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Sample records for undissociated butyric acid

  1. A comparison of three pH control methods for revealing effects of undissociated butyric acid on specific butanol production rate in batch fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuepeng; Tu, Maobing; Xie, Rui; Adhikari, Sushil; Tong, Zhaohui

    2013-01-07

    pH control has been essential for butanol production with Clostridium acetobutylicum. However, it is not very clear at what pH level the acid crash will occur, at what pH level butanol production will be dominant, and at what pH level butyric acid production will be prevailing. Furthermore, contradictory results have been reported about required acidic conditions for initiation of solventogenesis. In this study, with the aim of further understanding the role of undissociated butyric acid in butanol production, we investigated the correlation between undissociated butyric acid concentration and specific butanol production rate in batch fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum by comparing three pH control approaches: NaOH neutralization (at 12, 24 or 36 h), CaCO3 supplementation (2, 5, or 8 g/l) and NaOAc buffering (pH 4.6, 5.0 or 5.6). By neutralizing the fermentation pH to ~5.0 at different time, we observed that neutralization should take place at the beginning of exponential phase (12 h), and otherwise resulting in lower concentrations of undissociated butyric acid, cell biomass and final butanol. CaCO3 supplementation extended cell growth to 36 h and resulted in higher butyrate yield under 8 g/L of CaCO3. In the NaOAc buffering, the highest specific butanol rate (0.58 h-1) was associated with the highest undissociated butyric acid (1.92 g/L). The linear correlation of the undissociated butyric acid with the specific butanol production rates suggested the undissociated butyric acid could be the major driving force for butanol production.

  2. A comparison of three pH control methods for revealing effects of undissociated butyric acid on specific butanol production rate in batch fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xuepeng; Tu, Maobing; Xie, Rui; Adhikari, Sushil; Tong, Zhaohui

    2013-01-01

    pH control has been essential for butanol production with Clostridium acetobutylicum. However, it is not very clear at what pH level the acid crash will occur, at what pH level butanol production will be dominant, and at what pH level butyric acid production will be prevailing. Furthermore, contradictory results have been reported about required acidic conditions for initiation of solventogenesis. In this study, with the aim of further understanding the role of undissociated butyric acid in b...

  3. Factors that inhibit growth of Listeria monocytogenes in nature-ripened Gouda cheese: A major role for undissociated lactic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemmenhove, E.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.; Wells-Bennik, M.H.J.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, factors relevant to nature-ripened Gouda cheese were evaluated for their potential to inhibit growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Factors included water activity, pH, undissociated acetic and lactic acid, diacetyl, free fatty acids, lactoferrin, nitrate, nitrite and nisin. In addition,

  4. Method of extracting butyric acid from a fermented liquid and chemically converting butyric acid into biofuel

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Hyungwoong

    2014-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of converting butyric acid contained in a fermentation broth into biofuel. This chemical conversion method includes separating biohydrogen from gases generated in the course of production of butyric acid through fermentation of carbohydrate, extracting butyric acid from the broth using an insoluble solvent, esterifying butyric acid thus producing butylbutyrate, and hydrogenolyzing all or part of butylbutyrate, thus obtaining butanol. Thereby, biobutanol can be efficientl...

  5. The future of butyric acid in industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwidar, Mohammed; Park, Jae-Yeon; Mitchell, Robert J; Sang, Byoung-In

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the different applications of butyric acid and its current and future production status are highlighted, with a particular emphasis on the biofuels industry. As such, this paper discusses different issues regarding butyric acid fermentations and provides suggestions for future improvements and their approaches.

  6. Biosynthesis of butyric acid by Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin; Tang, Wan; Zhu, Shengquan; Du, Meini

    2018-03-21

    Butyric acid (C 3 H 7 COOH) is an important chemical that is widely used in foodstuffs along with in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. The bioproduction of butyric acid via large-scale fermentation has the potential to be more economical and efficient than petrochemical synthesis. In this paper, the metabolic pathways involved in the production of butyric acid from Clostridium tyrobutyricum using hexose and pentose as substrates are investigated, and approaches to enhance butyric acid production via genetic modification are discussed. Finally, bioreactor modifications (including fibrous bed bioreactor, inner disc-shaped matrix bioreactor, fibrous matrix packed in porous levitated sphere carriers), low-cost feedstocks and special treatments (including continuous fermentation with cell recycling, extractive fermentation with solvent, using different artificial electron carriers) intended to improve the feasibility of commercial butyric acid bioproduction are summarized.

  7. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum for butyric acid production with high butyric acid selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Im, Jung Ae; Choi, So Young; Lee, Jung Im; Lee, Sang Yup

    2014-05-01

    A typical characteristic of the butyric acid-producing Clostridium is coproduction of both butyric and acetic acids. Increasing the butyric acid selectivity important for economical butyric acid production has been rather difficult in clostridia due to their complex metabolic pathways. In this work, Clostridium acetobutylicum was metabolically engineered for highly selective butyric acid production. For this purpose, the second butyrate kinase of C. acetobutylicum encoded by the bukII gene instead of butyrate kinase I encoded by the buk gene was employed. Furthermore, metabolic pathways were engineered to further enhance the NADH-driving force. Batch fermentation of the metabolically engineered C. acetobutylicum strain HCBEKW (pta(-), buk(-), ctfB(-) and adhE1(-)) at pH 6.0 resulted in the production of 32.5g/L of butyric acid with a butyric-to-acetic acid ratio (BA/AA ratio) of 31.3g/g from 83.3g/L of glucose. By further knocking out the hydA gene (encoding hydrogenase) in the HCBEKW strain, the butyric acid titer was not further improved in batch fermentation. However, the BA/AA ratio (28.5g/g) obtained with the HYCBEKW strain (pta(-), buk(-), ctfB(-), adhE1(-) and hydA(-)) was 1.6 times higher than that (18.2g/g) obtained with the HCBEKW strain at pH 5.0, while no improvement was observed at pH 6.0. These results suggested that the buk gene knockout was essential to get a high butyric acid selectivity to acetic acid in C. acetobutylicum. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium tyrobutyricum for enhanced butyric acid production with high butyrate/acetate ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Yukai; Ren, Mengmeng; Yang, Xitong; Liao, Zhengping; Fu, Hongxin; Wang, Jufang

    2018-04-07

    Butyric acid fermentation by Clostridium couples with the synthesis of acetic acid. But the presence of acetic acid reduces butyric acid yield and increases separation and purification costs of butyric acid. Hence, enhancing the butyrate/acetate ratio is important for economical butyric acid production. This study indicated that enhancing the acetyl-CoA to butyrate flux by overexpression of both the butyryl-CoA/acetate CoA transferase (cat1) and crotonase (crt) genes in C. tyrobutyricum could significantly reduce acetic acid concentration. Fed-batch fermentation of ATCC 25755/cat1 + crt resulted in increased butyrate/acetate ratio of 15.76 g/g, which was 2.24-fold higher than that of the wild-type strain. Furthermore, in order to simultaneously increase the butyrate/acetate ratio, butyric acid concentration and productivity, the recombinant strain ATCC 25755/ppcc (co-expression of 6-phosphofructokinase (pfkA) gene, pyruvate kinase (pykA) gene, cat1, and crt) was constructed. Consequently, ATCC 25755/ppcc produced more butyric acid (46.8 vs. 35.0 g/L) with a higher productivity (0.83 vs. 0.49 g/L·h) and butyrate/acetate ratio (13.22 vs. 7.22 g/g) as compared with the wild-type strain in batch fermentation using high glucose concentration (120 g/L). This study demonstrates that enhancing the acetyl-CoA to butyrate flux is an effective way to reduce acetic acid production and increase butyrate/acetate ratio.

  9. Catalytic upgrading of butyric acid towards fine chemicals and biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöblom, Magnus; Matsakas, Leonidas; Christakopoulos, Paul; Rova, Ulrika

    2016-04-01

    Fermentation-based production of butyric acid is robust and efficient. Modern catalytic technologies make it possible to convert butyric acid to important fine chemicals and biofuels. Here, current chemocatalytic and biocatalytic conversion methods are reviewed with a focus on upgrading butyric acid to 1-butanol or butyl-butyrate. Supported Ruthenium- and Platinum-based catalyst and lipase exhibit important activities which can pave the way for more sustainable process concepts for the production of green fuels and chemicals. © FEMS 2016.

  10. Catalytic upgrading of butyric acid towards fine chemicals and biofuels

    OpenAIRE

    Sj?blom, Magnus; Matsakas, Leonidas; Christakopoulos, Paul; Rova, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation-based production of butyric acid is robust and efficient. Modern catalytic technologies make it possible to convert butyric acid to important fine chemicals and biofuels. Here, current chemocatalytic and biocatalytic conversion methods are reviewed with a focus on upgrading butyric acid to 1-butanol or butyl-butyrate. Supported Ruthenium- and Platinum-based catalyst and lipase exhibit important activities which can pave the way for more sustainable process concepts for the produc...

  11. Fermentative production of butyric acid from wheat straw: Economic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroi, G. N.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Westermann, P.

    2017-01-01

    The economic feasibility of biochemical conversion of wheat straw to butyric acid was studied in this work. Basic process steps included physicochemical pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis and saccharification, fermentation with in-situ acids separation by electrodialysis and product purification....... Two scenarios (S1 and S2) were examined assuming a plant with an annual capacity of 10,000 tonnes of product installed in India (due to significantly lower feedstock prices). S1 resulted in a product of 89% butyric acid mixed with acetic acid and S2 produced butyric acid of 99% purity. Unit production...... cost was estimated at 2.75 and 3.31 $ per kg product for S1 and S2 respectively. The main part of production cost was attributed to steam for the purification step and electricity for the in-situ acids separation. This unit production cost combined with an estimated butyric acid selling price (year...

  12. Effects of dietary probiotic, prebiotic and butyric acid glycerides on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primalac), prebiotic (Fermacto) and butyric acid glycerides (Baby C4) on broiler performance and serum composition. Seven hundred and four day-old broilers were randomly distributed in a 222 factorial arrangement with two levels of probiotic ...

  13. Effects of dietary probiotic, prebiotic and butyric acid glycerides on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    Primalac), prebiotic. (Fermacto) and butyric acid glycerides (Baby C4) on broiler performance and serum composition. Seven hundred and four day-old broilers were randomly distributed in a 2×2×2 factorial arrangement with ...

  14. Impact of butyric acid on butanol formation by Clostridium pasteurianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regestein, Lars; Doerr, Eric Will; Staaden, Antje; Rehmann, Lars

    2015-11-01

    The butanol yield of the classic fermentative acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) process has been enhanced in the past decades through the development of better strains and advanced process design. Nevertheless, by-product formation and the incomplete conversion of intermediates still decrease the butanol yield. This study demonstrates the potential of increasing the butanol yield from glycerol though the addition of small amounts of butyric acid. The impact of butyric acid was investigated in a 7L stirred tank reactor. The results of this study show the positive impact of butyric acid on butanol yield under pH controlled conditions and the metabolic stages were monitored via online measurement of carbon dioxide formation, pH value and redox potential. Butyric acid could significantly increase the butanol yield at low pH values if sufficient quantities of primary carbon source (glycerol) were present. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Current progress on butyric acid production by fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunhui; Yang, Hua; Yang, Fangxiao; Ma, Yujiu

    2009-12-01

    Several issues of butyric acid production with bacteria through fermentation are presented in this review. The current progress including the utilization of butyric acid, the production strains, the metabolic pathway, and regulation are presented in the paper. Process operation modes such as batch, fed-batch, and continuous fermentation are being discussed. Genetic engineering technologies for microbial strain improvement are also being discussed and fermentation systems have been recommended.

  16. Inhibitory effect of ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid on fermentative hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bo; Wan, Wei; Wang, Jianlong [Laboratory of Environmental Technology, INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2008-12-15

    The inhibitory effect of added ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid on fermentative hydrogen production by mixed cultures was investigated in batch tests using glucose as substrate. The experimental results showed that, at 35 C and initial pH 7.0, during the fermentative hydrogen production, the substrate degradation efficiency, hydrogen production potential, hydrogen yield and hydrogen production rate all trended to decrease with increasing added ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid concentration from 0 to 300 mmol/L. The inhibitory effect of added ethanol on fermentative hydrogen production was smaller than those of added acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid. The modified Han-Levenspiel model could describe the inhibitory effects of added ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid on fermentative hydrogen production rate in this study successfully. The modified Logistic model could describe the progress of cumulative hydrogen production. (author)

  17. Solid–liquid equilibria measurements for binary systems comprising (butyric acid + propionic or pentanoic acid) and (heptanoic acid + propionic or butyric or pentanoic or hexanoic acid)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadie, Margreth; Bahadur, Indra; Reddy, Prashant; Ngema, Peterson Thokozani; Naidoo, Paramespri; Deenadayalu, Nirmala; Ramjugernath, Deresh

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Binary SLE measurement for butyric acid + {propionic or pentanoic acid}. ► Binary SLE measurements for heptanoic acid + {propionic or butyric or pentanoic or hexanoic acid}. ► Measurements undertaken using a synthetic method using two new apparati. - Abstract: Solid–liquid equilibria (SLE) measurements have been undertaken for carboxylic acid systems comprising (butyric acid + propionic or pentanoic acid) and (heptanoic acid + propionic or butyric or pentanoic or hexanoic acid) via a synthetic method using two complementary pieces of equipment. The measurements have been obtained at atmospheric pressure and over the temperature range of (225.6 to 270.7) K. All the acid mixtures exhibit a eutectic point in their respective phase diagrams, which have been determined experimentally. The estimated maximum uncertainties in the reported temperatures and compositions are ±1 K and ±0.0006 mole fraction, respectively. The experimental data have been satisfactorily correlated with the Wilson and NRTL activity coefficient models.

  18. Butyrate Suppresses The Severity Of Acetic Acid-Induced Ulcerative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short chain fatty acids are increasingly used as food additives due to the health benefits they have. Recently, they have been implicated in protecting patients against intestinal disorders but without a well-known mechanism. We explored the benefits of a major short chain fatty acid, butyrate on experimental ulcerative colitis ...

  19. (Liquid + liquid) equilibria of (water + butyric acid + esters) ternary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirbaslar, S. Ismail; Sahin, Selin; Bilgin, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data of the solubility (binodal) curves and tie-line end compositions were examined for mixtures of {water (1) + butyric acid (2) + ethyl propionate or dimethyl phthalate or dibutyl phthalate (3)} at T = 298.15 K and (101.3 ± 0.7) kPa. The relative mutual solubility of the butyric acid is higher in the layers of esters than in the aqueous layer. The reliability of the experimental tie-line data was confirmed by using the Othmer-Tobias correlation. The LLE data of the ternary systems were predicted by UNIFAC method. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated for the immiscibility region

  20. Effect of indole butyric acid on micrografting of cactus | Moghadam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of indole butyric acid on micrografting of cactus. ARL Moghadam, ZO Ardebili, L Rezaie. Abstract. Grafting is a common technique to propagate cacti species. Gymnocalycium mihanovichii is an ornamental plant and they should be grafted to root stock containing chlorophyll. In this research, exogenous auxin ...

  1. Effects of acetic, propionic and butyric acids given intraruminally at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-19

    Apr 19, 2010 ... gluconeogenesis (Bergman, 1990). However, the contri- bution of propionate to blood glucose via gluconeogenesis could probably be covered by the glucose infused into the abomasum. Effects of acetic, propionic and butyric acids given individually on rumen papillae size, and IGF-I, IGFBP-. 3, GH and ...

  2. Demonstration of in situ product recovery of butyric acid via CO2 -facilitated pH swings and medium development in two-phase partitioning bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Eric C; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    Production of organic acids in solid-liquid two-phase partitioning bioreactors (TPPBs) is challenging, and highly pH-dependent, as cell growth occurs near neutral pH, while acid sorption occurs only at low pH conditions. CO2 sparging was used to achieve acidic pH swings, facilitating undissociated organic acid uptake without generating osmotic stress inherent in traditional acid/base pH control. A modified cultivation medium was formulated to permit greater pH reduction by CO2 sparging (pH 4.8) compared to typical media (pH 5.3), while still possessing adequate nutrients for extensive cell growth. In situ product recovery (ISPR) of butyric acid (pKa = 4.8) produced by Clostridium tyrobutyricum was achieved through intermittent CO2 sparging while recycling reactor contents through a column packed with absorptive polymer Hytrel® 3078. This polymer was selected on the basis of its composition as a polyether copolymer, and the use of solubility parameters for predicting solute polymer affinity, and was found to have a partition coefficient for butyric acid of 3. Total polymeric extraction of 3.2 g butyric acid with no CO2 mediated pH swings was increased to 4.5 g via CO2 -facilitated pH shifting, despite the buffering capacity of butyric acid, which resists pH shifting. This work shows that CO2 -mediated pH swings have an observable positive effect on organic acid extraction, with improvements well over 150% under optimal conditions in early stage fermentation compared to CO2 -free controls, and this technique can be applied other organic acid fermentations to achieve or improve ISPR. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. (Liquid + liquid) equilibria of (water + butyric acid + esters) ternary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirbaslar, S. Ismail [Istanbul University, Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, 34320 Avcilar, Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: krbaslar@istanbul.edu.tr; Sahin, Selin; Bilgin, Mehmet [Istanbul University, Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, 34320 Avcilar, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2007-09-15

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data of the solubility (binodal) curves and tie-line end compositions were examined for mixtures of {l_brace}water (1) + butyric acid (2) + ethyl propionate or dimethyl phthalate or dibutyl phthalate (3){r_brace} at T = 298.15 K and (101.3 {+-} 0.7) kPa. The relative mutual solubility of the butyric acid is higher in the layers of esters than in the aqueous layer. The reliability of the experimental tie-line data was confirmed by using the Othmer-Tobias correlation. The LLE data of the ternary systems were predicted by UNIFAC method. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated for the immiscibility region.

  4. Continuous butyric acid fermentation coupled with REED technology for enhanced productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroi, George Nabin; Skiadas, Ioannis; Westermann, Peter

    , today’s organic residues and wastes may become tomorrow’s platform for a variety of products for industrial use. Butyric acid fermentation has long been discussed in the last decade due to the wide application of butyric acid in chemical, pharmaceutical and food industries. Compared to other microbial...... strains, C.tyrobutyricum seems the most promising for biological production of butyric acid as it is characterised by higher selectivity and higher tolerance to butyric acid. However, studies on fermentative butyric production from lignocellulosic biomasses are scarce in the international literature....... The present study focuses on butyric acid fermentation of Pre-treated (by wet explosion) and enzymatically Hydrolysed Wheat Straw (PHWS) by an adapted C. tyrobutyricum strain. The strain could grow in up to 80% (v/v) PHWS in batch mode and it was capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose producing butyric...

  5. Cholesterylbutyrate Solid Lipid Nanoparticles as a Butyric Acid Prodrug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Mauro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterylbutyrate (Chol-but was chosen as a prodrug of butyric acid.Butyrate is not often used in vivo because its half-life is very short and therefore too largeamounts of the drug would be necessary for its efficacy. In the last few years butyric acid'santi-inflammatory properties and its inhibitory activity towards histone deacetylases havebeen widely studied, mainly in vitro. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs, whose lipid matrixis Chol-but, were prepared to evaluate the delivery system of Chol-but as a prodrug and totest its efficacy in vitro and in vivo. Chol-but SLNs were prepared using the microemulsionmethod; their average diameter is on the order of 100-150 nm and their shape is spherical.The antineoplastic effects of Chol-but SLNs were assessed in vitro on different cancer celllines and in vivo on a rat intracerebral glioma model. The anti-inflammatory activity wasevaluated on adhesion of polymorphonuclear cells to vascular endothelial cells. In thereview we will present data on Chol-but SLNs in vitro and in vivo experiments, discussingthe possible utilisation of nanoparticles for the delivery of prodrugs for neoplastic andchronic inflammatory diseases.

  6. Modeling of Clostridium tyrobutyricum for Butyric Acid Selectivity in Continuous Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Jianjun; McGraw, Amy; Hestekin, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to describe batch and continuous fermentation of glucose to organic acids with Clostridium tyrobutyricum. A modified Monod equation was used to describe cell growth, and a Luedeking-Piret equation was used to describe the production of butyric and acetic acids. Using the batch fermentation equations, models predicting butyric acid selectivity for continuous fermentation were also developed. The model showed that butyric acid production was a strong function ...

  7. Modeling of Clostridium t yrobutyricum for Butyric Acid Selectivity in Continuous Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Jianjun Du; Amy McGraw; Jamie A. Hestekin

    2014-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to describe batch and continuous fermentation of glucose to organic acids with Clostridium tyrobutyricum . A modified Monod equation was used to describe cell growth, and a Luedeking-Piret equation was used to describe the production of butyric and acetic acids. Using the batch fermentation equations, models predicting butyric acid selectivity for continuous fermentation were also developed. The model showed that butyric acid production was a strong function...

  8. Butyric acid fermentation of sodium hydroxide pretreated rice straw with undefined mixed culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Binling; Li, Jianzheng; Chi, Xue; Meng, Jia; Liu, Chong; Shi, En

    2014-05-01

    This study describes an alternative mixed culture fermentation technology to anaerobically convert lignocellulosic biomass into butyric acid, a valuable product with wide application, without supplementary cellulolytic enzymes. Rice straw was soaked in 1% NaOH solution to increase digestibility. Among the tested pretreatment conditions, soaking rice straw at 50°C for 72 h removed ~66% of the lignin, but retained ~84% of the cellulose and ~71% of the hemicellulose. By using an undefined cellulose-degrading butyrate-producing microbial community as butyric acid producer in batch fermentation, about 6 g/l of butyric acid was produced from the pretreated rice straw, which accounted for ~76% of the total volatile fatty acids. In the repeated-batch operation, the butyric acid production declined batch by batch, which was most possibly caused by the shift of microbial community structure monitored by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. In this study, batch operation was observed to be more suitable for butyric acid production.

  9. Batch and fed-batch production of butyric acid by Clostridium butyricum ZJUCB

    OpenAIRE

    He, Guo-qing; Kong, Qing; Chen, Qi-he; Ruan, Hui

    2005-01-01

    The production of butyric acid by Clostridium butyricum ZJUCB at various pH values was investigated. In order to study the effect of pH on cell growth, butyric acid biosynthesis and reducing sugar consumption, different cultivation pH values ranging from 6.0 to 7.5 were evaluated in 5-L bioreactor. In controlled pH batch fermentation, the optimum pH for cell growth and butyric acid production was 6.5 with a cell yield of 3.65 g/L and butyric acid yield of 12.25 g/L. Based on these results, th...

  10. Butyric acid production from softwood hydrolysate by acetate-consuming Clostridium sp. S1 with high butyric acid yield and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minsun; Kim, Ki-Yeon; Lee, Kyung Min; Youn, Sung Hun; Lee, Sun-Mi; Woo, Han Min; Oh, Min-Kyu; Um, Youngsoon

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the butyric acid production from softwood hydrolysate by acetate-consuming Clostridium sp. S1. Results showed that Clostridium sp. S1 produced butyric acid by simultaneously utilizing glucose and mannose in softwood hydrolysate and, more remarkably, it consumed acetic acid in hydrolysate. Clostridium sp. S1 utilized each of glucose, mannose, and xylose as well as mixed sugars simultaneously with partially repressed xylose utilization. When softwood (Japanese larch) hydrolysate containing glucose and mannose as the main sugars was used, Clostridium sp. S1 produced 21.17g/L butyric acid with the yield of 0.47g/g sugar and the selectivity of 1 (g butyric acid/g total acids) owing to the consumption of acetic acid in hydrolysate. The results demonstrate potential of Clostridium sp. S1 to produce butyric acid selectively and effectively from hydrolysate not only by utilizing mixed sugars simultaneously but also by converting acetic acid to butyric acid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling of Clostridium tyrobutyricum for Butyric Acid Selectivity in Continuous Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Du

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model was developed to describe batch and continuous fermentation of glucose to organic acids with Clostridium tyrobutyricum. A modified Monod equation was used to describe cell growth, and a Luedeking-Piret equation was used to describe the production of butyric and acetic acids. Using the batch fermentation equations, models predicting butyric acid selectivity for continuous fermentation were also developed. The model showed that butyric acid production was a strong function of cell mass, while acetic acid production was a function of cell growth rate. Further, it was found that at high acetic acid concentrations, acetic acid was metabolized to butyric acid and that this conversion could be modeled. In batch fermentation, high butyric acid selectivity occurred at high initial cell or glucose concentrations. In continuous fermentation, decreased dilution rate improved selectivity; at a dilution rate of 0.028 h−1, the selectivity reached 95.8%. The model and experimental data showed that at total cell recycle, the butyric acid selectivity could reach 97.3%. This model could be used to optimize butyric acid production using C. tyrobutyricum in a continuous fermentation scheme. This is the first study that mathematically describes batch, steady state, and dynamic behavior of C. tyrobutyricum for butyric acid production.

  12. Continuous Fermentation of Clostridium tyrobutyricum with Partial Cell Recycle as a Long-Term Strategy for Butyric Acid Production

    OpenAIRE

    Jianjun Du; Amy McGraw; Nicole Lorenz; Robert R. Beitle; Edgar C. Clausen; Jamie A. Hestekin

    2012-01-01

    In making alternative fuels from biomass feedstocks, the production of butyric acid is a key intermediate in the two-step production of butanol. The fermentation of glucose via Clostridium tyrobutyricum to butyric acid produces undesirable byproducts, including lactic acid and acetic acid, which significantly affect the butyric acid yield and productivity. This paper focuses on the production of butyric acid using Clostridium tyrobutyricum in a partia...

  13. Butyric acid tolerance of rice mutant M4 families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Marini Kopp

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydromorphic soils have a low drainage capacity and are used mainly for the cultivation of irrigated rice.This condition favors the development of anaerobic microorganisms that produce phytotoxic substances. The objective of thisstudy was to evaluate the response of rice mutants to the phytotoxicity caused by butyric acid under anaerobic conditions. Theexperiment consisted of four treatments arranged in a randomized block design. Plants of 40 families were grown in ahydroponic system and the measured variables were root length and length of aerial part (LAP, number of roots (NR androot dry matter (RDM and aerial part dry matter (DMAP. The analysis of variance was performed, the relative performancecalculated and linear regressions were fitted. Only the treatment effect for NR and effect of interaction for LAP were notsignificant. Root length was most affected by the acid and the regressions expressed positive as well as negative effects for acidtolerance in the mutant families.

  14. Butyric acid from anaerobic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213 was found producing butyrate under strict anaerobic conditions. This strain produced 9.47 g L-1 butyric acid from MRS media (0.48 g/g glucose). RPT-4213 was also used to ferment dilute acid pretreated hydrolysates including wheat straw (WSH), corn fiber (CFH...

  15. Recent advances and strategies in process and strain engineering for the production of butyric acid by microbial fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hongzhen; Yang, Rongling; Zhao, Yuping; Wang, Zhaoyu; Liu, Zheng; Huang, Mengyu; Zeng, Qingwei

    2018-04-01

    Butyric acid is an important platform chemical, which is widely used in the fields of food, pharmaceutical, energy, etc. Microbial fermentation as an alternative approach for butyric acid production is attracting great attention as it is an environmentally friendly bioprocessing. However, traditional fermentative butyric acid production is still not economically competitive compared to chemical synthesis route, due to the low titer, low productivity, and high production cost. Therefore, reduction of butyric acid production cost by utilization of alternative inexpensive feedstock, and improvement of butyric acid production and productivity has become an important target. Recently, several advanced strategies have been developed for enhanced butyric acid production, including bioprocess techniques and metabolic engineering methods. This review provides an overview of advances and strategies in process and strain engineering for butyric acid production by microbial fermentation. Additionally, future perspectives on improvement of butyric acid production are also proposed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Burn injury influences the T cell homeostasis in a butyrate-acid sphingomyelinase dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Teresa C.; Armocida, Stephanie M.; Kuethe, Joshua W.; Midura, Emily F.; Jain, Ayushi; Hildeman, David A.; Healy, Daniel P.; Gulbins, Erich; Caldwell, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Following burn injury, a key factor for patients susceptible to opportunistic infections is immune suppression. Butyrate levels are important in maintaining a functional immune system and these levels can be altered after injury. The acid sphingomyelinase (Asm) lipid signaling system has been implicated in a T cell actions with some evidence of being influenced by butyrate. Here, we hypothesized that burn-injury changes in butyrate levels would mediate Asm activity and, consequently, T cell h...

  17. Enhanced butyric acid tolerance and bioproduction by Clostridium tyrobutyricum immobilized in a fibrous bed bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Wang, Jufang; Liang, Shizhong; Cai, Jin; Xu, Zhinan; Cen, Peilin; Yang, Shangtian; Li, Shuang

    2011-01-01

    Repeated fed-batch fermentation of glucose by Clostridium tyrobutyricum immobilized in a fibrous bed bioreactor (FBB) was successfully employed to produce butyric acid at a high final concentration as well as to adapt a butyric-acid-tolerant strain. At the end of the eighth fed-batch fermentation, the butyric acid concentration reached 86.9 ± 2.17 g/L, which to our knowledge is the highest butyric acid concentration ever produced in the traditional fermentation process. To understand the mechanism and factors contributing to the improved butyric acid production and enhanced acid tolerance, adapted strains were harvested from the FBB and characterized for their physiological properties, including specific growth rate, acid-forming enzymes, intracellular pH, membrane-bound ATPase and cell morphology. Compared with the original culture used to seed the bioreactor, the adapted culture showed significantly reduced inhibition effects of butyric acid on specific growth rate, cellular activities of butyric-acid-forming enzyme phosphotransbutyrylase (PTB) and ATPase, together with elevated intracellular pH, and elongated rod morphology. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Batch and fed-batch production of butyric acid by Clostridium butyricum ZJUCB

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guo-qing; Kong, Qing; Chen, Qi-he; Ruan, Hui

    2005-01-01

    The production of butyric acid by Clostridium butyricum ZJUCB at various pH values was investigated. In order to study the effect of pH on cell growth, butyric acid biosynthesis and reducing sugar consumption, different cultivation pH values ranging from 6.0 to 7.5 were evaluated in 5-L bioreactor. In controlled pH batch fermentation, the optimum pH for cell growth and butyric acid production was 6.5 with a cell yield of 3.65 g/L and butyric acid yield of 12.25 g/L. Based on these results, this study then compared batch and fed-batch fermentation of butyric acid production at pH 6.5. Maximum value (16.74 g/L) of butyric acid concentration was obtained in fed-batch fermentation compared to 12.25 g/L in batch fermentation. It was concluded that cultivation under fed-batch fermentation mode could enhance butyric acid production significantly (P<0.01) by C. butyricum ZJUCB. PMID:16252341

  19. Butyric acid fermentation from pretreated and hydrolyzed wheat straw by C.tyrobutyricum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroi, George Nabin; Westermann, Peter; Gavala, Hariklia N.

    ) and higher productivity. However, very few studies have focused on fermentation of sugars derived from lignocellulogic biomass. The present study investigates butyric acid fermentation from pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed wheat straw. The sugars derived from wheat straw consist mainly of glucose...... with C.tyrobutyricum showed that the strain was capable of producing butyric acid from hydrolyzed wheat straw by simultaneous uptake of glucose and xylose. Maximum yield of butyric acid (0,47g/g sugars, 96% of the theoretical yield) was obtained at a pH between 6 and 7 with higher selectivity (>90......%). However, the xylose uptake rate was much lower than that of glucose, implying that further process development is required. Moreover, reduced cell growth rate was observed at higher metal (K+) concentration added during pH control which could be overcome by in-situ separation of butyric acid....

  20. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Claycombe, Kate J; Reindl, Katie M

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of a high-fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk, while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer-preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of DCA and butyrate (two major metabolites in colon lumen), we examined the effects of physiologically relevant doses of butyrate (0.5-2 mmol/l) and DCA (0.05-0.3 mmol/l) on colon cell proliferation. We hypothesize that butyrate and DCA each modulates the cell cycle and apoptosis via common and distinct cellular signaling targets. In this study, we demonstrated that both butyrate and DCA inhibited cell proliferation by up to 89% and 92% and increased cell apoptosis rate by up to 3.1- and 4.5-fold, respectively. Cell cycle analyses revealed that butyrate led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction, but DCA induced an increase in only G1 fraction with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction when compared with the untreated cells. The examination of early cellular signaling revealed that DCA but not butyrate increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, genomic DNA breakage, the activation of ERK1/2, caspase-3 and PARP. In contrast, DCA decreased activated Rb protein level, and butyrate but not DCA increased p21 expression. Collectively, although both butyrate and DCA inhibit colonic cell proliferation, butyrate increases tumor suppressor gene expression, whereas DCA decreases tumor suppressor activation in cell cycle and apoptosis pathways. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Hepatic inflammation caused by dysregulated bile acid synthesis is reversible by butyrate supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Lili; Jena, Prasant Kumar; Hu, Ying; Liu, Hui-Xin; Nagar, Nidhi; Kalanetra, Karen M; French, Samuel William; French, Samuel Wheeler; Mills, David A; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2017-12-01

    Dysregulated bile acid (BA) synthesis or reduced farnesoid X receptor (FXR) levels are found in patients having metabolic diseases, autoimmune hepatitis, and liver cirrhosis or cancer. The objective of this study was to establish the relationship between butyrate and dysregulated BA synthesis-induced hepatitis as well as the effect of butyrate in reversing the liver pathology. Wild-type (WT) and FXR knockout (KO) male mice were placed on a control (CD) or western diet (WD) for 15 months. In the presence or absence of butyrate supplementation, feces obtained from 15-month-old WD-fed FXR KO mice, which had severe hepatitis and liver tumors, were transplanted to 7-month-old WD-fed FXR KO for 3 months. Hepatic phenotypes, microbiota profile, and BA composition were analyzed. Butyrate-generating bacteria and colonic butyrate concentration were reduced due to FXR inactivation and further reduced by WD intake. In addition, WD-fed FXR KO male mice had the highest concentration of hepatic β-muricholic acid (β-MCA) and bacteria-generated deoxycholic acid (DCA) accompanied by serious hepatitis. Moreover, dysregulated BA and reduced SCFA signaling co-existed in both human liver cancers and WD-fed FXR KO mice. Microbiota transplantation using butyrate-deficient feces derived from 15-month-old WD-fed FXR KO mice increased hepatic lymphocyte numbers as well as hepatic β-MCA and DCA concentrations. Furthermore, butyrate supplementation reduced hepatic β-MCA as well as DCA and eliminated hepatic lymphocyte infiltration. In conclusion, reduced butyrate contributes to the development of hepatitis in the FXR KO mouse model. In addition, butyrate reverses dysregulated BA synthesis and its associated hepatitis. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Transfer of dietary fatty acids from butyric acid fortified canola oil into the meat of broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Rapaccini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature reported positive beneficial effects of butyric acid and canola oil on production performance traits of broiler chickens. Three hundred hybrid Ross 708 (150 males and 150 females were randomly allotted to 10 pens per treatment with 5 males and 5 females per pen. Ten pens were administered a diet supplemented with soybean oil (control, ten pens the same basal diet but supplemented with a blend of mono-, di-, tri-glyceride of butyric acid added to soybean oil (T1 and ten pens the same basal diet supplemented with a mix of soybean and canola oil containing butyrate (T2. No differences in final body weight, dressing percentage, liver and thigh weight were found be- tween groups. The T2 birds showed the highest feed/gain ratio (P<0.05. The control group showed the highest value for breast weight while the highest quantity of abdominal fat was in T2 carcasses. Fatty acid profile was significantly influenced by the presence of oil supplements, not only quantitatively but also qualitatively.

  3. Effects of ptb knockout on butyric acid fermentation by Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yali; Yu, Mingrui; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 is an anaerobic, rod-shaped, gram-positive bacterium that produces butyrate, acetate, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide from various saccharides, including glucose and xylose. Phosphotransbutyrylase (PTB) is a key enzyme in the butyric acid synthesis pathway. In this work, effects of ptb knockout by homologous recombination on metabolic flux and product distribution were investigated. When compared with the wild type, the activities of PTB and butyrate kinase in ptb knockout mutant decreased 76 and 42%, respectively; meanwhile, phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase increased 7 and 29%, respectively. However, ptb knockout did not significantly reduce butyric acid production from glucose or xylose in batch fermentations. Instead, it increased acetic acid and hydrogen production 33.3-53.8% and ≈ 11%, respectively. Thus, the ptb knockout did increase the carbon flux toward acetate synthesis, resulting in a significant decrease (28-35% reduction) in the butyrate/acetate ratio in ptb mutant fermentations. In addition, the mutant displayed a higher specific growth rate (0.20 h(-1) vs. 0.15 h(-1) on glucose and 0.14 h(-1) vs. 0.10 h(-1) on xylose) and tolerance to butyric acid. Consequently, batch fermentation with the mutant gave higher fermentation rate and productivities (26-48% increase for butyrate, 81-100% increase for acetate, and 38-46% increase for hydrogen). This mutant thus can be used more efficiently than the parental strain in fermentations to produce butyrate, acetate, and hydrogen from glucose and xylose. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  4. Hyper-production of butyric acid from delignified rice straw by a novel consolidated bioprocess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xue; Li, Jianzheng; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yafei; Antwi, Philip

    2018-04-01

    A novel consolidated bioprocess for hyper-production of butyric acid from delignified rice straw without exogenous enzymes involved was developed by co-fermentation of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 and C. thermobutyricum ATCC 49875. Feasibility of the consolidated bioprocess was approved by batch fermentations, with the optimum pH of 6.5. Fed-batch fermentation with a constant pH of 6.5 at 55 °C could enhance the butyric acid yield to a remarkable 33.9 g/L with a selectivity as high as 78%. Metabolic analysis of the co-culture indicated that sugars liberated by C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 were effectively converted to butyric acid by C. thermobutyricum ATCC 49875. Secondary metabolism of C. thermobutyricum ATCC 49875 also contributed to the hyper-production of butyric acid, resulting in the re-assimilation of by-products such as acetic acid and ethanol. This work provides a more effective fermentation process for butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass for future applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Butyric acid fermentation from pretreated and hydrolysed wheat straw by an adapted Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroi, G N; Baumann, I; Westermann, P; Gavala, H N

    2015-09-01

    Butyric acid is a valuable building-block for the production of chemicals and materials and nowadays it is produced exclusively from petroleum. The aim of this study was to develop a suitable and robust strain of Clostridium tyrobutyricum that produces butyric acid at a high yield and selectivity from lignocellulosic biomasses. Pretreated (by wet explosion) and enzymatically hydrolysed wheat straw (PHWS), rich in C6 and C5 sugars (71.6 and 55.4 g l(-1) of glucose and xylose respectively), was used as substrate. After one year of serial selections, an adapted strain of C. tyrobutyricum was developed. The adapted strain was able to grow in 80% (v v(-1) ) PHWS without addition of yeast extract compared with an initial tolerance to less than 10% PHWS and was able to ferment both glucose and xylose. It is noticeable that the adapted C. tyrobutyricum strain was characterized by a high yield and selectivity to butyric acid. Specifically, the butyric acid yield at 60-80% PHWS lie between 0.37 and 0.46 g g(-1) of sugar, while the selectivity for butyric acid was as high as 0.9-1.0 g g(-1) of acid. Moreover, the strain exhibited a robust response in regards to growth and product profile at pH 6 and 7. © 2015 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Efficient production of butyric acid from Jerusalem artichoke by immobilized Clostridium tyrobutyricum in a fibrous-bed bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin; Cai, Jin; Wang, Jin; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Huang, Lei; Yang, Shang-Tian; Xu, Zhinan

    2011-02-01

    Butyric acid is an important specialty chemical with wide industrial applications. The feasible large-scale fermentation for the economical production of butyric acid requires low-cost substrate and efficient process. In the present study, butyric acid production by immobilized Clostridium tyrobutyricum was successfully performed in a fibrous-bed bioreactor using Jerusalem artichoke as the substrate. Repeated-batch fermentation was carried out to produce butyric acid with a high butyrate yield (0.44 g/g), high productivity (2.75 g/L/h) and a butyrate concentration of 27.5 g/L. Furthermore, fed-batch fermentation using sulfuric acid pretreated Jerusalem artichoke hydrolysate resulted in a high butyric acid concentration of 60.4 g/L, with the yield of 0.38 g/g and the selectivity of ∼ 85.1 (85.1g butyric acid/g acetic acid). Thus, the production of butyric acid from Jerusalem artichoke on a commercial scale could be achieved based on the system developed in this work. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Butyrate and retinoic acid imprint mucosal-like dendritic cell development synergistically from bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Y; Xu, J; Yan, C; Jin, H; Xiao, T; Yan, N; Zhou, L; An, H; Zhou, X; Shao, Q; Xia, S

    2017-09-01

    Accumulating data show that the phenotypes and functions of distinctive mucosal dendritic cells (DCs) in the gut are regulated by retinoic acid (RA). Unfortunately, the exact role of butyrate in RA-mediated mucosal DC differentiation has not been elucidated thoroughly to date. Mucosal-like dendritic cell differentiation was completed in vitro by culturing bone marrow cells with growth factors [granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF/interleukin (IL)-4], RA and/or butyrate. The phenotypes, cytokine secretion, immune functions and levels of retinal dehydrogenase of different DCs were detected using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry, respectively. The results showed that RA-induced DCs (RA-DCs) showed mucosal DC properties, including expression of CD103 and gut homing receptor α 4 β 7 , low proinflammatory cytokine secretion and low priming capability to antigen-specific CD4 + T cells. Butyrate-treated RA-DCs (Bu-RA-DCs) decreased CD11c, but increased CD103 and α 4 β 7 expression. Moreover, the CD4 + T priming capability and the levels of retinal dehydrogenase of RA-DCs were suppressed significantly by butyrate. Thus, butyrate and retinoic acid have different but synergistic regulatory functions on mucosal DC differentiation, indicating that immune homeostasis in the gut depends largely upon RA and butyrate to imprint different mucosal DC subsets, both individually and collectively. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  8. Consolidated bioprocessing for butyric acid production from rice straw with undefined mixed culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binling Ai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable source with great potential for biofuels and bioproducts. However, the cost of cellulolytic enzymes limits the utilization of the low-cost bioresource. This study aimed to develop a consolidated bioprocessing without the need of supplementary cellulase for butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass. A stirred-tank reactor with a working volume of 21 L was constructed and operated in batch and semi-continuous fermentation modes with a cellulolytic butyrate-producing microbial community. The semi-continuous fermentation with intermittent discharging of the culture broth and replenishment with fresh medium achieved the highest butyric acid productivity of 2.69 g/(L•d. In semi-continuous operation mode, the butyric acid and total carboxylic acid concentrations of 16.2 and 28.9 g/L, respectively, were achieved. Over the 21-day fermentation period, their cumulative yields reached 1189 and 2048 g, respectively, corresponding to 41% and 74% of the maximum theoretical yields based on the amount of NaOH pretreated rice straw fed in. This study demonstrated that an undefined mixed culture-based consolidated bioprocessing for butyric acid production can completely eliminate the cost of supplementary cellulolytic enzymes.

  9. Butyric acid from anaerobic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain RPT-4213.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siqing; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Leathers, Timothy D; Qureshi, Nasib; Rich, Joseph O; Hughes, Stephen R

    2013-09-01

    A novel Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain RPT-4213 was found producing butyrate under strict anaerobic conditions. This strain produced 9.47 g L(-1) butyric acid from MRS media (0.48 g/g glucose). RPT-4213 was also used to ferment dilute acid pretreated hydrolysates including wheat straw (WSH), corn fiber (CFH), corn stover (CSH), rice hull (RHH), and switchgrass (SGH). Results indicated that 50% WSH with a Clostridia medium (Ct) produced the most butyric acid (8.06 g L(-1), 0.46 g/g glucose), followed by 50% SGH with Ct (6.01 g L(-1), 0.44 g/g glucose), however, 50% CSH Ct showed growth inhibition. RPT-4213 was then used in pH-controlled bioreactor fermentations using 60% WSH and SGH, with a dilute (0.5×) Ct medium, resulting 9.87 g L(-1) butyric acid in WSH (yield 0.44 g/g) and 7.05 g L(-1) butyric acid in SGH (yield 0.42 g/g). The titer and productivity could be improved through process engineering. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Consolidated Bioprocessing for Butyric Acid Production from Rice Straw with Undefined Mixed Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Binling; Chi, Xue; Meng, Jia; Sheng, Zhanwu; Zheng, Lili; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Li, Jianzheng

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable source with great potential for biofuels and bioproducts. However, the cost of cellulolytic enzymes limits the utilization of the low-cost bioresource. This study aimed to develop a consolidated bioprocessing without the need of supplementary cellulase for butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass. A stirred-tank reactor with a working volume of 21 L was constructed and operated in batch and semi-continuous fermentation modes with a cellulolytic butyrate-producing microbial community. The semi-continuous fermentation with intermittent discharging of the culture broth and replenishment with fresh medium achieved the highest butyric acid productivity of 2.69 g/(L· d). In semi-continuous operation mode, the butyric acid and total carboxylic acid concentrations of 16.2 and 28.9 g/L, respectively, were achieved. Over the 21-day fermentation period, their cumulative yields reached 1189 and 2048 g, respectively, corresponding to 41 and 74% of the maximum theoretical yields based on the amount of NaOH pretreated rice straw fed in. This study demonstrated that an undefined mixed culture-based consolidated bioprocessing for butyric acid production can completely eliminate the cost of supplementary cellulolytic enzymes.

  11. Butyric acid fermentation from pre-treated wheat straw by a mutant clostridium tyrobutyricum strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroi, George Nabin; Baumann, Ivan; Westermann, Peter

    Only little research on butyric acid fermentation has been carried out in relationship to bio-refinery perspectives involving strain selection, development of adapted strains, physiological analyses for higher yield, productivity and selectivity. However, a major step towards the development......’s platform for a variety of products for industrial use. Butyric acid is considered as a potential chemical building-block for the production of chemicals for e.g. polymeric compounds and the aim of this work was to develop a suitable and robust strain of Clostridium tyrobutyricum that produces less acetic...... acid (higher selectivity), has a higher yield and a higher productivity of butyric acid from pre-treated lignocellulosic biomass. Pre-treated wheat straw was used as the main carbon source. After one year of serial adaptation and selection a mutant strain of C. tyrobutyricum was developed. This new...

  12. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum for enhanced production of butyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Woo, Hee Moon; Im, Jung Ae; Kim, In Ho; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-11-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum has been considered as an attractive platform host for biorefinery due to its metabolic diversity. Considering its capability to overproduce butanol through butyrate, it was thought that butyric acid can also be efficiently produced by this bacterium through metabolic engineering. The pta-ctfB-deficient C. acetobutylicum CEKW, in which genes encoding phosphotransacetylase and CoA-transferase were knocked out, was assessed for its potential as a butyric acid producer in fermentations with four controlled pH values at 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, and 6.4. Butyric acid could be best produced by fermentation of the CEKW at pH 6.0, resulting in the highest titer of 26.6 g/l, which is 6.4 times higher than that obtained with the wild type. However, due to the remaining solventogenic ability of the CEKW, 3.6 g/l solvents were also produced. Thus, the CEKW was further engineered by knocking out the adhE1-encoding aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase to prevent solvent production. Batch fermentation of the resulting C. acetobutylicum HCEKW at pH 6.0 showed increased butyric acid production to 30.8 g/l with a ratio of butyric-to-acetic acid (BA/AA) of 6.6 g/g and a productivity of 0.72 g/l/h from 86.9 g/l glucose, while negligible solvent (0.8 g/l ethanol only) was produced. The butyric acid titer, BA/AA ratio, and productivity obtained in this study were the highest values reported for C. acetobutylicum, and the BA/AA ratio and productivity were also comparable to those of native butyric acid producer Clostridium tyrobutyricum. These results suggested that the simultaneous deletion of the pta-ctfB-adhE1 in C. acetobutylicum resulted in metabolic switch from biphasic to acidogenic fermentation, which enhanced butyric acid production.

  13. Combination therapy with butyrate and docosahexaenoic acid for keloid fibrogenesis: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Kazuhiro; Maeshige, Noriaki; Aoyama-Ishikawa, Michiko; Miyoshi, Makoto; Terashi, Hiroto; Usami, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    A single, effective therapeutic regimen for keloids has not been established yet, and the development of novel therapeutic approaches is expected. Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, play multiple anti-inflammatory and anticancer roles via their respective mechanisms of action. In this study, we evaluated the antifibrogenic effects of their single and combined use on keloid fibroblasts. Keloid fibroblasts were treated with butyrate (0-16 mM) and/or DHA (0-100 µM) for 48 or 96 h. Butyrate inhibited cell proliferation, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and type III collagen expressions, with inhibition of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and TGF-β type I receptor expressions and increased prostaglandin E2 with upregulation of cyclooxygenase-1 expression with induction of histone acetylation. DHA inhibited α-SMA, type III collagen, and TGF-β type I receptor expressions. Then, the butyrate/DHA combination augmented the antifibrogenic effects, resulting in additional inhibition of α-SMA, type I and III collagen expressions, with strong disruption of stress fiber and apoptosis induction. Moreover, the butyrate/DHA combination inhibited the cyclooxygenase-2 expression, suggesting stronger anti-inflammatory effect than each monotherapy. Activation in keloid tissue is affected not only by fibroblasts but also by epithelial cells and immune cells. Evaluation of the effects by butyrate and DHA in these cells or in an in vivo study is required. This study demonstrated that butyrate and docosahexaenoic acid have antifibrogenic effects on keloid fibroblasts and that these may exert therapeutic effects for keloid.

  14. Combination therapy with butyrate and docosahexaenoic acid for keloid fibrogenesis: an in vitro study*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Kazuhiro; Maeshige, Noriaki; Aoyama-Ishikawa, Michiko; Miyoshi, Makoto; Terashi, Hiroto; Usami, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Background A single, effective therapeutic regimen for keloids has not been established yet, and the development of novel therapeutic approaches is expected. Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, play multiple anti-inflammatory and anticancer roles via their respective mechanisms of action. Objective In this study, we evaluated the antifibrogenic effects of their single and combined use on keloid fibroblasts. Methods Keloid fibroblasts were treated with butyrate (0-16 mM) and/or DHA (0-100 µM) for 48 or 96 h. Results Butyrate inhibited cell proliferation, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and type III collagen expressions, with inhibition of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and TGF-β type I receptor expressions and increased prostaglandin E2 with upregulation of cyclooxygenase-1 expression with induction of histone acetylation. DHA inhibited α-SMA, type III collagen, and TGF-β type I receptor expressions. Then, the butyrate/DHA combination augmented the antifibrogenic effects, resulting in additional inhibition of α-SMA, type I and III collagen expressions, with strong disruption of stress fiber and apoptosis induction. Moreover, the butyrate/DHA combination inhibited the cyclooxygenase-2 expression, suggesting stronger anti-inflammatory effect than each monotherapy. Study limitations Activation in keloid tissue is affected not only by fibroblasts but also by epithelial cells and immune cells. Evaluation of the effects by butyrate and DHA in these cells or in an in vivo study is required. Conclusion This study demonstrated that butyrate and docosahexaenoic acid have antifibrogenic effects on keloid fibroblasts and that these may exert therapeutic effects for keloid. PMID:28538876

  15. Hyperpolarized butyrate: a metabolic probe of short chain fatty acid metabolism in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Daniel R; Rowlands, Ben; Dodd, Michael S; Le Page, Lydia; Ball, Vicky; Carr, Carolyn A; Clarke, Kieran; Tyler, Damian J

    2014-05-01

    Butyrate, a short chain fatty acid, was studied as a novel hyperpolarized substrate for use in dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments, to define the pathways of short chain fatty acid and ketone body metabolism in real time. Butyrate was polarized via the dynamic nuclear polarization process and subsequently dissolved to generate an injectable metabolic substrate. Metabolism was initially assessed in the isolated perfused rat heart, followed by evaluation in the in vivo rat heart. Hyperpolarized butyrate was generated with a polarization level of 7% and was shown to have a T1 relaxation time of 20 s. These physical characteristics were sufficient to enable assessment of multiple steps in its metabolism, with the ketone body acetoacetate and several tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates observed both in vitro and in vivo. Metabolite to butyrate ratios of 0.1-0.4% and 0.5-2% were observed in vitro and in vivo respectively, similar to levels previously observed with hyperpolarized [2-(13) C]pyruvate. In this study, butyrate has been demonstrated to be a suitable hyperpolarized substrate capable of revealing multi-step metabolism in dynamic nuclear polarization experiments and providing information on the metabolism of fatty acids not currently achievable with other hyperpolarized substrates. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumption of a high fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of D...

  17. Reactivation of latent HIV-1 by a wide variety of butyric acid-producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Kenichi; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Tamura, Muneaki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Okamoto, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    Latently infected cells harbor human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA copies integrated in heterochromatin, allowing persistence of transcriptionally silent proviruses. It is widely accepted that hypoacetylation of histone proteins by histone deacetylases (HDACs) is involved in maintaining the HIV-1 latency by repressing viral transcription. HIV-1 replication can be induced from latently infected cells by environmental factors, such as inflammation and co-infection with other microbes. It is known that a bacterial metabolite butyric acid inhibits catalytic action of HDAC and induces transcription of silenced genes including HIV-1 provirus. There are a number of such bacteria in gut, vaginal, and oral cavities that produce butyric acid during their anaerobic glycolysis. Since these organs are known to be the major site of HIV-1 transmission and its replication, we explored a possibility that explosive viral replication in these organs could be ascribable to butyric acid produced from anaerobic resident bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate that the culture supernatant of various bacteria producing butyric acid could greatly reactivate the latently-infected HIV-1. These bacteria include Fusobacterium nucleatum (commonly present in oral cavity, and gut), Clostridium cochlearium, Eubacterium multiforme (gut), and Anaerococcus tetradius (vagina). We also clarified that butyric acid in these culture supernatants could induce histone acetylation and HIV-1 replication by inhibiting HDAC. Our observations indicate that butyric acid-producing bacteria could be involved in AIDS progression by reactivating the latent HIV provirus and, subsequently, by eliminating such bacterial infection may contribute to the prevention of the AIDS development and transmission.

  18. Isolation of acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibis, Katharina Gabriela; Gneipel, Armin; König, Helmut

    2016-02-20

    In this study, acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria were isolated from thermophilic and mesophilic biogas plants (BGP) located in Germany. The fermenters were fed with maize silage and cattle or swine manure. Furthermore, pressurized laboratory fermenters digesting maize silage were sampled. Enrichment cultures for the isolation of acid-forming bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with one of the following carbon sources: Na(+)-dl-lactate, succinate, ethanol, glycerol, glucose or a mixture of amino acids. These substrates could be converted by the isolates to acetic, propionic or butyric acid. In total, 49 isolates were obtained, which belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Tenericutes or Thermotogae. According to 16S rRNA gene sequences, most isolates were related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides, Defluviitoga tunisiensis and Dendrosporobacter quercicolus. Acetic, propionic or butyric acid were produced in cultures of isolates affiliated to Bacillus thermoamylovorans, Clostridium aminovalericum, Clostridium cochlearium/Clostridium tetani, C. sporosphaeroides, D. quercicolus, Proteiniborus ethanoligenes, Selenomonas bovis and Tepidanaerobacter sp. Isolates related to Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum produced acetic, butyric and lactic acid, and isolates related to D. tunisiensis formed acetic acid. Specific primer sets targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences were designed and used for real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The isolates were physiologically characterized and their role in BGP discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Production of Butyric Acid and Butanol from Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, David E. [Environmental Energy Inc., Blacklick, OH (United States); Yang, Shang-Tian [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

    2005-08-25

    prices as a chemical are at $3.00 per gallon – wholesaling in 55 gallon drums for $6.80, with a worldwide market of 1.4 billion gallon per year. The market demand is expected to increase dramatically since butanol can now be produced economically from low-cost biomass. Butanol’s application as a replacement for gasoline will outpace ethanol, biodiesel and hydrogen when its safety and simplicity of use are seen. Butanol’s application for the Department of Defense as a clean-safe replacement for batteries when used in conjunction with fuel cell technology is seen as an application for the future. Disposable canisters made of PLA that carry butanol to be reformed and used to generate electricity for computers, night vision and stealth equipment can be easily disposed of. In a typical ABE fermentation, butyric, propionic and acetic acids are produced first by C. acetobutylicum; the culture then undergoes a metabolic shift and solvents (butanol, acetone, and ethanol) are formed (Fond et al., 1985). In conventional ABE fermentations, the butanol yield from glucose is low, typically at ~15% (w/w) and rarely exceeds 25% (0.77–1.3 gallons per bushel corn respectfully). The production of butanol is also limited by severe product inhibition. Butanol at a concentration of 10 g/L can significantly inhibit cell growth and the fermentation. Consequently, butanol titers in conventional ABE fermentations are usually lower than 13 g/L. The low butanol yield and butanol concentration made butanol production from glucose by ABE fermentation uneconomical.

  20. Butyric acid fermentation in a fibrous bed bioreactor with immobilized Clostridium tyrobutyricum from cane molasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Wang, Jufang; Liang, Shizhong; Wang, Xiaoning; Cen, Peilin; Xu, Zhinan

    2009-07-01

    Butyrate fermentation by immobilized Clostridium tyrobutyricum was successfully carried out in a fibrous bed bioreactor using cane molasses. Batch fermentations were conducted to investigate the influence of pH on the metabolism of the strain, and the results showed that the fermentation gave a highest butyrate production of 26.2 g l(-1) with yield of 0.47 g g(-1) and reactor productivity up to 4.13 g l(-1)h(-1) at pH 6.0. When repeated-batch fermentation was carried out, long-term operation with high butyrate yield, volumetric productivity was achieved. Several cane molasses pretreatment techniques were investigated, and it was found that sulfuric acid treatment gave better results regarding butyrate concentration (34.6+/-0.8 g l(-1)), yield (0.58+/-0.01 g g(-1)), and sugar utilization (90.8+/-0.9%). Also, fed-batch fermentation from cane molasses pretreated with sulfuric acid was performed to further increase the concentration of butyrate up to 55.2 g l(-1).

  1. Production of γ-Amino Butyric Acid in Tea Leaves wit Treatment of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yuko; Hayakawa, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Hiroshi

    Lactic acid bacteria was searched for producing termented tea that contained a lot of γ-amino butyric acid(GABA). Also examined were the growth condition, GABA production and changes in catechin contents in the tea leaves. Lactobacillus brevis L12 was found to be suitable for the production of fermented tea since it gave as much GABA as gabaron tea when tea leaves being suspended with water at 10% and incubated for 4 days at 25°C. The amount of GABA produced was more than calculated based upon the content of glutamic acid in tea leaves. It is probable to assume that glutamate derived from glutamine and theanine is converted into GABA.

  2. Eicosanoid modulation by the short-chain fatty acid n-butyrate in human monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarik, Johannes J; Hölzl, Markus A; Hofer, Johannes; Waidhofer-Söllner, Petra; Sobanov, Yury; Koeffel, René; Saemann, Marcus D; Mechtcheriakova, Diana; Zlabinger, Gerhard J

    2013-01-01

    n-Butyrate deriving from bacterial fermentation in the mammalian intestine is a key determinant in gastrointestinal homeostasis. We examined the effects of this short-chain fatty acid and Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR) and TLR4 engagement on inflammatory/immunity-associated genes, cyclo-oxygenases (COXs), prostaglandins (PGs) and leukotrienes (LTs) in human monocytes. Before RNA isolation, freshly isolated human monocytes were co-incubated for different time-points with 1 mm n-butyrate alone or in combination with bacterial stimuli. Based on a knowledge-driven approach, a signature of 180 immunity/inflammation-associated genes was picked and real-time PCR analysis was performed. Pathway analysis was carried out using a web-based database analysing program. Based on these gene expression studies the findings were evaluated at the protein/mediator level by Western blot analysis, FACS and ELISA. Following co-incubation with n-butyrate and lipopolysaccharide, key enzymes of the eicosanoid pathway, like PTGS2 (COX-2), TXS, ALOX5, LTA4H and LTC4S, were significantly up-regulated compared with stimulation with lipopolysaccharide alone. Furthermore, release of the lipid mediators PGE2, 15d-PGJ2, LTB4 and thromboxane B2 was increased by n-butyrate. Regarding signalling, n-butyrate had no additional effect on mitogen-activated protein kinase and interfered differently with early and late phases of nuclear factor-κB signalling. Our results suggest that among many other mediators of eicosanoid signalling n-butyrate massively induces PGE2 production by increasing the expression of PTGS2 (COX-2) in monocytes following TLR4 and TLR2 activation and induces secretion of LTB4 and thromboxane B2. This underscores the role of n-butyrate as a crucial mediator of gut-specific immunity. PMID:23398566

  3. Improving farm management by modeling the contamination of farm tank milk with butyric acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.M.M.; Driehuis, F.; Giffel, te M.C.; Jong, de P.; Lankveld, J.M.G.

    2006-01-01

    Control of contamination of farm tank milk (FTM) with the spore-forming butyric acid bacteria (BAB) is important to prevent the late-blowing defect in semi-hard cheeses. The risk of late blowing can be decreased via control of the contamination level of FTM with BAB. A modeling approach was applied

  4. Radiation induces acid tolerance of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and enhances bioproduction of butyric acid through a metabolic switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Lu, Xi-Hong; Li, Xue-Hu; Xin, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Jia-Rong; Zhao, Mei-Rong; Wang, Liang; Du, Wen-Yue; Liang, Jian-Ping

    2014-02-18

    Butyric acid as a renewable resource has become an increasingly attractive alternative to petroleum-based fuels. Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T is well documented as a fermentation strain for the production of acids. However, it has been reported that butyrate inhibits its growth, and the accumulation of acetate also inhibits biomass synthesis, making production of butyric acid from conventional fermentation processes economically challenging. The present study aimed to identify whether irradiation of C. tyrobutyricum cells makes them more tolerant to butyric acid inhibition and increases the production of butyrate compared with wild type. In this work, the fermentation kinetics of C. tyrobutyricum cultures after being classically adapted for growth at 3.6, 7.2 and 10.8 g·L-1 equivalents were studied. The results showed that, regardless of the irradiation used, there was a gradual inhibition of cell growth at butyric acid concentrations above 10.8 g·L-1, with no growth observed at butyric acid concentrations above 3.6 g·L-1 for the wild-type strain during the first 54 h of fermentation. The sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis also showed significantly different expression levels of proteins with molecular mass around the wild-type and irradiated strains. The results showed that the proportion of proteins with molecular weights of 85 and 106 kDa was much higher for the irradiated strains. The specific growth rate decreased by 50% (from 0.42 to 0.21 h-1) and the final concentration of butyrate increased by 68% (from 22.7 to 33.4 g·L-1) for the strain irradiated at 114 AMeV and 40 Gy compared with the wild-type strains. This study demonstrates that butyric acid production from glucose can be significantly improved and enhanced by using 12C6+ heavy ion-irradiated C. tyrobutyricum. The approach is economical, making it competitive compared with similar fermentation processes. It may prove useful as a first step in a combined

  5. The SCFA butyrate stimulates the epithelial production of retinoic acid via inhibition of epithelial HDAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilderink, Ronald; Verseijden, Caroline; Seppen, Jurgen; Muncan, Vanesa; van den Brink, Gijs R; Lambers, Tim T; van Tol, Eric A; de Jonge, Wouter J

    2016-06-01

    In the intestinal mucosa, retinoic acid (RA) is a critical signaling molecule. RA is derived from dietary vitamin A (retinol) through conversion by aldehyde dehydrogenases (aldh). Reduced levels of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are associated with pathological microbial dysbiosis, inflammatory disease, and allergy. We hypothesized that SCFAs contribute to mucosal homeostasis by enhancing RA production in intestinal epithelia. With the use of human and mouse epithelial cell lines and primary enteroids, we studied the effect of SCFAs on the production of RA. Functional RA conversion was analyzed by Adlefluor activity assays. Butyrate (0-20 mM), in contrast to other SCFAs, dose dependently induced aldh1a1 or aldh1a3 transcript expression and increased RA conversion in human and mouse epithelial cells. Epithelial cell line data were replicated in intestinal organoids. In these organoids, butyrate (2-5 mM) upregulated aldh1a3 expression (36-fold over control), whereas aldh1a1 was not significantly affected. Butyrate enhanced maturation markers (Mucin-2 and villin) but did not consistently affect stemness markers or other Wnt target genes (lgr5, olfm4, ascl2, cdkn1). In enteroids, the stimulation of RA production by SCFA was mimicked by inhibitors of histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) but not by HDAC1/2 inhibitors nor by agonists of butyrate receptors G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR)43 or GPR109A, indicating that butyrate stimulates RA production via HDAC3 inhibition. We conclude that the SCFA butyrate inhibits HDAC3 and thereby supports epithelial RA production. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Enhanced butyric acid tolerance and production by Class I heat shock protein-overproducing Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Yukai; Luo, Sheng; Zhang, Yanan; Liao, Zhengping; Wang, Jufang

    2017-08-01

    The response of Clostridium tyrobutyricum to butyric acid stress involves various stress-related genes, and therefore overexpression of stress-related genes can improve butyric acid tolerance and yield. Class I heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in the process of protecting bacteria from sudden changes of extracellular stress by assisting protein folding correctly. The results of quantitative real-time PCR indicated that the Class I HSGs grpE, dnaK, dnaJ, groEL, groES, and htpG were significantly upregulated under butyric acid stress, especially the dnaK and groE operons. Overexpression of groESL and htpG could significantly improve the tolerance of C. tyrobutyricum to butyric acid, while overexpression of dnaK and dnaJ showed negative effects on butyric acid tolerance. Acid production was also significantly promoted by increased GroESL expression levels; the final butyric acid and acetic acid concentrations were 28.2 and 38% higher for C. tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755/groESL than for the wild-type strain. In addition, when fed-batch fermentation was carried out using cell immobilization in a fibrous-bed bioreactor, the butyric acid yield produced by C. tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755/groESL reached 52.2 g/L, much higher than that for the control. The improved butyric acid yield is probably attributable to the high GroES and GroEL levels, which can stabilize the biosynthetic machinery of C. tyrobutyricum under extracellular butyric acid stress.

  7. Co-culturing a novel Bacillus strain with Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 to produce butyric acid from sucrose

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, the most promising microorganism used for the bio-production of butyric acid is Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T; however, it is unable to use sucrose as a sole carbon source. Consequently, a newly isolated strain, Bacillus sp. SGP1, that was found to produce a levansucrase enzyme, which hydrolyzes sucrose into fructose and glucose, was used in a co-culture with this strain, permitting C. tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T to ferment sucrose to butyric acid. Results B. sp. SGP1 alone did not show any butyric acid production and the main metabolite produced was lactic acid. This allowed C. tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T to utilize the monosaccharides resulting from the activity of levansucrase together with the lactic acid produced by B. sp. SGP1 to generate butyric acid, which was the main fermentative product within the co-culture. Furthermore, the final acetic acid concentration in the co-culture was significantly lower when compared with pure C. tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T cultures grown on glucose. In fed-batch fermentations, the optimum conditions for the production of butyric acid were around pH 5.50 and a temperature of 37°C. Under these conditions, the final butyrate concentration was 34.2±1.8 g/L with yields of 0.35±0.03 g butyrate/g sucrose and maximum productivity of 0.3±0.04 g/L/h. Conclusions Using this co-culture, sucrose can be utilized as a carbon source for butyric acid production at a relatively high yield. In addition, this co-culture offers also the benefit of a greater selectivity, with butyric acid constituting 92.8% of the acids when the fermentation was terminated. PMID:23452443

  8. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium tyrobutyricum for enhanced butyric acid production from glucose and xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hongxin; Yu, Le; Lin, Meng; Wang, Jufang; Xiu, Zhilong; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum is a promising microorganism for butyric acid production. However, its ability to utilize xylose, the second most abundant sugar found in lignocellulosic biomass, is severely impaired by glucose-mediated carbon catabolite repression (CCR). In this study, CCR in C. tyrobutyricum was eliminated by overexpressing three heterologous xylose catabolism genes (xylT, xylA and xlyB) cloned from C. acetobutylicum. Compared to the parental strain, the engineered strain Ct-pTBA produced more butyric acid (37.8g/L vs. 19.4g/L) from glucose and xylose simultaneously, at a higher xylose utilization rate (1.28g/L·h vs. 0.16g/L·h) and efficiency (94.3% vs. 13.8%), resulting in a higher butyrate productivity (0.53g/L·h vs. 0.26g/L·h) and yield (0.32g/g vs. 0.28g/g). When the initial total sugar concentration was ~120g/L, both glucose and xylose utilization rates increased with increasing their respective concentration or ratio in the co-substrates but the total sugar utilization rate remained almost unchanged in the fermentation at pH 6.0. Decreasing the pH to 5.0 significantly decreased sugar utilization rates and butyrate productivity, but the effect was more pronounced for xylose than glucose. The addition of benzyl viologen (BV) as an artificial electron carrier facilitated the re-assimilation of acetate and increased butyrate production to a final titer of 46.4g/L, yield of 0.43g/g sugar consumed, productivity of 0.87g/L·h, and acid purity of 98.3% in free-cell batch fermentation, which were the highest ever reported for butyric acid fermentation. The engineered strain with BV addition thus can provide an economical process for butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Short Chain Fatty Acids in the Colon and Peripheral Tissues: A Focus on Butyrate, Colon Cancer, Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M. McNabney

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased dietary fiber consumption has been associated with many beneficial effects, including amelioration of obesity and insulin resistance. These effects may be due to the increased production of short chain fatty acids, including propionate, acetate and butyrate, during fermentation of the dietary fiber in the colon. Indeed, oral and dietary supplementation of butyrate alone has been shown to prevent high fat-diet induced obesity and insulin resistance. This review focuses on sources of short chain fatty acids, with emphasis on sources of butyrate, mechanisms of fiber and butyrate metabolism in the gut and its protective effects on colon cancer and the peripheral effects of butyrate supplementation in peripheral tissues in the prevention and reversal of obesity and insulin resistance.

  10. Phase equilibria of liquid (water + butyric acid + oleyl alcohol) ternary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilgin, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data for the ternary system of (water + butyric acid + oleyl alcohol) at T = (298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K are reported. Complete phase diagrams were obtained by determining solubility and the tie-line data. The reliability of the experimental tie lines was confirmed by using Othmer-Tobias correlation. The UNIFAC method was used to predict the phase equilibrium data. The phase diagrams for the ternary mixtures including both the experimental and correlated tie lines are presented. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated for the immiscibility region. A comparison of the solvent extracting capability was made with respect to distribution coefficients, separation factors, and solvent-free selectivity bases for T = (298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K. It is concluded that oleyl alcohol may serve as an adequate solvent to extract butyric acid from its dilute aqueous solutions

  11. (Liquid + liquid) equilibria of (water + butyric acid + dibasic esters) ternary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirbaslar, S. Ismail; Sahin, Selin; Bilgin, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data of the solubility (binodal) curves and tie-line end compositions were examined for mixtures of {water (1) + butyric acid (2) + dimethyl succinate or dimethyl glutarate or dimethyl adipate (3)} at T = 298.15 K and p = (101.3 ± 0.7) kPa. The relative mutual solubility of the butyric acid is higher in the dibasic esters layers than in the aqueous layer. The reliability of the experimental tie-line data was confirmed by using the Othmer-Tobias correlation. The LLE data of the ternary systems were predicted by UNIFAC method. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated for the immiscibility region

  12. Phase equilibria of liquid (water + butyric acid + oleyl alcohol) ternary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilgin, Mehmet [Istanbul University, Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, 34320 Avcilar, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: mbilgin@istanbul.edu.tr

    2006-12-15

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data for the ternary system of (water + butyric acid + oleyl alcohol) at T = (298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K are reported. Complete phase diagrams were obtained by determining solubility and the tie-line data. The reliability of the experimental tie lines was confirmed by using Othmer-Tobias correlation. The UNIFAC method was used to predict the phase equilibrium data. The phase diagrams for the ternary mixtures including both the experimental and correlated tie lines are presented. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated for the immiscibility region. A comparison of the solvent extracting capability was made with respect to distribution coefficients, separation factors, and solvent-free selectivity bases for T = (298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K. It is concluded that oleyl alcohol may serve as an adequate solvent to extract butyric acid from its dilute aqueous solutions.

  13. (Liquid + liquid) equilibria of (water + butyric acid + dibasic esters) ternary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirbaslar, S. Ismail [Istanbul University, Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, 34320 Avcilar, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: krbaslar@istanbul.edu.tr; Sahin, Selin [Istanbul University, Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, 34320 Avcilar, Istanbul (Turkey); Bilgin, Mehmet [Istanbul University, Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, 34320 Avcilar, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2007-02-15

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data of the solubility (binodal) curves and tie-line end compositions were examined for mixtures of {l_brace}water (1) + butyric acid (2) + dimethyl succinate or dimethyl glutarate or dimethyl adipate (3){r_brace} at T = 298.15 K and p = (101.3 {+-} 0.7) kPa. The relative mutual solubility of the butyric acid is higher in the dibasic esters layers than in the aqueous layer. The reliability of the experimental tie-line data was confirmed by using the Othmer-Tobias correlation. The LLE data of the ternary systems were predicted by UNIFAC method. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated for the immiscibility region.

  14. Effect of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) on in vitro root induction in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Root induction pre-developed in vitro plantlets of orchid was carried out using indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3 mM) on basal Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium. Among the concentrations of IBA, the number of roots per plantlet with 1 mM IBA was found to be the highest (2.25 roots per plantlet) ...

  15. Propionic acid and butyric acid inhibit lipolysis and de novo lipogenesis and increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in primary rat adipocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Heimann, Emilia; Nyman, Margareta; Degerman, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Fermentation of dietary fibers by colonic microbiota generates short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), e.g., propionic acid and butyric acid, which have been described to have "anti-obesity properties" by ameliorating fasting glycaemia, body weight and insulin tolerance in animal models. In the present study, we therefore investigate if propionic acid and butyric acid have effects on lipolysis, de novo lipogenesis and glucose uptake in primary rat adipocytes. We show that both propionic ac...

  16. Proboscis conditioning experiments with honeybees, Apis mellifera caucasica, with butyric acid and DEET mixture as conditioned and unconditioned stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Charles I; Giray, Tugrul; Mixson, T Andrew; Nolf, Sondra L; Wells, Harrington; Kence, Aykut; Kence, Meral

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments are described investigating whether olfactory repellents DEET and butyric acid can support the classical conditioning of proboscis extension in the honeybee, Apis mellifera caucasica (Hymenoptera: Apidae). In the first experiment DEET and butyric acid readily led to standard acquisition and extinction effects, which are comparable to the use of cinnamon as a conditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that the odor of DEET or butyric acid is not intrinsically repellent to honey bees. In a second experiment, with DEET and butyric acid mixed with sucrose as an unconditioned stimulus, proboscis conditioning was not established. After several trials, few animals responded to the unconditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that these chemicals are gustatory repellents when in direct contact. In the last experiment a conditioned suppression paradigm was used. Exposing animals to butyric acid or DEET when the proboscis was extended by direct sucrose stimulation or by learning revealed that retraction of the proboscis was similar to another novel odor, lavender, and in all cases greatest when the animal was not permitted to feed. These results again demonstrate that DEET or butyric acid are not olfactory repellents, and in addition, conditioned suppression is influenced by feeding state of the bee.

  17. Production of butyric acid from glucose and xylose with immobilized cells of Clostridium tyrobutyricum in a fibrous-bed bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Wang, Jufang; Liang, Shizhong; Wang, Xiaoning; Cen, Peilin; Xu, Zhinan

    2010-01-01

    Butyric acid has many applications in chemical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. In the present study, Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 was immobilized in a fibrous-bed bioreactor to evaluate the performance of butyrate production from glucose and xylose. The results showed that the final concentration and yield of butyric acid were 13.70 and 0.46 g g(-1), respectively, in batch fermentation when 30 g L(-1) glucose was introduced into the bioreactor. Furthermore, high concentration 10.10 g L(-1) and yield 0.40 g g(-1) of butyric acid were obtained with 25 g L(-1) xylose as the carbon source. The immobilized cells of C. tyrobutyricum ensured similar productivity and yield from repeated batch fermentation. In the fed-batch fermentation, the final concentration of butyric acid was further improved to 24.88 g L(-1) with one suitable glucose feeding in the fibrous-bed bioreactor. C. tyrobutyricum immobilized in the fibrous-bed bioreactor would provide an economically viable fermentation process to convert the reducing sugars derived from plant biomass into the final bulk chemical (butyric acid).

  18. Direct hydrogenation of biomass-derived butyric acid to n-butanol over a ruthenium-tin bimetallic catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Min; Upare, Pravin P; Chang, Jong-San; Hwang, Young Kyu; Lee, Jeong Ho; Hwang, Dong Won; Hong, Do-Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Jeong, Myung-Geun; Kim, Young Dok; Kwon, Young-Uk

    2014-11-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of organic carboxylic acids and their esters, for example, cellulosic ethanol from fermentation of acetic acid and hydrogenation of ethyl acetate is a promising possibility for future biorefinery concepts. A hybrid conversion process based on selective hydrogenation of butyric acid combined with fermentation of glucose has been developed for producing biobutanol. ZnO-supported Ru-Sn bimetallic catalysts exhibits unprecedentedly superior performance in the vapor-phase hydrogenation of biomass-derived butyric acid to n-butanol (>98% yield) for 3500 h without deactivation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. (Liquid + liquid) equilibria of the (water + butyric acid + dodecanol) ternary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirbaslar, S. Ismail [Istanbul University, Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, 34320 Avcilar, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: krbaslar@istanbul.edu.tr

    2006-06-15

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data for the (water + butyric acid + dodecanol) ternary system have been determined experimentally at T = (298.2, 308.2 and 318.2) K. Complete phase diagrams were obtained by determining binodal curves and tie lines. The reliability of the experimental tie lines was confirmed by using the Othmer-Tobias correlation. The UNIFAC method was used to predict the phase equilibrium in the ternary system using the interaction parameters determined from experimental data of CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}, COOH, OH and H{sub 2}O functional groups. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated for the immiscibility region.

  20. Liquid - liquid equilibria of the water + butyric acid + decanol ternary system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Kirbaslar

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE data for the water + butyric acid + decanol ternary system were determined experimentally at temperatures of 298.15, 308.15 and 318.15 K. Complete phase diagrams were obtained by determining the solubility curve and the tie lines. The reliability of the experimental tie line data was confirmed with the Othmer-Tobias correlation. The UNIFAC method was used to predict the phase equilibrium of the system using the interaction parameters for groups CH3, CH2, COOH, OH and H2O determined experimentally. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated for the immiscibility region.

  1. Propionic acid and butyric acid inhibit lipolysis and de novo lipogenesis and increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in primary rat adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimann, Emilia; Nyman, Margareta; Degerman, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Fermentation of dietary fibers by colonic microbiota generates short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), e.g., propionic acid and butyric acid, which have been described to have "anti-obesity properties" by ameliorating fasting glycaemia, body weight and insulin tolerance in animal models. In the present study, we therefore investigate if propionic acid and butyric acid have effects on lipolysis, de novo lipogenesis and glucose uptake in primary rat adipocytes. We show that both propionic acid and butyric acid inhibit isoproterenol- and adenosine deaminase-stimulated lipolysis as well as isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis in the presence of a phosphodiesterase (PDE3) inhibitor. In addition, we show that propionic acid and butyric acid inhibit basal and insulin-stimulated de novo lipogenesis, which is associated with increased phosphorylation and thus inhibition of acetyl CoA carboxylase, a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid synthesis. Furthermore, we show that propionic acid and butyric acid increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. To conclude, our study shows that SCFAs have effects on fat storage and mobilization as well as glucose uptake in rat primary adipocytes. Thus, the SCFAs might contribute to healthier adipocytes and subsequently also to improved energy metabolism with for example less circulating free fatty acids, which is beneficial in the context of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  2. Transplutonium elements separation on anionites by using aqueous-alcohol solutions of nitric acid and butyric acid mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.

    1978-01-01

    The behaviour of 243 Am, 243 Cm, and 249 Cf isotopes has been investigated in aqueous-methanol solutions of butyric, isobutyric, α-oxybutyric and α-oxynisobutyric acids in a mixture with nitric acid during their sorption on strongly basic anionites. The coefficients of distribution of transplutonium elements have been determined depending on the concentration of various components of the solution. Under the optimum conditions, the factors of separation of Am-Cm and Cm-Cf pairs amount to about 6 and 4 respectively. The advantages of using macroporous anionites of the soviet production have been demonstrated for the separation of transplutonium elements in the systems under examination

  3. Continuous Fermentation of Clostridium tyrobutyricum with Partial Cell Recycle as a Long-Term Strategy for Butyric Acid Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar C. Clausen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In making alternative fuels from biomass feedstocks, the production of butyric acid is a key intermediate in the two-step production of butanol. The fermentation of glucose via Clostridium tyrobutyricum to butyric acid produces undesirable byproducts, including lactic acid and acetic acid, which significantly affect the butyric acid yield and productivity. This paper focuses on the production of butyric acid using Clostridium tyrobutyricum in a partial cell recycle mode to improve fermenter yield and productivity. Experiments with fermentation in batch, continuous culture and continuous culture with partial cell recycle by ultrafiltration were conducted. The results show that a continuous fermentation can be sustained for more than 120 days, which is the first reported long-term production of butyric acid in a continuous operation. Further, the results also show that partial cell recycle via membrane ultrafiltration has a great influence on the selectivity and productivity of butyric acid, with an increase in selectivity from ≈9% to 95% butyric acid with productivities as high as 1.13 g/Lh. Continuous fermentation with low dilution rate and high cell recycle ratio has been found to be desirable for optimum productivity and selectivity toward butyric acid and a comprehensive model explaining this phenomenon is given.

  4. [Simultaneous determination of clevidipine butyrate and its metabolite clevidipine acid in dog blood by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui-hui; Gu, Yuan; Liu, Yan-ping; Wei, Guang-li; Chen, Yong; Liu, Chang-xiao; Si, Duan-yun

    2015-10-01

    A rapid, sensitive and simple liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of clevidipine butyrate and its primary metabolite clevidipine acid in dog blood. After one-step protein precipitation with methanol, the chromatographic separation was carried out on an Ecosil C18 column (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 µm) with a gradient mobile phase consisting of methanol and 5 mmol · L(-1) ammonium formate. A chromatographic total run time of 13.0 min was achieved. The quantitation analysis was performed using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) at the specific ion transitions of m/z 454.1 [M-H]- --> m/z 234.1 for clevidipine butyrate, m/z 354.0 [M-H]- --> m/z 208.0 for clevidipine acid and m/z 256.1 [M-H]- --> m/z 227.1 for elofesalamide (internal standard, IS) in the negative ion mode with electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The linear calibration curves for clevidipine butyrate and clevidipine acid were obtained in the concentration ranges of 0.5-100 ng · mL and 1-200 ng · mL(-1), separately. The lower limit of quantification of clevidipine butyrate and clevidipine acid were 0.5 ng · mL(-1) and 1 ng · mL(-1). The intra and inter-assay precisions were all below 12.9%, the accuracies were all in standard ranges. Stability testing indicated that clevidipine butyrate and clevidipine acid in dog blood with the addition of denaturant methanol was stable under various processing and/or handling conditions. The validated method has been successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of clevidipine butyrate injection to 8 healthy Beagle dogs following intravenous infusion at a flow rate of 5 mg · h(-1) for 0.5 h.

  5. Construction and characterization of pta gene-deleted mutant of Clostridium tyrobutyricum for enhanced butyric acid fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Liu, Xiaoguang; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2005-04-20

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 is an acidogenic bacterium, producing butyrate and acetate as its main fermentation products. In order to decrease acetate and increase butyrate production, integrational mutagenesis was used to disrupt the gene associated with the acetate formation pathway in C. tyrobutyricum. A nonreplicative integrational plasmid containing the phosphotransacetylase gene (pta) fragment cloned from C. tyrobutyricum by using degenerate primers and an erythromycin resistance cassette were constructed and introduced into C. tyrobutyricum by electroporation. Integration of the plasmid into the homologous region on the chromosome inactivated the target pta gene and produced the pta-deleted mutant (PTA-Em), which was confirmed by Southern hybridization. SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional protein electrophoresis results indicated that protein expression was changed in the mutant. Enzyme activity assays using the cell lysate showed that the activities of PTA and acetate kinase (AK) in the mutant were reduced by more than 60% for PTA and 80% for AK. The mutant grew more slowly in batch fermentation with glucose as the substrate but produced 15% more butyrate and 14% less acetate as compared to the wild-type strain. Its butyrate productivity was approximately 2-fold higher than the wild-type strain. Moreover, the mutant showed much higher tolerance to butyrate inhibition, and the final butyrate concentration was improved by 68%. However, inactivation of pta gene did not completely eliminate acetate production in the fermentation, suggesting the existence of other enzymes (or pathways) also leading to acetate formation. This is the first-reported genetic engineering study demonstrating the feasibility of using a gene-inactivation technique to manipulate the acetic acid formation pathway in C. tyrobutyricum in order to improve butyric acid production from glucose. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Profile of preoperative fecal organic acids closely predicts the incidence of postoperative infectious complications after major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection: Importance of fecal acetic acid plus butyric acid minus lactic acid gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Mizuno, Takashi; Sugawara, Gen; Asahara, Takashi; Nomoto, Koji; Igami, Tsuyoshi; Ebata, Tomoki; Nagino, Masato

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the association between preoperative fecal organic acid concentrations and the incidence of postoperative infectious complications in patients undergoing major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection for biliary malignancies. The fecal samples of 44 patients were collected before undergoing hepatectomy with bile duct resection for biliary malignancies. The concentrations of fecal organic acids, including acetic acid, butyric acid, and lactic acid, and representative fecal bacteria were measured. The perioperative clinical characteristics and the concentrations of fecal organic acids were compared between patients with and without postoperative infectious complications. Among 44 patients, 13 (30%) developed postoperative infectious complications. Patient age and intraoperative bleeding were significantly greater in patients with postoperative infectious complications compared with those without postoperative infectious complications. The concentrations of fecal acetic acid and butyric acid were significantly less, whereas the concentration of fecal lactic acid tended to be greater in the patients with postoperative infectious complications. The calculated gap between the concentrations of fecal acetic acid plus butyric acid minus lactic acid gap was less in the patients with postoperative infectious complications (median 43.5 vs 76.1 μmol/g of feces, P = .011). Multivariate analysis revealed that an acetic acid plus butyric acid minus lactic acid gap acid profile (especially low acetic acid, low butyric acid, and high lactic acid) had a clinically important impact on the incidence of postoperative infectious complications in patients undergoing major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Diet structure, butyric acid, and fermentable carbohydrates influence growth performance, gut morphology, and cecal fermentation characteristics in broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qaisrani, S.N.; Krimpen, van M.M.; Kwakkel, R.P.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment with 288 male (Ross 308) 1-d-old broilers was conducted to test the hypothesis that a coarse diet supplemented with butyric acid (BA) and fermentable carbohydrates (FC) improves performance of broilers with a poorly digestible protein source. The interaction effects of diet structure

  8. Lipase in biphasic alginate beads as a biocatalyst for esterification of butyric acid and butanol in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Choong Hey; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Esterification of organic acids and alcohols in aqueous media is very inefficient due to thermodynamic constraints. However, fermentation processes used to produce organic acids and alcohols are often conducted in aqueous media. To produce esters in aqueous media, biphasic alginate beads with immobilized lipase are developed for in situ esterification of butanol and butyric acid. The biphasic beads contain a solid matrix of calcium alginate and hexadecane together with 5 mg/mL of lipase as the biocatalyst. Hexadecane in the biphasic beads serves as an organic phase to facilitate the esterification reaction. Under optimized conditions, the beads are able to catalyze the production of 0.16 mmol of butyl butyrate from 0.5 mmol of butyric acid and 1.5 mmol of butanol. In contrast, when monophasic beads (without hexadecane) are used, only trace amount of butyl butyrate is produced. One main application of biphasic beads is in simultaneous fermentation and esterification (SFE) because the organic phase inside the beads is very stable and does not leach out into the culture medium. SFE is successfully conducted with an esterification yield of 6.32% using biphasic beads containing iso-octane even though the solvent is proven toxic to the butanol-producing Clostridium spp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. (Liquid + liquid) equilibria of (water + butyric acid + isoamyl alcohol) ternary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilgin, Mehmet [Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, Istanbul University, Avcilar-Campus, 34320 Istanbul (Turkey); Ismail Kirbaslar, S. [Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, Istanbul University, Avcilar-Campus, 34320 Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: krbaslar@istanbul.edu.tr; Oezcan, Oender [Mustafa Nevzat Ilac San. AS., 34530 Yenibosna, Istanbul (Turkey); Dramur, Umur [Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, Istanbul University, Avcilar-Campus, 34320 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-04-15

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data for the ternary system (water + butyric acid + isoamyl alcohol) have been determined experimentally at T (298.15, 308.15 and 318.15) K. Complete phase diagrams were obtained by determining solubility and the tie-line data. Tie-line compositions were correlated by Othmer-Tobias method. The UNIFAC method was used to predict the phase equilibrium in the system using the interaction parameters determined from experimental data between groups CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}, CH, COOH, OH and H{sub 2}O. It is found that UNIFAC group interaction parameters used for LLE could not provide a good prediction. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated for the immiscibility region.

  10. Butyric acid increases transepithelial transport of ferulic acid through upregulation of the monocarboxylate transporters SLC16A1 (MCT1) and SLC16A3 (MCT4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Kerstin; Kerimi, Asimina; Poquet, Laure; Williamson, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Ferulic acid is released by microbial hydrolysis in the colon, where butyric acid, a major by-product of fermentation, constitutes the main energy source for colonic enterocytes. We investigated how varying concentrations of this short chain fatty acid may influence the absorption of the phenolic acid. Chronic treatment of Caco-2 cells with butyric acid resulted in increased mRNA and protein abundance of the monocarboxylate transporters SLC16A1 (MCT1) and SLC16A3 (MCT4), previously proposed to facilitate ferulic acid absorption in addition to passive diffusion. Short term incubation with butyric acid only led to upregulation of MCT4 while both conditions increased transepithelial transport of ferulic acid in the apical to basolateral, but not basolateral to apical, direction. Chronic treatment also elevated intracellular concentrations of ferulic acid, which in turn gave rise to increased concentrations of ferulic acid metabolites. Immunofluorescence staining of cells revealed uniform distribution of MCT1 protein in the cell membrane, whereas MCT4 was only detected in the lateral plasma membrane sections of Caco-2 cells. We therefore propose that MCT1 may be acting as an uptake transporter and MCT4 as an efflux system across the basolateral membrane for ferulic acid, and that this process is stimulated by butyric acid. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hepatic metabolism of anaesthetized growing pigs during acute portal infusion of volatile fatty acids and hydroxy-methyl butyrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theil, Peter Kappel; Larsen, Uffe Krogh; Bjerre-Harpøth, Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    intervals and analyzed for contents of paraamino- hippuric acid (PAH; blood flow marker) and plasma metabolites. Total VFA was infused at a rate of 0 mmol/h (background; Inf1, Inf6), 60 mmol/h (Inf2) or 120 mmol/h (Inf3 to Inf5). Infused VFA contained 70, 20, and 5% of acetate, propionate, and butyrate......, respectively, for Inf2 and Inf3, or 65%, 20%, and 10% of acetate, propionate, and butyrate, respectively, for Inf4 and Inf5. In addition, for Inf5, HMB was infused at 2 mmol/h. Statistical analysis included fixed effects of infusion and interaction between infusion and samplings within infusion while...... accounting for repeated measurements. A net hepatic uptake of propionate, butyrate, and lactate was observed, whereas the liver released acetate, glucose, and urea. The portal lactate absorption could not account for the net hepatic uptake of lactate, suggesting lactate originated from partial oxidation...

  12. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect in the oxidation of deuteriated butyric acid-D7 with chromium trioxide in 85% orthophosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, A.; Zielinski, M.

    2001-01-01

    A comparative study of the deuterium kinetic isotope effect in the oxidation of the deuteriated butyric acid-D 7 with Cr(VI) in 85% orthophosphoric acid has been carried out. The (k HH /k DD ) KIE values between 5.7 and 7.0 indicate that the tunnelling is not involved in oxidation of deuteriated aliphatic carboxylic acids with chromium trioxide in acidic media and the oxidation KIE is determined by the zero point energy difference corresponding to the C-H/C-D stretching vibrations lost in the transition state. The results were compared with the large D-KIE observed in the oxidation of butyrate-D 7 with alkaline manganate caused by the simultaneous operation of zeropoint energy effect and tunnelling. (author)

  13. β-Amino-n-butyric Acid Regulates Seedling Growth and Disease Resistance of Kimchi Cabbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong Chae; Kim, Yeon Hwa; Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Sang Woo; Chae, Yun-Soek; Kang, Hyun-Kyung; Yun, Byung-Wook; Hong, Jeum Kyu

    2013-09-01

    Non-protein amino acid, β-amino-n-butyric acid (BABA), has been involved in diverse physiological processes including seedling growth, stress tolerance and disease resistance of many plant species. In the current study, treatment of kimchi cabbage seedlings with BABA significantly reduced primary root elongation and cotyledon development in a dose-dependent manner, which adverse effects were similar to the plant response to exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) application. BABA was synergistically contributing ABA-induced growth arrest during the early seedling development. Kimchi cabbage leaves were highly damaged and seedling growth was delayed by foliar spraying with high concentrations of BABA (10 to 20 mM). BABA played roles differentially in in vitro fungal conidial germination, mycelial growth and conidation of necrotroph Alternaria brassicicola causing black spot disease and hemibiotroph Colletotrichum higginsianum causing anthracnose. Pretreatment with BABA conferred induced resistance of the kimchi cabbage against challenges by the two different classes of fungal pathogens in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that BABA is involved in plant development, fungal development as well as induced fungal disease resistance of kimchi cabbage plant.

  14. β-Amino-n-butyric Acid Regulates Seedling Growth and Disease Resistance of Kimchi Cabbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong Chae Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-protein amino acid, β-amino-n-butyric acid (BABA, has been involved in diverse physiological processes including seedling growth, stress tolerance and disease resistance of many plant species. In the current study, treatment of kimchi cabbage seedlings with BABA significantly reduced primary root elongation and cotyledon development in a dose-dependent manner, which adverse effects were similar to the plant response to exogenous abscisic acid (ABA application. BABA was synergistically contributing ABA-induced growth arrest during the early seedling development. Kimchi cabbage leaves were highly damaged and seedling growth was delayed by foliar spraying with high concentrations of BABA (10 to 20 mM. BABA played roles differentially in in vitro fungal conidial germination, mycelial growth and conidation of necrotroph Alternaria brassicicola causing black spot disease and hemibiotroph Colletotrichum higginsianum causing anthracnose. Pretreatment with BABA conferred induced resistance of the kimchi cabbage against challenges by the two different classes of fungal pathogens in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that BABA is involved in plant development, fungal development as well as induced fungal disease resistance of kimchi cabbage plant.

  15. Effects of propionate and methylmalonate on conversions of acetate, butyrate, and D(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate to fatty acids and carbon dioxide by mammary tissue slices of goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmanuel, B.; Kennelly, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    Incorporations of [1-carbon-14] acetate, [1-carbon-14] propionate, n-[1-carbon-14] butyrate, and D(-)-3-hydroxy[3-carbon-14] butyrate into individual milk fatty acids and their conversion to carbon dioxide were studied in vitro with caprine mammary tissue slices in the presence and absence of propionate and methylmalonate. Neither propionate nor methylmalonate affected incorporation of these substances into fatty acids. In a decreasing order butyrate, acetate, propionate, and D(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate were converted to carbon dioxide. Acetate had the highest incorporation rate into fatty acids followed by D(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate, butyrate, and propionate. Labeled propionate was incorporated mainly into odd-numbered fatty acids. Results do not support the theory that either propionate or its metabolite, methylmalonate, inhibit de novo synthesis of fatty acids in the mammary gland in relation to the etiology of low milk fat syndrome

  16. Sensitization of colon cancer cell lines to butyrate-mediated proliferation inhibition by combined application of indomethacin and nordihydroguaiaretic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galfi, Peter; Neogrady, Zsuzsa; Amberger, Albert; Margreiter, Raimund; Csordas, Adam

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on histone deacetylase-mediated proliferation inhibition. In the colon cancer cell line HT29 butyrate-mediated proliferation inhibition was enhanced by the additional presence of indomethacin (IM) and/or nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA). Sensitisation to butyrate-mediated proliferation inhibition was abolished by the general caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk, however, only IM-induced cell detachment was prevented by the caspase inhibitor but not that induced by NDGA or NDGA plus IM. In contrast to the parental cell line HT29, in the methotrexate-resistant sub-lines HT29-12 and HT29-21, IM counteracted butyrate-mediated proliferation inhibition, which was abrogated by NDGA. In all the investigated cell lines, proliferation inhibition was most effectively achieved under the combined application of butyrate with IM and NDGA, suggesting that inhibition of both cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) isoenzymes is needed for proliferation inhibition by NSAIDs in tumour cells.

  17. Subclinical Ketosis on Dairy Cows in Transition Period in Farms with Contrasting Butyric Acid Contents in Silages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between subclinical ketosis (SCK in dairy cows and the butyric acid content of the silage used in their feeding. Twenty commercial farms were monitored over a period of 12 months. The feed at each farm and the silages used in its ration were sampled monthly for proximal analysis and for volatile fatty acid analysis. A total of 2857 urine samples were taken from 1112 cows to examine the ketonuria from about 30 days prepartum to 100 postpartum. Wide variation was recorded in the quality of silages used in the preparation of diets. Approximately 80% of the urine samples analyzed had no detectable ketone bodies, 16% returned values indicative of slight SCK, and the remainder, 4%, showed symptoms of ketosis. Most of the cases of hyperkenuria were associated with the butyric acid content of the silage used (r2=0.56; P<0.05. As the metabolizable energy content of the feed was similar, no relationship was observed between the proportion of cows with SCK and the energy content of the feed. In our study, the probability of dairy cows suffering SCK is higher when they are eating feed made from silage with a high butyric acid content (35.2 g/kg DM intake.

  18. Subclinical ketosis on dairy cows in transition period in farms with contrasting butyric acid contents in silages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Fernando; Rodríguez, María Luisa; Martínez-Fernández, Adela; Soldado, Ana; Argamentería, Alejandro; Peláez, Mario; de la Roza-Delgado, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between subclinical ketosis (SCK) in dairy cows and the butyric acid content of the silage used in their feeding. Twenty commercial farms were monitored over a period of 12 months. The feed at each farm and the silages used in its ration were sampled monthly for proximal analysis and for volatile fatty acid analysis. A total of 2857 urine samples were taken from 1112 cows to examine the ketonuria from about 30 days prepartum to 100 postpartum. Wide variation was recorded in the quality of silages used in the preparation of diets. Approximately 80% of the urine samples analyzed had no detectable ketone bodies, 16% returned values indicative of slight SCK, and the remainder, 4%, showed symptoms of ketosis. Most of the cases of hyperkenuria were associated with the butyric acid content of the silage used (r2=0.56; P<0.05). As the metabolizable energy content of the feed was similar, no relationship was observed between the proportion of cows with SCK and the energy content of the feed. In our study, the probability of dairy cows suffering SCK is higher when they are eating feed made from silage with a high butyric acid content (35.2 g/kg DM intake).

  19. Moessbauer spectroscopic evidence for iron(III) complexation and reduction in acidic aqueous solutions of indole-3-butyric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, K.; Kuzmann, E.; Vertes, A.; Kamnev, A.A.; Shchelochkov, A.G.; Medzihradszky-Schweiger, H.; Mink, J.; Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest

    2004-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopic studies were carried out in acidic (pH 2.3) 57 Fe III nitrate containing aqueous solutions of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), rapidly frozen in liquid nitrogen at various periods of time after mixing the reagents. The data obtained show that in solution in the presence of IBA, iron(III) forms a complex with a dimeric structure characterised by a quadrupole doublet, whereas without IBA under similar conditions iron(III) exhibits a broad spectral feature due to a slow paramagnetic spin relaxation which, at liquid nitrogen temperature, results in a large anomalous line broadening (or, at T = 4.2 K, in a hyperfine magnetic splitting). The spectra of 57 Fe III +IBA solutions, kept at ambient temperature under aerobic conditions for increasing periods of time before freezing, contained a gradually increasing contribution of a component with a higher quadrupole splitting. The Moessbauer parameters for that component are typical for iron(II) aquo complexes, thus showing that under these conditions gradual reduction of iron(III) occurs, so that the majority (85%) of dissolved iron(III) is reduced within 2 days. The Moessbauer parameters for the iron(III)-IBA complex in aqueous solution and in the solid state (separated from the solution by filtration) were found to be similar, which may indicate that the dissolved and solid complexes have the same composition and/or iron(III) coordination environment. For the solid complex, the data of elemental analysis suggest the following composition of the dimer: [L 2 Fe-(OH) 2 -FeL 2 ] (where L is indole-3-butyrate). This structure is also in agreement with the data of infrared spectroscopic study of the complex reported earlier, with the side-chain carboxylic group in indole-3-butyrate as a bidentate ligand. The Moessbauer parameters for the solid 57 Fe III -IBA complex at T = 80 K and its acetone solution rapidly frozen in liquid nitrogen were virtually identical, which indicates that the complex retains its

  20. Colon cancer cell apoptosis is induced by combined exposure to the n-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid and butyrate through promoter methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngmi; Turner, Nancy D; Davidson, Laurie A; Chapkin, Robert S; Carroll, Raymond J; Lupton, Joanne R

    2014-03-01

    DNA methylation and histone acetylation contribute to the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in apoptosis. We have demonstrated that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3) and butyrate enhance colonocyte apoptosis. To determine if DHA and/or butyrate elevate apoptosis through epigenetic mechanisms thereby restoring the transcription of apoptosis-related genes, we examined global methylation; gene-specific promoter methylation of 24 apoptosis-related genes; transcription levels of Cideb, Dapk1, and Tnfrsf25; and global histone acetylation in the HCT-116 colon cancer cell line. Cells were treated with combinations of (50 µM) DHA or linoleic acid (18:2 n-6), (5 mM) butyrate or an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferases, and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC, 2 µM). Among highly methylated genes, the combination of DHA and butyrate significantly reduced methylation of the proapoptotic Bcl2l11, Cideb, Dapk1, Ltbr, and Tnfrsf25 genes compared to untreated control cells. DHA treatment reduced the methylation of Cideb, Dapk1, and Tnfrsf25. These data suggest that the induction of apoptosis by DHA and butyrate is mediated, in part, through changes in the methylation state of apoptosis-related genes.

  1. The effect of butyric acid with autogenous omental graft on healing of experimental Achilles tendon injury in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahani, S; Moslemi, H R; Dehghan, M M; Sedaghat, R; Mazaheri Nezhad, R; Rezaee Moghaddam, D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the role of local injection of butyric acid (BA) with autogenous omental graft was evaluated in healing of experimental Achilles tendon injury in rabbits. Nine adult male New Zealand rabbits were anesthetized and a partial thickness tenotomy was created on both hindlimbs. In treated group, omental graft was secured in place using BA soaked polygalactin 910 suture. In control group, the graft was sutured without BA. Butyric acid and normal saline were injected daily to treatment and control groups for three days, respectively. Based on the findings, on day 15 after injury, the tendon sections showed that healing rate in BA treated group was higher than that in control group. Furthermore, at days 28 and 45, comparison between BA treated and control groups demonstrated that BA increased the healing rate but with no significance. In summary, results of this study show that application of BA with autogenous omental graft can improve healing process of damaged Achilles tendon.

  2. Lipid alterations in human colon epithelial cells induced to differentiation and/or apoptosis by butyrate and polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofmanová, Jiřina; Ciganek, M.; Slavík, J.; Kozubík, Alois; Stixová, Lenka; Vaculová, Alena; Dušek, L.; Machala, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 6 (2012), s. 539-548 ISSN 0955-2863 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA524/07/1178; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/1730 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Colon cancer * Polyunsaturated fatty acids * Butyrate Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.552, year: 2012

  3. Negative polarity of phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester adjacent to donor macromolecule domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alley, Olivia J.; Dawidczyk, Thomas J.; Hardigree, Josué F. Martínez; Katz, Howard E.; Wu, Meng-Yin; Johns, Gary L.; Markovic, Nina; Arnold, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial fields within organic photovoltaics influence the movement of free charge carriers, including exciton dissociation and recombination. Open circuit voltage (V oc ) can also be dependent on the interfacial fields, in the event that they modulate the energy gap between donor HOMO and acceptor LUMO. A rise in the vacuum level of the acceptor will increase the gap and the V oc , which can be beneficial for device efficiency. Here, we measure the interfacial potential differences at donor-acceptor junctions using Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy, and quantify how much of the potential difference originates from physical contact between the donor and acceptor. We see a statistically significant and pervasive negative polarity on the phenyl-C 61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) side of PCBM/donor junctions, which should also be present at the complex interfaces in bulk heterojunctions. This potential difference may originate from molecular dipoles, interfacial interactions with donor materials, and/or equilibrium charge transfer due to the higher work function and electron affinity of PCBM. We show that the contact between PCBM and poly(3-hexylthiophene) doubles the interfacial potential difference, a statistically significant difference. Control experiments determined that this potential difference was not due to charges trapped in the underlying substrate. The direction of the observed potential difference would lead to increased V oc , but would also pose a barrier to electrons being injected into the PCBM and make recombination more favorable. Our method may allow unique information to be obtained in new donor-acceptor junctions

  4. Augmentation of tendon healing with butyric acid-impregnated sutures: biomechanical evaluation in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leek, Bryan T; Tasto, James P; Tibor, Lisa M; Healey, Robert M; Freemont, Anthony; Linn, Michael S; Chase, Derek E; Amiel, David

    2012-08-01

    Butyric acid (BA) has been shown to be angiogenic and to enhance transcriptional activity in tissue. These properties of BA have the potential to augment biological healing of a repaired tendon. To evaluate this possibility both biomechanically and histologically in an animal tendon repair model. Controlled laboratory study. A rabbit Achilles tendon healing model was used to evaluate the biomechanical strength and histological properties at 6 and 12 weeks after repair. Unilateral tendon defects were created in the middle bundle of the Achilles tendon of each rabbit, which were repaired equivalently with either Ultrabraid BA-impregnated sutures or control Ultrabraid sutures. After 6 weeks, BA-impregnated suture repairs had a significantly increased (P Tendons repaired with BA-impregnated sutures demonstrated improved biomechanical properties at 6 weeks relative to control sutures, suggesting a neoangiogenic mechanism of enhanced healing through an increased myofibroblast presence. These findings demonstrate that a relatively simple alteration of suture material may augment early tendon healing to create a stronger repair construct during this time.

  5. Indole butyric acid and substrates influence on multiplication of blackberry 'Xavante'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrar Hussain

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Blackberry is a shrubby plant specie which has a high economic importance among agriculture crops. Brazil is the major country of Latin America with the highest future scope for blackberries. For availability of good quality and maximum quantity of seedlings, the present study was carried out at the Universidade Estadual de Londrina,PR from January to March in 2013. The aim of the study was to evaluate the multiplication of blackberry 'Xavante' cuttings under different type of substrates treated with different levels of indole butyric acid (IBA. The experiment was laid out in randomized complete block design with 2 factors, i.e., substrate (rice husk, vermiculite and coconut fiber and IBA (0; 1,000; 2,000 and 3,000mg L-1, with 5 replications. Each replicate consisted of 10 cuttings. The variables studied were: cutting rooting, cutting survival, leaf retention, cuttings with new leaves, number of major roots, length of major roots and roots dry weight. Most of the variables were significantly affected by both substrate and IBA. Rice husk and vermiculite performed better than coconut fiber and provided the same results for most of the variables, while coconut fiber showed lower performance for all of the variables studied. IBA significantly affected the rooting and the number of major roots. It is concluded that for multiplication of blackberry 'Xavante', both rice husk and vermiculite can be used along 2,000mg L-1 of IBA

  6. Electronic Structures and Optical Properties of Phenyl C71 Butyric Acid Methyl Esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Rong Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM has been adopted as electron acceptor materials in bulk heterojunction solar cells with relatively higher power conversion efficiency. The understanding of the mechanism and performance for the devices based upon PC71BM requires the information of conformations, electronic structures, optical properties, and so forth. Here, the geometries, IR and Raman, electronic structures, polarizabilities, and hyperpolarizabilities of PC71BM isomers are studied by using density functional theory (DFT; the absorption and excitation properties are investigated via time-dependent DFT with B3LYP, PBE0, and CAM-B3LYP functionals. The calculated results show that [6,6]PC71BM is more stable than [5,6]PC71BM due to the lower total energy. The vibrational modes of the isomers at IR and Raman peaks are quite similar. As to absorption properties, CAM-B3LYP functional is the suitable functional for describing the excitations of PC71BM because the calculated results with CAM-B3LYP functional agree well with that of the experiment. The analysis of transition configurations and molecular orbitals demonstrated that the transitions at the absorption maxima in UV/Vis region are localized π-π* transitions in fullerenes cages. Furthermore, the larger isotropic polarizability of PC71BM indicates that the response of PC71BM to applied external electric field is stronger than that of PC61BM, and therefore resulting into better nonlinear optical properties.

  7. Rhizogenic behavior of black pepper cultivars to indole-3-butyric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welington Secundino

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Little information is available regarding vegetative propagation of the species Piper nigrum L. to generate technical recommendations for the production of seedlings on a commercial scale. The purpose of this study was to investigate the rhizogenic behavior of cultivars of this species regarding indol-3-butyric acid (IBA. The experiment was performed at a vegetation house equipped with an intermittent nebulization irrigation system. The experimental site was located in the University Center of Northern Espírito Santo (CEUNES of the Federal University of Espírito Santo (UFES, Brazil. The experimental design consisted of randomized blocks arranged in a 3 x 5 factorial scheme: three cultivars (Bragantina, Iaçará and Guajarina x five IBA concentrations (0; 1,500; 3,000; 4,500 and 6,000 mg kg-1, with four repetitions of 16 cuttings each. Total immersion of the cuttings in IBA is recommended for the Iaçará and Guajarina cultivars, and immersion of only the basal region is recommended for cv. Bragantina. The recommended IBA concentration for these cultivars is 4,000 mg kg-1.

  8. Butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by engineered Clostridium tyrobutyricum overexpressing Class I heat shock protein GroESL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Yukai; Fu, Hongxin; Ren, Mengmeng; Yang, Xitong; Liao, Zhengping; Wang, Jufang

    2018-02-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant and renewable substrate for biological fermentation, but the inhibitors present in the lignocellulosic hydrolysates could severely inhibit the cell growth and productivity of industrial strains. This study confirmed that overexpressing of native groESL in Clostridium tyrobutyricum could significantly improve its tolerance to lignocellulosic hydrolysate-derived inhibitors, especially for phenolic compounds. Consequently, ATCC 25755/groESL showed a better performance in butyric acid fermentation with hydrolysates of corn cob, corn straw, rice straw, wheat straw, soybean hull and soybean straw, respectively. When corn straw and rice straw hydrolysates, which showed strong toxicity to C. tyrobutyricum, were used as the substrates, 29.6 g/L and 30.1 g/L butyric acid were obtained in batch fermentation, increased by 26.5% and 19.4% as compared with the wild-type strain, respectively. And more importantly, the butyric acid productivity reached 0.31 g/L·h (vs. 0.20-0.21 g/L·h for the wild-type strain) due to the shortened lag phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Diastereoselective Three-Component Reactions of Chiral Nickel(II Glycinate for Convenient Synthesis of Novel α-Amino-β-Substituted-γ,γ-Disubstituted Butyric Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The convenient, high yielding and diastereoselective synthesis of α-amino-β-substituted-γ,γ-disubstituted butyric acid derivatives was carried out by a three-component tandem reaction of a chiral equivalent of nucleophilic glycine. The reaction was performed smoothly under mild conditions and enabled the construction of two or three adjacent chiral centers in one step, thus affording a novel and convenient route to α-amino-β-substituted-γ,γ-disubstituted butyric acid derivatives.

  10. Effects of Feeding Methylthio Butyric Acid Isopropyl Ester on Postpartum Performance and Metabolism in Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Xia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment aimed to evaluate the effect of HMBi on the production performance and metabolism in dairy cows. Thirty multiparous Holstein dairy cows under similar conditions were randomly assigned to three dietary treatments; i Control, a basal diet; ii T1, a basal diet plus HMBi (0 g prepartum and 18 g postpartum; and iii T2, a basal diet plus HMBi (10 g prepartum and 18 g postpartum. Treatments were initiated 21 d before expected calving and continued through 91 d postpartum. HMBi was top-dressed onto the total mixed ration of each cow. Treatments did not affect dry matter intake, plasma urea nitrogen, peak milk yield, days to peak milk yield, nonesterified fatty acid, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, glutamic oxalaetic transaminase, milk fat content, milk protein content, milk lactose content, and milk solid non-fat content. The milk composition yields were increased by the HMBi-supplemented treatment. The T1 and T2 treatments increased the yields of 4% fat-corrected milk yield, milk fat, milk protein, and milk lactose compared with the control. Although there was no difference in the milk composition of the control and T2-treated cows, the T2-treated cows exhibited higher milk fat yield (increased by 74 g/d, lower milk urea nitrogen (reduced by 3.41%, and plasma β-hydroxy butyrate than the control cows. The results indicate that HMBi supplementation to diet has beneficial effects, and that there is no difference between supplementation at prepartum and starting only at parturition.

  11. Comparative photocatalytic study of two selected pesticide derivatives, indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-butyric acid in aqueous suspensions of titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qamar, M.; Muneer, M.

    2005-01-01

    Heterogeneous photocatalysed degradation of two selected pesticide derivatives such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) has been investigated in aqueous suspensions of titanium dioxide by monitoring the change in substrate concentration employing UV spectroscopic analysis technique and depletion in total organic carbon (TOC) content as a function of irradiation time. The degradation kinetics was studied under different conditions such as pH, types of TiO 2, substrate and catalyst concentration, and in the presence of electron acceptor such as hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) besides molecular oxygen. The degradation rates were found to be strongly influenced by all the above parameters. The photocatalyst Degussa P25 showed comparatively highest photocatalytics. The pesticide derivative, indole-3-acetic acid was found to degrade slightly faster than indole-3-butyric acid

  12. Propionic and butyric acids, formed in the caecum of rats fed highly fermentable dietary fibre, are reflected in portal and aortic serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsdottir, Greta; Jädert, Cecilia; Holm, Lena; Nyman, Margareta E

    2013-11-14

    SCFA are important end products formed during colonic fermentation of dietary fibre (DF). It has been suggested that propionic and butyric acids affect metabolic parameters, low-grade systemic inflammation, insulin resistance and obesity. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the various SCFA profiles observed after fermentation in the caecum of rats fed pectin, guar gum and fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) were also represented in hepatic portal and aortic serum. The SCFA in serum were extracted using hollow fibre-supported liquid membrane extraction before GLC analysis. The concentrations of acetic, propionic and butyric acids in caecal content correlated well with those in portal serum (Pbutyric acids between the caecal content and aortic serum (PButyric acid concentration in caecal content was also reflected in the aortic serum (P= 0·019) of rats fed FOS. FOS gave rather low amounts of the SCFA, especially butyric acid, but caecal tissue weight was higher with FOS than with the other two diets. This may be explained by rapid fermentation and quick utilisation/absorption of the SCFA. The present study also showed that propionic acid was metabolised/utilised to a higher extent than butyric acid by colonocytes before reaching the liver. We conclude that the formation of propionic and butyric acids in the caecum is reflected by increased concentrations in the aortic blood. This approach may therefore simplify the evaluation and study of SCFA from DF in human subjects.

  13. Transport of the Two Natural Auxins, Indole-3-Butyric Acid and Indole-3-Acetic Acid, in Arabidopsis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashotte, Aaron M.; Poupart, Julie; Waddell, Candace S.; Muday, Gloria K.

    2003-01-01

    Polar transport of the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is important in a number of plant developmental processes. However, few studies have investigated the polar transport of other endogenous auxins, such as indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), in Arabidopsis. This study details the similarities and differences between IBA and IAA transport in several tissues of Arabidopsis. In the inflorescence axis, no significant IBA movement was detected, whereas IAA is transported in a basipetal direction from the meristem tip. In young seedlings, both IBA and IAA were transported only in a basipetal direction in the hypocotyl. In roots, both auxins moved in two distinct polarities and in specific tissues. The kinetics of IBA and IAA transport appear similar, with transport rates of 8 to 10 mm per hour. In addition, IBA transport, like IAA transport, is saturable at high concentrations of auxin, suggesting that IBA transport is protein mediated. Interestingly, IAA efflux inhibitors and mutations in genes encoding putative IAA transport proteins reduce IAA transport but do not alter IBA movement, suggesting that different auxin transport protein complexes are likely to mediate IBA and IAA transport. Finally, the physiological effects of IBA and IAA on hypocotyl elongation under several light conditions were examined and analyzed in the context of the differences in IBA and IAA transport. Together, these results present a detailed picture of IBA transport and provide the basis for a better understanding of the transport of these two endogenous auxins. PMID:14526119

  14. Transport of the two natural auxins, indole-3-butyric acid and indole-3-acetic acid, in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashotte, Aaron M.; Poupart, Julie; Waddell, Candace S.; Muday, Gloria K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Polar transport of the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is important in a number of plant developmental processes. However, few studies have investigated the polar transport of other endogenous auxins, such as indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), in Arabidopsis. This study details the similarities and differences between IBA and IAA transport in several tissues of Arabidopsis. In the inflorescence axis, no significant IBA movement was detected, whereas IAA is transported in a basipetal direction from the meristem tip. In young seedlings, both IBA and IAA were transported only in a basipetal direction in the hypocotyl. In roots, both auxins moved in two distinct polarities and in specific tissues. The kinetics of IBA and IAA transport appear similar, with transport rates of 8 to 10 mm per hour. In addition, IBA transport, like IAA transport, is saturable at high concentrations of auxin, suggesting that IBA transport is protein mediated. Interestingly, IAA efflux inhibitors and mutations in genes encoding putative IAA transport proteins reduce IAA transport but do not alter IBA movement, suggesting that different auxin transport protein complexes are likely to mediate IBA and IAA transport. Finally, the physiological effects of IBA and IAA on hypocotyl elongation under several light conditions were examined and analyzed in the context of the differences in IBA and IAA transport. Together, these results present a detailed picture of IBA transport and provide the basis for a better understanding of the transport of these two endogenous auxins.

  15. The short chain fatty acid, butyrate, stimulates MUC2 mucin production in the human colon cancer cell line, LS174T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatayama, Hajime; Iwashita, Jun; Kuwajima, Akiko; Abe, Tatsuya

    2007-01-01

    The short fatty acid, butyrate, which is produced by intestinal anaerobic bacteria in the colon, has inhibitory activity on histone deacetylases (HDACs). Treatment of the human colon cancer cell line, LS174T, with 1-2 mM sodium butyrate stimulated MUC2 mucin production, as determined by histological PAS staining of carbohydrate chains of mucin, and confirmed at the protein and mRNA levels by immunoblotting with anti-MUC2 antibody and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Increases in acetylated histone H3 in the LS174T cells treated with butyrate suggest inhibition of HDACs in these cells. Butyrate-stimulated MUC2 production in the LS174T cells was inhibited by the MEK inhibitor, U0126, implicating the involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascades in this process. Proliferation of the LS174T cells was inhibited by butyrate treatment. Although apoptotic nuclear DNA fragmentation could not be detected, cell-cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in the butyrate-treated cells was demonstrated by flow cytometry. Thus butyrate, an HDAC inhibitor, inhibits proliferation of LS174T cells but stimulates MUC2 production in individual cells

  16. Effects of adding butyric acid to PN on gut-associated lymphoid tissue and mucosal immunoglobulin A levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoshi, Satoshi; Fukatsu, Kazuhiko; Omata, Jiro; Moriya, Tomoyuki; Noguchi, Midori; Saitoh, Daizoh; Koyama, Isamu

    2011-07-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) causes intestinal mucosal atrophy, gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) atrophy and dysfunction, leading to impaired mucosal immunity and increased susceptibility to infectious complications. Therefore, new PN formulations are needed to maintain mucosal immunity. Short-chain fatty acids have been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on the intestinal mucosa. We examined the effects of adding butyric acid to PN on GALT lymphocyte numbers, phenotypes, mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels, and intestinal morphology in mice. Male Institute of Cancer Research mice (n = 103) were randomized to receive either standard PN (S-PN), butyric acid-supplemented PN (Bu-PN), or ad libitum chow (control) groups. The mice were fed these respective diets for 5 days. In experiment 1, cells were isolated from Peyer's patches (PPs) to determine lymphocyte numbers and phenotypes (αβTCR(+), γδTCR(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), B220(+) cells). IgA levels in small intestinal washings were also measured. In experiment 2, IgA levels in respiratory tract (bronchoalveolar and nasal) washings were measured. In experiment 3, small intestinal morphology was evaluated. Lymphocyte yields from PPs and small intestinal, bronchoalveolar, and nasal washing IgA levels were all significantly lower in the S-PN group than in the control group. Bu-PN moderately, but significantly, restored PP lymphocyte numbers, as well as intestinal and bronchoalveolar IgA levels, as compared with S-PN. Villous height and crypt depth in the small intestine were significantly decreased in the S-PN group vs the control group, however Bu-PN restored intestinal morphology. A new PN formula containing butyric acid is feasible and would ameliorate PN-induced impairment of mucosal immunity.

  17. Kinetic study of the electroreduction of Cd2+ and Zn2+ cations in the presence of n-butyric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, B.N.; Skobochkina, Yu.P.; Serdyukova, G.G.

    1988-01-01

    Consideration is being given to electrochemical reactions which proceed both in 'pores' inside the surface layer, composed of surfactant molecules, and on the surface covered by adsorbate molecules. It is shown that in the course of n-butyric acid adsorption electroreduction of Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ takes place in 'pores' and on the surface of electrode due to formation of electroactive surface complexes. Values of constants characterizing process rates in the case of complete occupation of electrode surface by surfactant molecules have been determined

  18. Continuous fermentation and in-situ reed separation of butyric acid for higher sugar consumption rate and productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroi, George Nabin; Skiadas, Ioannis; Westermann, Peter

    that disconnection of the REED system resulted to much lower (48 and 83% for glucose and xylose, respectively) sugars consumption rates and consequently lower butyric acid production rates. It was also noticeable that continuous operation, even without the REED system, resulted to higher glucose consumption rates...... than batch operation (0.85 compared to 0.31 g/L/h). Similar conclusions were drawn from the experiments with increasing concentrations of PHWS. It should also be emphasized that fermentation of 100% PHWS proceeded unhindered with just urea and K2HPO4 added (to making up for nutrient deficiency...

  19. Comparison of the effects of high energy carbon heavy ion irradiation and Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. on biosynthesis butyric acid efficiency in Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Shu-Yang; Lu, Xi-Hong; Liang, Jian-Ping

    2014-06-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum is well documented as a fermentation strain for the production of butyric acid. In this work, using high-energy carbon heavy ion irradiated C. tyrobutyricum, then butyric acid fermentation using glucose or alkali and acid pretreatments of Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. as a carbon source was carried out. Initially, the modes at pH 5.7-6.5 and 37°C were compared using a model medium containing glucose as a carbon source. When the 72gL(-1) glucose concentration was found to be the highest yield, the maximum butyric acid production from glucose increased significantly, from 24gL(-1) for the wild type strains to 37gL(-1) for the strain irradiated at 126AMeV and a dose of 35Gy and a 10(7)ions/pulse. By feeding 100gL(-1) acid pretreatments of E. ulmoides Oliv. into the fermentations, butyrate yields (5.8gL(-1)) and butyrate/acetate (B/A) ratio (4.32) were achieved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Tie line data for the (water + butyric acid + n-butyl alcohol or amyl alcohol) at T = (298.2, 308.2, and 318.2) K and (water + butyric acid + isoamyl alcohol) at T = 298.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanadzadeh Gilani, A.; Ghanadzadeh Gilani, H.; Amouzadeh, F.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Liquid equilibrium data of (water + BA + alcohols) systems were measured. • Experimental LLE data were correlated with NRTL and UNIQUAC models. • Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated. -- Abstract: In this study, solubility and tie-line data of the (water + butyric acid + n-butyl alcohol or amyl alcohol) ternary systems were determined at T = (298.2, 308.2, and 318.2) K and p = 101.3 kPa for the first time. Due to the structural similarity, the tie-line data for (water + butyric acid + isoamyl alcohol) system were also measured and correlated at T = 298.2 K. The ternary systems investigated display type-1 behaviour of LLE. The cloud point method was used to measure the solubility data and the Karl-Fischer, acidimetric titration, and refractive index methods were used to determine the tie-line data. For each system, the experimental tie-line data were correlated using the UNIQUAC and NRTL models. The Othmer–Tobias and Hand correlations equations were used to establish the quality of the LLE data. Experimental distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated over the immiscibility regions

  1. Analysis of the key enzymes of butyric and acetic acid fermentation in biogas reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabris, Christina; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Dürre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms of acidogenesis, which is a key process during anaerobic digestion. To expose possible bottlenecks, specific activities of the key enzymes of acidification, such as acetate kinase (Ack, 0.23–0.99 U mg−1 protein), butyrate kinase (Buk, biogas reactor content from three different biogas reactors. Furthermore, the detection of Ack was successful via Western blot analysis. Quantification of corresponding functional genes encoding Buk (buk) and But (but) was not feasible, although an amplification was possible. Thus, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on respective gene fragments. Four new clades of possible butyrate-producing bacteria were postulated, as well as bacteria of the genera Roseburia or Clostridium identified. The low Buk activity was in contrast to the high specific But activity in the analysed samples. Butyrate formation via Buk activity does barely occur in the investigated biogas reactor. Specific enzyme activities (Ack, Buk and But) in samples drawn from three different biogas reactors correlated with ammonia and ammonium concentrations (NH3 and NH4+-N), and a negative dependency can be postulated. Thus, high concentrations of NH3 and NH4+-N may lead to a bottleneck in acidogenesis due to decreased specific acidogenic enzyme activities. PMID:26086956

  2. Analysis of the key enzymes of butyric and acetic acid fermentation in biogas reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabris, Christina; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Dürre, Peter

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms of acidogenesis, which is a key process during anaerobic digestion. To expose possible bottlenecks, specific activities of the key enzymes of acidification, such as acetate kinase (Ack, 0.23-0.99 U mg(-1) protein), butyrate kinase (Buk, butyrate-producing bacteria were postulated, as well as bacteria of the genera Roseburia or Clostridium identified. The low Buk activity was in contrast to the high specific But activity in the analysed samples. Butyrate formation via Buk activity does barely occur in the investigated biogas reactor. Specific enzyme activities (Ack, Buk and But) in samples drawn from three different biogas reactors correlated with ammonia and ammonium concentrations (NH₃ and NH₄(+)-N), and a negative dependency can be postulated. Thus, high concentrations of NH₃ and NH₄(+)-N may lead to a bottleneck in acidogenesis due to decreased specific acidogenic enzyme activities. © 2015 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. (Liquid + liquid) equilibria of aqueous solutions of butyric acid with n-heptane and toluene at T = (298.2, 308.2, and 318.2) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanadzadeh Gilani, H.; Ghanadzadeh Gilani, A.; Janbaz, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Liquid equilibrium data of (water + butyric acid + n-heptane) were obtained. ► LLE data were correlated with NRTL and UNIQUAC models. ► Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated. - Abstract: Solubility and tie line data for the (water + butyric acid + n-heptane) and (water + butyric acid + toluene) ternary systems were determined at T = (298.2, 308.2, and 318.2) K and atmospheric pressure. Solubility data were obtained by the cloud-point titration method. The concentration of each phase was determined by acidimetric titration, the Karl-Fischer technique, and refractive index measurements. The experimental tie-line data were correlated using the UNIQUAC and NRTL thermodynamic models. The reliability of the experimental data was determined through the Othmer–Tobias and Hand plots. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated for each system over the immiscibility regions.

  4. Amelioration of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in rats by valproic acid and butyrate: Role of nuclear factor kappa-B, proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabel, Ahmed M; Omar, Mohamed S; Elmaaboud, Maaly A Abd

    2016-10-01

    Bleomycin is one of the anticancer agents used frequently in management of various types of tumors. Pulmonary fibrosis is the major limiting factor for the use of bleomycin. Mechanisms of fibrosis may include disordered wound healing, infiltration with inflammatory cells and fibroblasts and release of reactive oxygen species and growth factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of valproic acid and butyrate on lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin, and to clarify their mechanisms of action. Fifty male Wistar rats were divided into 5 equal groups as follows: control group; bleomycin group; bleomycin+valproic acid group; bleomycin+butyrate group and bleomycin+valproic acid+butyrate group. Weight of rats, lung tissue hydroxyproline, malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase and catalase were measured. Also, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was analyzed for total and differential leukocytic count, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1). Lung tissue was examined histopathologically and immunostained for nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). Valproic acid and/or butyrate resulted in significant improvement of the body weight gain, oxidative stress, TGF-β1, IL-6, TNF-α, hydroxyproline and BAL cellularity together with significant improvement of the histopathological and immunohistochemical picture. The use of valproic acid/butyrate combination was better than the use of each of these drugs alone in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In conclusion, valproic acid/butyrate combination may be used prophylactically for amelioration of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Driving carbon flux through exogenous butyryl-CoA: Acetate CoA-transferase to produce butyric acid at high titer in Thermobifida fusca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yu; Mao, Yin; Zhang, Xiaojuan

    2015-12-20

    Butyric acid, a 4-carbon short chain fatty acid, is widely used in chemical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. The low activity of butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase in Thermobifida fusca muS, a thermophilic actinobacterium whose optimal temperature was 55°C, was found to hinder the accumulation of high yield of butyric acid. In order to solve this problem, an exogenous butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase gene (actA) from Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum DSM571 was integrated into the chromosome of T. fusca muS by replacing celR gene, forming T. fusca muS-1. We demonstrated that on 5g/L cellulose, the yield of butyric acid by the engineered muS-1 strain was increased by 42.9 % compared to the muS strain. On 100g/L of cellulose, the muS-1 strain could consume 90.5% of total cellulose in 144h, with 33.2g/L butyric acid produced. Furthermore, on the mix substrates including the major components of biomass: cellulose, xylose, mannose and galactose, 70.4g/L butyric acid was produced in 168h by fed-batch fermentation. To validate the ability of fermenting biomass, the muS-1 strain was grown on the milled corn stover ranging from 200 to 250μm. The muS-1 strain had the highest butyrate titer 17.1g/L on 90g/L corn stover. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Continuous fermentation and kinetic experiments for the conversion of crude glycerol derived from second-generation biodiesel into 1,3 propanediol and butyric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varrone, Cristiano; Floriotis, Georgis; Heggeset, Tonje M. B.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of different mixed microbial cultures (MMC) able to ferment crude glycerol generated from animal fat-based biodiesel to produce 1,3 propanediol (1,3 PDO) and butyric acid, under non-sterile conditions. Eight different continuous flow stirred-tank reactors...... communities were monitored by means of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). Maximum substrate degradation rate reached approximately 110 g/L/d of glycerol (with a productivity of 38 g/L/d and 11 g/L/d for 1,3 PDO and butyric acid, respectively), obtained with an hydraulic retention time of 12 h and 60 g/L feed...

  7. Phase diagrams for the system water/butyric acid/propylene carbonate at T = 293.2-313.2 K and p = 101.3 kPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekarsaraee, Sina; Nahzomi, Hossein Taherpour; Nasiri-Touli, Elham

    2017-11-01

    Phase diagrams for the system water/butyric acid/propylene carbonate were plotted at T = 293.2, 303.2, 313.2 K and p = 101.3 kPa. Acidimetric titration and refractive index methods were used to determine tie-line data. Solubility data revealed that the studied system exhibits type-1 behavior of liquid-liquid equilibrium. The experimental data were regressed and acceptably correlated using the UNIQUAC and NRTL models. As a result, propylene carbonate is a suitable separating agent for aqueous mixture of butyric acid.

  8. Fermentation of sweet sorghum derived sugars to butyric acid at high titer and productivity by a moderate thermophile Clostridium thermobutyricum at 50°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Ou, Mark S; Nieves, Ismael; Erickson, John E; Vermerris, Wilfred; Ingram, L O; Shanmugam, K T

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a moderate thermophile Clostridium thermobutyricum is shown to ferment the sugars in sweet sorghum juice treated with invertase and supplemented with tryptone (10 g L(-1)) and yeast extract (10 g L(-1)) at 50°C to 44 g L(-1) butyrate at a calculated highest volumetric productivity of 1.45 g L(-1)h(-1) (molar butyrate yield of 0.85 based on sugars fermented). This volumetric productivity is among the highest reported for batch fermentations. Sugars from acid and enzyme-treated sweet sorghum bagasse were also fermented to butyrate by this organism with a molar yield of 0.81 (based on the amount of cellulose and hemicellulose). By combining the results from juice and bagasse, the calculated yield of butyric acid is approximately 90 kg per tonne of fresh sweet sorghum stalk. This study demonstrates that C. thermobutyricum can be an effective microbial biocatalyst for production of bio-based butyrate from renewable feedstocks at 50°C. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hyper-thermal acid hydrolysis and adsorption treatment of red seaweed, Gelidium amansii for butyric acid production with pH control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Chae Hun; Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Kim, Sung-Koo

    2017-03-01

    Optimal hyper-thermal (HT) acid hydrolysis conditions for Gelidium amansii were determined to be 12% (w/v) seaweed slurry content and 144 mM H 2 SO 4 at 150 °C for 10 min. HT acid hydrolysis-treated G. amansii hydrolysates produced low concentrations of inhibitory compounds and adsorption treatment using 3% activated carbon. An adsorption time of 5 min was subsequently used to remove the inhibitory 5-hydroxymethylfurfural from the medium. A final maximum monosaccharide concentration of 44.6 g/L and 79.1% conversion from 56.4 g/L total fermentable monosaccharides with 120 g dw/L G. amansii slurry was obtained from HT acid hydrolysis, enzymatic saccharification, and adsorption treatment. This study demonstrates the potential for butyric acid production from G. amansii hydrolysates under non-pH-controlled as well as pH-controlled fermentation using Clostridium acetobutylicum KCTC 1790. The activated carbon treatment and pH-controlled fermentation showed synergistic effects and produced butyric acid at a concentration of 11.2 g/L after 9 days of fermentation.

  10. The response of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae)to traps baited with carbon dioxide, 1-octen-3-ol, acetone, butyric acid and human foot odour in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mboera, L.E.G.; Takken, W.; Sambu, E.Z.

    2000-01-01

    The responses of Culex quinquefasciatus Say to traps baited with carbon dioxide, 1-octen-3-ol, acetone, butyric acid and human foot odour were studied in the field in Muheza, north-east Tanzania using Counterflow Geometry (CFG) and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) traps. It was found that

  11. Bioprotective carnitinoids: lipoic acid, butyrate, and mitochondria-targeting to treat radiation injury: mitochondrial drugs come of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steliou, Kosta; Faller, Douglas V; Pinkert, Carl A; Irwin, Michael H; Moos, Walter H

    2015-06-01

    Preclinical Research Given nuclear-power-plant incidents such as the 2011 Japanese Fukushima-Daiichi disaster, an urgent need for effective medicines to protect against and treat the harmful biological effects of radiation is evident. To address such a challenge, we describe potential strategies herein including mitochondrial and epigenetic-driven methods using lipoic and butyric acid ester conjugates of carnitine. The antioxidant and other therapeutically beneficial properties of this class of agents may protect against ionizing radiation and resultant mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent studies of the compounds described herein reveal the potential-although further research and development is required to prove the effectiveness of this approach-to provide field-ready radiation-protective drugs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Morphology characterization of phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester films via an electrohydrodynamic spraying route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung-Eun; Park, Ji-Woon; Hwang, Jungho

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a thin film layer of phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) fine particles using electrohydrodynamic (EHD) spray and evaluated the effects of the process parameters on the film morphology. After the PCBM was dissolved in dichloromethane, the solution was sprayed onto a substrate using the stable cone-jet mode of EHD spraying at various flow rates ranging from 5 to 15 μl/min and electric potentials ranging from 3 to 5 kV. The effects of the liquid flow rate, nozzle-plate distance, solute fraction, and electrical conductivity on the spray characteristics were investigated. The sizes of the PCBM particles deposited on the substrate were calculated using a scaling law and a mass balance equation, the results of which were in agreement with those obtained by scanning electron microscopy. A thin film was obtained with the structure of PCBM particles deposited without any void or agglomeration from the EHD spraying technique. The electrical conductivity of the PCBM solution was the dominant parameter in controlling the size of the PCBM particles. As the conductivity was increased to 2.4 × 10 −3 S/m from 4.3 × 10 −9 S/m, the particle size decreased from 6.7 μm to 320 nm. The size distribution measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer also supported the generation of nano-scale PCBM particles. The decrease of the particle size with increasing electrical conductivity may lead to a better morphology of PCBM films. - Highlights: • The phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester thin film was obtained by electrospray. • The morphology of film consisting of microparticles was investigated. • The particle size was controlled by adjusting experimental parameters. • The nanoparticle was obtained by increasing the solution conductivity. • The particle size distribution was studied using a scanning mobility particle sizer

  13. Killed Whole-Cell Oral Cholera Vaccine Induces CCL20 Secretion by Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells in the Presence of the Short-Chain Fatty Acid, Butyrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Ri Sim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, such as acetate, butyrate, and propionate, modulate immune responses in the gut. However, the effect of SCFAs on mucosal vaccine-induced immune cell migration is poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether SCFAs modulate chemokine expression induced by the killed whole-cell oral cholera vaccine, Shanchol™, in human intestinal epithelial cells. Shanchol™ induced expression of CCL2, CCL5, CCL20, and CXCL10 at the mRNA level, but not at the protein level. Interestingly, CCL20 secretion was substantially increased by co-stimulation with Shanchol™ and butyrate, while neither acetate nor propionate showed such effect. Enhanced CCL20 secretion was associated with GPR109A activation, and histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibition. In addition, co-treatment with Shanchol™ and butyrate synergistically increased the secretion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Moreover, CCL20 secretion was decreased by inhibiting the extracellular ATP receptor P2X7. However, neither inflammasomes nor caspases were involved in CCL20 production. The culture supernatant of cells treated with Shanchol™ and butyrate augmented human immature dendritic cell migration. Collectively, these results suggest that butyrate enhances Shanchol™-induced CCL20 production in human intestinal epithelial cells via HDAC inhibition and ATP-P2X7 signaling by activating GPR109A. These effects potentially enhance the mucosal immune responses in the gut induced by this oral cholera vaccine.

  14. Killed Whole-Cell Oral Cholera Vaccine Induces CCL20 Secretion by Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells in the Presence of the Short-Chain Fatty Acid, Butyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Ju-Ri; Kang, Seok-Seong; Lee, Daesang; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as acetate, butyrate, and propionate, modulate immune responses in the gut. However, the effect of SCFAs on mucosal vaccine-induced immune cell migration is poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether SCFAs modulate chemokine expression induced by the killed whole-cell oral cholera vaccine, Shanchol™, in human intestinal epithelial cells. Shanchol™ induced expression of CCL2, CCL5, CCL20, and CXCL10 at the mRNA level, but not at the protein level. Interestingly, CCL20 secretion was substantially increased by co-stimulation with Shanchol™ and butyrate, while neither acetate nor propionate showed such effect. Enhanced CCL20 secretion was associated with GPR109A activation, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition. In addition, co-treatment with Shanchol™ and butyrate synergistically increased the secretion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Moreover, CCL20 secretion was decreased by inhibiting the extracellular ATP receptor P2X7. However, neither inflammasomes nor caspases were involved in CCL20 production. The culture supernatant of cells treated with Shanchol™ and butyrate augmented human immature dendritic cell migration. Collectively, these results suggest that butyrate enhances Shanchol™-induced CCL20 production in human intestinal epithelial cells via HDAC inhibition and ATP-P2X7 signaling by activating GPR109A. These effects potentially enhance the mucosal immune responses in the gut induced by this oral cholera vaccine.

  15. The microbe-derived short chain fatty acid butyrate targets miRNA-dependent p21 gene expression in human colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shien Hu

    Full Text Available Colonic microbiota ferment non-absorbed dietary fiber to produce prodigious amounts of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs that benefit the host through a myriad of metabolic, trophic, and chemopreventative effects. The chemopreventative effects of the SCFA butyrate are, in part, mediated through induction of p21 gene expression. In this study, we assessed the role of microRNA(miRNA in butyrate's induction of p21 expression. The expression profiles of miRNAs in HCT-116 cells and in human sporadic colon cancers were assessed by microarray and quantitative PCR. Regulation of p21 gene expression by miR-106b was assessed by 3' UTR luciferase reporter assays and transfection of specific miRNA mimics. Butyrate changed the expression of 44 miRNAs in HCT-116 cells, many of which were aberrantly expressed in colon cancer tissues. Members of the miR-106b family were decreased in the former and increased in the latter. Butyrate-induced p21 protein expression was dampened by treatment with a miR-106b mimic. Mutated p21 3'UTR-reporter constructs expressed in HCT-116 cells confirmed direct miR-106b targeting. Butyrate decreased HCT-116 proliferation, an effect reversed with the addition of the miR-106b mimic. We conclude that microbe-derived SCFAs regulate host gene expression involved in intestinal homeostasis as well as carcinogenesis through modulation of miRNAs.

  16. Whole-body pharmacokinetics of HDAC inhibitor drugs, butyric acid, valproic acid and 4-phenylbutyric acid measured with carbon-11 labeled analogs by PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Won; Hooker, Jacob M.; Otto, Nicola; Win, Khaing; Muench, Lisa; Shea, Colleen; Carter, Pauline; King, Payton; Reid, Alicia E.; Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2013-01-01

    The fatty acids, n-butyric acid (BA), 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) and valproic acid (VPA, 2-propylpentanoic acid) have been used for many years in the treatment of a variety of CNS and peripheral organ diseases including cancer. New information that these drugs alter epigenetic processes through their inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) has renewed interest in their biodistribution and pharmacokinetics and the relationship of these properties to their therapeutic and side effect profiles. In order to determine the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of these drugs in primates, we synthesized their carbon-11 labeled analogues and performed dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) in six female baboons over 90 min. The carbon-11 labeled carboxylic acids were prepared by using 11 CO 2 and the appropriate Grignard reagents. [ 11 C]BA was metabolized rapidly (only 20% of the total carbon-11 in plasma was parent compound at 5 min post injection) whereas for VPA and PBA 98% and 85% of the radioactivity were the unmetabolized compound at 30 min after their administration respectively. The brain uptake of all three carboxylic acids was very low ( VPA > PBA), which is consistent with the need for very high doses for therapeutic efficacy. Most of the radioactivity was excreted through the kidneys and accumulated in the bladder. However, the organ biodistribution between the drugs differed. [ 11 C]BA showed relatively high uptake in spleen and pancreas whereas [ 11 C]PBA showed high uptake in liver and heart. Notably, [ 11 C]VPA showed exceptionally high heart uptake possibly due to its involvement in lipid metabolism. The unique biodistribution of each of these drugs may be of relevance in understanding their therapeutic and side effect profile including their teratogenic effects

  17. Butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by engineered Clostridium tyrobutyricum overexpressing xylose catabolism genes for glucose and xylose co-utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hongxin; Yang, Shang-Tian; Wang, Minqi; Wang, Jufang; Tang, I-Ching

    2017-06-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum can utilize glucose and xylose as carbon source for butyric acid production. However, xylose catabolism is inhibited by glucose, hampering butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates containing both glucose and xylose. In this study, an engineered strain of C. tyrobutyricum Ct-pTBA overexpressing heterologous xylose catabolism genes (xylT, xylA, and xylB) was investigated for co-utilizing glucose and xylose present in hydrolysates of plant biomass, including soybean hull, corn fiber, wheat straw, rice straw, and sugarcane bagasse. Compared to the wild-type strain, Ct-pTBA showed higher xylose utilization without significant glucose catabolite repression, achieving near 100% utilization of glucose and xylose present in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates in bioreactor at pH 6. About 42.6g/L butyrate at a productivity of 0.56g/L·h and yield of 0.36g/g was obtained in batch fermentation, demonstrating the potential of C. tyrobutyricum Ct-pTBA for butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Aqueous Extract of Saffron on Gamma-Amino Butyric Acid Content in Rat Hypothalami

    OpenAIRE

    Nikpour Moghaddam; Qujeq; Rastegari Efahani

    2016-01-01

    Background Preliminary studies revealed that 4-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a key and major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Evidence from many animal studies and even some clinical studies indicate that GABA is responsible for regulating behavior and also plays an important role in brain functions. Previous studies presented Glutamic acid decarboxylase as a catalyst for the conversion of glutamic acid to GABA. Objectives ...

  19. Vegetative propagation of Plukenetia polyadenia by cuttings: effects of leaf area and indole-3-butyric acid concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Solis

    Full Text Available Abstract The seeds of Plukenetia polyadenia have high levels of unsaturated fatty acids and are used as medicine and food for native people in the Peruvian and Brazilian Amazon. The objective of this study was to develop a method for vegetative propagation of Plukenetia polyadenia by rooting of cuttings. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with 12 treatments and 3 replications of 8 cuttings, in a 3 × 4 factorial arrangement. The factors were: 3 levels of leaf area (25, 50 and 75% and 3 indole-3-butyric acid - IBA concentrations (9.84, 19.68 and 29.52mM and a control without IBA. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and means were compared by Tukey test at 5% probability. Our results show that the use of cuttings with 50% of leaf area and treatment with 29.52mM of IBA induced high percentages of rooting (93% and the best root formation. Vegetative propagation of Plukenetia polyadenia by cuttings will be used as a tool to conserve and propagate germplasm in breeding programs.

  20. Vegetative propagation of Plukenetia polyadenia by cuttings: effects of leaf area and indole-3-butyric acid concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, R; Pezo, M; Diaz, G; Arévalo, L; Cachique, D

    2017-01-01

    The seeds of Plukenetia polyadenia have high levels of unsaturated fatty acids and are used as medicine and food for native people in the Peruvian and Brazilian Amazon. The objective of this study was to develop a method for vegetative propagation of Plukenetia polyadenia by rooting of cuttings. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with 12 treatments and 3 replications of 8 cuttings, in a 3 × 4 factorial arrangement. The factors were: 3 levels of leaf area (25, 50 and 75%) and 3 indole-3-butyric acid - IBA concentrations (9.84, 19.68 and 29.52mM) and a control without IBA. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and means were compared by Tukey test at 5% probability. Our results show that the use of cuttings with 50% of leaf area and treatment with 29.52mM of IBA induced high percentages of rooting (93%) and the best root formation. Vegetative propagation of Plukenetia polyadenia by cuttings will be used as a tool to conserve and propagate germplasm in breeding programs.

  1. The SCFA butyrate stimulates the epithelial production of retinoic acid via inhibition of epithelial HDAC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilderink, Ronald; Verseijden, Caroline; Seppen, Jurgen; Muncan, Vanesa; van den Brink, Gijs R.; Lambers, Tim T.; van Tol, Eric A.; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    2016-01-01

    In the intestinal mucosa, retinoic acid (RA) is a critical signaling molecule. RA is derived from dietary vitamin A (retinol) through conversion by aldehyde dehydrogenases (aldh). Reduced levels of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are associated with pathological microbial dysbiosis, inflammatory

  2. Molecular structure of the 1:2 complex of 2-quinuclidinium-butyrate with p-hydroxybenzoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Katrusiak, A.; Szafran, M.

    2011-05-01

    The structure of the 1:2 complex of 2-quinuclidinium-butyrate, QNBu, with p-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA, ( 1) has been determined by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculations, and the complex was characterized by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. The crystals are triclinic, space group P1¯. The QNBu and HBA molecules are linked by medium-strong O sbnd H···O hydrogen bonds into a double strand related by two types of inversion centers, each inside different H-bonded rings. The O···O distances vary between 2.652(3) and 2.720(2) Å. The FTIR spectrum of the solid complex is consistent with the X-ray results. The second-derivative IR spectrum and calculated frequencies for the optimized structure of QNBu·2HBA were used to explain the FTIR spectrum in the carbonyl-carboxylate region. The interpretation of 1H and 13C NMR spectra has been based on 2D experiments and calculated GIAO/B3LYP/6-31G( d, p) magnetic isotropic shielding constants.

  3. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) release in the ciliated protozoon Paramecium occurs by neuronal-like exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramoino, P; Milanese, M; Candiani, S; Diaspro, A; Fato, M; Usai, C; Bonanno, G

    2010-04-01

    Paramecium primaurelia expresses a significant amount of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). Paramecia possess both glutamate decarboxylase (GAD)-like and vesicular GABA transporter (vGAT)-like proteins, indicating the ability to synthesize GABA from glutamate and to transport GABA into vesicles. Using antibodies raised against mammalian GAD and vGAT, bands with an apparent molecular weight of about 67 kDa and 57 kDa were detected. The presence of these bands indicated a similarity between the proteins in Paramecium and in mammals. VAMP, syntaxin and SNAP, putative proteins of the release machinery that form the so-called SNARE complex, are present in Paramecium. Most VAMP, syntaxin and SNAP fluorescence is localized in spots that vary in size and density and are primarily distributed near the plasma membrane. Antibodies raised against mammal VAMP-3, sintaxin-1 or SNAP-25 revealed protein immunoblot bands having molecular weights consistent with those observed in mammals. Moreover, P. primaurelia spontaneously releases GABA into the environment, and this neurotransmitter release significantly increases after membrane depolarization. The depolarization-induced GABA release was strongly reduced not only in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) but also by pre-incubation with bafilomycin A1 or with botulinum toxin C1 serotype. It can be concluded that GABA occurs in Paramecium, where it is probably stored in vesicles capable of fusion with the cell membrane; accordingly, GABA can be released from Paramecium by stimulus-induced, neuronal-like exocytotic mechanisms.

  4. Optimization of conditions to achieve high content of gamma amino butyric acid in germinated black rice, and changes in bioactivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaiyavat CHAIYASUT

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study estimated the optimum germination conditions to achieve high content of Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA and other phytochemicals in Thai black rice cultivar Kum Payao (BR. The Box–Behnken design of response surface methodology was employed to optimize the germination conditions. The changes in the GABA, phytochemical content, impact of salt, and temperature stress variation on phytochemical content, and stability of GABA were studied. The results showed that 12 h of soaking at pH 7, followed by 36 h of germination was the optimum condition to achieve maximum GABA content (0.2029 mg/g of germinated BR (GBR. The temperature (8 and 30 °C, and salt (50-200 mM NaCl content affected the phytochemicals of GBR, especially GABA, and anthocyanins. Obviously, the antioxidant capability, and enzyme (α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibiting nature of BR was significantly (P < 0.001 increased after germination. The storage of GBR at 4 °C significantly, preserved the GABA content (∼80% for 45 days. Primarily, the current study revealed the changes in phytochemical content, and bioactivity of Thai black rice cr. Kum Payao during germination. More studies should be carried out on pharmacological benefits of GABA-rich GBR.

  5. Diet structure, butyric acid, and fermentable carbohydrates influence growth performance, gut morphology, and cecal fermentation characteristics in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaisrani, S N; van Krimpen, M M; Kwakkel, R P; Verstegen, M W A; Hendriks, W H

    2015-09-01

    An experiment with 288 male (Ross 308) 1-d-old broilers was conducted to test the hypothesis that a coarse diet supplemented with butyric acid (BA) and fermentable carbohydrates (FC) improves performance of broilers with a poorly digestible protein source. The interaction effects of diet structure (fine or coarse), FC supplementation (with or without), and BA supplementation (with or without) in a poorly digestible diet based on rapeseed meal (RSM) were tested in a factorial arrangement of 8 (2×2×2) dietary treatments. The coarseness of the diet affected feed intake (FI) (PFermentable carbohydrate supplementation did not influence growth performance, gut development, or contents of total BCFA and total biogenic amines in the cecal digesta (P>0.05). Supplementation with FC, however, decreased the cecal concentration of spermine by approximately 31% compared with broilers fed diets without FC (P=0.002). In conclusion, feeding a coarse diet supplemented with BA improved performance of broilers fed a diet containing a poorly digestible protein source. The negative effects of a poorly digestible protein source can thus be partly counterbalanced by coarse grinding and BA supplementation in the diet. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  6. Butyrate presence in distinct gastrointestinal tract segments modifies differentially digestive processes and amino acid bioavailability in young broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moquet, P.C.A.; Salami, S.A.; Onrust, L.; Hendriks, W.H.; Kwakkel, R.P.

    2018-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that butyrate presence in the digesta of distinct gastrointestinal tract (GIT) segments of broilers leads to differential effects on digesta retention time, gut morphology, and proteolytic enzymatic activities, ultimately resulting in differences in protein digestibility. A

  7. The use of high pressure CO2 -facilitated pH swings to enhance in situ product recovery of butyric acid in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Eric C; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2014-11-01

    Through the use of high partial pressures of CO2 (pCO2 ) to facilitate temporary pH reductions in two-phase partitioning bioreactors (TPPBs), improved pH dependent partitioning of butyric acid was observed which achieved in situ product recovery (ISPR), alleviating end-product inhibition (EPI) during the production of butyric acid by Clostridium tyrobutyricum (ATCC 25755). Through high pressure pCO2 studies, media buffering effects were shown to be substantially overcome at 60 bar pCO2 , resulting in effective extraction of the organic acid by the absorptive polymer Pebax® 2533, yielding a distribution coefficient (D) of 2.4 ± 0.1 after 1 h of contact at this pressure. Importantly, it was also found that C. tyrobutyricum cultures were able to withstand 60 bar pCO2 for 1 h with no decrease in growth ability when returned to atmospheric pressure in batch reactors after several extraction cycles. A fed-batch reactor with cyclic high pCO2 polymer extraction recovered 92 g of butyric acid to produce a total of 213 g compared to 121 g generated in a control reactor. This recovery reduced EPI in the TPPB, resulting in both higher productivity (0.65 vs. 0.33 g L(-1)  h(-1) ) and yield (0.54 vs. 0.40). Fortuitously, it was also found that repeated high pCO2 -facilitated polymer extractions of butyric acid during batch growth of C. tyrobutyricum lessened the need for pH control, and reduced base requirements by approximately 50%. Thus, high pCO2 -mediated absorptive polymer extraction presents a novel method for improving process performance in butyric acid fermentation, and this technique could be applied to the bioproduction of other organic acids as well. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Interaction of polyunsaturated fatty acids and sodium butyrate in human colon adenocarcinoma cells in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofmanová, Jiřina; Vaculová, Alena; Kovaříková, Martina; Zadák, Z.; Kozubík, Alois

    Suppl. 11 (2002), s. 77 ISSN 0196-4763. [Congress of the International Society for Analytical Cytology /21./. 04.05.2002-09.05.2002, San Diego] R&D Projects: GA MZd NC6171; GA ČR GA525/01/0419; GA AV ČR IBS5004009 Keywords : polyunsaturated fatty acids * colon cancer Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  9. Butyrate and other short-chain fatty acids as modulators of immunity : what relevance for health?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Kees; de Vos, Paul; Priebe, Marion G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review High-fiber diets have been shown to reduce plasma concentrations of inflammation markers. Increased production of fermentation-derived short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) is one of the factors that could exert these positive effects. This review examines the effects of SCFAs on immune

  10. Genetic differences in the modulation of accumbal glutamate and γ-amino butyric acid levels after cocaine-induced reinstatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguéns, Miguel; Botreau, Fanny; Olías, Oscar; Del Olmo, Nuria; Coria, Santiago M; Higuera-Matas, Alejandro; Ambrosio, Emilio

    2013-07-01

    The Lewis (LEW) and Fischer 344 (F344) inbred rat strains are frequently used to study the role of genetic factors in vulnerability to drug addiction and relapse. Glutamate and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) transmission are significantly altered after cocaine-induced reinstatement, although whether LEW and F344 rats differ in their accumbal glutamate and GABA responsiveness to cocaine-induced reinstatement remains unknown. To investigate this, we measured by in vivo microdialysis extracellular glutamate and GABA levels in the core division of the nucleus accumbens after extinction of cocaine self-administration and during cocaine-induced reinstatement (7.5mg/kg, i.p.) in these two strains of rats. No strain differences were evident in cocaine self-administration or extinction behavior, although cocaine priming did induce a higher rate of lever pressing in LEW compared with F344 rats. After extinction, F344 rats that self-administered cocaine had less GABA than the saline controls, while the glutamate levels remained constant in both strains. There was more accumbal glutamate after cocaine priming in LEW rats that self-administered cocaine, while GABA levels were unaffected. By contrast, GABA increased transiently in F344 rats that self-administered cocaine, while glutamate levels were unaltered. In F344 saline controls, cocaine priming provoked contrasting effects in glutamate and GABA levels, inducing a delayed increase in glutamate and a delayed decrease in GABA levels. These amino acids were unaffected by cocaine priming in LEW saline rats. Together, these results suggest that genetic differences in cocaine-induced reinstatement reflect different responses of the accumbal GABA and glutamate systems to cocaine priming. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Role of indole-3-butyric acid or/and putrescine in improving productivity of chickpea (Cicer arientinum L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, A A; Gharib, F A; Abouziena, H F; Dawood, Mona G

    2013-12-15

    The response of chickpea (Cicer arientinum L. cv. Giza 3) to treatment with two plant growth regulators putrescine (Put) and Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) at 25, 50 and 100 mg L(-1) applied either alone or in combinations was studied. Spraying of Put and IBA either individually or in combination significantly increased the plant height, number and dry weight of branches, leaves and pods/plant and leaf area/plant at the two growth stages. Total photosynthetic pigments in fresh leaves were significantly promoted as a result of application of Put or IBA. Generally, application of Put and/or IBA at 100 mg L(-1) produced the highest numbers of pods which resulted in substantially the highest seed yield. Put and IBA increased the seed yield by 21.3 and 19.2%, respectively, while the combination of Put at 100 mgL(-1) and IBA at 50 mgL(-1) increased it by 27.4%. Greatest increases in straw and biological yield/fed (38.3 and 30.4%, respectively) were noted with the combination treatment of IBA 100 mg L(-1) plus Put at 100 mg L(-1). Put and IBA significantly increased the nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, total soluble sugars and total free amino acids in chickpea seeds over control, but the effects were less marked than those of their combination. This response was greater following treatment with IBA than with Put. It could be conclude that spraying Put or/and IBA on chickpea plants have promotion effects on the seeds yield criteria which have promising potential as sources of low-cost protein and minerals for possible use as food/feed supplements.

  12. Plasmonic-based colorimetric and spectroscopic discrimination of acetic and butyric acids produced by different types of Escherichia coli through the different assembly structures formation of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Ju A; Lim, Sora; Park, Hyo Jeong; Heo, Min-Ji; Sang, Byoung-In; Oh, Min-Kyu; Cho, Eun Chul

    2016-08-24

    We present a plasmonic-based strategy for the colourimetric and spectroscopic differentiation of various organic acids produced by bacteria. The strategy is based on our discovery that particular concentrations of dl-lactic, acetic, and butyric acids induce different assembly structures, colours, and optical spectra of gold nanoparticles. We selected wild-type (K-12 W3110) and genetically-engineered (JHL61) Escherichia coli (E. coli) that are known to primarily produce acetic and butyric acid, respectively. Different assembly structures and optical properties of gold nanoparticles were observed when different organic acids, obtained after the removal of acid-producing bacteria, were mixed with gold nanoparticles. Moreover, at moderate cell concentrations of K-12 W3110 E. coli, which produce sufficient amounts of acetic acid to induce the assembly of gold nanoparticles, a direct estimate of the number of bacteria was possible based on time-course colour change observations of gold nanoparticle aqueous suspensions. The plasmonic-based colourimetric and spectroscopic methods described here may enable onsite testing for the identification of organic acids produced by bacteria and the estimation of bacterial numbers, which have applications in health and environmental sciences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Aqueous Extract of Saffron on Gamma-Amino Butyric Acid Content in Rat Hypothalami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikpour Moghaddam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Preliminary studies revealed that 4-aminobutyric acid (GABA is a key and major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Evidence from many animal studies and even some clinical studies indicate that GABA is responsible for regulating behavior and also plays an important role in brain functions. Previous studies presented Glutamic acid decarboxylase as a catalyst for the conversion of glutamic acid to GABA. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of saffron on GABA content in the hypothalamus of rats. Materials and Methods Male rats weighing 190 - 210 g were used. They were maintained in a temperature-controlled room with a 12-hour light/dark illumination cycle. The rats were fed standard pellet feed and had access to water ad libitum. The animals were divided into three groups: The first group received a 250 µL intraperitoneal injection of 0.05 g/mL saffron (Group I. The second group received a 250 µL intraperitoneal injection of 0.1 g/mL saffron (Group II. The third group acted as the control and received only water (Group III. The time intervals chosen for this experiment were 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks following the administration of saffron. At least six animals were assigned to each experimental group. At each time interval, the animals were anaesthetized and brain tissue extracted, hypothalami separated and homogenized in PBS solution, rinsed with PBS, re-filtered, and centrifuged at 1200 g for 10 minutes. Results In this study, both doses of saffron (0.05 g/mL [Group I]; and 0.1 g/mL [Group II] caused significantly increased GABA content in each hypothalamus. GABA in Group I increased significantly compared to the control group (1.00 ± 0.05 [mean ± SD, n = 8] vs. 0.29 ± 0.05, mM. GABA in Group II also increased significantly compared to the control group (1.45 ± 0.07 [mean ± SD, n = 8] vs. 0.29 ± 0.05, mM. The effect of saffron on GABA was also dose dependent; the only exception occurring during the

  14. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) synthesis of Lactobacillus in fermentation of defatted rice bran extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dat, Lai Quoc; Ngan, Tran Thi Kim; Nu, Nguyen Thi Xuan

    2017-09-01

    This research focused on the synthesis of GABA by Lactobacillus bacteria in fermentation of defatted rice bran extract without adding glutamate. Two strains of Lactobacillus were investigated into capacity of GABA synthesis. Result indicates that, Lactobacillus brevis VTCC - B - 454 exhibited the higher capacity of GABA synthesis in fermentation of defatted rice bran extract than that of Lactobacillus plantarum VTCC - B - 890. Total dissolved solid (TDS), free amino acids (AA) and reducing sugar (RS) contents in fermentation of defatted rice bran extract with two strains also significantly decreased. At pH 5 and 9 %w/w of TDS content in defatted rice bran extract, Lactobacillus brevis VTCC - B - 454 accumulated 2,952 ppm of GABA in 24 hours of fermentation. The result implies that fermentation with Lactobacillus brevis VTCC - B - 454 can be applied for GABA production from defatted rice bran extract.

  15. Gamma Amino Butyric Acid Attenuates Brain Oxidative Damage Associated with Insulin Alteration in Streptozotocin-Treated Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltahawy, N A; Saada, H N; Hammad, A S

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the role of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) in insulin disturbance and hyperglycemia associated with brain oxidative damage in streptozotocin-treated rats. Streptozotocin (STZ) was administered to male albino rats as a single intraperitoneal dose (60 mg/kg body weight). GABA (200 mg/Kg body weight/day) was administered daily via gavages during 3 weeks to STZ-treated-rats. Male albino rats Sprague-Dawley (10 ± 2 weeks old; 120 ± 10 g body weight) were divided into 4 groups of 6 rats and treated in parallel. (1) Control group: received distilled water, (2) GABA group: received GABA, (3) STZ group: STZ-treated rats received distilled water, (4) STZ + GABA group: STZ-treated rats received GABA. Rats were sacrificed after a fasting period of 12 h next last dose of GABA. The results obtained showed that STZ-treatment produced hyperglycemia and insulin deficiency (similar to type1 Diabetes). These changes were associated with oxidative damage in brain tissue and notified by significant decreases of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in parallel to significant increases of malondialdehyde and advanced oxidation protein products levels. The histopathology reports also revealed that STZ-treatment produced degeneration of pancreatic cells. The administration of GABA to STZ-treated rats preserved pancreatic tissue with improved insulin secretion, improved glucose level and minimized oxidative stress in brain tissues. It could be concluded that GABA might protect the brain from oxidative stress and preserve pancreas tissues with adjusting glucose and insulin levels in Diabetic rats and might decrease the risk of neurodegenerative disease in diabetes.

  16. Biochemical changes in barberries during adventitious root formation: the role of indole-3-butyric acid and hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tehranifar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase (PPO, phenolic compounds and total sugars (TS were investigated during root formation in cuttings of Berberis vulgaris var. asperma (BVA and Berberis thunbergii var. atropurpurea (BTA treated with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA and IBA+H2O2. Rooting was observed on BTA cuttings but not on BVA cuttings. The BTA cuttings treated with IBA and IBA+H2O2 showed higher rooting percentages, number of roots, and root length over the control. Those treated with IBA+H2O2 recorded the lowest peroxidase activity after planting. BTA cuttings treated with IBA+H2O2 showed the highest peroxidase activity at 50 d after planting; BVA cuttings under different treatments showed no significant difference for peroxidase activity at planting time or up to 80 d after planting. PPO activity for the BTA cuttings in the control treatment was lower than for other treatments during root formation. The cuttings in the IBA and IBA+H2O2 treatments showed increased PPO activity from 0 to 50 d after planting and a slight decrease in PPO activity from 60 to 80 d after planting. PPO activity for the BVA cuttings was significantly lower than for BTA during root formation. The BTA cuttings treated with IBA and IBA+H2O2 showed the highest phenolic compound content during root formation. The BVA cuttings displayed higher TS than BTA during the initial stage of root formation. A comparison of the anatomical structure of easy-to-root and difficult-to-root cuttings indicated that physical inhibitors did not affect the rooting capacity of BVA.

  17. Revealing charge carrier dynamics in squaraine:[6, 6]-phenyl-C 71-butyric acid methyl ester based organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Aniket; Sharma, Chhavi; Prabhu, Deepak D.; Kumar, Mahesh; Karuvath, Yoosaf; Das, Suresh; Chand, Suresh; Singh, Rajiv K.

    2018-04-01

    Ultrafast charge carrier dynamics as well as the generation of polaron pair in squaraine (SQ) and squaraine:[6,6]-phenyl-C 71-butyric acid methyl ester (SQ:PCBM71) have been studied using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy (UTAS). The current study reveals that the pure SQ exhibits the creation of singlet and triplet states; however, incorporation of PCBM71 in SQ results in the formation of polaron pairs with ˜550ps lifetime, which in turn leads to the creation of free electrons in the device. We show that the considerable increment in monomolecular and bimolecular recombination in SQ:PCBM71 compared to pure SQ which describes the interfacial compatibility of SQ and PCBMC71 molecules. The present work not only provides the information about the carrier generation in SQ and SQ:PCBM71 but also gives the facts relating to the effect of PCBM71 mixing into the SQ which is very significant because the SQ has donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) structure and mixing one more acceptor can introduce more complex recombinations in the blend. These findings have been complimented by the charge transport study in the device using impedance spectroscopy. The various important transport parameters are transit time (τt), diffusion constant (Dn), global mobility (μ) and carrier lifetime (τr). The values of these parameters are 26.38 μs, 4.64x10-6 cm2s-1, 6.12x10-6 cm2V-1s-1 and 399 μs, respectively. To the best of our knowledge such study related to SQ is not present in the literature comprehensively.

  18. Effect of indole-3-butyric acid and Trichoderma harzianum Rifai on asexual cape gooseberry propagation (Physalis peruviana L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Humberto Alvarado-Sanabria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth and development of cape gooseberry plants obtained from cuttings is affected by microorganisms in the substrate and by the concentration of plant growth regulators applied during planting. Using a factorial design, the effect of four concentrations of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA (0, 800, 1,200, and 1,600 mg L-1 and four suspensions of Trichoderma harzianum (0, 2·10(6, 3·10(6, and 4·10(6 cfu/mL on the growth of cape gooseberry cuttings was evaluated. Apical cuttings were used, 20 cm long, from 20-month-old plants of the Colombian ecotype, which were planted in pots (2 L using peat moss with burned rice husks as the substrate at a 3:1 ratio (v/v. The 800 mg L-1 of IBA application showed the highest accumulation of total dry mass (DM and root DM. Moreover, 800 mg L-1 of IBA resulted in the highest leaf chlorophyll content, showing significant differences from 1,600 mg L-1, which had the lowest value. The 3·10(6 cfu/mL suspension of T. harzianum caused a greater accumulation of root DM and total DM and a higher leaf area in the plants. The most favorable interaction between the factors, which favors the growth of cape gooseberry plants obtained from cuttings, was observed with the application of 800 mg L-1 of IBA and 3·10(6 cfu/mL of T. harzianum.

  19. Effect of sodium caproate on the volumetric and viscometric properties of glycine, DL-α-alanine, and DL-α-amino-n-butyric acid in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianji; Yan Zhenning; Lu Jinsuo

    2004-01-01

    The apparent molar volumes (V m,2 ) and relative viscosities (η r ) at T=(298.15 and 308.15) K have been obtained for glycine, DL-α-alanine, and DL-α-amino-butyric acid in aqueous sodium caproate solutions from measurements of density and the flow time. The standard partial molar volumes (V 0 m,2 ), standard volumes of transfer (Δ t V 0 ), the viscosity B-coefficients, and the activation thermodynamic quantities (Δμ 2 0≠ and ΔS 2 0≠ ) of viscous flow have been calculated for the amino acids. It is shown that the standard partial molar volumes, viscosity B-coefficients, and activation free energies for viscous flow increase with increasing number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain of the amino acids. An increase in V 0 m,2 and Δ t V 0 with increasing electrolyte concentrations have been explained due to the interactions of sodium caproate with the charged center of zwitterions for the amino acids. A comparison of the V 0 m,2 values for glycine, DL-α-alanine, and DL-α-aminon-n-butyric acid in different aqueous salts solutions showed that carboxylate ions have stronger interactions with amino acid than chloride, thiocyanate, and nitrate ions. Results of viscosity are discussed in terms of changes in solvent structure

  20. Effects of ruminal ammonia and butyrate concentrations on reticuloruminal epithelial blood flow and volatile fatty acid absorption kinetics under washed reticulorumen conditions in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, A C; Hanigan, M D; Kristensen, N B

    2011-08-01

    The effect of reticuloruminal epithelial blood flow on the absorption of propionate as a volatile fatty acid (VFA) marker in 8 lactating Holstein cows was studied under washed rumen conditions. The cows were surgically prepared with ruminal cannulas and permanent catheters in an artery and mesenteric, right ruminal, and hepatic portal veins. The experiment was designed with 2 groups of cows: 4 cows adapted to high crude protein (CP) and 4 to low CP. All cows were subjected to 3 buffers: butyric, ammonia, and control in a randomized replicated 3 × 3 incomplete Latin square design. The buffers (30 kg) were maintained in a temporarily emptied and washed rumen for 40 min. The initial concentration of VFA was 84.2 mmol/L. Butyrate was increased from 4 to 36 mmol/L in butyric buffer by replacement of acetate, and ammonia (NH(3)) was increased from 2.5 to 22.5 mmol/L in ammonia buffer by replacement of NaCl. Increasing amounts of deuterium oxide (D(2)O) were added to the buffers as the order of buffer sequence increased (6, 12, and 18 g of D(2)O). Ruminal clearance of D(2)O was used to estimate epithelial blood flow. To increase accuracy of the epithelial blood flow estimates, data of ruminal liquid marker (Cr-EDTA), and initial and final buffer volumes were fitted to a dynamic simulation model. The model was used to estimate ruminal liquid passages, residual liquid, and water influx (saliva and epithelia water) for each combination of cow and buffer (n=24). Epithelial blood flow increased 49±11% for butyric buffer compared with control. The ruminal disappearance of propionate (marker VFA) was affected by buffer and followed the same pattern as for epithelial blood flow. The correlation between ruminal disappearance of propionate and epithelial blood flow (r=0.56) indicates that the removal of propionate can be limited by epithelial blood flow. The ruminal disappearance of propionate increased 30±12% for the butyric compared with ammonia buffer and 12.5±8% when

  1. Enhanced productivity of gamma-amino butyric acid by cascade modifications of a whole-cell biocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinwei; Ke, Chongrong; Zhu, Jiangming; Wang, Yan; Zeng, Wenchao; Huang, Jianzhong

    2018-04-01

    We previously developed a gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-producing strain of Escherichia coli, leading to production of 614.15 g/L GABA at 45 °C from L-glutamic acid (L-Glu) with a productivity of 40.94 g/L/h by three successive whole-cell conversion cycles. However, the increase in pH caused by the accumulation of GABA resulted in inactivation of the biocatalyst and consequently led to relatively lower productivity. In this study, by overcoming the major problem associated with the increase in pH during the production process, a more efficient biocatalyst was obtained through cascade modifications of the previously reported E. coli strain. First, we introduced four amino acid mutations to the codon-optimized GadB protein from Lactococcus lactis to shift its decarboxylation activity toward a neutral pH, resulting in 306.65 g/L of GABA with 99.14 mol% conversion yield and 69.8% increase in GABA productivity. Second, we promoted transportation of L-Glu and GABA by removing the genomic region encoding the C-plug of GadC (a glutamate/GABA antiporter) to allow its transport path to remain open at a neutral pH, which improved the GABA productivity by 16.8% with 99.3 mol% conversion of 3 M L-Glu. Third, we enhanced the expression of soluble GadB by introducing the GroESL molecular chaperones, leading to 20.2% improvement in GABA productivity, with 307.40 g/L of GABA and a 61.48 g/L/h productivity obtained in one cycle. Finally, we inhibited the degradation of GABA by inactivation of gadA and gadB from the E. coli genome, which resulted in almost no GABA degradation after 40 h. After the cascade system modifications, the engineered recombinant E. coli strain achieved a 44.04 g/L/h productivity with a 99.6 mol% conversion of 3 M L-Glu in a 5-L bioreactor, about twofold increase in productivity compared to the starting strain. This increase represents the highest GABA productivity by whole-cell bioconversion using L-Glu as a substrate in one cycle observed

  2. Effect of indole-butyric acid on the rooting of ficus cuttings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Matilda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Propagation by cuttings is one of the most successful methods of vegetative propagation of floral crops. In addition to applications in interior decoration, ficuses belong to the group of plants that will potentially be used in green spaces of Belgrade due to global climate changes. In this paper, the possibility of rooting stimulated by adding different concentrations of the indolbytric acid phytohormone was investigated in the commonly cultivated species Ficus benjamina L. and Ficus elastica Roxb.. This is the most commonly used phytohormone in the propagation of ornamental plants due to its stability and stimulation of the rooting process, i.e. its favourable impact on the formation of adventitious roots, their size, number and weight. In this research, the rooting percent of cuttings was 100 % in F. benjamina and 77.66 % in F. elastica. It was found that the highest dose (2 % of the phytohormone significantly increased all indicators of rooting success in F. benjamina and that the application of weaker concentrations also showed good success. The rooting of F. elastica cuttings was not successful without phytohormones, and the best results were achieved at the phytohormone concentration of 2 %, which increased the dry weight of the roots of this ficus about 4 times. It would be useful to examine higher concentrations of this phytohormone and also some combinations with other rooting stimulators, to be able to make sound recommendations on the optimal dose for the mass production of these ficuses. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43007

  3. Continuous hydrogen and butyric acid fermentation by immobilized Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755: effects of the glucose concentration and hydraulic retention time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Robert J; Kim, Ji-Seong; Jeon, Byung-Seung; Sang, Byoung-In

    2009-11-01

    The effects of the hydraulic retention time (HRT=8, 10, 12 or 16.7 h) and glucose concentration (30, 40 or 50 g/L) on the production of hydrogen and butyrate by an immobilized Clostridium tyrobutyricum culture, grown under continuous culturing conditions, were evaluated. With 30 g/L glucose, the higher HRTs tested led to greater butyrate concentrations in the culture, i.e., 9.3 g/L versus 12.9 g/L with HRTs of 8 h and 16.7 h, respectively. In contrast, higher biogas and hydrogen production rates were generally seen when the HRT was lower. Experiments with different glucose concentrations saw a significant amount of glucose washed out when 50 g/L was used, the highest being 22.7 g/L when the HRT was 16.7 h. This study found the best conditions for the continuous production of hydrogen and butyric acid by C. tyrobutyricum to be with an HRT of 12 h and a glucose concentration of 50 g/L, respectively.

  4. Interaction of polyunsaturated fatty acids and sodium butyrate during apoptosis in HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofmanová, Jiřina; Vaculová, Alena; Lojek, Antonín; Kozubík, Alois

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2005), s. 40-51 ISSN 1436-6207 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA525/01/0419 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : colon cancer * diet * butyrate Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.257, year: 2005

  5. Detection and molecular characterization of butyrate-producing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Butyrate-producing gut microflora synthesizes and secretes butyrate which serves as source of energy and stimulates rumen development in young animals. The present study was undertaken to characterize and screen butyrate-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) for probiotic use in animals in order to manipulate their gut ...

  6. Butyrate-induced transcriptional changes in human colonic mucosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhoutvin, S.A.L.W.; Troost, F.J.; Hamer, H.M.; Lindsey, P.J.; Koek, G.H.; Jonkers, D.M.A.E.; Kodde, A.; Venema, K.; Brummer, R.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Fermentation of dietary fiber in the colon results in the production of short chain fatty acids (mainly propionate, butyrate and acetate). Butyrate modulates a wide range of processes, but its mechanism of action is mostly unknown. This study aimed to determine the effects of butyrate on

  7. Molecular modeling study of agglomeration of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester in solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortuza, S M; Banerjee, Soumik

    2012-12-28

    The molecular interactions between solvent and nanoparticles during photoactive layer formation in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells influence the morphology of the photoactive layer and hence determine the power conversion efficiency. Prediction of optimal synthesis parameters in OPVs, such as choice of solvent, processing temperature, and nanoparticle concentration, requires fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern the agglomeration of nanoparticles in solvents. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations to simulate a commonly used organic nanoparticle, [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), in various solvents to correlate solvent-nanoparticle interactions with the size of the agglomerate structure of PCBM. We analyzed the effects of concentration of PCBM and operating temperature on the molecular rearrangement and agglomeration of PCBM in three solvents: (i) toluene, (ii) indane, and (iii) toluene-indane mixture. We evaluated the agglomeration behavior of PCBM by determining sizes of the largest clusters of PCBM and the corresponding size distributions. To obtain further insight into the agglomerate structure of PCBMs, we evaluated radial distribution functions (RDFs) and coordination numbers of the various moieties of PCBMs with respect to solvent atoms as well as with respect to that of other PCBMs. Our simulations demonstrate that PCBMs form larger clusters in toluene while they are relatively dispersed in indane, which indicates the greater solubility of PCBM in indane than in toluene. In toluene-indane mixture, PCBMs are clustered to a greater extent than in indane and less than that in toluene. To correlate agglomerate size to nanoparticle-solvent interactions, we also evaluated the potential of mean force (PMF) of the fullerene moiety of PCBM in toluene and indane. Our results also show that the cluster size of PCBM molecules increases with the increase of concentration of PCBM and the processing temperature. To

  8. Transport of Indole-3-Butyric Acid and Indole-3-Acetic Acid in Arabidopsis Hypocotyls Using Stable Isotope Labeling1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Barkawi, Lana; Gardner, Gary; Cohen, Jerry D.

    2012-01-01

    The polar transport of the natural auxins indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) has been described in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hypocotyls using radioactive tracers. Because radioactive assays alone cannot distinguish IBA from its metabolites, the detected transport from applied [3H]IBA may have resulted from the transport of IBA metabolites, including IAA. To test this hypothesis, we used a mass spectrometry-based method to quantify the transport of IBA in Arabidopsis hypocotyls by following the movement of [13C1]IBA and the [13C1]IAA derived from [13C1]IBA. We also assayed [13C6]IAA transport in a parallel control experiment. We found that the amount of transported [13C1]IBA was dramatically lower than [13C6]IAA, and the IBA transport was not reduced by the auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid. Significant amounts of the applied [13C1]IBA were converted to [13C1]IAA during transport, but [13C1]IBA transport was independent of IBA-to-IAA conversion. We also found that most of the [13C1]IBA was converted to ester-linked [13C1]IBA at the apical end of hypocotyls, and ester-linked [13C1]IBA was also found in the basal end at a level higher than free [13C1]IBA. In contrast, most of the [13C6]IAA was converted to amide-linked [13C6]IAA at the apical end of hypocotyls, but very little conjugated [13C6]IAA was found in the basal end. Our results demonstrate that the polar transport of IBA is much lower than IAA in Arabidopsis hypocotyls, and the transport mechanism is distinct from IAA transport. These experiments also establish a method for quantifying the movement of small molecules in plants using stable isotope labeling. PMID:22323783

  9. Effect of Volatile Fatty Acids and Trimethylamine on Denitrification in Activated Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eilersen, Ann Marie; Henze, Mogens; Kløft, Lene

    1995-01-01

    with the strongest effect, n-butyric acid has a moderate effect, while TMA only have a small effect in stimulating the rates. Propionic, isobutyric, n-valeric, isovaleric and caproic acid inhibit denitrification, nitrate reduction being more inhibited than nitrite reduction. The inhibitor concentration, KI, at which...... mM for isovaleric and 105 mM for caproic acid. KI values for nitrite reduction were found to be 196 mM for propionic, 32 mM for isobutyric, 57 mM for n-valeric, 18 mM for isovaleric and 110 mM for caproic acid. Inhibition of the rate of hydrolysis could not be determined. Anaerobically treated....... For propionic acid it could not be assessed whether the degree of inhibition were determined by the undissociated or the total concentration of the inhibitor....

  10. THE ACTIVATION OF STARFISH EGGS BY ACIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillie, Ralph S.

    1926-01-01

    1. Exposure of unfertilized starfish eggs to dilute solutions of weak acids (fatty acids, benzoic and carbonic acids) in isotonic balanced salt solution causes complete activation with the proper durations of exposure. For each acid the rate of activation (reciprocal of optimum duration) varies with concentration and temperature; at a given temperature and within a considerable range of concentrations (e.g. 0.00075 to 0.004 M for butyric acid), this rate is approximately proportional to concentration. We may thus speak of a molecular rate of action characteristic of each acid. 2. In general the molecular rate of action increases with the dissociation constant and surface activity of the acids. In the fatty acid series (up to caproic), formic acid has the most rapid effect, acting about four times as rapidly as acetic; for the other acids the order is: acetic = propionic ≦ butyric Carbonic acid acts qualitatively like the fatty acids, but its molecular rate of action is only about one-fourteenth that of acetic acid. 3. Hydrochloric and lactic acids are relatively ineffective as activating agents, apparently because of difficulty of penetration. Lactic acid is decidedly the more effective. The action of both acids is only slightly modified by dissolving in pure (isotonic NaCl and CaCl2) instead of in balanced salt solution. 4. The rate of action of acetic acid, in concentrations of 0.002 M to 0.004 M is increased (by 10 to 20 per cent) by adding Na-acetate (0.002 to 0.016) to the solution. The degree of acceleration is closely proportional to the estimated increase in undissociated acetic acid molecules. Activation thus appears to be an effect of the undissociated acid molecules in the external solution and not of the ions. Acetate anions and H ions acting by themselves, in concentrations much higher than those of the solutions used, have no activating effect. The indications are that the undissociated molecules penetrate rapidly, the ions slowly. Having penetrated

  11. Effects of Chinese herbal medicine Ningdong granule on regulating dopamine (DA)/serotonin (5-TH) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) in patients with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuzhen; Qi, Fanghua; Li, Jijun; Zhao, Lin; Li, Anyuan

    2012-08-01

    Many studies have indicated that a variety of neurotransmitters are implicated in the pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome (TS), including dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-TH), homovanillic acid (HVA), and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). Our previous studies found that Ningdong granule (NDG) is effective on a rat model with TS. NDG can regulate the metabolic disturbance of DA, 5-TH and HVA in the rat brain. However, the mechanisms of NDG in patients with TS are still not clear. To further evaluate the efficiency, safety, and possible mechanisms of NDG, a randomized and double-blind study was carried out. One hundred and twenty patients with TS were enrolled in this study, that were randomly divided into 4 groups (NDG group, Haloperidol (Hal) group, NDG + Hal group and Control group). First, the efficiency of NDG was assessed using the Yale Global Tic Severity Score (YGTSS). Second, the concentration of DA, HVA, 5-TH, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and GABA in sera were tested by ELISA. In addition, the influence of NDG on liver and renal function was recorded. We found that NDG could ameliorate tics significantly according the YGTSS score. The concentration of HVA and GABA were increased after treatment with NDG. Furthermore, we found that there was no liver or renal damage in children treated with NDG. We also found that the NDG + Hal group was more effective and safe compared with other groups. In conclusion, the current study indicates that NDG might be effective on patients with TS by regulating dopamine (DA)/serotonin (5-TH) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA).

  12. Indole-3-butyric acid promotes adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis thaliana thin cell layers by conversion into indole-3-acetic acid and stimulation of anthranilate synthase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattorini, L; Veloccia, A; Della Rovere, F; D'Angeli, S; Falasca, G; Altamura, M M

    2017-07-11

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and its precursor indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), control adventitious root (AR) formation in planta. Adventitious roots are also crucial for propagation via cuttings. However, IBA role(s) is/are still far to be elucidated. In Arabidopsis thaliana stem cuttings, 10 μM IBA is more AR-inductive than 10 μM IAA, and, in thin cell layers (TCLs), IBA induces ARs when combined with 0.1 μM kinetin (Kin). It is unknown whether arabidopsis TCLs produce ARs under IBA alone (10 μM) or IAA alone (10 μM), and whether they contain endogenous IAA/IBA at culture onset, possibly interfering with the exogenous IBA/IAA input. Moreover, it is unknown whether an IBA-to-IAA conversion is active in TCLs, and positively affects AR formation, possibly through the activity of the nitric oxide (NO) deriving from the conversion process. Revealed undetectable levels of both auxins at culture onset, showing that arabidopsis TCLs were optimal for investigating AR-formation under the total control of exogenous auxins. The AR-response of TCLs from various ecotypes, transgenic lines and knockout mutants was analyzed under different treatments. It was shown that ARs are better induced by IBA than IAA and IBA + Kin. IBA induced IAA-efflux (PIN1) and IAA-influx (AUX1/LAX3) genes, IAA-influx carriers activities, and expression of ANTHRANILATE SYNTHASE -alpha1 (ASA1), a gene involved in IAA-biosynthesis. ASA1 and ANTHRANILATE SYNTHASE -beta1 (ASB1), the other subunit of the same enzyme, positively affected AR-formation in the presence of exogenous IBA, because the AR-response in the TCLs of their mutant wei2wei7 was highly reduced. The AR-response of IBA-treated TCLs from ech2ibr10 mutant, blocked into IBA-to-IAA-conversion, was also strongly reduced. Nitric oxide, an IAA downstream signal and a by-product of IBA-to-IAA conversion, was early detected in IAA- and IBA-treated TCLs, but at higher levels in the latter explants. Altogether, results showed that IBA induced

  13. Synthesis of L-2,4-diamino[4-11C]butyric acid and its use in some in vitro and in vivo tumour models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoni, G.; Omura, H.; Bergstroem, M.; Furuya, Y.; Moulder, R.; Roberto, A.; Sundin, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Laangstroem, B.

    1997-01-01

    L-2,4-Diamino[4- 11 C]butyric acid (DAB) was synthesized by an enzyme catalysed carrier added (0.1 μmol KCN) reaction of hydrogen [ 11 C]cyanide with O-acetyl-L-serine followed by reduction. L-[ 11 C]DAB was obtained with a radiochemical purity higher than 96% and with a decay corrected radiochemical yield of 30-40% within a 32 min reaction time. The enantiomeric excess was 98%. The uptake of L-[ 11 C]DAB was investigated in multicellular aggregates of six different cell lines and animal tumour models. L-[ 11 C]DAB is potentially useful for the assessment of pharmacokinetics of L-DAB in vivo for part of its evaluation as an antitumoural agent, although its use for diagnostic purposes seems limited

  14. 4,4,4-trifluoro-3-(indole-3-)butyric acid promotes root elongation in Lactuca sativa independent of ethylene synthesis and pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nenggang; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    We studied the mode of action of 4,4,4-trifluoro-3- (indole-3-) butyric acid (TFIBA), a recently described root growth stimulator, on primary root growth of Lactuca sativa L. seedlings. TFIBA (100 micromoles) promoted elongation of primary roots by 40% in 72 h but inhibited hypocotyl growth by 35%. TFIBA induced root growth was independent of pH. TFIBA did not affect ethylene production, but reduced the inhibitory effect of ethylene on root elongation. TFIBA promoted root growth even in the presence of the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor L-alpha-(2-aminoethoxyvinyl)glycine. TFIBA and the ethylene-binding inhibitor silver thiosulphate (STS) had a similar effect on root elongation. The results indicate that TFIBA-stimulated root elongation was neither pH-dependent nor related to inhibition of ethylene synthesis, but was possibly related to ethylene action.

  15. Metabolism of γ-hydroxyl-[1-14C] butyrate by rat brain: relationship to the Krebs cycle and metabolic compartmentation of amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, J.D.; Roth, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    Ninhydrin decarboxylation experiments were carried out on the labelled amino acids produced following intraventricular injection of either γ-hydroxy-[1- 14 C] butyric acid (GHB) or [1- 14 C] succinate. The loss of isotope (as 14 CO 2 ) was similar for both substances. The [1- 14 C] GHB metabolites lost 75% of the label and the [1- 14 C] succinate metabolites lost 68%. This observation gives support to the hypothesis that the rat brain has the enzymatic capacity to metabolize [1- 14 C] GHB to succinate and to amino acids that have the isotope in the carboxylic acid group adjacent to the α-amino group. These results also indicate that the label from [1- 14 C] GHB does not enter the Krebs cycle as acetate. The specific activity ratio of radio-labelled glutamine to glutamic acid was determined in order to evaluate which of the two major metabolic compartments prefentially metabolize GHB. It was found that for [1- 14 C] GHB the ratio was 4.20 +- 0.18 (S.E. for n = 7) and for [1- 14 C] succinate the ratio was 7.71 (average of two trials, 7.74 and 7.69). These results suggest that the compartment thought to be associated with glial cells and synaptosomal structures is largely responsible for the metabolism of GHB. Metabolism as it might relate to the neuropharmacological action of GHB is discussed. (author)

  16. Impact of pH and butyric acid on butanol production during batch fermentation using a new local isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shorgani, Najeeb Kaid Nasser; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid; Yusoff, Wan Mohtar Wan; Hamid, Aidil Abdul

    2018-02-01

    The effect of pH and butyric acid supplementation on the production of butanol by a new local isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1 during batch culture fermentation was investigated. The results showed that pH had a significant effect on bacterial growth and butanol yield and productivity. The optimal initial pH that maximized butanol production was pH 6.0 ± 0.2. Controlled pH was found to be unsuitable for butanol production in strain YM1, while the uncontrolled pH condition with an initial pH of 6.0 ± 0.2 was suitable for bacterial growth, butanol yield and productivity. The maximum butanol concentration of 13.5 ± 1.42 g/L was obtained from cultures grown under the uncontrolled pH condition, resulting in a butanol yield ( Y P / S ) and productivity of 0.27 g/g and 0.188 g/L h, respectively. Supplementation of the pH-controlled cultures with 4.0 g/L butyric acid did not improve butanol production; however, supplementation of the uncontrolled pH cultures resulted in high butanol concentrations, yield and productivity (16.50 ± 0.8 g/L, 0.345 g/g and 0.163 g/L h, respectively). pH influenced the activity of NADH-dependent butanol dehydrogenase, with the highest activity obtained under the uncontrolled pH condition. This study revealed that pH is a very important factor in butanol fermentation by C. acetobutylicum YM1.

  17. Impact of pH and butyric acid on butanol production during batch fermentation using a new local isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeb Kaid Nasser Al-Shorgani

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of pH and butyric acid supplementation on the production of butanol by a new local isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1 during batch culture fermentation was investigated. The results showed that pH had a significant effect on bacterial growth and butanol yield and productivity. The optimal initial pH that maximized butanol production was pH 6.0 ± 0.2. Controlled pH was found to be unsuitable for butanol production in strain YM1, while the uncontrolled pH condition with an initial pH of 6.0 ± 0.2 was suitable for bacterial growth, butanol yield and productivity. The maximum butanol concentration of 13.5 ± 1.42 g/L was obtained from cultures grown under the uncontrolled pH condition, resulting in a butanol yield (YP/S and productivity of 0.27 g/g and 0.188 g/L h, respectively. Supplementation of the pH-controlled cultures with 4.0 g/L butyric acid did not improve butanol production; however, supplementation of the uncontrolled pH cultures resulted in high butanol concentrations, yield and productivity (16.50 ± 0.8 g/L, 0.345 g/g and 0.163 g/L h, respectively. pH influenced the activity of NADH-dependent butanol dehydrogenase, with the highest activity obtained under the uncontrolled pH condition. This study revealed that pH is a very important factor in butanol fermentation by C. acetobutylicum YM1.

  18. A Co-Drug of Butyric Acid Derived from Fermentation Metabolites of the Human Skin Microbiome Stimulates Adipogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: Implications in Tissue Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanhan; Zhang, Lingjuan; Yu, Jinghua; Huang, Stephen; Wang, Zhenping; Chun, Kimberly Ann; Lee, Tammy Ling; Chen, Ying-Tung; Gallo, Richard L; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2017-01-01

    We show that Staphylococcus epidermidis, a commensal bacterium in the human skin microbiome, produces short-chain fatty acids by glycerol fermentation that can induce adipogenesis. Although the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of short-chain fatty acids have been previously well characterized, little is known about the contribution of short-chain fatty acids to the adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). We show that ADSCs differentiated into adipocytes and accumulated lipids in the cytoplasm when cultured with butyric acid, a principal short-chain fatty acid in the fermentation metabolites of S. epidermidis. Additionally, a co-drug, butyric acid 2-(2-butyryloxyethoxy) ethyl ester (BA-DEG-BA), released active butyric acid when it was intradermally injected into mouse ears and induced ADSC differentiation, characterized by an increased expression of cytoplasmic lipids and perilipin A. The BA-DEG-BA-induced adipogenic differentiation was mediated via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma. Furthermore, intradermal injection of ADSCs along with BA-DEG-BA into mouse ears markedly enhanced the adipogenic differentiation of ADSCs, leading to dermal augmentation. Our study introduces BA-DEG-BA as an enhancer of ADSC adipogenesis and suggests an integral interaction between the human skin microbiome and ADSCs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Periodontal disease level-butyric acid amounts locally administered in the rat gingival mucosa induce ER stress in the systemic blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueno, Marni E; Saito, Yuko; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2016-05-01

    Periodontal diseases have long been postulated to contribute to systemic diseases and, likewise, it has been proposed that periodontal disease treatment may ameliorate certain systemic diseases. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) are major secondary metabolites produced by oral anaerobic bacteria and, among the SCFAs, butyric acid (BA) in high amounts contribute to periodontal disease development. Periodontal disease level-butyric acid (PDL-BA) is found among patients suffering from periodontal disease and has previously shown to induce oxidative stress, whereas, oxidative stress is correlated to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This would imply that PDL-BA may likewise stimulate ER stress, however, this was never elucidated. A better understanding of the correlation between PDL-BA and systemic ER stress stimulation could shed light on the possible systemic effects of PDL-BA-related periodontal diseases. Here, PDL-BA was injected into the gingival mucosa and the systemic blood obtained from the rat jugular was collected at 0, 15, 60, and 180 min post-injection. Collected blood samples were purified and only the blood cytosol was used throughout this study. Subsequently, we measured blood cytosolic GADD153, Ca(2+), representative apoptotic and inflammatory caspases, and NF-κB amounts. We found that PDL-BA presence increased blood cytosolic GADD153 and Ca(2+) amounts. Moreover, we observed that blood cytosolic caspases and NF-κB were activated only at 60 and 180 min post-injection in the rat gingival mucosa. This suggests that PDL-BA administered through the gingival mucosa may influence the systemic blood via ER stress stimulation and, moreover, prolonged PDL-BA retention in the gingival mucosa may play a significant role in ER stress-related caspase and NF-κB activation. In a periodontal disease scenario, we propose that PDL-BA-related ER stress stimulation leading to the simultaneous activation of apoptosis and inflammation may contribute to periodontal disease

  20. An in vitro model of renal inflammation after ischemic oxidative stress injury: nephroprotective effects of a hyaluronan ester with butyric acid on mesangial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baraldi O

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Olga Baraldi,1 Francesca Bianchi,2,3 Viola Menghi,1 Andrea Angeletti,1 Anna Laura Croci Chiocchini,1 Maria Cappuccilli,1 Valeria Aiello,1 Giorgia Comai,1 Gaetano La Manna1 1Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, Nephrology, Dialysis and Renal Transplant Unit, Sant’Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, 2Stem Wave Institute for Tissue Healing, Gruppo Villa Maria Care & Research – Ettore Sansavini Health Science Foundation, Lugo, Ravenna, 3National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems at the Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, Sant’Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy Background: Acute kidney injury, known as a major trigger for organ fibrosis and independent predictor of chronic kidney disease, is characterized by mesangial cell proliferation, inflammation and unbalance between biosynthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix. Therapeutic approaches targeting the inhibition of mesangial cell proliferation and matrix expansion may represent a promising opportunity for the treatment of kidney injury. An ester of hyaluronic acid and butyric acid (HB has shown vasculogenic and regenerative properties in renal ischemic-damaged tissues, resulting in enhanced function recovery and minor degree of inflammation in vivo. This study evaluated the effect of HB treatment in mesangial cell cultures exposed to H2O2-induced oxidative stress.Materials and methods: Lactate dehydrogenase release and caspase-3 activation were measured using mesangial cells prepared from rat kidneys to assess necrosis and apoptosis. Akt and p38 phosphorylation was analyzed to identify the possible mechanism underlying cell response to HB treatment. The relative expressions of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MPP-9 and collagen type 1 alpha genes were also analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cell proliferation rate and viability were measured using

  1. Growth and development of moringa (Moringa oleifera L. stem cuttings as affected by diameter magnitude, growth media, and indole-3-butyric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsuddeen Rufai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The acknowledged status of Moringa oleifera L. in sub-Saharan Africa, especially western Africa, has of recent accorded it the significance of being a good source of income to a large segment of many of its populace. Intensification of research into the realization of its full economic potential will be of utmost value to impoverished societies globally. One way to achieve this is the full exploration of all possible means that will facilitate its successful growth, propagation, and domestication. Even though it can be successfully raised through seeds, the high level outcrossing (64.3% observed is a hindrance to realization of true to type trees. Vegetative propagation can be employed as an option to tackle the noted limitation, ease the cultivation process, and achieve the required realization of its economic potential. Our trial was carried out to study the influence of two growth media and three levels of indole 3-butyric acid (IBA on root and shoot development in cuttings taken from a coppiced moringa tree existent in Universiti Putra Malaysia. Semi-hardwood cuttings of moringa, of between 20 and 30 mm diameter, cut into 25 cm length, were obtained, rinsed with a fungicide, then dipped, through their basal portion, inside varying levels (0, 1000, 2000, and 3000 ppm of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA for between 7 and 10 seconds. The treated cuttings were then transplanted into a polyethylene bags (23 cm × 36 cm, containing two growth media - a munchong series soil (M and a combination of a munchong series soil thoroughly mixed with biochar (MB in a 3:1 ratio sequence. The trial was conducted inside a shade house where the humidity of the experimental area was manipulated through a regular daily manual hand sprinkling. Plant height, percentage of primary branch produced, leaf area, and dry matter (DM were found to be significantly (P<0.05 influenced by variation in stem diameter magnitude, while the diameter of the primary branch and spad

  2. Comparative transcriptome analysis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in response to plant signal salicylic acid, indole-3-acetic acid and gamma-amino butyric acid reveals signalling cross-talk and Agrobacterium--plant co-evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ze-Chun; Haudecoeur, Elise; Faure, Denis; Kerr, Kathleen F; Nester, Eugene W

    2008-11-01

    Agrobacterium has evolved sophisticated strategies to perceive and transduce plant-derived cues. Recent studies have found that numerous plant signals, including salicylic acid (SA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), profoundly affect Agrobacterium-plant interactions. Here we determine and compare the transcriptome profiles of Agrobacterium in response to these three plant signals. Collectively, the transcription of 103, 115 and 95 genes was significantly altered by SA, IAA and GABA respectively. Both distinct cellular responses and overlapping signalling pathways were elicited by these three plant signals. Interestingly, these three plant compounds function additively to shut off the Agrobacterium virulence programme and activate the quorum-quenching machinery. Moreover, the repression of the virulence programme by SA and IAA and the inactivation of quorum-sensing signals by SA and GABA are regulated through independent pathways. Our data indicate that these plant signals, while cross-talk in plant signalling networks, also act as cross-kingdom signals and play redundant roles in tailoring Agrobacterium regulatory pathways, resulting in intensive signalling cross-talk in Agrobacterium. Our results support the notion that Agrobacterium has evolved the ability to hijack plant signals for its own benefit. The complex signalling interplay between Agrobacterium and its plant hosts reflects an exquisite co-evolutionary balance.

  3. Potential beneficial effects of butyrate in intestinal and extraintestinal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canani, Roberto Berni; Costanzo, Margherita Di; Leone, Ludovica; Pedata, Monica; Meli, Rosaria; Calignano, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The multiple beneficial effects on human health of the short-chain fatty acid butyrate, synthesized from non-absorbed carbohydrate by colonic microbiota, are well documented. At the intestinal level, butyrate plays a regulatory role on the transepithelial fluid transport, ameliorates mucosal inflammation and oxidative status, reinforces the epithelial defense barrier, and modulates visceral sensitivity and intestinal motility. In addition, a growing number of studies have stressed the role of butyrate in the prevention and inhibition of colorectal cancer. At the extraintestinal level, butyrate exerts potentially useful effects on many conditions, including hemoglobinopathies, genetic metabolic diseases, hypercholesterolemia, insulin resistance, and ischemic stroke. The mechanisms of action of butyrate are different; many of these are related to its potent regulatory effects on gene expression. These data suggest a wide spectrum of positive effects exerted by butyrate, with a high potential for a therapeutic use in human medicine. PMID:21472114

  4. Review article: the role of butyrate on colonic function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, H.M.; Jonkers, D.; Venema, K.; Vanhoutvin, S.; Troost, F.J.; Brummer, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid, is a main end-product of intestinal microbial fermentation of mainly dietary fibre. Butyrate is an important energy source for intestinal epithelial cells and plays a role in the maintenance of colonic homeostasis. Aim: To provide an overview on the

  5. Side chain effect on electronic structure of spin-coated films of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester and its bis-adduct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaike, Kouki; Kanai, Kaname; Ouchi, Yukio; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Electronic structure of spin-coated films of PCBM and bis-PCBM was investigated. ► Ionization energy and electron affinity of bis-PCBM are smaller than those of PCBM. ► Electron donation from the side chain to C 60 -backbone raises the HOMO and LUMO. ► Open circuit voltages of PCBM-based solar cells relates to electron affinities. - Abstract: We investigated the electronic structure of spin-coated films of two soluble fullerenes; [6,6]-phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and its bis-adduct (bis-PCBM) using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, inverse photoemission spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations. The ionization energy and electron affinity of spin-coated films of bis-PCBM were determined to be 6.01 eV and 3.4 eV, respectively. Analysis of electron density suggested the stronger electron donation from the two side chains to fullerene-backbone in a bis-PCBM molecule, compared with PCBM. The electron donation raises the energies of the frontier orbitals of bis-PCBM, which mainly consist of π-orbitals of fullerene-backbone. As a result, the ionization energy and electron affinity of bis-PCBM are smaller than those of PCBM. Moreover, we also concluded that the larger open circuit voltage observed for bis-PCBM based organic photovoltaics was explained by the higher-lying unoccupied molecular orbital of bis-PCBM

  6. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and inverse photoemission spectroscopy of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester in gas and solid phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaike, Kouki; Nishi, Toshio; Ouchi, Yukio; Seki, Kazuhiko; Kanai, Kaname; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Tsutsumi, Jun'ya; Sato, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    The electronic structure of [6,6]-phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) was studied using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of vapor and thin film and inverse photoemission spectroscopy of thin film. The threshold ionization energy of PCBM was found to be 7.17±0.04 eV in gas phase and 5.96±0.02 eV in solid phase. The threshold electron affinity was 3.9±0.1 eV in solid phase. These values are 0.4-0.6 eV smaller than C 60 . The density functional theory calculations gave consistent results with these trends and suggested that the electron donation from the side chain to C 60 backbone raised the C 60 -backbone-derived π orbitals of PCBM. The polarization energy of PCBM is 1.21 eV, which is almost the same as C 60 but is about 0.5 eV smaller than the value of typical aromatic hydrocarbons

  7. Enhanced performance of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester solar cells by UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Wenjin; Song, Guoxin; Li, Yonghua; Yuan, Chunqiu; Fan, Tianju; Tang, Wei; Wang, Jin; Zhao, Chunyan; Lai, Wenyong [Key Laboratory for Organic Electronics and Information Displays & Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts & Telecommunications, 9 Wenyuan Road, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhang, Hongmei, E-mail: iamhmzhang@njupt.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Organic Electronics and Information Displays & Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts & Telecommunications, 9 Wenyuan Road, Nanjing 210023 (China); Min, Yong, E-mail: iamygmin@njupt.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Organic Electronics and Information Displays & Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts & Telecommunications, 9 Wenyuan Road, Nanjing 210023 (China); Huang, Wei, E-mail: wei-huang@njtech.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Organic Electronics and Information Displays & Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts & Telecommunications, 9 Wenyuan Road, Nanjing 210023 (China); Key Laboratory of Flexible Electronics (KLOFE) & Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials - SICAM, Nanjing Tech University - NanjingTech, 30 South Puzhu Road, Nanjing 211816 (China)

    2016-02-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl (P3HT:PCBM) solar cells before the thermal annealing of its active layer. Aggregation size of the active layer was observed to increase after UV irradiation, according to the transmission electron microscopy images. Characterization of X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy demonstrated that UV irradiation can improve the crystallinity of P3HT phase and optimize the roughness of the active layer. Simulation results indicated that UV irradiation of appropriate time can improve physics parameters of the devices. As a result, the maximum power conversion efficiency of the devices was increased from 3.5% to 4.5%. - Highlights: • High efficiency of 4.5% was achieved based on P3HT:PCBM system. • UV irradiation of 365 nm significantly influenced aggregate morphology of PCBM. • Physical parameters were calculated to evaluate the variation quantitatively.

  8. Efficient and stable, structurally inverted poly(3-hexylthiopen): [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester heterojunction solar cells with fibrous like poly(3-hexylthiopen)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandara, Jayasundera; Shankar, Karthik; Grimes, Craig A.; Thelakkat, Mukundan

    2011-01-01

    We investigated an inverted organic photovoltaic device structure in which a densely packed ∼ 100 nm thin TiO 2 layer on fluorine doped conducting glass serves as anode and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate)/Au layer on top of the active layer serves as cathode. The active layer is comprised of a blend of poly(3-hexylthiopene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The rectification behavior of such a device is improved significantly and injection losses are minimized compared to devices without any compact TiO 2 layer. Moreover, nanostructured P3HT active layer was achieved in-situ by spin coating concentrated pure P3HT and P3HT:PCBM blend and solar cell performances on thickness of the active layer were also investigated. For the inverted solar cells constructed with different concentrations of P3HT and PCBM keeping the P3HT:PCBM ratio 1:0.8 (wt.%), the highest short circuit current and efficiency was observed when the P3HT and PCBM concentration was equal to 1.5 (wt.%) and 1.2 (wt.%) respectively. This leads to highly stable and reproducible power conversion efficiency above 3.7% at 100 mW/cm 2 light intensity under AM 1.5 conditions.

  9. Dependence of protein binding capacity of dimethylamino-γ-butyric-acid (DMGABA)-immobilized porous membrane on composition of solvent used for DMGABA immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanade, Akio; Umeno, Daisuke; Saito, Kyoichi; Sugo, Takanobu

    2013-01-01

    Dimethylamino-γ-butyric acid (DMGABA) as an ampholite was reacted with the epoxy group of the poly-glycidyl methacrylate chain grafted onto the pore surface of a porous hollow-fiber polyethylene membrane by radiation-induced graft polymerization. DMGABA was dissolved in a mixture of dioxane and water at various dioxane volume fractions, defined by dividing the dioxane volume by the total volume. The equilibrium binding capacity (EBC) of the DMGABA-immobilized porous hollow-fiber membrane for lysozyme was evaluated in the permeation mode. The EBC was varied from a 1/50-fold monolayer binding capacity to a 10-fold monolayer binding capacity by controlling the composition of the solvent used for DMGABA immobilization and the molar conversion of the epoxy group into the DMGABA group. - Highlights: ► A DMGABA membrane was immobilized by irradiation induced graft polymerization. ► The DMGABA was immobilized in a mixture of dioxane and water of various compositions. ► Lysozyme adsorptivity of DMGABA-immobilized membranes evaluated in the permeation mode. ► The composition of the DMGABA immobilized solvent can control adsorptivity

  10. Influence of indole-butyric acid and electro-pulse on in vitro rooting and development of olive (Olea europea L.) microshoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Isabel Maria Gonzalez; Vidoy, I; Encina, C L

    2009-09-01

    The effects of indole-butyric acid (IBA) and electro-pulses on rooting and shoot growth were studied in vitro, using olive shoot cultures. Tested shoots were obtained from seedlings belonging to three Spanish cultivars, 'Arbequina', 'Manzanilla de Sevilla' and 'Gordal Sevillana', which have easy-, medium- and difficult-to-root rooting abilities, respectively. The standard two-step rooting method (SRM), consisting of root induction in olive rooting medium supplemented with 0, 0.1 or 1 mg/l IBA followed by root elongation in the same rooting medium without IBA, was compared with a novel one-step method consisting of shoot electro-pulses of 250, 1,250 or 2,500 V in a solution of IBA (0, 0.1 or 1 mg/l) and direct transferral to root elongation medium. The rooting percentage of the seedling-derived shoots obtained with the SRM was 76% for 'Arbequina' and 'Gordal Sevillana' cultivars and 100% for 'Manzanilla de Sevilla' cultivar, whereas with the electro-pulse method, the rooting percentages were 68, 64 and 88%, respectively. IBA dipping without pulse produced 0% rooting in 'Arbequina' seedling-derived shoots. The electroporation in IBA not only had an effect on shoot rooting but also on shoot growth and development, with longer shoots and higher axillary shoot sprouting and growth after some of the treatments. These effects were cultivar-dependent. The electro-pulse per se could explain some of these effects on shoot development.

  11. Electrical and optical modeling of poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester P3HT-PCBM bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brioua, Fathi; Remram, Mohamed; Nechache, Riad; Bourouina, Hicham

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we investigate a two-dimensional theoretical model for the photon conversion through an integration of the optical and electrical part of multilayer system in a bulk heterojunction solar cell based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/6,6-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend. The optical properties of the studied structure ITO/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PCBM/Ca/Al, such as the exciton generation rate and the electrical field distribution, are predicted at vicinity of the active layer and have been used to solve Poisson and continuity, drift-diffusion equations of the electrical model which characterize the electrical behavior of semiconductor device using finite element method (FEM). The electrical parameters such as power conversion efficiency (PCE), open voltage circuit ( V oc), short-circuit current density ( J sc) and fill factor (FF) are extracted from the current-voltage (J-V) characteristics under illumination and in dark conditions. Highest external quantum efficiency (IPCE), up to 60%, is obtained around 520 nm, while a power conversion efficiency (PCE) value of 3.62% is found to be in good agreement with the literature results. Integration of such theoretical approach into technological applications dealing with optoelectrical material performance will rapidly provide to the user accurate data outputs required for efficient validation of proof-of-concepts.

  12. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency: Decrease in 4-OH-butyric acid levels with low doses of vigabatrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escalera, G.I.; Ferrer, I.; Marina, L.C.; Sala, P.R.; Salomons, G.S.; Jakobs, C.; Perez-Cerda, C.

    2010-01-01

    Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency (gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria) is a rare neurometabolic disease caused by a deficiency in gamma-aminobutyric degradation, resulting in an increase in gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in biological fluids. The clinical spectrum is heterogeneous, including a

  13. Enteric bacterial metabolites propionic and butyric acid modulate gene expression, including CREB-dependent catecholaminergic neurotransmission, in PC12 cells--possible relevance to autism spectrum disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bistra B Nankova

    Full Text Available Alterations in gut microbiome composition have an emerging role in health and disease including brain function and behavior. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA like propionic (PPA, and butyric acid (BA, which are present in diet and are fermentation products of many gastrointestinal bacteria, are showing increasing importance in host health, but also may be environmental contributors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Further to this we have shown SCFA administration to rodents over a variety of routes (intracerebroventricular, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal or developmental time periods can elicit behavioral, electrophysiological, neuropathological and biochemical effects consistent with findings in ASD patients. SCFA are capable of altering host gene expression, partly due to their histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. We have previously shown BA can regulate tyrosine hydroxylase (TH mRNA levels in a PC12 cell model. Since monoamine concentration is known to be elevated in the brain and blood of ASD patients and in many ASD animal models, we hypothesized that SCFA may directly influence brain monoaminergic pathways. When PC12 cells were transiently transfected with plasmids having a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the TH promoter, PPA was found to induce reporter gene activity over a wide concentration range. CREB transcription factor(s was necessary for the transcriptional activation of TH gene by PPA. At lower concentrations PPA also caused accumulation of TH mRNA and protein, indicative of increased cell capacity to produce catecholamines. PPA and BA induced broad alterations in gene expression including neurotransmitter systems, neuronal cell adhesion molecules, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function, all of which have been implicated in ASD. In conclusion, our data are consistent with a molecular mechanism through which gut related environmental signals

  14. Gamma Amino Butyric Acid Attenuates Liver and Kidney Damage Associated with Insulin Alteration in γ-Irradiated and Streptozotocin-Treated Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saada, H.N.; Eltahawy, N.A.; Hammad, A.S.; Morcos, N.Y.S.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the inhibitory neurotransmitters that may have the ability to relive the intensity of stress. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the role of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) in modulating insulin disturbance associated with liver and kidney damage in γ-irradiated and streptozotocin-treated rats. Irradiation was performed by whole body exposure to 6 Gy from a Cs-137 source. Streptozotocin (STZ) was administered in a single intraperitoneal dose (60 mg/kg body weight). GABA (200 mg/Kg body weight/day) was administered daily via gavages during 3 weeks to γ-irradiated and STZ-treated-rats. The results obtained showed that γ-irradiation induced hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance (similar to type 2 Diabetes), while STZ-treatment produced hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency with no insulin resistance detected (similar to type 1 Diabetes). In both cases, significant increases of alanine amino transferase (ALT) and aspartate amino transferase (AST) activities, urea and creatinine levels were recorded in the serum. These changes were associated with oxidative damage to the liver and kidney tissues notified by significant decreases of superoxide dismutase (SOD ), catalase and glutathione peroxidase ( GSH-Px) activities in parallel to significant increases of malondialdehyde (MDA) and advanced oxidation protein products ( AOPP) levels. The administration of GABA to irradiated as well as STZ-treated rats regulated insulin and glucose levels, minimized oxidative stress and reduced the severity of liver and kidney damage. It could be concluded that GABA could be a useful adjunct to reduce some metabolic complications associated with insulin deficiency and insulin resistance

  15. Vegetative propagation of Plukenetia polyadenia by cuttings: effects of leaf area and indole-3-butyric acid concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Solis, R.; Pezo, M.; Diaz, G.; Arévalo, L.; Cachique, D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The seeds of Plukenetia polyadenia have high levels of unsaturated fatty acids and are used as medicine and food for native people in the Peruvian and Brazilian Amazon. The objective of this study was to develop a method for vegetative propagation of Plukenetia polyadenia by rooting of cuttings. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with 12 treatments and 3 replications of 8 cuttings, in a 3 × 4 factorial arrangement. The factors were: 3 levels of leaf are...

  16. Effect of butyrate and Lactobacillus GG on a butyrate receptor and transporter during Campylobacter jejuni exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresci, Gail A M; Mayor, Paul C; Thompson, Stuart A

    2017-03-01

    Campylobacter jejuni frequently infects humans causing many gastrointestinal symptoms, fever, fatigue and several long-term debilitating diseases. Current treatment for campylobacteriosis includes rehydration and in some cases, antibiotic therapy. Probiotics are used to treat several gastrointestinal diseases. Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid known to promote intestinal health. Interaction of butyrate with its respective receptor (HCAR2) and transporter (SLC5A8), both expressed in the intestine, is associated with water and electrolyte absorption as well as providing defense against colon cancer and inflammation. Alterations in gut microbiota influence the presence of HCAR2 and SLC5A8 in the intestine. We hypothesized that adherence and/or invasion of C. jejuni and alterations in HCAR2 and SLC5A8 expression would be minimized with butyrate or Lactobacillus GG (LGG) pretreatment of Caco-2 cells. We found that both C. jejuni adhesion but not invasion was reduced with butyrate pretreatment. While LGG pretreatment did not prevent C. jejuni adhesion, it did result in reduced invasion which was associated with altered cell supernate pH. Both butyrate and LGG protected HCAR2 and SLC5A8 protein expression following C. jejuni infection. These results suggest that the first stages of C. jejuni infection of Caco-2 cells may be minimized by LGG and butyrate pretreatment. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Osmotic stress- and indole-3-butyric acid-induced NO generation are partially distinct processes in root growth and development in Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Bartha, Bernadett; Erdei, László

    2008-06-01

    In this work, the effects of osmotic stress and exogenous auxin (indole-3-butyric acid, IBA) on root morphology and nitric oxide (NO) generation in roots were compared in pea plants. Five-day-old plants were treated with 0, 10(-3), 10(-4), 10(-5), 10(-6), 10(-7), 10(-8) or 10(-9) M IBA or with PEG 6000 at concentrations that determined 0, 50, 100, 200 or 400 mOsm in the medium, during 5 days. NO generation was examined by in situ and in vivo fluorescence method. Increasing concentrations of PEG as well as IBA resulted in shortening of primary root (PR), enhancement of lateral root (LR) number and significant increase of NO generation. Time-dependent investigations revealed that in the case of IBA treatments, the LR number increased in parallel with an intensified NO generation, while elongation of PR was not followed by changes in NO levels. Under osmotic stress, the time curve of NO development was distinct compared with that of IBA-treated roots, because significantly, the appearance of lateral initials was preceded by a transient burst of NO. This early phase of NO generation under osmotic stress was clearly distinguishable from that which accompanied LR initiation. It is concluded that osmotic stress and the presence of exogenous auxin resulted in partly similar root architecture but different time courses of NO synthesis. We suppose that the early phase of NO generation may fulfill a role in the osmotic stress-induced signalization process leading to the modification of root morphology.

  18. Seed priming with BABA (β-amino butyric acid): a cost-effective method of abiotic stress tolerance in Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jisha, K C; Puthur, Jos T

    2016-03-01

    The effects of β-amino butyric acid (BABA) on abiotic stress tolerance potential of three Vigna radiata varieties were studied. The reduction in the growth of seedlings subjected to NaCl/polyethylene glycol (PEG) stress is alleviated by BABA seed priming, which also enhanced photosynthetic pigment content and photosynthetic and mitochondrial activities, and also modified the chlorophyll a fluorescence-related parameters. Moreover, BABA seed priming reduced malondialdehyde content in the seedlings and enhanced the accumulation of proline, total protein, total carbohydrate, nitrate reductase activity, and activities of antioxidant enzymes like guaiacol peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Most of these positive features of BABA priming were predominantly exhibited when the plants were encountered with stress (NaCl/PEG). The BABA content in the BABA-treated green gram seeds and seedlings was also detected and quantified with high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC), and it revealed that the priming effect of BABA initiated in seeds and further gets carried over to the seedlings. It was concluded that BABA seed priming improved the drought and salinity stress tolerance potential of all the three green gram varieties, and it was evident in the NaCl-tolerant variety Pusa Vishal as compared to Pusa Ratna (abiotic stress sensitive) and Pusa 9531(drought tolerant). Dual mode in cost effectiveness of BABA priming is evident from: (1) the positive features of priming are being exhibited more during the exposure of plants to stress, and (2) priming of seedlings can be carried out by BABA application to seeds at very low concentration and volume.

  19. Gaseous CO2 signal initiates growth of butyric-acid-producing Clostridium butyricum in both pure culture and mixed cultures with Lactobacillus brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakalehto, Elias; Hänninen, Osmo

    2012-07-01

    Microbial strains produce numerous volatile substances in the anaerobic conditions of the human intestines. The availability of CO(2) is known to be a prerequisite for bacterial growth in general. In experiments with anaerobic Lactobacillus brevis and Clostridium butyricum bacteria in the Portable Microbial Enrichment Unit (PMEU) it was shown that these strains interact; this interaction being mediated by CO(2) emission. CO(2) promoted clostridial growth in pure cultures and mixed cultures with lactobacilli. The growth of C. butyricum in pure cultures was much delayed or did not start at all without CO(2) from outside. Conversely, the onset of growth was provoked by a short (15 min) CO(2) burst. In mixed cultures the presence of lactobacilli in equal numbers speeded up the onset of clostridial growth by 10 h. If C. butyricum cultures designated as PMEU 1, 2, and 3 in cultivation syringes were chained by connecting the gas flow thereby allowing the volatiles of the preceding syringe culture to bubble to the next one, the growth started in 20, 10, or 6 h, respectively. This effect of gaseous emissions from other cultures speeding up the bacterial growth initiation was abolished if the gas was passed through sodium hydroxide to remove the CO(2). The positive contribution of lactobacilli to the growth of butyric-acid-producing clostridia documented in this simulation experiment with PMEU has in vivo implications and indicates molecular communication between the species. CO(2) is a necessary signal for the growth of clostridia, and lactobacilli can promote clostridial growth in mixed cultures where both bacteria grow well with mutual benefit.

  20. Quantum confinement-tunable ultrafast charge transfer at the PbS quantum dot and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester interface

    KAUST Repository

    El-Ballouli, AlA'A O.

    2014-05-14

    Quantum dot (QD) solar cells have emerged as promising low-cost alternatives to existing photovoltaic technologies. Here, we investigate charge transfer and separation at PbS QDs and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) interfaces using a combination of femtosecond broadband transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy and steady-state photoluminescence quenching measurements. We analyzed ultrafast electron injection and charge separation at PbS QD/PCBM interfaces for four different QD sizes and as a function of PCBM concentration. The results reveal that the energy band alignment, tuned by the quantum size effect, is the key element for efficient electron injection and charge separation processes. More specifically, the steady-state and time-resolved data demonstrate that only small-sized PbS QDs with a bandgap larger than 1 eV can transfer electrons to PCBM upon light absorption. We show that these trends result from the formation of a type-II interface band alignment, as a consequence of the size distribution of the QDs. Transient absorption data indicate that electron injection from photoexcited PbS QDs to PCBM occurs within our temporal resolution of 120 fs for QDs with bandgaps that achieve type-II alignment, while virtually all signals observed in smaller bandgap QD samples result from large bandgap outliers in the size distribution. Taken together, our results clearly demonstrate that charge transfer rates at QD interfaces can be tuned by several orders of magnitude by engineering the QD size distribution. The work presented here will advance both the design and the understanding of QD interfaces for solar energy conversion. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  1. Effects of ruminal ammonia and butyrate concentrations on reticuloruminal epithelial blood flow and volatile fatty acid absorption kinetics under washed reticulorumen conditions in lactating dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Adam Christian; Hanigan, M.D.; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2011-01-01

    and mesenteric, right ruminal, and hepatic portal veins. The experiment was designed with 2 groups of cows: 4 cows adapted to high crude protein (CP) and 4 to low CP. All cows were subjected to 3 buffers: butyric, ammonia, and control in a randomized replicated 3 × 3 incomplete Latin square design. The buffers...... liquid marker (Cr-EDTA), and initial and final buffer volumes were fitted to a dynamic simulation model. The model was used to estimate ruminal liquid passages, residual liquid, and water influx (saliva and epithelia water) for each combination of cow and buffer (n = 24). Epithelial blood flow increased...... that the removal of propionate can be limited by epithelial blood flow. The ruminal disappearance of propionate increased 30 ± 12% for the butyric compared with ammonia buffer and 12.5 ± 8% when compared with control. The net portal flux of propionate increased 32 ± 6% in butyric compared with control...

  2. Purification of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) from fermentation of defatted rice bran extract by using ion exchange resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan Nha, Vi; Phung, Le Thi Kim; Dat, Lai Quoc

    2017-09-01

    Rice bran is one of the significant byproducts of rice processing with 10 %w/w of constitution of whole rice grain. It is rich in nutrient compounds, including glutamic acid. Thus, it could be utilized for the fermentation with Lactobateria for synthesis of GABA, a valuable bioactive for antihypertensive effects. However, the concentration and purity of GABA in fermentation broth of defatted rice bran extract is low for production of GABA drug. This research focused on the purification of GABA from the fermentation broth of defatted rice bran extract by using cation exchange resin. The results indicate that, the adsorption isotherm of GABA by Purelite C100 showed the good agreement with Freundlich model, with high adsorption capacity. The effects of pH and concentration of NaCl in eluent on the elution were also investigated. The obtained results show that, at the operating conditions of elution as follows: pH 6.5, 0.8 M of NaCl in eluent, 0.43 of bed volume; concentration of GABA in accumulative eluent, the purity and recovery yield of GABA were 743.8 ppm, 44.0% and 84.2%, respectively. Results imply that, it is feasible to apply cation exchange resin for purification of GABA from fermentation broth of defatted rice bran extract.

  3. (photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic) and the auxin indole-butyric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of different culture conditions (photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic) and the auxin indole-butyric acid on the in vitro acclimatization of papaya ( Carica papaya L. var. Red Maradol) plants using zeolite as support.

  4. A new highly selective metabotropic excitatory amino acid agonist: 2-amino-4-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)butyric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Sløk, F A; Skjaerbaek, N

    1996-01-01

    , however, shown to be a specific and rather potent agonist at mGlu6, approximately 4 times weaker than the nonselective excitatory amino acid receptor agonist (S)-glutamic acid. 2-Aminoadipic acid (3), which shows a complex excitatory amino acid synaptic pharmacology, was an agonist at mGlu6 as well as m......The homologous series of acidic amino acids, ranging from aspartic acid (1) to 2-aminosuberic acid (5), and the corresponding series of 3-isoxazolol bioisosteres of these amino acids, ranging from (RS)-2-amino-2-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (AMAA, 6) to (RS)-2-amino-6-(3-hydroxy-5......-methylisoxazol-4-yl)hexanoic acid (10), were tested as ligands for metabotropic excitatory amino acid receptors (mGlu1 alpha, mGlu2, mGlu4a, and mGlu6). Whereas AMAA (6) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propinoic acid (AMPA, 7) are potent and highly selective agonists at N...

  5. Microbial degradation products influence colon cancer risk: the butyrate controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, Joanne R

    2004-02-01

    All dietary fiber, by definition, escapes digestion in the small intestine and thus arrives relatively intact in the large intestine. Its fate in the large intestine depends upon the type of fiber and the colonic microflora. Highly fermentable fibers result in short chain fatty acids including butyrate, which is thought by some to be protective against colon cancer. However, not all studies support a chemopreventive effect for butyrate and the lack of agreement (particularly between in vivo and in vitro studies) on butyrate and colon cancer has been termed the "butyrate paradox." There are a number of reasons for this discrepant effect including differences between the in vitro and in vivo environments, the timing of butyrate administration, the amount of butyrate administered, the source of butyrate (usually dietary fiber) as a potential confounder, and an interaction with dietary fat. Collectively, the studies suggest that the chemopreventive benefits of butyrate depend in part on amount, time of exposure with respect to the tumorigenic process, and the type of fat in the diet.

  6. Effects of β-hydroxy β-methyl butyrate supplementation to sows in late gestation on absorption and hepatic metabolism of glucose and amino acids during transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flummer, Christine; Lyby, H; Storli, K S

    2012-01-01

    A multicatheter sow model was established to study the effects of dietary β-hydroxy β-methyl butyrate (HMB) supplementation on net portal flux (NPF) and net hepatic flux (NHF) of HMB, glucose, and the AA Ala, Gly, Ile, Leu, Phe, Tyr, and Val. Eight second parity sows were fitted with permanent...

  7. Hepatic Uptake of Rectally Administered Butyrate Prevents an Increase in Systemic Butyrate Concentrations in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Beek, Christina M; Bloemen, Johanne G; van den Broek, Maartje A; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Venema, Koen; Buurman, Wim A; Dejong, Cornelis H

    2015-09-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), fermentation products of undigested fibers, are considered beneficial for colonic health. High plasma concentrations are potentially harmful; therefore, information about systemic SCFA clearance is needed before therapeutic use of prebiotics or colonic SCFA administration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of rectal butyrate administration on SCFA interorgan exchange. Twelve patients (7 men; age: 66.4 ± 2.0 y; BMI 24.5 ± 1.4 kg/m(2)) undergoing upper abdominal surgery participated in this randomized placebo-controlled trial. During surgery, 1 group received a butyrate enema (100 mmol sodium butyrate/L; 60 mL; n = 7), and the other group a placebo (140 mmol 0.9% NaCl/L; 60 mL; n = 5). Before and 5, 15, and 30 min after administration, blood samples were taken from the radial artery, hepatic vein, and portal vein. Plasma SCFA concentrations were analyzed, and fluxes from portal-drained viscera, liver, and splanchnic area were calculated and used for the calculation of the incremental area under the curve (iAUC) over a 30-min period. Rectal butyrate administration led to higher portal butyrate concentrations at 5 min compared with placebo (92.2 ± 27.0 μmol/L vs. 14.3 ± 3.4 μmol/L, respectively; P butyrate-treated group, iAUCs of gut release (282.8 ± 133.8 μmol/kg BW · 0.5 h) and liver uptake (-293.7 ± 136.0 μmol/kg BW · 0.5 h) of butyrate were greater than in the placebo group [-16.6 ± 13.4 μmol/kg BW · 0.5 h (gut release) and 16.0 ± 13.8 μmol/kg BW · 0.5 h (liver uptake); P = 0.01 and P butyrate release did not differ between groups. After colonic butyrate administration, splanchnic butyrate release was prevented in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery. These observations imply that therapeutic colonic SCFA administration at this dose is safe. The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02271802. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Nanofibrillar self-organization of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester by dip-coating: a simple method to obtain efficient bulk heterojunction solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, L; Bagnis, D; Kenny, J M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the dip-coating technique has been investigated as a method for the production of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (RR-P3HT):[6,6]-phenyl C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM)-based solar cells. We found that the utilization of the dip-coating technique for the RR-P3HT:PCBM system can facilitate its self-assembly into a nanofibrillar lamellar structure after evaporation of the solvent. The condition for the formation of the nanofibrillar structures leads to a power conversion efficiency of 3.6% by using only this approach without thermal treatment.

  9. Oral administration of sodium butyrate attenuates inflammation and mucosal lesion in experimental acute ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Erica L M; Leonel, Alda J; Sad, Alexandre P; Beltrão, Nathália R M; Costa, Thaís F; Ferreira, Talita M R; Gomes-Santos, Ana C; Faria, Ana M C; Peluzio, Maria C G; Cara, Denise C; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline I

    2012-05-01

    Butyrate is a four-carbon short-chain fatty acid that improves colonic trophism. Although several studies have shown the benefits of butyrate enemas in ulcerative colitis (UC), studies using the oral route are rare in the literature. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of butyrate intake in the immune response associated to UC. For that, mice were fed control or butyrate (0.5% sodium butyrate) diets for 14 days. Acute UC was induced by dextran sulphate sodium (DSS, 2.5%), replacing drinking water. The results showed that, in UC animals, oral butyrate significantly improved trophism and reduced leukocyte (eosinophil and neutrophil) infiltration in the colon mucosa and improved the inflammatory profile (activated macrophage, B and T lymphocytes) in cecal lymph nodes. In the small intestine, although mucosa histology was similar among groups, DSS treatment reduced duodenal transforming growth factor-β, increased interleukin-10 concentrations and increased memory T lymphocytes and dendritic cells in Peyer's patches. Butyrate supplementation was able to revert these alterations. When cecal butyrate concentration was analyzed in cecal content, it was still higher in the healthy animals receiving butyrate than in the UC+butyrate and control groups. In conclusion, our results show that oral administration of sodium butyrate improves mucosa lesion and attenuates the inflammatory profile of intestinal mucosa, local draining lymph nodes and Peyer's patches of DSS-induced UC. Our results also highlight the potential use of butyrate supplements as adjuvant in UC treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Butyrate increases IL-23 production by stimulated dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Bradford E.; Zhang, Min; Owyang, Stephanie Y.; Cole, Tyler S.; Wang, Teresa W.; Luther, Jay; Veniaminova, Natalia A.; Merchant, Juanita L.; Chen, Chun-Chia; Huffnagle, Gary B.

    2012-01-01

    The gut microbiota is essential for the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis and is responsible for breaking down dietary fiber into short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Butyrate, the most abundant bioactive SCFA in the gut, is a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), a class of drug that has potent immunomodulatory properties. This characteristic of butyrate, along with our previous discovery that conventional dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the development of experimental colitis, led us to speculate that butyrate may modulate DC function to regulate gut mucosal homeostasis. We found that butyrate, in addition to suppressing LPS-induced bone marrow-derived DC maturation and inhibiting DC IL-12 production, significantly induced IL-23 expression. The upregulation of mRNA subunit IL-23p19 at the pretranslational level was consistent with the role of HDACi on the epigenetic modification of gene expression. Furthermore, the mechanism of IL-23p19 upregulation was independent of Stat3 and ZBP89. Coculture of splenocytes with LPS-stimulated DCs pretreated with or without butyrate was performed and showed a significant induction of IL-17 and IL-10. We demonstrated further the effect of butyrate in vivo using dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis and found that the addition of butyrate in the drinking water of mice worsened DSS-colitis. This is in contrast to the daily intraperitoneal butyrate injection of DSS-treated mice, which mildly improved disease severity. Our study highlights a novel effect of butyrate in upregulating IL-23 production of activated DCs and demonstrates a difference in the host response to the oral vs. systemic route of butyrate administration. PMID:23086919

  11. In vitro effects of hydrochloric acid and various concentrations of acetic, propionic, butyric, or valeric acids on bioelectric properties of equine gastric squamous mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Frank M; Buchanan, Benjamin R; Smith, Sionagh H; Elliott, Sarah B; Saxton, Arnold M

    2006-11-01

    To compare the effects of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and various concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) on tissue bioelectric properties of equine stomach nonglandular (NG) mucosa. Gastric tissues obtained from 48 adult horses. NG gastric mucosa was studied by use of Ussing chambers. Short-circuit current (Isc) and potential difference (PD) were measured and electrical resistance (R) and conductance calculated for tissues after addition of HCl and VFAs (5, 10, 20, and 40 mM) in normal Ringer's solution (NRS). Mucosa exposed to HCl in NRS (pH of 1.5 and, to a lesser extent, 4.0) had a significant decrease in Isc, PD, and R, whereas tissues exposed to acetic acid at a pH of acids at a pH of acid at a pH of acid at a pH of acid, in the presence of HCl at a pH of

  12. Strategies for production of butanol and butyl-butyrate through lipase-catalyzed esterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Fengxue; Basu, Anindya; Yang, Kun-Lin; He, Jianzhong

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a fermentation process for production of butanol and butyl-butyrate by using Clostridium sp. strain BOH3 is developed. This strain is able to produce butyric acid and butanol when it ferments 60 g/L xylose. Meanwhile, it also excreted indigenous lipases (induced by olive oil) which naturally convert butyric acid and butanol into 1.2 g/L of butyl-butyrate. When Bio-OSR was used as both an inducer for lipase and extractant for butyl-butyrate, the butyl-butyrate concentration can reach 6.3 g/L. To further increase the yield, additional lipases and butyric acid are added to the fermentation system. Moreover, kerosene was used as an extractant to remove butyl-butyrate in situ. When all strategies are combined, 22.4 g/L butyl-butyrate can be produced in a fed-batch reactor spiked with 70 g/L xylose and 7.9 g/L butyric acid, which is 4.5-fold of that in a similar system (5 g/L) with hexadecane as the extractant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Accumulation, selection and covariation of amino acids in sieve tube sap of tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) and castor bean (Ricinus communis): evidence for the function of a basic amino acid transporter and the absence of a γ-amino butyric acid transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Susanne N; Nowak, Heike; Keller, Frank; Kallarackal, Jose; Hajirezaei, Mohamad-Reza; Komor, Ewald

    2014-09-01

    Sieve tube sap was obtained from Tanacetum by aphid stylectomy and from Ricinus after apical bud decapitation. The amino acids in sieve tube sap were analyzed and compared with those from leaves. Arginine and lysine accumulated in the sieve tube sap of Tanacetum more than 10-fold compared to the leaf extracts and they were, together with asparagine and serine, preferably selected into the sieve tube sap, whereas glycine, methionine/tryptophan and γ-amino butyric acid were partially or completely excluded. The two basic amino acids also showed a close covariation in sieve tube sap. The acidic amino acids also grouped together, but antagonistic to the other amino acids. The accumulation ratios between sieve tube sap and leaf extracts were smaller in Ricinus than in Tanacetum. Arginine, histidine, lysine and glutamine were enriched and preferentially loaded into the phloem, together with isoleucine and valine. In contrast, glycine and methionine/tryptophan were partially and γ-amino butyric acid almost completely excluded from sieve tube sap. The covariation analysis grouped arginine together with several neutral amino acids. The acidic amino acids were loaded under competition with neutral amino acids. It is concluded from comparison with the substrate specificities of already characterized plant amino acid transporters, that an AtCAT1-like transporter functions in phloem loading of basic amino acids, whereas a transporter like AtGAT1 is absent in phloem. Although Tanacetum and Ricinus have different minor vein architecture, their phloem loading specificities for amino acids are relatively similar. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  14. In vitro and in vivo study of transcriptome alternation induced by butyrate in cattle using deep RNA-seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs,), especially butyrate, affect cell differentiation, proliferation, and motility. Furthermore, butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through its inhibition on histone deacetylases (HDACs). Butyrate is a potent inducer of histone hyper-acetylation in cells a...

  15. Butyrate influences intracellular levels of adenine and adenine derivatives in the fungus Penicillium restrictum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutz, Christoph; Chiang, Yi Ming; Faehnrich, Bettina; Bacher, Markus; Hellinger, Roland; Kluger, Bernhard; Wagner, Martin; Strauss, Joseph; Rychli, Kathrin

    2017-04-01

    Butyrate, a small fatty acid, has an important role in the colon of ruminants and mammalians including the inhibition of inflammation and the regulation of cell proliferation. There is also growing evidence that butyrate is influencing the histone structure in mammalian cells by inhibition of histone deacetylation. Butyrate shows furthermore an antimicrobial activity against fungi, yeast and bacteria, which is linked to its toxicity at a high concentration. In fungi there are indications that butyrate induces the production of secondary metabolites potentially via inhibition of histone deacetylases. However, information about the influence of butyrate on growth, primary metabolite production and metabolism, besides lipid catabolism, in fungi is scarce. We have identified the filamentous fungus Penicillium (P.) restrictum as a susceptible target for butyrate treatment in an antimicrobial activity screen. The antimicrobial activity was detected only in the mycelium of the butyrate treated culture. We investigated the effect of butyrate ranging from low (0.001mM) to high (30mM), potentially toxic, concentrations on biomass and antimicrobial activity. Butyrate at high concentrations (3 and 30mM) significantly reduced the fungal biomass. In contrast P. restrictum treated with 0.03mM of butyrate showed the highest antimicrobial activity. We isolated three antimicrobial active compounds, active against Staphylococcus aureus, from P. restrictum cellular extracts treated with butyrate: adenine, its derivate hypoxanthine and the nucleoside derivate adenosine. Production of all three compounds was increased at low butyrate concentrations. Furthermore we found that butyrate influences the intracellular level of the adenine nucleoside derivate cAMP, an important signalling molecule in fungi and various organisms. In conclusion butyrate treatment increases the intracellular levels of adenine and its respective derivatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Butyrate Specifically Down-Regulates Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Gantois, I.; Ducatelle, R.; Pasmans, F.; Haesebrouck, F.; Hautefort, I.; Thompson, A.; Hinton, J. C.; Van Immerseel, F.

    2006-01-01

    Invasion of intestinal epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica is decreased after exposure to butyric acid. To understand the molecular mechanisms of this phenomenon, a comparative transcriptomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium grown in medium supplemented with butyrate was performed. We found that butyrate down-regulated the expression of 19 genes common to both serovars by a factor of twofold or more, and 17 of these genes loca...

  17. Liquid-liquid equilibrium data in aqueous solutions of propionic and butyric acids with 1-heptanol at T=(298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilani, Ali Ghanadzadeh; Gilani, Hossein Ghanadzadeh; Saadat, Seyedeh Laleh Seyed; Nasiri-Touli, Elham; Peer, Mahrokh

    2016-01-01

    Liquid-liquid phase equilibrium (LLE) data were determined for the (water+propionic or butyric acid+1- heptanol) ternary systems at T=(298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K and p=101.3 kPa. For both systems, a type-1 LLE phase diagram was obtained. The quality of the experimental LLE data was determined through the Othmer-Tobias and Bancroft equations. The experimental tie-lines were fitted using the UNIQUAC and NRTL correlation models. For the studied systems, a comparison was made between the experimental and correlated distribution coefficients and separation factors. The LSER model of Katritzky was applied to obtain the contributions of intermolecular interactions in these systems.

  18. Selective agonists at group II metabotropic glutamate receptors: synthesis, stereochemistry, and molecular pharmacology of (S)- and (R)-2-amino-4-(4-hydroxy[1,2,5]thiadiazol-3-yl)butyric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Rasmus P; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Greenwood, Jeremy R

    2002-01-01

    )-form of the 1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-ol Glu analogue, 2-amino-3-(4-hydroxy[1,2,5]thiadiazol-3-yl)propionic acid (TDPA, 6), is an 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonist, which in addition stereospecifically activates group I mGluRs. We have now synthesized the (S)- and (R......Homologation of analogues of the central excitatory neurotransmitter glutamic acid (Glu), in which the distal carboxy group has been bioisosterically replaced by acidic heterocyclic units, has previously provided subtype selective ligands for metabotropic Glu receptors (mGluRs). The (S......)-forms of 2-amino-4-(4-hydroxy[1,2,5]thiadiazol-3-yl)butyric acid (homo-TDPA, 7) and shown that whereas neither enantiomer interacts with AMPA receptors, (S)- and (R)-7 appear to be selective and equipotent agonists at group II mGluRs as represented by the mGluR2 subtype. The activities of (S)- and (R)-7...

  19. Mechanisms involved in enhancement of apoptosis by radiation or hyperthermia in combination with sodium butyrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Z.L.; Zhao, Q.L.; Hassan, M.A.; Kondo, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Sodium butyrate is a four-carbon fatty acid and natural component of the colonic milieu. Butyrate has been shown to induce apoptosis in numerous types of cancer cells, and received much attention as a potential chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer. However, during initial clinical trials, its efficacy was limited. X-irradiation or hyperthermia as an adjuvant significantly enhanced the cell growth arrest, alteration of the cell cycle, and cell death caused by butyrate. The balance between anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins was lost and a mitochondrial pathway was activated. In this review, the interactions of butyrate with X-irradiation and hyperthermia are discussed. (author)

  20. The effects of butyrate enemas on visceral perception in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhoutvin, S.A.L.W.; Troost, F.J.; Kilkens, T.O.C.; Lindsey, P.J.; Hamer, H.M.; Jonkers, D.M.A.E.; Venema, K.; Brummer, R.-J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Fermentation of dietary fibres by colonic microbes leads to the production of short chain fatty acids (mainly propionate, butyrate and acetate), which are utilized by the colonic mucosa. Previous studies showed positive effects of butyrate on parameters of oxidative stress, inflammation and

  1. Effect of Volatile Fatty Acids and Trimethylamine on Nitrification in Activated Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eilersen, Ann Marie; Henze, Mogens; Kløft, Lene

    1994-01-01

    to be 6 mM for isobutyric, 37 mM for n-valeric, 6 mM for isovaleric 36 mM for n-caproic acid and 3 mM for trimethylamine. IK values for nitrite oxidation were found to be 2 mM for formic, 115 mM for acetic, 68 mM for propionic, 33 mM for n-butyric, 8 mM for isobutyric, 75 mM for n-valeric, 7 m......M for isovaleric and 81 mM for n-caproic acid. For propionic acid and trimethylamine, the undissociated compound appears to act as an inhibitor. For formic, isobutyric and isovaleric acids, the degree of inhibition seems to be determined by the total concentration of acid. Experiments with anaerobically treated......The effect of volatile fatty acids and trimethylamine on the nitrification activity of activated sludge was studied in laboratory batch experiments. The critical concentration of inhibitor IK at which the activity ceases was determined by modelling. IK values for ammonia oxidation were found...

  2. Biosynthesis of heparin. Effects of n-butyrate on cultured mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsson, K.G.; Riesenfeld, J.; Lindahl, U.

    1985-01-01

    Murine mastocytoma cells were incubated in vitro with inorganic [ 35 S]sulfate, in the absence or presence of 2.5 mM n-butyrate, and labeled heparin was isolated. The polysaccharide produced in the presence of butyrate showed a lower charge density on anion exchange chromatography than did the control material and a 3-fold increased proportion of components with high affinity for antithrombin. Structural analysis of heparin labeled with [ 3 H] glucosamine in the presence of butyrate showed that approximately 35% of the glucosamine units were N-acetylated, as compared to approximately 10% in the control material; the nonacetylated glucosamine residues were N-sulfated. The presence of butyrate thus leads to an inhibition of the N-deacetylation/N-sulfation process in heparin biosynthesis, along with an augmented formation of molecules with high affinity for antithrombin. Preincubation of the mastocytoma cells with butyrate was required for manifestation of either effect; when the preincubation period was reduced from 24 to 10 h the effects of butyrate were no longer observed. A polysaccharide formed on incubating mastocytoma microsomal fraction with UDP-[ 3 H]glucuronic acid, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, and 3'-phosphoadenylylsulfate in the presence of 5 mM butyrate showed the same N-acetyl/N-sulfate ratio as did the corresponding control polysaccharide, produced in the absence of butyrate. These findings suggest that the effect of butyrate on heparin biosynthesis depends on the integrity of the cell

  3. Butyrate inhibits interleukin-17 and generates Tregs to ameliorate colorectal colitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingming; Zhou, Qian; Dorfman, Robert G; Huang, Xiaoli; Fan, Tingting; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Chenggong

    2016-07-30

    Butyrate is an energy source for colonocytes that is formed by bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber in the colon and that exerts broad anti-inflammatory activities. Although the administration of butyrate improves homeostasis in patients and ameliorates IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Disease)-related lesions and symptoms, the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of butyrate still remain unclear. To explore the impact of butyrate on Treg (Regulatory T cell)/Th17 (T helper 17 cell) differentiation and colitis in rats. The effect of butyrate on the expression of markers related to both Tregs and Th17 cells were determined in human monocytes as well as a rat model of colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. Rats were treated with butyrate in vivo, whereas the rat splenocytes and human monocytes were treated in vitro. We found that butyrate administration increased peripheral blood Treg cell levels as well as plasma levels of anti-Th17 cytokines (IL-10 and IL-12). Butyrate administration further suppressed IL-17 levels in both plasma and colonic mucosa, and ameliorated colonic colitis lesions in rats. This promotion of Treg activity and inhibition of IL-17 release was also observed in human venous monocytes and rat splenocytes in vitro. Our results suggest that butyrate plays a key role in regulating the Treg/Th17 balance and ultimately protects the colon mucosa against the development of IBD.

  4. Sodium Butyrate Stimulates Expression of Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 in Liver by Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huating; Gao, Zhanguo; Zhang, Jin; Ye, Xin; Xu, Aimin; Ye, Jianping; Jia, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) stimulates fatty acid oxidation and ketone body production in animals. In this study, we investigated the role of FGF21 in the metabolic activity of sodium butyrate, a dietary histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. FGF21 expression was examined in serum and liver after injection of sodium butyrate into dietary obese C57BL/6J mice. The role of FGF21 was determined using antibody neutralization or knockout mice. FGF21 transcription was investigated in liver and HepG2 hepatocytes. Trichostatin A (TSA) was used in the control as an HDAC inhibitor. Butyrate was compared with bezafibrate and fenofibrate in the induction of FGF21 expression. Butyrate induced FGF21 in the serum, enhanced fatty acid oxidation in mice, and stimulated ketone body production in liver. The butyrate activity was significantly reduced by the FGF21 antibody or gene knockout. Butyrate induced FGF21 gene expression in liver and hepatocytes by inhibiting HDAC3, which suppresses peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-α function. Butyrate enhanced bezafibrate activity in the induction of FGF21. TSA exhibited a similar set of activities to butyrate. FGF21 mediates the butyrate activity to increase fatty acid use and ketogenesis. Butyrate induces FGF21 transcription by inhibition of HDAC3. PMID:22338096

  5. Stimulation of butyrate absorption in the human rectum in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtug, K; Hove, H; Mortensen, P B

    1995-01-01

    the change in fluid composition. RESULTS: Sodium absorption was highest (24 +/- 8 mumol/cm2 h) in the presence of chloride and lowest (16 +/- 2 mumol/cm2 h) in the presence of bicarbonate and butyrate. Butyrate (70 mmol/l) was absorbed at a high rate of 7.1 +/- 2.2 mumol/cm2 h, independent on the presence...... of chloride, and was accompanied by increased bicarbonate secretion. Butyrate absorption increased to 9.6 +/- 1.8 mumol/cm2 h in sodium-free high-potassium media containing bicarbonate. CONCLUSION: The results show that it is possible to increase butyrate uptake by manipulation of the electrolyte composition......BACKGROUND: Models of short-chain fatty acid absorption have focused on the stimulation of sodium absorption, an effect mainly located in the proximal colon of man. With the present efforts to utilize butyrate enemas as a treatment of ulcerative colitis, it seemed important to assess the transport...

  6. p300 Knockout Promotes Butyrate Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Lazarova, Darina L.; Bordonaro, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Dietary fiber is linked to a reduced risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), and this protective activity is likely due to its fermentation product, butyrate. Dependent upon the hyperactivation of Wnt signaling, butyrate represses CRC cell growth and induces apoptosis. However, resistance to butyrate activity may allow for CRC development even in the context of relatively high fiber intake. We have previously determined that CRC cells resistant to butyrate are deficient in p300 expression. The histo...

  7. Models construction for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentations with acetate/butyrate consecutively feeding by graph theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Shi, Zhongping; Li, Xin

    2014-05-01

    Several fermentations with consecutively feeding of acetate/butyrate were conducted in a 7 L fermentor and the results indicated that exogenous acetate/butyrate enhanced solvents productivities by 47.1% and 39.2% respectively, and changed butyrate/acetate ratios greatly. Then extracellular butyrate/acetate ratios were utilized for calculation of acids rates and the results revealed that acetate and butyrate formation pathways were almost blocked by corresponding acids feeding. In addition, models for acetate/butyrate feeding fermentations were constructed by graph theory based on calculation results and relevant reports. Solvents concentrations and butanol/acetone ratios of these fermentations were also calculated and the results of models calculation matched fermentation data accurately which demonstrated that models were constructed in a reasonable way. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Restricted Distribution of the Butyrate Kinase Pathway among Butyrate-Producing Bacteria from the Human Colon

    OpenAIRE

    Louis, Petra; Duncan, Sylvia H.; McCrae, Sheila I.; Millar, Jacqueline; Jackson, Michelle S.; Flint, Harry J.

    2004-01-01

    The final steps in butyrate synthesis by anaerobic bacteria can occur via butyrate kinase and phosphotransbutyrylase or via butyryl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase. Degenerate PCR and enzymatic assays were used to assess the presence of butyrate kinase among 38 anaerobic butyrate-producing bacterial isolates from human feces that represent three different clostridial clusters (IV, XIVa, and XVI). Only four strains were found to possess detectable butyrate kinase activity. These were ...

  9. Butyrate enhances antibacterial effects while suppressing other features of alternative activation in IL-4-induced macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Maria R; Saxena, Alpana; Reyes, José-Luis; McKay, Derek M

    2016-05-15

    The short-chain fatty acid butyrate is produced by fermentation of dietary fiber by the intestinal microbiota; butyrate is the primary energy source of colonocytes and has immunomodulatory effects. Having shown that macrophages differentiated with IL-4 [M(IL-4)s] can suppress colitis, we hypothesized that butyrate would reinforce an M(IL-4) phenotype. Here, we show that in the presence of butyrate M(IL-4)s display reduced expression of their hallmark markers Arg1 and Ym1 and significantly suppressed LPS-induced nitric oxide, IL-12p40, and IL-10 production. Butyrate treatment likely altered the M(IL-4) phenotype via inhibition of histone deacetylation. Functionally, M(IL-4)s treated with butyrate showed increased phagocytosis and killing of bacteria, compared with M(IL-4) and this was not accompanied by enhanced proinflammatory cytokine production. Culture of regulatory T cells with M(IL-4)s and M(IL-4 + butyrate)s revealed that both macrophage subsets suppressed expression of the regulatory T-cell marker Foxp3. However, Tregs cocultured with M(IL-4 + butyrate) produced less IL-17A than Tregs cocultured with M(IL-4). These data illustrate the importance of butyrate, a microbial-derived metabolite, in the regulation of gut immunity: the demonstration that butyrate promotes phagocytosis in M(IL-4)s that can limit T-cell production of IL-17A reveals novel aspects of bacterial-host interaction in the regulation of intestinal homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Acetylcarnitine potentiates the anticarcinogenic effects of butyrate on SW480 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elimrani, Ihsan; Dionne, Serge; Saragosti, Dan; Qureshi, Ijaz; Levy, Emile; Delvin, Edgar; Seidman, Ernest G

    2015-08-01

    Butyrate is a potent anticarcinogenic compound against colon cancer cells in vitro. However, its rapid metabolism is hypothesized to limit its anticancer benefits in colonic epithelial cells. Carnitine, a potent antioxidant, is essential to fatty acid oxidation. The aims of this study were to identify a colon cancer cell line capable of transporting carnitine. We evaluated the effect of carnitine and acetylcarnitine (ALCAR) on the response of colon carcinoma cells to butyrate. We explored the mechanisms underlying the anticarcinogenic benefit. SW480 cells were incubated with butyrate ± carnitine or ALCAR. Carnitine uptake was assessed using [3H]-carnitine. Apoptosis and cell viability were assessed using an ELISA kit and flow cytometry, respectively. Modulation of proteins implicated in carnitine transport, cell death and proliferation were assessed by western blotting. SW480 cells were found to transport carnitine primarily via the OCTN2 transporter. Butyrate induced SW480 cell death occurred at concentrations of 2 mM and higher. Cells treated with the combination of butyrate (3 mM) with ALCAR exhibited increased mortality. The addition of carnitine or ALCAR also increased butyrate-induced apoptosis. Butyrate increased levels of cyclin D1, p21 and PARP p86, but decreased Bcl-XL and survivin levels. Butyrate also downregulated dephospho-β-catenin and increased acetylated histone H4 levels. Butyrate and carnitine decreased survivin levels by ≥25%. ALCAR independently induced a 20% decrease in p21. These results demonstrate that butyrate and ALCAR are potentially beneficial anticarcinogenic nutrients that inhibit colon cancer cell survival in vitro. The combination of both agents may have superior anticarcinogenic properties than butyrate alone.

  11. Is butyrate the link between diet, intestinal microbiota and obesity-related metabolic diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahe, L K; Astrup, A; Larsen, L H

    2013-12-01

    It is increasingly recognized that there is a connection between diet, intestinal microbiota, intestinal barrier function and the low-grade inflammation that characterizes the progression from obesity to metabolic disturbances, making dietary strategies to modulate the intestinal environment relevant. In this context, the ability of some Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria to produce the short-chain fatty acid butyrate is interesting. A lower abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria has been associated with metabolic risk in humans, and recent studies suggest that butyrate might have an anti-inflammatory potential that can alleviate obesity-related metabolic complications, possibly due to its ability to enhance the intestinal barrier function. Here, we review and discuss the potential of butyrate as an anti-inflammatory mediator in metabolic diseases, and the potential for dietary interventions increasing the intestinal availability of butyrate. © 2013 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  12. Synergetic Enhancement of Device Efficiency in Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl/[6,6]-phenyl C61 Butyric Acid Methyl Ester Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells by Glycerol Addition in the Active Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobins Augustine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl(P3HT:[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC60BM is the widely used active layer for the bulk heterojunction solar cells. Annealing is essential for P3HT:PC60BM active layer, since it facilitates the creation of better network for the transfer of the charge carriers. However, the PC60BM in the active layer can crystallize excessively during annealing treatments and disrupt the favorable morphology by forming crystallites in micrometer ranges, thus reducing device efficiency. In this paper we used glycerol as an additive in the active layer. Due to high boiling point of glycerol, it makes slow drying of the active layer possible during the annealing. It thus gives enough time to both electron donor (P3HT and electron acceptor (PC60BM components of the active layer to self-organize and also restrict the crystal overgrowth of PC60BM. Further, the glycerol additive makes the active layer smoother, which may also improve adhesion between the electrode and the active layer. The devices with the pristine active layer showed a power conversion efficiency (PCE of about 2.1% and, with the addition of 30 vol% of glycerol in the active layer, the PCE value increased to 3%.

  13. The efficient n-doping of [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester by leuco-crystal violet to enhance the performance of inverted organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Zhao, Wei; Cao, Huan; Shi, Zhihua; Zhang, Jidong; Qin, Dashan

    2018-02-01

    Inverted organic solar cells (OSCs) have been fabricated using the photoactive blend thin films based on regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), and leuco-crystal violet (LCV). It was found that the LCV as an efficient n-dopant could significantly increase intrinsic electron concentration of PCBM zone. The electron mobility of P3HT:PCBM:LCV blend thin film was measured 1.75 times as high as that of P3HT:PCBM blend thin film, as a result of LCV-induced trap filling in the bandgap of PCBM. The power conversion efficiency for the inverted device using the photoactive layer of P3HT:PCBM:LCV could be 1.22 times as high as that for the inverted device using the conventional photoactive layer of P3HT:PCBM, mostly because (1) the higher electron mobility could enhance the exciton dissociation and thereby short-circuit current density in the former relative to the latter; (2) the increase in the electron concentration of PCBM zone in P3HT:PCBM:LCV blend thin film may help blocking holes diffusion towards cathode, improving the hole collection efficiency and thereby fill factor of device. We provide a new insight on optimizing the electron-conducting property of bulk-heterojunction photoactive thin film, useful for pushing forward inverted OSCs towards the cost-effective commercialization.

  14. Supplemental butyrate does not enhance the absorptive or barrier functions of the isolated ovine ruminal epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D J; Mutsvangwa, T; Penner, G B

    2012-09-01

    Our objective was to determine if increasing the ruminal butyrate concentration would improve the selective permeability of ruminal epithelia. Suffolk wether lambs (n = 18) with an initial BW of 47.4 ±1.4 kg were housed in individual pens (1.5 × 1.5 m) with rubber mats on the floor. Lambs were blocked by initial BW into 6 blocks and, within block, were randomly assigned to either the control (CON) or 1 of 2 butyrate supplementation amounts (i.e., 1.25% or 2.50% butyrate as a proportion of DMI). With the exception of butyrate supplementation, all lambs were fed a common diet (90% concentrate and 10% barley silage). After a 14-d feeding period, lambs were killed, and ruminal epithelia from the ventral sac were mounted in Ussing chambers. To facilitate the Ussing chamber measurements, only 1 lamb was killed on an individual day. Thus, the starting date was staggered so that all lambs were exposed to the same experimental protocol. In Ussing chambers, epithelia were incubated using separate mucosal (pH 6.2) and serosal (pH 7.4) bathing solutions. Then 1-14C-butyrate (74 kBq/10 mL) was added to the mucosal side and was used to measure the mucosal-to-serosal flux (J(ms-butyrate)) in 2 consecutive 60-min flux periods with simultaneous measurement of transepithelial conductance (G(t)). During the first (challenge) flux period, the mucosal buffer solution was either acidified to pH 5.2 (ACID) or used as a control (pH 6.2; SHAM). Buffer solutions bathing the epithelia were replaced before the second flux period (recovery). Total ruminal short-chain fatty acid and butyrate concentrations were greater (P = 0.001) in lambs fed 2.50% compared with those fed 0% or 1.25% butyrate. The J(ms-butyrate) was less for lambs fed 1.25% and 2.50% butyrate [3.00 and 3.12 μmol/(cm2·h), respectively] than for CON [3.91 μmol/(cm2· h)]. However, no difference (P = 0.13)was observed for G(t). An ex vivo treatment × flux period interaction was detected (P = 0.003) for J(ms-butyrate), where

  15. Mechanism of Butyrate Stimulation of Triglyceride Storage and Adipokine Expression during Adipogenic Differentiation of Porcine Stromovascular Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yan

    Full Text Available Short chain fatty acids (SCFA, products of microbial fermentation of dietary fiber, exert multiple metabolic effects in cells. Previously, we had demonstrated that soluble fiber influenced fat mass accumulation, gut microbial community structure and SCFA production in pigs. The current study was designed to identify effects of SCFA treatment during adipogenic differentiation of porcine stromovascular cells on lipid metabolism and adipokine expression. Differentiating cells were treated with varying concentrations of butyrate. Results show that butyrate treatment enhanced adipogenesis and lipid accumulation, perhaps through upregulation of glucose uptake and de novo lipogenesis and other mechanisms that include induction of SREBP-1c, C/EBPα/β, GLUT4, LPL, PPARγ, GPAT4, DGAT1 and DGAT2 expression. In addition, butyrate induced adiponectin expression, resulting in activation of downstream target genes, such as AMPK and AKT. Activation of AMPK by butyrate led to phosphorylation of ACC. Although increased ACO gene expression was seen with butyrate treatment, experiments with the peroxisomal fatty acid inhibitor, thioridazine, suggest that butyrate may have an inhibitory effect on peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. Our studies also provide evidence that butyrate may inhibit lipolysis, perhaps in an FFAR3-dependent manner. Therefore, this study presents a novel paradigm for butyrate action in adipocytes and shows that adipocytes are capable of utilizing butyrate, leading to increased expression of adiponectin for enhanced glucose uptake and improved insulin sensitivity.

  16. Butyrate as preferred substrate for polyhydroxybutyrate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marang, Leonie; Jiang, Yang; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Kleerebezem, Robbert

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the suitability of butyrate as substrate for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production by microbial enrichment cultures was assessed. Two sequencing batch reactors were operated under feast-famine conditions: one fed with butyrate, and another with mixed acetate and butyrate. The obtained results were compared to previous results with acetate as sole substrate. In all three reactors Plasticicumulans acidivorans dominated the enrichment culture. The carbon uptake rate and PHA yield were significantly higher on butyrate than on acetate, resulting in a higher PHA production rate. When both substrates were available the bacteria strongly preferred the uptake of butyrate. Only after butyrate depletion acetate was taken up at a high rate. The molar substrate uptake rate remained the same, suggesting that substrate uptake is the rate-limiting step. The results show that for optimized waste-based PHA production the pre-fermentation process should be directed towards butyrate production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential responses to isoprenoid, N-6-substituted aromatic cytokinins and indole-3-butyric acid in direct plant regeneration of Eriocephalus africanus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Madzikane-Mlungwana, O.; Moyo, M.; Aremu, A.O.; Plíhalová, Lucie; Doležal, Karel; Van Staden, J.; Finnie, J.F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 1 (2017), s. 103-110 ISSN 0167-6903 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : in-vitro cultures * auxin transport * meta-topolin * antioxidant activity * biological-activity * arabidopsis roots * phenolic-acids * l. asteraceae * south-africa * flavonoids * Auxins * Cytokinins * Flavonoids * Plant regeneration * Phenolics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.646, year: 2016

  18. Effect of thidiazuron and indole-butyric acid in the in vitro propagation of two varieties of strawberry (Oso Grande and Sweet Charlie from foliar sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillco-Tancara Hilda Corina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Strawberry farmers indicate that yields are low compared to other countries. This effect is due to the fact that they plant seedlings that come from stolons since the strawberries are propagated asexual. This con-ventional form of reproduction has disadvantages such as: decreased yield, loss of fruit quality. An alter-native to solve this problem is micropropagation. The present research evaluated the in vitro behavior of two varieties of strawberry (Oso Grande and Sweet Charlie from leaf segments with different degrees of maturation (juvenile and adult in two periods of introduction. To induce in vitro propagation, the culture media were supplemented with growth regulators, using two concentrations 4.54 and 9.08 μM of thidiazuron with the combination of three concentrations of 0, 0.98 and 2.5 μM of acid Indolebutyric acid. Explants of leaf segments showing juvenile tissues (May came to form buds. The same did not occur with those that came from adult tissue (June, so it can be noted that those that came from juvenile tissue had a better response in vitro. It was determined that the combination of 9.08 μM thidiazuron and 0.98 μM indolbutyric acid was the most suitable for the in vitro propagation of leaf sections of strawberry leaves in both varieties, since in this medium more formation was obtained Of cell aggregates, for the formation of outbreaks compared to the other treatments.

  19. Butyrate regulates the expression of inflammatory and chemotactic cytokines in human acute leukemic cells during apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Stephanie R; Pellom, Samuel T; Shanker, Anil; Adunyah, Samuel E

    2016-08-01

    Butyrate is a histone deacetylase inhibitor implicated in many studies as a potential therapy for various forms of cancer. High concentrations of butyrate (>1.5mM) have been shown to activate apoptosis in several cancer cell lines including prostate, breast, and leukemia. Butyrate is also known to influence multiple signaling pathways that are mediators of cytokine production. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of high concentrations of butyrate on the cancer microenvironment vis-à-vis apoptosis, cellular migration, and capacity to modulate cytokine expression in cancer cells. The results indicate that high concentrations of butyrate induced a 2-fold activation of caspase-3 and reduced cell viability by 60% in U937 leukemia cells. Within 24h, butyrate significantly decreased the levels of chemokines CCL2 and CCL5 in HL-60 and U937 cells, and decreased CCL5 in THP-1 leukemia cells. Differential effects were observed in treatments with valproic acid for CCL2 and CCL5 indicating butyrate-specificity. Many of the biological effects examined in this study are linked to activation of the AKT and MAPK signaling pathways; therefore, we investigated whether butyrate alters the levels of phosphorylated forms of these signaling proteins and how it correlated with the expression of chemokines. The results show that butyrate may partially regulate CCL5 production via p38 MAPK. The decrease in p-ERK1/2 and p-AKT levels correlated with the decrease in CCL2 production. These data suggest that while promoting apoptosis, butyrate has the potential to influence the cancer microenvironment by inducing differential expression of cytokines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Morphological and spectroscopic characterizations of inkjet-printed poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl): Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester blends for organic solar cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, A.; Villani, F.; Grimaldi, I.A.; Loffredo, F.; Morvillo, P.; Diana, R.; Haque, S.; Minarini, C.

    2014-01-01

    The most exploited active material for photovoltaic devices is the regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), p-type conjugated polymer, blended with [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), n-type material. The deposition methods and the induced morphology strongly influence the functionality of the active material and in turn the final charge generation performances of a photoactive layer. In the present work, we studied the influence of PCBM concentration on the morphological and spectroscopic properties of the inkjet printed P3HT:PCBM blends through atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy and transient absorption spectroscopy. The aim is to value the charge formation yield in the blends, prepared by inkjet technology, as function of the acceptor concentrations in correlation with morphology and intermixing of the two components. For the inkjet printed samples the blends composition that corresponds to the best intermixing between P3HT and PCBM and the higher charges formation yield should be between 20% and 45% in weight (wt)., differently for what has been found previously for spin-coated samples. Indeed, for inkjet prepared film, the 45 wt.% blend ratio leads to much bigger domains with respect to the spin-coated samples as shown from the AFM measurements. - Highlights: • Inkjet-printed P3HT:PCBM blends for organic solar cell applications • Coarser morphology of inkjet P3HT:PCBM films with respect to the spin-coated film • Inkjet P3HT:PCBM films showed charge formation maximum for PCBM wt.% lower than 45

  1. A novel approach for the characterization of a bilayer of phenyl-c71-butyric-acid-methyl ester and pentacene using ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and argon gas cluster ion beam sputtering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Chung, JaeGwan; Jung, Changhoon; Chung, Yeonji; Kim, SeongHeon; Lee, Seunghyup; Kim, Ki-Hong; Han, Hyouksoo; Park, Gyeong-Su; Park, SungHoon

    2013-01-01

    The material arrangement and energy level alignment of an organic bilayer comprising of phenyl-c71-butyric-acid-methyl ester (PCBM-71) and pentacene were studied using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and the argon gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputtering process. Although there is a small difference in the full width at half maximum of the carbon C 1s core level peaks and differences in the oxygen O 1s core levels of an X-ray photoemission spectroscopy spectra, these differences are insufficient to clearly distinguish between PCBM-71 and pentacene layers and to classify the interface and bulk regions. On the other hand, the valence band structures in the UPS spectra contain completely distinct configurations for the PCBM-71 and pentacene layers, even when they have similar atomic compositions. According to the valence band structures of the PCBM-71/pentacene/electrodes, the highest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO) region of pentacene is at least 0.8 eV closer to the Fermi level than that of PCBM-71 and it does not overlap with any of the chemical states in the valence band structure of PCBM-71. Therefore, by just following the variations in the area of the HOMO region of pentacene, the interface/bulk regions of the PCBM/pentacene layers were distinctly categorized. Besides, the variation of valence band structures as a function of the Ar GCIB sputtering time fully corroborated with the surface morphologies observed in the atomic force microscope images. In summary, we believe that the novel approach, which involves UPS analysis in conjunction with Ar GCIB sputtering, can be one of the best methods to characterize the material distribution and energy level alignments of stacks of organic layers

  2. Spray deposition of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester blend under electric field for improved interface and organic solar cell characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaturvedi, Neha, E-mail: nchaturvedi9@gmail.com; Swami, Sanjay Kumar; Dutta, Viresh

    2016-01-01

    Spray process is used for the deposition of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend film under different voltages (0 V, 300 V, 500 V and 700 V) applied to the nozzle. The presence of the electric field during the spray process makes the P3HT:PCBM film smoother, uniform and more crystalline with well aligned domains. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study shows that PCBM rich surface is formed by application of the DC voltage (700 V) which improves the electron transport at the active layer and cathode interface. The application of electric field reduces the recombination at interfaces. The increased charge carrier separation between donor and acceptor at the interface and the crystallinity enhancement result in improved short circuit current density–voltage characteristics of Indium tin oxide/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)(PEDOT:PSS) /P3HT:PCBM/Aluminum solar cell. The organic bulk-heterojunction solar cell using the electric field assisted spray deposited PEDOT:PSS and P3HT:PCBM layers exhibited 84% and 154% increment in the short circuit current density and power conversion efficiency, respectively in comparison to the solar cell having spray deposited PEDOT:PSS and P3HT:PCBM layers in the absence of the electric field. - Highlights: • Spray deposition of P3HT:PCBM is carried out. • Spray deposition under electric field is done. • Electric field application enhanced the crystallinity of the layers. • P3HT:PCBM film arranged in more ordered form with electric field • Efficiency of organic solar cell is enhanced with application of electric field.

  3. The neuropharmacology of butyrate: The bread and butter of the microbiota-gut-brain axis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilling, Roman M; van de Wouw, Marcel; Clarke, Gerard; Stanton, Catherine; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2016-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that brain function and behaviour are influenced by microbial metabolites. Key products of the microbiota are short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), including butyric acid. Butyrate is a functionally versatile molecule that is produced in the mammalian gut by fermentation of dietary fibre and is enriched in butter and other dairy products. Butyrate along with other fermentation-derived SCFAs (e.g. acetate, propionate) and the structurally related ketone bodies (e.g. acetoacetate and d-β-hydroxybutyrate) show promising effects in various diseases including obesity, diabetes, inflammatory (bowel) diseases, and colorectal cancer as well as neurological disorders. Indeed, it is clear that host energy metabolism and immune functions critically depend on butyrate as a potent regulator, highlighting butyrate as a key mediator of host-microbe crosstalk. In addition to specific receptors (GPR43/FFAR2; GPR41/FFAR3; GPR109a/HCAR2) and transporters (MCT1/SLC16A1; SMCT1/SLC5A8), its effects are mediated by utilisation as an energy source via the β-oxidation pathway and as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs), promoting histone acetylation and stimulation of gene expression in host cells. The latter has also led to the use of butyrate as an experimental drug in models for neurological disorders ranging from depression to neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive impairment. Here we provide a critical review of the literature on butyrate and its effects on multiple aspects of host physiology with a focus on brain function and behaviour. We find fundamental differences in natural butyrate at physiological concentrations and its use as a neuropharmacological agent at rather high, supraphysiological doses in brain research. Finally, we hypothesise that butyrate and other volatile SCFAs produced by microbes may be involved in regulating the impact of the microbiome on behaviour including social communication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  4. Butyrate protects rat liver against total hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury with bowel congestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Qian, Jianmin; Wang, Qingbao; Wang, Fangrui; Ma, Zhenyu; Qiao, Yingli

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an unavoidable consequence of major liver surgery, especially in liver transplantation with bowel congestion, during which endotoxemia is often evident. The inflammatory response aggravated by endotoxin after I/R contributes to liver dysfunction and failure. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of butyrate, a naturally occurring four-carbon fatty acid in the body and a dietary component of foods such as cheese and butter, on hepatic injury complicated by enterogenous endotoxin, as well as to examine the underlying mechanisms involved. SD rats were subjected to a total hepatic ischemia for 30 min after pretreatment with either vehicle or butyrate, followed by 6 h and 24 h of reperfusion. Butyrate preconditioning markedly improved hepatic function and histology, as indicated by reduced transaminase levels and ameliorated tissue pathological changes. The inflammatory factors levels, macrophages activation, TLR4 expression, and neutrophil infiltration in live were attenuated by butyrate. Butyrate also maintained the intestinal barrier structures, reversed the aberrant expression of ZO-1, and decreased the endotoxin translocation. We conclude that butyrate inhibition of endotoxin translocation, macrophages activation, inflammatory factors production, and neutrophil infiltration is involved in the alleviation of total hepatic I/R liver injury in rats. This suggests that butyrate should potentially be utilized in liver transplantation.

  5. Dietary fibres modulate the composition and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria in the large intestine of suckling piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Chunlong; Zhang, Lingli; He, Xiangyu; Smidt, Hauke; Zhu, Weiyun

    2017-05-01

    Dietary fibres have been shown to affect early-life microbiota colonization in the large intestine of suckling piglets, however, much less is known as to whether they also modulate the composition and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of dietary fibres on the abundance, composition, and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria in suckling piglets. Piglets were fed a control diet or creep feeds containing alfalfa, wheat bran, or pure cellulose, respectively, from postnatal day 7 to 22. Large intestinal digesta and mucosa samples were collected for quantitative analysis of bacterial group-specific 16S ribosomal RNA- and butyrate production-related genes, and digesta samples for quantification of short-chain fatty acids. The alfalfa diet increased (P butyrate production (butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase, butyrate kinase), and butyrate concentration compared to the wheat bran diet in the digesta of the proximal colon. In the distal colonic digesta, animals fed the alfalfa diet had the highest number of butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene copies (P butyrate concentration, albeit not significant (P > 0.05), compared to other groups. In the distal colonic mucosa, the cellulose diet increased (P butyrate-producing bacteria in the large intestine of suckling piglets, and that a moderate supplementation of alfalfa and cellulose may benefit early-life gut health through the delivery of butyrate to the mucosa.

  6. Characterization of a Clostridium beijerinckii spo0A mutant and its application for butyl butyrate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seung-Oh; Wang, Yi; Lu, Ting; Jin, Yong-Su; Blaschek, Hans P

    2017-01-01

    Spo0A is a master regulator that governs the metabolic shift of solventogenic Clostridium species such as Clostridium beijerinckii. Its disruption can thus potentially cause a significant alteration of cellular physiology as well as metabolic patterns. To investigate the specific effect of spo0A disruption in C. beijerinckii, a spo0A mutant of C. beijerinckii was characterized in this study. In a batch fermentation with pH control at 6.5, the spo0A mutant accumulated butyrate and butanol up to 8.96 g/L and 3.32 g/L, respectively from 60 g/L glucose. Noticing the unique phenotype of the spo0A mutant accumulating both butyrate and butanol at significant concentrations, we decided to use the spo0A mutant for the production of butyl butyrate that can be formed by the condensation of butyrate and butanol during the ABE fermentation in the presence of the enzyme lipase. Butyl butyrate is a value-added chemical that has numerous uses in the food and fragrance industry. Moreover, butyl butyrate as a biofuel is compatible with Jet A-1 aviation kerosene and used for biodiesel enrichment. In an initial trial of small-scale extractive batch fermentation using hexadecane as the extractant with supplementation of lipase CalB, the spo0A mutant was subjected to acid crash due to the butyrate accumulation, and thus produced only 98 mg/L butyl butyrate. To alleviate the butyrate toxicity, the biphasic medium was supplemented with 10 g/L CaCO 3 and 5 g/L butanol. The butyl butyrate production was then increased up to 2.73 g/L in the hexadecane layer. When continuous agitation was performed to enhance the esterification and extraction of butyl butyrate, 3.32 g/L butyl butyrate was obtained in the hexadecane layer. In this study, we successfully demonstrated the use of the C. beijerinckii spo0A mutant for the butyl butyrate production through the simultaneous ABE fermentation, condensation, and extraction. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 106-112. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals

  7. Upregulation of genes related to bone formation by γ-amino butyric acid and γ-oryzanol in germinated brown rice is via the activation of GABAB-receptors and reduction of serum IL-6 in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Sani Ismaila; Maznah, Ismail; Mahmud, Rozi; Zuki, Abu Bakar Zakaria; Imam, Mustapha Umar

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis and other bone degenerative diseases are among the most challenging non-communicable diseases to treat. Previous works relate bone loss due to osteoporosis with oxidative stress generated by free radicals and inflammatory cytokines. Alternative therapy to hormone replacement has been an area of interest to researchers for almost three decades due to hormone therapy-associated side effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), gamma-oryzanol (ORZ), acylated steryl glucosides (ASG), and phenolic extracts from germinated brown rice (GBR) on the expression of genes related to bone metabolism, such as bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2), secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX-2), osteoblast-specific transcription factor osterix (Osx), periostin, osteoblast specific factor (Postn), collagen 1&2 (Col1&2), calcitonin receptor gene (CGRP); body weight measurement and also serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and osteocalcin, in serum and bone. Rats were treated with GBR, ORZ, GABA, and ASG at (100 and 200 mg/kg); estrogen (0.2 mg/kg), or remifemin (10 and 20 mg/kg), compared to ovariectomized non-treated group as well as non-ovariectomized non-treated (sham) group. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the IL-6 and osteocalcin levels at week 2, 4, and 8, while the gene expression in the bone tissue was determined using the Genetic Analysis System (Beckman Coulter Inc., Brea, CA, USA). The results indicate that groups treated with GABA (100 and 200 mg/kg) showed significant upregulation of SPARC, calcitonin receptor, and BMP-2 genes (P < 0.05), while the ORZ-treated group (100 and 200 mg/kg) revealed significant (P < 0.05) upregulation of Osx, Postn, RUNX-2, and Col1&2. Similarly, IL-6 concentration decreased, while osteocalcin levels increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the treated groups as compared to ovariectomized non-treated groups. GABA and ORZ from

  8. Butyrate induces reactive oxygen species production and affects cell cycle progression in human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M-C; Tsai, Y-L; Chen, Y-W; Chan, C-P; Huang, C-F; Lan, W-C; Lin, C-C; Lan, W-H; Jeng, J-H

    2013-02-01

    Short-chain fatty acids, such as butyric acid and propionic acid, are metabolic by-products generated by periodontal microflora such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, and contribute to the pathogenesis of periodontitis. However, the effects of butyrate on the biological activities of gingival fibroblasts (GFs) are not well elucidated. Human GFs were exposed to various concentrations of butyrate (0.5-16 mm) for 24 h. Viable cells that excluded trypan blue were counted. Cell cycle distribution of GFs was analyzed by propidium iodide-staining flow cytometry. Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured by flow cytometry using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF). Total RNA and protein lysates were isolated and subjected to RT-PCR using specific primers or to western blotting using specific antibodies, respectively. Butyrate inhibited the growth of GFs, as indicated by a decrease in the number of viable cells. This event was associated with an induction of G0/G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest by butyrate (4-16 mm) in GFs. However, no marked apoptosis of GFs was noted in this experimental condition. Butyrate (> 2 mm) inhibited the expression of cdc2, cdc25C and cyclinB1 mRNAs and reduced the levels of Cdc2, Cdc25C and cyclinB1 proteins in GFs, as determined using RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. This toxic effect of butyrate was associated with the production of ROS. These results suggest that butyrate generated by periodontal pathogens may be involved in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases via the induction of ROS production and the impairment of cell growth, cell cycle progression and expression of cell cycle-related genes in GFs. These events are important in the initiation and prolongation of inflammatory processes in periodontal diseases. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Effect of butyrate on immune response of a chicken macrophage cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z Y; Packialakshmi, B; Makkar, S K; Dridi, S; Rath, N C

    2014-11-15

    Butyric acid is a major short chain fatty acid (SCFA), produced in the gastrointestinal tract by anaerobic bacterial fermentation, that has beneficial health effects in many species including poultry. To understand the immunomodulating effects of butyrate on avian macrophage, we treated a naturally transformed line of chicken macrophage cells named HTC with Na-butyrate in the absence or presence of Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a metabolic activator, evaluating its various functional parameters. The results demonstrate that, butyrate by itself had no significant effect on variables such as nitric oxide (NO) production and the expression of genes associated with various inflammatory cytokines but it inhibited NO production, and reduced the expression of cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, and IL-10 in LPS-stimulated cells. Butyrate decreased the expression of TGF-β3 in the presence or absence of LPS, while it had no effect on IL-4, Tβ4, and MMP2 gene expression. In addition, butyrate augmented PMA induced oxidative burst indicated by DCF-DA oxidation and restored LPS induced attenuation of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Although butyrate had no significant effect on phagocytosis or matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities of resting macrophages, it significantly suppressed the effects induced by their respective stimulants such as LPS induced phagocytosis and PMA induced MMP expression. These results suggest that butyrate has immunomodulatory property in the presence of agents that incite the cells thus, has potential to control inflammation and restore immune homeostasis. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Butyrate transcriptionally enhances peptide transporter PepT1 expression and activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Dalmasso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PepT1, an intestinal epithelial apical di/tripeptide transporter, is normally expressed in the small intestine and induced in colon during chronic inflammation. This study aimed at investigating PepT1 regulation by butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced by commensal bacteria and accumulated inside inflamed colonocyte. RESULTS: We found that butyrate treatment of human intestinal epithelial Caco2-BBE cells increased human PepT1 (hPepT1 promoter activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with maximal activity observed in cells treated with 5 mM butyrate for 24 h. Under this condition, hPepT1 promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression levels were increased as assessed by luciferase assay, real-time RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. hPepT1 transport activity was accordingly increased by approximately 2.5-fold. Butyrate did not alter hPepT1 mRNA half-life indicating that butyrate acts at the transcriptional level. Molecular analyses revealed that Cdx2 is the most important transcription factor for butyrate-induced increase of hPepT1 expression and activity in Caco2-BBE cells. Butyrate-activated Cdx2 binding to hPepT1 promoter was confirmed by gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Moreover, Caco2-BBE cells overexpressing Cdx2 exhibited greater hPepT1 expression level than wild-type cells. Finally, treatment of mice with 5 mM butyrate added to drinking water for 24 h increased colonic PepT1 mRNA and protein expression levels, as well as enhanced PepT1 transport activity in colonic apical membranes vesicles. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our results demonstrate that butyrate increases PepT1 expression and activity in colonic epithelial cells, which provides a new understanding of PepT1 regulation during chronic inflammation.

  11. Butyrate suppresses motility of colorectal cancer cells via deactivating Akt/ERK signaling in histone deacetylase dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingran; Ding, Chujie; Meng, Tuo; Lu, Wenjie; Liu, Wenyue; Hao, Haiping; Cao, Lijuan

    2017-12-01

    Butyrate is a typical short chain fatty acid produced by gut microbiota of which the dysmetabolism has been consistently associated with colorectal diseases. However, whether butyrate affects metastatic colorectal cancer is not clear. In this study we investigated in vitro the effect of butyrate on motility, a significant metastatic factor of colorectal cancer cells and explored the potential mechanism. By using wound healing and transwell-based invasion models, we demonstrated that pretreatment of butyrate significantly inhibited motility of HCT116, HT29, LOVO and HCT8 cells, this activity was further attributed to deactivation of Akt1 and ERK1/2. Suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA), another HDAC inhibitor, mimicked the inhibitory effect of butyrate on cell motility and deactivation of Akt/ERK. Furthermore, by silencing of HDAC3 with siRNA, we confirmed dependence of butyrate's effect on HDAC3, the similar reduced cell motility observed under HDAC3 silencing also indicates the significance of HDAC itself in cell motility. In conclusion, we confirmed the HDAC3-relied activity of butyrate on inhibiting motility of colorectal cancer cells via deactivating Akt/ERK signaling. Our data indicate that modulating butyrate metabolism is an effective therapeutic strategy of metastatic colorectal cancer; and HDAC3 might be a novel target for management of colorectal cancer metastasis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The role of butyrate, a histone deacetylase inhibitor in diabetes mellitus: experimental evidence for therapeutic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sabbir; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of epigenetic mechanisms in diabetes mellitus (DM), β-cell reprogramming and its complications is an emerging concept. Recent evidence suggests that there is a link between DM and histone deacetylases (HDACs), because HDAC inhibitors promote β-cell differentiation, proliferation, function and improve insulin resistance. Moreover, gut microbes and diet-derived products can alter the host epigenome. Furthermore, butyrate and butyrate-producing microbes are decreased in DM. Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid produced from the fermentation of dietary fibers by microbiota and has been proven as an HDAC inhibitor. The present review provides a pragmatic interpretation of chromatin-dependent and independent complex signaling/mechanisms of butyrate for the treatment of Type 1 and Type 2 DM, with an emphasis on the promising strategies for its drugability and therapeutic implication.

  13. n-Butyrate inhibits Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation and cytokine transcription in mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diakos, Christos; Prieschl, Eva E.; Saeemann, Marcus D.; Boehmig, Georg A.; Csonga, Robert; Sobanov, Yury; Baumruker, Thomas; Zlabinger, Gerhard J.

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells are well known to contribute to type I allergic conditions but only recently have been brought in association with chronic relapsing/remitting autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease and ulcerative colitis. Since the bacterial metabolite n-butyrate is considered to counteract intestinal inflammation we investigated the effects of this short chain fatty acid on mast cell activation. Using RNAse protection assays and reporter gene technology we show that n-butyrate downregulates TNF-α transcription. This correlates with an impaired activation of the Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) but not other MAP kinases such as ERK and p38 that are largely unaffected by n-butyrate. As a consequence, we observed a decreased nuclear activity of AP-1 and NF-AT transcription factors. These results indicate that n-butyrate inhibits critical inflammatory mediators in mast cells by relatively selectively targeting the JNK signalling

  14. n-Butyrate inhibits Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation and cytokine transcription in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakos, Christos; Prieschl, Eva E; Säemann, Marcus D; Böhmig, Georg A; Csonga, Robert; Sobanov, Yury; Baumruker, Thomas; Zlabinger, Gerhard J

    2006-10-20

    Mast cells are well known to contribute to type I allergic conditions but only recently have been brought in association with chronic relapsing/remitting autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease and ulcerative colitis. Since the bacterial metabolite n-butyrate is considered to counteract intestinal inflammation we investigated the effects of this short chain fatty acid on mast cell activation. Using RNAse protection assays and reporter gene technology we show that n-butyrate downregulates TNF-alpha transcription. This correlates with an impaired activation of the Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) but not other MAP kinases such as ERK and p38 that are largely unaffected by n-butyrate. As a consequence, we observed a decreased nuclear activity of AP-1 and NF-AT transcription factors. These results indicate that n-butyrate inhibits critical inflammatory mediators in mast cells by relatively selectively targeting the JNK signalling.

  15. Indol-butyric acid levels on cashew cloning by air-layering process Níveis de ácido indolbutírico na clonagem do cajueiro pelo processo de mergulhia aérea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Luiz Lopes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the possibility of cashew (Anacardium occidentale cloning by air-layering and influence of IBA (indol-butyric acid on this process. It was adopted a completely randomized design with 4 treatments, 10 air layers each and 4 replications, reaching 160 air layers. The IBA levels on the treatments were, as follow: 0, 1000, 3000 and 5000 mg.kg-1. It was evaluated: survival, callus and rooting percentage, average number and length of roots. The highest survival rate (67.5% was registered with no growth regulator and IBA at 1000 mg.kg-1, while the best rooting percentage (82% referred to 1000 mg.kg-1. In spite of average number and length of roots, the highest results were observed with IBA at 5000 mg.kg-1. IBA concentrations had no influence on cashew air-layering formation.Um estudo foi conduzido com a finalidade de determinar a possibilidade de clonagem do cajueiro (Anacardium occidentale por alporquia e a influência do AIB (ácido indolbutírico nesse processo. Adotou-se delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado, com 4 tratamentos, 10 alporques por parcela, repetidos por 4 vezes, num total de 160 alporques. Os tratamentos constaram das concentrações de AIB: 0 (testemunha, 1.000, 3.000 e 5.000 mg.kg-1. Foram avaliadas as percentagens de sobrevivência, calejamento e enraizamento, bem como número e comprimento médio de raízes. A maior percentagem de sobrevivência (67,5% foi observada para a testemunha e concentração de 1.000 mg.kg-1, enquanto a melhor percentagem de enraizamento (82% foi relacionada com o nível de 1.000 mg.kg-1. Para o número e comprimento médio de raízes, os melhores resultados foram concernentes à dose de 5.000 mg.kg-1. Não houve influência do AIB na clonagem do cajueiro por alporquia.

  16. Varying butyric acid amounts induce different stress- and cell death-related signals in nerve growth factor-treated PC12 cells: implications in neuropathic pain absence during periodontal disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Keisuke; Cueno, Marni E; Kamio, Noriaki; Saito, Yuko; Kamimoto, Atsushi; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2016-06-01

    Neuropathic pain is absent from the early stages of periodontal disease possibly due to neurite retraction. Butyric acid (BA) is a periodontopathic metabolite that activates several stress-related signals and, likewise, induce neurite retraction. Neuronal cell death is associated to neurite retraction which would suggest that BA-induced neurite retraction is ascribable to neuronal cell death. However, the underlying mechanism of BA-related cell death signaling remains unknown. In this study, we exposed NGF-treated PC12 cells to varying BA concentrations [0 (control), 0.5, 1.0, 5.0 mM] and determined selected stress-related (H2O2, glutathione reductase, calcium (Ca(2+)), plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA), and GADD153/CHOPS) and cell death-associated (extrinsic: FasL, TNF-α, TWEAK, and TRAIL; intrinsic: cytochrome C (CytC), NF-kB, CASP8, CASP9, CASP10, and CASP3) signals. Similarly, we confirmed cell death execution by chromatin condensation. Our results showed that low (0.5 mM) and high (1.0 and 5.0 mM) BA levels differ in stress and cell death signaling. Moreover, at periodontal disease-level BA concentration (5 mM), we observed that only FasL amounts were affected and occurred concurrently with chromatin condensation insinuating that cells have fully committed to neurodegeneration. Thus, we believe that both stress and cell death signaling in NGF-treated PC12 cells are affected differently depending on BA concentration. In a periodontal disease scenario, we hypothesize that during the early stages, low BA amounts accumulate resulting to both stress- and cell death-related signals that favor neurite non-proliferation, whereas, during the later stages, high BA amounts accumulate resulting to both stress- and cell death-related signals that favor neurodegeneration. More importantly, we propose that neuropathic pain absence at any stage of periodontal disease progression is ascribable to BA accumulation regardless of amount.

  17. Bicarbonate-dependent transport of acetate and butyrate across the basolateral membrane of sheep rumen epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, F; Rackwitz, R; Benesch, F; Pfannkuche, H; Gäbel, G

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of HCO₃⁻ in the transport of acetate and butyrate across the basolateral membrane of rumen epithelium and to identify transport proteins involved. The effects of basolateral variation in HCO₃⁻ concentrations on acetate and butyrate efflux out of the epithelium and the transepithelial flux of these short-chain fatty acids were tested in Ussing chamber experiments using (14)C-labelled substrates. HCO₃⁻-dependent transport mechanisms were characterized by adding specific inhibitors of candidate proteins to the serosal side. Effluxes of acetate and butyrate out of the epithelium were higher to the serosal side than to the mucosal side. Acetate and butyrate effluxes to both sides of rumen epithelium consisted of HCO₃⁻-independent and -dependent parts. HCO₃⁻-dependent transport across the basolateral membrane was confirmed in studies of transepithelial fluxes. Mucosal to serosal fluxes of acetate and butyrate decreased with lowering serosal HCO₃⁻ concentrations. In the presence of 25 mm HCO₃⁻, transepithelial flux of acetate was inhibited effectively by p-hydroxymercuribenzoic acid or α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, while butyrate flux was unaffected by the blockers. Fluxes of both acetate and butyrate from the serosal to the mucosal side were diminished largely by the addition of NO₃⁻ to the serosal side, with this effect being more pronounced for acetate. Our results indicate the existence of a basolateral short-chain fatty acid/HCO₃⁻ exchanger, with monocarboxylate transporter 1 as a primary candidate for acetate transfer. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Avaliação de genótipos de arroz sob efeito do ácido butírico Rice genotype evaluation under butyric acid effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Marini Kopp

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Solos do tipo hidromórfico apresentam uma reduzida capacidade de drenagem, sendo utilizados principalmente para cultivo de arroz irrigado. Esta condição favorece o desenvolvimento de microrganismos anaeróbios que produzem substâncias fitotóxicas. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a resposta de 25 genótipos de arroz ao ácido butírico, um composto produzido em solos de deficiente drenagem e alto teor de matéria orgânica. O trabalho foi executado em sistema de hidroponia com 4 doses do ácido e o delineamento utilizado foi blocos casualizados com 3 repetições em um esquema fatorial. As variáveis mensuradas foram comprimento de raízes (CR e de parte aérea (CPA, número de raízes (NR e matéria seca de raízes (MSR e parte aérea (MSPA. Foram procedidas análise de variância, desempenho relativo e ajuste de regressões. Os efeitos para genótipos e doses de ácido butírico foram todos significativos. Apenas os efeitos de interação entre doses x genótipos para as variáveis CR e MSR revelaram significância. A variável CR foi a mais afetada pelo ácido e as regressões estabelecidas para essa variável revelaram 9 genótipos tolerantes e 16 sensíveis ao efeito fitototoxico do ácido butírico. Genótipos desenvolvidos para sistema de irrigação por inundação se mostraram mais tolerantes ao ácido.Hydromorphic soils have low drainage capacity and are used mainly for growing irrigated rice.. This condition favors the development of anaerobic microorganisms that produce phytotoxic substances. The objective of this work was to evaluate the response of 25 rice genotypes to butyric acid, a phytotoxic compound produced in low-drainage soils with high organic matter content. This work was performed by hydroponics with four acid doses as treatments using a random block design with three replications. The variables measured were root (CR and shoot (CPA length, number of roots (NR and root (MSR and shoot (MSPA dry matter. Analysis of

  19. Butyrate suppresses proliferation and migration of RKO colon cancer cells though regulating endocan expression by MAPK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Li; Lu, Man; Zhou, Qing; Wei, Wei; Wang, Yuan

    2013-12-01

    Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid produced by colonic bacterial fermentation. In colon cancer cells butyrate is able to suppress cell growth, induce apoptosis. It also inhibits tumor growth in vivo. However, the underlying mechanism is still not fully understood. We hypothesize that butyrate regulates the growth and migration of colon cancer cells by altering endocan expression. To test this hypothesis, we performed quantitative real time RT–PCR and Western blots, and found that butyrate increased endocan expression of colon cancer cell RKO. Moreover, endocan over-expression inhibited RKO proliferation, migration and colony formation. Functionally, butyrate significantly suppressed RKO proliferation, migration, and colony formation, as well as induced apoptosis. Knocking down endogenous endocan was able to attenuate the inhibitory role of butyrate in RKO migration and proliferation. Since our results showed that butyrate inhibited MAPK/ERK2 phosphorylation. To determine whether ERK2 signaling is associated with endocan expression, we knocked down endogenous ERK2 expression. Our results showed that knocking down ERK2 expression up-regulated endocan expression. Taken together, these results suggested that butyrate suppressed RKO proliferation, colony formation, migration through up-regulating endocan expression via ERK2/MAPK signaling pathway.

  20. Transcriptome Characterization by RNA-seq Unravels the Mechanisms of Butyrate-Induced Epigenomic Regulation in Bovine Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sitao; Li, Robert W.; Li, Weizhong; Li, Cong-jun

    2012-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), especially butyrate, affect cell differentiation, proliferation, and motility. Butyrate also induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through its inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs). In addition, butyrate is a potent inducer of histone hyper-acetylation in cells. Therefore, this SCFA provides an excellent in vitro model for studying the epigenomic regulation of gene expression induced by histone acetylation. In this study, we analyzed the differential in vitro expression of genes induced by butyrate in bovine epithelial cells by using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq). The number of sequences read, ranging from 57,303,693 to 78,933,744, were generated per sample. Approximately 11,408 genes were significantly impacted by butyrate, with a false discovery rate (FDR) butyrate included cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results provided insight into the transcriptome alterations induced by butyrate, which will undoubtedly facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying butyrate-induced epigenomic regulation in bovine cells. PMID:22615851

  1. Transcriptome characterization by RNA-seq unravels the mechanisms of butyrate-induced epigenomic regulation in bovine cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitao Wu

    Full Text Available Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, especially butyrate, affect cell differentiation, proliferation, and motility. Butyrate also induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through its inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs. In addition, butyrate is a potent inducer of histone hyper-acetylation in cells. Therefore, this SCFA provides an excellent in vitro model for studying the epigenomic regulation of gene expression induced by histone acetylation. In this study, we analyzed the differential in vitro expression of genes induced by butyrate in bovine epithelial cells by using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq. The number of sequences read, ranging from 57,303,693 to 78,933,744, were generated per sample. Approximately 11,408 genes were significantly impacted by butyrate, with a false discovery rate (FDR <0.05. The predominant cellular processes affected by butyrate included cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results provided insight into the transcriptome alterations induced by butyrate, which will undoubtedly facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying butyrate-induced epigenomic regulation in bovine cells.

  2. Pathway of butyrate catabolism by Desulfobacterium cetonicum

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, Peter H.; Schink, Bernhard

    1995-01-01

    Desulfobacterium cetonicum 480 oxidized butyrate to 1 mol of acetate and 2 mol of CO2; this reaction was coupled to reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Butyrate was activated by coenzyme A (CoA) transfer from acetyl-CoA, and butyryl-CoA was oxidized to acetyl-CoA by a classical beta-oxidation pathway. Acetyl-CoA was oxidized through the acetyl-CoA/carbon monoxide dehydrogenase pathway. There was a rapid exchange of 14CO2 into the intermediate CoA esters and into acetate and butyrate, showing tha...

  3. Butyrate: A dietary inhibitor of histone deacetylases and an epigenetic regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    The short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate, propionate and butyrate, also known as volatile fatty acids (VFA), are produced in the gastrointestinal tract by microbial fermentation. Consumption of dietary fibers has been shown to have positive metabolic health effects, such as increasing satiety, an...

  4. Individual cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii exhibit different short-term intracellular pH responses to acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneborg, N; Jespersen, L; Jakobsen, M

    2000-01-01

    The effects of perfusion with 2.7 and 26 mM undissociated acetic acid in the absence or presence of glucose on short-term intracellular pH (pH(i)) changes in individual Saccharormyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii cells were studied using fluorescence-ratio-imaging microscopy and a perfusion system. In the S. cerevisiae cells, perfusion with acetic acid induced strong short-term pH(i) responses, which were dependent on the undissociated acetic acid concentration and the presence of glucose in the perfusion solutions. In the Z. bailii cells, perfusion with acetic acid induced only very weak short-term pH(i) responses, which were neither dependent on the undissociated acetic acid concentration nor on the presence of glucose in the perfusion solutions. These results clearly show that Z. bailii is more resistant than S. cerevisiae to short-term pH(i) changes caused by acetic acid.

  5. Maternal butyrate supplementation induces insulin resistance associated with enhanced intramuscular fat deposition in the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanping; Gao, Shixing; Chen, Jinglong; Albrecht, Elke; Zhao, Ruqian; Yang, Xiaojing

    2017-02-21

    Maternal nutrition is important for the risk of the offspring to develop insulin resistance and adiposity later in life. The study was undertaken to determine effects of maternal butyrate supplementation on lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity in the offspring skeletal muscle. The offspring of rats, fed a control diet or a butyrate diet (1% sodium butyrate) throughout gestation and lactation, was studied at weaning and at 60 days of age. The offspring of dams fed a butyrate diet had higher HOMA-insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. This was associated with elevated mRNA and protein expressions of lipogenic genes and decreased amounts of lipolytic enzyme. Simultaneously, enhanced acetylation of histone H3 lysine 9 and histone H3 lysine 27 modification on the lipogenic genes in skeletal muscle of adult offspring was observed. Higher concentration of serum insulin and intramuscular triglyceride in skeletal muscle of offspring from the butyrate group at weaning were accompanied by increasing levels of lipogenic genes and enrichment of acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27. Maternal butyrate supplementation leads to insulin resistance and ectopic lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle of offspring, indicating the importance of short chain fatty acids in the maternal diet on lipid metabolism.

  6. Perturbation Dynamics of the Rumen Microbiota in Response to Exogenous Butyrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Robert W.; Wu, Sitao; Baldwin, Ransom L.; Li, Weizhong; Li, Congjun

    2012-01-01

    The capacity of the rumen microbiota to produce volatile fatty acids (VFAs) has important implications in animal well-being and production. We investigated temporal changes of the rumen microbiota in response to butyrate infusion using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Twenty one phyla were identified in the rumen microbiota of dairy cows. The rumen microbiota harbored 54.5±6.1 genera (mean ± SD) and 127.3±4.4 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. However, the core microbiome comprised of 26 genera and 82 OTUs. Butyrate infusion altered molar percentages of 3 major VFAs. Butyrate perturbation had a profound impact on the rumen microbial composition. A 72 h-infusion led to a significant change in the numbers of sequence reads derived from 4 phyla, including 2 most abundant phyla, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. As many as 19 genera and 43 OTUs were significantly impacted by butyrate infusion. Elevated butyrate levels in the rumen seemingly had a stimulating effect on butyrate-producing bacteria populations. The resilience of the rumen microbial ecosystem was evident as the abundance of the microorganisms returned to their pre-disturbed status after infusion withdrawal. Our findings provide insight into perturbation dynamics of the rumen microbial ecosystem and should guide efforts in formulating optimal uses of probiotic bacteria treating human diseases. PMID:22253719

  7. Characterization of butyrate transport across the luminal membranes of equine large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedjadi, Taoufik; Moran, Andrew W; Al-Rammahi, Miran A; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2014-10-01

    The diet of the horse, pasture forage (grass), is fermented by the equine colonic microbiota to short-chain fatty acids, notably acetate, propionate and butyrate. Short-chain fatty acids provide a major source of energy for the horse and contribute to many vital physiological processes. We aimed to determine both the mechanism of butyrate uptake across the luminal membrane of equine colon and the nature of the protein involved. To this end, we isolated equine colonic luminal membrane vesicles. The abundance and activity of cysteine-sensitive alkaline phosphatase and villin, intestinal luminal membrane markers, were significantly enriched in membrane vesicles compared with the original homogenates. In contrast, the abundance of GLUT2 protein and the activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, known markers of the intestinal basolateral membrane, were hardly detectable. We demonstrated, by immunohistochemistry, that monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) protein is expressed on the luminal membrane of equine colonocytes. We showed that butyrate transport into luminal membrane vesicles is energized by a pH gradient (out butyrate uptake is time and concentration dependent, with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 5.6 ± 0.45 mm and maximal velocity of 614 ± 55 pmol s(-1) (mg protein)(-1). Butyrate transport is significantly inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, phloretin and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, all potent inhibitors of MCT1. Moreover, acetate and propionate, as well as the monocarboxylates pyruvate and lactate, also inhibit butyrate uptake. Data presented here support the conclusion that transport of butyrate across the equine colonic luminal membrane is predominantly accomplished by MCT1. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  8. Unusual aggregation of bis(2-quinuclidinium-butyrate) hydrobromides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Katrusiak, A.; Szafran, M.

    2010-12-01

    The molecular structure of di-[bis(2-quinuclidinium-butyrate) hydrobromide], [(QNBu) 2HBr] 2 ( 1), has been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and DFT calculations. The crystals ( 1) are monoclinic, space group P2 1/c with [(QNBu) 2HBr] 2 symmetry-independent units. The complex 1 consists of two independent homoconjugated cations, in which two ( S) QNBu semications, and ( S) and ( R) QNBu semications are joined by short, symmetrical O⋯H⋯O hydrogen bonds of 2.418(12) and 2.411(13) Å, respectively. The bromide anions interact electrostatically with the one positively charged nitrogen atom of each cation. The presence of short OHO hydrogen bonds is confirmed by the broad absorption in the 1500-400 cm -1 region, with the center of gravity, νH, at ca. 900 cm -1, in the solid-state FTIR spectrum. In the structure of [(QNBu) 2HBr] 2 ( 2) optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory, the 2-quinuclidinium-butyrate units are non-equivalent. In each homoconjugated cation the 2-quinuclidinium-butyric acid interacts with the QNBu inner salt by the short, asymmetric O-H···O hydrogen bonds of 2.440 and 2.446 Å, respectively. Each bromide anion interacts electrostatically with the positively charged nitrogen atoms from both homoconjugated cations, which fold into a globular supramolecular aggregate.

  9. Sustained Induction of Fetal Hemoglobin by Pulse Butyrate Therapy in Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atweh, George F.; Sutton, Millicent; Nassif, Imad; Boosalis, Vassiliki; Dover, George J.; Wallenstein, Sylvan; Wright, Elizabeth; McMahon, Lillian; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Faller, Douglas V.; Perrine, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    High levels of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) protect from many of the complications of sickle cell disease and lead to improved survival. Butyrate and other short chain fatty acids were previously shown to increase Hb F production in erythroid cells in vitro and in animal models in vivo. However, butyrates are also known to inhibit the proliferation of many cell types, including erythroid cells. Experience with the use of butyrate in animal models and in early clinical trials demonstrated that the Hb F response may be lost after prolonged administration of high doses of butyrate. We hypothesized that this loss of response may be a result of the antiproliferative effects of butyrate. We designed a regimen consisting of intermittent or pulse therapy in which butyrate was administered for 4 days followed by 10 to 24 days with no drug exposure. This pulse regimen induced fetal globin gene expression in 9 of 11 patients. The mean Hb F in this group increased from 7.2% to 21.0% (P butyrate therapy for a mean duration of 29.9 weeks. This was associated with a parallel increase in the number of F cells and F reticulocytes. The total hemoglobin levels also increased from a mean of 7.8 g/dL to a mean of 8.8 g/dL (P butyrate therapy for more than 28 months. This regimen, which resulted in a marked and sustained increase in Hb F levels in more than two thirds of the adult sickle cell patients enrolled in this study, was well tolerated without adverse side effects. These encouraging results require confirmation along with an appropriate evaluation of clinical outcomes in a larger number of patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:10068649

  10. Butyrate-mediated acquisition of chemoresistance by human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyang Ri; Choi, Hyeon Gyeom; Jeon, Chae Kyung; Lim, Soo-Jeong; Kim, So Hee

    2016-08-01

    Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid produced by the intestinal microflora and it not only induces apoptosis but also inhibits the proliferation of cancer cells. Recently, it has been reported that butyrate may cause resistance in colon cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated the effects of increased resistance to butyrate in HCT116 colon cancer cells. We established HCT116 cells resistant to butyrate (HCT116/BR) by treating HCT116 parental cells (HCT116/PT) with increasing concentrations of butyrate to a maximum of 1.6 mM for 3 months. The butyrate concentrations that inhibited cell growth by 50% (IC50) were 0.508 and 5.50 mM in HCT116/PT and HCT116/BR cells. The values after treatment with paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), doxorubicin and trichostatin A (TSA) were 2.42, 2.36, 4.31 and 11.3-fold higher, respectively, in HCT116/BR cells compared with HCT116/PT cells. The protein expression of drug efflux pumps, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer-resistant protein (BCRP) and the multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1), did not differ between HCT116/PT and HCT116/BR cells. The expression level of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL protein was increased while those of pro-apoptotic Bax and Bim proteins were reduced in HCT116/BR cells. There were no significant differences in cell motility and invasion. This study suggests that exposure of colon cancer cells to butyrate results in development of resistance to butyrate, which may play a role in the acquisition of chemoresistance in colon cancer.

  11. Upregulation of genes related to bone formation by γ-amino butyric acid and γ-oryzanol in germinated brown rice is via the activation of GABAB-receptors and reduction of serum IL-6 in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad SI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sani Ismaila Muhammad,1,2 Ismail Maznah,1,3 Rozi Mahmud,4 Abu Bakar Zakaria Zuki,5 Mustapha Umar Imam1 1Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, 2Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria; 3Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, 4Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, 5Department of Veterinary Anatomy, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Background: Osteoporosis and other bone degenerative diseases are among the most challenging non-communicable diseases to treat. Previous works relate bone loss due to osteoporosis with oxidative stress generated by free radicals and inflammatory cytokines. Alternative therapy to hormone replacement has been an area of interest to researchers for almost three decades due to hormone therapy-associated side effects. Methods: In this study, we investigated the effects of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA, gamma-oryzanol (ORZ, acylated steryl glucosides (ASG, and phenolic extracts from germinated brown rice (GBR on the expression of genes related to bone metabolism, such as bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2, secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC, runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX-2, osteoblast-specific transcription factor osterix (Osx, periostin, osteoblast specific factor (Postn, collagen 1&2 (Col1&2, calcitonin receptor gene (CGRP; body weight measurement and also serum interleukin-6 (IL-6 and osteocalcin, in serum and bone. Rats were treated with GBR, ORZ, GABA, and ASG at (100 and 200 mg/kg; estrogen (0.2 mg/kg, or remifemin (10 and 20 mg/kg, compared to ovariectomized non-treated group as well as non-ovariectomized non-treated (sham group. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the IL-6 and osteocalcin levels at week 2, 4, and 8, while the gene expression in the

  12. Fat coating of Ca butyrate results in extended butyrate release in the gastrointestinal tract of broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borne, van den J.J.G.C.; Heetkamp, M.J.W.; Buyse, J.; Niewold, T.A.

    2015-01-01

    Based on its described beneficial effects on small and large intestinal epithelium, butyrate can be a very good alternative to antimicrobial growth promoters. Effective dietary application requires coating because the majority of uncoated butyrate is purportedly absorbed before reaching the proximal

  13. Butyrate Regulates Liver Mitochondrial Function, Efficiency, and Dynamics in Insulin-Resistant Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Maria Pina; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Cavaliere, Gina; Trinchese, Giovanna; De Filippo, Chiara; Aceto, Serena; Prisco, Marina; Pirozzi, Claudio; Di Guida, Francesca; Lama, Adriano; Crispino, Marianna; Tronino, Diana; Di Vaio, Paola; Berni Canani, Roberto; Calignano, Antonio; Meli, Rosaria

    2017-05-01

    Fatty liver, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction are key pathophysiological features of insulin resistance and obesity. Butyrate, produced by fermentation in the large intestine by gut microbiota, and its synthetic derivative, the N-(1-carbamoyl-2-phenyl-ethyl) butyramide, FBA, have been demonstrated to be protective against insulin resistance and fatty liver. Here, hepatic mitochondria were identified as the main target of the beneficial effect of both butyrate-based compounds in reverting insulin resistance and fat accumulation in diet-induced obese mice. In particular, butyrate and FBA improved respiratory capacity and fatty acid oxidation, activated the AMPK-acetyl-CoA carboxylase pathway, and promoted inefficient metabolism, as shown by the increase in proton leak. Both treatments consistently increased utilization of substrates, especially fatty acids, leading to the reduction of intracellular lipid accumulation and oxidative stress. Finally, the shift of the mitochondrial dynamic toward fusion by butyrate and FBA resulted in the improvement not only of mitochondrial cell energy metabolism but also of glucose homeostasis. In conclusion, butyrate and its more palatable synthetic derivative, FBA, modulating mitochondrial function, efficiency, and dynamics, can be considered a new therapeutic strategy to counteract obesity and insulin resistance. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  14. [Effect of dietary fiber in the quantitative expression of butyrate receptor GPR43 in rats colon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corte Osorio, L Y; Martínez Flores, H E; Ortiz Alvarado, R

    2011-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) acetate, propionate and butyrate are the major anions produced by the bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber (DF) in colon. Recently, butyrate has been recently studied because is important to maintain colonic functions and because it has been related with a protective effect in colorectal cancer, which is mainly, explained by its potential to regulate gene expression by inhibiting enzyme histonedeacetylase (HDAC). Several investigationsshown that SCFAreceptor GPR43 is involved insignal transduction mechanisms once they bind to ligands such as butyrate to generate different physiological effects in colonocytes. Determine if dietary fiber consumption from nopal (Opuntia ficus I.) containing a ratio of soluble-insoluble fiber 40/60, has a direct influence on the quantitative expression of butyrate-specific receptor GPR43. Wistar rats were fed with four different diets formulated at different concentrations of dietary fiber of 0, 5, 15 and 25% of dietary fiber from opuntia, respectively. The results shown an increase in the expression of GPR43 (93.1%) when rats was fed with a 5% fiber diet, using β-actin as a reference gene. The results of this investigation will contribute to determinate the relation of diet with intestinal health for the purpose of expanding the knowledge of butyric acid on colonic functions.

  15. Oxidative stress plays a key role in butyrate-mediated autophagy via Akt/mTOR pathway in hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Kishor; Saraya, Anoop; Venugopal, Senthil K

    2017-08-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer, responsible for a number of deaths in humans. Butyrate, one of the short chain fatty acids produced by the gut microbiota during anaerobic fermentation, was shown to be beneficial for inhibiting cancer growth. In this study, we showed that sodium butyrate induced autophagy via reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hepatoma cells. Butyrate (0-6 mM) incubation significantly increased intracellular ROS levels (45.2% compared to control), which in turn inhibited phosphorylation of akt and mTOR, leading to the upregulation of autophagic proteins, such as beclin 1, ATG 5, LC3-II, followed by the increased autophagosome formation (34.4% compared to control cells). Addition of a known antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), reversed these butyrate-induced ROS and autophagy. It was also found that butyrate-induced ROS enhanced MAPK activation, which was inhibited by NAC. In conclusion, our data showed that butyrate induced ROS, which in turn induced autophagy via inhibition of akt/mTOR pathway. Hence, butyrate could be considered as a potential candidate for HCC treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sodium Butyrate Reduces Colitogenic Immunoglobulin A-Coated Bacteria and Modifies the Composition of Microbiota in IL-10 Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tenghui; Ding, Chao; Zhao, Mingli; Dai, Xujie; Yang, Jianbo; Li, Yi; Gu, Lili; Wei, Yao; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-11-24

    High levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA)-coated bacteria may have a role in driving inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We therefore investigated the effect of sodium butyrate on microbiota in IBD prone interleukin (IL)-10 -/- mice. At 8 weeks of age, mice were allocated into three groups ( n = 4/group): normal (C57BL/6), IL-10 -/- , and IL-10 -/- treated with sodium butyrate (100 mM). Severity of colitis, inflammatory cytokine and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration in proximal colon contents, the percentage of IgA-coated bacteria and microbiota composition by 16S ribosomal RNA assessment of stool were measured after 4 weeks of treatment. Sodium butyrate ameliorated histological colitis and decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-6 in IL-10 -/- mice compared with those without treatment. At the phylum level, a reduction in Bacteroidetes and an increase in Firmicutes in IL-10 -/- mice treated with sodium butyrate were observed. Additionally, Prevotellaceae species were reduced in IL-10 -/- mice treated with sodium butyrate as compared with those without treatment. The level of biodiversity was slightly increased and the amount of IgA-coated bacteria decreased in IL-10 -/- mice treated with sodium butyrate compared with those without treatment. Our results indicate that sodium butyrate protects against colitis, possibly through modifying the gut microbiota, enriching biodiversity and reducing the amount of colitogenic IgA-coated bacteria in IL-10 -/- mice.

  17. Butyrate down regulates BCL-XL and sensitizes human fibroblasts to radiation and chemotherapy induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Diana H.; Ljungman, Mats; Zhang Fenfen; Chen Feng; McLaughlin, William P.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Butyrate is a short chain fatty acid that has been implicated in the induction of cell cycle arrest, cell differentiation and apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to determine if butyrate treatment sensitizes cells to radiation or chemotherapy induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: Normal neonatal human diploid fibroblasts were used throughout this study. Apoptosis was scored and quantified using three different methods. First, cell morphology using propidium iodide and fluorescence microscopy was used to qualitatively determine apoptosis and to quantify the percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis. Second, apoptosis induced DNA degradation was scored by quantifying the amount of cells appearing in a sub-G1 peak using fixed and PI-stained cells and flow cytometry. Third, apoptosis-induced DNA degradation was examined by using an assay involving direct lysis of cells in the wells of agarose gels followed by conventional gel electrophoresis. Western blotting was used to quantify the cellular levels of the apoptosis regulators, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Bax. Results: Human diploid fibroblasts, which were resistant to radiation induced apoptosis, were found to undergo massive apoptosis when radiation was combined with butyrate treatment. Sensitization was obtained when butyrate was added before or after radiation although the combination of both pre and post-treatment was the most effective. Butyrate was also found to enhance UV light and cisplatin-induced apoptosis. These findings correlated with a reduction of the apoptosis antagonist Bcl-XL. Bcl-XL levels significantly dropped in a time and dose dependent manner. In addition, butyrate effectively blocked UV-induced accumulation of p53. Conclusion: Our results suggest that butyrate may be an attractive agent to use in combination with radiation or chemotherapy to lower the apoptotic threshold of tumor cells, regardless of the p53 status of the tumor cells

  18. Comparative genomics and physiology of the butyrate-producing bacterium Intestinimonas butyriciproducens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, Thi Phuong Nam; Shetty, Sudarshan Anand; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Ritari, Jarmo; Chamlagain, Bhawani; Douillard, François P.; Paulin, Lars; Piironen, Vieno; Clavel, Thomas; Plugge, Caroline M.; Vos, de Willem M.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinimonas is a newly described bacterial genus with representative strains present in the intestinal tract of human and other animals. Despite unique metabolic features including the production of butyrate from both sugars and amino acids, there is to date no data on their diversity,

  19. Collagen-Immobilized Lipases Show Good Activity and Reusability for Butyl Butyrate Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewei, Song; Min, Chen; Haiming, Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Candida rugosa lipases were immobilized onto collagen fibers through glutaraldehyde cross-linking method. The immobilization process has been optimized. Under the optimal immobilization conditions, the activity of the collagen-immobilized lipase reached 340 U/g. The activity was recovered of 28.3 % by immobilization. The operational stability of the obtained collagen-immobilized lipase for hydrolysis of olive oil emulsion was determined. The collagen-immobilized lipase showed good tolerance to temperature and pH variations in comparison to free lipase. The collagen-immobilized lipase was also applied as biocatalyst for synthesis of butyl butyrate from butyric acid and 1-butanol in n-hexane. The conversion yield was 94 % at the optimal conditions. Of its initial activity, 64 % was retained after 5 cycles for synthesizing butyl butyrate in n-hexane.

  20. Impaired butyrate oxidation in ulcerative colitis is due to decreased butyrate uptake and a defect in the oxidation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Preter, Vicky; Arijs, Ingrid; Windey, Karen; Vanhove, Wiebe; Vermeire, Severine; Schuit, Frans; Rutgeerts, Paul; Verbeke, Kristin

    2012-06-01

    In ulcerative colitis (UC) butyrate metabolism is impaired due to a defect in the butyrate oxidation pathway and/or transport. In the present study we correlated butyrate uptake and oxidation to the gene expression of the butyrate transporter SLC16A1 and the enzymes involved in butyrate oxidation (ACSM3, ACADS, ECHS1, HSD17B10, and ACAT2) in UC and controls. Colonic mucosal biopsies were collected during endoscopy of 88 UC patients and 20 controls with normal colonoscopy. Butyrate uptake and oxidation was measured by incubating biopsies with (14) C-labeled Na-butyrate. To assess gene expression, total RNA from biopsies was used for quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In 20 UC patients, gene expression was reassessed after treatment with infliximab. Butyrate uptake and oxidation were significantly decreased in UC versus controls (P Butyrate oxidation remained significantly reduced in UC after correction for butyrate uptake (P butyrate oxidation pathway itself is also affected. Also, the mucosal gene expression of SLC16A1, ACSM3, ACADS, ECHS1, HSD17B10, and ACAT2 was significantly decreased in UC as compared with controls (P butyrate metabolism in UC is initiated at the gene expression level and is the result of a decreased expression of SLC16A1 and enzymes in the β-oxidation pathway of butyrate. Copyright © 2011 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  1. One-step fabrication of large-scaled indium tin oxide/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/poly (3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester multi-layered structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Jianchen; Shirai, Yasuhiro; Han, Liyuan; Wakayama, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    A technique is established for fabricating a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/poly (3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PCBM) multi-layered structure in one step by transferring a continuous P3HT:PCBM solid film floating on PEDOT:PSS solution onto an indium tin oxide/glass substrate with a size of 2.5 × 1.5 cm 2 . This structure can be obtained under simple experimental conditions and can be fabricated over a large area. Preliminary testing shows that the prepared structure can yield a photovoltaic effect. - Highlights: • Organic photovoltaic cell produced by floating multi-layers • One-step fabrication technique for large-scale organic photovoltaic cell • Swelling and surface tension to enable multi-layer floating films

  2. Inhibition of Butyrate Oxidation by Formate during Methanogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Jaeho; McCarty, Perry L.

    1993-01-01

    A mixed methanogenic culture fed with glucose was perturbed with butyrate and formate to investigate the role of formate in the acetogenesis of butyrate. A free energy analysis suggests that formate rather than H2 was the interspecies electron carrier for butyrate conversion into acetate for the culture studied.

  3. Modulation of butyrate anticancer activity by solid lipid nanoparticle delivery: an in vitro investigation on human breast cancer and leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglietta, Federica; Serpe, Loredana; Canaparo, Roberto; Vivenza, Nicoletta; Riccio, Giovanna; Imbalzano, Erica; Gasco, Paolo; Zara, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Histone modification has emerged as a promising approach to cancer therapy. The short-chain fatty acid, butyric acid, a histone deacetylase (HD) inhibitor, has shown anticancer activity. Butyrate transcriptional activation is indeed able to withdraw cancer cells from the cell cycle, leading to programmed cell death. Since butyrate's clinical use is hampered by unfavorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, delivery systems, such as solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), have been developed to overcome these constraints. In order to outline the influence of butyrate delivery on its anticancer activity, the effects of butyrate as a free (sodium butyrate, NB) or nanoparticle (cholesteryl butyrate solid lipid nanoparticles, CBSLN) formulation on the growth of different human cancer cell lines, such as the promyelocytic leukemia, HL-60, and the breast cancer, MCF-7 was investigated. A detailed investigation into the mechanism of the induced cytotoxicity was also carried out, with a special focus on the modulation of HD and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) mRNA gene expression by real time PCR analysis. In HL-60 cells, CBSLN induced a higher and prolonged expression level of the butyrate target genes at lower concentrations than NB. This led to a significant decrease in cell proliferation, along with considerable apoptosis, cell cycle block in the G0/G1 phase, significant inhibition of total HD activity and overexpression of the p21 protein. Conversely, in MCF-7 cells, CBSLN did not enhance the level of expression of the butyrate target genes, leading to the same anticancer activity as that of NB. Solid lipid nanoparticles were able to improve butyrate anticancer activity in HL-60, but not in MCF-7 cells. This is consistent with difference in properties of the cells under study, such as expression of the TP53 tumor suppressor, or the transporter for short-chain fatty acids, SLC5A8.

  4. Thermophilic Anaerobic Degradation of Butyrate by a Butyrate-Utilizing Bacterium in Coculture and Triculture with Methanogenic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Ahring, Birgitte K.; Westermann, Peter

    1987-01-01

    We studied syntrophic butyrate degradation in thermophilic mixed cultures containing a butyrate-degrading bacterium isolated in coculture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum or in triculture with M. thermoautotrophicum and the TAM organism, a thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogenic bacterium. Butyrate was β-oxidized to acetate with protons as the electron acceptors. Acetate was used concurrently with its production in the triculture. We found a higher butyrate degradation rate in th...

  5. Butyrate increases intracellular calcium levels and enhances growth hormone release from rat anterior pituitary cells via the G-protein-coupled receptors GPR41 and 43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Consolata Miletta

    Full Text Available Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA closely related to the ketone body ß-hydroxybutyrate (BHB, which is considered to be the major energy substrate during prolonged exercise or starvation. During fasting, serum growth hormone (GH rises concomitantly with the accumulation of BHB and butyrate. Interactions between GH, ketone bodies and SCFA during the metabolic adaptation to fasting have been poorly investigated to date. In this study, we examined the effect of butyrate, an endogenous agonist for the two G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR, GPR41 and 43, on non-stimulated and GH-releasing hormone (GHRH-stimulated hGH secretion. Furthermore, we investigated the potential role of GPR41 and 43 on the generation of butyrate-induced intracellular Ca2+ signal and its ultimate impact on hGH secretion. To study this, wt-hGH was transfected into a rat pituitary tumour cell line stably expressing the human GHRH receptor. Treatment with butyrate promoted hGH synthesis and improved basal and GHRH-induced hGH-secretion. By acting through GPR41 and 43, butyrate enhanced intracellular free cytosolic Ca2+. Gene-specific silencing of these receptors led to a partial inhibition of the butyrate-induced intracellular Ca2+ rise resulting in a decrease of hGH secretion. This study suggests that butyrate is a metabolic intermediary, which contributes to the secretion and, therefore, to the metabolic actions of GH during fasting.

  6. Butyrate increases intracellular calcium levels and enhances growth hormone release from rat anterior pituitary cells via the G-protein-coupled receptors GPR41 and 43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Petkovic, Vibor; Eblé, Andrée; Ammann, Roland A; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus-E

    2014-01-01

    Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) closely related to the ketone body ß-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), which is considered to be the major energy substrate during prolonged exercise or starvation. During fasting, serum growth hormone (GH) rises concomitantly with the accumulation of BHB and butyrate. Interactions between GH, ketone bodies and SCFA during the metabolic adaptation to fasting have been poorly investigated to date. In this study, we examined the effect of butyrate, an endogenous agonist for the two G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), GPR41 and 43, on non-stimulated and GH-releasing hormone (GHRH)-stimulated hGH secretion. Furthermore, we investigated the potential role of GPR41 and 43 on the generation of butyrate-induced intracellular Ca2+ signal and its ultimate impact on hGH secretion. To study this, wt-hGH was transfected into a rat pituitary tumour cell line stably expressing the human GHRH receptor. Treatment with butyrate promoted hGH synthesis and improved basal and GHRH-induced hGH-secretion. By acting through GPR41 and 43, butyrate enhanced intracellular free cytosolic Ca2+. Gene-specific silencing of these receptors led to a partial inhibition of the butyrate-induced intracellular Ca2+ rise resulting in a decrease of hGH secretion. This study suggests that butyrate is a metabolic intermediary, which contributes to the secretion and, therefore, to the metabolic actions of GH during fasting.

  7. Engineering of E. coli for increased production of L- lactic acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... Russel (1992) and Diez-Gonzalez and Russel (1997) as the medium pH was farther away from the internal pH maintained by the bacteria, inhibition effect increased regardless of whether the lactic acid was in the dissociated or undissociated form. Tang et al. (1989) have shown that both dissociated and ...

  8. A gnotobiotic mouse model demonstrates that dietary fiber protects against colorectal tumorigenesis in a microbiota- and butyrate-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Dallas R; Holley, Darcy; Collins, Leonard B; Montgomery, Stephanie A; Whitmore, Alan C; Hillhouse, Andrew; Curry, Kaitlin P; Renner, Sarah W; Greenwalt, Alicia; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Godfrey, Virginia; Heise, Mark T; Threadgill, Deborah S; Han, Anna; Swenberg, James A; Threadgill, David W; Bultman, Scott J

    2014-12-01

    Whether dietary fiber protects against colorectal cancer is controversial because of conflicting results from human epidemiologic studies. However, these studies and mouse models of colorectal cancer have not controlled the composition of gut microbiota, which ferment fiber into short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. Butyrate is noteworthy because it has energetic and epigenetic functions in colonocytes and tumor-suppressive properties in colorectal cancer cell lines. We used gnotobiotic mouse models colonized with wild-type or mutant strains of a butyrate-producing bacterium to demonstrate that fiber does have a potent tumor-suppressive effect but in a microbiota- and butyrate-dependent manner. Furthermore, due to the Warburg effect, butyrate was metabolized less in tumors where it accumulated and functioned as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor to stimulate histone acetylation and affect apoptosis and cell proliferation. To support the relevance of this mechanism in human cancer, we demonstrate that butyrate and histone-acetylation levels are elevated in colorectal adenocarcinomas compared with normal colonic tissues. These results, which link diet and microbiota to a tumor-suppressive metabolite, provide insight into conflicting epidemiologic findings and suggest that probiotic/prebiotic strategies can modulate an endogenous HDAC inhibitor for anticancer chemoprevention without the adverse effects associated with synthetic HDAC inhibitors used in chemotherapy. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Butyrate Produced by Commensal Bacteria Potentiates Phorbol Esters Induced AP-1 Response in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepelska, Malgorzata; Cultrone, Antonietta; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Le Roux, Karine; Doré, Joël; Arulampalam, Vermulugesan; Blottière, Hervé M.

    2012-01-01

    The human intestine is a balanced ecosystem well suited for bacterial survival, colonization and growth, which has evolved to be beneficial both for the host and the commensal bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of bacterial metabolites produced by commensal bacteria on AP-1 signaling pathway, which has a plethora of effects on host physiology. Using intestinal epithelial cell lines, HT-29 and Caco-2, stably transfected with AP-1-dependent luciferase reporter gene, we tested the effect of culture supernatant from 49 commensal strains. We observed that several bacteria were able to activate the AP-1 pathway and this was correlated to the amount of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced. Besides being a major source of energy for epithelial cells, SCFAs have been shown to regulate several signaling pathways in these cells. We show that propionate and butyrate are potent activators of the AP-1 pathway, butyrate being the more efficient of the two. We also observed a strong synergistic activation of AP-1 pathway when using butyrate with PMA, a PKC activator. Moreover, butyrate enhanced the PMA-induced expression of c-fos and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but not p38 and JNK. In conclusion, we showed that SCFAs especially butyrate regulate the AP-1 signaling pathway, a feature that may contribute to the physiological impact of the gut microbiota on the host. Our results provide support for the involvement of butyrate in modulating the action of PKC in colon cancer cells. PMID:23300800

  10. Syntrophic oxidation of butyrate and ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Syntrophic bacteria live at the thermodynamic limit of growth. The biochemistry of those secondary fermenters is not fully understood yet. In this thesis, two model systems of syntrophic organisms growing on two difficult to degrade substrates were investigated: Syntrophomonas wolfei in coculture with Methanospirillum hungatei converting butyrate to acetate and methane and Pelobacter carbinolicus or P. acetylenicus in coculture with M. hungatei fermenting ethanol to acetate and methane.All pr...

  11. Alternative Splicing Regulated by Butyrate in Bovine Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sitao; Li, Congjun; Huang, Wen; Li, Weizhong; Li, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    As a signaling molecule and an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs), butyrate exerts its impact on a broad range of biological processes, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to its critical role in energy metabolism in ruminants. This study examined the effect of butyrate on alternative splicing in bovine epithelial cells using RNA-seq technology. Junction reads account for 11.28 and 12.32% of total mapped reads between the butyrate-treated (BT) and control (CT) groups. 201,326 potential splicing junctions detected were supported by ≥3 junction reads. Approximately 94% of these junctions conformed to the consensus sequence (GT/AG) while ∼3% were GC/AG junctions. No AT/AC junctions were observed. A total of 2,834 exon skipping events, supported by a minimum of 3 junction reads, were detected. At least 7 genes, their mRNA expression significantly affected by butyrate, also had exon skipping events differentially regulated by butyrate. Furthermore, COL5A3, which was induced 310-fold by butyrate (FDR butyrate were detected. For example, Isoform 1 of ORC1 was strongly repressed by butyrate while Isoform 2 remained unchanged. Butyrate physically binds to and inhibits all zinc-dependent HDACs except HDAC6 and HDAC10. Our results provided evidence that butyrate also regulated deacetylase activities of classical HDACs via its transcriptional control. Moreover, thirteen gene fusion events differentially affected by butyrate were identified. Our results provided a snapshot into complex transcriptome dynamics regulated by butyrate, which will facilitate our understanding of the biological effects of butyrate and other HDAC inhibitors. PMID:22720068

  12. Butyrate attenuates lipolysis in adipocytes co-cultured with macrophages through non-prostaglandin E2-mediated and prostaglandin E2-mediated pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Hideo; Tsutsui, Wao; Mamoto, Rie; Yamaguchi, Sayaka; Nishida, Masako; Ito, Miki; Fujioka, Yoshio

    2016-12-09

    Interactions between adipocytes and macrophages are associated with metabolic disorders. Production of pro-inflammatory mediators and the release of free fatty acids (FFAs) increase when these cells are co-cultured; butyrate significantly diminishes these effects by suppressing both the macrophage inflammatory and adipocyte lipolysis pathways. Butyrate is known to up-regulate the expression of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Therefore, we hypothesized that PGE2 is associated with the suppression of lipolysis by butyrate in co-culture. Using contact or transwell co-culture methods with differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes and RAW264.7 macrophages, we investigated the effects of butyrate on the release of PGE2 into the medium and on lipolysis in adipocytes. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we examined the effects of butyrate on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in co-cultured cells, and cyclic adenine monophosphate (cAMP) and protein kinase A type 1-α regulatory subunit (PRKAR1A) in co-cultured adipocytes. Silent interfering (si)RNA targeting of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR)41 and 109A was employed to examine the effect on lipolysis in TNF-α-stimulated adipocytes. Co-culture increased PGE2 release into the medium, compared with cells cultured separately. Butyrate significantly increased PGE2 production. Co-culture elevated COX2 expression in macrophages and adipocytes, and butyrate further enhanced this effect. Co-culture enhanced cytosolic PLA2 activity in macrophages, which was further enhanced by butyrate. As for lipolysis, co-culture increased the release of FFAs and free glycerol into the medium, whereas butyrate (and to a lesser extent, PGE2) suppressed FFAs and free glycerol release. An inhibition study using a prostaglandin E receptor 3-selective antagonist suggested that approximately 40% of the suppressive effect of butyrate depends on the PGE2-mediated pathway, whereas 60% depends on a non-PGE2-mediated pathway. Co-culture increased c

  13. Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum, a butyrate producer with probiotic potential, is intrinsically tolerant to stomach and small intestine conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geirnaert, Annelies; Steyaert, Alix; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Debruyne, Bo; Arends, Jan B A; Van Immerseel, Filip; Boon, Nico; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Butyrate has several beneficial properties that are essential to maintain gastrointestinal health. Therefore butyrate-producing bacteria are seen as the next generation of probiotics. The butyrate-producing bacterium Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum (a clostridial cluster IV strain) is such a promising probiotic candidate for people suffering from inflammatory bowel disease. To exert its beneficial properties, it is crucial that B. pullicaecorum survives the harsh conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract to arrive in the colon in a viable and metabolically active state. Before developing a stable formulation of B. pullicaecorum for oral administration, it is important to know its intrinsic acid and bile tolerance. We monitored the survival during and short chain fatty acid production after incubation in conditions simulating the stomach and small intestine using in vitro batch experiments. In case of acid conditions (pH 2 and pH 3), B. pullicaecorum was viable and active but not cultivable. Cultivability was restored during subsequent small intestine conditions. Importantly, bile and pancreatic juice had no lethal effect. Milk, as a suspension medium, only had a protective effect on the cultivability during the first hour at pH 2. B. pullicaecorum was still metabolically active after upper gastrointestinal conditions and produced short chain fatty acids, but a shift from butyrate to acetate production was observed. Although the butyrate-producing anaerobe B. pullicaecorum showed good intrinsic acid and bile tolerance in terms of viability and metabolic activity, colonization efficiency and butyrate production under colon conditions is needed to further evaluate its probiotic potential. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genome-wide ChIP-seq mapping and analysis of butyrate-induced H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation and epigenomic landscapes alteration in bovine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatile short-chain fatty acids (VFAs, acetate, propionate, and butyrate) are nutrients especially critical to ruminants. Beyond their nutritional impact, clear evidence is beginning to link modifications in chromatin structure induced by butyrate to cell cycle progression, DNA replication and over...

  15. Enhanced butyrate formation by cross-feeding between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bifidobacterium adolescentis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Covian, David; Gueimonde, Miguel; Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J; de los Reyes-Gavilan, Clara G

    2015-11-01

    Cross-feeding is an important metabolic interaction mechanism of bacterial groups inhabiting the human colon and includes features such as the utilization of acetate by butyrate-producing bacteria as may occur between Bifidobacterium and Faecalibacterium genera. In this study, we assessed the utilization of different carbon sources (glucose, starch, inulin and fructooligosaccharides) by strains of both genera and selected the best suited combinations for evidencing this cross-feeding phenomenon. Co-cultures of Bifidobacterium adolescentis L2-32 with Faecalibacterium prausnitzii S3/L3 with fructooligosaccharides as carbon source, as well as with F. prausnitzii A2-165 in starch, were carried out and the production of short-chain fatty acids was determined. In both co-cultures, acetate levels decreased between 8 and 24 h of incubation and were lower than in the corresponding B. adolescentis monocultures. In contrast, butyrate concentrations were higher in co-cultures as compared to the respective F. prausnitzii monocultures, indicating enhanced formation of butyrate by F. prausnitzii in the presence of the bifidobacteria. Variations in the levels of acetate and butyrate were more pronounced in the co-culture with fructooligosaccharides than with starch. Our results provide a clear demonstration of cross-feeding between B. adolescentis and F. prausnitzii. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Isobaric vapor liquid equilibria data for the binary system (glycidyl butyrate + acetone, glycidyl butyrate + carbon tetrachloride, glycidyl butyrate + chloroform) at atmospheric pressure 101 kPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiang; Meng, Qingyi; Ban, Chunlan; Zhang, Rui; Gao, Yingyu

    2016-09-01

    Isobaric vapor liquid equilibria (VLE) for the binary mixtures of glycidyl butyrate(1) + acetone(2), glycidyl butyrate(1) + carbon tetrachloride(2) and glycidyl butyrate(1) + chloroform(2) at 101 kPa were studied. The experimental data were satisfactorily correlated with the models of Wilson, NRTL and UNIQUAC activity coefficients. The activity coefficients for the equilibrium data were obtained by the nonlinear least square method. The average relative deviations between experimental temperatures and calculated temperatures by the Wilson, NRTL and UNIQUAC models were 0.16, 0.16, 0.23% for glycidyl butyrate(1) + chloroform( 2), 0.38, 0.12, 0.27% for glycidylbutyrate(1) + carbon tetrachloride(2), and 0.67, 0.13, 0.54% for glycidyl butyrate(1) + acetone(2). Azeotrope behavior was not found for these systems. The thermodynamic consistency of the correlations was checked by the Herrington's area test.

  17. Butyrate production in engineered Escherichia coli with synthetic scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jang-Mi; Mazumdar, Suman; Lee, Sang-Woo; Jung, Moo-Young; Lim, Jae-Hyung; Seo, Sang-Woo; Jung, Gyoo-Yeol; Oh, Min-Kyu

    2013-10-01

    Butyrate pathway was constructed in recombinant Escherichia coli using the genes from Clostridium acetobutylicum and Treponema denticola. However, the pathway constructed from exogenous enzymes did not efficiently convert carbon flux to butyrate. Three steps of the productivity enhancement were attempted in this study. First, pathway engineering to delete metabolic pathways to by-products successfully improved the butyrate production. Second, synthetic scaffold protein that spatially co-localizes enzymes was introduced to improve the efficiency of the heterologous pathway enzymes, resulting in threefold improvement in butyrate production. Finally, further optimizations of inducer concentrations and pH adjustment were tried. The final titer of butyrate was 4.3 and 7.2 g/L under batch and fed-batch cultivation, respectively. This study demonstrated the importance of synthetic scaffold protein as a useful tool for optimization of heterologous butyrate pathway in E. coli. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Lipase catalyzed transesterification of ethyl butyrate synthesis inn-hexane- a kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, N Annapurna; Radhika, G B; Bhargavi, R J

    2017-08-01

    Kinetics of lipase catalyzed transesterification of ethyl caprate and butyric acid was investigated. The objective of this work was to propose a reaction mechanism and develop a rate equation for the synthesis of ethyl butyrate by transesterification using surfactant coated lipase from Candida rugosa . The reaction rate could be described in terms of Michaelis-Menten equation with a Ping-Pong Bi-Bi mechanism and competitive inhibition by both the substrates. The values of kinetic parameters computed were V max  = 2.861 μmol/min/mg; K m(acid)  = 0.0746 M; K m(ester)  = 0.125 M; K i acid = 0.450 M. This study indicated a competitive enzyme inhibition by butyric acid during lipase catalyzed transesterification reaction. Experimental observations had clearly indicated that the substrates as well as product act as dead-end inhibitors.

  19. Esterification for butyl butyrate formation using Candida cylindracea lipase produced from palm oil mill effluent supplemented medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliyu Salihu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Candida cylindracea lipase produced using palm oil mill effluent (POME as a basal medium to catalyze the esterification reaction for butyl butyrate formation was investigated. Butyric acid and n-butanol were used as substrates at different molar ratios. Different conversion yields were observed according to the affinity of the produced lipase toward the substrates. The n-butanol to butyric acid molar ratio of 8 and lipase concentration of 75 U/mg gave the highest butyl butyrate formation of 63.33% based on the statistical optimization using face centered central composite design (FCCCD after 12 h reaction. The esterification potential of the POME based lipase when compared with the commercial lipase from the same strain using the optimum levels was found to show a similar pattern. It can be concluded therefore that the produced lipase possesses appropriate characteristics to be used as a biocatalyst in the esterification reactions for butyl butyrate formation.

  20. Níveis críticos dos ácidos acético, propiônico e butírico para estudos de toxicidade em arroz em solução nutritiva Critical levels of acetic, propionic and butyric acids for toxicity studies of rice in nutrient solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Marini Kopp

    2007-03-01

    and 20 mM, propionic acid (0; 3; 6; 9; 12; and 15 mM and butyric acid (0; 2; 4; 6; 8 and 10 mM and two genotypes of high divergence (BRS-7-TAIM and SAIBAN were used. The results indicate that the most appropriate concentration ranges for studies of rice tolerance to organic acids are: 8.4 and 15.8; 4.2 and 9.1 and 3.7 and 7.7 mM for acetic, propionic and butyric acids, respectively, and the most responsive variable was root length.

  1. Fluctuations in butyrate-producing bacteria in ulcerative colitis patients of North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Reena; Ahuja, Vineet; Paul, Jaishree

    2013-06-14

    To study the interplay between butyrate concentration and butyrate-producing bacteria in fecal samples of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients vs control individuals. Fecal samples were collected from 14 control individuals (hemorrhoid patients only) and 26 UC patients (severe: n = 12, moderate: n = 6, remission: n = 8), recruited by the gastroenterologist at the Department of Gastroenterology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Disease activity in UC patients was determined by clinical colitis activity index. We employed fluorescent in situ hybridization in combination with flow cytometry to enumerate the clostridium cluster population targeted by 16S rRNA gene probe. Major butyrate-producing species within this cluster were quantified to see if any change existed in control vs UC patients with different disease activity. This observed change was further validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition to this, we carried out gas chromatography to evaluate the changes in concentration of major short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), namely acetate, n-butyrate, iso-butyrate, in the above samples. Student t test and Graph pad prism-6 were used to compare the data statistically. There was a significant decrease of Clostridium coccoides (control, 25.69% ± 1.62% vs severe, 9.8% ± 2.4%, P = 0.0001) and Clostridium leptum clusters (control, 13.74% ± 1.05% vs severe, 6.2% ± 1.8%, P = 0.0001) in fecal samples of UC patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that some butyrate-producing members of the clostridial cluster, like Fecalibacterium prausnitzii (control, 11.66% ± 1.55% vs severe, 6.01% ± 1.6%, P = 0.0001) and Roseburia intestinalis (control, 14.48% ± 1.52% vs severe, 9% ± 1.83%, P = 0.02) were differentially present in patients with different disease activity. In addition, we also demonstrated decreased concentrations of fecal SCFAs, especially of n-butyrate (control, 24.32 ± 1.86 mmol/μL vs severe, 12.74 ± 2.75 mmol/μL, P = 0

  2. Selective agonists at group II metabotropic glutamate receptors: synthesis, stereochemistry, and molecular pharmacology of (S)- and (R)-2-amino-4-(4-hydroxy[1,2,5]thiadiazol-3-yl)butyric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Rasmus P; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Greenwood, Jeremy R

    2002-01-01

    Homologation of analogues of the central excitatory neurotransmitter glutamic acid (Glu), in which the distal carboxy group has been bioisosterically replaced by acidic heterocyclic units, has previously provided subtype selective ligands for metabotropic Glu receptors (mGluRs). The (S)-form of t...

  3. Comparative genomics and physiology of the butyrate-producing bacterium Intestinimonas butyriciproducens

    OpenAIRE

    Nam Bui, Thi Phuong; Shetty, Sudarshan; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Ritari, Jarmo; Chamlagain, Bhawani; Douillard, Francois; Paulin, Lars Göran; Piironen, Vieno; Clavel, Thomas; Plugge, Caroline M.; de Vos, Willem Meindert

    2016-01-01

    Intestinimonas is a newly described bacterial genus with representative strains present in the intestinal tract of human and other animals. Despite unique metabolic features including the production of butyrate from both sugars and amino acids, there is to date no data on their diversity, ecology, and physiology. Using a comprehensive phylogenetic approach, Intestinimomas was found to include at least three species that colonize primarily the human and mouse intestine. We focused on the most ...

  4. Butyrate protects liver against ischemia reperfusion injury by inhibiting nuclear factor kappa B activation in Kupffer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Ying-li; Qian, Jian-min; Wang, Fang-rui; Ma, Zhen-yu; Wang, Qian-wei

    2014-04-01

    The inflammatory response after hepatic ischemia reperfusion (I/R) contributes to liver dysfunction and failure after transplantation. Butyrate is a four-carbon fatty acid, normally produced by bacterial fermentation of fiber in mammalian intestines, with anti-inflammatory activities. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of butyrate preconditioning, if any, against hepatic I/R injury in rats and the underlying mechanisms involved. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a partial (70%) hepatic ischemia for 60 min after pretreatment with either vehicle or butyrate, followed by 3, 6, and 24 h of reperfusion. Hepatic injury was evaluated by biochemical and histopathologic examinations. Neutrophil infiltration was measured by myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa) and Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 was determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Butyrate treatment markedly improved hepatic function and histology, as indicated by reduced transaminase levels and ameliorated tissue pathologic changes. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6, and myeloperoxidase activity was attenuated by butyrate. Butyrate also reduced I/R-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in Kupffer cells. Our results suggest that butyrate alleviates I/R-induced liver injury, possibly by suppressing inflammatory factors production and preventing NF-κB activation in Kupffer cells. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Sodium Butyrate Reduces Colitogenic Immunoglobulin A-Coated Bacteria and Modifies the Composition of Microbiota in IL-10 Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenghui Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA-coated bacteria may have a role in driving inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. We therefore investigated the effect of sodium butyrate on microbiota in IBD prone interleukin (IL-10−/− mice. At 8 weeks of age, mice were allocated into three groups (n = 4/group: normal (C57BL/6, IL-10−/−, and IL-10−/− treated with sodium butyrate (100 mM. Severity of colitis, inflammatory cytokine and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA concentration in proximal colon contents, the percentage of IgA-coated bacteria and microbiota composition by 16S ribosomal RNA assessment of stool were measured after 4 weeks of treatment. Sodium butyrate ameliorated histological colitis and decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and IL-6 in IL-10−/− mice compared with those without treatment. At the phylum level, a reduction in Bacteroidetes and an increase in Firmicutes in IL-10−/− mice treated with sodium butyrate were observed. Additionally, Prevotellaceae species were reduced in IL-10−/− mice treated with sodium butyrate as compared with those without treatment. The level of biodiversity was slightly increased and the amount of IgA-coated bacteria decreased in IL-10−/− mice treated with sodium butyrate compared with those without treatment. Our results indicate that sodium butyrate protects against colitis, possibly through modifying the gut microbiota, enriching biodiversity and reducing the amount of colitogenic IgA-coated bacteria in IL-10−/− mice.

  6. Control of placental alkaline phosphatase gene expression in HeLa cells: induction of synthesis by prednisolone and sodium butyrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, J.Y.; Takahashi, S.

    1987-01-01

    HeLa S 3 cells produce an alkaline phosphatase indistinguishable from the enzyme from human term placenta. The phosphatase activity in these cells was induced by both prednisolone and sodium butyrate. Both agents stimulated de novo synthesis of the enzyme. The increase in phosphatase activity paralleled the increase in immunoactivity and biosynthesis of placental alkaline phosphatase. The fully processed phosphatase monomer in control, prednisolone-treated or butyrate-treated cells was a 64.5 K polypeptide, measured by both incorporation of L-[ 35 S]methionine into enzyme protein and active-site labeling. The 64.5K polypeptide was formed by the incorporation of additional N-acetylneuraminic acid moieties to a precursor polypeptide of 61.5K. However, this biosynthetic pathway was identified only in butyrate-treated cells. In prednisolone-treated cells, the processing of 61.5K to 64.5K monomer was accelerated, and the presence of the 61.5 precursor could only be detected by either neuraminidase or monensin treatment. Phosphatase mRNA which comigrated with the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA of 2.7 kilobases was induced in the presence of either prednisolone or butyrate. Alkaline phosphatase mRNA is untreated HeLa S 3 cells migrated slightly faster than the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Butyrate also induced a second still faster migrating alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Both prednisolone and butyrate increased the steady-state levels of placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. The data indicate that the increase in phosphatase mRNA by prednisolone and butyrate resulted in the induction of alkaline phosphatase activity and biosynthesis in HeLa S 3 cells. Furthermore, both agents induced the expression of different alkaline phosphatase gene transcripts without altering its protein product

  7. Dietary calcium phosphate content and oat β-glucan influence gastrointestinal microbiota, butyrate-producing bacteria and butyrate fermentation in weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Zijlstra, Ruurd T; Mosenthin, Rainer; Gänzle, Michael G

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of oat β-glucan in combination with low- and high-dietary calcium phosphate (CaP) content on gastrointestinal bacterial microbiota, prevalence of butyrate-production pathway genes and fermentation end-products in 32 weaned pigs allocated to four diets: a cornstarch-casein-based diet with low [65% of the calcium (Ca) and phosphorous (P) requirement] and high CaP content (125% and 115% of the Ca and P requirement, respectively); and low and high CaP diets supplemented with 8.95% of oat β-glucan concentrate. Pigs were slaughtered after 14 days, and digesta were collected for quantitative PCR analysis, and quantification of short-chain fatty acids and lactate. The high CaP content reduced gastric lactate and streptococci and propionate in the large intestine. Oat β-glucan distinctly raised gastric bacterial numbers, and colonic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. Although not reflected by gene copies of butyrate-production pathway genes, oat β-glucan also increased gastric, caecal and colonic butyrate concentrations, which may be favourable for intestinal development in weaned pigs. Thus, a high CaP content negatively affected the intestinal abundance of certain fermentation end-products, whereas oat β-glucan generally enhanced bacterial numbers and activity. The results emphasize the importance of the stomach for bacterial metabolism of oat β-glucan in weaned pigs. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Performance of spray deposited poly [N-9″-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4′,7′-di-2-thienyl-2′,1′, 3′-benzothiadiazole)]/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester blend active layer based bulk heterojunction organic solar cell devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Leona; Babu, R. Ramesh; Kannappan, Santhakumar; Kojima, Kenzo; Mizutani, Teruyoshi; Ochiai, Shizuyasu

    2012-01-01

    Bulk heterojunction organic solar cell devices were fabricated using the spray deposited poly [N-9″-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4′,7′-di-2-thienyl-2′,1′, 3′-benzothiadiazole)]/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester blend active layer. The spray coating parameters such as spraying time, substrate-nozzle distance for the deposition of active layers were analyzed. Optical absorption of the active layers was analyzed using UV–visible spectral studies in the wavelength range from 300 to 800 nm. The surface morphology of the active layers deposited with different parameters was examined using atomic force microscopy. Surface morphology of the active layers deposited with the substrate-nozzle distance of 20 cm and for 20 s shows smooth morphology with peak-valley value of 4 nm. The devices fabricated using the selected active layer show overall power conversion efficiency of 1.08%. - Graphical abstract: Current–voltage (J–V) characteristics of spray deposited PCDTBT:PC 61 BM active layer based solar cell device under illumination of AM 1.5 G, 100 mW/cm 2 . Highlights: ► Organic solar cells were fabricated using a spray deposited PCDTBT:PC61BM active layer. ► The active layers deposited with spray conditions show flat morphology. ► Using the selected active layers power conversion efficiency of 1.08% is obtained.

  9. Butyrate restores HFD-induced adaptations in brain function and metabolism in mid-adult obese mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnoldussen, I.A.C.; Wiesmann, M.; Pelgrim, C.E.; Wielemaker, E.M.; Duyvenvoorde, W. van; Amaral-Santos, P.L.; Verschuren, L.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Heerschap, A.; Kleemann, R.; Wielinga, P.Y.; Kiliaan, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Midlife obesity affects cognition and increases risk of developing dementia. Recent data suggest that intake of the short chain fatty acid butyrate could improve memory function, and may protect against diet-induced obesity by reducing body weight and adiposity. SUBJECTS: We examined the

  10. Transcriptional Response to Lactic Acid Stress in the Hybrid Yeast Zygosaccharomyces parabailii

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz-Merino, Raúl A.; Kuanyshev, Nurzhan; Byrne, Kevin P.; Varela, Javier A.; Morrissey, John P.; Porro, Danilo; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Branduardi, Paola

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lactic acid has a wide range of applications starting from its undissociated form, and its production using cell factories requires stress-tolerant microbial hosts. The interspecies hybrid yeast Zygosaccharomyces parabailii has great potential to be exploited as a novel host for lactic acid production, due to high organic acid tolerance at low pH and a fermentative metabolism with a high growth rate. Here we used mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to analyze Z. parabailii's transcriptional re...

  11. Effect of dietary supplementation with butyrate and probiotic on the survival of Pacific white shrimp after challenge with Vibrio alginolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norha Constanza Bolívar Ramírez

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study evaluated the performance, immunology, and survival of the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei to experimental challenge to Vibrio alginolyticus based on the use of the probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum and the combined use of probiotic and butyrate. Four different diets resulted from the addition of additives: butyrate, probiotic, butyrate + probiotic, and control (no additives. The attractiveness of the diets was assessed by the percentage of positive choices and rejections, using a dual-choice Y-maze format aquarium. The shrimps were fed during four weeks and performance parameters, intestinal microbiota, and immunological parameters were all evaluated. Subsequently, the shrimps were challenged with V. alginolyticus and after 48 h, survival and immunological parameters were evaluated. The results showed increased attractiveness and intake, but only with diets supplemented with sodium butyrate. However, other diets were not rejected. No difference in performance or immunological parameters was observed among the different diets. Also, among the treatments, no difference in Vibrio spp., or total heterotrophic bacteria counts, was found in the intestinal tract. However, the lactic acid bacteria count was higher in the intestinal tract of shrimps fed diets supplemented with probiotic. After bacterial challenge, shrimp fed all diets had a greater survival when compared with the control group. Lactobacillus plantarum and sodium butyrate increase the resistance of shrimp to infection with V. alginolyticus, but do so without affecting performance, immunological parameters, or Vibrio spp., and total heterotrophic bacteria counts in the intestinal tract.

  12. Butyrate Reduces HFD-Induced Adipocyte Hypertrophy and Metabolic Risk Factors in Obese LDLr-/-.Leiden Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte E. Pelgrim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue (AT has a modulating role in obesity-induced metabolic complications like type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM via the production of so-called adipokines such as leptin, adiponectin, and resistin. The adipokines are believed to influence other tissues and to affect insulin resistance, liver function, and to increase the risk of T2DM. In this study, we examined the impact of intervention with the short-chain fatty acid butyrate following a high-fat diet (HFD on AT function and other metabolic risk factors associated with obesity and T2DM in mice during mid- and late life. In both mid- and late adulthood, butyrate reduced HFD-induced adipocyte hypertrophy and elevations in leptin levels, which were associated with body weight, and cholesterol and triglyceride levels. HFD feeding stimulated macrophage accumulation primarily in epididymal AT in both mid- and late life adult mice, which correlated with liver inflammation in late adulthood. In late-adult mice, butyrate diminished increased insulin levels, which were related to adipocyte size and macrophage content in epididymal AT. These results suggest that dietary butyrate supplementation is able to counteract HFD-induced detrimental changes in AT function and metabolic outcomes in late life. These changes underlie the obesity-induced elevated risk of T2DM, and therefore it is suggested that butyrate has potential to attenuate risk factors associated with obesity and T2DM.

  13. Enraizamento de estacas de Pau-Brasil (Caesalpinia echinata Lam. tratadas com ácido indol butírico e ácido naftaleno acético Rooting cuttings of Pau-Brasil (Caesalpinia echinata Lam. treated with indole butyric acid and naphthalene acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurício Endres

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O pau-brasil (Caesalpinia echinata Lam. tem grande valor cultural no Brasil e a sua propagação por sementes é dificultada pela rápida perda do poder germinativo delas. A estaquia pode ser usada para a produção de mudas de espécies florestais, principalmente quando existem algumas dificuldades de propagação por sementes. Este trabalho teve como objetivo caracterizar o efeito de concentrações e fontes de auxinas sobre o enraizamento de estacas de pau-brasil. Estacas com cerca de 12cm de comprimento e de um a dois pares de folhas foram tratadas na base com ácido indol butírico (AIB, ácido naftaleno acético (ANA na forma líquida ou na forma de pó nas concentrações de 0, 1.250, 2.500, 5.000, 10.000mg L-1 ou mg Kg-1, respectivamente. As estacas foram transferidas para substrato contendo areia e mantidas sob nebulização (90-95% UR. Aos 120 dias de estaquia, foram avaliados a mortalidade, a retenção foliar, a formação de calo e a percentagem de estacas enraizadas. As estacas apresentaram índices de sobrevivência de até 70%. A formação de calos não foi relacionada com a concentração de auxinas utilizadas. O maior índice de enraizamento de estacas de pau-brasil, em torno de 16%, foi resgistrada com a utilização do ácido indolbutírico (AIB e do ácido naftalenoacético (ANA na concentração 2.500mg L-1. Os altos índices de sobrevivência e os baixos índices de enraizamento sugerem que as estacas devem permanecer por mais tempo sob nebulização, a fim de induzir o seu processo de enraizamento.The 'pau-brasil' tree (Caesalpinia echinata Lam. have a high cultural value in Brazil and its seed propagation is very difficult because of its rapid losses of germination potential. Cuttings propagation has been considered as alternative method to propagate forest species that seed propagation is poor. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA and naphthalene acetic (NAA acid on

  14. Rice genotypes evaluate under the interactive phytotoxic effect of acetic, propionic and butyric acidsAvaliação de genótipos de arroz sob o efeito fitotóxico interativo dos ácidos acético, propiônico e butírico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Costa de Oliveira

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the development of 20 rice genotypes to acetic, pripionic and butyric acid, a phytotoxic compounds produced in low drainage soils with high organic matter content. This work was performed in hydroponics with four acid doses (0; 3; 6 e 9 mM and 6:3:1 relationship acetic, propionic and butyric respectively. A factorial random block design with three replications were performed. The variables measured were root (CR and shoot (CPA length, number of roots (NR and root (MSR and shoot (MSPA dry matter. The data relative to the measured variables were subjected to an analysis of variance in a factorial model (4x20 and regression fitting, considering dose and genotype as fixed factors. Significance for the interaction (genotype vs. dose was found only for CR and CPA. The variable CR was the most influenced by the acid and the regression stablished for the variables CR and CPA revealed 2 genotypes with root length stability and 3 with shoot length stability front to organic acid stress. Genotypes with higher rusticity and developed for irrigated systems were more tolerant. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar o desenvolvimento de 20 genótipos de arroz aos ácidos acético, propiônico e butírico, compostos fitotóxicos produzidos em solos de deficiente drenagem e alto teor de matéria orgânica. O trabalho foi executado em sistema de hidroponia com 4 doses (0; 3; 6 e 9 mM dos ácidos na relação 6:3:1 acético, propiônico e butírico respectivamente. O delineamento utilizado foi blocos casualizados com 3 repetições num esquema fatorial. As variáveis mensuradas foram comprimento de raízes (CR e parte aérea (CPA, número de raízes (NR e massa seca de raízes (MSR e parte aérea (MSPA. Os dados relativos às variáveis mensuradas foram submetidos à análise de variância em um modelo fatorial (4x20, considerando dose e genótipo como fatores fixos e ajuste de regressões. A variável CR foi a mais afetada

  15. Butyrate and propionate inhibit antigen-specific CD8+ T cell activation by suppressing IL-12 production by antigen-presenting cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nastasi, Claudia; Fredholm, Simon; Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as acetate, butyrate and propionate, are products of microbial macronutrients fermentation that distribute systemically and are believed to modulate host immune responses. Recent data have indicated that certain SCFAs, such as butyrate and propionate, directly...... modulate human dendritic cell (DC) function. Given the role of DCs in initiating and shaping the adaptive immune response, we now explore how SCFAs affect the activation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells stimulated with autologous, MART1 peptide-pulsed DC. We show that butyrate reduces the frequency...... of peptide-specific CD8+ T cells and, together with propionate, inhibit the activity of those cells. On the contrary, acetate does not affect them. Importantly, butyrate and propionate inhibit the production of IL-12 and IL-23 in the DCs and exogenous IL-12 fully restores the activation of the MART-1...

  16. The microbial metabolite butyrate regulates intestinal macrophage function via histone deacetylase inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pamela V.; Hao, Liming; Offermanns, Stefan; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Given the trillions of microbes that inhabit the mammalian intestines, the host immune system must constantly maintain a balance between tolerance to commensals and immunity against pathogens to avoid unnecessary immune responses against otherwise harmless bacteria. Misregulated responses can lead to inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. The mechanisms by which the immune system maintains this critical balance remain largely undefined. Here, we demonstrate that the short-chain fatty acid n-butyrate, which is secreted in high amounts by commensal bacteria, can modulate the function of intestinal macrophages, the most abundant immune cell type in the lamina propria. Treatment of macrophages with n-butyrate led to the down-regulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide, IL-6, and IL-12, but did not affect levels of TNF-α or MCP-1. These effects were independent of toll-like receptor signaling and activation of G-protein–coupled receptors, two pathways that could be affected by short-chain fatty acids. In this study, we provide several lines of evidence that suggest that these effects are due to the inhibition of histone deacetylases by n-butyrate. These findings elucidate a pathway in which the host may maintain tolerance to intestinal microbiota by rendering lamina propria macrophages hyporesponsive to commensal bacteria through the down-regulation of proinflammatory effectors. PMID:24390544

  17. ALA-Butyrate prodrugs for Photo-Dynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitch, G.; Nudelman, A.; Ehenberg, B.; Rephaeli, A.; Malik, Z.

    2010-05-01

    The use of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) administration has led to many applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in cancer. However, the hydrophilic nature of ALA limits its ability to penetrate the cells and tissues, and therefore the need for ALA derivatives became an urgent research target. In this study we investigated the activity of novel multifunctional acyloxyalkyl ester prodrugs of ALA that upon metabolic hydrolysis release active components such as, formaldehyde, and the histone deacetylase inhibitory moiety, butyric acid. Evaluation of these prodrugs under photo-irradiation conditions showed that butyryloxyethyl 5-amino-4-oxopentanoate (ALA-BAC) generated the most efficient photodynamic destruction compared to ALA. ALA-BAC stimulated a rapid biosynthesis of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in human glioblastoma U-251 cells which resulted in generation of intracellular ROS, reduction of mitochondrial activity, leading to apoptotic and necrotic death of the cells. The apoptotic cell death induced by ALA / ALA-BAC followed by PDT equally activate intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signals and both pathways may occur simultaneously. The main advantage of ALA-BAC over ALA stems from its ability to induce photo-damage at a significantly lower dose than ALA.

  18. Alternative splicing regulated by butyrate in bovine epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitao Wu

    Full Text Available As a signaling molecule and an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs, butyrate exerts its impact on a broad range of biological processes, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to its critical role in energy metabolism in ruminants. This study examined the effect of butyrate on alternative splicing in bovine epithelial cells using RNA-seq technology. Junction reads account for 11.28 and 12.32% of total mapped reads between the butyrate-treated (BT and control (CT groups. 201,326 potential splicing junctions detected were supported by ≥ 3 junction reads. Approximately 94% of these junctions conformed to the consensus sequence (GT/AG while ~3% were GC/AG junctions. No AT/AC junctions were observed. A total of 2,834 exon skipping events, supported by a minimum of 3 junction reads, were detected. At least 7 genes, their mRNA expression significantly affected by butyrate, also had exon skipping events differentially regulated by butyrate. Furthermore, COL5A3, which was induced 310-fold by butyrate (FDR <0.001 at the gene level, had a significantly higher number of junction reads mapped to Exon#8 (Donor and Exon#11 (Acceptor in BT. This event had the potential to result in the formation of a COL5A3 mRNA isoform with 2 of the 69 exons missing. In addition, 216 differentially expressed transcript isoforms regulated by butyrate were detected. For example, Isoform 1 of ORC1 was strongly repressed by butyrate while Isoform 2 remained unchanged. Butyrate physically binds to and inhibits all zinc-dependent HDACs except HDAC6 and HDAC10. Our results provided evidence that butyrate also regulated deacetylase activities of classical HDACs via its transcriptional control. Moreover, thirteen gene fusion events differentially affected by butyrate were identified. Our results provided a snapshot into complex transcriptome dynamics regulated by butyrate, which will facilitate our understanding of the biological effects of butyrate and other HDAC

  19. Uranyl butyrate complexes with divalent cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, R.M.; Gonzalez, V.; Bermudez, J.; De Paz, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Mixed uranium(VI) oxides with magnesium or manganese have been extensively studied. From the solid state reactions between uranium(VI) oxide and magnesium or manganese oxides, two different types of compound have been identified, MUO 4 and MU 3 O 10 , (M = Mg,Mn) and their crystallographic properties determinated. The formation of cubic magnesium uranate Mg, Usub(1-y)Osub(2+x) has also been reported and a similar phase for the manganese uranium oxide, MnU 2 O 6 , with a fluorite type structure has been described. In the present paper, the synthesis and thermal behaviour of two new uranyl butyrate complexes with magnesium and manganese are described. Taking into account the U/M ratio in these complexes, the processes of thermal decomposition have been investigated in detail. (author)

  20. Effects of volatile fatty acids in biohydrogen effluent on biohythane production from palm oil mill effluent under thermophilic condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chonticha Mamimin

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Preventing the high concentration of butyric acid, and propionic acid in the hydrogenic effluent could enhance methane production in two-stage anaerobic digestion for biohythane production.

  1. Síntese enzimática de butirato de isoamila empregando lipases microbianas comerciais Enzymatic synthesis isoamyl butyrate employing commercial microbial lipases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Cardoso Aragão

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Isoamyl butyrate production was investigated using free and immobilized lipases by esterification of butyric acid with isoamyl alcohol in a solvent-free system and in an organic media. Among the enzymes studied, Lipozyme TL IM was found to be the most active catalyst in n-hexane as a solvent. The effects of different solvents and the amount of water added on conversion rates were studied. A maximum conversion yield of 80% in n-hexano at 48 h was obtained under the following conditions: 3 g L-1 of Lipozyme TL IM, 30 ºC, 180 rpm of agitation, isoamyl alcohol to butyric acid molar ratio of 1:1 and acid substrate concentration of 0.06 M.

  2. Efficacy of the dietary histone deacetylase inhibitor butyrate alone or in combination with vitamin A against proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, F.O. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nagamine, M.K. [Laboratório de Oncologia Experimental, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); De Conti, A. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Chaible, L.M. [Laboratório de Oncologia Experimental, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fontelles, C.C. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Jordão Junior, A.A.; Vannucchi, H. [Divisão de Nutrição, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Dagli, M.L.Z. [Laboratório de Oncologia Experimental, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bassoli, B.K.; Moreno, F.S.; Ong, T.P. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-06-22

    The combined treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and retinoids has been suggested as a potential epigenetic strategy for the control of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treatment with butyrate, a dietary HDACi, combined with vitamin A on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Cell proliferation was evaluated by the crystal violet staining method. MCF-7 cells were plated at 5 x 10{sup 4} cells/mL and treated with butyrate (1 mM) alone or combined with vitamin A (10 µM) for 24 to 120 h. Cell proliferation inhibition was 34, 10 and 46% following treatment with butyrate, vitamin A and their combination, respectively, suggesting that vitamin A potentiated the inhibitory activities of butyrate. Furthermore, exposure to this short-chain fatty acid increased the level of histone H3K9 acetylation by 9.5-fold (Western blot), but not of H4K16, and increased the expression levels of p21{sup WAF1} by 2.7-fold (Western blot) and of RARβ by 2.0-fold (quantitative real-time PCR). Our data show that RARβ may represent a molecular target for butyrate in breast cancer cells. Due to its effectiveness as a dietary HDACi, butyrate should be considered for use in combinatorial strategies with more active retinoids, especially in breast cancers in which RARβ is epigenetically altered.

  3. Efficacy of the dietary histone deacetylase inhibitor butyrate alone or in combination with vitamin A against proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.O. Andrade

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The combined treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi and retinoids has been suggested as a potential epigenetic strategy for the control of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treatment with butyrate, a dietary HDACi, combined with vitamin A on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Cell proliferation was evaluated by the crystal violet staining method. MCF-7 cells were plated at 5 x 10(4 cells/mL and treated with butyrate (1 mM alone or combined with vitamin A (10 µM for 24 to 120 h. Cell proliferation inhibition was 34, 10 and 46% following treatment with butyrate, vitamin A and their combination, respectively, suggesting that vitamin A potentiated the inhibitory activities of butyrate. Furthermore, exposure to this short-chain fatty acid increased the level of histone H3K9 acetylation by 9.5-fold (Western blot, but not of H4K16, and increased the expression levels of p21WAF1 by 2.7-fold (Western blot and of RARβ by 2.0-fold (quantitative real-time PCR. Our data show that RARβ may represent a molecular target for butyrate in breast cancer cells. Due to its effectiveness as a dietary HDACi, butyrate should be considered for use in combinatorial strategies with more active retinoids, especially in breast cancers in which RARβ is epigenetically altered.

  4. Efficacy of the dietary histone deacetylase inhibitor butyrate alone or in combination with vitamin A against proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, F.O.; Nagamine, M.K.; De Conti, A.; Chaible, L.M.; Fontelles, C.C.; Jordão Junior, A.A.; Vannucchi, H.; Dagli, M.L.Z.; Bassoli, B.K.; Moreno, F.S.; Ong, T.P.

    2012-01-01

    The combined treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and retinoids has been suggested as a potential epigenetic strategy for the control of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treatment with butyrate, a dietary HDACi, combined with vitamin A on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Cell proliferation was evaluated by the crystal violet staining method. MCF-7 cells were plated at 5 x 10 4 cells/mL and treated with butyrate (1 mM) alone or combined with vitamin A (10 µM) for 24 to 120 h. Cell proliferation inhibition was 34, 10 and 46% following treatment with butyrate, vitamin A and their combination, respectively, suggesting that vitamin A potentiated the inhibitory activities of butyrate. Furthermore, exposure to this short-chain fatty acid increased the level of histone H3K9 acetylation by 9.5-fold (Western blot), but not of H4K16, and increased the expression levels of p21 WAF1 by 2.7-fold (Western blot) and of RARβ by 2.0-fold (quantitative real-time PCR). Our data show that RARβ may represent a molecular target for butyrate in breast cancer cells. Due to its effectiveness as a dietary HDACi, butyrate should be considered for use in combinatorial strategies with more active retinoids, especially in breast cancers in which RARβ is epigenetically altered

  5. Prebiotic potential of L-sorbose and xylitol in promoting the growth and metabolic activity of specific butyrate-producing bacteria in human fecal culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tadashi; Kusuhara, Shiro; Yokoi, Wakae; Ito, Masahiko; Miyazaki, Kouji

    2017-01-01

    Dietary low-digestible carbohydrates (LDCs) affect gut microbial metabolism, including the production of short-chain fatty acids. The ability of various LDCs to promote butyrate production was evaluated in in vitro human fecal cultures. Fecal suspensions from five healthy males were anaerobically incubated with various LDCs. L-Sorbose and xylitol markedly promoted butyrate formation in cultures. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses of these fecal cultures revealed a marked increase in the abundance of bacteria closely related to the species Anaerostipes hadrus or A. caccae or both, during enhanced butyrate formation from L-sorbose or xylitol. By using an agar plate culture, two strains of A. hadrus that produced butyrate from each substrate were isolated from the feces of two donors. Furthermore, of 12 species of representative colonic butyrate producers, only A. hadrus and A. caccae demonstrated augmented butyrate production from L-sorbose or xylitol. These findings suggest that L-sorbose and xylitol cause prebiotic stimulation of the growth and metabolic activity of Anaerostipes spp. in the human colon. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. EVALUACIÓN DE LA CONCENTRACIÓN DE LOS ÁCIDOS ACÉTICO, BUTÍRICO Y PROPIÓNICO EN EL CO-CULTIVO: ASPERGILLUS ORYZAE-BUTYRIVIBRIO FIBRISOLVENS. EVALUATION OF THE CONCENTRATION OF THE ACETIC, BUTYRIC AND PROPIONIC ACIDS IN THE CO-CULTURE: ASPERGILLUS ORYZAE-BUTYRIVIBRIO FIBRISOLVENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. LARA MANTILLA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio en co-cultivo entre el hongo Aspergillus oryzae y la bacteria ruminal celulolítica Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, cuyo objetivo fue determinar "in vitro" el efecto del hongo sobre la producción de los ácidos acético, propiónico y butírico por parte de la bacteria. El medio de cultivo se preparó utilizando líquido ruminal filtrado, centrifugado, autoclavado y diluído al 40% con agua, y 0,05 p/v de pastos Angleton (Dichamthium aristatum (Córdoba, Colombia. Las condiciones de cultivo fueron en anaerobiosis, y el tiempo de incubación de 24 horas. A partir del sobrenadante fueron determinadas las concentraciones de los ácidos grasos volátiles por cromatografía de gases. Se estudiaron dos relaciones bacteria-hongo: 1:1 y 1:3. Como resultado se observó un efecto negativo de Aspergillus oryzae sobre Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, que se reflejó en la disminución en la producción de ácidos grasos volátiles.A study in co-culture between Aspergillus oryzae with the cellulolytic ruminal bacteria Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens was carried out aiming the "in vitro" determination of the effect of the fungi on the production of acetic, propionic and butyric acids by the bacteria. The culture medium was prepared using filtered, centrifuged, autoclaved and ruminal liquid diluted to 40% with water, and 0,05 % p/v of Angleton grass [;Dichamthium aristatum]; [;Córdoba, Colombia];. Culture was performed in anaerobic conditions for 24 hours. The concentrations of volatile fatty acids in the supernatant were determined by gas chromatography. Two bacteria-fungi relations were studied: 1:1 and 1:3. The results showed a negative effect of Aspergillus oryzae on Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens which was reflected in a decrease in the production of volatile fatty acids.

  7. Perinatal exposure to germinated brown rice and its gamma amino-butyric acid-rich extract prevents high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in first generation rat offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiza Altine Adamu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence suggests perinatal environments influence the risk of developing insulin resistance. Objective: The present study was aimed at determining the effects of intrauterine exposure to germinated brown rice (GBR and GBR-derived gamma (γ aminobutyric acid (GABA extract on epigenetically mediated high fat diet–induced insulin resistance. Design: Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were fed high-fat diet (HFD, HFD+GBR, or HFD+GABA throughout pregnancy until 4 weeks postdelivery. The pups were weighed weekly and maintained on normal pellet until 8 weeks postdelivery. After sacrifice, biochemical markers of obesity and insulin resistance including oral glucose tolerance test, adiponectin, leptin, and retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4 were measured. Hepatic gene expression changes and the global methylation and histone acetylation levels were also evaluated. Results: Detailed analyses revealed that mothers given GBR and GABA extract, and their offspring had increased adiponectin levels and reduced insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, leptin, oxidative stress, and RBP4 levels, while their hepatic mRNA levels of GLUT2 and IPF1 were increased. Furthermore, GBR and GABA extract lowered global DNA methylation levels and modulated H3 and H4 acetylation levels. Conclusions: These results showed that intrauterine exposure to GBR-influenced metabolic outcomes in offspring of rats with underlying epigenetic changes and transcriptional implications that led to improved glucose homeostasis.

  8. Perinatal exposure to germinated brown rice and its gamma amino-butyric acid-rich extract prevents high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in first generation rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamu, Hadiza Altine; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ooi, Der-Jiun; Esa, Norhaizan Mohd; Rosli, Rozita; Ismail, Maznah

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests perinatal environments influence the risk of developing insulin resistance. The present study was aimed at determining the effects of intrauterine exposure to germinated brown rice (GBR) and GBR-derived gamma (γ) aminobutyric acid (GABA) extract on epigenetically mediated high fat diet-induced insulin resistance. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were fed high-fat diet (HFD), HFD+GBR, or HFD+GABA throughout pregnancy until 4 weeks postdelivery. The pups were weighed weekly and maintained on normal pellet until 8 weeks postdelivery. After sacrifice, biochemical markers of obesity and insulin resistance including oral glucose tolerance test, adiponectin, leptin, and retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4) were measured. Hepatic gene expression changes and the global methylation and histone acetylation levels were also evaluated. Detailed analyses revealed that mothers given GBR and GABA extract, and their offspring had increased adiponectin levels and reduced insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, leptin, oxidative stress, and RBP4 levels, while their hepatic mRNA levels of GLUT2 and IPF1 were increased. Furthermore, GBR and GABA extract lowered global DNA methylation levels and modulated H3 and H4 acetylation levels. These results showed that intrauterine exposure to GBR-influenced metabolic outcomes in offspring of rats with underlying epigenetic changes and transcriptional implications that led to improved glucose homeostasis.

  9. Comparative analysis of transcriptional and physiological responses of Bacillus cereus to organic and inorganic acid shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mols, Maarten; van Kranenburg, Richard; Tempelaars, Marcel H; van Schaik, Willem; Moezelaar, Roy; Abee, Tjakko

    2010-01-31

    Comparative phenotype and transcriptome analyses were performed with Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 exposed to pH 5.5 set with different acidulants including hydrochloric acid (HCl), lactic acid (HL) and acetic acid (HAc). Phenotypes observed included a decreased growth rate (with HCl), bacteriostatic and bactericidal conditions, with 2mM undissociated HAc or HL, and 15mM undissociated HAc, respectively. In the latter condition a concomitant decrease in intracellular ATP levels was observed. The transcriptome analyses revealed general and specific responses to the acidulants used. The general acid stress response includes modulation of pyruvate metabolism with activation of the butanediol fermentation pathway, and an oxidative stress response that was, however, more extensive in the bacteriostatic and bactericidal conditions. HL-specific and HAc-specific responses include modulation of metabolic pathways for amino acid metabolism. Activation of lactate, formate, and ethanol fermentation pathways, alternative electron-transport chain components and fatty acid biosynthesis genes was noted in the presence of 15mM undissociated HAc. In conclusion, our study has provided insights in phenotype-associated, and general and acidulant-specific responses in B. cereus. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Synergistic Effects of Probiotic Microorganisms on the Microbial Production of Butyrate In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas, Khadija A.

    2009-01-01

    Butyrate producing microbiota perform a number of activities important in supporting the normal function of the human gastrointestinal tract. The goal of this study was to determine the synergistic effects of lactate- and butyrate-producing bacteria on butyrate production in vitro co-culture. PCR was used to detect the genes butyrate kinase and butyryl-CoA transferase that contribute to butyrate production, in a panel of representative gut microbiota. Preliminary data suggested that two Clost...

  11. Thermal decomposition of lanthanum(III) butyrate in argon atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Yue, Zhao; Xiao, Tang

    2013-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of La(C3H7CO2)3·xH2O (x≈0.82) was studied in argon during heating at 5K/min. After the loss of bound H2O, the anhydrous butyrate presents at 135°C a phase transition to a mesophase, which turns to an isotropic liquid at 180°C. The decomposition of the anhydrous butyrate...

  12. Microbial metabolite butyrate facilitates M2 macrophage polarization and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jian; Shu, Dingming; Zheng, Mingzhu; Wang, Jie; Luo, Chenglong; Wang, Yan; Guo, Fuyou; Zou, Xian; Lv, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Liu, Tianfei; Qu, Hao

    2016-04-20

    Metabolites from intestinal microbes modulate the mucosal immune system by regulating the polarization and expansion of T cells. Whether the microbial metabolites influence macrophage polarization, however, is poorly understood. Here, we show that the large bowel microbial fermentation product, butyrate, facilitates M2 macrophage polarization, in vitro and in vivo. The supernatant from butyrate-treated M2 macrophage increased the migration and enhanced the wound closure rate of MLE-12 cells. Butyrate attenuated intestinal inflammation in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, with a significant increase in colonic expression of the M2 macrophage-associated protein, Arg1. M2 macrophage treated with butyrate, had increased activation of the H3K9/STAT6 signaling pathway, suggesting a mechanism for butyrate facilitated M2 macrophage polarization. Collectively, our study indicated that commensal microbe-derived butyrate is a novel activator of STAT6-mediated transcription through H3K9 acetylation driving M2 macrophage polarization, and delineated new insights into the immune interplay underlying inflammatory bowel disease.

  13. Controlled Morphology of Porous Polyvinyl Butyral Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Lubasova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and effective method for the fabrication of porous nanofibers based on the solvent evaporation methods in one-step electrospinning process from the commercial polyvinyl butyral (PVB is presented. The obtained nanofibers are prevalently amorphous with diameters ranging from 150 to 4350 nm and specific surface area of approximately 2–20 m2/g. Pore size with irregular shape of the porous PVB fibers ranged approximately from 50 to 200 nm. The effects of polymer solution concentration, composition of the solvents mixture, and applied voltage on fiber diameter and morphology were investigated. The theoretical approach for the choice of poor and good solvents for PVB was explained by the application Hansen solubility parameter (HSP and two-dimensional graph. Three basic conditions for the production of porous PVB nanofibers were defined: (i application of good/poor solvent mixture for spinning solution, (ii differences of the evaporation rate between good/poor solvent, and (iii correct ratios of good/poor solvent (v/v. The diameter of prepared porous PVB fibers decreased as the polymer concentration was lowered and with higher applied voltage. These nanofiber sheets with porous PVB fibers could be a good candidate for high-efficiency filter materials in comparison to smooth fibers without pores.

  14. Microbial-Derived Butyrate Promotes Epithelial Barrier Function through IL-10 Receptor-Dependent Repression of Claudin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Leon; Kelly, Caleb J; Battista, Kayla D; Schaefer, Rachel; Lanis, Jordi M; Alexeev, Erica E; Wang, Ruth X; Onyiah, Joseph C; Kominsky, Douglas J; Colgan, Sean P

    2017-10-15

    Commensal interactions between the enteric microbiota and distal intestine play important roles in regulating human health. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyrate, produced through anaerobic microbial metabolism represent a major energy source for the host colonic epithelium and enhance epithelial barrier function through unclear mechanisms. Separate studies revealed that the epithelial anti-inflammatory IL-10 receptor α subunit (IL-10RA) is also important for barrier formation. Based on these findings, we examined if SCFAs promote epithelial barrier through IL-10RA-dependent mechanisms. Using human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), we discovered that SCFAs, particularly butyrate, enhanced IEC barrier formation, induced IL-10RA mRNA, IL-10RA protein, and transactivation through activated Stat3 and HDAC inhibition. Loss and gain of IL-10RA expression directly correlates with IEC barrier formation and butyrate represses permeability-promoting claudin-2 tight-junction protein expression through an IL-10RA-dependent mechanism. Our findings provide a novel mechanism by which microbial-derived butyrate promotes barrier through IL-10RA-dependent repression of claudin-2. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Trench layering using indole-3-butyric acid and local organic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apples (Malus domestica) were introduced to enhance nutrition and improve livelihoods of famers in highlands of Uganda. However, adoption and commercialisation of apples is largely constrained by low quality rootstocks due to poor rooting and low survivability. This study determined the effect of organic substrate ...

  16. Effect of butyric acid supplementation and whole wheat inclusion on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B2) relative to the control and other experimental diets during 0 - 42 d, but this increase was not associated with improved AWG or FCR as compared with that of the control. The BA had no significant effect on relative fat pad, gizzard or breast ...

  17. Effect of indole butyric acid on micrografting of cactus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-03-22

    Mar 22, 2012 ... The importance of plant growth regulators for improving the performance of grafted vegetable seedlings have been recognized (Aloni et al.,. 2010). Vascular system has the considerable adaptive capacities (Sachs, 1989). Auxin induces many develop- mental effects by regulating gene expression (Wilmoth ...

  18. trench layering using indole-3-butyric acid and local organic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    (Received 4 October, 2017; accepted 12 February, 2018). ABSTRACT .... introduced for research at Kachekano Zonal. Agricultural Research and .... Data analysis. The collected data were subjected to analysis of variance using. MINITAB statistical software, Version 14 and the difference between means was compared.

  19. Suppression of monosodium urate crystal-induced cytokine production by butyrate is mediated by the inhibition of class I histone deacetylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleophas, Maartje C P; Crişan, Tania O; Lemmers, Heidi; Toenhake-Dijkstra, Helga; Fossati, Gianluca; Jansen, Tim L; Dinarello, Charles A; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2016-03-01

    Acute gouty arthritis is caused by endogenously formed monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, which are potent activators of the NLRP3 inflammasome. However, to induce the release of active interleukin (IL)-1β, an additional stimulus is needed. Saturated long-chain free fatty acids (FFAs) can provide such a signal and stimulate transcription of pro-IL-1β. In contrast, the short-chain fatty acid butyrate possesses anti-inflammatory effects. One of the mechanisms involved is inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here, we explored the effects of butyrate on MSU+FFA-induced cytokine production and its inhibition of specific HDACs. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors were stimulated with MSU and palmitic acid (C16.0) in the presence or absence of butyrate or a synthetic HDAC inhibitor. Cytokine responses were measured with ELISA and quantitative PCR. HDAC activity was measured with fluorimetric assays. Butyrate decreased C16.0+MSU-induced production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-1β mRNA in PBMCs from healthy donors. Similar results were obtained in PBMCs isolated from patients with gout. Butyrate specifically inhibited class I HDACs. The HDAC inhibitor, panobinostat and the potent HDAC inhibitor, ITF-B, also decreased ex vivo C16.0+MSU-induced IL-1β production. In agreement with the reported low inhibitory potency of butyrate, a high concentration was needed for cytokine suppression, whereas synthetic HDAC inhibitors showed potent anti-inflammatory effects at nanomolar concentrations. These novel HDAC inhibitors could be effective in the treatment of acute gout. Moreover, the use of specific HDAC inhibitors could even improve the efficacy and reduce any potential adverse effects. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Microculture model studies on the effect of sorbic acid on Penicillium chrysogenum, Cladosporium cladosporioides and Ulocladium atrum at different pH levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirdal, I M; Eklund, T

    1993-02-01

    The minimum growth-inhibitory concentration of sorbic acid has been determined for Penicillium chrysogenum, Cladosporium cladosporioides and Ulocladium atrum at pH 4.1-7.6 by using a microculture technique. This technique had earlier been applied to bacteria and Candida albicans and gave very reliable minimum inhibitory values. This investigation has shown that it is suitable also for determination of mould growth. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of sorbic acid were at the tested pH levels 1-230 mmol l-1 for P. chrysogenum, 0.3-18.0 mmol l-1 for C. cladosporioides and 0.2-33.0 mmol l-1 for U. atrum. A mathematical model for combined inhibition by dissociated and undissociated acid, which gave a good description of the minimum inhibitory concentration data earlier obtained for bacteria and Candida albicans, was suitable also for moulds. Both dissociated and undissociated acid contributed to growth inhibition.

  1. Thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) propionate and butyrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    The thermal decompositions of yttrium(III) propionate monohydrate (Y(C2H5CO2)3·H2O) and yttrium(III) butyrate dihydrate (Y(C3H7CO2)3·2H2O) were studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and hot-stage microscopy. These two...... compounds follow a similar decomposition path starting with dehydration, which is complete at 110°C. The dehydrated salts convert to a dioxycarbonate (Y2O2CO3) via an unstable intermediate product (probably Y2O(C2H5CO2)4 and Y2O(C3H7CO2)4 for the propionate and butyrate respectively), with the evolution...... in anhydrous yttrium butyrate, whereas no melting was evidenced in the propionate. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  2. Supplementation of total parenteral nutrition with butyrate acutely increases structural aspects of intestinal adaptation after an 80% jejunoileal resection in neonatal piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholome, Anne L; Albin, David M; Baker, David H

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Supplementation of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) with a mixture of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) enhances intestinal adaptation in the adult rodent model. However, the ability and timing of SCFA to augment adaptation in the neonatal intestine is unknown. Furthermore, the specific...... and decreasing apoptosis within 4 hours postresection. The intestinotrophic mechanism(s) underlying butyrate's effects may involve GLP-2. Ultimately, butyrate administration may enable an infant with short-bowel syndrome to successfully transition to enteral feedings by maximizing their absorptive area....

  3. N-Butyrate alters chromatin accessibility to DNA repair enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that the complex nature of mammalian chromatin can result in the concealment of DNA damage from repair enzymes and their co-factors. Recently it has been proposed that the acetylation of histone proteins in chromatin may provide a surveillance system whereby damaged regions of DNA become exposed due to changes in chromatin accessibility. This hypothesis has been tested by: (i) using n-butyrate to induce hyperacetylation in human adenocarcinoma (HT29) cells; (ii) monitoring the enzymatic accessibility of chromatin in permeabilised cells; (iii) measuring u.v. repair-associated nicking of DNA in intact cells and (iv) determining the effects of n-butyrate on cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. The results indicate that the accessibility of chromatin to Micrococcus luteus u.v. endonuclease is enhanced by greater than 2-fold in n-butyrate-treated cells and that there is a corresponding increase in u.v. repair incision rates in intact cells exposed to the drug. Non-toxic levels of n-butyrate induce a block to G1 phase transit and there is a significant growth delay on removal of the drug. Resistance of HT29 cells to u.v.-radiation and adriamycin is enhanced in n-butyrate-treated cells whereas X-ray sensitivity is increased. Although changes in the responses of cells to DNA damaging agents must be considered in relation to the effects of n-butyrate on growth rate and cell-cycle distribution, the results are not inconsistent with the proposal that increased enzymatic-accessibility/repair is biologically favourable for the resistance of cells to u.v.-radiation damage. Overall the results support the suggested operation of a histone acetylation-based chromatin surveillance system in human cells

  4. Colonic production of butyrate in patients with previous colonic cancer during long-term treatment with dietary fibre (Plantago ovata seeds)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordgaard, I; Hove, H; Clausen, M R

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Butyrate has antineoplastic properties against colorectal cancer cells and is the preferred oxidative substrate for colonocytes. Like acetate and propionate (short-chain fatty acids; SCFAs), butyrate is produced by colonic fermentation of dietary fibre. METHODS: Twenty patients resected...... for colorectal cancer were treated with 20 g/day of the fibre Plantago ovata seeds for 3 months, which increased the intake of fibre by 17.9 +/- 0.8 g/day, from basal levels of 19.2 +/- 1.7 g/day; 17 patients completed the study. Faecal samples were obtained on eight occasions, twice before treatment......, and monthly three times during and three time after treatment. RESULTS: One month of fibre therapy increased faecal concentrations of butyrate by 42 +/- 12% (from 13.2 +/- 1.2 to 19.3 +/- 3.0 mmol/l; P

  5. K562 human erythroleukemia cell variants resistant to growth inhibition by butyrate have deficient histone acetylation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohlsson-Wilhelm, B M; Farley, B A; Kosciolek, B; La Bella, S; Rowley, P T

    1984-01-01

    K562 is an established human erythroleukemia cell line, inducible for hemoglobin synthesis by a variety of compounds including n-butyrate. To elucidate the role of butyrate-induced histone acetylation in the regulation of gene expression in K562 cells, we isolated 20 variants resistant to the growth inhibitory effect of butyrate. Four variants having different degrees of resistance were selected for detailed study. All four were found to be resistant to the hemoglobin-inducing effect of butyr...

  6. Butyrate Therapy for Poorly Differentiated Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McBain, John

    2000-01-01

    ... with organicacidemias and hypoglycin (i.e., MCPA) poisoning suggested that prolonged exposure to such acids would lead to bone marrow depression and hair loss, but would be compatible with life...

  7. Butyrate reduces appetite and activates brown adipose tissue via the gut-brain neural circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Zhuang; Yi, Chun-Xia; Katiraei, Saeed; Kooijman, Sander; Zhou, Enchen; Chung, Chih Kit; Gao, Yuanqing; van den Heuvel, José K.; Meijer, Onno C.; Berbée, Jimmy F. P.; Heijink, Marieke; Giera, Martin; Willems van Dijk, Ko; Groen, Albert K.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Wang, Yanan

    2017-01-01

    Butyrate exerts metabolic benefits in mice and humans, the underlying mechanisms being still unclear. We aimed to investigate the effect of butyrate on appetite and energy expenditure, and to what extent these two components contribute to the beneficial metabolic effects of butyrate. Acute effects

  8. Butyrate supplementation to gestating sows and piglets induces muscle and adipose tissue oxidative genes and improves growth performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H; Su, S; Ajuwon, K M

    2012-12-01

    Weaned pigs often experience growth reduction immediately after weaning due to multiple stress factors associated with weaning. We tested the effect of prenatal and postnatal butyrate supplementation on growth performance of piglets. In study 1, piglets were orally gavaged with 0.3% butyrate from day 4 after birth to weaning (day 21). Butyrate increased ADG by 13% compared to saline treated control. Expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) was higher in muscle, adipose tissue, and ileum of butyrate-supplemented animals. Also, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) was induced (P butyrate-supplemented piglets. In vitro, butyrate increased (P Butyrate suppressed (P butyrate-treated cells vs. controls. Piglets born to sows that were supplemented with 0.3% butyrate during the last trimester of gestation had a 15% higher (P butyrate supplementation to gestating sows and piglets enhanced postweaning growth performance, which may be mediated by increased substrate oxidation in butyrate treated animals.

  9. Diet-dependent shifts in ruminal butyrate producing bacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrázek, Jakub; Tepšič, K.; Avguštin, G.; Kopečný, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 4 (2006), s. 294-298 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5045112 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : butyrate -producing bacteria Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 0.963, year: 2006

  10. Drug-loaded Cellulose Acetate and Cellulose Acetate Butyrate Films ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this research work was to evaluate the contribution of formulation variables on release properties of matrix type ocular films containing chloramphenicol as a model drug. This study investigated the use of cellulose acetate and cellulose acetate butyrate as film-forming agents in development of ocular films.

  11. Pré-tratamento com água e doses de ácido indolbutírico para estaquia herbácea de pitangueiras Pre-treatments with water and indole butyric acid dosis for herbaceous cuttings of Surinam cherry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Silva Lattuada

    2011-12-01

    . In this context, a study for the multiplication of Surinam cherry was conduced with herbaceous cuttings, taken from young and adult mother plants, immersed in indole butyric acid doses (0, 2000, 4000 and 6000mg L-1, in three different water periods (0, 24 or 48 hours. Survival rate (%, leaf retention and emission (No. leaves /cutting, callus rate (% and rooting (% were evaluated. At the end of the experiment, were also evaluated fresh and dry weight of shoot and root, leaf number and leaf area. The experiment has a completely randomized design with three replications of ten plants per treatment for nom destructive and three replications of five plants per treatment for the destrutive parameters. The herbaceous cuttings were efficient to produce seedlings of Surinam cherry, particularly when using cuttings derived from seedlings in the absence of the immersion in water and exogenous auxin.

  12. Rhizogenic Induction in Adult Juglans regia L. cv. Serr Tissue Induced by Indole Butyric Acid and Agrobacterium rhizogenes Inducción Rizogénica en Tejido Adulto de Juglans regia L. cv. Serr Mediada por Ácido Indol Butírico y Agrobacterium rhizogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Sánchez-Olate

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro introduction of adult walnut (Juglans regia L. tissue represents an opportunity to clone elite genotypes whose selection occurs in advanced ontogenic states. With the purpose of developing a protocol to allow mass propagation of valuable genotypes from adult material, a comparison was made between two root induction systems of walnut microshoots of the fourth subculture of adult walnut tissue of an in vitro introduction program previously reinvigorated through traditional grafting. Rhizogenic induction by indole-3-butyric acid (IBA and Agrobacterium rhizogenes was used. The rhizogenic process was analyzed in two phases for both auxinic (T1: 3 mg L-1 IBA; T2: 5 mg L-1 IBA and A. rhizogenes inductions (T3: A-477; T4: A-478. The first phase of root induction was during 3 days in the dark while the second phase, root manifestation, was 27 days. Rooting percentage was evaluated and the induced root systems characterized (number, length, diameter, and root insertion zone in all the procedures. The best rooting results were obtained in T2, although the response obtained with A. rhizogenes didn’t differ from the T1 response. This appears to be an increasingly interesting methodology for adventitious rhizogenesis in this species.La introducción in vitro de tejido adulto de nogal (Juglans regia L. representa una oportunidad de clonación de genotipos elite, cuya selección ocurre en estados ontogénicos avanzados. Así, con el objeto de desarrollar un protocolo que permita la propagación masiva de genotipos valiosos a partir de material adulto, se compararon dos sistemas de inducción rizogénica de microtallos de nogal provenientes del cuarto subcultivo de un programa de introducción in vitro de tejido adulto de nogal, previamente revigorizado mediante injerto tradicional. Se utilizó la inducción rizogénica por ácido indol-3-butírico (AIB y Agrobacterium rhizogenes. El proceso rizogénico se analizó tanto para inducción aux

  13. Infusion of butyrate affects plasma glucose, butyrate, and ß-hydroxybutyrate but not plasma insulin in lactating dairy cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects on plasma metabolites and rumen measures when butyrate was infused into the rumen or abomasum of lactating cows. Jugular catheters were inserted into 5 ruminally fistulated Holstein cows (94.2 ± 26.3 days in milk [DIM]; 717 ± 45 kg body w...

  14. Modulation of fecal Clostridiales bacteria and butyrate by probiotic intervention with Lactobacillus paracasei DG varies among healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Chiara; Taverniti, Valentina; Milani, Christian; Fiore, Walter; Laureati, Monica; De Noni, Ivano; Stuknyte, Milda; Chouaia, Bessem; Riso, Patrizia; Guglielmetti, Simone

    2014-11-01

    The modulation of gut microbiota is considered to be the first target to establish probiotic efficacy in a healthy population. This study was conducted to determine the impact of a probiotic on the intestinal microbial ecology of healthy volunteers. High-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing was used to characterize the fecal microbiota in healthy adults (23-55 y old) of both sexes, before and after 4 wk of daily consumption of a capsule containing at least 24 billion viable Lactobacillus paracasei DG cells, according to a randomized, double-blind, crossover placebo-controlled design. Probiotic intake induced an increase in Proteobacteria (P = 0.006) and in the Clostridiales genus Coprococcus (P = 0.009), whereas the Clostridiales genus Blautia (P = 0.036) was decreased; a trend of reduction was also observed for Anaerostipes (P = 0.05) and Clostridium (P = 0.06). We also found that the probiotic effect depended on the initial butyrate concentration. In fact, participants with butyrate >100 mmol/kg of wet feces had a mean butyrate reduction of 49 ± 21% and a concomitant decrease in the sum of 6 Clostridiales genera, namely Faecalibacterium, Blautia, Anaerostipes, Pseudobutyrivibrio, Clostridium, and Butyrivibrio (P = 0.021), after the probiotic intervention. In contrast, in participants with initial butyrate concentrations probiotic contributed to a 329 ± 255% (mean ± SD) increment in butyrate concomitantly with an ∼55% decrease in Ruminococcus (P = 0.016) and a 150% increase in an abundantly represented unclassified Bacteroidales genus (P = 0.05). The intake of L. paracasei DG increased the Blautia:Coprococcus ratio, which, according to the literature, can potentially confer a health benefit on the host. The probiotic impact on the microbiota and on short-chain fatty acids, however, seems to strictly depend on the initial characteristics of the intestinal microbial ecosystem. In particular, fecal butyrate concentrations could represent an important

  15. Butyrate, Neuroepigenetics and the Gut Microbiome: Can a High Fiber Diet Improve Brain Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Megan W.; Alim, Ishraq; Bultman, Scott J.; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2016-01-01

    As interest in the gut microbiome has grown in recent years, attention has turned to the impact of our diet on our brain. The benefits of a high fiber diet in the colon have been well documented in epidemiological studies, but its potential impact on the brain has largely been understudied. Here, we will review evidence that butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) produced by bacterial fermentation of fiber in the colon, can improve brain health. Butyrate has been extensively studied as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor but also functions as a ligand for a subset of G protein-coupled receptors and as an energy metabolite. These diverse modes of action make it well suited for solving the wide array of imbalances frequently encountered in neurological disorders. In this review, we will integrate evidence from the disparate fields of gastroenterology and neuroscience to hypothesize that the metabolism of a high fiber diet in the gut can alter gene expression in the brain to prevent neurodegeneration and promote regeneration. PMID:26868600

  16. Aggregation of larvae of the house cricket,Acheta domesticus (L.), by propionic acid present in the excreta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, I E; Steeves, E; Alli, I

    1983-09-01

    Acetic, propionic, butyric, isobutyric, valeric, and isovaleric acids have been identified in extracts of the excreta of the house cricket,Acheta domesticus (L.), by gas-liquid chromatography. Solutions of propionic acid applied to filter paper aggregated 1- to 2-week-old larvae, while solutions of acetic, butyric, valeric, and isovaleric acids were without effect.

  17. Importance of release location on the mode of action of butyrate derivatives in the avian gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moquet, P.C.A.; Onrust, L.; Immerseel, Van F.; Ducatelle, R.; Hendriks, W.H.; Kwakkel, R.P.

    2016-01-01

    In the field of animal nutrition, butyrate is used as a zootechnical ingredient and can be used as an unprotected salt or in the form of protected derivatives such as butyrate glycerides or butyrate-loaded matrices. Dietary butyrate supplementation has been shown to improve growth performance and

  18. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaro, Christopher, E-mail: cchiaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Lazarova, Darina L., E-mail: dlazarova@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Bordonaro, Michael, E-mail: mbordonaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulates butyrate's effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulation of butyrate's effects differ by cell context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G{sub 1} to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that

  19. Structure and properties of oil palm-based nanocellulose reinforced chitosan nanocomposite for efficient synthesis of butyl butyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Nursyafiqah; Chandren, Sheela; Attan, Nursyafreena; Mahat, Naji Arafat; Razak, Fazira Ilyana Abdul; Jamalis, Joazaizulfazli; Wahab, Roswanira Abdul

    2017-11-15

    In this study, nanocellulose (NC) was successfully extracted from oil palm frond leaves (OPFL) using a combination of bleaching, alkaline treatment and acid hydrolysis. X-ray diffractogram revealed the extracted NC was crystalline with a crystallinity index of 70.2%. This indicates its suitability as nano-fillers for preparing the chitosan/nanocellulose (CS-NC) supports to immobilize Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) to produce the CRL/CS-NC biocatalysts. FTIR, FESEM and TGA characterizations of the CRL/CS-NC confirm the CRLs were successfully conjugated to the CS-NC supports. The air-dried CS-NC supports gave satisfactory immobilization of the CRLs (5.2mg/g) with the resultant CRL/CS-NCs catalysed conversions of ≥80% of butyl butyrate within 6h. Time course reaction profile revealed that 76.3% butyl butyrate conversion was achieved at 4h immobilization time using 3mg/mL of CRL/CS-NCs. NMR analyses on the purified butyl butyrate confirmed that the ester was successfully synthesized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Contribution of C. beijerinckii and C. sporogenes in association with C. tyrobutyricum to the butyric fermentation in Emmental type cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bourhis, Anne-Gaëlle; Doré, Joël; Carlier, Jean-Philippe; Chamba, Jean-François; Popoff, Michel-Robert; Tholozan, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-25

    The relationship between C. tyrobutyricum, C. sporogenes and C. beijerinckii in experimental cheese conditions, and their influences on late-blowing and butyric fermentation, have been investigated. A molecular approach using a PCR-TTGE method in combination with conventional methods, such as microbiological and physico-chemical analysis, was performed to monitor the evolution of these clostridial species, simultaneously with the occurrence of cheese defects. Sixteen Emmental type cheeses were produced from milk inoculated with different clostridial spore associations. In all cheeses inoculated with C. tyrobutyricum, obvious signs of late blowing were detected. In cheeses inoculated with C. beijerinckii or C. sporogenes, a formation of holes in cheese body was observed, with a concomitant slight amount of butyric acid production. Even though C. beijerinckii and C. sporogenes were less metabolically active and less numerically important than C. tyrobutyricum in cheese as shown by TTGE profiles, the association of these species to C. tyrobutyricum enhanced the butyric fermentation and the cheese defects. The level of butyric content in ripened cheese increased to 268 mg 100 g(-1) in presence of C. tyrobutyricum, and reached a maximum of 414 mg 100 g(-1) in presence of the C. beijerinckii-C. tyrobutyricum (1:10) association. The propionic fermentation was also higher in cheese inoculated with C. tyrobutyricum, and was slowed down in presence of C. beijerinckii and C. sporogenes. From 30 days of ripening, a strong correlation between the chemical contents and the intensity of cheese defects was demonstrated. A chemical analysis of cheese associated with a molecular method for microbial spoilage investigation allows the prediction of the level of late blowing at early stages of ripening, and the understanding of the origin of the defect.

  1. Biological effects of propionic acid in humans; metabolism, potential applications and underlying mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Lahham, Sa'ad H.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Roelofsen, Han; Vonk, Roel J.; Venema, Koen

    2010-01-01

    Undigested food is fermented in the colon by the microbiota and gives rise to various microbial metabolites. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), including acetic, propionic and butyric acid, are the principal metabolites produced However, most of the literature focuses on butyrate and to a lesser extent

  2. Síntese do butirato de n-butila empregando lipase microbiana imobilizada em copolímero de estireno-divinilbenzeno Synthesis of butyl butyrate by microbial lipase immobilized onto styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Carlos de Oliveira

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the reaction parameters of an immobilized lipase in the esterification reaction of n-butanol and butyric acid. Microbial lipase from Candida rugosa was immobilized onto styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer (STY-DVB and subsequently introduced in an organic medium containing substrates in appropriate concentrations. Heptane was selected as solvent on the basis of its compatibility with the resin and the enzyme. The influence of molar ratio of acid to alcohol, amount of immobilized lipase and temperature on the butyl butyrate formation was determined. The results were compared with those achieved with free lipase and Lipozyme (commercially immobilized lipase under the same operational conditions.

  3. Polyvinyl butyral based solid polymeric electrolytes. Preliminary studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopal, Shaleen; Ramchandran, R.; Agnihotry, Rashmi S.A. [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India)

    1996-01-08

    A series of solid polymeric electrolytes has been prepared based on Polyvinyl Butyral (PVB) with different proportions of LiI salt. These polymeric electrolytes showed high ionic conductivity, which has been investigated as a function of the LiI concentration. The highest conductivity was seen at weight proportions 1:0.15 for PVB:LiI. An electrochromic device fabricated using this polymeric electrolyte showed good switching

  4. Butyrate absorption and lactate secretion in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, H; Holtug, K; Jeppesen, P B

    1995-01-01

    .12. Despite normal butyrate absorption, sodium absorption was compromised in active ulcerative colitis (11.5 +/- 1.4 mumol/cm2/h) compared with quiescent (15.4 +/- 1.0 mumol/cm2/h) and controls (18.7 +/- 0.8 mumol/cm2/h) (P = 0.0006). Mucosal secretion of L-lactate was minimal in both healthy controls...

  5. In Vitro Digestion and Fermentation of Microencapsulated Tributyrin for the Delivery of Butyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Joseph D; Bauer, Laura; Fahey, George C; Lee, Youngsoo

    2017-06-01

    Butyrate possesses negative sensory qualities and is most effectively utilized in the intestine to provide energy to the colonocyte for the maintenance of intestinal health. Butyrate has also shown promise in the treatment of intestinal disorders and diseases such as short bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, and colon cancer. To modify sensory properties, intestinal release, and butyrate production capabilities, tributyrin (TB) was microencapsulated in whey protein isolate (WPI)-based and gamma-cyclodextrin (GC)-based materials. Using an in vitro digestion and fermentation model, microcapsules containing TB were monitored for their release and production of butyrate in vitro. All samples containing TB showed limited butyrate release (butyrate with no significant differences (P > 0.05) across formulations. During the fermentation phase, GC-based microcapsules produced significantly more butyrate (P Butyrate production increased significantly (P fermentation. The GC-based TB encapsulation systems were able to effectively deliver butyrate to the small intestine and generate butyrate in the large intestine. These microcapsules may, therefore, be beneficial for the maintenance of intestinal health and improvement of disease states across all areas of the gastrointestinal tract. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  6. Extractive Fermentation of Lactic Acid in Lactic Acid Bacteria Cultivation: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Majdiah; Ariff, Arbakariya B.; Rios-Solis, Leonardo; Halim, Murni

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are industrially important microorganisms recognized for their fermentative ability mostly in their probiotic benefits as well as lactic acid production for various applications. Nevertheless, lactic acid fermentation often suffers end-product inhibition which decreases the cell growth rate. The inhibition of lactic acid is due to the solubility of the undissociated lactic acid within the cytoplasmic membrane and insolubility of dissociated lactate, which causes acidification of cytoplasm and failure of proton motive forces. This phenomenon influences the transmembrane pH gradient and decreases the amount of energy available for cell growth. In general, the restriction imposed by lactic acid on its fermentation can be avoided by extractive fermentation techniques, which can also be exploited for product recovery. PMID:29209295

  7. Extractive Fermentation of Lactic Acid in Lactic Acid Bacteria Cultivation: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Majdiah; Ariff, Arbakariya B; Rios-Solis, Leonardo; Halim, Murni

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are industrially important microorganisms recognized for their fermentative ability mostly in their probiotic benefits as well as lactic acid production for various applications. Nevertheless, lactic acid fermentation often suffers end-product inhibition which decreases the cell growth rate. The inhibition of lactic acid is due to the solubility of the undissociated lactic acid within the cytoplasmic membrane and insolubility of dissociated lactate, which causes acidification of cytoplasm and failure of proton motive forces. This phenomenon influences the transmembrane pH gradient and decreases the amount of energy available for cell growth. In general, the restriction imposed by lactic acid on its fermentation can be avoided by extractive fermentation techniques, which can also be exploited for product recovery.

  8. Extractive Fermentation of Lactic Acid in Lactic Acid Bacteria Cultivation: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majdiah Othman

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria are industrially important microorganisms recognized for their fermentative ability mostly in their probiotic benefits as well as lactic acid production for various applications. Nevertheless, lactic acid fermentation often suffers end-product inhibition which decreases the cell growth rate. The inhibition of lactic acid is due to the solubility of the undissociated lactic acid within the cytoplasmic membrane and insolubility of dissociated lactate, which causes acidification of cytoplasm and failure of proton motive forces. This phenomenon influences the transmembrane pH gradient and decreases the amount of energy available for cell growth. In general, the restriction imposed by lactic acid on its fermentation can be avoided by extractive fermentation techniques, which can also be exploited for product recovery.

  9. Effect of the Butyrate Prodrug Pivaloyloxymethyl Butyrate (AN9) on a Mouse Model for Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jonathan D; Butchbach, Matthew E R

    2016-11-29

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an early-onset motor neuron disease that leads to loss of muscle function. Butyrate (BA)-based compounds markedly improve the survival and motor phenotype of SMA mice. In this study, we examine the protective effects of the BA prodrug pivaloyloxymethyl butyrate (AN9) on the survival of SMNΔ7 SMA mice. Oral administration of AN9 beginning at PND04 almost doubled the average lifespan of SMNΔ7 SMA mice. AN9 treatment also increased the growth rate of SMNΔ7 SMA mice when compared to vehicle-treated SMNΔ7 SMA mice. In conclusion, BA prodrugs like AN9 have ameliorative effects on SMNΔ7 SMA mice.

  10. Acyl-CoA reductase PGN_0723 utilizes succinyl-CoA to generate succinate semialdehyde in a butyrate-producing pathway of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yasuo; Sato, Mitsunari; Kezuka, Yuichiro; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Nagano, Keiji; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-04-15

    The molecular basis of butyrate production in Porphyromonas gingivalis has not been fully elucidated, even though butyrate, a short chain fatty acid (SCFA), can exert both beneficial and harmful effects on a mammalian host. A database search showed that the amino acid sequence of PGN_0723 protein was 50.6% identical with CoA-dependent succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) in Clostridium kluyveri. By contrast, the protein has limited identity (19.1%) with CoA-independent SSADH in Escherichia coli. Compared with the wild type, growth speed, and final turbidity were lower in the PGN_0723 deletion strain that was constructed by replacing the PGN_0723 gene with an erythromycin resistance cassette. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry revealed the supernatant concentrations of the SCFAs butyrate, isobutyrate, and isovalerate, but not propionate, in the PGN_0723 deletion strain were also lower than those in the wild type. The wild-type phenotype was restored in a complemented strain. We cloned the PGN_0723 gene, purified the recombinant protein, and computationally constructed its three-dimensional model. A colorimetric assay and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that the recombinant PGN_0723 produces succinate semialdehyde, which is an intermediate in the P. gingivalis butyrate synthesis pathway, not from succinate but from succinyl-CoA in the presence of NAD(P)H via a ping-pong bi-bi mechanism. Asn110Ala and Cys239Ala mutations resulted in a significant loss of the CoA-dependent PGN_0723 enzymatic activity. The study provides new insights into butyrate production, which constitutes a virulence factor in P. gingivalis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Volatile Fatty Acids and Trimethylamine on Denitrification in Activated Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eilersen, Ann Marie; Henze, Mogens; Kløft, Lene

    1995-01-01

    mM for isovaleric and 105 mM for caproic acid. KI values for nitrite reduction were found to be 196 mM for propionic, 32 mM for isobutyric, 57 mM for n-valeric, 18 mM for isovaleric and 110 mM for caproic acid. Inhibition of the rate of hydrolysis could not be determined. Anaerobically treated...... wastewaters from fish, potato and onion industries all stimulated denitrification. Reject water from anaerobic treatment of excess sludge had no significant effect on the denitrification processes. For isobutyric, isovaleric and n-valeric acid the undissociated compounds appear to act as the inhibitor...

  12. Regulation of T-type calcium channel expression by sodium butyrate in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Erika M; Zamora, Francis J; Puplampu-Dove, Yvonne A; Kiessu, Ezechielle; Hearne, Jennifer L; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel

    2015-02-15

    Several cellular mechanisms contribute to the neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer cells, including exposure to sodium butyrate (NaBu), a naturally occurring salt of the short chain fatty acid n-butyric acid. NaBu belongs to a class of histone deacetylase inhibitors with potential anticancer function. T-type calcium channel expression constitutes an important route for calcium influx in tumor cells that may trigger changes in cell proliferation and differentiation. In this work we investigated the role NaBu on the differentiation of lymph node carcinoma of the prostate (LNCaP) cells and its effect on T-type Ca(2+) channel expression. NaBu stimulates the morphological and molecular differentiation of LNCaP cells. Stimulation of LNCaP cells with NaBu evokes a significant increase in the expression of the Cav3.2 T-type channel subunits. Furthermore, the increased Cav3.2 expression promotes membrane insertion of T-type Ca(2+) channels capable of generating fast inactivating Ca(2+) currents, sensitive to 100μM Ni(2+) ions. Inhibition of T-type Ca(2+) channel function reduces the outgrowth of neurite-like processes in LNCaP cells. NaBu-evoked expression of T-type Ca(2+) channels is also involved in the regulation of cell viability. Inhibition of T-type Ca(2+) channels causes a significant reduction in the viability of LNCaP cells treated with 1mM NaBu, suggesting that Ca(2+) influx via T-type channels can promote cell proliferation. However, increased expression of T-type Ca(2+) channels enhanced the cytotoxic effect of thapsigargin and paclitaxel on cell proliferation. These findings demonstrate that NaBu stimulates T-type Ca(2+) channel expression, thereby regulating both the morphological differentiation and growth of prostate cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Enraizamento de estacas, crescimento e respostas anatômicas de mudas clonais de cacaueiro ao ácido indol-3-butírico Stem cutting rooting, growth and anatomical responses of cacao tree clonal changes to the indole-3-butyric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto José dos Santos Júnior

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se os efeitos do ácido indol-3-butírico (AIB no crescimento e na morfologia interna de quatro clones de Theobroma cacao (CCN-10, CP-53, PS-1319 e CA-1.4. O AIB foi aplicado na base da estaca de caule, em talco inerte, nas concentrações de 2; 4; 6 e 8 g kg-1, juntamente com o controle (sem AIB. A avaliação do crescimento de raízes, caule e folhas dos quatro clones foi realizada aos 160 dias após o estaqueamento (DAE para todas as concentrações de AIB, período também em que se realizou a coleta de material para os estudos anatômicos dos diversos órgãos, mas somente para a concentração de 4g kg-1 AIB e o controle. O clone CA-1.4 apresentou incremento na biomassa seca de raiz (BSR com o aumento das concentrações de AIB, ao passo que, nos demais clones, houve diminuições de BSR a partir dos 4 g kg-1 AIB. O mesmo fato foi observado para a biomassa seca de caule (BSC e de folha (BSF, exceto para a BSC do CCN-10 que não respondeu ao incremento das concentrações de AIB. Houve aumento de área foliar total para os clones CP-53 e PS-1319 com o incremento de AIB até 4 g kg-1, enquanto o aumento do número de folhas ocorreu somente para os clones CA-1.4 e CP-53 até as concentrações 8 e 4 g kg-1 AIB, respectivamente. Houve diminuição do número de estacas mortas para os clones CA-1.4 e CCN-10 até 8 g kg-1 de AIB e para o CP-53 até 4 g kg-1 de AIB. As melhores concentrações de AIB para o enraizamento de estacas de ramos dos clones de cacaueiros CP-53, PS-1319 e CCN-10 foram de 4, 4 e 6 g kg-1 AIB, respectivamente, enquanto para o clone CA-1.4 foi de 8 g kg-1 AIB; o aumento da concentração de AIB promoveu mudanças anatômicas nos órgãos vegetativos de todos os clones, influenciando na atividade do câmbio vascular e induzindo a formação de um maior número de raízes adventícias nas estacas.The effects of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA on growth and internal morphology of four clones of Theobroma cacao (CCN-10, CP

  14. Unstructured Models for Lactic Acid Fermentation – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Bouguettoucha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To describe a microbial process, two kinds of models can be developed, structured and unstructured models. Contrary to structured models, which take into account some basic aspects of cell structure, their function and composition, no physiological characterization of cells is considered in unstructured models, which only consider total cellular concentration. However, in spite of their simplicity, unstructured models have proven to accurately describe lactic acid fermentation in a wide range of experimental conditions and media. A partial link between cell growth and production, namely the Luedeking and Piret model, is mostly considered by the authors. Culture pH is the main parameter to be considered for model development. Acidic pH leads to inhibitory concentrations of undissociated lactic acid, the main inhibitory component, which causes cessation of growth and then production. On the other hand, pH control at optimal value for LAB growth allows to overcome product inhibition (by the total lactic acid produced or its undissociated part; hence nutritional limitations have to be considered for model development. Nitrogen is mainly involved in cessation of growth, owing to the fastidious nutritional requirements of LAB, while lactic acid production ceased when carbon was exhausted from the medium. The lack of substrate inhibition when usual concentrations of carbon substrate are used should be noted.

  15. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiaro, Christopher; Lazarova, Darina L.; Bordonaro, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. ► Tcf3 modulates butyrate’s effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. ► Tcf3 modulation of butyrate’s effects differ by cell context. ► Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. ► Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G 1 to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that prevent or reverse butyrate resistance.

  16. Inflammation-Induced Downregulation of Butyrate Uptake and Oxidation Is Not Caused by a Reduced Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesmans, Leen; Ramakers, Meine; Arijs, Ingrid; Windey, Karen; Vanhove, Wiebe; Schuit, Frans; Rutgeerts, Paul; Verbeke, Kristin; De Preter, Vicky

    2015-02-01

    In ulcerative colitis (UC) the butyrate metabolism is impaired, leading to energy-deficiency in the colonic cells. The effect of inflammation on the butyrate metabolism was investigated. HT-29 cells were incubated with pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and/or IFN-γ) for 1 and 24 h. Cells were additionally stimulated with butyrate to investigate its anti-inflammatory potential. Butyrate uptake and oxidation were measured using (14)C-labeled butyrate. Gene expression of the butyrate metabolism enzymes, interleukin 8 (IL-8; inflammatory marker) and villin-1 (VIL-1; epithelial cell damage marker) was measured via quantitative RT-PCR. Significantly increased IL-8 expression and decreased VIL-1 expression after 24 h incubation with TNF-α and/or IFN-γ confirmed the presence of inflammation. These conditions induced a decrease of both butyrate uptake and oxidation, whereas the gene expression was not reduced. Simultaneous incubation with butyrate counteracted the reduced butyrate oxidation. In contrast, 1 h incubation with TNF-α induced a significant increased IL-8 expression and decreased butyrate uptake. Incubation with TNF-α and/or IFN-γ for 1 h did not induce cell damage nor influence butyrate oxidation. The inflammation-induced downregulation of the butyrate metabolism was not caused by a reduced gene expression, but appeared consequential to a decreased butyrate uptake. Increasing the luminal butyrate levels might have therapeutic potential in UC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Comparing nonsynergistic gamma models with interaction models to predict growth of emetic Bacillus cereus when using combinations of pH and individual undissociated acids as growth-limiting factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesta-Peters, E.G.; Reij, M.W.; Gorris, L.G.M.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    A combination of multiple hurdles to limit microbial growth is frequently applied in foods to achieve an overall level of protection. Quantification of hurdle technology aims at identifying synergistic or multiplicative effects and is still being developed. The gamma hypothesis states that

  18. Thermal decomposition of lanthanum(III) butyrate in argon atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grivel, J.-C., E-mail: jean@dtu.dk [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Zhao, Y.; Tang, X.; Pallewatta, P.G.P.A. [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Watenphul, A.; Zimmermann, M. von [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-08-20

    Highlights: • The dehydration of La(C{sub 3}H{sub 7}CO{sub 2}){sub 3}·xH{sub 2}O takes place between 50 °C and 120 °C. • La(C{sub 3}H{sub 7}CO{sub 2}){sub 3} melts at 180 °C. • The decomposition of La(C{sub 3}H{sub 7}CO{sub 2}){sub 3} to La{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} involves a meta-butyrate intermediate. • CO{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 7}COC{sub 3}H{sub 7} (4-heptanone) are released between 250 °C and 350 °C. • La{sub 2}O{sub 3} is formed as a final decomposition product. - Abstract: The thermal decomposition of La(C{sub 3}H{sub 7}CO{sub 2}){sub 3}·xH{sub 2}O (x ≈ 0.82) was studied in argon during heating at 5 K/min. After the loss of bound H{sub 2}O, the anhydrous butyrate presents at 135 °C a phase transition to a mesophase, which turns to an isotropic liquid at 180 °C. The decomposition of the anhydrous butyrate is associated to a solidification process. The final decomposition to La{sub 2}O{sub 3} takes place via two intermediate products: La{sub 2}O(C{sub 3}H{sub 7}CO{sub 2}){sub 4} and La{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} with release of CO{sub 2} and the symmetrical ketone C{sub 3}H{sub 7}COC{sub 3}H{sub 7}.

  19. Acetate and butyrate as substrates for hydrogen production through photo-fermentation: Process optimization and combined performance evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srikanth, S.; Venkata Mohan, S.; Prathima Devi, M.; Peri, Dinakar; Sarma, P.N. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Tarnaka, Hyderabad, AP 500 007 (India)

    2009-09-15

    Organic acids viz., acetate and butyrate were evaluated as primary substrates for the production of biohydrogen (H{sub 2}) through photo-fermentation process using mixed culture at mesophilic temperature (34 C). Experiments were performed by varying parameters like operating pH, presence/absence of initiator substrate (glucose) and vitamin solution, type of nitrogen source (mono sodium salt of glutamic acid and amino glutamic acid) and gas (nitrogen/argon) used to create anaerobic microenvironment. Experimental data showed the feasibility of H{sub 2} production along with substrate degradation utilizing organic acids as metabolic substrate but was found to be dependent on the process parameters evaluated. Maximum specific H{sub 2} production and substrate degradation were observed with acetic acid [3.51 mol/Kg COD{sub R}-day; 1.22 Kg COD{sub R}/m{sup 3}-day (92.96%)] compared to butyric acid [3.33 mol/Kg COD{sub R}-day; 1.19 Kg COD{sub R}/m{sup 3}-day (88%)]. Higher H{sub 2} yield was observed under acidophilic microenvironment in the presence of glucose (co-substrate), mono sodium salt of glutamic acid (nitrogen source) and vitamins. Argon induced microenvironment was observed to be effective compared to nitrogen induced microenvironment. Combined process efficiency viz., H{sub 2} production and substrate degradation was evaluated employing data enveloping analysis (DEA) methodology based on the relative efficiency. Integration of dark fermentation with photo-fermentation appears to be an economically viable route for sustainable biohydrogen production if wastewater is used as substrate. (author)

  20. Zinc Sensing Receptor Signaling, Mediated by GPR39, Reduces Butyrate-Induced Cell Death in HT29 Colonocytes via Upregulation of Clusterin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Limor; Azriel-Tamir, Hagit; Arotsker, Natan; Sekler, Israel; Hershfinkel, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Zinc enhances epithelial proliferation, protects the digestive epithelial layer and has profound antiulcerative and antidiarrheal roles in the colon. Despite the clinical significance of this ion, the mechanisms linking zinc to these cellular processes are poorly understood. We have previously identified an extracellular Zn2+ sensing G-protein coupled receptor (ZnR) that activates Ca2+ signaling in colonocytes, but its molecular identity as well as its effects on colonocytes' survival remained elusive. Here, we show that Zn2+, by activation of the ZnR, protects HT29 colonocytes from butyrate induced cell death. Silencing of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR39 expression abolished ZnR-dependent Ca2+ release and Zn2+-dependent survival of butyrate-treated colonocytes. Importantly, GPR39 also mediated ZnR-dependent upregulation of Na+/H+ exchange activity as this activity was found in native colon tissue but not in tissue obtained from GPR39 knock-out mice. Although ZnR-dependent upregulation of Na+/H+ exchange reduced the cellular acid load induced by butyrate, it did not rescue HT29 cells from butyrate induced cell death. ZnR/GPR39 activation however, increased the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein clusterin in butyrate-treated cells. Furthermore, silencing of clusterin abolished the Zn2+-dependent survival of HT29 cells. Altogether, our results demonstrate that extracellular Zn2+, acting through ZnR, regulates intracellular pH and clusterin expression thereby enhancing survival of HT29 colonocytes. Moreover, we identify GPR39 as the molecular moiety of ZnR in HT29 and native colonocytes. PMID:22545109

  1. Effects of lactation of ketogenesis from oleate or butyrate in rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelaw, E; Williamson, D H

    1977-01-01

    1. Rates of ketogenesis from endogenous butyrate or oleate were measured in isolated hepatocytes prepared from fed rats during different reproductive states [virgin, pregnant, early-lactating (2-4 days) and peak-lactating (10-17 days)]. In the peak-lactation group there was a decrease (25%) in the rate of ketogenesis from butyrate, but there were no differences in the rates between the other groups. Wth oleate, the rate of ketogenesis was increased in the pregnant and in the early-lactation groups compared with the virgin group, whereas the rate was 50% lower in the peak-lactation group. 2. Experiments with [1-(14)C]oleate indicated that these differences in rates of ketogenesis were not due to alterations in the rate of oleate utilization, but to changes in the amount of oleoyl-CoA converted into ketone bodies. 3. Although the addition of carnitine increased the rates of ketogenesis from oleate in all groups of rats, it did not abolish the differences between the groups. 4. Measurements of the accumulation of glucose and lactate showed that hepatocytes from rats at peak lactation had a higher rate of glycolytic flux than did hepatocytes from the other groups. After starvation, the rate of ketogenesis from oleate was still lower in the peak-lactation group compared with the control group. This suggests that the alteration in ketogenic capacity in the former group is not merely due to a higher glycolytic flux. 5. It is concluded that livers from rats at peak lactation have a lower capacity to produce ketone bodies from long-chain fatty acids which is due to an alteration in the partitioning of long-chain acyl-CoA esters between the pathways of triacylglycerol synthesis and beta-oxidation. The physiological relevance of this finding is discussed. PMID:883950

  2. Role of rumen butyrate in regulation of nitrogen utilization and urea nitrogen kinetics in growing sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, U; Hu, Q; Baldwin, R L; Bequette, B J

    2015-05-01

    Butyrate, a major rumen VFA, has been indirectly linked to enhancement of urea recycling on the basis of increased expression of urea transporter in the rumen epithelia of steers fed a rumen butyrate-enhancing diet. Two studies were conducted to quantify the effect of elevated rumen butyrate concentrations on N balance, urea kinetics and rumen epithelial proliferation. Wether sheep (n= 4), fitted with a rumen cannula, were fed a pelleted ration (∼165 g CP/kg DM, 10.3 MJ ME/kg DM) at 1.8 × ME requirement. In Exp. 1, sheep were infused intraruminally with either an electrolyte buffer solution (Con-Buf) or butyrate dissolved in the buffer solution (But-Buf) during 8-d periods in a balanced crossover design. In Exp. 2, sheep were infused intraruminally with either sodium acetate (Na-Ac) or sodium butyrate (Na-But) for 9 d. All solutions were adjusted to pH 6.8 and 8.0 in Exp. 1 and 2, respectively, and VFA were infused at 10% of ME intake. [15N2] urea was continuously infused intravenously for the last 5 d of each period, and total urine and feces were collected. In Exp. 1, 2H5-phenylalanine was continuously infused intravenously over the last 12 h, after which a biopsy from the rumen papillae was taken for measurement of fractional protein synthesis rate (FSR). Butyrate infusion treatments increased (P = 0.1 in Exp. 1; P butyrate, and acetate infusion increased (P butyrate in urea recycling and its effects on rumen papillae protein turnover in growing lambs. Under the feeding conditions used and the rate of continuous butyrate infusion into the rumen in the present studies, butyrate does not affect overall N retention in growing sheep. However, butyrate may play a role in the redistribution of urea N fluxes in the overall scheme of N metabolism.

  3. Cultures of human colonic epithelial cells isolated from endoscopical biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Effect of IFNgamma, TNFalpha and IL-1beta on viability, butyrate oxidation and IL-8 secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, G; Saermark, T; Bendtzen, K

    2000-01-01

    nontransformed colonic epithelial cells. We investigated the effects of TNFalpha, IFNgamma and IL-1beta on viability, short chain fatty acid (butyrate) oxidation and IL-8 secretion in human colonic epithelial cell cultures in vitro obtained from macroscopically normal mucosa from IBD patients and controls...... to TNFalpha + IFNgamma exposure (median 74%) compared to cells from controls (median 58 %) (P Butyrate oxidation, as measured by entrapment of 14CO2, was not inhibited in cells exposed to TNFalpha + IFNgamma, neither from controls (median 112%) nor from IBD patients (median 108%), suggesting...

  4. Optimization of Enzymatically Prepared Hexyl Butyrate by Lipozyme IM-77

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Wei Chang

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hexyl butyrate, a green note flavour compound, is widely used in the food industry. The ability of immobilised lipase (Lipozyme IM-77 from Rhizomucor miehei to catalyse the transesterification of hexanol and tributyrin was investigated in this study. Response surface methodology (RSM and five-level-five-factor central composite rotatable design (CCRD were employed to evaluate the effects of synthesis parameters, such as reaction time (2 to 10 h, temperature (25 to 65 °C, enzyme amount (10 to 50 %, substrate amount (in mol ratio of tributyrin to hexanol (1:1 to 3:1, and added water content (0 to 20 %, on percentage amount (in mol conversion of hexyl butyrate by transesterification. Reaction time and enzyme amount were the most important variables and substrate amount (in mol ratio had less effect on the percentage of amount (in mol conversion. Based on canonical analysis, the optimum synthesis conditions were: reaction time 8.3 h, temperature 50 °C, enzyme amount 42.7 %, substrate amount (in mol ratio 1.8:1, and added water 12.6 %. The predicted value was 96.2 % and actual experimental value 95.3 % of the amount (in mol conversion.

  5. Assessment of heterologous butyrate and butanol pathway activity by measurement of intracellular pathway intermediates in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Curt R; Tseng, Hsien-Chung; Tai, Mitchell; Prather, Kristala L J; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2010-09-01

    In clostridia, n-butanol production from carbohydrates at yields of up to 76% of the theoretical maximum and at titers of up to 13 g/L has been reported. However, in Escherichia coli, several groups have reported butyric acid or butanol production from recombinant expression of clostridial genes, at much lower titers and yields. To pinpoint deficient steps in the recombinant pathway, we developed an analytical procedure for the determination of intracellular pools of key pathway intermediates and applied the technique to the analysis of three sets of E. coli strains expressing various combinations of butyrate biosynthesis genes. Low expression levels of the hbd-encoded S-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase were insufficient to convert acetyl-CoA to 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA, indicating that hbd was a rate-limiting step in the production of butyryl-CoA. Increasing hbd expression alleviated this bottleneck, but in resulting strains, our pool size measurements and thermodynamic analysis showed that the reaction step catalyzed by the bcd-encoded butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase was rate-limiting. E. coli strains expressing both hbd and ptb-buk produced crotonic acid as a byproduct, but this byproduct was not observed with expression of related genes from non-clostridial organisms. Our thermodynamic interpretation of pool size measurements is applicable to the analysis of other metabolic pathways.

  6. Butyrate induced changes in Wnt-signaling specific gene expression in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarova, Darina L; Chiaro, Christopher; Bordonaro, Michael

    2014-04-09

    We have determined that butyrate, which is derived from the fermentation of dietary fiber in the colonic lumen, hyperactivates Wnt activity in colorectal (CRC) cells, and that this upregulation of Wnt signaling is causatively related to the induction of apoptosis. To better understand the genetic program regulated by butyrate-mediated Wnt hyperactivation, we performed total human genome microarray analyses on HCT-116 CRC cells in the presence or absence of a physiologically relevant concentration of butyrate. To evaluate changes in Wnt-specific gene expression, Wnt activity was suppressed with inducible dominant negative Tcf4 (DN-Tcf4). Six biological replicates of a full human genome microarray were performed, and the data deposited into the Gene Expression Omnibus database, according to Minimum Information About A Microarray Experiment standards. Reporter assay and western blot data confirm that DN-Tcf4 is expressed at high levels in stably transfected HCT-116 cells upon cotreatment with doxycycline and butyrate, and that these cells exhibit a marked repression of butyrate-mediated Wnt hyperactivation. Analysis of six biological replicates of microarray analyses indicated that 1008 genes are modulated by butyrate (>two-fold, P butyrate. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the response of CRC cells to butyrate in vitro may assist in determining more effective preventive and therapeutic strategies against CRC.

  7. Cereal fibre sources that enchance the production and plasma concentrations of enterrolignans and butyrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach Knudsen, Knud Erik; Serena, Anja; Adlercreutz, H

    2007-01-01

    Enterolactone (ENL), the main enteroligans, is formed by microbial fermentation in the gut from lignans, and butyrate from fermentation of non-digestibles carbohydrates.......Enterolactone (ENL), the main enteroligans, is formed by microbial fermentation in the gut from lignans, and butyrate from fermentation of non-digestibles carbohydrates....

  8. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  9. Bioinformatic dissecting of TP53 regulation pathway underlying butyrate-induced histone modification in epigenetic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butyrate affects cell proliferation, differentiation and motility. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. TP53 is one of the most active upstream regulators discovered by IPA in our RNA sequencing data set. The TP53 signaling pathway pl...

  10. Protective effects of butyrate on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yingli; Qian, Jianmin; Lu, Qingyang; Tian, Yaqiang; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Butyrate is normally fermented from undigested fiber by intestinal microflora. The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of butyrate and its underlying mechanisms on intestinal injury in a rat model of ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to warm ischemia for 45 min by clamping the superior mesenteric artery after treatment with butyrate, followed by 6 and 72 h of reperfusion. Pathologic histology analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunofluorescence, and Western blot were performed. Butyrate preconditioning markedly improved intestinal injury. The inflammatory factor levels and leukocyte infiltration were attenuated by butyrate. Butyrate also maintained the intestinal barrier structures, increased the expression of tight junction proteins, and decreased endotoxin translocation. We conclude that butyrate administration attenuates intestinal I/R injury, which is associated with preservation of intestinal tight junction barrier function and suppression of inflammatory cell infiltration in the intestinal mucosa. This suggests butyrate as a potential strategy to prevent intestinal I/R injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential Cellular and Molecular Effects of Butyrate and Trichostatin A on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasturi Ranganna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, butyrate and trichostatin A (TSA, are epigenetic histone modifiers and proliferation inhibitors by downregulating cyclin D1, a positive cell cycle regulator, and upregulating p21Cip1 and INK family of proteins, negative cell cycle regulators. Our recent study indicated cyclin D1 upregulation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC that are proliferation-arrested by butyrate. Here we investigate whether cyclin D1 upregulation is a unique response of VSMC to butyrate or a general response to HDAC inhibitors (HDACi by evaluating the effects of butyrate and TSA on VSMC. While butyrate and TSA inhibit VSMC proliferation via cytostatic and cytotoxic effects, respectively, they downregulate cdk4, cdk6, and cdk2, and upregulate cyclin D3, p21Cip1 and p15INK4B, and cause similar effects on key histone H3 posttranslational modifications. Conversely, cyclin D1 is upregulated by butyrate and inhibited by TSA. Assessment of glycogen synthase 3-dependent phosphorylation, subcellular localization and transcription of cyclin D1 indicates that differential effects of butyrate and TSA on cyclin D1 levels are linked to disparity in cyclin D1 gene expression. Disparity in butyrate- and TSA-induced cyclin D1 may influence transcriptional regulation of genes that are associated with changes in cellular morphology/cellular effects that these HDACi confer on VSMC, as a transcriptional modulator.

  12. Butyrate inhibits pro-proliferative miR-92a by diminishing c-Myc-induced miR-17-92a cluster transcription in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shien; Liu, Lan; Chang, Eugene B; Wang, Jian-Ying; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2015-10-13

    Compromised colonic butyrate production resulting from low dietary fiber or altered gut microbiota may promote colon neoplasia. Previous reports indicate these actions are mediated in part by altered levels of miRNAs, including suppressed expression of the oncogenic miR-17-92a cluster. Here, we sought to identify the mechanisms underlying these effects of butyrate in colon cancer. miR-92a levels were measured in archived human colon cancer and adjacent normal colon specimens by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR). The effects of butyrate and other histone deacetylase inhibitors (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and valproic acid) on primary (pri-miR17-92a), precursor and mature miR-92a were analyzed in HCT-116 and HT-29 human colon cancer cells using qPCR. The effects of butyrate, SAHA and valproic acid on protein levels of c-Myc, Drosha and p57 were measured in HCT-116 cells using immunoblotting. Regulation of C13orf25 promoter activity by butyrate was analyzed by luciferase reporter assay using modified pGL3 constructs containing a wild-type or mutated c-Myc binding site. Expression of c-Myc was modulated using siRNA or adenovirus vectors. p57 mRNA and protein were measured before and after transfection with miR-92a-mimic molecules. Following butyrate treatment and miR-92a-mimic transfection, apoptosis was analyzed by TUNEL staining and caspase-3 immunoblotting. Microarray, confirmed by qPCR, revealed a seven-fold increase in miR-92a levels in sporadic human colon cancer tissue compared to adjacent normal colon. Treating human colon cancer cells with butyrate reduced the levels of pri-miR17-92a, precursor and mature miR-92a, as well as c-Myc. SAHA and valproic acid had similar effects. Mutation of the c-Myc binding site diminished butyrate's inhibitory effects on C13orf25 promoter activity. Silencing c-Myc expression reduced miR-92a levels. c-Myc over-expression neutralized butyrate-induced attenuation of pri-miR17-92a. Exogenous miR-92a inhibited

  13. Iron Modulates Butyrate Production by a Child Gut Microbiota In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostal, Alexandra; Lacroix, Christophe; Bircher, Lea; Pham, Van Thanh; Follador, Rainer; Zimmermann, Michael Bruce; Chassard, Christophe

    2015-11-17

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of iron (Fe) availability on butyrate production in the complex bacterial ecosystem of the human gut. Hence, different Fe availabilities were mimicked in an in vitro colonic fermentation model (the polyfermenter intestinal model called PolyFermS) inoculated with immobilized gut microbiota from a child and in batch cultures of the butyrate producer Roseburia intestinalis. Shifts in the microbial community (16S rRNA sequencing and quantitative PCR), metabolic activity (high-performance liquid chromatography), and expression of genes involved in butyrate production were assessed. In the PolyFermS, moderate Fe deficiency resulted in a 1.4-fold increase in butyrate production and a 5-fold increase in butyryl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase gene expression, while very strong Fe deficiency significantly decreased butyrate concentrations and butyrate-producing bacteria compared with the results under normal Fe conditions. Batch cultures of R. intestinalis grown in a low-Fe environment preferentially produced lactate and had reduced butyrate and hydrogen production, in parallel with upregulation of the lactate dehydrogenase gene and downregulation of the pyruvate:ferredoxin-oxidoreductase gene. In contrast, under high-Fe conditions, R. intestinalis cultures showed enhanced butyrate and hydrogen production, along with increased expression of the corresponding genes, compared with the results under normal-Fe conditions. Our data reveal the strong regulatory effect of Fe on gut microbiota butyrate producers and on the concentrations of butyrate, which contributes to the maintenance of host gut health. Fe deficiency is one of the most common nutritional deficiencies worldwide and can be corrected by Fe supplementation. In this in vitro study, we show that environmental Fe concentrations in a continuous gut fermentation model closely mimicking a child's gut microbiota strongly affect the composition of the gut

  14. Combined effects of starvation and butyrate on autophagy-dependent gingival epithelial cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M; Murofushi, T; Tsuda, H; Mikami, Y; Zhao, N; Ochiai, K; Kurita-Ochiai, T; Yamamoto, M; Otsuka, K; Suzuki, N

    2017-06-01

    Bacteria in the dental biofilm surrounding marginal gingival grooves cause periodontal diseases. Numerous bacteria within the biofilm consume nutrients from the gingival crevicular fluid. Furthermore, some gram-negative bacteria in mature dental biofilms produce butyrate. Thus, gingival epithelial cells in close proximity to mature dental biofilms are at risk of both starvation and exposure to butyrate. In the present study, we determined the combined effects of starvation and butyrate exposure on gingival epithelial cell death and the underlying mechanisms. The Ca9-22 cell line was used as an in vitro counterpart of gingival epithelial cells. Cell death was measured as the amount of total DNA in the dead cells using SYTOX Green dye, which penetrates through membranes of dead cells and emits fluorescence when it intercalates into double-stranded DNA. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity, the amount of autophagy, and acetylation of histone H3 were determined using western blot. Gene expression levels of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3b (lc3b) were determined using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Butyrate-induced cell death occurred in a dose-dependent manner whether cells were starved or fed. However, the induction of cell death was two to four times higher when cells were placed under starvation conditions compared to when they were fed. Moreover, both starvation and butyrate exposure induced AMPK activity and autophagy. While AMPK inactivation resulted in decreased autophagy and butyrate-induced cell death under conditions of starvation, AMPK activation resulted in butyrate-induced cell death when cells were fed. Combined with the results of our previous report, which demonstrated butyrate-induced autophagy-dependent cell death, the results of this study suggest that the combination of starvation and butyrate exposure activates AMPK inducing autophagy and subsequent cell death. Notably, this combination markedly

  15. Phylogenetic diversity of cultivalble butyrate-producing bacteria from pig gut content and feces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaoqiong; Højberg, Ole; Canibe, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a preferred energy source for colonocytes and is considered crucial for maintaining colonic health in humans and animals. To investigate the diversity of cultivable butyrate-producing bacteria in pig gut, bacteria were isolated from intestinal digesta (Exp. 1) and feces (Exp. 2......) of finishers. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, 2,762 isolates were categorized into 122 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Representative isolates of 31 OTUs produced butyrate. Complete 16S rRNA gene sequences of the 31 OTUs were subjected to phylogenetic analysis, and based on a level of ... sequence similarity with their nearest validly named neighbors, 15 of the OTUs appeared to represent novel species. The abundance of the cultivable butyrate-producing community was 8.3%, 10.7%, 17.2%, and 7.0% in the ileum, cecum, colon, and feces, respectively. Butyrate producers within clostridial...

  16. Effect of propionic acid on citric acid fermentation in an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Bao, Jia-Wei; Su, Xian-Feng; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Zeng, Xin; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2016-03-01

    In this study, an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process was established to solve the problem of wastewater treatment in citric acid production. Citric acid wastewater was treated through anaerobic digestion and then the anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) was further treated and recycled for the next batch citric acid fermentation. This process could eliminate wastewater discharge and reduce water resource consumption. Propionic acid was found in the ADE and its concentration continually increased in recycling. Effect of propionic acid on citric acid fermentation was investigated, and results indicated that influence of propionic acid on citric acid fermentation was contributed to the undissociated form. Citric acid fermentation was inhibited when the concentration of propionic acid was above 2, 4, and 6 mM in initial pH 4.0, 4.5 and, 5.0, respectively. However, low concentration of propionic acid could promote isomaltase activity which converted more isomaltose to available sugar, thereby increasing citric acid production. High concentration of propionic acid could influence the vitality of cell and prolong the lag phase, causing large amount of glucose still remaining in medium at the end of fermentation and decreasing citric acid production.

  17. Hypoxia and Inactivity Related Physiological Changes (Constipation, Inflammation Are Not Reflected at the Level of Gut Metabolites and Butyrate Producing Microbial Community: The PlanHab Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Šket

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We explored the assembly of intestinal microbiota in healthy male participants during the run-in (5 day and experimental phases [21-day normoxic bed rest (NBR, hypoxic bedrest (HBR], and hypoxic ambulation (HAmb in a strictly controlled laboratory environment, balanced fluid, and dietary intakes, controlled circadian rhythm, microbial ambiental burden, and 24/7 medical surveillance. The fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2 and partial pressure of inspired O2 (PiO2 were 0.209 and 133.1 ± 0.3 mmHg for NBR and 0.141 ± 0.004 and 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg for both hypoxic variants (HBR and HAmb; ~4,000 m simulated altitude, respectively. A number of parameters linked to intestinal transit spanning Bristol Stool Scale, defecation rates, zonulin, α1-antitrypsin, eosinophil derived neurotoxin, bile acids, reducing sugars, short chain fatty acids, total soluble organic carbon, water content, diet composition, and food intake were measured (167 variables. The abundance, structure, and diversity of butyrate producing microbial community were assessed using the two primary bacterial butyrate synthesis pathways, butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase (but and butyrate kinase (buk genes. Inactivity negatively affected fecal consistency and in combination with hypoxia aggravated the state of gut inflammation (p < 0.05. In contrast, gut permeability, various metabolic markers, the structure, diversity, and abundance of butyrate producing microbial community were not significantly affected. Rearrangements in the butyrate producing microbial community structure were explained by experimental setup (13.4%, experimentally structured metabolites (12.8%, and gut metabolite-immunological markers (11.9%, with 61.9% remaining unexplained. Many of the measured parameters were found to be correlated and were hence omitted from further analyses. The observed progressive increase in two immunological intestinal markers suggested that the transition from healthy physiological state toward

  18. Short chain fatty acids exchange: Is the cirrhotic, dysfunctional liver still able to clear them?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, J.G.; Olde Damink, S.W.M.; Venema, K.; Buurman, W.A.; Jalan, R.; Dejong, C.H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background & aims: Prebiotics are increasingly used to improve gut integrity. A presumed mechanism of their beneficial action is the synthesis of short chain fatty acids (SCFA: acetate, propionate and butyrate). High systemic concentrations of propionate and butyrate are toxic and can adversely

  19. Butyrate plays differential roles in cellular signaling in cancerous HCT116 and noncancerous NCM460 colon cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects in colon. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate at the cellular level remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate plays differential roles in cancerous and non-cancerous cells through si...

  20. Butyrate inhibits cancerous HCT116 cell proliferation but to a lesser extent in noncancerous NCM460 colon cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects on colon cancer development. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate at the cellular level remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate inhibits cancerous cell proliferation but to a lesser...

  1. Positron labeled phorbol ester: synthesis method for ''non-carrier added'' phorbol 13-[1-11C] butyrate using ketene reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imahori, Yoshio; Fujii, Ryou; Nakahashi, Hisamitsu; Ido, Tatsuo; Hirakawa, Kimiyoshi

    1989-01-01

    A new method was developed to synthesize positron labeled phorbol esters for second messenger imaging based on a receptor binding to protein kinase C. [1- 11 C]propyl ketene was produced by the pyrolytic decomposition of [1- 11 C]butyric acid. This new method was made possible by the reaction of [1- 11 C]propyl ketene to the hydroxyl group of phorbol under the non-carrier added conditions. The precursor protected in the 20-hydroxyl group of phorbol was acylated by [1- 11 C]propyl ketene to the 13-hydroxyl group producing phorbol 13-[1- 11 C]butyrate ([ 11 C]P13Bu). Total synthesis time was about 60 minutes and the specific activity was greater than 67 GBq/μmol (1800 mCi/μmol). [ 11 C ]P13Bu will prove to be a useful ligand for PET studies due to the simple procedures required for synthesis. (author)

  2. Invited review: Use of butyrate to promote gastrointestinal tract development in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górka, P; Kowalski, Z M; Zabielski, R; Guilloteau, P

    2018-03-07

    Promotion of microbial butyrate production in the reticulorumen is a widely used method for enhancing forestomach development in calves. Additional acceleration of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) development, both the forestomach and lower parts of the GIT (e.g., abomasum, intestine, and also pancreas), can be obtained by dietary butyrate supplementation. For this purpose, different sources (e.g., butyrate salts or butyrins), forms (e.g., protected or unprotected), methods (e.g., in liquid feed or solid feed), and periods (e.g., before or after weaning) of butyrate administration can be used. The aim of this paper was to summarize the knowledge in the field of butyrate supplementation in feeds for newborn calves in practical situations, and to suggest directions of future studies. It has been repeatedly shown that supplementation of unprotected salts of butyrate (primarily sodium salt) in milk replacer (MR) stimulates the rumen, small intestine, and pancreas development in calves, with a supplementation level equating to 0.3% of dry matter being sufficient to exert the desired effect on both GIT development and growth performance. On the other hand, the effect of unprotected butyrins and protected forms of butyrate supplementation in MR has not been extensively investigated, and few studies have documented the effect of butyrate addition into whole milk (WM), with those available focusing mainly on the growth performance of animals. Protected butyrate supplementation at a low level (0.3% of protected product in DM) in solid feed was shown to have a potential to enhance GIT development and performance of calves fed MR during the preweaning period. Justification of this form of butyrate supplementation in solid feed when calves are fed WM or after weaning needs to be documented. After weaning, inclusion of unprotected butyrate salts in solid feed was shown to increase solid feed intake, but the effect on GIT development and function has not been determined in detail

  3. [Pharmacological study on hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 21-propionate (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otomo, S; Higuchi, S; Nakaike, S; Takeshita, K; Tanaka, M; Gotoh, Y; Osada, Y; Tsuchida, K; Inoue, K; Kyogoku, K; Tarumoto, Y; Sasajima, M; Ohzeki, M

    1981-12-01

    The topical and systemic anti-inflammatory activities of hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 21-propionate (HBP) were studied. The systemic anti-inflammatory activities of HBP and reference steroids were examined for their effects on dinitrochlorobenzene dermatitis, carrageenin edema, cotton pellet granuloma and adjuvant arthritis in rats and by the delayed allergic edema test in mice. The topical anti-inflammatory activities of these steroids were examined for their effects on croton oil dermatitis, croton oil ear edema, carrageenin edema and cotton pellet granuloma in rats. Furthermore, effects of these steroids on liver glycogen deposition in mice, thymolysis, and decrease of serum corticosterone level in rats were examined. Systemically administered HBP was less potent than betamethasone 17-valerate (BV), but was almost equal to hydrocortisone 17-butyrate (HB) in anti-inflammatory activity, and its effects on liver glycogen deposition, thymolysis, and the decrease of serum corticosterone level. However, the topical anti-inflammatory activity of HBP was more potent than that of BV and HB, although in the same experiment, thymolytic activity of HBP was less potent than that of BV, but was almost equal to HB. The inhibitory effect of HBP on hypotonic induced hemolysis was weaker than that of BV, but was stronger than that of HB in vitro. The affinity of HBP was higher than that of BV and HB to polymorphonuclear leucocytes used as the inflammatory cells in vitro. On the other hand no marked difference was observed in the affinity to erythrocytes used as the non-inflammatory cells in vitro. These results suggest that HBP is a useful drug which has superior topical anti-inflammatory activity, but has a weak systemic effect.

  4. Genotype-dependency of butyrate efficacy in children with congenital chloride diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canani, Roberto Berni; Terrin, Gianluca; Elce, Ausilia; Pezzella, Vincenza; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Pedrolli, Annalisa; Centenari, Chiara; Amato, Felice; Tomaiuolo, Rossella; Calignano, Antonio; Troncone, Riccardo; Castaldo, Giuseppe

    2013-12-19

    Congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by life-long, severe diarrhea with intestinal Cl- malabsorption. It results from a reduced activity of the down regulated in adenoma exchanger (DRA), due to mutations in the solute carrier family 26, member 3 (SLC26A3) gene. Currently available therapies are not able to limit the severity of diarrhea in CLD. Conflicting results have been reported on the therapeutic efficacy of oral butyrate. We investigated the effect of oral butyrate (100 mg/kg/day) in seven CLD children with different SLC26A3 genotypes. Nasal epithelial cells were obtained to assess the effect of butyrate on the expression of the two main Cl- transporters: DRA and putative anion transporter-1 (PAT-1). A variable clinical response to butyrate was observed regarding the stool pattern and fecal ion loss. The best response was observed in subjects with missense and deletion mutations. Variable response to butyrate was also observed on SLC26A3 (DRA) and SLC26A6 (PAT1) gene expression in nasal epithelial cells of CLD patients. We demonstrate a genotype-dependency for butyrate therapeutic efficacy in CLD. The effect of butyrate is related in part on a different modulation of the expression of the two main apical membrane Cl- exchangers of epithelial cells, members of the SLC26 anion family. Australian New Zealand Clinical trial Registry ACTRN12613000450718.

  5. Flow Cytometry Analysis of Cell Cycle and Specific Cell Synchronization with Butyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cong-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable in many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. We explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells and we characterize the properties of butyrate-induced cell cycle arrest. The site of growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest was analyzed using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and flow cytometry analyses. Exposure of MDBK cells to 10 mM butyrate caused growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest in a reversible manner. Butyrate affected the cell cycle at a specific point both immediately after mitosis and at a very early stage of the G1 phase. After release from butyrate arrest, MDBK cells underwent synchronous cycles of DNA synthesis and transited through the S phase. It takes at least 8 h for butyrate-induced G1-synchronized cells to begin the progression into the S phase. One cycle of cell division for MDBK cells is about 20 h. By combining BrdU incorporation and DNA content analysis, not only can the overlapping of different cell populations be eliminated, but the frequency and nature of individual cells that have synthesized DNA can be determined.

  6. Butyrate modulates antioxidant enzyme expression in malignant and non-malignant human colon tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahns, Franziska; Wilhelm, Anne; Jablonowski, Nadja; Mothes, Henning; Greulich, Karl Otto; Glei, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The induction of antioxidant enzymes is an important mechanism in colon cancer chemoprevention, but the response of human colon tissue to butyrate, a gut fermentation product derived from dietary fiber, remains largely unknown. Therefore, our study investigated the effect of a butyrate treatment on catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in matched human colon tissues of different transformation stages (n = 3-15 in each group) ex vivo. By performing quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot, and spectrophotometric measurements, we found an increase in SOD2 at expression and activity level in colonic adenocarcinomas (mRNA: 1.96-fold; protein: 1.41-fold, activity: 1.8-fold; P butyrate (10 mM) resulted in a significant increase (P butyrate against H2 O2 -mediated DNA damage. Despite a significantly lowered SOD2 transcript (0.51-fold, P butyrate exposure of normal colon cells, the catalytic activity was significantly enhanced (1.19-fold, P butyrate were observed. Furthermore, both enzymes showed an age-dependent decrease in activity in normal colon epithelium (CAT: r = -0.49, P = 0.09; SOD2: r = -0.58, P = 0.049). In conclusion, butyrate exhibited potential antioxidant features ex vivo but cellular consequences need to be investigated more in depth. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Genes and Gut Bacteria Involved in Luminal Butyrate Reduction Caused by Diet and Loperamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakwon Hwang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Unbalanced dietary habits and gut dysmotility are causative factors in metabolic and functional gut disorders, including obesity, diabetes, and constipation. Reduction in luminal butyrate synthesis is known to be associated with gut dysbioses, and studies have suggested that restoring butyrate formation in the colon may improve gut health. In contrast, shifts in different types of gut microbiota may inhibit luminal butyrate synthesis, requiring different treatments to restore colonic bacterial butyrate synthesis. We investigated the influence of high-fat diets (HFD and low-fiber diets (LFD, and loperamide (LPM administration, on key bacteria and genes involved in reduction of butyrate synthesis in mice. MiSeq-based microbiota analysis and HiSeq-based differential gene analysis indicated that different types of bacteria and genes were involved in butyrate metabolism in each treatment. Dietary modulation depleted butyrate kinase and phosphate butyryl transferase by decreasing members of the Bacteroidales and Parabacteroides. The HFD also depleted genes involved in succinate synthesis by decreasing Lactobacillus. The LFD and LPM treatments depleted genes involved in crotonoyl-CoA synthesis by decreasing Roseburia and Oscilllibacter. Taken together, our results suggest that different types of bacteria and genes were involved in gut dysbiosis, and that selected treatments may be needed depending on the cause of gut dysfunction.

  8. Genes and Gut Bacteria Involved in Luminal Butyrate Reduction Caused by Diet and Loperamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Nakwon; Eom, Taekil; Gupta, Sachin K; Jeong, Seong-Yeop; Jeong, Do-Youn; Kim, Yong Sung; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Sadowsky, Michael J; Unno, Tatsuya

    2017-11-28

    Unbalanced dietary habits and gut dysmotility are causative factors in metabolic and functional gut disorders, including obesity, diabetes, and constipation. Reduction in luminal butyrate synthesis is known to be associated with gut dysbioses, and studies have suggested that restoring butyrate formation in the colon may improve gut health. In contrast, shifts in different types of gut microbiota may inhibit luminal butyrate synthesis, requiring different treatments to restore colonic bacterial butyrate synthesis. We investigated the influence of high-fat diets (HFD) and low-fiber diets (LFD), and loperamide (LPM) administration, on key bacteria and genes involved in reduction of butyrate synthesis in mice. MiSeq-based microbiota analysis and HiSeq-based differential gene analysis indicated that different types of bacteria and genes were involved in butyrate metabolism in each treatment. Dietary modulation depleted butyrate kinase and phosphate butyryl transferase by decreasing members of the Bacteroidales and Parabacteroides . The HFD also depleted genes involved in succinate synthesis by decreasing Lactobacillus . The LFD and LPM treatments depleted genes involved in crotonoyl-CoA synthesis by decreasing Roseburia and Oscilllibacter . Taken together, our results suggest that different types of bacteria and genes were involved in gut dysbiosis, and that selected treatments may be needed depending on the cause of gut dysfunction.

  9. Dissociation and homoconjugation equilibria of some acids and bases in N,N-dimethylformamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roletto, E; Vanni, A

    1977-01-01

    The following monoprotic acids have been studied in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF): p-toluenesulphonic acid; 2,6-dichlorobenzoic acid; 2,5-dichlorophenol; the anilinium ion; the N-methyl-anilinium ion. The first dissociation step of malonic and succinic acids has also been studied. Dissociation and homoconjugation constants have been determined potentiometrically, at 25 degrees , in buffer solutions containing either the acid and its tetraethylammonium salt or the base and its picrate. Homoconjugation equilibria between unchanged acid and univalent conjugate base have been found not only for benzoic acid and phenol derivatives, but also between undissociated diprotic carboxylic acids and the corresponding monoanions, which are strongly intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded. Results are discussed with reference to previously published values.

  10. Induction of apoptosis by the medium-chain length fatty acid lauric acid in colon cancer cells due to induction of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauser, J K; Matthews, G M; Cummins, A G; Howarth, G S

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acids are classified as short-chain (SCFA), medium-chain (MCFA) or long-chain and hold promise as adjunctive chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of colorectal cancer. The antineoplastic potential of MCFA remains underexplored; accordingly, we compared the MCFA lauric acid (C12:0) to the SCFA butyrate (C4:0) in terms of their capacity to induce apoptosis, modify glutathione (GSH) levels, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), and modify phases of the cell cycle in Caco-2 and IEC-6 intestinal cell lines. Caco-2 and IEC-6 cells were treated with lauric acid, butyrate, or vehicle controls. Apoptosis, ROS, and cell cycle analysis were determined by flow cytometry. GSH availability was assessed by enzymology. Lauric acid induced apoptosis in Caco-2 (p lauric acid reduced GSH availability and generated ROS compared to butyrate (p Lauric acid reduced Caco-2 and IEC-6 cells in G0/G1and arrested cells in the S and G2/M phases. Lauric acid induced apoptosis in IEC-6 cells compared to butyrate (p lauric acid induced high levels of ROS compared to butyrate. Compared to butyrate, lauric acid displayed preferential antineoplastic properties, including induction of apoptosis in a CRC cell line.

  11. Butyrate-induced proapoptotic and antiangiogenic pathways in EAT cells require activation of CAD and downregulation of VEGF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belakavadi, Madesh; Prabhakar, B.T.; Salimath, Bharathi P.

    2005-01-01

    Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced in the colon, induces cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in transformed cell lines. In this report, we study the effects of butyrate (BuA) on the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells in vivo. BuA, when injected intraperitoneally (i.p) into mice, inhibited proliferation of EAT cells. Further, induction of apoptosis in EAT cells was monitored by nuclear condensation, annexin-V staining, DNA fragmentation, and translocation of caspase-activated DNase into nucleus upon BuA-treatment. Ac-DEVD-CHO, a caspase-3 inhibitor, completely inhibited BuA-induced apoptosis, indicating that activation of caspase-3 mediates the apoptotic pathway in EAT cells. The proapoptotic effect of BuA also reflects on the antiangiogenic pathway in EAT cells. The antiangiogenic effect of BuA in vivo was demonstrated by the downregulation of the secretion of VEGF in EAT cells. CD31 immunohistochemical staining of peritoneum sections clearly indicated a potential angioinhibitory effect of BuA in EAT cells. These results suggest that BuA, besides regulating other fundamental cellular processes, is able to modulate the expression/secretion of the key angiogenic growth factor VEGF in EAT cells

  12. Adipic acid tolerance screening for potential adipic acid production hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Emma; Mapelli, Valeria; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2017-02-01

    Biobased processes for the production of adipic acid are of great interest to replace the current environmentally detrimental petrochemical production route. No efficient natural producer of adipic acid has yet been identified, but several approaches for pathway engineering have been established. Research has demonstrated that the microbial production of adipic acid is possible, but the yields and titres achieved so far are inadequate for commercialisation. A plausible explanation may be intolerance to adipic acid. Therefore, in this study, selected microorganisms, including yeasts, filamentous fungi and bacteria, typically used in microbial cell factories were considered to evaluate their tolerance to adipic acid. Screening of yeasts and bacteria for tolerance to adipic acid was performed in microtitre plates, and in agar plates for A. niger in the presence of adipic acid over a broad range of concentration (0-684 mM). As the different dissociation state(s) of adipic acid may influence cells differently, cultivations were performed with at least two pH values. Yeasts and A. niger were found to tolerate substantially higher concentrations of adipic acid than bacteria, and were less affected by the undissociated form of adipic acid than bacteria. The yeast exhibiting the highest tolerance to adipic acid was Candida viswanathii, showing a reduction in maximum specific growth rate of no more than 10-15% at the highest concentration of adipic acid tested and the tolerance was not dependent on the dissociation state of the adipic acid. Tolerance to adipic acid was found to be substantially higher among yeasts and A. niger than bacteria. The explanation of the differences in adipic acid tolerance between the microorganisms investigated are likely related to fundamental differences in their physiology and metabolism. Among the yeasts investigated, C. viswanathii showed the highest tolerance and could be a potential host for a future microbial cell factory for adipic acid.

  13. Economics of feeding drinking water containing organic acids to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A feeding trial was conducted to determine the economic effect of acidifying drinking water of broiler chickens with organic acids. The organic acids were acetic, butyric, citric and formic acids, each offered at 0.25%. The control did not contain any of the acids. One hundred and fifty (150) day old AborAcre - plus chicks were ...

  14. Tsukamurella sp. E105 as a new biocatalyst for highly enantioselective hydrolysis of ethyl 2-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl) butyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Junyao; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Pu; Wang, Nengqiang

    2012-09-01

    A new bacterial strain, E105, has been introduced as a biocatalyst for the enantioselective hydrolysis of ethyl (R,S)-2-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl) butyrate, (R,S)-1, to (S)-2-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl) butyric acid, (S)-2. This strain was isolated from 60 soil samples using (R,S)-1 as the sole carbon source. The isolate was identified as Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens E105, based on its morphological characteristics, physiological tests, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The process of cell growth and hydrolase production for this strain was then investigated. The hydrolase activity reached its maximum after cultivation at 200 rpm and 30 °C for 36 h. Furthermore, the performance of the enantioselective hydrolysis of (R,S)-1 was studied. The optimal reaction temperature, initial pH, substrate concentration, and concentration of suspended cells were 30 °C, 6.8, 10 and 30 g/l (DCW), respectively. Under these conditions, a high conversion (>45 %) of the product (S)-2 with an excellent enantiomeric excess (ee) (>99 %), and a satisfied enantiomeric ratio (E) (>600) as well were obtained. This study showed that the bacterial isolate T. tyrosinosolvens E105 displayed a high enantioselectivity towards the hydrolysis of racemic ethyl 2-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl) butyrate.

  15. Protein kinase Cγ in colon cancer cells: Expression, Thr514 phophorylation and sensitivity to butyrate-mediated upregulation as related to the degree of differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garczarczyk, Dorota; Szeker, Krisztina; Galfi, Peter; Csordas, Adam; Hofmann, Johann

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes are expressed and activated in a cell type-specific manner, and play an essential role in tissue-specific signal transduction. The presence of butyrate at millimolar concentrations in the colon raises the question of whether it affects the expression of PKC isoenzymes in the different cell types of the colonic epithelium. We investigated the protein expression levels of PKCγ, Thr514-phosphorylated PKCγ (pPKCγ-Thr514), and their subcellular distribution as affected by butyrate in a set of colon cancer cell lines. Thr514-phosphorylation of de novo synthesized PKCγ is the first step in priming of the inactive PKCγ before its release into the cytoplasm. For immunoblot analysis, we employed three antibodies, one against an unmodified sequence, mapping within 50 amino acids at its C-terminus, a second against pPKCγ-Thr514, and a third against pPKCγ-pan-Thr514. The antibody against an unmodified C-terminal peptide epitope did not recognize pPKCγ-Thr514, suggesting that phosphorylation at this site interferes with the binding of the antibody to the C-terminus. Marked butyrate-induced upregulation of PKCγ occurred in HT29 cells (colonocyte stem cells) and HT29-derived cell lines. However, in Caco2 and IEC-18 cells (differentiated intestinal epithelial cells), PKCγ was insensitive to upregulation, and present exclusively as pPKCγ-Thr514. Lovo and SW480 expressed higher levels of PKCγ. In HT29 cells, butyrate-induced upregulation of the non-phosphorylated PKCγ was observed in both the membrane and cytosolic fraction. In Caco2 cells, the Thr514-phosphorylated form was present at high levels in both fractions. The presence of unphosphorylated PKCγ in HT29 cells, and its complete absence in Caco2 cells demonstrates a cell type-dependent differential coupling of Thr514-phosphorylation with de novo synthesis of PKCγ in colon cancer cells. PMID:20188713

  16. Physico-chemical study of erbium, thulium ytterbium and lutetium butyrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loginova, V.E.; Dvornikova, L.M.; Khazov, L.A.; Rubinshtejn, A.S.

    1975-01-01

    Er-Lu butyrates have been obtained. The crystals of the obtained salts had an identical shape of combinations of hexagonal prisms and pyramids. The values of the refraction index, measured by the method of circular screening and use of immersion liquids, were found to be close to each other in all the salts considered. The densities of the crystallohydrates of rare earth element butyrates, measured by the pycnometric method in isooctane, increases in the order of Er, Tm, Lu: 1.73; 1.74; 1.79 g/cm 3 , respectively. Infrared spectra of rare earth element butyrates were studied, and the main ware frequencies of maximum absorption were determined with a view of finding the character of the bond between the metal and the anion. A thermo-differential and a thermo-gravimetric investigation of rare earth element butyrates was carried out

  17. CaCO3supplementation alleviates the inhibition of formic acid on acetone/butanol/ethanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Gaoxiang; Xiong, Lian; Lin, Xiaoqing; Huang, Chao; Li, Hailong; Chen, Xuefang; Chen, Xinde

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the inhibiting effect of formic acid on acetone/butanol/ethanol (ABE) fermentation and explain the mechanism of the alleviation in the inhibiting effect under CaCO 3 supplementation condition. From the medium containing 50 g sugars l -1 and 0.5 g formic acid l -1 , only 0.75 g ABE l -1 was produced when pH was adjusted by KOH and fermentation ended prematurely before the transformation from acidogenesis to solventogenesis. In contrast, 11.4 g ABE l -1 was produced when pH was adjusted by 4 g CaCO 3 l -1 . The beneficial effect can be ascribed to the buffering capacity of CaCO 3 . Comparative analysis results showed that the undissociated formic acid concentration and acid production coupled with ATP and NADH was affected by the pH buffering capacity of CaCO 3 . Four millimole undissociated formic acid was the threshold at which the transformation to solventogenesis occurred. The inhibiting effect of formic acid on ABE fermentation can be alleviated by CaCO 3 supplementation due to its buffering capacity.

  18. CREB-binding protein, p300, butyrate, and Wnt signaling in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordonaro, Michael; Lazarova, Darina L

    2015-07-21

    This paper reviews the distinctive roles played by the transcriptional coactivators CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and cell physiology in colorectal cancer (CRC). Specifically, we focus on the effects of CBP- and p300-mediated Wnt activity on (1) neoplastic progression; (2) the activities of butyrate, a breakdown product of dietary fiber, on cell signaling and colonic cell physiology; (3) the development of resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis), including butyrate and synthetic HDACis, in colonic cells; and (4) the physiology and number of cancer stem cells. Mutations of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway initiate the majority of CRC cases, and we have shown that hyperactivation of this pathway by butyrate and other HDACis promotes CRC cell apoptosis. This activity by butyrate may in part explain the preventive action of fiber against CRC. However, individuals with a high-fiber diet may still develop neoplasia; therefore, resistance to the chemopreventive action of butyrate likely contributes to CRC. CBP or p300 may modify the ability of butyrate to influence colonic cell physiology since the two transcriptional coactivators affect Wnt signaling, and likely, its hyperactivation by butyrate. Also, CBP and p300 likely affect colonic tumorigenesis, as well as stem cell pluripotency. Improvement of CRC prevention and therapy requires a better understanding of the alterations in Wnt signaling and gene expression that underlie neoplastic progression, stem cell fate, and the development of resistance to butyrate and clinically relevant HDACis. Detailed knowledge of how CBP- and p300 modulate colonic cell physiology may lead to new approaches for anti-CRC prevention and therapeutics, particularly with respect to combinatorial therapy of CBP/p300 inhibitors with HDACis.

  19. Cyclic AMP synergizes with butyrate in promoting β-defensin 9 expression in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Lakshmi T; Zeng, Xiangfang; Curtis, Amanda R; Zhang, Guolong

    2014-02-01

    Host defense peptides (HDP) have both microbicidal and immunomodulatory properties. Specific induction of endogenous HDP synthesis has emerged as a novel approach to antimicrobial therapy. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and butyrate have been implicated in HDP induction in humans. However, the role of cAMP signaling and the possible interactions between cAMP and butyrate in regulating HDP expression in other species remain unknown. Here we report that activation of cAMP signaling induces HDP gene expression in chickens as exemplified by β-defensin 9 (AvBD9). We further showed that, albeit being weak inducers, cAMP agonists synergize strongly with butyrate or butyrate analogs in AvBD9 induction in macrophages and primary jejunal explants. Additionally, oral supplementation of forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase agonist in the form of a Coleus forskohlii extract, was found to induce AvBD9 expression in the crop of chickens. Furthermore, feeding with both forskolin and butyrate showed an obvious synergy in triggering AvBD9 expression in the crop and jejunum of chickens. Surprisingly, inhibition of the MEK-ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway augmented the butyrate-FSK synergy, whereas blocking JNK or p38 MAPK pathway significantly diminished AvBD9 induction in chicken macrophages and jejunal explants in response to butyrate and FSK individually or in combination. Collectively, these results suggest the potential for concomitant use of butyrate and cAMP signaling activators in enhancing HDP expression, innate immunity, and disease resistance in both animals and humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The histone deacetylase inhibitor butyrate improves metabolism and reduces muscle atrophy during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael E; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Qaisar, Rizwan; Sloane, Lauren; Rahman, Md M; Kinter, Michael; Van Remmen, Holly

    2015-12-01

    Sarcopenia, the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function during aging, is a major contributor to disability and frailty in the elderly. Previous studies found a protective effect of reduced histone deacetylase activity in models of neurogenic muscle atrophy. Because loss of muscle mass during aging is associated with loss of motor neuron innervation, we investigated the potential for the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor butyrate to modulate age-related muscle loss. Consistent with previous studies, we found significant loss of hindlimb muscle mass in 26-month-old C57Bl/6 female mice fed a control diet. Butyrate treatment starting at 16 months of age wholly or partially protected against muscle atrophy in hindlimb muscles. Butyrate increased muscle fiber cross-sectional area and prevented intramuscular fat accumulation in the old mice. In addition to the protective effect on muscle mass, butyrate reduced fat mass and improved glucose metabolism in 26-month-old mice as determined by a glucose tolerance test. Furthermore, butyrate increased markers of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and whole-body oxygen consumption without affecting activity. The increase in mass in butyrate-treated mice was not due to reduced ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. However, butyrate reduced markers of oxidative stress and apoptosis and altered antioxidant enzyme activity. Our data is the first to show a beneficial effect of butyrate on muscle mass during aging and suggests HDACs contribute to age-related muscle atrophy and may be effective targets for intervention in sarcopenia and age-related metabolic disease. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Antagonistic Effects of Sodium Butyrate and N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl-retinamide on Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Kuefer

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Butyrates and retinoids are promising antineoplastic agents. Here we analyzed effects of sodium butyrate and N-(4-hydroxyphenyl-retinamide (4-HPR on prostate cancer cells as monotherapy or in combination in vitro and in vivo. Sodium butyrate and 4-HPR induced concentration-dependent growth inhibition in prostate cancer cells in vitro. The isobologram analysis revealed that sodium butyrate and 4-HPR administered together antagonize effects of each other. For the in vivo studies, a water-soluble complex (4-HPR with a cyclodextrin was created. A single dose of sodium butyrate and 4-HPR showed a peak level in chicken plasma within 30 minutes. Both compounds induced inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis in xenografts of the chicken chorioallantoic membrane. Analysis of the cytotoxic effects of the drugs used in combination demonstrated an antagonistic effect on inhibition of proliferation and on induction of apoptosis. Prolonged jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation induced by sodium butyrate and 4-HPR was strongly attenuated when both compounds were used in combination. Both compounds induced inhibition of NF-κ,B. This effect was strongly antagonized in LNCaP cells when the compounds were used in combination. These results indicate that combinational therapies have to be carefully investigated due to potential antagonistic effects in the clinical setting despite promising results of a monotherapy.

  2. Activation of PPARγ is not involved in butyrate-induced epithelial cell differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, S.; Waechtershaeuser, A.; Loitsch, S.; Knethen, A. von; Bruene, B.; Stein, J.

    2005-01-01

    Histone deacetylase-inhibitors affect growth and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells by inducing expression of several transcription factors, e.g. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) or vitamin D receptor (VDR). While activation of VDR by butyrate mainly seems to be responsible for cellular differentiation, the activation of PPARγ in intestinal cells remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PPARγ in butyrate-induced cell growth inhibition and differentiation induction in Caco-2 cells. Treatment with PPARγ ligands ciglitazone and BADGE (bisphenol A diglycidyl) enhanced butyrate-induced cell growth inhibition in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas cell differentiation was unaffected after treatment with PPARγ ligands rosiglitazone and MCC-555. Experiments were further performed in dominant-negative PPARγ mutant cells leading to an increase in cell growth whereas butyrate-induced cell differentiation was again unaffected. The present study clearly demonstrated that PPARγ is involved in butyrate-induced inhibition of cell growth, but seems not to play an essential role in butyrate-induced cell differentiation

  3. Kinetic and thermodynamic control of butyrate conversion in non-defined methanogenic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junicke, H; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kleerebezem, R

    2016-01-01

    Many anaerobic conversions proceed close to thermodynamic equilibrium and the microbial groups involved need to share their low energy budget to survive at the thermodynamic boundary of life. This study aimed to investigate the kinetic and thermodynamic control mechanisms of the electron transfer during syntrophic butyrate conversion in non-defined methanogenic communities. Despite the rather low energy content of butyrate, results demonstrate unequal energy sharing between the butyrate-utilizing species (17 %), the hydrogenotrophic methanogens (9-10 %), and the acetoclastic methanogens (73-74 %). As a key finding, the energy disproportion resulted in different growth strategies of the syntrophic partners. Compared to the butyrate-utilizing partner, the hydrogenotrophic methanogens compensated their lower biomass yield per mole of electrons transferred with a 2-fold higher biomass-specific electron transfer rate. Apart from these thermodynamic control mechanisms, experiments revealed a ten times lower hydrogen inhibition constant on butyrate conversion than proposed by the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1, suggesting a much stronger inhibitory effect of hydrogen on anaerobic butyrate conversion. At hydrogen partial pressures exceeding 40 Pa and at bicarbonate limited conditions, a shift from methanogenesis to reduced product formation was observed which indicates an important role of the hydrogen partial pressure in redirecting electron fluxes towards reduced products such as butanol. The findings of this study demonstrate that a careful consideration of thermodynamics and kinetics is required to advance our current understanding of flux regulation in energy-limited syntrophic ecosystems.

  4. Chitin butyrate coated electrospun nylon-6 fibers for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Hem Raj; Kim, Han Joo; Bhatt, Lok Ranjan; Joshi, Mahesh Kumar; Kim, Eun Kyo; Kim, Jeong In; Abdal-hay, Abdalla; Hui, K. S.; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we describe the preparation and characterizations of chitin butyrate (CB) coated nylon-6 nanofibers using single-spinneret electrospinning of blends solution. The physicochemical properties of nylon-6 composite fibers with different proportions of CB to nylon-6 were determined using FE-SEM, TEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurement. FE-SEM and TEM images revealed that the nylon-6 and CB were immiscible in the as-spun nanofibers, and phase separated nanofiber morphology becomes more pronounced with increasing amounts of CB. The bone formation ability of composite fibers was evaluated by incubating in biomimetic simulated body fluid. In order to assay the cytocompatibility and cell behavior on the composite scaffolds, osteoblast cells were seeded on the matrix. Results suggest that the deposition of CB layer on the surface of nylon-6 could increase its cell compatibility and bone formation ability. Therefore, as-synthesized nanocomposite fibrous mat has great potentiality in hard tissue engineering.

  5. Favouring butyrate production for a new generation biofuel by acidogenic glucose fermentation using cells immobilised on γ-alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syngiridis, Kostas; Bekatorou, Argyro; Kandylis, Panagiotis; Larroche, Christian; Kanellaki, Maria; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2014-06-01

    The effect of γ-alumina as a fermentation advancing tool and as carrier for culture immobilisation, regarding VFAs and ethanol production during acidogenic fermentation of glucose, was examined at various process conditions (sugar concentration, pH) and operation modes (continuous with and without effluent recirculation and batch). The results showed that at high initial pH (8.9) the continuous acidogenic fermentation of glucose led to high yields of VFAs and favoured the accumulation of butyric acid. The batch process on the other hand at pH 6.5, favoured the ethanol-type fermentation. The results indicate that in the frame of technology development for new generation biofuels, using γ-alumina as a process advancing tool at optimum process conditions (pH, initial glucose concentration and mode of operation), the produced VFAs profile and ethanol concentration may be manipulated. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Diabetes Mellitus and Increased Tuberculosis Susceptibility: The Role of Short-Chain Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmandas, Ekta; van den Heuvel, Corina N A M; Damen, Michelle S M A; Cleophas, Maartje C P; Netea, Mihai G; van Crevel, Reinout

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus confers a threefold increased risk for tuberculosis, but the underlying immunological mechanisms are still largely unknown. Possible mediators of this increased susceptibility are short-chain fatty acids, levels of which have been shown to be altered in individuals with diabetes. We examined the influence of physiological concentrations of butyrate on cytokine responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Butyrate decreased Mtb-induced proinflammatory cytokine responses, while it increased production of IL-10. This anti-inflammatory effect was independent of butyrate's well-characterised inhibition of HDAC activity and was not accompanied by changes in Toll-like receptor signalling pathways, the eicosanoid pathway, or cellular metabolism. In contrast blocking IL-10 activity reversed the effects of butyrate on Mtb-induced inflammation. Alteration of the gut microbiota, thereby increasing butyrate concentrations, can reduce insulin resistance and obesity, but further studies are needed to determine how this affects susceptibility to tuberculosis.

  7. In vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption of calcium [1-(14)c]butyrate in free or protected forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David J; Barri, Adriana; Herges, Grant; Hahn, Joe; Yersin, Andrew G; Jourdan, Alissa

    2012-03-28

    Butyrate is a byproduct of microbial carbohydrate fermentation that occurs primarily in the large intestine. When added to feed, butyrate quickly disappears in the upper digestive tract. Because butyrate is important for epithelial cell development, mucosal integrity, and animal growth, an encapsulation technique has been developed that allows for the slow release of butyrate into the small and large intestines. The purpose of this study was to describe the in vitro release of calcium [1-(14)C]butyrate, formulated into a slow-release (protected) bead, into water and simulated intestinal fluids and to compare the in vivo absorption and disposition of unprotected versus protected calcium [1-(14)C]butyrate in broiler chicks. Formulation of calcium [1-(14)C]butyrate into protected beads allowed release of 5.8 ± 0.2 and 3.4 ± 0.2% of the formulated radiocarbon into water and gastric fluid, respectively, after 2 h of incubation. Beads incubated in gastric fluid for 2 h and subsequently incubated in simulated intestinal fluid released a total of 17.4 ± 0.8% of the formulated radioactivity. Release of respiratory [(14)C]CO(2) after oral dosing of aqueous calcium [1-(14)C]butyrate in broiler chicks peaked at 15.2 ± 5.2% per hour 1.5 h after dosing; in contrast, maximal rates of release in chicks dosed with protected calcium [1-(14)C]butyrate occurred 4 h after dosing at 9.0 ± 3.1% per hour. The data suggested an improved efficacy of protected butyrate delivery to intestinal tissues over nonprotected butyrate. This study confirmed that encapsulation strategies designed to enhance delivery of ingredients to improve intestinal health are effective at prolonging intestinal exposure to butyrate. Encapsulation of such ingredients might benefit the food and feed industries.

  8. Butyrate suppresses murine mast cell proliferation and cytokine production through inhibiting histone deacetylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanying; Du, Min; Yang, Qiyuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Beyond their nutritional impact to colonic epithelial cells, the intestinal microbiota metabolite butyrate has pleotropic effects to host cells and is known for its beneficial effects on intestinal homeostasis and metabolism. However, it remains unclear how it modulates mast cell function. Here, we demonstrate that butyrate profoundly inhibited proliferation of mouse mastocytoma P815 cells through inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, as well as decreasing c-Kit activation. In addition, butyrate increased early- and late-stage apoptotic P815 cells. In murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC), butyrate-suppressed FcεRI-dependent tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) release without affecting β-Hexosaminidase, but that was associated with decreased mitogen-activated protein kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases activation. Butyrate treatment substantially enhanced histone 3 acetylation in both P815 and BMMC and decreased FcεRI-dependent mRNA expression of tnf-α and il-6 in BMMC, mimicking the effect of Trichostatin A, a known histone deacetylase inhibitor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that butyrate enhanced acetylation of the tnf-α and il-6 promoter regions but blocked RNA polymerase II binding to the promoters of tnf-α and il-6 genes, indicating suppressed transcription initiation. These phenotypes mimicked those of Trichostatin A treatment. In conclusion, butyrate inhibits cell proliferation and increases cell apoptosis in mastocytoma P815 cells and suppresses FcεRI-dependent cytokine production in murine primary BMMC, which are likely mediated by HDAC inhibition. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Propolis Augments Apoptosis Induced by Butyrate via Targeting Cell Survival Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Eric; Bordonaro, Michael; Lee, Seon; Atamna, Wafa; Lazarova, Darina L.

    2013-01-01

    Diet is one of the major lifestyle factors affecting incidence of colorectal cancer (CC), and despite accumulating evidence that numerous diet-derived compounds modulate CC incidence, definitive dietary recommendations are not available. We propose a strategy that could facilitate the design of dietary supplements with CC-preventive properties. Thus, nutrient combinations that are a source of apoptosis-inducers and inhibitors of compensatory cell proliferation pathways (e.g., AKT signaling) may produce high levels of programmed death in CC cells. Here we report the combined effect of butyrate, an apoptosis inducer that is produced through fermentation of fiber in the colon, and propolis, a honeybee product, on CC cells. We established that propolis increases the apoptosis of CC cells exposed to butyrate through suppression of cell survival pathways such as the AKT signaling. The programmed death of CC cells by combined exposure to butyrate and propolis is further augmented by inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway. Analyses on the contribution of the downstream targets of JNK signaling, c-JUN and JAK/STAT, to the apoptosis of butyrate/propolis-treated CC cells ascertained that JAK/STAT signaling has an anti-apoptotic role; whereas, the role of cJUN might be dependent upon regulatory cell factors. Thus, our studies ascertained that propolis augments apoptosis of butyrate-sensitive CC cells and re-sensitizes butyrate-resistant CC cells to apoptosis by suppressing AKT signaling and downregulating the JAK/STAT pathway. Future in vivo studies should evaluate the CC-preventive potential of a dietary supplement that produces high levels of colonic butyrate, propolis, and diet-derived JAK/STAT inhibitors. PMID:24023824

  10. Sodium butyrate protects against severe burn-induced remote acute lung injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Liang

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1, a ubiquitous nuclear protein, drives proinflammatory responses when released extracellularly. It plays a key role as a distal mediator in the development of acute lung injury (ALI. Sodium butyrate, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, has been demonstrated to inhibit HMGB1 expression. This study investigates the effect of sodium butyrate on burn-induced lung injury. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: 1 sham group, sham burn treatment; 2 burn group, third-degree burns over 30% total body surface area (TBSA with lactated Ringer's solution for resuscitation; 3 burn plus sodium butyrate group, third-degree burns over 30% TBSA with lactated Ringer's solution containing sodium butyrate for resuscitation. The burned animals were sacrificed at 12, 24, and 48 h after burn injury. Lung injury was assessed in terms of histologic changes and wet weight to dry weight (W/D ratio. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-8 protein concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and HMGB1 expression in the lung was determined by Western blot analysis. Pulmonary myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and malondialdehyde (MDA concentration were measured to reflect neutrophil infiltration and oxidative stress in the lung, respectively. As a result, sodium butyrate significantly inhibited the HMGB1 expressions in the lungs, reduced the lung W/D ratio, and improved the pulmonary histologic changes induced by burn trauma. Furthermore, sodium butyrate administration decreased the TNF-α and IL-8 concentrations in BALF and serum, suppressed MPO activity, and reduced the MDA content in the lungs after severe burn. These results suggest that sodium butyrate attenuates inflammatory responses, neutrophil infiltration, and oxidative stress in the lungs, and protects against remote ALI induced by severe burn, which is associated with inhibiting HMGB1

  11. Propolis augments apoptosis induced by butyrate via targeting cell survival pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Drago

    Full Text Available Diet is one of the major lifestyle factors affecting incidence of colorectal cancer (CC, and despite accumulating evidence that numerous diet-derived compounds modulate CC incidence, definitive dietary recommendations are not available. We propose a strategy that could facilitate the design of dietary supplements with CC-preventive properties. Thus, nutrient combinations that are a source of apoptosis-inducers and inhibitors of compensatory cell proliferation pathways (e.g., AKT signaling may produce high levels of programmed death in CC cells. Here we report the combined effect of butyrate, an apoptosis inducer that is produced through fermentation of fiber in the colon, and propolis, a honeybee product, on CC cells. We established that propolis increases the apoptosis of CC cells exposed to butyrate through suppression of cell survival pathways such as the AKT signaling. The programmed death of CC cells by combined exposure to butyrate and propolis is further augmented by inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway. Analyses on the contribution of the downstream targets of JNK signaling, c-JUN and JAK/STAT, to the apoptosis of butyrate/propolis-treated CC cells ascertained that JAK/STAT signaling has an anti-apoptotic role; whereas, the role of cJUN might be dependent upon regulatory cell factors. Thus, our studies ascertained that propolis augments apoptosis of butyrate-sensitive CC cells and re-sensitizes butyrate-resistant CC cells to apoptosis by suppressing AKT signaling and downregulating the JAK/STAT pathway. Future in vivo studies should evaluate the CC-preventive potential of a dietary supplement that produces high levels of colonic butyrate, propolis, and diet-derived JAK/STAT inhibitors.

  12. Sodium Butyrate Protects against Severe Burn-Induced Remote Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Guo, Feng; Sun, Li; Wang, Yong-Jie; Sun, Ye-Xiang; Chen, Xu-Lin

    2013-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), a ubiquitous nuclear protein, drives proinflammatory responses when released extracellularly. It plays a key role as a distal mediator in the development of acute lung injury (ALI). Sodium butyrate, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, has been demonstrated to inhibit HMGB1 expression. This study investigates the effect of sodium butyrate on burn-induced lung injury. Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into three groups: 1) sham group, sham burn treatment; 2) burn group, third-degree burns over 30% total body surface area (TBSA) with lactated Ringer’s solution for resuscitation; 3) burn plus sodium butyrate group, third-degree burns over 30% TBSA with lactated Ringer’s solution containing sodium butyrate for resuscitation. The burned animals were sacrificed at 12, 24, and 48 h after burn injury. Lung injury was assessed in terms of histologic changes and wet weight to dry weight (W/D) ratio. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-8 protein concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and HMGB1 expression in the lung was determined by Western blot analysis. Pulmonary myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration were measured to reflect neutrophil infiltration and oxidative stress in the lung, respectively. As a result, sodium butyrate significantly inhibited the HMGB1 expressions in the lungs, reduced the lung W/D ratio, and improved the pulmonary histologic changes induced by burn trauma. Furthermore, sodium butyrate administration decreased the TNF-α and IL-8 concentrations in BALF and serum, suppressed MPO activity, and reduced the MDA content in the lungs after severe burn. These results suggest that sodium butyrate attenuates inflammatory responses, neutrophil infiltration, and oxidative stress in the lungs, and protects against remote ALI induced by severe burn, which is associated with inhibiting HMGB1

  13. Effects of dry whey powder and calcium butyrate supplementation of corn/soybean-based diets on productive performance, duodenal histological integrity, and Campylobacter colonization in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocejo, Medelin; Oporto, Beatriz; Juste, Ramón A; Hurtado, Ana

    2017-06-26

    Campylobacter is the main cause of gastroenteritis in humans in industrialized countries, and poultry is its principal reservoir and source of human infections. Dietary supplementation of broiler feed with additives could improve productive performance and elicit health benefits that might reduce Campylobacter contamination during primary production. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of dietary supplementation with whey (a prebiotic) and calcium butyrate (a salt of a short-chain fatty acid) on productive traits, duodenal histological integrity, and Campylobacter colonization and dissemination in broiler chickens during the 42-day rearing period. Six hundred one-day-old Ross-308 chickens were placed into 20 ground pens and assigned to one of 4 corn/soybean-based dietary treatments (5 replicates of 30 chicks per treatment) following a randomized complete block design: 1) basal diet with no supplementation as the control, 2) diet supplemented with 6% dry whey powder, 3) diet containing 0.1% coated calcium butyrate, and 4) diet containing 6% whey and 0.1% calcium butyrate. At age 15 days, 6 chickens per pen were experimentally inoculated with Campylobacter jejuni. The results showed that supplementation of the corn/soybean-based diet with 6% whey alone or, preferably, in combination with 0.1% coated calcium butyrate improved growth and feed efficiency, had a beneficial effect on duodenal villus integrity, and decreased mortality. These favourable effects were particularly significant during the starter period. Six days after oral challenge, Campylobacter was widespread in the flock, and the birds remained positive until the end of the rearing period. Although Campylobacter was not isolated from environmental samples, it was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in dust, air filters, and drinkers while birds shed culturable C. jejuni cells. No differences (p > 0.050) in colonization or shedding levels that could be attributed to the diet

  14. Degradation of Arginine and Other Amino Acids by Eubacterium nodatum ATCC 33099

    OpenAIRE

    Uematsu, H.; Hoshino, E.

    2011-01-01

    The utilisation of a total of 20 amino acids by Eubacterium nodatum, a predominant asaccharolytic anaerobe isolated from human periodontal pockets, was studied. Washed cells of the microorganism produced substantial amounts of acetate, butyrate and ammonia from lysine, and butyrate and ammonia from arginine as main products under anaerobic conditions. They also produced a small amount of formate from histidine. Metabolic products were not detected from any of the other 17 amino acids. These r...

  15. Butyrate Inhibits Cancerous HCT116 Colon Cell Proliferation but to a Lesser Extent in Noncancerous NCM460 Colon Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Taussig, David P; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Johnson, LuAnn K; Hakkak, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects on colon cancer development. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate inhibits cancerous cell proliferation but to a lesser extent in noncancerous cells through regulating apoptosis and cellular-signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis by exposing cancerous HCT116 or non-cancerous NCM460 colon cells to physiologically relevant doses of butyrate. Cellular responses to butyrate were characterized by Western analysis, fluorescent microscopy, acetylation, and DNA fragmentation analyses. Butyrate inhibited cell proliferation, and led to an induction of apoptosis, genomic DNA fragmentation in HCT116 cells, but to a lesser extent in NCM460 cells. Although butyrate increased H3 histone deacetylation and p21 tumor suppressor expression in both cell types, p21 protein level was greater with intense expression around the nuclei in HCT116 cells when compared with that in NCM460 cells. Furthermore, butyrate treatment increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-ERK1/2), a survival signal, in NCM460 cells while it decreased p-ERK1/2 in HCT116 cells. Taken together, the activation of survival signaling in NCM460 cells and apoptotic potential in HCT116 cells may confer the increased sensitivity of cancerous colon cells to butyrate in comparison with noncancerous colon cells.

  16. Butyrate-Loaded Chitosan/Hyaluronan Nanoparticles: A Suitable Tool for Sustained Inhibition of ROS Release by Activated Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sacco, Pasquale; Decleva, Eva; Tentor, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    that butyrate inhibits neutrophil ROS release in a dose and time-dependent fashion. Given the short half-life of butyrate, chitosan/hyaluronan nanoparticles are next designed and developed as controlled release carriers able to provide cells with a long-lasting supply of this SCFA. Notably, while the inhibition...... of neutrophil ROS production by free butyrate declines over time, that of butyrate-loaded chitosan/hyaluronan nanoparticles (B-NPs) is sustained. Additional valuable features of these nanoparticles are inherent ROS scavenger activity, resistance to cell internalization, and mucoadhesiveness. B-NPs appear...

  17. Dissociation of strong acid revisited: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations of HNO3 in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Tanza; Winter, Berndt; Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tobias, Douglas J.; Hemminger, J. C.

    2011-08-04

    Molecular-level insight into the dissociation of nitric acid in water is obtained from photoelectron X-ray spectroscopy and first-principles molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our combined studies reveal surprisingly abrupt changes in solvation configurations of undissociated nitric acid at approximately 4 M concentration. Experimentally, this is inferred from N1s binding energy shifts of HNO3(aq) as a function of concentration, and is associated with variations in the local electronic structure of the nitrogen atom. It also shows up as a discontinuity in the degree of dissociation as a function of concentration, determined here from the N1s photoelectron signal intensity, which can be separately quantified for undissociated HNO3(aq) and dissociated NO3-(aq). Intermolecular interactions within the nitric acid solution are discussed on the basis of MD simulations, which reveal that molecular HNO3 interacts remarkably weakly with solvating water molecules at low concentration; around 4 M there is a turnover to a more structured solvation shell, accompanied by an increase in hydrogen bonding between HNO3 and water. We suggest that the driving force behind the more structured solvent configuration of HNO3 is the overlap of nitric acid solvent shells that sets in around 4 M concentration. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  18. New holographic polymeric composition based on plexiglass, polyvinyl butyral, and phenanthrenquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusevich, Vladislav; Tolstik, Elen; Kowarschik, Richard; Egorova, Elena; Matusevich, Yuri I.; Krul, Leonid

    2013-05-01

    The newly developed Plexiglas films containing polyvinyl butyral resins and phenanthrenequinone molecules as photosensitive dopant, which are proposed for the practical application as interlayer of laminated safety glass, are shown for the first time. The injection of the phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate) into the polyvinyl butyral protective interlayer provides a homogenous distribution of the recording holographic medium in the layer and allows fixing the entire surface grating in the laminated glass. In addition, the original properties of polyvinyl butyral as a connecting material were preserved during manufacturing of the laminated glass. This allows a recording of holographic structures directly after baking of the laminated glass, thus reducing the destruction of the gratings due to the elevated temperatures. The diffractive structures in phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate)-polyvinyl butyral polymeric layers with thicknesses of hundreds of microns are sealed between two panels of glass (so-called laminated glass) and are generated by illumination with an Argon-laser of 514 nm. Efficiently fixed and long-term stable holographic gratings recorded in the phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate)-polyvinyl butyral layer enable to produce transparent laminated glass with inserted diffractive elements, which can be used e.g. for Head-up Displays in automobile windshields or as holographic light concentrators for solar cells.

  19. Use of butyrate or glutamine in enema solution reduces inflammation and fibrosis in experimental diversion colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Rodrigo Goulart; Esposito, Christiano Costa; Müller, Lucas C M; Castelo-Branco, Morgana T L; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira; Chagas, Vera Lucia A; de Souza, Heitor Siffert P; Schanaider, Alberto

    2012-08-28

    To investigate whether butyrate or glutamine enemas could diminish inflammation in experimental diversion colitis. Wistar specific pathogen-free rats were submitted to a Hartmann's end colostomy and treated with enemas containing glutamine, butyrate, or saline. Enemas were administered twice a week in the excluded segment of the colon from 4 to 12 wk after the surgical procedure. Follow-up colonoscopy was performed every 4 wk for 12 wk. The effect of treatment was evaluated using video-endoscopic and histologic scores and measuring interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor beta production in organ cultures by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Colonoscopies of the diverted segment showed mucosa with hyperemia, increased number of vessels, bleeding and mucus discharge. Treatment with either glutamine or butyrate induced significant reductions in both colonoscopic (P < 0.02) and histological scores (P < 0.01) and restored the densities of collagen fibers in tissue (P = 0.015; P = 0.001), the number of goblet cells (P = 0.021; P = 0.029), and the rate of apoptosis within the epithelium (P = 0.043; P = 0.011) to normal values. The high levels of cytokines in colon explants from rats with diversion colitis significantly decreased to normal values after treatment with butyrate or glutamine. The improvement of experimental diversion colitis following glutamine or butyrate enemas highlights the importance of specific luminal nutrients in the homeostasis of the colonic mucosa and supports their utilization for the treatment of human diversion colitis.

  20. [Sodium butyrate induces rat hepatic oval cells differentiating into mature hepatocytes in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Jia, Ji-Dong; Tang, Shu-Zhen; Yan, Zhong-Yu; You, Hong; Cong, Min; Wang, Bao-En; Chen, Li; An, Wei

    2004-12-01

    To elucidate the effects of sodium butyrate on rat hepatic oval cell differentiation in vitro. Hepatic oval cells were isolated from rats fed with a choline-deficient diet supplemented with 0.1% (w/w) ethonine for 4 to 6 weeks. The cultured hepatic oval cells were identified by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). After hepatic oval cells were treated with sodium butyrate, the morphological changes were studied through Giemsa staining and the albumin expression level was tested by Western blot. Immunohistochemical results showed the isolated cells were positive for both mature hepatocyte marker albumin and bile duct cell marker cytokeratin-19. Furthermore, RT-PCR results showed that the cells expressed stem cell marker c-kit, but not hematopoietic stem cell marker CD34. In short, the isolated cells were rat hepatic oval cells. 0.75 mmol/L sodium butyrate induced obvious phenotype changes of hepatic oval cells, including enlargement of the oval cells, a decrease in nucleus to cytoplasm ratio, and a 50% increase in the number of binucleated cells. Western blot results showed that 0.75 mmol/L sodium butyrate markedly raised the expression of albumin. Sodium butyrate, a differentiation promoting agent, can induce rat hepatic oval cells (liver progenitor cells) to differentiate into mature hepatocytes in vitro.

  1. Butyrate alters expression of cytochrome P450 1A1 and metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene via its histone deacetylase activity in colon epithelial cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapletal, Ondřej; Tylichová, Zuzana; Neča, Jiří; Kohoutek, Jiří; Machala, Miroslav; Milcová, Alena; Pokorná, Michaela; Topinka, Jan; Moyer, Mary Pat; Hofmanová, Jiřina; Kozubík, Alois; Vondráček, Jan

    2017-05-01

    Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced by fermentation of dietary fiber, is an important regulator of colonic epithelium homeostasis. In this study, we investigated the impact of this histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor on expression/activity of cytochrome P450 family 1 (CYP1) and on metabolism of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), in colon epithelial cells. Sodium butyrate (NaBt) strongly potentiated the BaP-induced expression of CYP1A1 in human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells. It also co-stimulated the 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity induced by the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, a prototypical ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Up-regulation of CYP1A1 expression/activity corresponded with an enhanced metabolism of BaP and formation of covalent DNA adducts. NaBt significantly potentiated CYP1A1 induction and/or metabolic activation of BaP also in other human colon cell models, colon adenoma AA/C1 cells, colon carcinoma HT-29 cells, or in NCM460D cell line derived from normal colon mucosa. Our results suggest that the effects of NaBt were due to its impact on histone acetylation, because additional HDAC inhibitors (trichostatin A and suberanilohydroxamic acid) likewise increased both the induction of EROD activity and formation of covalent DNA adducts. NaBt-induced acetylation of histone H3 (at Lys14) and histone H4 (at Lys16), two histone modifications modulated during activation of CYP1A1 transcription, and it reduced binding of HDAC1 to the enhancer region of CYP1A1 gene. This in vitro study suggests that butyrate, through modulation of histone acetylation, may potentiate induction of CYP1A1 expression, which might in turn alter the metabolism of BaP within colon epithelial cells.

  2. Density, speed of sound, and refractive index measurements for the binary systems (butanoic acid + propanoic acid, or 2-methyl-propanoic acid) at T = (293.15 to 313.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahadur, Indra; Deenadayalu, Nirmala; Naidoo, Paramespri; Ramjugernath, Deresh

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ►V m E for (butyric acid + propanoic acid) is positive and negative for (butyric acid + isobutyric acid). ►κ s E is positive for (butanoic acid + propanoic acid). ►κ s E is both positive and negative for (butanoic acid + 2-methyl-propanoic acid). ► Δn values are negative for the system (butyric acid + propanoic acid). ► Δn values are positive for the system (butyric acid + isobutyric acid) at all temperatures. - Abstract: Density, speed of sound, and refractive index for the binary systems (butanoic acid + propanoic acid, or 2-methyl-propanoic acid) were measured over the whole composition range and at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15) K. The excess molar volumes, isentropic compressibilities, excess isentropic compressibilities, molar refractions, and deviation in refractive indices were also calculated by using the experimental densities, speed of sound, and refractive indices data, respectively. The Redlich–Kister smoothing polynomial equation was used to fit the excess molar volume, excess isentropic compressibility and deviation in refractive index data. The thermodynamic properties have been discussed in terms of intermolecular interactions between the components of the mixtures.

  3. Effect of methyl butyrate aroma on the survival and viability of human breast cancer cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Rumana Ahmad, R.; Srivastava, A.N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aroma can have far reaching effects on mind, body and soul. Pleasant aromas are known to have a soothing effect on the mind and are known to relieve stress and enhance concentration. Recently, it has been demonstrated that aroma may also have some curative effects as well as benefits and can be used both for prophylaxis and therapy of diseases. Our aim was to test our hypothesis whether aroma can cure or prevent cancer. Methyl butyrate (MB) is the methyl ester of butyric acid having a characteristic sweet and fruity odor like that of apples and pineapples. It occurs in many plant products in minute quantities and in pineapple oil. Methods: In the present study, the effect of aroma of MB has been evaluated on human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in vitro . The percentage viability of the cell line was determined by using Trypan blue dye exclusion assay. Results: It was found that MB at a concentration of 0.01 M was effective in causing considerable cytotoxicity (40%) in breast cancer cells (without even coming in contact with cells) while at 0.02 M, % cytotoxicity was found to be 50%. Mechanism of action of MB on cancer cells was investigated by acridine orange–ethidium bromide assay using fluorescence microscopy and DNA fragmentation assay. MB aroma appeared to induce necrosis in cancer cells exposed to it. Conclusion: No study involving the effect of aroma/smell on cancer cells has ever been reported before and warrants further investigation on other cancer and normal cell lines.

  4. Transport and metabolism of fumaric acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic glucose-limited chemostat culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mihir V; van Mastrigt, Oscar; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2016-04-01

    Currently, research is being focused on the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid and other relevant organic acids from renewable feedstocks via fermentation, preferably at low pH for better product recovery. However, at low pH a large fraction of the extracellular acid is present in the undissociated form, which is lipophilic and can diffuse into the cell. There have been no studies done on the impact of high extracellular concentrations of fumaric acid under aerobic conditions in S. cerevisiae, which is a relevant issue to study for industrial-scale production. In this work we studied the uptake and metabolism of fumaric acid in S. cerevisiae in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at a cultivation pH of 3.0 (pH medium. The experiments were carried out with the wild-type S. cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D and an engineered S. cerevisiae ADIS 244 expressing a heterologous dicarboxylic acid transporter (DCT-02) from Aspergillus niger, to examine whether it would be capable of exporting fumaric acid. We observed that fumaric acid entered the cells most likely via passive diffusion of the undissociated form. Approximately two-thirds of the fumaric acid in the feed was metabolized together with glucose. From metabolic flux analysis, an increased ATP dissipation was observed only at high intracellular concentrations of fumarate, possibly due to the export of fumarate via an ABC transporter. The implications of our results for the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid are discussed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Dynamics of the anaerobic process: Effects of volatile fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pind, Peter Frode; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    A complex and fast dynamic response of the anaerobic biogas system was observed when the system was subjected to pulses of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). It was shown that a pulse of specific VFAs into a well-functioning continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system operating on cow manure affected...... effect on process yield and the levels of all VFA were shown to stabilize at a lower level after the biomass had been subjected to several pulses. The response to pulses of propionate or acetate was different from the response to butyrate, iso-butyrate, valerate, or iso-valerate. High concentrations...... of propionate affected the degradation of all VFAs, while a pulse of acetate affected primarily the degradation of iso-valerate or 2-methylbutyrate. Pulses of n-butyrate, iso-butyrate, and iso-valerate yielded only acetate, while degradation of n-valerate gave both propionate and acetate. Product sensitivity...

  6. Nutritional modulation of intestinal drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 by butyrate of different origin in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulcsár, Anna; Mátis, Gábor; Molnár, Andor; Petrilla, Janka; Wágner, László; Fébel, Hedvig; Husvéth, Ferenc; Dublecz, Károly; Neogrády, Zsuzsanna

    2017-08-01

    Intestinal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key role in the first pass metabolism of orally ingested xenobiotics, providing a primary metabolic barrier, being of special importance in maintaining animal health and production. This study was aimed to investigate how intestinal drug-metabolizing CYPs can be modulated by nutritional factors in broiler chicken. We investigated the effects of the natural growth promoter (n-)butyrate of different origin (feed supplementation of protected or non-protected forms and/or inducing caecal microbial production by supporting higher level of dietary non-starch polysaccharides [NSP]) on the activity of duodenal CYPs. To observe the connection between intestinal CYP activity and butyrate concentration, the distribution of differently originated butyrate was also assessed by measuring its concentration in various intestinal segments and different vessels of portal and systemic circulation. Butyrate of different origin showed varying distribution properties as being absorbed from different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Intestinal CYP1A and CYP2H2 activities were increased by dietary butyrate supplementation and by the increased caecal microbial butyrate production, while CYP3A37 activity was minimally influenced by microbial butyrate only. The present study proved that both dietary and microbial butyrate could alter the activity of CYPs in the duodenal epithelium. Our findings suggest that intestinal CYPs could be induced not only by the intestinal luminal butyrate, but also from basolateral side, by the already absorbed butyrate. Such action of butyrate can be of special importance from food safety and pharmacotherapeutic point of view as it may modify the metabolism and intestinal kinetics of simultaneously applied xenobiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Induction of porcine host defense peptide gene expression by short-chain fatty acids and their analogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangfang Zeng

    Full Text Available Dietary modulation of the synthesis of endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs represents a novel antimicrobial approach for disease control and prevention, particularly against antibiotic-resistant infections. However, HDP regulation by dietary compounds such as butyrate is species-dependent. To examine whether butyrate could induce HDP expression in pigs, we evaluated the expressions of a panel of porcine HDPs in IPEC-J2 intestinal epithelial cells, 3D4/31 macrophages, and primary monocytes in response to sodium butyrate treatment by real-time PCR. We revealed that butyrate is a potent inducer of multiple, but not all, HDP genes. Porcine β-defensin 2 (pBD2, pBD3, epididymis protein 2 splicing variant C (pEP2C, and protegrins were induced markedly in response to butyrate, whereas pBD1 expression remained largely unaltered in any cell type. Additionally, a comparison of the HDP-inducing efficacy among saturated free fatty acids of different aliphatic chain lengths revealed that fatty acids containing 3-8 carbons showed an obvious induction of HDP expression in IPEC-J2 cells, with butyrate being the most potent and long-chain fatty acids having only a marginal effect. We further investigated a panel of butyrate analogs for their efficacy in HDP induction, and found glyceryl tributyrate, benzyl butyrate, and 4-phenylbutyrate to be comparable with butyrate. Identification of butyrate and several analogs with a strong capacity to induce HDP gene expression in pigs provides attractive candidates for further evaluation of their potential as novel alternatives to antibiotics in augmenting innate immunity and disease resistance of pigs.

  8. Revealing the bacterial butyrate synthesis pathways by analyzing (meta)genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, Marius; Howe, Adina Chuang; Tiedje, James M

    2014-04-22

    Butyrate-producing bacteria have recently gained attention, since they are important for a healthy colon and when altered contribute to emerging diseases, such as ulcerative colitis and type II diabetes. This guild is polyphyletic and cannot be accurately detected by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Consequently, approaches targeting the terminal genes of the main butyrate-producing pathway have been developed. However, since additional pathways exist and alternative, newly recognized enzymes catalyzing the terminal reaction have been described, previous investigations are often incomplete. We undertook a broad analysis of butyrate-producing pathways and individual genes by screening 3,184 sequenced bacterial genomes from the Integrated Microbial Genome database. Genomes of 225 bacteria with a potential to produce butyrate were identified, including many previously unknown candidates. The majority of candidates belong to distinct families within the Firmicutes, but members of nine other phyla, especially from Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Thermotogae, were also identified as potential butyrate producers. The established gene catalogue (3,055 entries) was used to screen for butyrate synthesis pathways in 15 metagenomes derived from stool samples of healthy individuals provided by the HMP (Human Microbiome Project) consortium. A high percentage of total genomes exhibited a butyrate-producing pathway (mean, 19.1%; range, 3.2% to 39.4%), where the acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) pathway was the most prevalent (mean, 79.7% of all pathways), followed by the lysine pathway (mean, 11.2%). Diversity analysis for the acetyl-CoA pathway showed that the same few firmicute groups associated with several Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae were dominating in most individuals, whereas the other pathways were associated primarily with Bacteroidetes. IMPORTANCE Microbiome research has revealed new, important roles of our gut microbiota for

  9. The Warburg Effect Dictates the Mechanism of Butyrate Mediated Histone Acetylation and Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Dallas R.; Collins, Leonard B.; Wali, Aminah; Bigler, Rebecca; Sun, Wei; Bultman, Scott J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Widespread changes in gene expression drive tumorigenesis, yet our knowledge of how aberrant epigenomic and transcriptome profiles arise in cancer cells is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic transformation plays an important role. Butyrate is the primary energy source of normal colonocytes and is metabolized to acetyl-CoA, which was shown to be important not only for energetics but also for HAT activity. Due to the Warburg effect, cancerous colonocytes rely on glucose as their primary energy source so butyrate accumulated and functioned as an HDAC inhibitor. Although both mechanisms increased histone acetylation, different target genes were upregulated. Consequently, butyrate stimulated the proliferation of normal colonocytes and cancerous colonocytes when the Warburg effect was prevented from occurring, whereas it inhibited the proliferation of cancerous colonocytes undergoing the Warburg effect. These findings link a common metabolite to epigenetic mechanisms that are differentially utilized by normal and cancerous cells because of their inherent metabolic differences. PMID:23063526

  10. Butyrate production from high-fiber diet protects against lymphoma tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Sun, Wei; Yu, Shanshan; Yang, Yu; Ai, Limei

    2016-10-01

    Gut microbiota and dietary fiber are critical for protecting body from obesity, diabetes and cancer. Butyrate, produced in the gut by bacterial fermentation of dietary fibers, is demonstrated to be protective against the development of colorectal cancer as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. We report that high-fiber diet and butyrate significantly inhibited the growth lymphoma tumors. Butyrate induced apoptosis of lymphoma tumor cells and significantly up-regulated histone 3 acetylation (H3ac) level and target genes such as Fas, P21, P27. Our results unravel an instrumental role of fiber diet and their metabolites on lymphoma tumor and demonstrate an intervention potential on the prevention and therapy of lymphoma.

  11. Interleukin-15 promotes intestinal dysbiosis with butyrate deficiency associated with increased susceptibility to colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisel, Marlies; Mayassi, Toufic; Fehlner-Peach, Hannah; Koval, Jason C.; O' Brien, Sarah L.; Hinterleitner, Reinhard; Lesko, Kathryn; Kim, Sangman; Bouziat, Romain; Chen, Li; Weber, Christopher R.; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.; Jabri, Bana; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.

    2016-09-20

    Dysbiosis resulting in gut-microbiome alterations with reduced butyrate production are thought to disrupt intestinal immune homeostasis and promote complex immune disorders. However, whether and how dysbiosis develops before the onset of overt pathology remains poorly defined. Interleukin 15 (IL-15) is upregulated in distressed tissue and its overexpression is thought to predispose susceptible individuals to and play a role in the pathogenesis of celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). While the immunological roles of IL-15 have been largely studied, its potential impact on the microbiota remains unexplored. Analysis of 16S rRNA-based inventories of bacterial communities in mice overexpressing IL-15 in the intestinal epithelium (v-IL-15tg mice) shows distinct changes in the composition of the intestinal bacteria. While some alterations are specific to individual intestinal compartments, others are found across the ileum, cecum, and feces. In particular, IL-15 overexpression restructures the composition of the microbiota with a decrease in butyrate producing bacteria that is associated with a reduction in luminal butyrate levels across all intestinal compartments. Fecal microbiota transplant experiments of wild-type and v-IL-15tg microbiota into germ-free mice further indicate that diminishing butyrate concentration observed in the intestinal lumen of v-IL-15tg mice is the result of intrinsic alterations in the microbiota induced by IL-15. This reconfiguration of the microbiota is associated with increased susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate induced colitis. Altogether, this study reveals that IL-15 impacts butyrate-producing bacteria and lowers butyrate levels in the absence of overt pathology, which represent events that precede and promote intestinal inflammatory diseases.

  12. Butyrate, a dietary fiber derivative that improves irinotecan effect in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encarnação, João Crispim; Pires, Ana Salomé; Amaral, Renata Alexandra; Gonçalves, Telmo José; Laranjo, Mafalda; Casalta-Lopes, João Eduardo; Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Sarmento-Ribeiro, Ana Bela; Abrantes, Ana Margarida; Botelho, Maria Filomena

    2018-03-03

    A diet rich in fiber is associated with a low risk of developing colorectal cancer. Dietary fiber fermentation by intestinal microflora results in the production of butyrate, which has been reported as a chemopreventive agent and a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi). Irinotecan is used as second-line treatment and induces adverse effects with serious life-threatening toxicities in at least 36% of patients. Our study intends to find a synergy that could improve the efficacy and decrease the toxicity of chemotherapy. Results demonstrate that milimolar concentrations of butyrate has an anti-proliferative effect in all three colon cancer cell lines under study, leading to a decrease on cell viability, expression of P21, P53 and β-catenin, being able to modulate P-glycoprotein activity and to induce apoptosis by modulation of BAX/BCL-2 ratio. Combined therapy has a cytotoxic potential, resulting in a synergistic effect, and allows a reduction in irinotecan concentration needed to reduce IC 50 . This potential was verified in terms of cell viability and death, cell cycle and expression of P21 and P53. Butyrate and irinotecan act synergistically in the three cancer cell lines, despite the different genetic background and location, and inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft model. Butyrate is able to influence the mechanism of LS1034 cell line chemoresistance. Butyrate in combination with chemotherapeutic agents has an important role for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Such understanding can guide decisions about which patients with colorectal cancer may benefit from therapy with butyrate demonstrating the important role of diet in colorectal cancer treatment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Determination of organic acids evolution during apple cider fermentation using an improved HPLC analysis method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.; Zhou, F.; Ji, B.; Nout, M.J.R.; Fang, Q.; Zhang, Z.

    2008-01-01

    An efficient method for analyzing ten organic acids in food, namely citric, pyruvic, malic, lactic, succinic, formic, acetic, adipic, propionic and butyric acids, using HPLC was developed. Boric acid was added into the mobile phase to separate lactic and succinic acids, and a post-column buffer

  14. Pilot-scale recovery of low molecular weight organic acids from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-05

    Nov 5, 2008 ... Low molecular weight organic acids such as acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acids generated from partial anaerobic ... nogenic phases would enhance the overall rate of waste stabilization if maintained in ..... from anaerobically treated palm oil mill effluent by ion exchange resins for the production of ...

  15. Effect of method of delivery of sodium butyrate on rumen development in newborn calves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Górka, P; Kowalski, Z M; Pietrzak, P

    2011-01-01

    The effect of sodium butyrate (SB) supplementation in milk replacer (MR) or in starter mixture (SM) or in both MR and SM on performance, selected blood parameters, and rumen development in newborn calves was determined. Twenty-eight male calves with a mean age of 5 (±1) d were randomly allocated...... into 1 of 4 groups (7 animals per group) and fed (1) MR and SM, both without SB (MR(-) and SM(-), respectively); (2) MR(-) and SM supplemented with SB encapsulated within a triglyceride matrix (SM(+), 0.6% as fed; 30:70 butyrate-to-triglyceride matrix); (3) MR supplemented with crystalline SB (MR(+), 0...

  16. Enhancing Butanol Production under the Stress Environments of Co-Culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae Integrated with Exogenous Butyrate Addition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhen Luo

    Full Text Available In this study, an efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE fermentation strategy integrating Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-culturing system with exogenous butyrate addition, was proposed and experimentally conducted. In solventogenic phase, by adding 0.2 g-DCW/L-broth viable S. cerevisiae cells and 4.0 g/L-broth concentrated butyrate solution into C. acetobutylicum culture broth, final butanol concentration and butanol/acetone ratio in a 7 L anaerobic fermentor reached the highest levels of 15.74 g/L and 2.83 respectively, with the increments of 35% and 43% as compared with those of control. Theoretical and experimental analysis revealed that, the proposed strategy could, 1 extensively induce secretion of amino acids particularly lysine, which are favorable for both C. acetobutylicum survival and butanol synthesis under high butanol concentration environment; 2 enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and over-produce intracellular NADH for butanol synthesis in C. acetobutylicum metabolism simultaneously; 3 direct most of extra consumed glucose into butanol synthesis route. The synergetic actions of effective amino acids assimilation, high rates of substrate consumption and NADH regeneration yielded highest butanol concentration and butanol ratio in C. acetobutylicum under this stress environment. The proposed method supplies an alternative way to improve ABE fermentation performance by traditional fermentation technology.

  17. Enhancing Butanol Production under the Stress Environments of Co-Culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae Integrated with Exogenous Butyrate Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hongzhen; Ge, Laibing; Zhang, Jingshu; Zhao, Yanli; Ding, Jian; Li, Zhigang; He, Zhenni; Chen, Rui; Shi, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation strategy integrating Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-culturing system with exogenous butyrate addition, was proposed and experimentally conducted. In solventogenic phase, by adding 0.2 g-DCW/L-broth viable S. cerevisiae cells and 4.0 g/L-broth concentrated butyrate solution into C. acetobutylicum culture broth, final butanol concentration and butanol/acetone ratio in a 7 L anaerobic fermentor reached the highest levels of 15.74 g/L and 2.83 respectively, with the increments of 35% and 43% as compared with those of control. Theoretical and experimental analysis revealed that, the proposed strategy could, 1) extensively induce secretion of amino acids particularly lysine, which are favorable for both C. acetobutylicum survival and butanol synthesis under high butanol concentration environment; 2) enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and over-produce intracellular NADH for butanol synthesis in C. acetobutylicum metabolism simultaneously; 3) direct most of extra consumed glucose into butanol synthesis route. The synergetic actions of effective amino acids assimilation, high rates of substrate consumption and NADH regeneration yielded highest butanol concentration and butanol ratio in C. acetobutylicum under this stress environment. The proposed method supplies an alternative way to improve ABE fermentation performance by traditional fermentation technology. PMID:26489085

  18. Effect of butyrate and fermentation products on epithelial integrity in a mucus-secreting human colon cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ditte Søvsø Gundelund; Jensen, Bent Borg; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2018-01-01

    . This was associated with regulation of different genes involved in epithelial integrity, mucus secretion, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and butyrate transport. In conclusion, butyrate in concentrations that can be achieved by dietary intervention in vivo enhanced the epithelial barrier function in vitro. B...

  19. Effect of sodium butyrate on cell proliferation and cell cycle in porcine intestinal epithelial (IPEC-J2) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yueqin; Ma, Xianyong; Yang, Xuefen; Wang, Li; Jiang, Zongyong

    2017-04-01

    Conflicting results have been reported that butyrate in normal piglets leads either to an increase or to a decrease of jejunal villus length, implying a possible effect on the proliferation of enterocytes. No definitive study was found for the biological effects of butyrate in porcine jejunal epithelial cells. The present study used IPEC-J2 cells, a non-transformed jejunal epithelial line to evaluate the direct effects of sodium butyrate on cell proliferation, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis. Low concentrations (0.5 and 1 mM) of butyrate had no effect on cell proliferation. However, at 5 and 10 mM, sodium butyrate significantly decreased cell viability, accompanied by reduced levels of p-mTOR and PCNA protein. Sodium butyrate, in a dose-dependent manner, induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and reduced the numbers of cells in S phase. In addition, relative expression of p21, p27, and pro-apoptosis bak genes, and protein levels of p21Waf1/Cip1, p27Kip1, cyclinD3, CDK4, and Cleave-caspase3 were increased by higher concentrations of sodium butyrate (1, 5, 10 mM), and the levels of cyclinD1 and CDK6 were reduced by 5 and 10 mM butyrate. Butyrate increased the phosphorylated form of the signaling molecule p38 and phosphorylated JNK. In conclusion, the present in vitro study indicated that sodium butyrate inhibited the proliferation of IPEC-J2 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase of cell cycles and by increasing apoptosis at high concentrations.

  20. Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: A Systemic Metabolic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Orson W.

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid nephrolithiasis is characteristically a manifestation of a systemic metabolic disorder. It has a prevalence of about 10% among all stone formers, the third most common type of kidney stone in the industrialized world. Uric acid stones form primarily due to an unduly acid urine; less deciding factors are hyperuricosuria and a low urine volume. The vast majority of uric acid stone formers have the metabolic syndrome, and not infrequently, clinical gout is present as well. A universal finding is a low baseline urine pH plus insufficient production of urinary ammonium buffer. Persons with gastrointestinal disorders, in particular chronic diarrhea or ostomies, and patients with malignancies with a large tumor mass and high cell turnover comprise a less common but nevertheless important subset. Pure uric acid stones are radiolucent but well visualized on renal ultrasound. A 24 h urine collection for stone risk analysis provides essential insight into the pathophysiology of stone formation and may guide therapy. Management includes a liberal fluid intake and dietary modification. Potassium citrate to alkalinize the urine to a goal pH between 6 and 6.5 is essential, as undissociated uric acid deprotonates into its much more soluble urate form. PMID:25045326

  1. Effect of abomasal butyrate infusion on gene expression in the duodenum of lambs

    Science.gov (United States)

    A previous study infusing butyrate into the abomasum of sheep produced increased oxygen, glucose, glutamate, and glutamine uptake by the portal-drained viscera. These changes were thought to be partially due to increases in glycolysis and cell proliferation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate...

  2. Response of HT29 cells to butyrate treatment depends on time of exposure and glucose deprivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučerová, Dana; Štokrová, Jitka; Korb, Jan; Šloncová, Eva; Tuháčková, Zdena; Sovová, Vlasta

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 6 (2002), s. 779-784 ISSN 1107-3756 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : colorectal carcinoma cells, butyrate treatment,glucose deprivation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.063, year: 2002

  3. Study of physicochemical properties of zinc(II) butyrate complex compounds with some heterocyclic ligands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szakácsová, M.; Györová, K.; Szunyogová, E.; Kovářová, Jana

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 96, - (2002), s. 383 ISSN 0009-2770. [Meeting of Chemical Societies /54./. 30.06.2002-04.07.2002, Brno] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4050111; GA MŠk VEGA 1/9247/02; GA MŠk VEGA 047/074 Keywords : butyrate complex compounds * heterocyclic ligands Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  4. Synthesis and Ionic Conductivity of Siloxane Based Polymer Electrolytes with Propyl Butyrate Pendant Groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalagonia, Natia; Tatrishvili, Tamara; Markarashvili, Eliza; Aneli, Jimsher; Mukbaniani, Omar; Grazulevicius, Jouzas Vidas

    2016-01-01

    Hydrosilylation reactions of 2.4.6.8-tetrahydro-2.4.6.8-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane with allyl butyrate catalyzed by Karstedt's, H2PtCl6 and Pt/C catalyst were studied and 2.4.6.8-tetra (propyl butyrate)-2.4.6.8-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane was obtained. The reaction order, activation energies and rate constants were determined. Ringopening polymerization of 2.4.6.8-tetra (propyl butyrate)-2.4.6.8-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane in the presence of CaF2, LiF, KF and anhydrous potassium hydroxide in 60-70 .deg. C temperature range was carried out and methylsiloxane oligomers with regular arrangement of propyl butyrate pendant groups were obtained. The synthesized products were studied by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. The polysiloxanes were characterized by wide-angle X-ray, gel-permeation chromatography and DSC analyses. Via sol-gel processes of oligomers doped with lithium trifluoromethylsulfonate or lithium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, solid polymer electrolyte membranes were obtained. The dependences of ionic conductivity of obtained polyelectrolytes on temperature and salt concentration were investigated, and it was shown that electric conductivity of the polymer electrolyte membranes at room temperature changed in the range 3.5x10 -4 - 6.4xa0 -7 S/cm

  5. Synthesis and Ionic Conductivity of Siloxane Based Polymer Electrolytes with Propyl Butyrate Pendant Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalagonia, Natia; Tatrishvili, Tamara; Markarashvili, Eliza; Aneli, Jimsher; Mukbaniani, Omar [Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi (Georgia); Grazulevicius, Jouzas Vidas [Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2016-02-15

    Hydrosilylation reactions of 2.4.6.8-tetrahydro-2.4.6.8-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane with allyl butyrate catalyzed by Karstedt's, H2PtCl6 and Pt/C catalyst were studied and 2.4.6.8-tetra (propyl butyrate)-2.4.6.8-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane was obtained. The reaction order, activation energies and rate constants were determined. Ringopening polymerization of 2.4.6.8-tetra (propyl butyrate)-2.4.6.8-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane in the presence of CaF2, LiF, KF and anhydrous potassium hydroxide in 60-70 .deg. C temperature range was carried out and methylsiloxane oligomers with regular arrangement of propyl butyrate pendant groups were obtained. The synthesized products were studied by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. The polysiloxanes were characterized by wide-angle X-ray, gel-permeation chromatography and DSC analyses. Via sol-gel processes of oligomers doped with lithium trifluoromethylsulfonate or lithium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, solid polymer electrolyte membranes were obtained. The dependences of ionic conductivity of obtained polyelectrolytes on temperature and salt concentration were investigated, and it was shown that electric conductivity of the polymer electrolyte membranes at room temperature changed in the range 3.5x10{sup -4} - 6.4xa0{sup -7} S/cm.

  6. Increased levels of unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated human fibroblasts pretreated with sodium butyrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.I.; Friedberg, E.C.

    1982-01-01

    Pretreatment of growing normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) human fibroblasts with sodium butyrate at concentrations of 5-20 mM results in increased levels of DNA repair synthesis measured by autoradiography after exposure of the cells to 254 nm UV radiation in the fluence range 0-25 J/m 2 . The phenomenon manifests as an increased extent and an increased initial rate of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS). This experimental result is not due to an artifact of autoradiography related to cell size. Xeroderma pigmentosum cells from complementation groups A, C, D and E and XP variant cells all exhibit increases in the levels of UV-induced UDS in response to sodium butyrate proportional to those observed with normal cells. These UDS increases associated with butyrate pretreatment correlate with demonstrable changes in intracellular thymidine pool size and suggest that sodium butyrate enhances uptake of exogenous radiolabeled thymidine during UV-induced repair synthesis by reducing endogenous levels of thymidine. (author)

  7. Epigenetic Regulation of Gene Expression Induced by Butyrate in Colorectal Cancer: Involvement of MicroRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S Bishop

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer mortality globally. Development of CRC is closely associated with lifestyle, and diet may modulate risk. A Western-style diet is characterised by a high intake of red meat but low consumption of fruit, vegetables, and whole cereals. Such a diet is associated with CRC risks. It has been demonstrated that butyrate, produced by the fermentation of dietary plant fibre, can alter both genetic and epigenetic expressions. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that are commonly present in both normal and tumour cells. Aberrant miRNA expression is associated with CRC initiation, progression, and metastasis. In addition, butyrate can modulate cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and miRNA expression in CRC. In this review, the effects of butyrate on modulating miRNA expression in CRC will be discussed. Furthermore, evidence on the effect of butyrate on CRC risk through reducing oncogenic miRNA expression will be presented.

  8. Morphological development of polypropylene in immiscible blends with cellulose acetate butyrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isotactic polypropylenes (iPP) with different melt flow indexes were melt blended with cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and then prepared into microspheres or nanofibers following a novel process of producing well dispersed CAB/iPP immiscible blends and subsequent removal of the CAB matrix. The morp...

  9. Short Communication Effects of short chain fatty acid (SCFA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of supplementing the diet of breeder hens with a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) premix, containing 509 g fatty acid salts/kg of which 285 g were calcium butyrate, on their eggshell characteristics and the hatching percentage of the eggs. One thousand six hundred 66-week old ...

  10. Níveis de ácido indol butírico (AIB no enraizamento in vitro de microestacas de mamoeiro ‘Tainung 01’ = Indole butyric acid (IBA levels in the in vitro rooting of microcuttings of papaya tree ‘Tainung 01’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edílson Romais Schmildt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar níveis de AIB no enraizamento in vitro de microestacas de mamoeiro (Carica papaya L. ‘Tainung 01’. Ápices caulinares de plantas com 120 dias de idade foram estabelecidos e avaliados em meio MS, suplementado comcomplementos orgânicos constituídos de sacarose a 87,64 mM, mio-inositol a 555,06 μM, tiamina-HCl a 0,30 μM, piridoxina-HCl a 2,43 μM, ácido nicotínico a 4,06 μM e 0; 0,74; 1,48; 2,96 e 5,92 μM de AIB, em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com quatro repetições e cinco tubos de ensaio por parcela. Após 30 dias, avaliou-se a percentagem de enraizamento, o crescimento das microestacas, o comprimento da maior folha e a massa de calo. Observou-se que o maior percentual estimado de enraizamento ocorreu com a adição de 5,92 μM no meio de cultivo. Apesar do maior crescimento das microestacas e da maior folha ocorrer em níveis de AIB superiores a 0,74 μM, ocorre, concomitantemente, maior formação de calos na base das microestacas e muitas das raízes são provenientes desses calos, as quais não possuem conexões com o sistema vascular dos ramos. The objective of this work was to test IBA levels in the in vitrorooting of microcuttings of papaya tree (Carica papaya L. 'Tainung 01'. Apical stems of plants at 120 days of age were established and evaluated onto MS supplemented medium with organic complements constituted of sucrose at 87.64 mM, myo-inositol at 555.06 μM, thiamin-HCl at 0.30 μM, pyridoxine-HCl at 2.43 μM, nicotinic acid at 4.06 μM and treated with 0, 0.74, 1.48, 2.96 and 5.92 μM of IBA, in a completely randomized design, with four replications. After 30 days, the percentage of rooted microcuttings, the development of microcuttings, the length of the largest leaf and callus mass were evaluated. It was observed that the largest percentage of rooting happens in the presence of IBA at 5.92 μM during of cultivation. In spite of the fact that larger growth of

  11. Synergistic effects of dimethyloxalylglycine and butyrate incorporated into α-calcium sulfate on bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Kyung Mi; Jung, Hong-Moon; Oh, Joung-Hwan; Rahman, Saeed Ur; Kim, Soung Min; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis is closely related to angiogenesis, and the combined delivery of angiogenic and osteogenic factors has been suggested to enhance bone regeneration. Small molecules have been explored as alternatives to growth factors for tissue regeneration applications. In this study, we examined the effects of the combined application of angiogenic and osteogenic small molecules on bone regeneration using a prolyl hydroxylase, dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), and a histone deacetylase inhibitor, butyrate. In a critical size bone defect model in rats, DMOG and butyrate, which were incorporated into α calcium sulfate (αCS), resulted in synergistic enhancements in bone and blood vessel formation, eventually leading to bone healing, as confirmed by micro-CT and histological analyses. In MC4 pre-osteoblast cultures, DMOG and butyrate enhanced the pro-angiogenic responses and osteoblast differentiation, respectively, which were evaluated based on the levels of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α protein and the expression of pro-angiogenic molecules (VEGF, home oxidase-1, glucose transporter-1) and by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the expression of osteoblast phenotype marker molecules (ALP, α1(I)col, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein). DMOG combined with butyrate synergistically improved osteoblast differentiation and pro-angiogenic responses, the levels of which were drastically increased in the cultures on αCS disks. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that αCS increased the level of HIF-1α and as a consequence VEGF expression, and supported osteoblast differentiation through the release of calcium ions from the αCS. Altogether, the results of this study provide evidence that a combination treatment with the small molecules DMOG and butyrate can expedite the process of bone regeneration and that αCS can be an efficient delivery vehicle for the small molecules for bone regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Butyrate and propionate induced activated or non-activated neutrophil apoptosis via HDAC inhibitor activity but without activating GPR-41/GPR-43 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Michiko; Kotani, Joji; Usami, Makoto

    2010-06-01

    Decreased neutrophil apoptosis is implicated in persistent inflammation resulting in systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ dysfunctions syndromes. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) may be a candidate to control neutrophil apoptosis because SCFAs are normally produced in the gut and related products have been approved for human use. We investigated the effects of SCFAs on apoptosis of activated and non-activated neutrophils and their mechanisms. Purified neutrophils obtained from healthy volunteers were preincubated for 1 h with or without the G-protein receptor (GPR) inhibitor pertussis toxin (100 ng/mL) or U-73122 (50 ng/mL), extracellular signal-related protein kinase inhibitor PD98059 (10 microM), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 inhibitor SB203580 (25 microM), Jun kinase inhibitor-I (2 microM), caspase-3 and -7 inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK (100 microM), caspase-8 inhibitor Z-IETD-FMK (50 microM), or caspase-9 inhibitor Z-LEHD-FMK (50 microM). The cells were then cultured with or without SCFAs or trichostatin A, a typical histone deacetylase inhibitor, in the presence or absence of lipopolysaccharide (1 microg/mL) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (100 ng/mL). Neutrophil apoptosis was assessed by annexin V staining using flow cytometry. The GPR-41 and -43 and apoptosis-related proteins (bax, mcl-1, a1) mRNA were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and the expression of acetylated histone H3 was determined by western blot. The caspase inhibitors inhibited butyrate- and propionate-induced neutrophil apoptosis treated or untreated with lipopolysaccharide or tumor necrosis factor-alpha, whereas GPR and MAPK inhibitors had no effect. The mRNA expressions of GPR-43 and a1 protein were reduced by butyrate and propionate. The expressions of acetylated histone H3 were induced by butyrate and propionate. These results suggest that butyrate and propionate increase apoptosis of neutrophils irrespective of their activation state, by

  13. Butyrate Inhibits Indices of Colorectal Carcinogenesis via Enhancing α-Ketoglutarate-Dependent DNA Demethylation of Mismatch Repair Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaofei; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2018-03-26

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC), one of the most common cancers, is inversely proportional to dietary fiber intake. Butyrate, the fermentation end product of dietary fibers in the colon, is known for its antitumor effects. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of butyrate on colorectal adenocarcinoma cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, metabolism, and their mechanistic links using HT-29 and Caco-2 cells. Butyrate suppressed proliferation, potentiated differentiation and induced apoptosis in both HT-29 and Caco-2 cells, associated with enhanced expression of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). Furthermore, butyrate upregulated acetyl-CoA and α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), concomitant with enhanced histone acetylation and DNA demethylation in the promoter of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene. Knocking down IDH1 abolished the positive effects of butyrate on CRC apoptosis and MMR protein expression, in junction with reduced α-KG content. Importantly, α-KG supplementation recovered the beneficial effects of butyrate in IDH1 deficient cells. In summary, butyrate inhibits indices of colorectal carcinogenesis in an α-ketoglutarate-dependent manner. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Upregulation of annexin A1 expression by butyrate in human melanoma cells induces invasion by inhibiting E-cadherin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jimin; Song, In-Sung; Pak, Jhang Ho; Jang, Sung-Wuk

    2016-11-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a critical step in the metastasis of epithelial cancer cells. Butyrate, which is produced from dietary fiber by colonic bacterial fermentation, has been reported to influence EMT. However, some studies have reported that butyrate promotes EMT, while others have reported an inhibitory effect. To clarify these controversial results, it is necessary to elucidate the mechanism by which butyrate can influence EMT. In this study, we examined the potential role of annexin A1 (ANXA1), which was previously reported to promote EMT in breast cancer cells, as a mediator of EMT regulation by butyrate. We found that ANXA1 mRNA and protein were expressed in highly invasive melanoma cell lines (A2058 and A375), but not in SK-MEL-5 cells, which are less invasive. We also showed that butyrate induced ANXA1 mRNA and protein expression and promoted EMT-related cell invasion in SK-MEL-5 cells. Downregulation of ANXA1 expression using specific small interfering RNAs in butyrate-treated SK-MEL-5 cells resulted in increased expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreased cell invasion. Moreover, overexpressing ANXA1 decreased the expression of the E-cadherin. Collectively, these results indicate that butyrate induces the expression of ANXA1 in human melanoma cells, which then promotes invasion through activating the EMT signaling pathway.

  15. Diet is a major factor governing the fecal butyrate-producing community structure across Mammalia, Aves and Reptilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, Marius; Gao, Jiarong; Rizzo, Mike; Harrison, Tara; Tiedje, James M

    2015-03-17

    Butyrate-producing bacteria have an important role in maintaining host health. They are well studied in human and medically associated animal models; however, much less is known for other Vertebrata. We investigated the butyrate-producing community in hindgut-fermenting Mammalia (n = 38), Aves (n = 8) and Reptilia (n = 8) using a gene-targeted pyrosequencing approach of the terminal genes of the main butyrate-synthesis pathways, namely butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk). Most animals exhibit high gene abundances, and clear diet-specific signatures were detected with but genes significantly enriched in omnivores and herbivores compared with carnivores. But dominated the butyrate-producing community in these two groups, whereas buk was more abundant in many carnivorous animals. Clustering of protein sequences (5% cutoff) of the combined communities (but and buk) placed carnivores apart from other diet groups, except for noncarnivorous Carnivora, which clustered together with carnivores. The majority of clusters (but: 5141 and buk: 2924) did not show close relation to any reference sequences from public databases (identity butyrate producers are abundant across vertebrates exhibiting great functional redundancy and that diet is the primary determinant governing the composition of the butyrate-producing guild.

  16. Comparison of the butyrate effects on neurotransmitter receptors in neurohybrids NG108-15 and NCB-20 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, X.Z.; Chuang, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The authors previous study demonstrated that long term treatment of NCB-20 cells with sodium butyrate resulted in a marked increase in the density of delta-opioid receptors with a much lesser effect on muscarinic cholinergic and no effect on alpha 2 -adrenergic receptors. In the present study the authors investigated the effect of sodium butyrate on these three types of receptors in NG108-15 cells whose neuroblastoma parent is the same as that of NCB-20 cells. Long term treatment of NG108-15 cells with sodium butyrate (0.5 mM) induced a 2-fold increase in the density of the specific binding of 3 H-clonidine. A comparable increase in the number of binding sites was detected when 3 H-yohimbine was used as the receptor ligand. The butyrate-induced increase in the alpha 2 -adrenergic receptor binding could be totally abolished by treatment with a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, suggesting that synthesis of receptor protein is involved. The same butyrate treatment had no significant effect on opioid and muscarinic cholinergic receptor bindings. Thus, butyrate effects on the expression of these three types of receptors in NG108-15 and NCB-20 cells are dramatically different. These data suggest that induction by butyrate of neurotransmitter receptors requires concerted action of genetic factors of both parents of the neurohybrids. 22 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  17. Supplementing the maternal diet of rats with butyrate enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in the skeletal muscles of weaned offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanping; Gao, Shixing; Jun, Guo; Zhao, Ruqian; Yang, Xiaojing

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of maternal dietary butyrate supplementation on energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in offspring skeletal muscle and the possible mediating mechanisms. Virgin female rats were randomly assigned to either control or butyrate diets (1 % butyrate sodium) throughout gestation and lactation. At the end of lactation (21 d), the offspring were killed by exsanguination from the abdominal aorta under anaesthesia. The results showed that maternal butyrate supplementation throughout gestation and lactation did not affect offspring body weight. However, the protein expressions of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR) 43 and 41 were significantly enhanced in offspring skeletal muscle of the maternal butyrate-supplemented group. The ATP content, most of mitochondrial DNA-encoded gene expressions, the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 4 protein contents and the mitochondrial DNA copy number were significantly higher in the butyrate group than in the control group. Meanwhile, the protein expressions of type 1 myosin heavy chain, mitochondrial transcription factor A, PPAR-coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and uncoupling protein 3 were significantly increased in the gastrocnemius muscle of the treatment group compared with the control group. These results indicate for the first time that maternal butyrate supplementation during the gestation and lactation periods influenced energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis through the GPR and PGC-1α pathways in offspring skeletal muscle at weaning.

  18. Efficacy of sodium butyrate adjunct therapy in shigellosis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment of shigellosis in rabbits with butyrate reduces clinical severity and counteracts the downregulation of cathelicidin (CAP-18) in the large intestinal epithelia. Here, we aimed to evaluate whether butyrate can be used as an adjunct to antibiotics in the treatment of shigellosis in patients. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group designed clinical trial was conducted. Eighty adult patients with shigellosis were randomized to either the Intervention group (butyrate, n = 40) or the Placebo group (normal saline, n = 40). The Intervention group was given an enema containing sodium butyrate (80 mM), twice daily for 3 days, while the Placebo group received the same dose of normal saline. The primary endpoint of the trial was to assess the efficacy of butyrate in improving clinical, endoscopic and histological features of shigellosis. The secondary endpoint was to study the effect of butyrate on the induction of antimicrobial peptides in the rectum. Clinical outcomes were assessed and concentrations of antimicrobial peptides (LL-37, human beta defensin1 [HBD-1] and human beta defensin 3 [HBD-3]) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β [IL-1β] and interleukin-8 [IL-8]) were measured in the stool. Sigmoidoscopic and histopathological analyses, and immunostaining of LL-37 in the rectal mucosa were performed in a subgroup of patients. Results Compared with placebo, butyrate therapy led to the early reduction of macrophages, pus cells, IL-8 and IL-1β in the stool and improvement in rectal histopathology. Butyrate treatment induced LL-37 expression in the rectal epithelia. Stool concentration of LL-37 remained significantly higher in the Intervention group on days 4 and 7. Conclusion Adjunct therapy with butyrate during shigellosis led to early reduction of inflammation and enhanced LL-37 expression in the rectal epithelia with prolonged release of LL-37 in the stool. Trial Registration Clinical

  19. Use of sodium butyrate as an alternative to dietary fiber: effects on the embryonic development and anti-oxidative capacity of rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Lin

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the effect of replacing dietary fiber with sodium butyrate on reproductive performance and antioxidant defense in a high fat diet during pregnancy by using a rat model. Eighty virgin female Sprague Dawley rats were fed one of four diets--(1 control diet (C group, (2 high fat + high fiber diet (HF group, (3 high-fat +5% sodium butyrate diet (SB group, and (4 HF diet + α-cyano-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid (CHC group--intraperitoneally on days 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 of gestation. SB and dietary fiber had similar effects on improving fetal number and reducing the abortion rate; however, the anti-oxidant capacity of maternal serum, placenta, and fetus was superior in the HF group than in the SB group. In comparison, CHC injection decreased reproductive performance and antioxidant defense. Both dietary fiber (DF and SB supplementation had a major but different effect on the expression of anti-oxidant related genes and nutrient transporters genes. In summary, our data indicate that SB and DF showed similar effect on reproductive performance, but SB cannot completely replace the DF towards with respect to redox regulation in high-fat diet; and SB might influence offspring metabolism and health differently to DF.

  20. Use of sodium butyrate as an alternative to dietary fiber: effects on the embryonic development and anti-oxidative capacity of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Fang, Zheng-feng; Che, Lian-qiang; Xu, Sheng-yu; Wu, De; Wu, Cai-mei; Wu, Xiu-qun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of replacing dietary fiber with sodium butyrate on reproductive performance and antioxidant defense in a high fat diet during pregnancy by using a rat model. Eighty virgin female Sprague Dawley rats were fed one of four diets--(1) control diet (C group), (2) high fat + high fiber diet (HF group), (3) high-fat +5% sodium butyrate diet (SB group), and (4) HF diet + α-cyano-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid (CHC group)--intraperitoneally on days 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 of gestation. SB and dietary fiber had similar effects on improving fetal number and reducing the abortion rate; however, the anti-oxidant capacity of maternal serum, placenta, and fetus was superior in the HF group than in the SB group. In comparison, CHC injection decreased reproductive performance and antioxidant defense. Both dietary fiber (DF) and SB supplementation had a major but different effect on the expression of anti-oxidant related genes and nutrient transporters genes. In summary, our data indicate that SB and DF showed similar effect on reproductive performance, but SB cannot completely replace the DF towards with respect to redox regulation in high-fat diet; and SB might influence offspring metabolism and health differently to DF.

  1. Purification and Immobilization of a Novel Enantioselective Lipase from Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvents for Efficient Resolution of Ethyl 2-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl) Butyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin; Yan, Ren; He, Jun-Yao; Wang, Pu

    2016-10-01

    A highly enantioselective lipase from Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvents E105 was purified via ultrasonic extraction, precipitation, and chromatographic steps. The enzyme was purified about 38-fold with the recovery yield of 9 % and was confirmed as a dimer protein consisting of two identical subunits with a molecular mass of 24 kDa. The purified lipase was used to catalyze resolution of racemic ethyl 2-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl) butyrate to (S)-2-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl) butyric acid. The maximum activity of such lipase was obtained at pH 7.5, 35 °C, and the highest relative activity (156.80 %) was observed in the presence of 0.5 mM Co 2+ . Subsequently, the lipase was encapsulated within a mixture of 3 % sodium alginate and 0.8 % carrageenan, and then cross-linked with 0.6 % glutaraldehyde to enhance its biocatalytic capability and stability. Comparing with 36.9 % product yield and 97.5 % product ee of free lipase, the highest product yield of 46.3 % and ee of 98.5 % for immobilized lipase were achieved with the presence of 20 mM substrate. In addition, the reusability of immobilized lipase was also investigated, which could maintain 63.7 % of its initial conversion yield after seven repeated batch reactions. Thus, the evaluated enantioselective lipase in this work has a good potential for further industrial application.

  2. Degradation intermediates of polyhydroxy butyrate inhibits phenotypic expression of virulence factors and biofilm formation in luminescent Vibrio sp. PUGSK8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghal Kiran, George; Priyadharshini, Sethu; Dobson, Alan D W; Gnanamani, Elumalai; Selvin, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent vibrios are ubiquitous in the marine environment and are the causative agents of vibriosis and mass mortality in many aquatic animals. In aquatic environments, treatments cannot be limited to the diseased population alone, therefore treatment of the entire aquatic system is the only possible approach. Thus, the use of antibiotics to treat part of the infected animals requires a dose based on the entire biomass, which results in the treatment of uninfected animals as well as non-target normal microbial flora. A treatment method based on anti-virulence or quorum quenching has recently been proposed as an effective treatment strategy for aquatic animals. Polyhydroxy butyrates (PHB) are bacterial storage molecules, which accumulate in cells under nutritional stress. The degradation of PHB releases short-chain β-hydroxy butyric acid, which may act as anti-infective molecule. To date, there is very limited information on the potential anti-infective and anti-virulence mechanisms involving PHB. In this study, we aim to examine the effect of PHB on inhibition of the virulence cascade of Vibrio such as biofilm formation, luminescence, motility behaviour, haemolysi