospitalbased screening trial of 12,639 65-73 year old men in Viborg County (Denmark) was initiated in 1994. It seemed that US screening is a valid, suitable and acceptable method of screening...... patients without previous hospital discharge diagnoses due to cardiovascular disease than among similar men without AAA. The absolute risk difference after 5 years was 16%. So, they will benefit from general cardiovascular preventive action as smoking cessation, statins and low-dose aspirin, which could...

  5. Abdominal Burkitt lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Romina J.; Villavicencio, Roberto L.; Oxilia, Hector G.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: As scarce information is available, in this research we have tried to describe the imaging findings of the Burkitt's lymphoma. Retrospective analysis of the clinical and imaging presentation of a 4 years old boy, is given. Biopsy confirmed the BL. Different imaging techniques were combined. The X-rays were negative. The US revealed a moderate hepatomegaly with multiple hypoechoic nodules and free fluid in the abdominal cavity. The CT showed the hepatomegaly as well as solid nodules in great number and different sizes(due to the densitometric behaviour and to post contrast enhancement), a scarce amount of ascites and a density increase of the mesentery fat. The MRI characterized and revealed in detail the US and the CT findings. The Burkitt's lymphoma is a rare entity; several methods are needed to approach the diagnosis. It represents a great clinical and imaging challenge. (author)

  6. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553...... patients, 51 (9%) of whom died within the first 48 hours. Of the 502 patients who survived for more than 48 hours, 109 required ICU therapy for more than 48 hours, whereas 393 patients were in the ICU for less than 48 hours. The incidence of preoperative risk factors was similar for the two groups...... combined failed to permit identification of patients in whom the perioperative survival rate was 0%. Even 20% of patients with multiorgan failure survived for 6 months. Of those patients who needed ICU therapy for more than 48 hours, 41 (38%) were alive at the end of 1988. In response to a questionnaire...

  7. Lower FOXO3 mRNA expression in granulosa cells is involved in unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hikaru; Yamashita, Yoshiki; Saito, Natsuho; Hayashi, Atsushi; Hayashi, Masami; Terai, Yoshito; Ohmichi, Masahide

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether FOXO1 and FOXO3 mRNA expression in granulosa cells is the cause of unexplained infertility. Thirty-one patients aged infertility and 18 with male partner infertility as a control group) whose serum anti-Müllerian hormone level was >0.5 ng/μL were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent oocyte retrieval under a short protocol from June 2012 to October 2013. Real-time PCR was carried out using mRNA extracted from granulosa cells retrieved from mature follicles. We compared FOXO1 and FOXO3 mRNA expression ratios in granulosa cells between the unexplained infertility group and the male infertility group. The relation between FOXO1 and FOXO3 mRNA expression ratios in granulosa cells and assisted reproduction technology clinical outcome was also examined. FOXO3 mRNA expression ratio was significantly lower in the unexplained infertility group than in the male infertility group. Moreover, FOXO3 mRNA expression ratio showed a positive correlation with both the number of retrieved oocytes and serum anti-Müllerian hormone level. A positive correlation was also identified between FOXO1 mRNA expression and total dose of hMG. As well, the number of retrieved oocytes in the unexplained infertility group was statistically lower than that in the male infertility group. A lower FOXO3 mRNA expression in granulosa cells leads to poor oocyte development in patients with unexplained infertility undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. Abdominal epilepsy in a Nigerian child S

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdominal epilepsy is an exceptionally rare cause of abdominal pain that is more likely to ... We report on a child with episodic paroxysmal abdominal pain, accompanied by ... causes for the presenting complaints, work-up should proceed.

  9. VACUUM THERAPY VERSUS ABDOMINAL EXERCISES ON ABDOMINAL OBESITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevein Mohammed Mohammed Gharib

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity is a medical condition that may adversely affect wellbeing and leading to increased incidence of many health problems. Abdominal obesity tends to be associated with weight gain and obesity and it is significantly connected with different disorders like coronary heart disease and type II diabetes mellitus.This study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of vacuum therapy as compared to abdominal exercises on abdominal obesity in overweight and obese women. Methods: Thirtyoverweight and obese women participated in this study with body mass index > 25 kg/m2andwaist circumference ≥ 85 cm. Their ages ranged from 28 - 40 years old.The subjects were excluded if they have diabetes, abdominal infection diseases or any physical limitation restricting exercise ability. They were randomly allocated into two equal groups; group I and group II. Group I received vacuum therapy sessions (by the use of LPG device in addition to aerobic exercise training. Group II received abdominal exercises in addition to the same aerobic exercisesgiven to group I. This study was extended for successive 8 weeks (3 sessions/ week. All subjects were assessed for thickness ofnthe abdominal skin fold, waist circumference and body mass index. Results: The results of this study showeda significant difference between group I and group II post-interventionas regarding to the mean values of waist circumference and abdominal skin fold thickness (p<0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that aerobic exercises combined with vacuum therapy (for three sessions/week for successive 8 weeks have a positive effect on women with abdominal obesity in terms of reducing waist circumference and abdominal skin fold thickness.

  10. Abdominal elephantiasis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Dominique; Cloutier, Richard; Lapointe, Roch; Desgagné, Antoine

    2004-01-01

    Elephantiasis is a well-known condition in dermatology usually affecting the legs and external genitalia. It is characterized by chronic inflammation and obstruction of the lymphatic channels and by hypertrophy of the skin and subcutaneous tissues. The etiology is either idiopathic or caused by a variety of conditions such as chronic filarial disease, leprosy, leishmaniasis, and chronic recurrent cellulites. Elephantiasis of the abdominal wall is very rare. A complete review of the English and French literature showed only two cases reported in 1966 and 1973, respectively. We report a third case of abdominal elephantiasis and we briefly review this entity. We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who had progressively developed an enormous pediculated abdominal mass hanging down her knees. The skin was thickened, hyperpigmented, and fissured. She had a history of multiple abdominal cellulites. She underwent an abdominal lipectomy. Histopathology of the specimen confirmed the diagnosis of abdominal elephantiasis. Abdominal elephantiasis is a rare disease that represents end-stage failure of lymph drainage. Lipectomy should be considered in the management of this condition.

  11. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  12. Abdominal and lower back pain in pediatric idiopathic stabbing headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Ohara, Tomoichiro; Hino-Fukuyo, Naomi; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Kure, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic stabbing headache (ISH) is a primary headache syndrome characterized by transient, sharp, stabbing pains located in the first division of the trigeminal nerve. Reports of pediatric ISH are rare, and extracephalic pain in pediatric ISH is extremely rare. Here we report the case of a 7-year-old male patient suffering from frequent, short, stabbing headache, which was occasionally associated with abdominal and lower back pain. Various investigations were normal. He was diagnosed with ISH, and valproic acid was administered to relieve his headache and accompanying symptoms. Our case demonstrates that abdominal and lower back pain may occur in pediatric ISH. This case may provide new evidence linking ISH and migraine by showing that extracephalic symptoms accompanying ISH are similar to those of migraine. We hypothesize that the mechanism underlying the headache and abdominal and lower back pain associated with ISH may be similar to that of a migraine headache. Accumulating additional cases by asking specific questions regarding the presence of the unusual symptoms presented in our case may help to establish a detailed clinical profile of these unfamiliar and peculiar symptoms in the pediatric ISH population.

  13. Glaucoma Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up You can help find a cure for glaucoma Give now Signs & Symptoms The most common types ... have completely different symptoms. Symptoms of Open-Angle Glaucoma Most people who develop open-angle glaucoma don’ ...

  14. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Newborn With Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwan, Riham; Drake, Meredith; Gurria Juarez, Juan; Emery, Kathleen H; Shaaban, Aimen F; Szabo, Sara; Sobolewski, Brad

    2017-11-01

    A previously healthy 3-week-old boy presented with 5 hours of marked fussiness, abdominal distention, and poor feeding. He was afebrile and well perfused. His examination was remarkable for localized abdominal tenderness and distention. He was referred to the emergency department in which an abdominal radiograph revealed gaseous distention of the bowel with a paucity of gas in the pelvis. Complete blood cell count and urinalysis were unremarkable. His ongoing fussiness and abnormal physical examination prompted consultation with surgery and radiology. Our combined efforts ultimately established an unexpected diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Effect of Daikenchuto (TJ-100) on abdominal bloating in hepatectomized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Ichikawa, Kengo; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Dabanaka, Ken; Namikawa, Tsutomu

    2013-04-27

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of Daikenchuto (DKT) in hepatecomized patients. Twenty patients were enrolled with informed consent. Two patients were excluded because of cancelled operations. The remaining 18 patients were randomly chosen for treatment with DKT alone or combination therapy of DKT and lactulose (n = 9, each group). Data were prospectively collected. Primary end points were Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score for abdominal bloating, total Gastrointestinal Symptoms Rating Scale (GSRS) score for abdominal symptoms, and GSRS score for abdominal bloating. The VAS score for abdominal bloating and total GSRS score for abdominal symptoms recovered to levels that were not significantly different to preoperative levels by 10 d postoperation. Combination therapy of DKT and lactulose was associated with a significantly poorer outcome in terms of VAS and GSRS scores for abdominal bloating, total GSRS score, and total daily calorie intake, when compared with DKT alone therapy. DKT is a potentially effective drug for postoperative management of hepatectomized patients, not only to ameliorate abdominal bloating, but also to promote nutritional support by increasing postoperative dietary intake.

  17. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Gastrointestinal symptoms and autism spectrum disorder: links and risks – a possible new overlap syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasilewska J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jolanta Wasilewska, Mark Klukowski Department of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology and Allergology, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland Abstract: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a genetically determined neurodevelopmental brain disorder presenting with restricted, repetitive patterns of behaviors, interests, and activities, or persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction. ASD is characterized by many different clinical endophenotypes and is potentially linked with certain comorbidities. According to current recommendations, children with ASD are at risk of having alimentary tract disorders – mainly, they are at a greater risk of general gastrointestinal (GI concerns, constipation, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. GI symptoms may overlap with ASD core symptoms through different mechanisms. These mechanisms include multilevel pathways in the gut–brain axis contributing to alterations in behavior and cognition. Shared pathogenetic factors and pathophysiological mechanisms possibly linking ASD and GI disturbances, as shown by most recent studies, include intestinal inflammation with or without autoimmunity, immunoglobulin E-mediated and/or cell-mediated GI food allergies as well as gluten-related disorders (celiac disease, wheat allergy, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, visceral hypersensitivity linked with functional abdominal pain, and dysautonomia linked with GI dysmotility and gastroesophageal reflux. Dysregulation of the gut microbiome has also been shown to be involved in modulating GI functions with the ability to affect intestinal permeability, mucosal immune function, and intestinal motility and sensitivity. Metabolic activity of the microbiome and dietary components are currently suspected to be associated with alterations in behavior and cognition also in patients with other neurodegenerative diseases. All the above-listed GI factors may contribute to brain dysfunction and neuroinflammation depending upon

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic or scrotal pain in children. Preparation will depend on the type of examination. ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child's abdominal ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) ... uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help diagnose appendicitis in children. Except for traumatic injury, ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... children. Except for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging ... of page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of an apparent enlarged abdominal organ identify the location of abnormal fluid in the abdomen help determine ... places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or ... help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, abscesses or an ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging can also: ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... kidneys bladder testicles ovaries uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help diagnose appendicitis in children. ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... apparent enlarged abdominal organ identify the location of abnormal fluid in the abdomen help determine causes of ... are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound may also be ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging produces pictures of the internal organs and blood vessels located within a child's abdomen. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of a child's abdominal ultrasound ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  11. Intra-abdominal tuberculous peritonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, G.; Ahlhelm, F.; Altmeyer, K.; Kramann, B.; Hennes, P.; Pueschel, W.; Karadiakos, N.

    2001-01-01

    We report the case of a 15-year-old boy suffering from progressive dyspnea on exertion and painful abdominal protrusion. Final diagnosis of intra-abdominal tuberculosis (TB), including lymphadenopathy and abdominal abscess formation, was made following elective laparotomy. This type of disease is a rare manifestation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. The imaging findings in unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI and laparoscopic images are presented. Differential diagnosis of abdominal abscess formation and other fungal or bacteriological infections, as well as the imaging findings of this type of lesion, are discussed. This case demonstrates that atypical manifestation of TB may remain unrecognized; thus, awareness of this kind of manifestation of tuberculosis may prevent patients from being subjected to inappropriate therapies. (orig.)

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ...

  13. Linking Abdominal Obesity and Dyslipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Enrique Miguel Soca

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Considering as a start point the discussion of an article published by this same journal (Finlay in its previous issue, this letter deals with some alterations associating abdominal obesity and dyslipidemia.

  14. Intra-abdominal tuberculous peritonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, G.; Ahlhelm, F.; Altmeyer, K.; Kramann, B. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Homburg (Germany); Hennes, P. [Dept. of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Homburg (Germany); Pueschel, W. [Dept. of Pathology, University Hospital, Homburg (Germany); Karadiakos, N. [Dept. of Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital, Homburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    We report the case of a 15-year-old boy suffering from progressive dyspnea on exertion and painful abdominal protrusion. Final diagnosis of intra-abdominal tuberculosis (TB), including lymphadenopathy and abdominal abscess formation, was made following elective laparotomy. This type of disease is a rare manifestation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. The imaging findings in unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI and laparoscopic images are presented. Differential diagnosis of abdominal abscess formation and other fungal or bacteriological infections, as well as the imaging findings of this type of lesion, are discussed. This case demonstrates that atypical manifestation of TB may remain unrecognized; thus, awareness of this kind of manifestation of tuberculosis may prevent patients from being subjected to inappropriate therapies. (orig.)

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... various body organs such as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses ... appendix stomach/ pylorus liver gallbladder spleen pancreas intestines kidneys bladder testicles ovaries uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can ...

  16. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-01-01

    Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication to abdominal surgery, occurring in more than 20% of all patients. Some of these hernias become giant and affect patients in several ways. This patient group often experiences pain, decreased perceived body image, and loss of physical function......, which results in a need for surgical repair of the giant hernia, known as abdominal wall reconstruction. In the current thesis, patients with a giant hernia were examined to achieve a better understanding of their physical and psychological function before and after abdominal wall reconstruction. Study...... was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery...

  17. A rare cause of lomber pain: diopatic abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, F.; Saglam, M.; Sahin, M.; Bozlar, U.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysms are rare and life-threatening situations. Trauma and operative procedures are common causes of pseudoaneurysm. Abdominal pain is the most common symptom of them. They are usually detected incidentally. Objectives and tasks: We aim to present CTA findings of abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm causes gradually increasing lomber pain in 70-year-old female patient. Physical examination also made diagnosis easy because of pulsatile mass detected. Materials and methods: Lomber MRG and endoscopic procedures were normal. Then we performed CTA to find the cause for pulsatile mass. Results: Pseudoaneurysm with approximately 6 x 7.5 cm size was compressing duodenum and not showing extravasation at the infrarenal segment of abdominal aorta detected in CTA. Pseudoaneurysm was filling from aorta through a 2 cm neck. Conclusion: Primary cause for pseudoaneurysms is traumating injuries. Initial presentation may be abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding or pulsatile mass. To plan treatment and figure out pseudoaneurysm CTA is very fast and non-invasive technic

  18. [Globalization: challenges in abdominal surgery for migrants and refugees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, T J; Post, S

    2018-03-01

    The increasing number of refugees, migrants and international travelers influences the surgical spectrum of abdominal diseases. The aim of this review is to familiarize surgeons with specific diseases which are endemic in the patients' countries of origin and are likely to be diagnosed with increasing incidence in Germany. Low levels of hygiene in the countries of origin or refugee camps is associated with a high incidence of numerous infections, such as helminth infections, typhoid fever or amoebiasis, which if untreated can cause surgical emergencies. Historically, some of them were common in Germany but have been more or less eradicated because of the high socioeconomic standard. Echinococcosis and Chagas disease are frequently treated surgically while schistosomiasis can mimic intestinal cancer. Abdominal tuberculosis presents in a variety of abdominal pathologies and frequently causes diagnostic uncertainty. Sigmoid volvulus has a very low incidence among Europeans, but is one of the most common abdominal surgical conditions of adults in endemic countries. The number of patients who eventually undergo surgery for these conditions might be relatively low; however, surgeons must be aware of them and consider them as differential diagnoses in refugees and migrants with acute or chronic abdominal symptoms.

  19. Recurrent severe abdominal pain in the pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homme, James L; Foster, Ashley A

    2014-05-01

    Ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) is a blockage occurring at the junction of the ureter and the renal pelvis. Pediatric patients with UPJO pose a diagnostic challenge when they present to the emergency department (ED) with severe recurrent abdominal pain if there is not a level of suspicion for this condition. Our aim was to review presentation of UPJO to the ED, methods of diagnosis, and treatment of this common but often overlooked condition. We report on 2 patients, a 9-year-old and 3-year-old, who had multiple presentations to health care providers and the ED with intermittent and recurrent abdominal pain. Subsequent testing, including ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) with diuretic-recreated symptoms, revealed UPJO. Open pyeloplasty was performed, resulting in complete resolution of symptoms. UPJO is an important diagnosis to consider when patients present to the ED with recurrent abdominal pain. US can be helpful in suspecting the diagnosis, but often CT, magnetic resonance urography, or diuretic scintigraphy is required for confirmation. Diuretics can be used to aid diagnostic testing by reproducing abdominal pain at the time of imaging. Referral to a urologist for open pyeloplasty is definitive treatment for this condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-visualized pregnancy losses are prognostically important for unexplained recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, A M; van Oppenraaij, R H; Quenby, S

    2014-01-01

    consecutive pregnancy losses before 12 weeks' gestation, and we included only women with unexplained RM after thorough evaluation. It is uncertain whether the findings apply to other definitions of RM and among women with known causes for their miscarriages. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: To our......STUDY QUESTION: Are non-visualized pregnancy losses (biochemical pregnancy loss and failed pregnancy of unknown location combined) in the reproductive history of women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage (RM) negatively associated with the chance of live birth in a subsequent pregnancy? SUMMARY...... ANSWER: Non-visualized pregnancy losses contribute negatively to the chance for live birth: each non-visualized pregnancy loss confers a relative risk (RR) for live birth of 0.90 (95% CI 0.83; 0.97), equivalent to the RR conferred by each additional clinical miscarriage. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: The number...

  1. Ectopic intra-abdominal fascioliasis

    OpenAIRE

    ÖNGÖREN, Ali Ulvi

    2009-01-01

    Human fascioliasis, caused by Fasciola hepatica, is emerging as an important chronic zoonotic disease in many areas of the world, including Turkey. It primarily involves the liver and may also cause severe damage in the tissue. Herein we report on a patient with ectopic intra-abdominal fascioliasis that presented to our clinic with abdominal pain and distention. Physical and radiological examination as well as an exploratory laparotomy revealed a 10 × 10-cm mass in the splenic flexura of the ...

  2. Abdominal ultrasonography, 2nd Ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, B.B.

    1984-01-01

    This volume is a new and updated edition of an extensively illustrated text and reference on the capabilities and imaging of gray scale ultrasonography for each major abdominal organ. Each major organ system is treated separately, including liver, gallbladder and bile ducts, pancreas, kidney, retroperitoneum, abdominal vasculature, and more. There are over 500 illustrations and ten pages of full color plates for cross sectional anatomy

  3. CT findings in abdominal actinomycosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Jae; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Moon Gyu; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Auh, Yong Ho

    1999-01-01

    Abdominal actinomycosis is a chronic, progressive, suppurative disease with a favorable response to intravenous treatment with penicillin. In many instances, however, its clinical and radiological findings may overlap with those of other inflammatory and neoplastic conditions, and the familiarity with the various radiological features can thus avoid diagnostic delays. The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss the CT findings of abdominal actinomycosis

  4. Increase of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression in women with unexplained early spontaneous abortion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Chun-fang; YU Xue-wen; JIN Hui; LI Xu

    2004-01-01

    To investigate membrane tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 protein expression level in decidua andconcentration of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in serum in women with unexplained early spontaneous abortion,threatened abortion, and compare the levels with healthy pregnant women. Methods: Thirty-seven women with unexplainedearly spontaneous abortion, 27 women with threatened abortion, and 34 healthy pregnant women undergoing artificial abortionof pregnancy at 6 - 10 weeks of gestation were selected. Decidual samples were collected when women were undergoing arti-ficial abortion, and blood samples were collected at the same time. The level of membrane tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 indecidua was detected by flow cytometer, and the concentration of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in sera was mea-sured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: The ercentages of membrane tumor necrosis factor receptor 1positive decidual cells were 16.42 ± 7.10 Mean ± SD for women with unexplained early spontaneous abortion and 13.14 ±6.30 for healthy pregnant women ( P < 0.05). Serum oncentration of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 was signifi-cantly higher in women with unexplained early spontaneous abortion than in healthy pregnant women and in women withthreatened abortion, and no difference was found between healthy pregnant women and women with threatened abortion.Conclusion: Women with unexplained early spontaneous abortion present significantly higher expression of tumor necrosisfactor receptor 1 than healthy pregnant women, suggesting that over-expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 may cont-ribute to the development of early spontaneous abortion.

  5. Blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, Deborah; Lee, Lois K

    2012-06-01

    This review will examine the current evidence regarding pediatric blunt abdominal trauma and the physical exam findings, laboratory values, and radiographic imaging associated with the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries (IAI), as well as review the current literature on pediatric hollow viscus injuries and emergency department disposition after diagnosis. The importance of the seat belt sign on physical examination and screening laboratory data remains controversial, although screening hepatic enzymes are recommended in the evaluation of nonaccidental trauma to identify occult abdominal organ injuries. Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) has modest sensitivity for hemoperitoneum and IAI in the pediatric trauma patient. Patients with concern for undiagnosed IAI, including bowel injury, may be considered for hospital admission and serial abdominal exams without an increased risk of complications, if an exploratory laparotomy is not performed emergently. Although the FAST exam is not recommended as the sole screening tool to rule out IAI in hemodynamically stable trauma patients, it may be used in conjunction with the physical exam and laboratory findings to identify children at risk for IAI. Children with a normal physical exam and normal abdominal CT may not require routine hospitalization after blunt abdominal trauma.

  6. Massive immunoglobulin treatment in women with four or more recurrent spontaneous primary abortions of unexplained aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, H; Kishida, T; Kobayashi, N; Kato, E H; Hoshi, N; Fujimoto, S

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this trial was to investigate the efficacy of massive i.v. immunoglobulin (MIVIg) treatment for women with a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) due to unexplained aetiology. The study included nine women (11 pregnancies) with a history of four or more consecutive RSA with unexplained aetiology and no live births. The mean number of fetal losses was 4.5 (range 4-6 abortions). Over the course of 5 days, immunoglobulin (20 g/day) was infused i.v. at gestational weeks 4-7. No additional infusions were carried out. Two pregnancies out of the 11 conceptions resulted in missed abortions at gestational weeks 6 and 7 respectively. Mosaicism (46XX/ 48XX, +16, +20), and tetraploidy (92XXXX) were found by chromosome analyses of the two aborti. Eight out of the other nine pregnancies resulted in full term deliveries of healthy neonates. One pregnancy developed intrauterine growth retardation and fetal distress, resulting in a premature delivery (30 gestational weeks) by Caesarean section. Thus, excluding the two abortions with chromosome aberrations, the MIVIg treatment was effective in all nine pregnancies of RSA women with unexplained aetiology. This MIVIg treatment (100 g administered in early gestation) may be a beneficial alternative to previous IVIg infusion methods, and should be further evaluated in a multicentric, placebo-controlled study, employing a larger number of homogeneous patients who fall into a high risk category of first trimester abortions.

  7. Expression of AIF-1 and RANTES in Unexplained Spontaneous Abortion and Possible Association with Alloimmune Abortion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-hong LI; Hai-lin WANG; Ya-juan ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of allograft inflammatory factor-1(AIF-1)and (RANTES) in sera and deciduas on unexplained early spontaneous abortion.Methods AIF-1 and RANTES were examined in sera and deciduas/endometria of 43 unexplained early spontaneous abortion women (group A),40 healthy women with early pregnancy(group B)and 20 healthy women with no pregnancy (group C). Immunohistochemistry and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used in this study. Results AIF-1 protein was expressed both in deciduas of group A and in endometria of group C.In group A, H scores in the recurrent abortion deciduas specimens were significantly greater than those in the first abortion;in endometrium,expression of AIF-1 was greater in the secretory than in proliferative phase of group C.In group B,concentrations of RANTES in sera were higher in 7th-8th week of pregnancy than in 6th-7th and >8th week of pregnancy;expression of AIF-1 protein showed a negative correlation with RASNTES concentration;a significant increase of the RANTES levels in sera and tissue was observed in group B. Conclusion These results demonstrate, for the first time,that AIF-1 are expressed in deciduas of unexplained spontaneous abortion suggesting that AIF-1 involve in alloimmune abortion; RANTES might act as a novel blocking antibody;AIF-1 and RANTES might act as reliable markers for diagnosis of early alloimmune abortion.

  8. Treatment of central sensitization in patients with 'unexplained' chronic pain: what options do we have?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Jo; Meeus, Mira; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Roussel, Nathalie; De Kooning, Margot; Ickmans, Kelly; Matic, Milica

    2011-05-01

    Central sensitization accounts for chronic 'unexplained' pain in a wide variety of disorders, including chronic whiplash-associated disorders, temporomandibular disorders, chronic low back pain, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and chronic tension-type headache among others. Given the increasing evidence supporting the clinical significance of central sensitization in those with unexplained chronic pain, the awareness is growing that central sensitization should be a treatment target in these patients. This article provides an overview of the treatment options available for desensitizing the CNS in patients with chronic pain due to central sensitization. It focuses on those strategies that specifically target pathophysiological mechanisms known to be involved in central sensitization. In addition, pharmacological options, rehabilitation and neurotechnology options are discussed. Acetaminophen, serotonin-reuptake inhibitor drugs, selective and balanced serototin and norepinephrine-reuptake inhibitor drugs, the serotonin precursor tryptophan, opioids, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antagonists, calcium-channel alpha(2)delta (a2δ) ligands, transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS), manual therapy and stress management each target central pain processing mechanisms in animals that - theoretically - desensitize the CNS in humans. To provide a comprehensive treatment for 'unexplained' chronic pain disorders characterized by central sensitization, it is advocated to combine the best evidence available with treatment modalities known to target central sensitization. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd

  9. An Abdominal Presentation of Churg-Strauss Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, J. R. E.; Burgess, P.

    2010-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a small and medium vessel vasculitis that is also known as allergic granulomatous angiitis. It most commonly presents with an asthma like symptoms. It was first described in Mount Siani Hospital, New York in 1951 by Jacob Churg and Lotte Stauss and was recognised after the study of a series of 13 patients who had asthma, eosinophilia, granulomatous inflammation necrotising systemic vasculitis and necrotising glomerulonephritis. We describe a case of Churg-Strauss syndrome presenting with abdominal pain and later during the hospital admission a mono-neuritis multiplex syndrome affecting the lower limbs. The patient presented in such an atypical fashion with abdominal signs and symptoms that they required laparotomy and the diagnosis was made after histological examination of tissue taken at the time of surgery. Treatment with immunosuppression and aggressive rehabilitation achieved a progressive recovery which continued on discharge from hospital. PMID:20814555

  10. Functional abdominal pain disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajindrajith, Shaman; Zeevenhooven, Judith; Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Perera, Bonaventure Jayasiri Crispus; Benninga, Marc A

    2018-04-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common problem in pediatric practice. The majority of cases fulfill the Rome IV criteria for functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs). At times, these disorders may lead to rather serious repercussions. Area covered: We have attempted to cover current knowledge on epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk factors related to pathophysiology, clinical evaluation and management of children with FAPDs. Expert commentary: FAPDs are a worldwide problem with a pooled prevalence of 13.5%. There are a number of predisposing factors and pathophysiological mechanisms including stressful events, child maltreatment, visceral hypersensitivity, altered gastrointestinal motility and change in intestinal microbiota. It is possible that the environmental risk factors intricately interact with genes through epigenetic mechanisms to contribute to the pathophysiology. The diagnosis mainly depends on clinical evaluation. Commonly used pharmacological interventions do not play a major role in relieving symptoms. Centrally directed, nonpharmacological interventions such as hypnotherapy and cognitive behavioral therapy have shown both short and long term efficacy in relieving pain in children with FAPDs. However, these interventions are time consuming and need specially trained staff and therefore, not currently available at grass root level. Clinicians and researchers should join hands in searching for more pragmatic and effective therapeutic modalities to improve overall care of children with FAPDs.

  11. Abdominal manifestations of cystic fibrosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; Navarro, Oscar M.; Levine, Daniel S.; Oudjhane, Kamaldine

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary complications remain the main cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis, but the presenting symptoms in children are often related to gastrointestinal or pancreaticobiliary disease. Furthermore, abdominal manifestations are now seen throughout childhood, from infancy to adolescence. The child might present in the neonatal period with meconium ileus or its attendant complications. The older child might present with distal intestinal obstruction syndrome or colonic stricture secondary to high doses of pancreatic enzyme replacement. Less-common gastrointestinal manifestations include intussusception, duodenitis and fecal impaction of the appendix. Most children also show evidence of exocrine pancreatic deficiency. Radiologically, the combination of fat deposition and pancreatic fibrosis leads to varying CT and MR appearances. A higher than normal incidence of pancreatic cysts and calcification is also seen. Decreased transport of water and chloride also increases the viscosity of bile, with subsequent obstruction of the biliary ductules. If extensive, this can progress to obstructive cirrhosis, portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Diffuse fatty infiltration, hypersplenism and gallstones are also commonly seen in these patients. We present a pictorial review of the radiological appearance of these abdominal manifestations. The conditions are dealt with individually, together with typical appearances in various imaging modalities. (orig.)

  12. Abdominal manifestations of cystic fibrosis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; Navarro, Oscar M.; Levine, Daniel S.; Oudjhane, Kamaldine [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-03-15

    Pulmonary complications remain the main cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis, but the presenting symptoms in children are often related to gastrointestinal or pancreaticobiliary disease. Furthermore, abdominal manifestations are now seen throughout childhood, from infancy to adolescence. The child might present in the neonatal period with meconium ileus or its attendant complications. The older child might present with distal intestinal obstruction syndrome or colonic stricture secondary to high doses of pancreatic enzyme replacement. Less-common gastrointestinal manifestations include intussusception, duodenitis and fecal impaction of the appendix. Most children also show evidence of exocrine pancreatic deficiency. Radiologically, the combination of fat deposition and pancreatic fibrosis leads to varying CT and MR appearances. A higher than normal incidence of pancreatic cysts and calcification is also seen. Decreased transport of water and chloride also increases the viscosity of bile, with subsequent obstruction of the biliary ductules. If extensive, this can progress to obstructive cirrhosis, portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Diffuse fatty infiltration, hypersplenism and gallstones are also commonly seen in these patients. We present a pictorial review of the radiological appearance of these abdominal manifestations. The conditions are dealt with individually, together with typical appearances in various imaging modalities. (orig.)

  13. Abdominal wall hernias: computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Rosas, George de Queiroz; Mota, Marcos Alexandre; Akisue, Sandra R. Tsukada; Galvao Filho, Mario de Melo.

    2005-01-01

    Abdominal hernias are a common clinical problem Clinical diagnosis of abdominal hernias can sometimes be challenging, particularly in obese patients or patients with previous abdominal surgery. CT scan of the abdomen allows visualization of hernias and their contents and the differentiation from other masses of the abdominal wall such as tumors, hematomas and abscesses. Moreover, CT may identify complications such as incarceration, bowel obstruction, volvulus and strangulation. This study illustrates the CT scan findings observed in different types of abdominal wall hernias. (author)

  14. Abdominal colic due to ureteric diverticulum with stone formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roodhooft, A.M.; Boven, K.; Acker, K.J. van; Gentens, P.

    1987-01-01

    In a 15-year-old boy right lower abdominal colicky pain was caused by intermittent obstruction of the ureter by stones which had accumulated in a ureteric diverticulum. As was shown by repeated X-rays, each of these stones had moved to the ureter and back to the diverticulum. Ureteric diverticulum mostly remains asymptomatic in children: stone formation and obstruction of the ureter by the stones is one of the instances which may cause symptoms. (orig.)

  15. Altered rectal sensory response induced by balloon distention in patients with functional abdominal pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudaira Miwako

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS has chronic unexplained abdominal pain and is similar to the psychiatric diagnosis of somatoform pain disorder. A patient with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS also has chronic unexplained abdominal pain, and rectal hypersensitivity is observed in a majority of the patients. However, no reports have evaluated the visceral sensory function of FAPS precisely. We aimed to test the hypothesis that FAPS would show altered visceral sensation compared to healthy controls or IBS. The present study determined the rectal perceptual threshold, intensity of sensation using visual analogue scale (VAS, and rectal compliance in response to rectal balloon distention by a barostat in FAPS, IBS, and healthy controls. Methods First, the ramp distention of 40 ml/min was induced and the thresholds of discomfort, pain, and maximum tolerance (mmHg were measured. Next, three phasic distentions (60-sec duration separated by 30-sec intervals of 10, 15 and 20 mmHg were randomly loaded. The subjects were asked to mark the VAS in reference to subjective intensity of sensation immediately after each distention. A pressure-volume relationship was determined by plotting corresponding pressures and volumes during ramp distention, and the compliance was calculated over the linear part of the curve by calculating from the slope of the curve using simple regression. Results Rectal thresholds were significantly reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. The VAS ratings of intensity induced by phasic distention (around the discomfort threshold of the controls were increased in IBS but significantly decreased in FAPS. Rectal compliance was reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. Conclusion An inconsistency of visceral sensitivity between lower and higher pressure distention might be a key feature for understanding the pathogenesis of FAPS.

  16. Are individuals within families with premature truly sudden unexplained death at risk during long-term follow-up?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Werf, Christian; Stiekema, Lotte; Hofman, Nynke; Alders, Marielle; Van Der Wal, Allard C.; Tan, Hanno L.; Van Langen, Irene M.; Wilde, Arthur A.

    Introduction: After young sudden unexplained death (SUD), comprehensive cardiologic and genetic examination in surviving first-degree relatives unmasks inherited cardiac disease in ∼40% of families, enabling timely prophylactic treatment. It is unknown, however, whether individuals from

  17. Clinical Usefulness of SPECT-CT in Patients with an Unexplained Pain in Metal on Metal (MOM) Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Reshid; Henckel, Johann; Khoo, Michael; Wan, Simon; Hua, Jia; Skinner, John; Hart, Alister

    2015-04-01

    SPECT-CT is increasingly used to assess painful knee arthroplasties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of SPECT-CT in unexplained painful MOM hip arthroplasty. We compared the diagnosis and management plan for 19 prosthetic MOM hips in 15 subjects with unexplained pain before and after SPECT-CT. SPECT-CT changed the management decision in 13 (68%) subjects, Chi-Square=5.49, P=0.24. In 6 subjects (32%) pain remained unexplained however the result reassured the surgeon to continue with non-operative management. SPECT-CT should be reserved as a specialist test to help identify possible causes of pain where conventional investigations have failed. It can help reassure surgeons making management decisions for patients with unexplained pain following MOM hip arthroplasty. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the thoracic splanchnic nerve in functional abdominal pain syndrome -A case report-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji-Won; Joo, Eun-Young; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Chul-Joong; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Sim, Woo-Seok

    2011-07-01

    The thoracic splanchnic nerve block has been used in managing abdominal pain, especially for pains arising from abdominal cancers. A 27-year-old male patient who had a constant abdominal pain was referred to our clinic for pain management but had no organic disease. The numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain scored 7/10. We applied a diagnostic thoracic splanchnic nerve block under the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain syndrome. Since the block reduced the pain, we applied a radiofrequency thermocoagulation at the T11 and T12 vertebral level. Thereafter, his symptoms improved markedly with pain decreasing to an NRS score of 2-3/10. Hereby, we report a successful management of functional abdominal pain via radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the thoracic splanchnic nerves.

  19. The prevalence and related symptomatology of Helicobacter pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Andersen, L P; Pærregaard, Anders

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess and compare the IgG seroprevalence of H. pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain with healthy children and to investigate the related symptoms. IgG antibodies against low-molecular weight H. pylori antigens were assessed in 438 children with recurrent...... abdominal pain and in 91 healthy controls. Sera with an ELISA unit-value above the cut-off level were confirmed by Western immunoblot. Only seropositive children with recurrent abdominal pain were examined by an oesophago-gastro-duodenoscopy. Symptomatology was recorded according to the localization...... of the abdominal pain, presence of pyrosis, nocturnal pain, relation of pain to meals and bowel irregularities. The seroprevalence was 21% (95% CI: 17-25%) in the children with recurrent abdominal pain and 10% (95% CI: 5-18%) in the healthy controls (p = 0.30). In seropositive children with RAP H. pylori was found...

  20. Cholecystic fistula with atypical symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, U.C.; Hasbak, P.; From, G.

    2008-01-01

    We report a patient with spontaneous cholecystocolonis fistula secondary to cholelithiasis. A 93 year-old woman was admitted because of weight loss, diarrhoea and upper abdominal pain. Ultrasound examination revealed air in the biliary tract and cholescientigraphy revealed a fistula between the g...... the gallbladder and right colon. Using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography a calculus was extracted from the bile duct and the symptoms disappeared Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1/14...

  1. Correction to: Relationship Between Abdominal Symptoms and Fructose Ingestion in Children with Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Veronika; Hammer, Katharina; Memaran, Nima; Huber, Wolf-Dietrich; Hammer, Karin; Hammer, Johann

    2018-04-02

    The original version of this article unfortunately contained an error in a couple of reference citation in Discussion Section, paragraph 6. The reference citation number should be changed from [6] to [9] in the below sentences so that it reads.

  2. A case report with Weber-Christian disease which recognized interesting abdominal lesions by abdominal ultrasonography and computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, Jin; Chiba, Junko; Ota, Kei; Mori, Kazuo; Toyota, Takayoshi; Goto, Yoshio

    1984-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman who had Weber-Christian disease associated with typical histological findings such as panniculitis was reported. The patient had painful subcutaneous nodules as the first symptom. She had diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis, which are reported to be rare complications of this disease. Abdominal ultrasonography and CT scanning revealed various sized cystic lesions and masses in the tail of pancreas. These findings have not yet been reported and seems to be rare in this disease. (Namekawa, K.)

  3. Yield and Pitfalls of Ajmaline Testing in the Evaluation of Unexplained Cardiac Arrest and Sudden Unexplained Death: Single-Center Experience With 482 Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Rafik; Nannenberg, Eline A; Lieve, Krystien V; Škorić-Milosavljević, Doris; Lahrouchi, Najim; Lekanne Deprez, Ronald H; Vendrik, Jeroen; Reckman, Yolan J; Postema, Pieter G; Amin, Ahmad S; Bezzina, Connie R; Wilde, Arthur A M; Tan, Hanno L

    2017-12-11

    This study evaluated the yield of ajmaline testing and assessed the occurrence of confounding responses in a large cohort of families with unexplained cardiac arrest (UCA) or sudden unexplained death (SUD). Ajmaline testing to diagnose Brugada syndrome (BrS) is routinely used in the evaluation of SUD and UCA, but its yield, limitations, and appropriate dosing have not been studied in a large cohort. We assessed ajmaline test response and genetic testing results in 637 individuals from 482 families who underwent ajmaline testing for SUD or UCA. Overall, 89 individuals (14%) from 88 families (18%) had a positive ajmaline test result. SCN5A mutations were identified in 9 of 86 ajmaline-positive cases (10%). SCN5A mutation carriers had positive test results at significantly lower ajmaline doses than noncarriers (0.75 [range: 0.64 to 0.98] mg/kg vs. 1.03 [range: 0.95 to 1.14] mg/kg, respectively; p genetic diagnosis accounting for UCA/SUD (5 cases) or noncosegregation of positive ajmaline response and arrhythmia (2 cases). The rate of confounding responses was significantly higher in positive ajmaline responses obtained at >1 mg/kg than in those obtained at ≤1 mg/kg (7 of 48 vs. 0 of 41 individuals; Fisher's exact test: p = 0.014). In line with previous, smaller studies, a positive ajmaline response was observed in a large proportion of UCA/SUD families. Importantly, our data emphasize the potential for confounding possibly false-positive ajmaline responses in this population, particularly at high doses, which could possibly lead to a misdiagnosis. Clinicians should consider all alternative causes in UCA/SUD and avoid ajmaline doses >1 mg/kg. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Abdominal Pain-Predominant Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Jordanian School Children

    OpenAIRE

    Altamimi, Eyad M.; Al-Safadi, Mohammad H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) is a common complaint in children. Significant portion of them are of functional origin. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of abdominal pain-predominant functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) and its types in Jordanian school children. Methods This is a school-based survey at south Jordan. Information using the self-reporting form of the Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms-Rome III Version (QPGS-RIII) - the official Arabi...

  5. Abdominal imaging in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Dawei; Wang Wei; Yuan Chunwang; Jia Cuiyu; Zhao Xuan; Zhang Tong; Ma Daqing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate abdominal imaging in AIDS. Methods: The imaging examinations (including US, CT and MR) of 6 patients with AIDS associated abdominal foci were analysed retrospectively. All the cases were performed US, and CT scan, of which 4 performed enhanced CT scan and 1 with MR. Results: Abdominal tuberculosis were found in 4 patients, including abdominal lymph nodes tuberculosis (3 cases) and pancreatic tuberculosis (1 case). The imaging of lymph nodes tuberculosis typically showed enlarged peripheral tim enhancement with central low-attenuation on contrast-enhanced CT. Pancreatic tuberculosis demonstrated low-attenuation area in pancreatic head and slightly peripheral enhancement. Disseminated Kaposi's sarcoma was seen in 1 case: CT and MRI scan demonstrated tumour infiltrated along hepatic portal vein and bronchovascular bundles. Pelvic tumor was observed in 1 case: CT scan showed large mass with thick and irregular wall and central low attenuation liquefacient necrotic area in the pelvic cavity. Conclusion: The imaging findings of AIDS with abdominal foci is extraordinarily helpful to the diagnosis of such disease. Tissue biopsy is needed to confirm the diagnosis. (authors)

  6. An unusual case of intra-abdominal testicular torsion: Role of laparoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Papparella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of intra-abdominal testicular torsion, where laparoscopy has been useful for diagnosis and surgical management. A boy was presented with a left impalpable testis. Laparoscopy revealed a twisted spermatic cord at the inlet pelvis, which ended in a testicular remnant located in the sub-umbilical area. After orchiectomy, the pathologist confirmed testicular atrophy. Diagnosis of intra-abdominal testicular torsion should be considered in patients with impalpable testis and abdominal pain, but could not be excluded in those with no symptoms.

  7. Abdominal Pain in Children: From the Eternal City to the Examination Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiter, Donna K

    2017-06-01

    Abdominal pain is a common presenting symptom in children. The differential diagnosis of abdominal pain is extensive; however, a vast majority of patients ultimately are diagnosed with functional abdominal pain disorders. Functional gastrointestinal disorders are defined using the recently released Rome IV criteria. These are not diagnoses of exclusion. If there are no alarm signs, the diagnosis may be made with a focused evaluation. Treatment of these disorders requires a biopsychosocial approach to the disorder and an individualized and multipronged treatment plan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Abdominal Pain: A Comparison between Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction and Chronic Idiopathic Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Møller Faaborg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Most spinal-cord-injured patients have constipation. One-third develop chronic abdominal pain 10 years or more after injury. Nevertheless, very little is known about the nature of abdominal pain after spinal cord injury (SCI. It may be neuropathic or caused by constipation. Aim. To compare characteristics of abdominal pain in SCI with able-bodied with chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC. Subjects and Methods. 21 SCI and 15 CIC patients were referred for treatment of bowel symptoms. Constipation-related symptoms were assessed with the Cleveland Constipation Scoring System and the International Spinal Cord Injury Basic Bowel Function Data Set. Characteristics of abdominal pain were described using the Brief Danish Pain Questionnaire. Total gastrointestinal transit times (GITT were measured by radiopaque markers. Results. Seventeen (81% SCI and 14 (93% CIC patients reported abdominal pain or discomfort within the last month (. Pain was considered more intense by CIC than by SCI patients (. Only minor differences were found in patient’s qualitative description of abdominal pain or in the location of pain. In neither SCI nor CIC was pain associated with GITT. Conclusion. Most characteristics of abdominal pain among SCI patients resemble those of CIC. This indicates that constipation is a major cause of pain after SCI.

  9. Plain abdominal radiography: A powerful tool to prognosticate outcome in patients with zinc phosphide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanian-Moghaddam, H.; Shahnazi, Makhtoom; Zamani, N.; Rahimi, M.; Bahrami-Motlagh, H.; Amiri, H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the clinical features of zinc phosphide poisoning and to investigate whether outcome could be prognosticated based on abdominal radiography on presentation. Materials and methods: All zinc phosphide-poisoned patients who were referred to Loghman-Hakim Hospital between March 2011 and September 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Data regarding patients' demographic characteristics, characteristics of the poisoning, abdominal radiography results, and patients' outcome were recorded. Results: In 102 patients, the most common presenting signs/symptoms were nausea and vomiting (60%). Four patients died and another seven had developed complications during their hospitalization (metabolic acidosis, liver abnormalities, or acute renal failure). Nineteen patients had radio-opaque abdominal radiographs, nine of whom had died or developed complications (p = 0.001). Plain abdominal radiography had a sensitivity and specificity of 81% and 89% in predicting the patients' death or further development of complications. The positive and negative predictive values were 47% and 97%, respectively. Conclusion: Plain abdominal radiography is a very good tool for prognostication in patients with zinc phosphide poisoning. Immediate abdominal radiography can help stratify patients into high- or low-risk groups and determine treatment strategies. - Highlights: • ZP poisoning may cause severe symptoms or death although less frequent compared to ALP. • ZP-poisoned patients may deteriorate within the first 72 hours post-ingestion. • Abdominal radiography is a good tool to predict death/complications in these patients

  10. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Catherine S; Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  11. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L.; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  12. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S Hubbard

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional gastrointestinal (GI disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL. Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC, whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI, whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease

  13. Report of a Case of Primary Abdominal Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Beigi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic pregnancy (EP is a potentially life-threatening condition in which the embryo implants outside the uterine endometrial cavity. Abdominal pregnancy is an atypical site wherein the product of conception lies totally outside the reproductive tract. Primary abdominal pregnancy is a very rare condition with a high mortality rate. Diagnosis is often late or misdiagnosed. The aim of introducing this case report is to present a new case of early primary abdominal pregnancy. Despite regular menstrual bleeding and contraception with IUD (intrauterine device, this pregnancy occurred in a 24-year old woman. Emergency laparotomy was performed because of abdominal pain, unstable condition and positive urine pregnancy test. It revealed more than 1500 ml of blood in the abdominal cavity. The uterus, both fallopian tubes and ovaries were completely intact. A 3X4 cm mass lateral to the left utersacral ligament was observed and resected. Since IUD strings could not be identified, endometrial currettage was performed and then the IUD was removed. Histological report of the mass and tissue of uterine cavity was placental villi and secretory endometrium, respectively, which according to Studdifords criteria is a new case of early primary abdominal pregnancy. To reduce maternal mortality and morbidity, early recognition of ectopic pregnancy is critical. According to review of the literature and the case report, a high index of suspicion is vital for the early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy because the signs and symptoms of EP overlap with many surgical and gynecologic conditions. With early diagnosis of EP, we can suggest many therapeutic options and also retain fertility (if desired by patient, while minimizing disease and treatment-related morbidity.

  14. CT evaluation of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Ruiting

    2004-01-01

    Objective: An evaluation of CT diagnosis of abdominal trauma. Methods: CT appearance of abdominal trauma was analyzed retrospectively in 95 cases. thirty-three patients were cured by operation, and the other 59 patients received conservative treatment. Fifty-one patients out of 59 were seen healed or improved by a follow up CT scan after the conservative treatment. Results: The study included: 31 cases of splenic contusion, accompanying with hemoperitoneum in 25 cases; 3 cases of hepatic laceration; 33 cases of liver and spleen compound trauma accompanying with hemoperitoneum; 18 cases of renal contusion, with subcapsular hemorrhage in 12 cases; 4 cases of midriff colic; 3 cases of mesentery breach; 3 cases of digestive tract perforation. Conclusion: CT is sensitive and precise in evaluating abdominal trauma, providing important information for treatment. (author)

  15. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa

  16. Abdominal wall hernia and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K K; Henriksen, N A; Jorgensen, L N

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: There is no consensus as to the treatment strategy for abdominal wall hernias in fertile women. This study was undertaken to review the current literature on treatment of abdominal wall hernias in fertile women before or during pregnancy. METHODS: A literature search was undertaken in Pub......Med and Embase in combination with a cross-reference search of eligible papers. RESULTS: We included 31 papers of which 23 were case reports. In fertile women undergoing sutured or mesh repair, pain was described in a few patients during the last trimester of a subsequent pregnancy. Emergency surgery...... of incarcerated hernias in pregnant women, as well as combined hernia repair and cesarean section appears as safe procedures. No major complications were reported following hernia repair before or during pregnancy. The combined procedure of elective cesarean section and abdominal wall hernia repair was reported...

  17. Subtotal versus total abdominal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lea Laird; Ottesen, Bent; Alling Møller, Lars Mikael

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to compare long-term results of subtotal vs total abdominal hysterectomy for benign uterine diseases 14 years after hysterectomy, with urinary incontinence as the primary outcome measure. STUDY DESIGN: This was a long-term follow-up of a multicenter......, randomized clinical trial without blinding. Eleven gynecological departments in Denmark contributed participants to the trial. Women referred for benign uterine diseases who did not have contraindications to subtotal abdominal hysterectomy were randomized to subtotal (n = 161) vs total (n = 158) abdominal...... from discharge summaries from all public hospitals in Denmark. The results were analyzed as intention to treat and per protocol. Possible bias caused by missing data was handled by multiple imputation. The primary outcome was urinary incontinence; the secondary outcomes were pelvic organ prolapse...

  18. Contemporary imaging in abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivit, Carlos J.

    2008-01-01

    Imaging is often a fundamental part in the evaluation of an injured or ill child. A variety of imaging modalities (radiography, angiography/fluoroscopy, sonography, CT, magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy) are among the options. CT is worth focused attention because of its usefulness in a variety of emergency department settings, its increasing use, and its potential radiation risks. CT plays an important role in the evaluation of traumatic and nontraumatic abdominal emergencies in children. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to review current imaging approaches and controversies in the evaluation of common acute abdominal emergencies. Through discussion of various modalities, especially CT in evaluation of abdominal pain and trauma, the relative advantages and disadvantages including radiation risk will be reviewed. (orig.)

  19. Radiological evaluation of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, K. S.; Cho, Y. H.; Kim, O.

    1982-01-01

    Simple abdomen film has played an important role in decision of emergency operations in patients with the abdominal trauma. Nowadays, it still acts as a primary and inevitable processes in emergency condition. At the Department of Radiology, Hanil Hospital, 70 patients, who were laparotomied due to penetrating or nonpernetraing abdominal trauma, were observed and analyzed with simple abdomen film after comparison with the operative findings. The results are as follows: 1. Most frequent age distribution was 10 to 39 years and marked 70%. Male was in 90% incidence. 2. Penetrating injury largely involved the small bowel and abdominal wall. Non-penetrating injury usually involved the spleen, small bowel, liver, kidney, pancreas, duodenum. 3. Single organ injury occurred in higher incidence at the small bowel and abdominal wall. Multiple organ injury occurred in higher incidence at the spleen, liver, kidney and pancreas. 4. Organ distribution was 26% in spleen, 22% in small bowel, 14% in liver, 11% in abdominal wall. 7% in pancreas, 7% in kidney. 5% in duodenum, 4% in GB and CBD, 2% in diaphragm, 2% in colon, and 1% in stomach. 5. The specific roentgen findings and their frequency which useful in differential diagnosis at abdominal trauma, were as follows: a) flank fluid; Detectable possibility was 71% in liver laceration, 69% in spleen laceration and 57% in pancreas laceration. b) ipsilateral psoas shadow obliteration; Detectable possibility was 57% in liver laceration, 57% in kidney laceration and 46% in spleen laceration. c) free air; Detactable possibility was 60% in duodenal perforation, and 36% in peroration of upper part of small bowel. d) Reflex ileus; Detectable possibility was 64% in small bowel, 50% in liver laceration and 35% in spleen laceration. e) rib fracture; Detactable possibility was 36% in liver laceration and 23% in spleen laceration. f) pleural effusion; Detectable possibility was 29% in liver laceration and 27% in spleen laceration

  20. Penetrating abdominal injuries: management controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Muhammad U; Zacharias, Nikolaos; Velmahos, George C

    2009-01-01

    Penetrating abdominal injuries have been traditionally managed by routine laparotomy. New understanding of trajectories, potential for organ injury, and correlation with advanced radiographic imaging has allowed a shift towards non-operative management of appropriate cases. Although a selective approach has been established for stab wounds, the management of abdominal gunshot wounds remains a matter of controversy. In this chapter we describe the rationale and methodology of selecting patients for non-operative management. We also discuss additional controversial issues, as related to antibiotic prophylaxis, management of asymptomatic thoracoabdominal injuries, and the use of colostomy vs. primary repair for colon injuries. PMID:19374761

  1. Penetrating abdominal injuries: management controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velmahos George C

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Penetrating abdominal injuries have been traditionally managed by routine laparotomy. New understanding of trajectories, potential for organ injury, and correlation with advanced radiographic imaging has allowed a shift towards non-operative management of appropriate cases. Although a selective approach has been established for stab wounds, the management of abdominal gunshot wounds remains a matter of controversy. In this chapter we describe the rationale and methodology of selecting patients for non-operative management. We also discuss additional controversial issues, as related to antibiotic prophylaxis, management of asymptomatic thoracoabdominal injuries, and the use of colostomy vs. primary repair for colon injuries.

  2. Abdominal surgery in neonatal foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, James E; Gaughan, Earl M

    2005-08-01

    Abdominal surgery in foals under 30 days old has become more common with improved neonatal care. Early recognition of a foal at risk and better nursing care have increased the survival rates of foals that require neonatal care. The success of improved neonatal care also has increased the need for accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal, umbilical, and bladder disorders in these foals. This chapter focuses on the early and accurate diagnosis of specific disorders that require abdominal exploratory surgery and the specific treatment considerations and prognosis for these disorders.

  3. CT appearances of abdominal tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.-K., E-mail: leewk33@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Imaging, St Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia); Van Tonder, F.; Tartaglia, C.J.; Dagia, C. [Department of Medical Imaging, St Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia); Cazzato, R.L. [Department of Radiology, Universita Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome (Italy); Duddalwar, V.A. [Department of Radiology, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Chang, S.D. [Department of Medical Imaging, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, British Columbia (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of this article is to review and illustrate the spectrum of computed tomography (CT) appearances of abdominal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis can affect any organ or tissue in the abdomen, and can be mistaken for other inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. The most common sites of tuberculosis in the abdomen include lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The liver, spleen, biliary tract, pancreas and adrenals are rarely affected, but are more likely in HIV-seropositive patients and in miliary tuberculosis. This article should alert the radiologist to consider abdominal tuberculosis in the correct clinical setting to ensure timely diagnosis and enable appropriate treatment.

  4. CT appearances of abdominal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.-K.; Van Tonder, F.; Tartaglia, C.J.; Dagia, C.; Cazzato, R.L.; Duddalwar, V.A.; Chang, S.D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review and illustrate the spectrum of computed tomography (CT) appearances of abdominal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis can affect any organ or tissue in the abdomen, and can be mistaken for other inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. The most common sites of tuberculosis in the abdomen include lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The liver, spleen, biliary tract, pancreas and adrenals are rarely affected, but are more likely in HIV-seropositive patients and in miliary tuberculosis. This article should alert the radiologist to consider abdominal tuberculosis in the correct clinical setting to ensure timely diagnosis and enable appropriate treatment.

  5. Secondary abdominal appendicular ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nama, Vivek; Gyampoh, Bright; Karoshi, Mahantesh; McRae, Reynold; Opemuyi, Isaac

    2007-01-01

    Although the case fatality rate for ectopic pregnancies has decreased to 0.08% in industrialized countries, it still represents 3.8% of maternal mortality in the United States alone. In developing countries, the case fatality rate varies from 3% to 27%. Laparoscopic management of tubal pregnancies is now the standard form of treatment where this technology is available. Abdominal pregnancies are rare, and secondary implantation of tubal ectopic pregnancies is the most common cause of abdominal gestations. We present an interesting case of secondary implantation of a tubal ectopic pregnancy to highlight the appendix as a possible secondary implantation site after a tubal ectopic pregnancy.

  6. Torsion of abdominal appendages presenting with acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jaberi, Tareq M.; Gharabeih, Kamal I.; Yaghan, Rami J.

    2000-01-01

    Diseases of abnormal appendages are rare causes of abdominal pain in all age groups. Nine patients with torsion and infraction of abdominal appendages were retrospectively reviewed. Four patients had torsion and infarction of the appendices epiploicae, four patients had torsion and infarction of the falciform ligament. The patient with falciform ligament disease represents the first reported case of primary torsion and infarction of the falciform ligament, and the patient with the transverse colon epiplocia represents the first reported case of vibration-induced appendix epiplocia torsion and infarction. The patient with the falciform ligament disease presented with a tender upper abdominal mass and the remaining patients were operated upon with the preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The presence of normal appendix with free serosanguinous fluid in the peritoneal cavity should raise the possibility of a disease and calls for further evaluation of the intra-abdominal organs. If the diagnosis is suspected preoperatively, CT scan and ultrasound may lead to a correct diagnosis and possibly conservative management. Laparoscopy is playing an increasing diagnostic and therapeutic role in such situations. (author)

  7. Diagnosis in acute abdominal pain and ongoing abdominal sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiewiet, J.J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common reason for presentation at the emergency department. To establish a timely and adequate diagnosis, doctors use the pattern of complaints and physical examination as the basis for the evaluation of a patient. In this thesis we conducted a study that showed that

  8. Isolated and unexplained dilation of the common bile duct on computed tomography scanscans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen B. Krishna

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Isolated dilation of common bile duct (CBD with normal sized pancreatic duct and without identifiable stones or mass lesion (unexplained is frequently encountered by computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging. We studied the final diagnoses in these patients and tried to elucidate factors that can predict a malignant etiology. This is a retrospective analysis of prospective database from a University based clinical practice (2002- 2008. We included 107 consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS for evaluation of isolated and unexplained CBD dilation noted on contrast computed tomography scans. EUS examination was performed using a radial echoendoscope followed by a linear echoechoendoscope, if a focal mass lesion was identified. Fine-needle aspirates were assessed immediately by an attending cytopathologist. Main outcome measurements included i prevalence of neoplasms, CBD stones and chronic pancreatitis and ii performance characteristics of EUS/EUS-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA. A malignant neoplasm was found in 16 patients (14.9% of the study subjects, all with obstructive jaundice (ObJ. Six patients had CBD stones; three with ObJ and three with abnormal liver function tests. EUS findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis were identified in 27 patients. EUSFNA had 97.3% accuracy (94.1% in subset with ObJ with a sensitivity of 81.2% and specificity of 100% for diagnosing malignancy. Presence of ObJ and older patient age were only significant predictors of malignancy in our cohort. Amongst patients with isolated and unexplained dilation of CBD, the risk of malignancy is significantly higher in older patients presenting with ObJ. EUS-FNA can diagnose malignancy in these patients with high accuracy besides identifying other potential etiologies including missed CBD stones and chronic pancreatitis.

  9. Managing acute abdominal pain in pediatric patients: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hijaz NM

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nadia M Hijaz, Craig A Friesen Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Children’s Mercy Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA Abstract: Acute abdominal pain in pediatric patients has been a challenge for providers because of the nonspecific nature of symptoms and difficulty in the assessment and physical examination in children. Although most children with acute abdominal pain have self-limited benign conditions, pain may be a manifestation of an urgent surgical or medical condition where the biggest challenge is making a timely diagnosis so that appropriate treatment can be initiated without any diagnostic delays that increase morbidity. This is weighed against the need to decrease radiation exposure and avoid unnecessary operations. Across all age groups, there are numerous conditions that present with abdominal pain ranging from a very simple viral illness to a life-threatening surgical condition. It is proposed that the history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging studies should initially be directed at differentiating surgical versus nonsurgical conditions both categorized as urgent versus nonurgent. The features of the history including patient’s age, physical examination focused toward serious conditions, and appropriate tests are highlighted in the context of making these differentiations. Initial testing and management is also discussed with an emphasis on making use of surgeon and radiologist consultation and the need for adequate follow-up and reevaluation of the patient. Keywords: acute abdominal pain, surgical abdomen, ultrasound

  10. Imaging of tuberculosis. Pt. 2. Abdominal manifestations in 112 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstedt, C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Nyman, R. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Brismar, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Hugosson, C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Kagevi, I. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-07-01

    Purpose: To describe the radiological findings of tuberculosis (TB) of the abdomen as reflected at our hospital. Material and Methods: The radiological files of 503 patients (referred to our institution mainly because of a clinical suspicion of malignancy, and found to have culture- or biopsy-proven TB) were reviewed in order to analyze the spectrum of the TB manifestations in this group of patients. Results: Abdominal manifestations were found in 112 patients, in 1/3 abdominal disease was the only evidence of TB. More than half of the patients also had chest TB. The most common abdominal TB manifestations were peritonitis and lymph node enlargement, each occurring in about 1/3 of the patients. Also 1/3 had genitourinary TB manifestations. About 1/5 had TB of the liver, spleen or pancreas or in the gastrointestinal tract, respectively. Multiple organ involvement was common. Conclusion: The need to consider TB in the differential diagnosis in patients with obscure abdominal symptoms, especially with multiple organ involvement, is stressed. (orig.).

  11. Imaging of tuberculosis. Pt. 2. Abdominal manifestations in 112 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundstedt, C.; Nyman, R.; Brismar, J.; Hugosson, C.; Kagevi, I.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the radiological findings of tuberculosis (TB) of the abdomen as reflected at our hospital. Material and Methods: The radiological files of 503 patients (referred to our institution mainly because of a clinical suspicion of malignancy, and found to have culture- or biopsy-proven TB) were reviewed in order to analyze the spectrum of the TB manifestations in this group of patients. Results: Abdominal manifestations were found in 112 patients, in 1/3 abdominal disease was the only evidence of TB. More than half of the patients also had chest TB. The most common abdominal TB manifestations were peritonitis and lymph node enlargement, each occurring in about 1/3 of the patients. Also 1/3 had genitourinary TB manifestations. About 1/5 had TB of the liver, spleen or pancreas or in the gastrointestinal tract, respectively. Multiple organ involvement was common. Conclusion: The need to consider TB in the differential diagnosis in patients with obscure abdominal symptoms, especially with multiple organ involvement, is stressed. (orig.)

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to evaluate the: appendix stomach/ pylorus liver gallbladder spleen pancreas intestines kidneys bladder testicles ovaries uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help diagnose appendicitis in children. Except for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do we get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of Abdominal ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic or scrotal pain in young children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  15. Chest complication after abdominal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, B. H.; Choi, J. Y.; Hahm, C. K.; Kang, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    In spite of many advances in medicine, anesthetic technique and surgical managements, pulmonary problems are the most frequent postoperative complications, particularly after abdominal surgery. As postoperative pulmonary complications, atelectasis, pleural effusion, pneumonia, chronic bronchitis and lung abscess can be occurred. This study include evaluation of chest films of 2006 patients (927 male, 1079 female), who had been operated abdominal surgery from Jan. 1979 to June, 1980 in the Hanyang university hospital. The results were as follows: 1. 70 cases out of total 2006 cases (3.5%) developed postoperative chest complications, 51 cases (5.5%) in male, 19 cases (1.8%) in female. 2. The complication rate was increased according to the increase of age. The incidence of the postoperative complications over 40 years of age was higher than the overall average complications rate. 3. The most common postoperative pulmonary complication was pleural effusion, next pneumonia, atelectasis and pulmonary edema respectively. 4. The complication rate of the group of upper abdominal surgery is much higher than the group of lower abdominal surgery. 5. Complication rate was increased according to increase of the duration of operation. 6. There were significant correlations between the operation site and side of the complicated hemithorax

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? What are some common uses of the procedure? How should we prepare for an ultrasound exam? What does the ultrasound equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will my ...

  17. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in Surgical Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome, affect ... timely surgical intervention is crucial. Key words: .... On the second postoperative day, he was noted to be restless ... Although surgery is very effective in managing ACS.

  18. Original Research Abdominal myomectomy: A retrospective review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdominal myomectomy and outcome in Ilorin, Nigeria 37. Malawi Medical Journal 29 (1): ... rate of 3.34% has been reported for Maiduguri, northeastern. Nigeria.4 Abdominal ... of Nigeria.6. Infertility secondary to uterine fibroid is one of the.

  19. Surgical excision of eroded mesh after prior abdominal sacrocolpopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Mary M T; Foster, Raymond T; Webster, George D; Weidner, Alison C; Amundsen, Cindy L

    2007-12-01

    We previously described an endoscopic-assisted transvaginal mesh excision technique. This study compares surgical outcomes after transvaginal mesh excision vs endoscopic-assisted transvaginal mesh excision. In addition, we reviewed our postoperative outcomes with excision via laparotomy. This was an inclusive retrospective analysis of patients presenting to our institution from 1997 to 2006 for surgical management of vaginal erosion of permanent mesh after sacrocolpopexy. Three techniques were utilized: transvaginal, endoscopic-assisted transvaginal, and laparotomy. For the patients undergoing transvaginal excision, data recorded included number and type of excisions performed, number of prior excisions performed at outside facilities, intraoperative and postoperative complications (including blood transfusions, pelvic abscess, or bowel complications), use of postoperative antibiotics, persistent symptoms of vaginal bleeding and discharge at follow-up, and demographic characteristics. The intraoperative and postoperative complications and the postoperative symptoms were recorded for the laparotomy cases. Thirty-one patients underwent transvaginal mesh excision during this time period: 17 endoscopic-assisted transvaginal and 14 transvaginal without endoscope assistance. In addition, a total of 7 patients underwent abdominal excision via laparotomy. Comparison of the 2 vaginal methods revealed no difference in the demographics or success rate, with success defined as no symptoms at follow-up. Endoscopic-assisted transvaginal excision was successful in 7 of 17 patients and transvaginal without endoscopic assistance in 9 of 13 patients (1 patient excluded for lack of follow-up data) for a total vaginal success rate of 53.3%. No intraoperative and only minor postoperative complications occurred with either vaginal method. Three patients underwent 3 vaginal attempts to achieve complete symptom resolution. The average follow-up time for the entire vaginal group was 14

  20. Medisinsk uforklarte plager og symptomer (MUPS) og sykefravær. Allmennlegens rolle

    OpenAIRE

    Aamland, Aase

    2015-01-01

    Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (MUPS) is a term which captures conditions characterized by subjective symptoms without corresponding objective findings. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and irritable bowel syndrome are examples of long-lasting and disabling MUPS-disorders. It is claimed that sick leave both in Norway and other countries, is mainly caused by unspecific health complaints and MUPS-disorders. General practitioners (GPs) have a key role for patients w...

  1. The Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Children with Unexplained Failure to Thrive in South West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Taheri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Celiac disease (CD, considered as a common chronic and genetic diseases that caused by hypersensitivity to gluten. Failure to thrive (FTT, is one of three major clinical features of CD during childhood. The current study aimed to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in children with unexplained FTT in South West of Iran. Materials and Methods  This cross‑sectional study was conducted on 433 children 9-month to 6 years old that diagnosed as unexplained FTT referred to Abuzar Children's Hospital, Ahvaz, South West of Iran, in 2014. In this study, we examined the serum levels of anti-transglutaminase antibody (anti-tTG in children with unexplained FTT. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 software. Results  The results showed that the prevalence of CD in children with unexplained FTT in was 8.8%. The mean scores of children's anti-tTG serum levels in both gender and age groups, showed no significant difference (P> 0.05. Conclusion  At current study, the prevalence of CD in children with FTT was 8.8%. Since the CD is an important cause of unexplained FTT in children, the early screening and diagnosis and dietary management can be decrease the risk for long-term complications in these children.

  2. Internal Mammary Vessels’ Impact on Abdominal Skin Perfusion in Free Abdominal Flap Breast Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig Nergård, MD

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions:. Using the IMV in free abdominal flap breast reconstruction had a significant effect on abdominal skin perfusion and may contribute to abdominal wound healing problems. The reperfusion of the abdominal skin was a dynamic process showing an increase in perfusion in the affected areas during the postoperative days.

  3. Prediction of thrombophilia in patients with unexplained recurrent pregnancy loss using a statistical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tongfei; Kang, Xiaomin; He, Liying; Liu, Zhilan; Xu, Haijing; Zhao, Aimin

    2017-09-01

    To establish a statistical model to predict thrombophilia in patients with unexplained recurrent pregnancy loss (URPL). A retrospective case-control study was conducted at Ren Ji Hospital, Shanghai, China, from March 2014 to October 2016. The levels of D-dimer (DD), fibrinogen degradation products (FDP), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), thrombin time (TT), fibrinogen (Fg), and platelet aggregation in response to arachidonic acid (AA) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) were collected. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to analyze data from 158 UPRL patients (≥3 previous first trimester pregnancy losses with unexplained etiology) and 131 non-RPL patients (no history of recurrent pregnancy loss). A logistic regression model (LRM) was built and the model was externally validated in another group of patients. The LRM included AA, DD, FDP, TT, APTT, and PT. The overall accuracy of the LRM was 80.9%, with sensitivity and specificity of 78.5% and 78.3%, respectively. The diagnostic threshold of the possibility of the LRM was 0.6492, with a sensitivity of 78.5% and a specificity of 78.3%. Subsequently, the LRM was validated with an overall accuracy of 83.6%. The LRM is a valuable model for prediction of thrombophilia in URPL patients. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  4. MRI as a problem-solving tool in unexplained failed total hip replacement following conventional assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, Ciaran; Kerr, Jennifer; Ford, Stephanie; Eustace, Stephen; O'Byrne, John

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate MRI as a problem-solving tool for patients with an unexplained failed total hip replacement following conventional radiological assessment. Patients' informed consent was obtained in all cases. Institutional review board approval was obtained. Twenty-eight patients with unexplained failed total hip replacements following conventional radiological assessment underwent additional MR imaging with an optimised turbo-spin echo sequence. Images were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists by consensus and compared with findings at surgery, or following response to image-guided intervention or clinical follow-up. Of the 28 patients, MRI revealed an unsuspected diagnosis explaining the cause of prosthesis failure in 15 patients. In eight of 15 patients in this group, subsequent minimally invasive image-guided intervention obviated the need for revision total hip replacement. No cause for prosthesis failure was identified in 13 patients. MRI may be successfully undertaken in patients following total hip replacement, and, when performed, it frequently leads to an unsuspected diagnosis, allowing informed patient treatment. In this study it allowed the identification of an unsuspected diagnosis in over 50% of cases. (orig.)

  5. Basic psychological need experiences, fatigue, and sleep in individuals with unexplained chronic fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Rachel; Tobback, Els; Delesie, Liesbeth; Vogelaers, Dirk; Mariman, An; Vansteenkiste, Maarten

    2017-12-01

    Grounded in self-determination theory, this study tested the hypothesis that the satisfaction and frustration of the psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness would relate to fatigue and subjective and objective sleep parameters, with stress and negative sleep cognitions playing an explanatory role in these associations. During a stay at a sleep laboratory in Belgium, individuals with unexplained chronic fatigue (N = 160; 78% female) underwent polysomnography and completed a questionnaire at 3 different points in time (i.e., after arrival in the sleep lab, before bedtime, and the following morning) that assessed their need-based experiences and stress during the previous week, fatigue during the preceding day, and sleep-related cognitions and sleep during the previous night. Results indicated that need frustration related to higher stress, which in turn, related to higher evening fatigue. Need frustration also related to poorer subjective sleep quality and shorter sleep duration, as indicated by both subjective and objective shorter total sleep time and subjective (but not objective) longer sleep latency. These associations were accounted for by stress and negative sleep cognitions. These findings suggest that health care professionals working with individuals with unexplained chronic fatigue may consider focusing on basic psychological needs within their therapeutic approach. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Abdominal Pain-predominant Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Adolescent Nigerians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoh, Ekong; Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Rajindrajith, Shaman; Meremikwu, Martin; Benninga, Marc Alexander

    2016-04-01

    To determine the prevalence, pattern, and predisposing factors of abdominal pain-predominant functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs) in adolescent Nigerians. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2 states in the southern part of Nigeria in June 2014. Adolescents of age 10 to 18 years were recruited from 11 secondary schools using a stratified random sampling technique. A validated self-administered questionnaire on Rome III criteria for diagnosing AP-FGIDs and its determinants were filled by the participants in a classroom setting. A total of 874 participants filled the questionnaire. Of this, 818 (93.4%) filled it properly and were included in the final analysis. The mean age of the participants was 14.6 ± 2.0 years with 409 (50.0%) being boys. AP-FGIDs were present in 81 (9.9%) participants. Forty six (5.6%) of the study participants had irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), 21 (2.6%) functional abdominal pain, 15 (1.8%) abdominal migraine while 3 (0.4%) had functional dyspepsia. The difference in AP-FGIDs between adolescents residing in rural and urban areas was not statistically significant (P = 0.22). Intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms occurred more frequently in those with AP-FGIDs. Nausea was the only symptom independently associated with AP-FGIDs (p = 0.015). Multiple regression analysis showed no significant association between stressful life events and AP-FGIDs. AP-FGIDs are a significant health problem in Nigerian adolescents. In addition to the intestinal symptoms, most of the affected children and others also had extraintestinal symptoms. None of the stressful life events evaluated was significantly associated with FGIDs.

  7. Abdominal injuries in a low trauma volume hospital--a descriptive study from northern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkari, Patrik; Bylund, Per-Olof; Lindgren, Hans; Öman, Mikael

    2014-08-15

    Abdominal injuries occur relatively infrequently during trauma, and they rarely require surgical intervention. In this era of non-operative management of abdominal injuries, surgeons are seldom exposed to these patients. Consequently, surgeons may misinterpret the mechanism of injury, underestimate symptoms and radiologic findings, and delay definite treatment. Here, we determined the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of traumatic abdominal injuries at our hospital to provide a basis for identifying potential hazards in non-operative management of patients with these injuries in a low trauma volume hospital. This retrospective study included prehospital and in-hospital assessments of 110 patients that received 147 abdominal injuries from an isolated abdominal trauma (n = 70 patients) or during multiple trauma (n = 40 patients). Patients were primarily treated at the University Hospital of Umeå from January 2000 to December 2009. The median New Injury Severity Score was 9 (range: 1-57) for 147 abdominal injuries. Most patients (94%) received computed tomography (CT), but only 38% of patients with multiple trauma were diagnosed with CT management succeeded in 82 patients. Surgery was performed for 28 patients, either immediately (n = 17) as result of operative management or later (n = 11), due to non-operative management failure; the latter mainly occurred with hollow viscus injuries. Patients with multiple abdominal injuries, whether associated with multiple trauma or an isolated abdominal trauma, had significantly more non-operative failures than patients with a single abdominal injury. One death occurred within 30 days. Non-operative management of patients with abdominal injuries, except for hollow viscus injuries, was highly successful in our low trauma volume hospital, even though surgeons receive low exposure to these patients. However, a growing proportion of surgeons lack experience in decision-making and performing trauma laparotomies. Quality assurance

  8. Congenital left paraduodenal hernia causing chronic abdominal pain and abdominal catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Felsted, Amy E; Masand, Prakash M; Mothner, Brent A; Nuchtern, Jed G; Rodriguez, J Ruben; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A

    2015-04-01

    Paraduodenal hernias are the most common type of congenital internal hernia. Because of its overall rare incidence, this entity is often overlooked during initial assessment of the patient. Lack of specific diagnostic criteria also makes diagnosis exceedingly difficult, and the resulting diagnostic delays can lead to tragic outcomes for patients. Despite these perceived barriers to timely diagnosis, there may be specific radiographic findings that, when combined with the appropriate constellation of clinical symptoms, would aid in diagnosis. This patient first presented at 8 years of age with vague symptoms of postprandial emesis, chronic abdominal pain, nausea, and syncope. Over the span of 6 years he was evaluated 2 to 3 times a year with similar complaints, all of which quickly resolved spontaneously. He underwent multiple laboratory, imaging, and endoscopic studies, which were nondiagnostic. It was not until he developed signs of a high-grade obstruction and extremis that he was found to have a large left paraduodenal hernia that had volvulized around the superior mesenteric axis. This resulted in the loss of the entire superior mesenteric axis distribution of the small and large intestine and necrosis of the duodenum. In cases of chronic intermittent obstruction without clear etiology, careful attention and consideration should be given to the constellation of symptoms, imaging studies, and potential use of diagnostic laparoscopy. Increased vigilance by primary care and consulting physicians is necessary to detect this rare but readily correctable condition. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Gastrointestinal symptoms related to the irritable bowel syndrome - a longitudinal population-based register study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinsvig Poulsen, Chalotte; Falgaard Eplov, Lene; Hjorthøj, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Objective Functional gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms can develop into persistent states often categorised as the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In the severe end of the GI symptom continuum, other coexisting symptoms are common. We aimed to investigate the GI symptom continuum in relation...... symptom groups and mortality (p = 0.47). IBS and GI symptoms with abdominal pain were significantly associated with development of GI diseases. Only GI symptoms with abdominal pain were associated with development of severe GI diseases (HR: 1.38; 95% CI: [1.06–1.79]). There were no statistically......, but continue to report frequent abdominal pain. Coexisting symptoms did not influence mortality and development of GI diseases....

  10. The utility of ultrasonography in the the diagnostics and monitoring of treatment of acute abdominal pain in children with neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaleska-Dorobisz, U.; Jankowski, B.; Maciaszek, A.; Moron, K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the results of the diagnostic imaging modalities, especially ultrasonography (US) in children during the oncological therapy with the acute abdominal symptoms. Acute abdominal symptoms in children with neoplasms causing a very difficult clinical and diagnostic problems and can occur in any stage of disease. The high-resolution ultrasound has a very important role in diagnosis in all patients with acute abdominal pain and with neoplasms. The authors consider that the US should be the first imaging method in the differential diagnosis of the abdominal changes in children with neutropenia and oncological disease. Proper diagnosis should be established only with clinical information. We analyzed 249 ultrasounds examinations of the abdominal cavity in 144 girls and 105 boys aged from 1 to 18 years (mean age 10, 3 years). The more important indication for the US exam in 133 cases was acute abdominal symptoms. We took exams during pre- and postoperative chemotherapy, radiotherapy and after the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. All the patients were under routine hematological control. Based on the clinical symptoms and the laboratory tests we analysed two groups of children with oncological disease and acute abdomen: I group - 111 children with neutropenia, II group - 22 children without neutropenia. In the patients who underwent operation procedure the final diagnosis was established on histopathology. In the other cases diagnosis was based on clinical, laboratory and radiological exams, especially ultrasonography. We analyzed clinical picture of disease, the results of therapy and the US changes in examined patients using statistic parameters as: sensitivity, specificity and efficiency. In the group of 133 children with acute abdominal symptoms the most (92- 69,1%) patients suffer from ALL (acute lymphoblastic leukaemia) and 16(12%) - from AML (acute lymphoblastic leukaemia), Ewing sarcoma-3(2,2%), osteosarcoma - 3(2,2%), NHL

  11. Acute and subacute symptoms among workers in the printing industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jesper; Andersen, I; Mølhave, Lars

    1982-01-01

    , and headache. Furthermore, abdominal pain and flatulence occurred more often among the printers. The symptoms showed no relation to age or job seniority, but neurological and general symptoms were related to shift work. No difference in lung function was found between the two groups. The printers had......The study population comprised 52 male printers and 52 controls. Each person was interviewed about job history, general health, and work-related symptoms. Symptoms from eyes and airways, neurological symptoms, and general symptoms were recorded. A lung function test and a measurement of the sense...

  12. Linaclotide in Chronic Idiopathic Constipation Patients with Moderate to Severe Abdominal Bloating: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E Lacy

    Full Text Available Abdominal bloating is a common and bothersome symptom of chronic idiopathic constipation. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of linaclotide in patients with chronic idiopathic constipation and concomitant moderate-to-severe abdominal bloating.This Phase 3b, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial randomized patients to oral linaclotide (145 or 290 μg or placebo once daily for 12 weeks. Eligible patients met Rome II criteria for chronic constipation upon entry with an average abdominal bloating score ≥5 (self-assessment: 0 10-point numerical rating scale during the 14-day baseline period. Patients reported abdominal symptoms (including bloating and bowel symptoms daily; adverse events were monitored. The primary responder endpoint required patients to have ≥3 complete spontaneous bowel movements/week with an increase of ≥1 from baseline, for ≥9 of 12 weeks. The primary endpoint compared linaclotide 145 μg vs. placebo.The intent-to-treat population included 483 patients (mean age=47.3 years, female=91.5%, white=67.7%. The primary endpoint was met by 15.7% of linaclotide 145 μg patients vs. 7.6% of placebo patients (P<0.05. Both linaclotide doses significantly improved abdominal bloating vs. placebo (P<0.05 for all secondary endpoints, controlling for multiplicity. Approximately one-third of linaclotide patients (each group had ≥50% mean decrease from baseline in abdominal bloating vs. 18% of placebo patients (P<0.01. Diarrhea was reported in 6% and 17% of linaclotide 145 and 290 μg patients, respectively, and 2% of placebo patients. AEs resulted in premature discontinuation of 5% and 9% of linaclotide 145 μg and 290 μg patients, respectively, and 6% of placebo patients.Once-daily linaclotide (145 and 290 μg significantly improved bowel and abdominal symptoms in chronic idiopathic constipation patients with moderate-to-severe baseline abdominal bloating; in particular

  13. Diagnostic value of FDG-PET/(CT) in children with fever of unknown origin and unexplained fever during immune suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blokhuis, Gijsbert J.; Diender, Marije G.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P. [Radboud University Medical Center, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Draaisma, Jos M.T. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Paediatrics, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee de [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); University of Twente, MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Biomedical Photonic Imaging Group, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) and unexplained fever during immune suppression in children are challenging medical problems. The aim of this study is to investigate the diagnostic value of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and FDG-PET combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in children with FUO and in children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. All FDG-PET/(CT) scans performed in the Radboud university medical center for the evaluation of FUO or unexplained fever during immune suppression in the last 10 years were reviewed. Results were compared with the final clinical diagnosis. FDG-PET/(CT) scans were performed in 31 children with FUO. A final diagnosis was established in 16 cases (52 %). Of the total number of scans, 32 % were clinically helpful. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in these patients was 80 % and 78 %, respectively. FDG-PET/(CT) scans were performed in 12 children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. A final diagnosis was established in nine patients (75 %). Of the total number of these scans, 58 % were clinically helpful. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in children with unexplained fever during immune suppression was 78 % and 67 %, respectively. FDG-PET/CT appears a valuable imaging technique in the evaluation of children with FUO and in the diagnostic process of children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. Prospective studies of FDG-PET/CT as part of a structured diagnostic protocol are warranted to assess the additional diagnostic value. (orig.)

  14. Diagnostic value of FDG-PET/(CT) in children with fever of unknown origin and unexplained fever during immune suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhuis, Gijsbert J.; Diender, Marije G.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.; Draaisma, Jos M.T.; Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee de

    2014-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) and unexplained fever during immune suppression in children are challenging medical problems. The aim of this study is to investigate the diagnostic value of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and FDG-PET combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in children with FUO and in children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. All FDG-PET/(CT) scans performed in the Radboud university medical center for the evaluation of FUO or unexplained fever during immune suppression in the last 10 years were reviewed. Results were compared with the final clinical diagnosis. FDG-PET/(CT) scans were performed in 31 children with FUO. A final diagnosis was established in 16 cases (52 %). Of the total number of scans, 32 % were clinically helpful. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in these patients was 80 % and 78 %, respectively. FDG-PET/(CT) scans were performed in 12 children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. A final diagnosis was established in nine patients (75 %). Of the total number of these scans, 58 % were clinically helpful. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in children with unexplained fever during immune suppression was 78 % and 67 %, respectively. FDG-PET/CT appears a valuable imaging technique in the evaluation of children with FUO and in the diagnostic process of children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. Prospective studies of FDG-PET/CT as part of a structured diagnostic protocol are warranted to assess the additional diagnostic value. (orig.)

  15. Acupuncture Treatment of Abdominal Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡金生

    2002-01-01

    @@ Case History Mr. Li, a university student aged 23 years, paid his first visit on July 16, 2001, with the chief complaint of abdominal pain for one day. The patient stated that one day before when it happened to be the weekend, he got abdominal pain after supper, which went worse gradually and caused him to roll all over in bed. The pain was slightly alleviated half an hour later after he had taken some pain killers. Upon inquiry, the patient said that because of their newly graduation from the university, he and his classmates were so excited that they went to have a sumptuous lunch with alcoholic drinks. And in the evening he ate again a delicious supper cooked for him by his mother, after which he continued to have some fruit and dessert.

  16. Combined laparoscopic and open technique for repair of congenital abdominal hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qinghuang; Chen, Yan; Zhu, Jinhui; Wang, Yuedong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Prune belly syndrome (PBS) is a rare congenital disorder among adults, and the way for repairing abdominal wall musculature has no unified standard. Materials and methods: We described combining laparoscopic and open technique in an adult male who presented with PBS. Physical examination and radiological imaging verified the case of PBS. The deficiency of abdominal wall musculature was repaired by combining laparoscopic and open technique using a double-deck complex patch. Results: The patient successfully underwent abdominal wall repair by combining laparoscopic and open technique. Postoperative recovery was uneventful, and improvement in symptom was significant in follow-up after 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Conclusions: Combining laparoscopic and open technique for repair of deficiency of abdominal wall musculature in PBS was an exploratory way to improve life quality. PMID:29049186

  17. Navigating recurrent abdominal pain through clinical clues, red flags, and initial testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Joshua D; Li, B U K

    2009-05-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain is a common chronic complaint that presents to your office. The constant challenge is one of detecting those with organic disease from the majority who have a functional pain disorder including functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal pain, and abdominal migraine. Beginning with a detailed history and physical exam, you can: 1) apply the symptom-based Rome III criteria to positively identify a functional disorder, and 2) filter these findings through the diagnostic clues and red flags that point toward specific organic disease and/or further testing. Once a functional diagnosis has been made or an organic disease is suspected, you can initiate a self-limited empiric therapeutic trial. With this diagnostic approach, you should feel confident navigating through the initial evaluation, management, and consultation referral for a child or adolescent with recurrent abdominal pain.

  18. Computed tomography, after abdominal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, H.; Toedt, H.C.

    1985-09-01

    The CT-examinations of 131 patients were analyzed after abdominal surgery. After nephrectomy, splenectomy, partial hepatectomy and pancreatectomy a displacement of the neighbouring intraabdominal and retroperitoneal organs was seen. Scar-tissue was observed containing fat, which faciltated the differential diagnosis to tumor recurrency. The changes of the roentgenmorphology were not so obvious after gastrointestinal surgery. After vascular surgery the permeability of an anastomosis or an operated artery could be demonstrated by bolus injection. (orig.).

  19. Computed tomography, after abdominal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Toedt, H.C.; Hamburg Univ.

    1985-01-01

    The CT-examinations of 131 patients were analyzed after abdominal surgery. After nephrectomy, splenectomy, partial hepatectomy and pancreatectomy a displacement of the neighbouring intraabdominal and retroperitoneal organs was seen. Scar-tissue was observed containing fat, which fascilated the differentialdiagnosis to tumorrecurrency. The changes of the roentgenmorphology were not so abvious after gastro-intestinal surgery. After vascular surgery the permeability of an anastomosis or an operated artery could be demonstrated by bolusinjection. (orig.) [de

  20. Defectos de la pared abdominal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adis L. Peña Cedeño

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio de los fetos con malformaciones congénitas, dadas por defecto de la pared abdominal (DPA, nacidos en el Hospital Universitario Ginecoobstétrico de Guanabacoa durante los años 1984 al 2000, para determinar la frecuencia de los distintos tipos de defectos de la pared abdominal y las malformaciones asociadas a éstas. Se revisaron los protocolos de necropsias e historias clínicas en este período y se obtuvieron 25 casos con DPA. La malformación más frecuente fue el onfalocele con 14 casos, seguido de la gastrosquisis con 6 casos. Se hallaron malformaciones asociadas en el 68 % de los casos, y se comprobó la efectividad del Programa Nacional de Malformaciones Congénitas, pues en el 80 % de las pacientes se interrumpió precozmente el embarazo.A study of the fetuses with congenital malformations due to defect of the abdominal wall (AWD that were born at the Gynecoobstetric Teaching Hospital of Guanabacoa from 1984 to 2000 was conducted aimed at determining the frequency of the different types of defects of the abdominal wall and the malformations associated with them. The protocosl of necropsies and medical histories corresponding to this period were reviewed and 25 cases with AWD were detected. The most common malformation was omphalocele with 14 cases, followed by gastrosquisis with 6 cases. Associated malformations were found in 68 % of the cases and it was proved the effectiveness of the National Program of Congenital Malformations, since pregnancy was interrupted early in 80 % of the patients.

  1. Hernia Following Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Aghaie

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic abdominal wall hernia is a rare type of hernia, which follows blunt trauma to the abdomen, where disruption of the musculature and fascia occurs with the overlying skin remaining intact. Diagnosis of this problem is very difficult and delayed. Traumatic hernia is often diagnosed during laparatomy or laparascopy, but CT scan also has a role in distinguishing this pathology. Delay in diagnosis is very dangerous and can result in gangrene and necrosis of the organs in the hernia. The case report of a 35 years old man with liftruck blunt trauma is reported. His vital signs were stable. On physical examination, tenderness of RUQ was seen. He underwent Dpl for suspected hemoprotein. Dpl was followed up by laparatomy. Laparatomy revealed that the transverse and ascending colon partially herniated in the abdominal wall defect. The colon was reduced in the abdomen and repair of abdominal hernia was done. The patient was discharged after 5 day. The etiology, pathogenesis and management are discussed.

  2. Mesh erosion after abdominal sacrocolpopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, N; Walsh, P M; Roat, T W; Karram, M M

    1998-12-01

    To report our experience with erosion of permanent suture or mesh material after abdominal sacrocolpopexy. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify patients who underwent sacrocolpopexy by the same surgeon over 8 years. Demographic data, operative notes, hospital records, and office charts were reviewed after sacrocolpopexy. Patients with erosion of either suture or mesh were treated initially with conservative therapy followed by surgical intervention as required. Fifty-seven patients underwent sacrocolpopexy using synthetic mesh during the study period. The mean (range) postoperative follow-up was 19.9 (1.3-50) months. Seven patients (12%) had erosions after abdominal sacrocolpopexy with two suture erosions and five mesh erosions. Patients with suture erosion were asymptomatic compared with patients with mesh erosion, who presented with vaginal bleeding or discharge. The mean (+/-standard deviation) time to erosion was 14.0+/-7.7 (range 4-24) months. Both patients with suture erosion were treated conservatively with estrogen cream. All five patients with mesh erosion required transvaginal removal of the mesh. Mesh erosion can follow abdominal sacrocolpopexy over a long time, and usually presents as vaginal bleeding or discharge. Although patients with suture erosion can be managed successfully with conservative treatment, patients with mesh erosion require surgical intervention. Transvaginal removal of the mesh with vaginal advancement appears to be an effective treatment in patients failing conservative management.

  3. Appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Travis

    2017-09-01

    Appendicitis is a frequently encountered surgical problem in the Emergency Department (ED). Appendicitis typically results from obstruction of the appendiceal lumen, although trauma has been reported as an infrequent cause of acute appendicitis. Intestinal injury and hollow viscus injury following blunt abdominal trauma are well reported in the literature but traumatic appendicitis is much less common. The pathophysiology is uncertain but likely results from several mechanisms, either in isolation or combination. These include direct compression/crush injury, shearing injury, or from indirect obstruction of the appendiceal lumen by an ileocecal hematoma or traumatic impaction of stool into the appendix. Presentation typically mirrors that of non-traumatic appendicitis with nausea, anorexia, fever, and right lower quadrant abdominal tenderness and/or peritonitis. Evaluation for traumatic appendicitis requires a careful history and physical exam. Imaging with ultrasound or computed tomography is recommended if the history and physical do not reveal an acute surgical indication. Treatment includes intravenous antibiotics and surgical consultation for appendectomy. This case highlights a patient who developed acute appendicitis following blunt trauma to the abdomen sustained during a motor vehicle accident. Appendicitis must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in any patient who presents to the ED with abdominal pain, including those whose pain begins after sustaining blunt trauma to the abdomen. Because appendicitis following trauma is uncommon, timely diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Overlap between functional abdominal pain disorders and organic diseases in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langshaw, A H; Rosen, J M; Pensabene, L; Borrelli, O; Salvatore, S; Thapar, N; Concolino, D; Saps, M

    2018-04-02

    Functional abdominal pain disorders are highly prevalent in children. These disorders can be present in isolation or combined with organic diseases, such as celiac disease and inflammatory bowel diseases. Intestinal inflammation (infectious and non-infectious) predisposes children to the development of visceral hypersensitivity that can manifest as functional abdominal pain disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome. The new onset of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms in a patient with an underlying organic disease, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is clinically challenging, given that the same symptomatology may represent a flare-up of the inflammatory bowel disease or an overlapping functional abdominal pain disorder. Similarly, irritable bowel syndrome symptoms in a child previously diagnosed with celiac disease may occur due to poorly controlled celiac disease or the overlap with a functional abdominal pain disorder. There is little research on the overlap of functional abdominal disorders with organic diseases in children. Studies suggest that the overlap between functional abdominal pain disorders and inflammatory bowel disease is more common in adults than in children. The causes for these differences in prevalence are unknown. Only a handful of studies have been published on the overlap between celiac disease and functional abdominal pain disorders in children. The present article provides a review of the literature on the overlap between celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and functional abdominal pain disorders in children and establish comparisons with studies conducted on adults. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Sudden unexplained death in childhood. An audit of the quality of Autopsy reporting

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Treacy, A

    2013-03-01

    Cases of sudden unexplained death in childhood (SUDC) in Ireland in children aged >1year and <5 years were examined in order to assess the quality of autopsy reporting. All SUDC cases are notified to and documented by the National Sudden Infant Death Register (NSIDR) in Ireland along with all cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) referring to sudden infant deaths less than one year of age. The database of the NSIDR in Ireland was interrogated and cases of SIDS and SUDC were compared over a fifteen-year period (1995-2009). SIDS cases whose autopsies were conducted in the same hospital in the same year as the index SUDC case were used for comparison. The autopsy report for each case was examined and modified Rushton(MR) scores 1\\r\

  6. Unexplained severe illness possibly associated with consumption of Kombucha tea--Iowa, 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-12-08

    Kombucha tea is a popular health beverage made by incubating the Kombucha mushroom in sweet black tea. Although advocates of Kombucha tea have attributed many therapeutic effects to the drink (1-3), its beneficial and/or adverse effects have not been determined scientifically. During April 1995, cases of unexplained severe illness (including one death) occurred in two persons in a rural town in northwestern Iowa who had been drinking Kombucha tea daily for approximately 2 months. Based on the findings of a preliminary investigation by the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH), on April 10 IDPH issued a news release recommending that persons refrain from drinking Kombucha tea until the role of the tea in the two cases of illness had been evaluated fully. This report summarizes the investigation of these cases by the IDPH, CDC, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

  7. Non-visualized pregnancy losses are prognostically important for unexplained recurrent miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolte, A M; van Oppenraaij, R H; Quenby, S; Farquharson, R G; Stephenson, M; Goddijn, M; Christiansen, O B

    2014-05-01

    Are non-visualized pregnancy losses (biochemical pregnancy loss and failed pregnancy of unknown location combined) in the reproductive history of women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage (RM) negatively associated with the chance of live birth in a subsequent pregnancy? Non-visualized pregnancy losses contribute negatively to the chance for live birth: each non-visualized pregnancy loss confers a relative risk (RR) for live birth of 0.90 (95% CI 0.83; 0.97), equivalent to the RR conferred by each additional clinical miscarriage. The number of clinical miscarriages prior to referral is an important determinant for live birth in women with RM, whereas the significance of non-visualized pregnancy losses is unknown. A retrospective cohort study comprising 587 women with RM seen in a tertiary RM unit 2000-2010. Data on the outcome of the first pregnancy after referral were analysed for 499 women. The study was conducted in the RM Unit at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. We included all women with unexplained RM, defined as ≥3 consecutive clinical miscarriages or non-visualized pregnancy losses following spontaneous conception or homologous insemination. The category 'non-visualized pregnancy losses' combines biochemical pregnancy loss (positive hCG, no ultrasound performed) and failed PUL (pregnancy of unknown location, positive hCG, but on ultrasound, no pregnancy location established). Demographics were collected, including BMI, age at first pregnancy after referral and outcome of pregnancies prior to referral. Using our own records and records from other Danish hospitals, we verified the outcome of the first pregnancy after referral. For each non-visualized pregnancy loss and miscarriage in the women's reproductive history, the RR for live birth in the first pregnancy after referral was determined by robust Poisson regression analysis, adjusting for risk factors for negative pregnancy outcome. Non-visualized pregnancy losses constituted 37% of reported

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eivindson, Martin; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius

    2015-01-01

    A general overview is given of the causes of anemia with iron deficiency as well as the pathogenesis of anemia and the para-clinical diagnosis of anemia. Anemia with iron deficiency but without overt GI bleeding is associated with a risk of malignant disease of the gastrointestinal tract; upper...... gastrointestinal cancer is 1/7 as common as colon cancer. Benign gastrointestinal causes of anemia are iron malabsorption (atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, chronic inflammation, and bariatric surgery) and chronic blood loss due to gastrointestinal ulcerations. The following diagnostic strategy is recommended...... for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency: conduct serological celiac disease screening with transglutaminase antibody (IgA type) and IgA testing and perform bidirectional endoscopy (gastroscopy and colonoscopy). Bidirectional endoscopy is not required in premenopausal women

  9. Clusters of sudden unexplained death associated with the mushroom, Trogia venenata, in rural Yunnan Province, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Qing Shi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Since the late 1970's, time-space clusters of sudden unexplained death (SUD in northwest Yunnan, China have alarmed the public and health authorities. From 2006-2009, we initiated enhanced surveillance for SUD to identify a cause, and we warned villagers to avoid eating unfamiliar mushrooms. METHODS: We established surveillance for SUD, defined as follows: sudden onset of serious, unexplained physical impairment followed by death in <24 hours. A mild case was onset of any illness in a member of the family or close socially related group of a SUD victim within 1 week of a SUD. We interviewed witnesses of SUD and mild case-persons to identify exposures to potentially toxic substances. We tested blood from mild cases, villagers, and for standard biochemical, enzyme, and electrolyte markers of disease. RESULTS: We identified 33 SUD, a 73% decline from 2002-2005, distributed among 21 villages of 11 counties. We found a previously undescribed mushroom, Trogia venenata, was eaten by 5 of 7 families with SUD clusters compared to 0 of 31 other control-families from the same villages. In T. venenata-exposed persons SUD was characterized by sudden loss of consciousness during normal activities. This mushroom grew nearby 75% of 61 villages that had time-space SUD clusters from 1975 to 2009 compared to 17% of 18 villages with only single SUD (p<0.001, Fisher's exact test. DISCUSSION: Epidemiologic data has implicated T. venenata as a probable cause of clusters of SUD in northwestern Yunnan Province. Warnings to villagers about eating this mushroom should continue.

  10. Increased pressure within the abdominal compartment: intra-abdominal hypertension and the abdominal compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Derek J; Ball, Chad G; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W

    2016-04-01

    This article reviews recent developments related to intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH)/abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) and clinical practice guidelines published in 2013. IAH/ACS often develops because of the acute intestinal distress syndrome. Although the incidence of postinjury ACS is decreasing, IAH remains common and associated with significant morbidity and mortality among critically ill/injured patients. Many risk factors for IAH include those findings suggested to be indications for use of damage control surgery in trauma patients. Medical management strategies for IAH/ACS include sedation/analgesia, neuromuscular blocking and prokinetic agents, enteral decompression tubes, interventions that decrease fluid balance, and percutaneous catheter drainage. IAH/ACS may be prevented in patients undergoing laparotomy by leaving the abdomen open where appropriate. If ACS cannot be prevented with medical or surgical management strategies or treated with percutaneous catheter drainage, guidelines recommend urgent decompressive laparotomy. Use of negative pressure peritoneal therapy for temporary closure of the open abdomen may improve the systemic inflammatory response and patient-important outcomes. In the last 15 years, investigators have better clarified the pathogenesis, epidemiology, diagnosis, and appropriate prevention of IAH/ACS. Subsequent study should be aimed at understanding which treatments effectively lower intra-abdominal pressure and whether these treatments ultimately affect patient-important outcomes.

  11. A 52-Year-Old Woman with a Palpable Abdominal Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Jeng Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 52-year-old woman presented with a history of diabetes mellitus under medical treatment and a surgical history of a cesarean section 20 years ago. The patient was referred to our emergency department because of a 2-week hypermenorrhea and unspecific abdominal pain without nausea and vomiting, fever, or other symptoms. She did not complain of weight loss.

  12. Nausea in Children With Functional Abdominal Pain Predicts Poor Health Outcomes in Young Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Alexandra C; Stone, Amanda L; Walker, Lynn S

    2017-05-01

    Nausea is common among children with functional abdominal pain (FAP). We evaluated the relation of nausea to short- and long-term morbidity in pediatric patients with FAP. We performed a prospective study of 871 children with FAP (age, 8-17 y) seen in a pediatric gastroenterology practice; follow-up data were collected from 392 of the patients at 8.7 ± 3.3 years later. Participants were defined as having significant nausea if they reported nausea "a lot" or "a whole lot" within the past 2 weeks. Validated questionnaires assessed abdominal pain, gastrointestinal and somatic symptoms, and depression. Baseline measures, anxiety, and the Rome III criteria were assessed in the follow-up evaluation. At baseline, 44.8% of the patients reported significant nausea. Those with nausea reported worse abdominal pain, gastrointestinal symptoms, somatic symptoms, and depression than those without nausea (P abdominal pain severity. Pediatric patients with FAP and nausea have more severe short- and long-term gastrointestinal and somatic symptoms than patients with FAP without nausea, as well as reductions in mental health and daily function. Pediatric patients with FAP and nausea therefore need intensive treatment and follow-up evaluation. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hypnotherapy for children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieger, Arine M.; Menko-Frankenhuis, Carla; Wolfkamp, Simone C. S.; Tromp, Ellen; Benninga, Marc A.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are highly prevalent in childhood. A substantial proportion of patients continues to experience long-lasting symptoms. Gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT) has been shown to be highly effective in the treatment of adult

  14. Depression, anxiety, stress, social interaction and health-related quality of life in men and women with unexplained chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manhem Karin

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unexplained chest pain (UCP is a common reason for emergency hospital admission and generates considerable health-care costs for society. Even though prior research indicates that psychological problems and impaired quality of life are common among UCP patients, there is lack of knowledge comparing UCP patients with a reference group from the general population. The aim of this study was to analyse differences between men and women with UCP and a reference group in terms of psychosocial factors as depression, anxiety, stress, social interaction and health-related quality of life (HRQOL. Methods A self-administered questionnaire about psychosocial factors was completed by 127 men and 104 women with acute UCP admitted consecutively to the Emergency Department (ED or as in-patients on a medical ward. A reference group from the general population, 490 men and 579 women, participants in the INTERGENE study and free of clinical heart disease, were selected. Results The UCP patients were more likely to be immigrants, have a sedentary lifestyle, report stress at work and have symptoms of depression and trait-anxiety compared with the reference group. After adjustment for differences in age, smoking, hypertension and diabetes, these factors were still significantly more common among patients with UCP. In a stepwise multivariate model with mutual adjustment for psychosocial factors, being an immigrant was associated with a more than twofold risk in both sexes. Stress at work was associated with an almost fourfold increase in risk among men, whereas there was no independent impact for women. In contrast, depression only emerged as an independent risk factor in women. Trait-anxiety and a low level of social interaction were not independently associated with risk in either men or women. Patients with UCP were two to five times more likely to have low scores for HRQOL. Conclusion Both men and women with UCP had higher depression scores

  15. Intestinal malrotation as a cause for abdominal pain in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Guillermo Lubinus Badillo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We show the case of a 63 year old woman complaining of chronicabdominal pain and bilious vomiting. The patient was admitted tothe hospital with a diagnosis of intestinal obstruction which got better by medical treatment. After performing an abdominal computarized tomography, a midgut volvulus was diagnosed and later confirmed by an intestinal transit time. The patient was discharged with out symptoms after medical treatment and an elective procedure was scheduled (Ladd procedure and to reduce the risk of volvulusand intestinal ischemia. We discuss the clinical presentation of thedisease, the diagnostic methods used and the treatment optionsavailable.

  16. Plague Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Plague Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Home Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics ...

  17. Recognizing Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helpful, please consider supporting IFFGD with a small tax- deductible donation. Make Donation Signs and Symptoms Overview ... arises requiring an expert’s care. © Copyright 1998-2018 International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, Inc. (IFFGD). All ...

  18. Rotavirus Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rotavirus Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rotavirus Home About Rotavirus Symptoms Transmission Treatment Photos Vaccination ...

  19. Cognitive mediators of treatment outcomes in pediatric functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Rona L; Langer, Shelby L; Romano, Joan M; Labus, Jennifer; Walker, Lynn S; Murphy, Tasha B; Tilburg, Miranda A L van; Feld, Lauren D; Christie, Dennis L; Whitehead, William E

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive-behavioral (CB) interventions improve outcomes for many pediatric health conditions, but little is known about which mechanisms mediate these outcomes. The goal of this study was to identify whether changes in targeted process variables from baseline to 1 week posttreatment mediate improvement in outcomes in a randomized controlled trial of a brief CB intervention for idiopathic childhood abdominal pain. Two hundred children with persistent functional abdominal pain and their parents were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 conditions: a 3-session social learning and CB treatment (N=100), or a 3-session educational intervention controlling for time and attention (N=100). Outcomes were assessed at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups. The intervention focused on altering parental responses to pain and on increasing adaptive cognitions and coping strategies related to pain in both parents and children. Multiple mediation analyses were applied to examine the extent to which the effects of the social learning and CB treatment condition on child gastrointestinal (GI) symptom severity and pain as reported by children and their parents were mediated by changes in targeted cognitive process variables and parents' solicitous responses to their child's pain symptoms. Reductions in parents' perceived threat regarding their child's pain mediated reductions in both parent-reported and child-reported GI symptom severity and pain. Reductions in children's catastrophic cognitions mediated reductions in child-reported GI symptom severity but no other outcomes. Reductions in parental solicitousness did not mediate outcomes. Results suggest that reductions in reports of children's pain and GI symptoms after a social learning and CB intervention were mediated at least in part by decreasing maladaptive parent and child cognitions.

  20. Unexplained week-to-week variation in BNP and NT-proBNP is low in chronic heart failure patients during steady state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Nielsen, Per H

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The usefulness of brain-natriuretic-peptide (BNP) and N-terminal-pro-brain-natriuretic-peptide (NT-proBNP) for monitoring of chronic heart failure (CHF) patients has been questioned because of high levels of unexplained variation. AIMS: Week-to-week total variance (CV(T)), unexplained...

  1. Ordering blood tests for patients with unexplained fatigue in general practice: what does it yield? Results of the VAMPIRE trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, H.; Bokhoven, M.A. van; Riet, G. ter; Alphen-Jager, J.T. van; Weijden, T.T. van der; Dinant, G.J.; Bindels, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Unexplained fatigue is frequently encountered in general practice. Because of the low prior probability of underlying somatic pathology, the positive predictive value of abnormal (blood) test results is limited in such patients. AIM: The study objectives were to investigate the

  2. Blood test ordering for unexplained complaints in general practice: the VAMPIRE randomised clinical trial protocol. [ISRCTN55755886

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bokhoven, Marloes A.; Koch, Hèlen; van der Weijden, Trudy; Grol, Richard P. T. M.; Bindels, Patrick J. E.; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practitioners (GPs) frequently order blood tests when they see patients presenting with unexplained complaints. Due to the low prevalence of serious pathology in general practice, the risk of false-positive test results is relatively high. This may result in unnecessary further

  3. Ordering blood tests for patients with unexplained fatigue in general practice: what does it yield? Results of the VAMPIRE trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Hèlen; van Bokhoven, Marloes A.; ter Riet, Gerben; van Alphen-Jager, Jm Tineke; van der Weijden, Trudy; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Bindels, Patrick Je

    2009-01-01

    Background Unexplained fatigue is frequently encountered in general practice. Because of the low prior probability of underlying somatic pathology, the positive predictive value of abnormal (blood) test results is limited in such patients. Aim The study objectives were to investigate the

  4. Incidence, risk factors, and clinical characteristics of unexplained visual loss after intraocular silicone oil for macula-on retinal detachment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerlinck, Laura M.; Schellekens, Peter A.; Liem, Albert T.; Steijns, Daan; van Leeuwen, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence, risk factors, and clinical characteristics of unexplained visual loss after macula-on rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Methods: Retrospective cohort of patients with primary macula-on rhegmatogenous retinal detachment treated by vitrectomy with gas or

  5. Evaluation of the levels of metalloproteinsase-2 in patients with abdominal aneurysm and abdominal hernias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoszewska, Magdalena

    2013-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms and abdominal hernias become an important health problems of our times. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and its rupture is one of the most dangerous fact in vascular surgery. There are some theories pointing to a multifactoral genesis of these kinds of diseases, all of them assume the attenuation of abdominal fascia and abdominal aortic wall. The density and continuity of these structures depend on collagen and elastic fibers structure. Reducing the strength of the fibers may be due to changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) by the proteolytic enzymes-matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that degrade extracellular matrix proteins. These enzymes play an important role in the development of many disease: malignant tumors (colon, breast, lung, pancreas), cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, ischemia-reperfusion injury), connective tissue diseases (Ehler-Danlos Syndrome, Marfan's Syndrome), complications of diabetes (retinopathy, nephropathy). One of the most important is matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). The aim of the study was an estimation of the MMP-2 blood levels in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia, and in patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm. The study involved 88 patients aged 42 to 89 years, including 75 men and 13 women. Patients were divided into two groups: patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia (45 persons, representing 51.1% of all group) and patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm (43 persons, representing 48,9% of all group). It was a statistically significant increase in MMP-2 blood levels in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia compared to patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm. It was a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of POCHP in patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm compared to patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia. Statistically significant

  6. Abdominal manifestations of autoimmune disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantopoulou, C.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Immunoglobulin G4-related disease was recognized as a systemic disease since various extrapancreatic lesions were observed in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The real etiology and pathogenesis of IgG4-RD is still not clearly understood. Moreover the exact role of IgG4 or IgG4-positive plasma cells in this disease has not yet been elucidated. only some inconsistent biological features such as hypergammaglobulinemia or hypocomplementemia support the autoimmune nature of the disease process. various names have been ascribed to this clinicopathological entity including IgG4-related sclerosing disease, IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease, IgG4-related disease, IgG4-related autoimmune disease, hyper-IgG4 disease and IgG4-related systemic disease. The extrapancreatic lesions of IgG4-RD also exhibit the same characteristic histologic features including dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, massive storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis as seen in IgG4-related pancreatitis. Abdominal manifestations include the following organs/systems: Bile ducts: Sclerosing cholangitis; Gallbladder and liver: Acalculous sclerosis cholecytitis with diffuse wall thickening; hepatic inflammatory pseudotumorts; Kidneys: round or wedge-shaped renal cortical nodules, peripheral cortical; lesions, mass like lesions or renal pelvic involvement; Prostate, urethra, seminal vesicle, vas deferens, uterine cervix; Autoimmune prostatitis; Retroperitoneum: Retroperitoneal fibrosis. thin or mildly thick homogeneous soft tissue lesion surrounding the abdominal aorta and its branches but also bulky masses causing hydronephroureterosis; Mesentery: Sclerosing mesenteritis usually involving the root of the mesentery; Bowel: Inflammatory bowel diseases mimicking Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. various types of sclerosing nodular lesions of the bowel wall; Stomach: Gastritis, gastric ulcers and focal masses mimicking submucosal tumor; omentum: Infiltration mimicking

  7. Abdominal ultrasonographic manifestation of Henoch-schonlein purpura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun, Hyo Won; Kim, Mi Sung; Kang, Beoung Chul; Lee, Sun Wha

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the ultrasonographic features and assess the diagnostic value of sonography in the evaluation of children with Henoch-Schonlein purpura. Between October 1993, and Febuary 1998, 67 children with Henoch-Schonlein purpura underwent abdominal ultrasonography, which in 13 was used for follow up. Bowel wall thickness and location, pattern of color Doppler signal in the thickened bowel wall, the size and location of enlarged mesenteric lymph node and the presence of ascites were evaluated. In 42 cases(63%), sonographic findings were positive, and indicated mesenteric lymphadenopathy(n=3D21), small bowel wall thickening(n=3D20), and ascites(n=3D17). Thickened bowels were demonstrated at the ileum in 11 cases, the jejunum in five, the duodenum in one, and combined wall thickening at the duodenum and jejunum in two;thickening of the duodenum and ileum was seen in one case. Thickness varied from 3 to 10 mm(mean:6.5 mm). On follow-up sonography, regression of bowel wall thickening was observed earlier than that of mesenteric lymphadenopathy or ascites, and correlated well with improved abdominal symptoms. Abdominal ultrasonographic manifestations of Henoch-Schonlein purpura were bowel wall thickening, mesentric lymphadenopathy and ascites. Sonography was a simple and useful method for the evaluation of gastrointestinal manifestation of Henoch-Schonlein purpura.=20

  8. Mechanisms and management of functional abdominal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Farmer, Adam D; Aziz, Qasim

    2014-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome is characterised by frequent or continuous abdominal pain associated with a degree of loss of daily activity. It has a reported population prevalence of between 0.5% and 1.7%, with a female preponderance. The pathophysiology of functional abdominal pain is incompletely understood although it has been postulated that peripheral sensitisation of visceral afferents, central sensitisation of the spinal dorsal horn and aberrancies within descending modulatory sys...

  9. Extra-appendiceal findings in pediatric abdominal CT for suspected appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, Mark; Delgado, Jorge; Mahboubi, Soroosh [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Much has been written regarding the incidence, types, importance and management of abdominal CT incidental findings in adults, but there is a paucity of literature on incidental findings in children. We sought to determine the prevalence and characteristics of extra-appendiceal and incidental findings in pediatric abdominal CT performed for suspected appendicitis. A retrospective review was performed of abdominal CT for suspected appendicitis in a pediatric emergency department from July 2010 to June 2012. Extra-appendiceal findings were recorded. Any subsequent imaging was noted. Extra-appendiceal findings were divided into incidental findings of doubtful clinical significance, alternative diagnostic findings potentially providing a diagnosis other than appendicitis explaining the symptoms, and incidental findings that were abnormalities requiring clinical correlation and sometimes requiring further evaluation but not likely related to the patient symptoms. One hundred sixty-five children had abdominal CT for suspected appendicitis. Seventy-seven extra-appendiceal findings were found in 57 (34.5%) patients. Most findings (64 of 77) were discovered in children who did not have appendicitis. Forty-one of these findings (53%) could potentially help explain the patient's symptoms, while 30 of the findings (39%) were abnormalities that were unlikely to be related to the symptoms but required clinical correlation and sometimes further work-up. Six of the findings (8%) had doubtful or no clinical significance. Extra-appendiceal findings are common in children who undergo abdominal CT in the setting of suspected appendicitis. A significant percentage of these patients have findings that help explain their symptoms. Knowledge of the types and prevalence of these findings may help radiologists in the planning and interpretation of CT examinations in this patient population. (orig.)

  10. Actinomycosis mimicking abdominal neoplasm. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waaddegaard, P; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    1988-01-01

    In a patient with a 6-month history of nonspecific abdominal complaints, preoperative examination indicated malignant disease involving the right ovary, rectum and sigmoid, but laparotomy revealed abdominal actinomycosis. Removal of the ovary and low anterior colonic resection followed by penicil......In a patient with a 6-month history of nonspecific abdominal complaints, preoperative examination indicated malignant disease involving the right ovary, rectum and sigmoid, but laparotomy revealed abdominal actinomycosis. Removal of the ovary and low anterior colonic resection followed...... by penicillin treatment gave a good result....

  11. Abdominal migraine in childhood: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicchitano B

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Beatrice Scicchitano,1 Gareth Humphreys,1 Sally G Mitton,2 Thiagarajan Jaiganesh1 1Children's Emergency Department, 2Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, St Georges Hospital, St Georges Healthcare NHS Trust, Tooting, London, United Kingdom Abstract: The childhood condition of abdominal migraine has been described under many different synonyms, including "abdominal epilepsy", "recurrent abdominal pain", "cyclical vomiting syndrome", and "functional gastrointestinal disorder". In the early literature, abdominal migraine is included in the "childhood periodic syndrome", first described by Wyllie and Schlesinger in 1933. Abdominal migraine has emerged over the last century as a diagnostic entity in its own right thanks to the development of well defined diagnostic criteria and its recent inclusion in the International Headache Society's Classification of Headache disorders. Despite this progress, little is known about the pathophysiology of the condition, and the treatment options are poorly defined. Here we summarize the recent literature, with particular focus on establishing the diagnosis of abdominal migraine and its pathophysiology, and suggest an approach to management. Keywords: abdominal migraine, recurrent abdominal pain, abdominal epilepsy, cyclical vomiting

  12. Mechanical ventilation in abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futier, E; Godet, T; Millot, A; Constantin, J-M; Jaber, S

    2014-01-01

    One of the key challenges in perioperative care is to reduce postoperative morbidity and mortality. Patients who develop postoperative morbidity but survive to leave hospital have often reduced functional independence and long-term survival. Mechanical ventilation provides a specific example that may help us to shift thinking from treatment to prevention of postoperative complications. Mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing surgery has long been considered only as a modality to ensure gas exchange while allowing maintenance of anesthesia with delivery of inhaled anesthetics. Evidence is accumulating, however, suggesting an association between intraoperative mechanical ventilation strategy and postoperative pulmonary function and clinical outcome in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Non-protective ventilator settings, especially high tidal volume (VT) (>10-12mL/kg) and the use of very low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (PEEPventilator-associated lung injury in patients with healthy lungs. Stimulated by previous findings in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, the use of lower tidal volume ventilation is becoming increasingly more common in the operating room. However, lowering tidal volume, though important, is only part of the overall multifaceted approach of lung protective mechanical ventilation. In this review, we aimed at providing the most recent and relevant clinical evidence regarding the use of mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Copyright © 2014 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Abdominal ultrasound in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escribano, J.; Gonzalez, J.; Alvarez, M.; Rivero, S.; Raya, J.L.; Ruza, M.

    1998-01-01

    To analyze the ultrasonography findings in abdomen in the AIDS patients in our hospital, as well as the indications for this exploration, assessing the role of abdominal ultrasound (AU). The ultrasonographic and clinical findings in 527 patients who underwent a total of 715 explorations between 1992 and 1996 were studied. Hepatomegaly and/or splenomegaly, usually homogeneous, were observed in nearly half of the studies (45%); one third of the patients with marked splenomegaly presented visceral leishmaniasis. Focal lesions in liver and/or spleen, corresponding to angiomas, abscesses, lymphomatous lesions and metastasis, were detected in 5.7% of the explorations. Thirty-five percent of the AU revealed the presence of lymphadenopathy; nodes measuring over 2.5 cm were usually related to potential treatable infection or neoplasm. Thickening of the gallbladder wall did not usually indicate the presence of acute cholecystitis unless Murphy''s sign was also detected. Bile duct dilation and wall thickening was related to opportunistic cholangitis, and the increase in the echogenicity of the renal parenchyma was linked to AIDS-related nephropathy. Despite the fact that many of findings with AU are nonspecific, we consider that this approach should be the principal diagnostic technique in AIDS patients with suspected abdominal pathology or fever of unknown origin. (Author) 43 refs,

  14. Estudo prospectivo de pacientes pediátricos com dor abdominal crônica Prospective study of infants with chronic abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Kores Dorsa

    2007-09-01

    were seen in a tertiary pediatric gastroenterology outclinic. Organic diseases were excluded by physical examination and laboratory procedures, and clinical complaints were evaluated according to Rome II criteria for children abdominal pain. In order to establish definitive diagnosis, patients were followed for a mean of three years. RESULTS: Allocation of the 71 patients was: organic disease (n=12, complete remission of symptoms following first clinical presentation (n=7, and functional disease (n=52. Nine patients from the organic disease group, who had been diagnosed as having lactose intolerance, were re-allocated to the functional disease criteria since their symptoms did not relieve when lactose was excluded from their diet. Out of the 52 patients of the functional disease group (median age=9.3 years, 50% boys, nine children with initial diagnosis of functional abdominal pain were re-allocated to functional constipation diagnosis during follow-up, and other 43 patients fulfilled the functional disease diagnosis defined by Rome II: 24 with functional dyspepsia, 18 with functional abdominal pain and one with irritable bowel syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: In a group of children with chronic abdominal pain, functional diseases were found more frequently than organic diseases, and functional dyspepsia was the commonest subtype. Long term follow-up was useful to establish definitive diagnosis in children with chronic abdominal pain.

  15. Effect of clomiphene citrate on uterine hemodynamics in women with unexplained infertility

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    Omran E

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Eman Omran, Mohamed El-Sharkawy, Akmal El-Mazny, Mohamed Hammam, Wafaa Ramadan, Dina Latif, Dalia Samir, Sherine Sobh Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasr Al-Ainy Hospital, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of clomiphene citrate on uterine artery blood flow using pulsed Doppler and endometrial and subendometrial micro vascularization using 3D power Doppler in unexplained infertility. Patients and methods: In a prospective observational study at a university teaching hospital, the mid-luteal (peri-implantation endometrial thickness and volume, uterine artery pulsatility index (PI and resistance index (RI, endometrial and subendometrial vascularization index (VI, flow index (FI, and vascularization flow index (VFI, and serum estradiol and progesterone levels were compared between natural and clomiphene citrate stimulated cycles in the same group of 50 patients with unexplained infertility. Statistical analysis was done using paired t-test to compare different study variables. Results: The primary outcome, which was the endometrial flow index, was significantly lower in the stimulated cycles (mean ± SD: 23.89±7.96 vs 27.49±8.73, mean difference (95% CI: -3.6 (-2, -5.9; P=0.03. The mean ± SD of endometrial thickness (10.92±3.04 vs 12.46±3.08 mm; P=0.01, volume (4.57±1.28 vs 5.26±1.32 cm3; P=0.009, endometrial VI (0.86±0.15 vs 0.95%±0.21%; P=0.02, VFI (0.25±0.08 vs 0.31±0.12; P=0.004, subendometrial VI (1.93±0.68 vs 2.26%±0.75%; P=0.02, FI (26.81±9.16 vs 30.73±9.87; P=0.04, and VFI (0.68±0.18 vs 0.79±0.21; P=0.006 were significantly lower in the stimulated cycles. However, there were no significant differences in the uterine artery PI (P=0.12 and RI (P=0.08 or serum estradiol (P=0.54 and progesterone (P=0.37 levels between natural and stimulated cycles. Conclusion: Peri-implantation endometrial perfusion is significantly lower in clomiphene citrate stimulated

  16. Don't Forget the Abdominal Wall: Imaging Spectrum of Abdominal Wall Injuries after Nonpenetrating Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalon, Shanna A; Askari, Reza; Gates, Jonathan D; Patel, Ketan; Sodickson, Aaron D; Khurana, Bharti

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal wall injuries occur in nearly one of 10 patients coming to the emergency department after nonpenetrating trauma. Injuries range from minor, such as abdominal wall contusion, to severe, such as abdominal wall rupture with evisceration of abdominal contents. Examples of specific injuries that can be detected at cross-sectional imaging include abdominal muscle strain, tear, or hematoma, including rectus sheath hematoma (RSH); traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH); and Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) (closed degloving injury). These injuries are often overlooked clinically because of (a) a lack of findings at physical examination or (b) distraction by more-severe associated injuries. However, these injuries are important to detect because they are highly associated with potentially grave visceral and vascular injuries, such as aortic injury, and because their detection can lead to the diagnosis of these more clinically important grave traumatic injuries. Failure to make a timely diagnosis can result in delayed complications, such as bowel hernia with potential for obstruction or strangulation, or misdiagnosis of an abdominal wall neoplasm. Groin injuries, such as athletic pubalgia, and inferior costochondral injuries should also be considered in patients with abdominal pain after nonpenetrating trauma, because these conditions may manifest with referred abdominal pain and are often included within the field of view at cross-sectional abdominal imaging. Radiologists must recognize and report acute abdominal wall injuries and their associated intra-abdominal pathologic conditions to allow appropriate and timely treatment. © RSNA, 2017.

  17. A case of megadolichobasilar anomaly complicated with abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Sumio; Yamaguchi, Takenori; Ogata, Jun; Ito, Mamoru; Kikuchi, Haruhiko

    1985-01-01

    A 41 year-old hypertensive male was admitted because of progressing left hemiparesis and dysarthria. CT demonstrated hyperdense mass with partial contast enhancement, extending from the level of lower pons to that of suprasellar cistern. Reconstructed imaging of CT showed a huge mass lesion, in which a wide curvilinear hyperdensity was demonstrated by contrast enhancement. Cerebral angiography revealed markedly elongated and dilated basilar and carotid arteries. From these findings, the prepontine hyperdense mass lesion was diagnosed as megadolichobasilar anomaly with marked wall thickening. Findings of abdominal aortic angiography and abdominal CT suggested the presence of marked atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm with mural thrombi. Six months after initial admission, neurological symptoms gradually deteriorated and CT showed dilatation of the 3rd and lateral ventricles, suggesting the development of hydrocephalus due to compression of the aqueduct by the megadolichobasilar anomaly. Magnetic resonance imaging at this time demonstrated more details of the lesion and the deformity of the brain stem, which was not detected by conventional CT. Complications of vascular anomalies other than intracranial vasculature, such as aortic aneurysm, have also been repoted. After the introduction of CT, demonstration of a long, wide, curvilinear structure with abnormal density in the prepontine region has been reported to be diagnostic for the megadolichobasilar anomaly. This patient has had hypertension for 10 years, which probably due to chronic nephritis. He had no definite findings for angitis, but had abdominal aortic aneurysm with mural thrombi. From these findings, atherosclerosis of large vessels may have played one of the roles in the pathogenesis of this anomaly in the present case. (J.P.N.)

  18. Abdominal Cystic Echinococcosis Treated with Albendazole. A Pediatric Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samanta Moroni

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis is endemic in Argentina. The standard pharmacological treatment for the disease is albendazole, but surgery is a common alternative. Even though primary infection occurs mainly in the pediatric population, the optimal therapeutic option in pediatrics is not clearly defined and few pediatric cohorts with cystic echinococcosis treated with albendazole have been described to date.To describe therapeutic response to albendazole in a cohort of pediatric patients with abdominal cystic echinococcosis.Patients (0-18 years old with abdominal cystic echinococcosis who were treated with albendazole between January 1998 and August 2013. Diagnosis of abdominal cystic echinococcosis was made by ultrasound. All patients received albendazole, 10-15 mg/kg/day. Epidemiological data, symptoms, number, location and outcome of the cysts, serology and treatment received were analyzed. The parameter used to assess treatment response was cyst changes evaluated by ultrasound follow up using the WHO-IWGE classification.A total of 28 patients (with 46 abdominal cysts were included in the cohort. Mean age at enrolment was 9.4 years and mean duration of follow-up, 23.8 months. All patients resided in rural areas and had had contact with dogs. The asymptomatic form of the disease was the most common presentation. All patients received albendazole (mean duration: 142.5 days, with low incidence of adverse events. Albendazole had a positive effect on most of the cysts. Surgery was performed in 13 patients.Treatment with albendazole for uncomplicated cystic echinococcosis cysts is safe and effective, and can potentially reduce the need for surgical intervention.

  19. Abdominal Cystic Echinococcosis Treated with Albendazole. A Pediatric Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Samanta; Moscatelli, Guillermo; Bournissen, Facundo García; González, Nicolás; Ballering, Griselda; Freilij, Héctor; Salgueiro, Fabián; Altcheh, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is endemic in Argentina. The standard pharmacological treatment for the disease is albendazole, but surgery is a common alternative. Even though primary infection occurs mainly in the pediatric population, the optimal therapeutic option in pediatrics is not clearly defined and few pediatric cohorts with cystic echinococcosis treated with albendazole have been described to date. To describe therapeutic response to albendazole in a cohort of pediatric patients with abdominal cystic echinococcosis. Patients (0-18 years old) with abdominal cystic echinococcosis who were treated with albendazole between January 1998 and August 2013. Diagnosis of abdominal cystic echinococcosis was made by ultrasound. All patients received albendazole, 10-15 mg/kg/day. Epidemiological data, symptoms, number, location and outcome of the cysts, serology and treatment received were analyzed. The parameter used to assess treatment response was cyst changes evaluated by ultrasound follow up using the WHO-IWGE classification. A total of 28 patients (with 46 abdominal cysts) were included in the cohort. Mean age at enrolment was 9.4 years and mean duration of follow-up, 23.8 months. All patients resided in rural areas and had had contact with dogs. The asymptomatic form of the disease was the most common presentation. All patients received albendazole (mean duration: 142.5 days), with low incidence of adverse events. Albendazole had a positive effect on most of the cysts. Surgery was performed in 13 patients. Treatment with albendazole for uncomplicated cystic echinococcosis cysts is safe and effective, and can potentially reduce the need for surgical intervention.

  20. The abdominal technetium scan (a decade of experience)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooney, D.R.; Duszynski, D.O.; Camboa, E.; Karp, M.P.; Jewett, T.C. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Out of 270 children with gastrointestinal symptoms, the indications for technetium scanning were: gastrointestinal tract bleeding (165 patients), abdominal pain (99 patients) and a history of intussusception (6 patients). Thirty children had abnormal findings, while the remaining 240 patients had normal scans. Four of the 30 children with positive scans were not explored, while the others underwent laparotomy. Of the 26 operated patients, 12 (46%) had a Meckel's diverticulum. Nine patients (34%) had other pathologic lesions that were detected by the scan. Five had true false positives as no pathologic lesions were found. Of the 240 children with negative scans, 19 were eventually explored because of persistent symptoms or clinical findings. Two of these had a Meckel's diverticulum. Eleven had a negative exploration while six had other surgical lesions. Technitium scan should reliably detect around 80%-90% of Meckel's diverticula. It will also accurately exclude the diagnosis of Meckel's diverticulum in over 90% of patients

  1. Advanced abdominal pregnancy, with live fetus and severe preeclampsia, case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailu, Fekade Getachew; Yihunie, Getnet Tesfaye; Essa, Ahmed Amdihun; Tsega, Walelign Kindie

    2017-07-26

    Abdominal pregnancy may account for up to 1.4% of all ectopic pregnancies. The incidence of abdominal pregnancy differs in various literatures and ranges between 1:10,000 pregnancies to 1:30, 000 pregnancies. The clinical symptoms of an uncomplicated abdominal pregnancy are unspecific. There are reports of maternal and fetal survival from advanced abdominal pregnancies. Our case was a 26 years old gravida 4, para 3 (2 alive, one early neonatal death) woman. She presented to Felegehiwot Referal Hospital with a principal complaint of vomiting, epigastric pain, headache, and blurring of vision. Emergency cesarean delivery was decided with the impression of bicornuate uterus with intrauterine pregnancy, intrauterine growth restriction and sever preeclampsia.it was found to be advanced abdominal pregnancy. Placenta was removed and pack was used to control bleeding. Both the mother and neonate were discharged in a good condition. Abdominal pregnancy with live fetus is an extremely rare condition and requires a high index of suspicion. Endometrial cavity may not be required for development of severe preeclampsia and packing is effective in controlling bleeding in selected cases.

  2. Correlation of bowel symptoms with colonic transit, length, and faecal load in functional faecal retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raahave, Dennis; Christensen, Elsebeth; Loud, Franck B.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Abdominal pain, bloating, and defecation disturbances are common complaints in gastrointestinal functional disorders. This study explores whether bowel symptoms are correlated to colon transit time (CTT), faecal loading (coprostasis), and colon length; and whether prokinetic interve...

  3. Post-operative symptoms at home in children following day case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    of the parents did not know enough about the treatment of the wound and of the overall ... Post operative symptoms following elective day case surgery are amenable to treatment and ..... with inguinal and abdominal wall hernias in children.

  4. Uso da peritoneostomia na sepse abdominal Laparostomy in abdominal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juvenal da Rocha Torres Neto

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Dentre as modalidades terapêuticas da sepse abdominal, a peritoneostomia tem papel decisivo permitindo explorações e lavagens da cavidade de forma facilitada. Observamos pacientes com diagnóstico clínico de sepse abdominal internados no Serviço de Coloproctologia do Hospital Universitário da Universidade Federal de Sergipe, e que foram submetidos a peritoneostomia de janeiro de 2004 a janeiro de 2006. Foram avaliados quanto ao diagnóstico primário e secundário, tipo de peritonite secundária, antibioticoterapia, esquema de lavagens, tempo de peritoneostomia, complicações e desfecho. Estudamos 12 pacientes, com idade de 15 a 57, média de 39,3 anos. Diagnóstico primário: abdome agudo inflamatório em 6(50%, abdome agudo obstrutivo em 2(16,7%, abdome agudo perfurativo em 2(16,7%, fístula enterocutânea em 1(8,3% e abscesso intra-cavitário em 1(8,3%. Diagnóstico secundário: perfuração de cólon em 4(33,3%, abscessos intra-cavitários em 3(25%, deiscências de anastomoses em 3(25%, 1(8,3% com tumor perfurado de sigmóide e 1(8,3% com necrose de cólon abaixado. Peritonite fecal em 10(83,3% e purulenta em 2(16,7%. A antibioticoterapia teve duração média de 19 dias. Lavagens de demanda em 6(50%, programadas em 4(33,3% e regime misto em 2(16,7%. O tempo médio de peritoneostomia foi de 10,9 dias (1-36. Como complicações: evisceração em 2(16,7% e fistulização em 1(8,3%. Quatro pacientes evoluíram com óbito.Among the therapeutics approach form of abdominal sepsis, the laparostomy has a decisive role allowing cavity explorations and lavages in an easier way. We study patients with abdominal sepsis diagnoses admitted to our surgical service of Coloproctology form Sergipe´s Federal University Hospital who underwent a Bogotá Bag laparostomy associated or not with polypropylene mesh from January 2004 to January 2006. These patients were assessed as: first and second diagnosis; secondary peritonitis type; antibiotic

  5. Evaluating Transcription Factor Activity Changes by Scoring Unexplained Target Genes in Expression Data.

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    Evi Berchtold

    Full Text Available Several methods predict activity changes of transcription factors (TFs from a given regulatory network and measured expression data. But available gene regulatory networks are incomplete and contain many condition-dependent regulations that are not relevant for the specific expression measurement. It is not known which combination of active TFs is needed to cause a change in the expression of a target gene. A method to systematically evaluate the inferred activity changes is missing. We present such an evaluation strategy that indicates for how many target genes the observed expression changes can be explained by a given set of active TFs. To overcome the problem that the exact combination of active TFs needed to activate a gene is typically not known, we assume a gene to be explained if there exists any combination for which the predicted active TFs can possibly explain the observed change of the gene. We introduce the i-score (inconsistency score, which quantifies how many genes could not be explained by the set of activity changes of TFs. We observe that, even for these minimal requirements, published methods yield many unexplained target genes, i.e. large i-scores. This holds for all methods and all expression datasets we evaluated. We provide new optimization methods to calculate the best possible (minimal i-score given the network and measured expression data. The evaluation of this optimized i-score on a large data compendium yields many unexplained target genes for almost every case. This indicates that currently available regulatory networks are still far from being complete. Both the presented Act-SAT and Act-A* methods produce optimal sets of TF activity changes, which can be used to investigate the difficult interplay of expression and network data. A web server and a command line tool to calculate our i-score and to find the active TFs associated with the minimal i-score is available from https://services.bio.ifi.lmu.de/i-score.

  6. Submicroscopic subtelomeric aberrations in Chinese patients with unexplained developmental delay/mental retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Liwen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtelomeric imbalance is widely accepted as related to developmental delay/mental retardation (DD/MR. Fine mapping of aberrations in gene-enriched subtelomeric regions provides essential clues for localizing critical regions, and provides a strategy for identifying new candidate genes. To date, no large-scale study has been conducted on subtelomeric aberrations in DD/MR patients in mainland China. Methods This study included 451 Chinese children with moderate to severe clinically unexplained DD/MR. The subtelomere-MLPA (multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification and Affymetrix human SNP array 6.0 were used to determine the subtelomeric copy number variations. The exact size and the breakpoint of each identified aberration were well defined. Results The submicroscopic subtelomeric aberrations were identified in 23 patients, with a detection rate of 5.1%. 16 patients had simple deletions, 2 had simple duplications and 5 with both deletions and duplications. The deletions involved 14 different subtelomeric regions (1p, 2p, 4p, 6p, 7p, 7q, 8p, 9p, 10p, 11q, 14q, 15q, 16p and 22q, and duplications involved 7 subtelomeric regions (3q, 4p, 6q, 7p, 8p, 12p and 22q. Of all the subtelomeric aberrations found in Chinese subjects, the most common was 4p16.3 deletion. The sizes of the deletions varied from 0.6 Mb to 12 Mb, with 5-143 genes inside. Duplicated regions were 0.26 Mb to 11 Mb, with 6-202 genes inside. In this study, four deleted subtelomeric regions and one duplicated region were smaller than any other previously reported, specifically the deletions in 11q25, 8p23.3, 7q36.3, 14q32.33, and the duplication in 22q13. Candidate genes inside each region were proposed. Conclusions Submicroscopic subtelomeric aberrations were detected in 5.1% of Chinese children with clinically unexplained DD/MR. Four deleted subtelomeric regions and one duplicated region found in this study were smaller than any previously reported, which

  7. Parental report of abdominal pain and abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders from a community survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saps, Miguel; Adams, Papa; Bonilla, Silvana; Chogle, Ashish; Nichols-Vinueza, Diana

    2012-12-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are common in children. Abdominal pain (AP) is the most common gastrointestinal (GI) symptom in children. The severity of AP drives medical consultations and quality of life in adult patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Thirty-eight percent of 8- to 15-year-old schoolchildren report AP weekly with 24% of those children reporting persistence of AP >8 weeks. Despite the high prevalence of AP, only 2% of school children seek medical attention for AP. Lack of parental knowledge on their child's symptoms may constitute one of the factors affecting the low ratio of consultation in children reporting AP. The aim was to assess parental reports of AP symptoms in a population of healthy community children. Data of 5 studies with identical methodology to assess GI symptoms in children with celiac disease (CD), cow's milk allergy (CMA), pyloric stenosis (PS), Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP), and stem cell transplant (SC) and their healthy siblings were reviewed: a phone questionnaire on GI symptoms and Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms Rome III version questionnaire (QPGS-RIII). Inclusion criteria were healthy children 4 to 18 years of age with a sibling previously diagnosed with CD, CMA, PS, HSP, or SC. Data on 246 healthy children, mean age (9.8 years, range 3-24, 112 girls) were obtained. Parents reported presence of AP in the last 8 weeks before the telephone contact in 20 (8.1%) children (age range 4-18 years, 11 girls). There was no significant difference in AP prevalence between boys and girls (P = 0.64). Six children (2.4%) met QPGS-RIII diagnostic criteria for FGIDs: 3 functional abdominal pain (FAP) and 3 IBS. AP was common in community children. FAP was the most common FGID among healthy community children. The prevalence of AP by parental report is lower than the previously published prevalence of AP reported by children. Lack of awareness of children's symptoms may play a role in the low ratio of

  8. Chronic appendicitis in a patient with 15 years abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    bizhan Khorasani

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Khorasani B1, Gholizadeh Pasha A2 1. Assistant professor, Department of surgery, Faculty of medicine, Tehran University of rehabilitation 2. Assistant professor, Department of surgery, Faculty of medicine, Babol University of medical sciences Abstract Background: Acute appendicitis is a completely known disease but for many physicians chronic appendicitis is unknown and some of them don believe in it. Although the number of people suffer from chronic appendicitis is much fewer than those who suffer from acute appendicitis, we shouldn ignore it. Clinical symptoms for these patients are chronic, longtime and recurrent abdominal pain, which is usually in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen. In the Para clinical examinations there isn any considerable pathological problem (in urine, stool, and sonography of the abdomen and pelvis. By recognizing appendicitis and appendectomy, the symptoms will be vanished and the patients will recover. Case presentation: The case was a 57-year-old man who has complained from chronic abdominal pain in the RLQ area since 15years ago. No pathological problem had been found in all diagnostic process. Conclusion: The problem was diagnosed as the chronic appendicitis and he underwent the appendectomy by laparoscopic procedure and was completely recovered.

  9. Treatment of Extra — Abdominal Desmoid Tumors with Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, Corey; Emory, Cynthia; Adams, Sheila; Cohen, Jonathan; Pitcher, John David; Potter, Benjamin Kyle; Temple, H. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Fibromatosis, or extra-abdominal desmoid tumor, is a benign disease which often has an aggressive clinical course that can be difficult to treat. We performed a retrospective review of 16 patients (12 females and four males) with a mean age of 34.2 years treated with methotrexate and vinblastine for newly diagnosed or recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid tumor. The mean age of our patient cohort was 34.2 years (range 11–70), and the mean tumor size was 11.5 cm (range 2.5–21.2 cm). The mean duration of therapy was 12 months with an average follow-up of 43 months (range 1–149 months). Fourteen of 16 patients demonstrated a clinical response to treatment. Eight of 14 patients demonstrated a radiologic decrease in tumor size. Only one patient progressed on therapy. Six patients developed recurrent symptoms after discontinuation of treatment. Chemotherapy-related symptoms including neutropenia, nausea, and vomiting were common and observed in most patients, however these side effects were mild and transient. Five patients developed peripheral neuropathy that prompted a change from vinblastine to vinorelbine during treatment. One potentially life-threatening complication (pneumocystis pneumonia) occurred which was diagnosed early and successfully treated. The use of methotrexate and vinblastine/vinorelbine in the management of fibromatosis appears to be an effective treatment with minimal treatment-related side effects

  10. Treatment of Extra — Abdominal Desmoid Tumors with Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, Corey [Rockefeller Cancer Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72211 (United States); Emory, Cynthia [Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Blvds, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Adams, Sheila [Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Cedars Medical Center, 1400 NW 12th Avenue (R-12), Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Cohen, Jonathan [Division of Psychology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1695 N.W. 9th Ave. (D-29), Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Pitcher, John David [Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Miami School of Medicine, 1400 NW 12th Avenue (R-12), Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Potter, Benjamin Kyle [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, 6900 Georgia Avenue North West, Washington, D.C., 20307 (United States); Temple, H. Thomas [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1600 N.W. 10th Avenue (R-12), Miami, FL 33136 (United States)

    2011-08-25

    Fibromatosis, or extra-abdominal desmoid tumor, is a benign disease which often has an aggressive clinical course that can be difficult to treat. We performed a retrospective review of 16 patients (12 females and four males) with a mean age of 34.2 years treated with methotrexate and vinblastine for newly diagnosed or recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid tumor. The mean age of our patient cohort was 34.2 years (range 11–70), and the mean tumor size was 11.5 cm (range 2.5–21.2 cm). The mean duration of therapy was 12 months with an average follow-up of 43 months (range 1–149 months). Fourteen of 16 patients demonstrated a clinical response to treatment. Eight of 14 patients demonstrated a radiologic decrease in tumor size. Only one patient progressed on therapy. Six patients developed recurrent symptoms after discontinuation of treatment. Chemotherapy-related symptoms including neutropenia, nausea, and vomiting were common and observed in most patients, however these side effects were mild and transient. Five patients developed peripheral neuropathy that prompted a change from vinblastine to vinorelbine during treatment. One potentially life-threatening complication (pneumocystis pneumonia) occurred which was diagnosed early and successfully treated. The use of methotrexate and vinblastine/vinorelbine in the management of fibromatosis appears to be an effective treatment with minimal treatment-related side effects.

  11. Norovirus Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... many times a day. This can lead to dehydration, especially in young children, older adults, and people with other illnesses. Symptoms of dehydration— decrease in urination dry mouth and throat feeling dizzy when standing up Children who are dehydrated may cry with few or ...

  12. Post caesarean section anterior abdominal wall endometriosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdominal wall endometriosis is a likely sequelae of caesarean section as viable endometrial tissue are deposited in the peritoneal cavity or anterior abdominal wall. One such case to sensitize clinicians of this rare presentation of the disease is presented. The patient was a 48 year old woman who presented with a lesion ...

  13. Synovial sarcoma of the abdominal wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matushita, J.P.K.; Matushita, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    A case report of synovial sarcoma arising in the abdominal wall is presented. A brief review of the clinical and radiological features of synovial sarcoma is made. Pre-operative diagnosis of an abdominal wall synovial sarcoma is virtually impossible, but should be considered when a soft tissue swelling is found to show amorphous stippled calcification X-ray. (author) [pt

  14. Actinomycosis mimicking abdominal neoplasm. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waaddegaard, P; Dziegiel, M

    1988-01-01

    In a patient with a 6-month history of nonspecific abdominal complaints, preoperative examination indicated malignant disease involving the right ovary, rectum and sigmoid, but laparotomy revealed abdominal actinomycosis. Removal of the ovary and low anterior colonic resection followed by penicil...

  15. Asymptomatic Incisional Endometrioma Presenting as Abdominal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asymptomatic incisional endometrioma of the anterior abdominal wall is rare. Clinical diagnosis may be difficult. We present a 26 year old woman with incisional abdominal wall endometrioma discovered 5 years after caeserian section. It was painless and there was no change in size with menstruation. The patient's body ...

  16. Abdominal imaging findings in gastrointestinal basidiobolomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicek, Kristina T; Vikram, Holenarasipur R; De Petris, Giovanni D; Johnson, C Daniel

    2015-02-01

    To describe the abdominal imaging findings of patients with gastrointestinal Basidiobolus ranarum infection. A literature search was performed to compile the abdominal imaging findings of all reported worldwide cases of gastrointestinal basidiobolomycosis (GIB). In addition, a retrospective review at our institution was performed to identify GIB cases that had imaging findings. A radiologist aware of the diagnosis reviewed the imaging findings in detail. Additional information was obtained from the medical records. A total of 73 GIB cases have been published in the medical literature. The most common abdominal imaging findings were masses in the colon, the liver, or multiple sites and bowel wall thickening. Initially, many patients were considered to have either a neoplasm or Crohn disease. We identified 7 proven cases of GIB at our institution, of which 4 had imaging studies (4 computed tomography [CT] examinations, 4 abdominal radiographs, and an upper gastrointestinal study). Imaging studies showed abnormalities in all 4 cases. Three-fourths of our study patients had an abdominal mass at CT. Two of 3 masses involved the kidneys and included urinary obstruction. All masses showed an inflammatory component with adjacent soft tissue stranding, with or without abscess formation. Radiologists should consider GIB when a patient from an arid climate presents with abdominal pain, weight loss, and an inflammatory abdominal mass on CT. Abdominal masses of the colon or liver, bowel wall thickening, and abscesses are the most common imaging findings.

  17. Functional abdominal pain disorders in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajindrajith, Shaman; Zeevenhooven, Judith; Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Perera, Bonaventure Jayasiri Crispus; Benninga, Marc A.

    2018-01-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common problem in pediatric practice. The majority of cases fulfill the Rome IV criteria for functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs). At times, these disorders may lead to rather serious repercussions. Area covered: We have attempted to cover current knowledge on

  18. PATTERN AND OUTCOME OF ABDOMINAL INJURIES AT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2006-01-01

    Jan 1, 2006 ... a significant cause of abdominal injuries in Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH). The rate-of ... of selective management of abdominal injuries in. 1960 by ..... that pays great attention to the condition of the patient. (11). To aid in ...

  19. Retrospective comparison of abdominal ultrasonography and radiography in the investigation of feline abdominal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Wylen Wade; Sharma, Ajay; Wu, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal radiography and ultrasonography are commonly used as part of the initial diagnostic plan for cats with nonspecific signs of abdominal disease. This retrospective study compared the clinical usefulness of abdominal radiography and ultrasonography in 105 feline patients with signs of abdominal disease. The final diagnosis was determined more commonly with ultrasonography (59%) compared to radiography (25.7%). Ultrasonography was also able to provide additional clinically relevant information in 76% of cases, and changed or refined the diagnosis in 47% of cases. Based on these findings, ultrasonography may be sufficient as an initial diagnostic test for the investigation of feline abdominal disease. PMID:26483582

  20. Unexplained neurological events during bathing in young people: Possible association with the use of gas geysers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Prabhjeet

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report sudden, unexplained neurological collapse in 14 young people while bathing with hot water associated with the use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG-based water heaters (gas geysers in ill-ventilated bathrooms. None of the patients reported any circumstantial evidence of seizures or prior epilepsy. One patient developed cortical blindness and demonstrated posterior leucoencephalopathy on imaging studies. The remaining patients made rapid and excellent recovery without any residual neurological sequelae. In these cases, the results of all routine investigations, i.e., serum chemistry, brain imaging (computed tomography in 2 and magnetic resonance imaging in 10 and electroencephalography were normal. The clinical clustering of these cases in winter months with similar presentations of reversible encephalopathy probably indicates an inhalational toxin exposure. Therefore, we postulate a hypothesis that harmful emissions consisting of carbon monoxide (CO, hydrocarbon gases (HC and nitrogen oxides (NOx, produced by incomplete combustion of LPG might be responsible for the cellular injury and subsequent transient neurological deficits. Physicians should be aware of this entity in order to avoid misdiagnosis of this condition as seizures, and a public awareness should also be created regarding the proper use of these devices.