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Sample records for undifferentiated pluripotent stem

  1. Conditionally replicating adenovirus prevents pluripotent stem cell–derived teratoma by specifically eliminating undifferentiated cells

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    Kaoru Mitsui

    Full Text Available Incomplete abolition of tumorigenicity creates potential safety concerns in clinical trials of regenerative medicine based on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs. Here, we demonstrate that conditionally replicating adenoviruses that specifically target cancers using multiple factors (m-CRAs, originally developed as anticancer drugs, may also be useful as novel antitumorigenic agents in hPSC-based therapy. The survivin promoter was more active in undifferentiated hPSCs than the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT promoter, whereas both promoters were minimally active in differentiated normal cells. Accordingly, survivin-responsive m-CRA (Surv.m-CRA killed undifferentiated hPSCs more efficiently than TERT-responsive m-CRAs (Tert.m-CRA; both m-CRAs exhibited efficient viral replication and cytotoxicity in undifferentiated hPSCs, but not in cocultured differentiated normal cells. Pre-infection of hPSCs with Surv.m-CRA or Tert.m-CRA abolished in vivo teratoma formation in a dose-dependent manner following hPSC implantation into mice. Thus, m-CRAs, and in particular Surv.m-CRAs, represent novel antitumorigenic agents that could facilitate safe clinical applications of hPSC-based regenerative medicine.

  2. Effect of antibiotics against Mycoplasma sp. on human embryonic stem cells undifferentiated status, pluripotency, cell viability and growth.

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    Leonardo Romorini

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are self-renewing pluripotent cells that can differentiate into specialized cells and hold great promise as models for human development and disease studies, cell-replacement therapies, drug discovery and in vitro cytotoxicity tests. The culture and differentiation of these cells are both complex and expensive, so it is essential to extreme aseptic conditions. hESCs are susceptible to Mycoplasma sp. infection, which is hard to detect and alters stem cell-associated properties. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxic effect of Plasmocin(TM and ciprofloxacin (specific antibiotics used for Mycoplasma sp. eradication on hESCs. Mycoplasma sp. infected HUES-5 884 (H5 884, stable hESCs H5-brachyury promoter-GFP line cells were effectively cured with a 14 days Plasmocin(TM 25 µg/ml treatment (curative treatment while maintaining stemness characteristic features. Furthermore, cured H5 884 cells exhibit the same karyotype as the parental H5 line and expressed GFP, through up-regulation of brachyury promoter, at day 4 of differentiation onset. Moreover, H5 cells treated with ciprofloxacin 10 µg/ml for 14 days (mimic of curative treatment and H5 and WA09 (H9 hESCs treated with Plasmocin(TM 5 µg/ml (prophylactic treatment for 5 passages retained hESCs features, as judged by the expression of stemness-related genes (TRA1-60, TRA1-81, SSEA-4, Oct-4, Nanog at mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the presence of specific markers of the three germ layers (brachyury, Nkx2.5 and cTnT: mesoderm; AFP: endoderm; nestin and Pax-6: ectoderm was verified in in vitro differentiated antibiotic-treated hESCs. In conclusion, we found that Plasmocin(TM and ciprofloxacin do not affect hESCs stemness and pluripotency nor cell viability. However, curative treatments slightly diminished cell growth rate. This cytotoxic effect was reversible as cells regained normal growth rate upon antibiotic withdrawal.

  3. Effect of antibiotics against Mycoplasma sp. on human embryonic stem cells undifferentiated status, pluripotency, cell viability and growth.

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    Romorini, Leonardo; Riva, Diego Ariel; Blüguermann, Carolina; Videla Richardson, Guillermo Agustin; Scassa, Maria Elida; Sevlever, Gustavo Emilio; Miriuka, Santiago Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are self-renewing pluripotent cells that can differentiate into specialized cells and hold great promise as models for human development and disease studies, cell-replacement therapies, drug discovery and in vitro cytotoxicity tests. The culture and differentiation of these cells are both complex and expensive, so it is essential to extreme aseptic conditions. hESCs are susceptible to Mycoplasma sp. infection, which is hard to detect and alters stem cell-associated properties. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxic effect of Plasmocin(TM) and ciprofloxacin (specific antibiotics used for Mycoplasma sp. eradication) on hESCs. Mycoplasma sp. infected HUES-5 884 (H5 884, stable hESCs H5-brachyury promoter-GFP line) cells were effectively cured with a 14 days Plasmocin(TM) 25 µg/ml treatment (curative treatment) while maintaining stemness characteristic features. Furthermore, cured H5 884 cells exhibit the same karyotype as the parental H5 line and expressed GFP, through up-regulation of brachyury promoter, at day 4 of differentiation onset. Moreover, H5 cells treated with ciprofloxacin 10 µg/ml for 14 days (mimic of curative treatment) and H5 and WA09 (H9) hESCs treated with Plasmocin(TM) 5 µg/ml (prophylactic treatment) for 5 passages retained hESCs features, as judged by the expression of stemness-related genes (TRA1-60, TRA1-81, SSEA-4, Oct-4, Nanog) at mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the presence of specific markers of the three germ layers (brachyury, Nkx2.5 and cTnT: mesoderm; AFP: endoderm; nestin and Pax-6: ectoderm) was verified in in vitro differentiated antibiotic-treated hESCs. In conclusion, we found that Plasmocin(TM) and ciprofloxacin do not affect hESCs stemness and pluripotency nor cell viability. However, curative treatments slightly diminished cell growth rate. This cytotoxic effect was reversible as cells regained normal growth rate upon antibiotic withdrawal.

  4. Dazlin' pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can be isolated from the inner cell mass (ICM) of blastocyst embryos and differentiate into all three germ layers in vitro. However, despite their similar origin, mouse embryonic stem cells represent a more naïve ICM-like pluripotent state whereas human

  5. Sustained levels of FGF2 maintain undifferentiated stem cell cultures with biweekly feeding.

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    Steven Lotz

    Full Text Available An essential aspect of stem cell culture is the successful maintenance of the undifferentiated state. Many types of stem cells are FGF2 dependent, and pluripotent stem cells are maintained by replacing FGF2-containing media daily, while tissue-specific stem cells are typically fed every 3rd day. Frequent feeding, however, results in significant variation in growth factor levels due to FGF2 instability, which limits effective maintenance due to spontaneous differentiation. We report that stabilization of FGF2 levels using controlled release PLGA microspheres improves expression of stem cell markers, increases stem cell numbers and decreases spontaneous differentiation. The controlled release FGF2 additive reduces the frequency of media changes needed to maintain stem cell cultures, so that human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells can be maintained successfully with biweekly feedings.

  6. Germline and Pluripotent Stem Cells.

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    Reik, Wolf; Surani, M Azim

    2015-11-02

    Epigenetic mechanisms play an essential role in the germline and imprinting cycle. Germ cells show extensive epigenetic programming in preparation for the generation of the totipotent state, which in turn leads to the establishment of pluripotent cells in blastocysts. The latter are the cells from which pluripotent embryonic stem cells are derived and maintained in culture. Following blastocyst implantation, postimplantation epiblast cells develop, which give rise to all somatic cells as well as primordial germ cells, the precursors of sperm and eggs. Pluripotent stem cells in culture can be induced to undergo differentiation into somatic cells and germ cells in culture. Understanding the natural cycles of epigenetic reprogramming that occur in the germline will allow the generation of better and more versatile stem cells for both therapeutic and research purposes. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  7. Induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from human somatic cells.

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    Yu, Junying; Vodyanik, Maxim A; Smuga-Otto, Kim; Antosiewicz-Bourget, Jessica; Frane, Jennifer L; Tian, Shulan; Nie, Jeff; Jonsdottir, Gudrun A; Ruotti, Victor; Stewart, Ron; Slukvin, Igor I; Thomson, James A

    2007-12-21

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows trans-acting factors present in the mammalian oocyte to reprogram somatic cell nuclei to an undifferentiated state. We show that four factors (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, and LIN28) are sufficient to reprogram human somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells that exhibit the essential characteristics of embryonic stem (ES) cells. These induced pluripotent human stem cells have normal karyotypes, express telomerase activity, express cell surface markers and genes that characterize human ES cells, and maintain the developmental potential to differentiate into advanced derivatives of all three primary germ layers. Such induced pluripotent human cell lines should be useful in the production of new disease models and in drug development, as well as for applications in transplantation medicine, once technical limitations (for example, mutation through viral integration) are eliminated.

  8. Derivation of porcine pluripotent stem cells for biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Yow-Ling; Yang, Jenn-Rong; Liao, Yu-Jing; Kuo, Ting-Yung; Liao, Chia-Hsin; Kang, Ching-Hsun; Tai, Chein; Anderson, Gary B; Chen, Lih-Ren

    2016-07-01

    Pluripotent stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), embryonic germ cells (EGCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are capable of self-renew and limitlessly proliferating in vitro with undifferentiated characteristics. They are able to differentiate in vitro, spontaneously or responding to suitable signals, into cells of all three primary germ layers. Consequently, these pluripotent stem cells will be valuable sources for cell replacement therapy in numerous disorders. However, the promise of human ESCs and EGCs is cramped by the ethical argument about destroying embryos and fetuses for cell line creation. Moreover, there are still carcinogenic risks existing toward the goal of clinical application for human ESCs, EGCs, and iPSCs. Therefore, a suitable animal model for stem cell research will benefit the further development of human stem cell technology. The pigs, on the basis of their similarity in anatomy, immunology, physiology, and biochemical properties, have been wide used as model animals in the study of various human diseases. The development of porcine pluripotent stem cell lines will hold the opportunity to provide an excellent material for human counterpart to the transplantation in biomedical research and further development of cell-based therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Human induced pluripotent stem cells on autologous feeders.

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    Kazutoshi Takahashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For therapeutic usage of induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS cells, to accomplish xeno-free culture is critical. Previous reports have shown that human embryonic stem (ES cells can be maintained in feeder-free condition. However, absence of feeder cells can be a hostile environment for pluripotent cells and often results in karyotype abnormalities. Instead of animal feeders, human fibroblasts can be used as feeder cells of human ES cells. However, one still has to be concerned about the existence of unidentified pathogens, such as viruses and prions in these non-autologous feeders. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This report demonstrates that human induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS cells can be established and maintained on isogenic parental feeder cells. We tested four independent human skin fibroblasts for the potential to maintain self-renewal of iPS cells. All the fibroblasts tested, as well as their conditioned medium, were capable of maintaining the undifferentiated state and normal karyotypes of iPS cells. Furthermore, human iPS cells can be generated on isogenic parental fibroblasts as feeders. These iPS cells carried on proliferation over 19 passages with undifferentiated morphologies. They expressed undifferentiated pluripotent cell markers, and could differentiate into all three germ layers via embryoid body and teratoma formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that autologous fibroblasts can be not only a source for iPS cells but also be feeder layers. Our results provide a possibility to solve the dilemma by using isogenic fibroblasts as feeder layers of iPS cells. This is an important step toward the establishment of clinical grade iPS cells.

  10. Human testis-derived embryonic stem cell-like cells are not pluripotent, but possess potential of mesenchymal progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chikhovskaya, J. V.; Jonker, M. J.; Meissner, A.; Breit, T. M.; Repping, S.; van Pelt, A. M. M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spontaneous in vitro transition of undifferentiated spermatogonia into the pluripotent cell state has been achieved using neonatal and adult mouse testis tissue. In an effort to establish an analogous source of human patient-specific pluripotent stem cells, several research groups have

  11. Characterization of companion animal pluripotent stem cells.

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    Paterson, Y Z; Kafarnik, C; Guest, D J

    2018-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells have the capacity to grow indefinitely in culture and differentiate into derivatives of the three germ layers. These properties underpin their potential to be used in regenerative medicine. Originally derived from early embryos, pluripotent stem cells can now be derived by reprogramming an adult cell back to a pluripotent state. Companion animals such as horses, dogs, and cats suffer from many injuries and diseases for which regenerative medicine may offer new treatments. As many of the injuries and diseases are similar to conditions in humans the use of companion animals for the experimental and clinical testing of stem cell and regenerative medicine products would provide relevant animal models for the translation of therapies to the human field. In order to fully utilize companion animal pluripotent stem cells robust, standardized methods of characterization must be developed to ensure that safe and effective treatments can be delivered. In this review we discuss the methods that are available for characterizing pluripotent stem cells and the techniques that have been applied in cells from companion animals. We describe characteristics which have been described consistently across reports as well as highlighting discrepant results. Significant steps have been made to define the in vitro culture requirements and drive lineage specific differentiation of pluripotent stem cells in companion animal species. However, additional basic research to compare pluripotent stem cell types and define characteristics of pluripotency in companion animal species is still required. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  12. Variations in Glycogen Synthesis in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells with Altered Pluripotent States

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    Chen, Richard J.; Zhang, Guofeng; Garfield, Susan H.; Shi, Yi-Jun; Chen, Kevin G.; Robey, Pamela G.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent very promising resources for cell-based regenerative medicine. It is essential to determine the biological implications of some fundamental physiological processes (such as glycogen metabolism) in these stem cells. In this report, we employ electron, immunofluorescence microscopy, and biochemical methods to study glycogen synthesis in hPSCs. Our results indicate that there is a high level of glycogen synthesis (0.28 to 0.62 μg/μg proteins) in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) compared with the glycogen levels (0 to 0.25 μg/μg proteins) reported in human cancer cell lines. Moreover, we found that glycogen synthesis was regulated by bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) and the glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) pathway. Our observation of glycogen bodies and sustained expression of the pluripotent factor Oct-4 mediated by the potent GSK-3 inhibitor CHIR-99021 reveals an altered pluripotent state in hPSC culture. We further confirmed glycogen variations under different naïve pluripotent cell growth conditions based on the addition of the GSK-3 inhibitor BIO. Our data suggest that primed hPSCs treated with naïve growth conditions acquire altered pluripotent states, similar to those naïve-like hPSCs, with increased glycogen synthesis. Furthermore, we found that suppression of phosphorylated glycogen synthase was an underlying mechanism responsible for altered glycogen synthesis. Thus, our novel findings regarding the dynamic changes in glycogen metabolism provide new markers to assess the energetic and various pluripotent states in hPSCs. The components of glycogen metabolic pathways offer new assays to delineate previously unrecognized properties of hPSCs under different growth conditions. PMID:26565809

  13. Systems Biology and Stem Cell Pluripotency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mashayekhi, Kaveh; Hall, Vanessa Jane; Freude, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology have accelerated research in the area of regenerative medicine. Over the past years, it has become possible to derive patient-specific stem cells which can be used to generate different cell populations for potential cell therapy. Systems biological...... improve systems biology and its uses in the field. In this chapter, we first give a general background on stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Stem cell potency is introduced together with the hierarchy of stem cells ranging from pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem...... modeling of stem cell pluripotency and differentiation have largely been based on prior knowledge of signaling pathways, gene regulatory networks, and epigenetic factors. However, there is a great need to extend the complexity of the modeling and to integrate different types of data, which would further...

  14. A new class of pluripotent stem cell cytotoxic small molecules.

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    Mark Richards

    Full Text Available A major concern in Pluripotent Stem Cell (PSC-derived cell replacement therapy is the risk of teratoma formation from contaminating undifferentiated cells. Removal of undifferentiated cells from differentiated cultures is an essential step before PSC-based cell therapies can be safely deployed in a clinical setting. We report a group of novel small molecules that are cytotoxic to PSCs. Our data indicates that these molecules are specific and potent in their activity allowing rapid eradication of undifferentiated cells. Experiments utilizing mixed PSC and primary human neuronal and cardiomyocyte cultures demonstrate that up to a 6-fold enrichment for specialized cells can be obtained without adversely affecting cell viability and function. Several structural variants were synthesized to identify key functional groups and to improve specificity and efficacy. Comparative microarray analysis and ensuing RNA knockdown studies revealed involvement of the PERK/ATF4/DDIT3 ER stress pathway. Surprisingly, cell death following ER stress induction was associated with a concomitant decrease in endogenous ROS levels in PSCs. Undifferentiated cells treated with these molecules preceding transplantation fail to form teratomas in SCID mice. Furthermore, these molecules remain non-toxic and non-teratogenic to zebrafish embryos suggesting that they may be safely used in vivo.

  15. Clinical potential of human-induced pluripotent stem cells : Perspectives of induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Kumar, Dharmendra; Anand, Taruna; Kues, Wilfried A

    2017-04-01

    The recent establishment of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells promises the development of autologous cell therapies for degenerative diseases, without the ethical concerns associated with human embryonic stem (ES) cells. Initially, iPS cells were generated by retroviral transduction of somatic cells with core reprogramming genes. To avoid potential genotoxic effects associated with retroviral transfection, more recently, alternative non-viral gene transfer approaches were developed. Before a potential clinical application of iPS cell-derived therapies can be planned, it must be ensured that the reprogramming to pluripotency is not associated with genome mutagenesis or epigenetic aberrations. This may include direct effects of the reprogramming method or "off-target" effects associated with the reprogramming or the culture conditions. Thus, a rigorous safety testing of iPS or iPS-derived cells is imperative, including long-term studies in model animals. This will include not only rodents but also larger mammalian model species to allow for assessing long-term stability of the transplanted cells, functional integration into the host tissue, and freedom from undifferentiated iPS cells. Determination of the necessary cell dose is also critical; it is assumed that a minimum of 1 billion transplantable cells is required to achieve a therapeutic effect. This will request medium to long-term in vitro cultivation and dozens of cell divisions, bearing the risk of accumulating replication errors. Here, we review the clinical potential of human iPS cells and evaluate which are the most suitable approaches to overcome or minimize risks associated with the application of iPS cell-derived cell therapies.

  16. CCL2 enhances pluripotency of human induced pluripotent stem cells by activating hypoxia related genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasegawa, Yuki; Tang, Dave; Takahashi, Naoko; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Suzuki, Harukazu; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J. Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J. L.; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bertin, Nicolas; Jørgensen, Mette; Dimont, Emmanuel; Arner, Erik; Schmidl, Christian; Schaefer, Ulf; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Plessy, Charles; Vitezic, Morana; Severin, Jessica; Semple, Colin A.; Ishizu, Yuri; Young, Robert S.; Francescatto, Margherita; Alam, Intikhab; Albanese, Davide; Altschuler, Gabriel M.; Arakawa, Takahiro; Archer, John A. C.; Arner, Peter; Babina, Magda; Baker, Sarah; Balwierz, Piotr J.; Beckhouse, Anthony G.; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Blake, Judith A.; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Califano, Andrea; Cannistraci, Carlo V.; Carbajo, Daniel; Chen, Yun; Chierici, Marco; Ciani, Yari; Clevers, Hans C.; Dalla, Emiliano; Davis, Carrie A.; Detmar, Michael; Diehl, Alexander D.; Dohi, Taeko; Drabløs, Finn; Edge, Albert S. B.; Edinger, Matthias; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Fang, Hai; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Favorov, Alexander V.; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Frith, Martin C.; Fujita, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Furlanello, Cesare; Furuno, Masaaki; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B.; Gibson, Andrew; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Gough, Julian; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J.; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Harbers, Matthias; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Herlyn, Meenhard; Hitchens, Kelly J.; Ho Sui, Shannan J.; Hofmann, Oliver M.; Hoof, Ilka; Hori, Fumi; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Iida, Kei; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jankovic, Boris R.; Jia, Hui; Joshi, Anagha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Kai, Chieko; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kasianov, Artem S.; Kasukawa, Takeya; Katayama, Shintaro; Kato, Sachi; Kawaguchi, Shuji; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kempfle, Judith S.; Kenna, Tony J.; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M.; Kitamura, Toshio; Klinken, S. Peter; Knox, Alan J.; Kojima, Miki; Kojima, Soichi; Kondo, Naoto; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Krampitz, Sarah; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kwon, Andrew T.; Laros, Jeroen F. J.; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Li, Kang; Lilje, Berit; Lipovich, Leonard; Mackay-sim, Alan; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Mar, Jessica C.; Marchand, Benoit; Mathelier, Anthony; Mejhert, Niklas; Meynert, Alison; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morais, David A. de Lima; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Motakis, Efthymios; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L.; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakazato, Kenichi; van Nimwegen, Erik; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Nozaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Pain, Arnab; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Persson, Helena; Piazza, Silvano; Prendergast, James G. D.; Rackham, Owen J. L.; Ramilowski, Jordan A.; Rashid, Mamoon; Ravasi, Timothy; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roncador, Marco; Roy, Sugata; Rye, Morten B.; Saijyo, Eri; Sajantila, Antti; Saka, Akiko; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sakai, Mizuho; Sato, Hiroki; Satoh, Hironori; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schneider, Claudio; Schultes, Erik A.; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G.; Schwegmann, Anita; Sengstag, Thierry; Sheng, Guojun; Shimoji, Hisashi; Shimoni, Yishai; Shin, Jay W.; Simon, Christophe; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaaki; Suzuki, Masanori; Suzuki, Naoko; Swoboda, Rolf K.; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.; Tagami, Michihira; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tatum, Zuotian; Thompson, Mark; Toyoda, Hiroo; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Valen, Eivind; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M.; Verardo, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Watanabe, Shoko; Wells, Christine A.; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Wood, Emily J.; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Zabierowski, Suzan E.; Zhang, Peter G.; Zhao, Xiaobei; Zucchelli, Silvia; Summers, Kim M.; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Heutink, Peter; Hide, Winston; Freeman, Tom C.; Lenhard, Boris; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Taylor, Martin S.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Sandelin, Albin; Hume, David A.; Carninci, Piero

    2014-01-01

    Standard culture of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) requires basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) to maintain the pluripotent state, whereas hiPSC more closely resemble epiblast stem cells than true naive state ES which requires LIF to maintain pluripotency. Here we show that

  17. Podocalyxin as a major pluripotent marker and novel keratan sulfate proteoglycan in human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Hidenao; Nagai, Yuko; Kojima, Aya; Kinoshita-Toyoda, Akiko

    2017-04-01

    Podocalyxin (PC) was first identified as a heavily sialylated transmembrane protein of glomerular podocytes. Recent studies suggest that PC is a remarkable glycoconjugate that acts as a universal glyco-carrier. The glycoforms of PC are responsible for multiple functions in normal tissue, human cancer cells, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). PC is employed as a major pluripotent marker of hESCs and hiPSCs. Among the general antibodies for human PC, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81 recognize the keratan sulfate (KS)-related structures. Therefore, It is worthwhile to summarize the outstanding chemical characteristic of PC, including the KS-related structures. Here, we review the glycoforms of PC and discuss the potential of PC as a novel KS proteoglycan in undifferentiated hESCs and hiPSCs.

  18. A Chemical Probe that Labels Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nao Hirata

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A small-molecule fluorescent probe specific for human pluripotent stem cells would serve as a useful tool for basic cell biology research and stem cell therapy. Screening of fluorescent chemical libraries with human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and subsequent evaluation of hit molecules identified a fluorescent compound (Kyoto probe 1 [KP-1] that selectively labels human pluripotent stem cells. Our analyses indicated that the selectivity results primarily from a distinct expression pattern of ABC transporters in human pluripotent stem cells and from the transporter selectivity of KP-1. Expression of ABCB1 (MDR1 and ABCG2 (BCRP, both of which cause the efflux of KP-1, is repressed in human pluripotent stem cells. Although KP-1, like other pluripotent markers, is not absolutely specific for pluripotent stem cells, the identified chemical probe may be used in conjunction with other reagents.

  19. Expression of the pluripotency marker UTF1 is restricted to a subpopulation of early A spermatogonia in rat testis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bragt, Maaike P. A.; Roepers-Gajadien, Hermien L.; Korver, Cindy M.; Bogerd, Jan; Okuda, Akihiko; Eggen, Bart J. L.; de Rooij, Dirk G.; van Pelt, Ans M. M.

    2008-01-01

    The population of early A spermatogonia includes stem cells that possess spermatogonial stem cell properties. Recent reports suggest that these cells have the ability to regain pluripotent properties. Here, we show that expression of the pluripotency marker undifferentiated embryonic cell

  20. Technical approaches to induce selective cell death of pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ho-Chang; Cho, Seung-Ju; Lee, Mi-Ok; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2017-07-01

    Despite the recent promising results of clinical trials using human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-based cell therapies for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the risk of teratoma formation resulting from residual undifferentiated hPSCs remains a serious and critical hurdle for broader clinical implementation. To mitigate the tumorigenic risk of hPSC-based cell therapy, a variety of approaches have been examined to ablate the undifferentiated hPSCs based on the unique molecular properties of hPSCs. In the present review, we offer a brief overview of recent attempts at selective elimination of undifferentiated hPSCs to decrease the risk of teratoma formation in hPSC-based cell therapy.

  1. Legislation governing pluripotent stem cells in South Africa | Pepper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pluripotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts (either from in vitro fertilisation or following somatic cell nuclear transfer) are called embryonic stem (ES) cells, while those derived by reprogramming adult cells are called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Adult stem cells include haematopoietic, ...

  2. Neural retinal regeneration with pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, Conor M; Powner, Michael B; Carr, Amanda-Jayne F; Smart, Matthew J K; da Cruz, Lyndon; Coffey, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Retinal degeneration represents a huge burden of blinding disease, and currently there are no effective treatments that reverse the most common causes of neural retinal degeneration. Stem cell biology has the potential to significantly ease this burden, not only through the development of disease models of retinal degeneration but also in the manufacture of a replacement for the neural retinal tissue. This review summarizes the major advancements in the last decade in the field of neural retinal regeneration with an emphasis on the differentiation of embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells into cells with retinal and specifically photoreceptor characteristics. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Genome Editing in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

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    Carlson-Stevermer, Jared; Saha, Krishanu

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) enables the generation of reporter lines and knockout cell lines. Zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and CRISPR/Cas9 technology have recently increased the efficiency of proper gene editing by creating double strand breaks (DSB) at defined sequences in the human genome. These systems typically use plasmids to transiently transcribe nucleases within the cell. Here, we describe the process for preparing hPSCs for transient expression of nucleases via electroporation and subsequent analysis to create genetically modified stem cell lines.

  4. Pluripotency of adult stem cells derived from human and rat pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, C.; Birth, M.; Rohwedel, J.; Assmuth, K.; Goepel, A.; Wedel, T.

    Adult stem cells are undifferentiated cells found within fully developed tissues or organs of an adult individuum. Until recently, these cells have been considered to bear less self-renewal ability and differentiation potency compared to embryonic stem cells. In recent studies an undifferentiated cell type was found in primary cultures of isolated acini from exocrine pancreas termed pancreatic stellate cells. Here we show that pancreatic stellate-like cells have the capacity of extended self-renewal and are able to differentiate spontaneously into cell types of all three germ layers expressing markers for smooth muscle cells, neurons, glial cells, epithelial cells, chondrocytes and secretory cells (insulin, amylase). Differentiation and subsequent formation of three-dimensional cellular aggregates (organoid bodies) were induced by merely culturing pancreatic stellate-like cells in hanging drops. These cells were developed into stable, long-term, in vitro cultures of both primary undifferentiated cell lines as well as organoid cultures. Thus, evidence is given that cell lineages of endodermal, mesodermal, and ectodermal origin arise spontaneously from a single adult undifferentiated cell type. Based on the present findings it is assumed that pancreatic stellate-like cells are a new class of lineage uncommitted pluripotent adult stem cells with a remarkable self-renewal ability and differentiation potency. The data emphasize the versatility of adult stem cells and may lead to a reappraisal of their use for the treatment of inherited disorders or acquired degenerative diseases.

  5. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Cardiovascular Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Egashira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are generated by reprogramming human somatic cells through the forced expression of several embryonic stem (ES cell-specific transcription factors. The potential of iPS cells is having a significant impact on regenerative medicine, with the promise of infinite self-renewal, differentiation into multiple cell types, and no problems concerning ethics or immunological rejection. Human iPS cells are currently generated by transgene introduction principally through viral vectors, which integrate into host genomes, although the associated risk of tumorigenesis is driving research into nonintegration methods. Techniques for pluripotent stem cell differentiation and purification to yield cardiomyocytes are also advancing constantly. Although there remain some unsolved problems, cardiomyocyte transplantation may be a reality in the future. After those problems will be solved, applications of human iPS cells in human cardiovascular regenerative medicine will be envisaged for the future. Furthermore, iPS cell technology has generated new human disease models using disease-specific cells. This paper summarizes the progress of iPS cell technology in cardiovascular research.

  6. Initial embryology and pluripotent stem cells in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Jan Ole Bertelsen; Callesen, Henrik; Freude, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    genetically modified pigs emerged. Over the past years, renewed interest in porcine PSCs has sparked activities in deriving in particular porcine induced pluripotent stem cells to develop the pig as a faithful model for studying the potentials and risks associated with induced pluripotent stem cell...

  7. The different shades of mammalian pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, E.W.; Lopes, S.M.; Geijsen, N.; Macklon, N.S.; Roelen, B.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The different shades of mammalian pluripotent stem cells Abstract BACKGROUND Pluripotent stem cells have been derived from a variety of sources such as from the inner cell mass of preimplantation embryos, from primordial germ cells, from teratocarcinomas and from male germ cells. The recent

  8. Reprogramming of two somatic nuclei in the same ooplasm leads to pluripotent embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Martin J; Esteves, Telma C; Balbach, Sebastian T; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Stehling, Martin; Jauch, Anna; Houghton, Franchesca D; Schwarzer, Caroline; Boiani, Michele

    2013-11-01

    The conversion of the nuclear program of a somatic cell from a differentiated to an undifferentiated state can be accomplished by transplanting its nucleus to an enucleated oocyte (somatic cell nuclear transfer [SCNT]) in a process termed "reprogramming." This process achieves pluripotency and occasionally also totipotency. Exploiting the obstacle of tetraploidy to full development in mammals, we show that mouse ooplasts transplanted with two somatic nuclei simultaneously (double SCNT) support preimplantation development and derivation of novel tetraploid SCNT embryonic stem cells (tNT-ESCs). Although the double SCNT embryos do not recapitulate the expression pattern of the pluripotency-associated gene Oct4 in fertilized embryos, derivative tNT-ESCs have characteristics of genuine pluripotency: in vitro they differentiate into neurons, cardiomyocytes, and endodermal cells; in vivo, tNT-ESCs form teratomas, albeit at reduced rates compared to diploid counterparts. Global transcriptome analysis revealed only few specific alterations, for example, in the quantitative expression of gastrulation-associated genes. In conclusion, we have shown that the oocyte's reprogramming capacity is in excess of a single nucleus and that double nucleus-transplanted embryos and derivative ESCs are very similar to their diploid counterparts. These results have key implications for reprogramming studies based on pluripotency: while reprogramming in the tetraploid state was known from fusion-mediated reprogramming and from fetal and adult hepatocyte-derived induced pluripotent stem cells, we have now accomplished it with enucleated oocytes. © AlphaMed Press.

  9. Modeling Keratoconus Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Roy; Srivastava, Om P; Pfister, Roswell R

    2016-07-01

    To model keratoconus (KC) using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) generated from fibroblasts of both KC and normal human corneal stroma by a viral method. Both normal and KC corneal fibroblasts from four human donors were reprogramed directly by delivering reprogramming factors in a single virus using 2A "self-cleaving" peptides, using a single polycistronic lentiviral vector coexpressing four transcription factors (Oct 4, Sox2, Klf4, and Myc) to yield iPSC. These iPS cells were characterized by immunofluorescence detection using of stem cell markers (SSEA4, Oct4, and Sox2). The mRNA sequencing was performed and the datasets were analyzed using ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA) software. The generated stem cell-like clones expressed the pluripotency markers, SSEA4, Oct4, Sox2, Tra-1-60, and also expressed pax6. Our transcriptome analysis showed 4300 genes, which had 2-fold change and 870 genes with a q-value of iPSC compared to normal iPSC. One of the genes that showed difference in KC iPSC was FGFR2 (down-regulated by 2.4 fold), an upstream target of Pi3-Kinase pathway, was further validated in keratoconus corneal sections and also KC iPSC-derived keratocytes (down regulated by 2.0-fold). Both normal and KC-derived keratocytes expressed keratocan, signature marker for keratocytes. KC iPSC-derived keratocytes showed adverse growth and proliferation and was further confirmed by using Ly2924002, a PI3k inhibitor, which severely affected the growth and differentiation in normal iPSC. Based on our result, we propose a model for KC in which inhibition FGFR2-Pi3-Kinase pathway affects the AKT phosphorylation, and thus affecting the keratocytes survival signals. This inhibition of the survival signals could be a potential mechanism for the KC-specific decreased cell survival and apoptosis of keratocytes.

  10. Expression of the pluripotency marker UTF1 is restricted to a subpopulation of early A spermatogonia in rat testis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bragt, Maaike P. A.; Roepers-Gajadien, Hermien L.; Korver, Cindy M.; Bogerd, Jan; Okuda, Akihiko; Eggen, Bart J. L.; de Rooij, Dirk G.; van Pelt, Ans M. M.

    The population of early A spermatogonia includes stem cells that possess spermatogonial stern cell properties. Recent reports suggest that these cells have the ability to regain pluripotent properties. Here, we show that expression of the pluripotency marker undifferentiated embryonic cell

  11. Human pluripotent stem cell derived HLC transcriptome data enables molecular dissection of hepatogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wruck, Wasco; Adjaye, James

    2018-03-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) provide a defined and renewable source of cells for drug screening, toxicology and regenerative medicine. We previously reprogrammed human fetal foreskin fibroblast cells (HFF1) into iPSCs employing an episomal plasmid-based integration-free approach, this iPSC-line and the hESC lines H1 and H9 were used to model hepatogenesis in vitro. Biochemical characterisation confirmed glycogen storage, ICG uptake and release, urea and bile acid production, as well as CYP3A4 activity. Microarray-based transcriptome analyses was carried out using RNA isolated from the undifferentiated pluripotent stem cells and subsequent differentiation stages- definitive endoderm (DE) hepatic endoderm (HE) and HLCs. K-means identified 100 distinct clusters, for example, POU5F1/OCT4 marking the undifferentiated stage, SOX17 the DE stage, HNF4α the HE stage, and ALB specific to HLCs, fetal liver and primary human hepatocytes (PHH). This data descriptor describes these datasets which should be useful for gaining new insights into the molecular basis of hepatogenesis and associated gene regulatory networks.

  12. Influences of lamin A levels on induction of pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingfeng Zuo

    2012-09-01

    Lamin A is an inner nuclear membrane protein that maintains nuclear structure integrity, is involved in transcription, DNA damage response and genomic stability, and also links to cell differentiation, senescence, premature aging and associated diseases. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells have been successfully generated from various types of cells and used to model human diseases. It remains unclear whether levels of lamin A influence reprogramming of somatic cells to pluripotent states during iPS induction. Consistently, lamin A is expressed more in differentiated than in relatively undifferentiated somatic cells, and increases in expression levels with age. Somatic cells with various expression levels of lamin A differ in their dynamics and efficiency during iPS cell induction. Cells with higher levels of lamin A show slower reprogramming and decreased efficiency to iPS cells. Furthermore, depletion of lamin A by transient shRNA accelerates iPS cell induction from fibroblasts. Reduced levels of lamin A are associated with increased expression of pluripotent genes Oct4 and Nanog, and telomerase genes Tert and Terc. On the contrary, overexpression of lamin A retards somatic cell reprogramming to iPS-like colony formation. Our data suggest that levels of lamin A influence reprogramming of somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells and that artificial silencing of lamin A facilitates iPS cell induction. These findings may have implications in enhancing rejuvenation of senescent or older cells by iPS technology and manipulating lamin A levels.

  13. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Generation from Blood Cells Using Sendai Virus and Centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Yeri Alice; Nam, Yoojun; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2016-12-21

    The recent development of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) proved that mature somatic cells can return to an undifferentiated, pluripotent state. Now, reprogramming is done with various types of adult somatic cells: keratinocytes, urine cells, fibroblasts, etc. Early experiments were usually done with dermal fibroblasts. However, this required an invasive surgical procedure to obtain fibroblasts from the patients. Therefore, suspension cells, such as blood and urine cells, were considered ideal for reprogramming because of the convenience of obtaining the primary cells. Here, we report an efficient protocol for iPSC generation from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). By plating the transduced PBMCs serially to a new, matrix-coated plate using centrifugation, this protocol can easily provide iPSC colonies. This method is also applicable to umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs). This study presents a simple and efficient protocol for the reprogramming of PBMCs and CBMCs.

  14. Graphene substrates enhance optical transfection efficiency in pluripotent stem cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khanyile, T

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies directed at investigating the role of nanomaterial substrates with varying properties in tissue engineering research are essential. In this research arena, pluripotent stem cells are popular for their self renewing ability and are widely...

  15. Platelet production from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, N; Eto, K

    2017-09-01

    Ex vivo production of human platelets has been pursued as an alternative measure to resolve limitations in the supply and safety of current platelet transfusion products. To this end, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are considered an ideal global source, as they are not only pluripotent and self-renewing, but are also available from basically any person, have relatively few ethical issues, and are easy to manipulate. From human iPSCs, megakaryocyte (MK) lines with robust proliferation capacity have been established by the introduction of specified sets of genes. These expandable MKs are also cryopreservable and thus would be suitable as master cells for good manufacturing practice (GMP)-grade production of platelets, assuring availability on demand and safety against blood-borne infections. Meanwhile, developments in bioreactors that physically mimic the in vivo environment and discovery of substances that promote thrombopoiesis have yielded competent platelets with improved efficiency. The derivation of platelets from iPSCs could further resolve transfusion-related alloimmune complications through the manufacturing of autologous products and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-compatible platelets from stocked homologous HLA-type iPSC libraries or by manipulation of HLAs and human platelet antigens (HPAs). Considering these key advances in the field, HLA-deleted platelets could become a universal product that is manufactured at industrial level to safely fulfill almost all demands. In this review, we provide an overview of the ex vivo production of iPSC-derived platelets toward clinical applications, a production that would revolutionize the blood transfusion system and lead the field of iPSC-based regenerative medicine. © 2017 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  16. Repair of cartilage defects in osteoarthritis rats with induced pluripotent stem cell derived chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanxia; Wu, Xiaomin; Liang, Yuhong; Gu, Hongsheng; Song, Kedong; Zou, Xuenong; Zhou, Guangqian

    2016-11-09

    The incapacity of articular cartilage (AC) for self-repair after damage ultimately leads to the development of osteoarthritis. Stem cell-based therapy has been proposed for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are becoming a promising stem cell source. Three steps were developed to differentiate human iPSCs into chondrocytes which were transplanted into rat OA models induced by monosodium iodoacetate (MIA). After 6 days embryonic body (EB) formation and 2 weeks differentiation, the gene and protein expression of Col2A1, GAG and Sox9 has significantly increased compare to undifferentiated hiPSCs. After 15 weeks transplantation, no immune responses were observed, micro-CT showed gradual engraftment and the improvement of subchondrol plate integrity, and histological examinations demonstrated articular cartilage matrix production. hiPSC could be an efficient and clinically translatable approach for cartilage tissue regeneration in OA cartilages.

  17. Expression of Neural Markers by Undifferentiated Mesenchymal-Like Stem Cells from Different Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Foudah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous expression of neural markers, already demonstrated in bone marrow (BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, has been considered as evidence of the MSCs’ predisposition to differentiate toward neural lineages, supporting their use in stem cell-based therapy for neural repair. In this study we have evaluated, by immunocytochemistry, immunoblotting, and flow cytometry experiments, the expression of neural markers in undifferentiated MSCs from different sources: human adipose stem cells (hASCs, human skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hS-MSCs, human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs, and human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs. Our results demonstrate that the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and NeuN, unlike other evaluated markers, are spontaneously expressed by a very high percentage of undifferentiated hASCs, hS-MSCs, hPDLSCs, and hDPSCs. Conversely, the neural progenitor marker nestin is expressed only by a high percentage of undifferentiated hPDLSCs and hDPSCs. Our results suggest that the expression of βIII-tubulin and NeuN could be a common feature of stem cells and not exclusive to neuronal cells. This could result in a reassessment of the use of βIII-tubulin and NeuN as the only evidence proving neuronal differentiation. Further studies will be necessary to elucidate the relevance of the spontaneous expression of these markers in stem cells.

  18. Efficient recovery of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cell cryopreserved with hydroxyethyl starch, dimethyl sulphoxide and serum replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Maristela Delgado; De Santis, Gil Cunha; Abraham, Kuruvilla Joseph; Fontes, Aparecida Maria; Magalhães, Danielle Aparecida Rosa; Oliveira, Viviane de Cássia; Costa, Everton de Brito Oliveira; Palma, Patrícia Vianna Bonini; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2015-08-01

    The therapeutic use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is dependent on an efficient cryopreservation protocol for long-term storage. The aim of this study was to determine whether the combination of three cryoprotecting reagents using two freezing systems might improve hESC recovery rates with maintenance of hESC pluripotency properties for potential cell therapy application. Recovery rates of hESC colonies which were frozen in three cryoprotective solutions: Me2SO/HES/SR medium, Defined-medium® and Me2SO/SFB in medium solution were evaluated in ultra-slow programmable freezing system (USPF) and a slow-rate freezing system (SRF). The hESC pluripotency properties after freezing-thawing were evaluated. We estimated the distribution frequency of survival colonies and observed that independent of the freezing system used (USPF or SRF) the best results were obtained with Me2SO/HES/SR as cryopreservation medium. We showed a significant hESC recovery colonies rate after thawing in Me2SO/HES/SR medium were 3.88 and 2.9 in USPF and SRF, respectively. The recovery colonies rate with Defined-medium® were 1.05 and 1.07 however in classical Me2SO medium were 0.5 and 0.86 in USPF and SRF, respectively. We showed significant difference between Me2SO/HES/SR medium×Defined-medium® and between Me2SO/HES/SR medium×Me2SO medium, for two cryopreservation systems (Psystem which resulted in hESC colonies that remain undifferentiated, maintain their in vitro and in vivo pluripotency properties and genetic stability. This approach may be suitable for cell therapy studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Morphological analysis of human induced pluripotent stem cells during induced differentiation and reverse programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtot, Anne-Marie; Magniez, Aurélie; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Féraud, Olivier; Bacci, Josette; Gobbo, Emilie; Proust, Stéphanie; Turhan, Ali G; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise

    2014-10-01

    The fine analysis of cell components during the generation of pluripotent cells and their comparison to bone fide human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are valuable tools to understand their biological behavior. In this report, human mesenchymal cells (hMSCs) generated from the human ES cell line H9, were reprogrammed back to induced pluripotent state using Oct-4, Sox2, Nanog, and Lin28 transgenes. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) were analyzed using electron microscopy and compared with regard to the original hESCs and the hMSCs from which they were derived. This analysis shows that hIPSCs and the original hESCs are morphologically undistinguishable but differ from the hMSCs with respect to the presence of several morphological features of undifferentiated cells at both the cytoplasmic (ribosomes, lipid droplets, glycogen, scarce reticulum) and nuclear levels (features of nuclear plasticity, presence of euchromatin, reticulated nucleoli). We show that hIPSC colonies generated this way presented epithelial aspects with specialized junctions highlighting morphological criteria of the mesenchymal-epithelial transition in cells engaged in a successful reprogramming process. Electron microscopic analysis revealed also specific morphological aspects of partially reprogrammed cells. These results highlight the valuable use of electron microscopy for a better knowledge of the morphological aspects of IPSC and cellular reprogramming.

  20. Sex-Dependent Gene Expression in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ronen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Males and females have a variety of sexually dimorphic traits, most of which result from hormonal differences. However, differences between male and female embryos initiate very early in development, before hormonal influence begins, suggesting the presence of genetically driven sexual dimorphisms. By comparing the gene expression profiles of male and X-inactivated female human pluripotent stem cells, we detected Y-chromosome-driven effects. We discovered that the sex-determining gene SRY is expressed in human male pluripotent stem cells and is induced by reprogramming. In addition, we detected more than 200 differentially expressed autosomal genes in male and female embryonic stem cells. Some of these genes are involved in steroid metabolism pathways and lead to sex-dependent differentiation in response to the estrogen precursor estrone. Thus, we propose that the presence of the Y chromosome and specifically SRY may drive sex-specific differences in the growth and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells.

  1. Pluripotent stem cells for the study of CNS development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Petros

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian central nervous system is a complex neuronal meshwork consisting of a diverse array of cellular subtypes generated in a precise spatial and temporal pattern throughout development. Achieving a greater understanding of the molecular and genetic mechanisms that direct a relatively uniform population of neuroepithelial progenitors into the diverse neuronal subtypes remains a significant challenge. A firmer knowledge of the fundamental aspects of developmental neuroscience will allow us to better study the vast array of neurodevelopmental diseases. The advent of stem cell technologies has expedited our ability to generate and isolate populations of distinct interneuron subtypes. To date, researchers have successfully developed protocols to derive many types of neural cells from pluripotent stem cells, with varying degrees of efficiencies and reproducibility. The stem cell field is devoted to the potential of stem cell-derived neurons for the treatment of disease, highlighted by the ability to create patient specific induced pluripotent stem cells. However, another application that is often overlooked is the use of stem cell technology for studying normal neural development. This is especially important for human neurodevelopment, since obtaining embryonic tissue presents numerous technical and ethical challenges. In this review, we will explore the use of pluripotent stem cells for the study of neural development. We will review the different classes of pluripotent stem cells and focus on the types of neurodevelopmental questions that stem cell technologies can help address. In addition to covering the different neural cells derived from stem cells to date, we will detail the derivation and characterization of three of the more thoroughly studied cell groups. We hope that this review encourages researchers to develop innovative strategies for using pluripotent stem cells for the study of mammalian, and specifically human

  2. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanassieff, Marielle; Tapponnier, Yann; Savatier, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We describe a procedure for generating induced pluripotent stem cell lines in rabbits, using retroviral vectors expressing Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc of human origin to reprogram rabbit fibroblasts prepared from an ear skin biopsy. We also provide detailed procedures for characterizing the resulting iPSC lines, including the analysis of pluripotency marker expression by RT-qPCR, immunolabeling, and fluorescent-associated cell sorting, the evaluation of pluripotency by teratoma production and genetic stability by karyotyping.

  3. Possibility of Undifferentiated Human Thigh Adipose Stem Cells Differentiating into Functional Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hoon Lee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThis study aimed to investigate the possibility of isolating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from human thigh adipose tissue and the ability of human thigh adipose stem cells (HTASCs to differentiate into hepatocytes.MethodsThe adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs were isolated from thigh adipose tissue. Growth factors, cytokines, and hormones were added to the collagen coated dishes to induce the undifferentiated HTASCs to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells. To confirm the experimental results, the expression of hepatocyte-specific markers on undifferentiated and differentiated HTASCs was analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical staining. Differentiation efficiency was evaluated using functional tests such as periodic acid schiff (PAS staining and detection of the albumin secretion level using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.ResultsThe majority of the undifferentiated HTASCs were changed into a more polygonal shape showing tight interactions between the cells. The differentiated HTASCs up-regulated mRNA of hepatocyte markers. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that they were intensely stained with anti-albumin antibody compared with undifferentiated HTASCs. PAS staining showed that HTASCs submitted to the hepatocyte differentiation protocol were able to more specifically store glycogen than undifferentiated HTASCs, displaying a purple color in the cytoplasm of the differentiated HTASCs. ELISA analyses showed that differentiated HTASCs could secrete albumin, which is one of the hepatocyte markers.ConclusionsMSCs were islolated from human thigh adipose tissue differentiate to heapatocytes. The source of ADSCs is not only abundant abdominal adipose tissue, but also thigh adipose tissue for cell therapy in liver regeneration and tissue regeneration.

  4. Rapid DNA replication origin licensing protects stem cell pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Jacob Peter; Dumitru, Raluca; Coryell, Philip; Baxley, Ryan M; Chen, Weili; Twaroski, Kirk; Webber, Beau R; Tolar, Jakub; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin; Purvis, Jeremy E; Cook, Jeanette Gowen

    2017-11-17

    Complete and robust human genome duplication requires loading minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase complexes at many DNA replication origins, an essential process termed origin licensing. Licensing is restricted to G1 phase of the cell cycle, but G1 length varies widely among cell types. Using quantitative single-cell analyses, we found that pluripotent stem cells with naturally short G1 phases load MCM much faster than their isogenic differentiated counterparts with long G1 phases. During the earliest stages of differentiation toward all lineages, MCM loading slows concurrently with G1 lengthening, revealing developmental control of MCM loading. In contrast, ectopic Cyclin E overproduction uncouples short G1 from fast MCM loading. Rapid licensing in stem cells is caused by accumulation of the MCM loading protein, Cdt1. Prematurely slowing MCM loading in pluripotent cells not only lengthens G1 but also accelerates differentiation. Thus, rapid origin licensing is an intrinsic characteristic of stem cells that contributes to pluripotency maintenance.

  5. Donor Dependent Variations in Hematopoietic Differentiation among Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Féraud

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis generated from human embryonic stem cells (ES and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS are unprecedented resources for cell therapy. We compared hematopoietic differentiation potentials from ES and iPS cell lines originated from various donors and derived them using integrative and non-integrative vectors. Significant differences in differentiation toward hematopoietic lineage were observed among ES and iPS. The ability of engraftment of iPS or ES-derived cells in NOG mice varied among the lines with low levels of chimerism. iPS generated from ES cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC reproduce a similar hematopoietic outcome compared to their parental ES cell line. We were not able to identify any specific hematopoietic transcription factors that allow to distinguish between good versus poor hematopoiesis in undifferentiated ES or iPS cell lines. There is a relatively unpredictable variation in hematopoietic differentiation between ES and iPS cell lines that could not be predicted based on phenotype or gene expression of the undifferentiated cells. These results demonstrate the influence of genetic background in variation of hematopoietic potential rather than the reprogramming process.

  6. Pluripotent human stem cells: Standing on the shoulders of giants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damjanov, Ivan; Andrews, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    The advent of human pluripotent stem cells, with the first derivation of human embryonic stem cells in 1998, and of human induced pluripotent stem cells in 2007, has ushered in an era of considerable excitement about the prospects of using these cells to develop new opportunities for healthcare, from their potential for regenerative medicine to their use as tools for studying the cellular basis of many diseases and the discovery of new drugs. But as with the flowering of many new areas in science, the biology of human pluripotent stem cells has its roots in a long history of, sometimes, less fêted research. In a period when research funding is frequently driven by a desire to meet specific clinical or economic goals, it is salutary to remember that the opportunities offered by human pluripotent stem cells have their origins in curiosity driven research without any of those goals in mind. In this case, that research focused on the relatively rare gonadal cancers known as teratomas, tumors that have fascinated people since antiquity because their sometime grotesque manifestations with haphazard collections of tissues and sometimes recognizable body parts. Although well known to clinical pathologists it was the pioneering work of Leroy Stevens, who first discovered that teratomas occur at a significant rate in the 129 strain of the laboratory mouse and could be produced experimentally, that laid the foundations for our understanding of the biology of these tumors and the central role of the embryonal carcinoma cell, one of the archetypal tumor stem cells.

  7. Marching towards regenerative cardiac therapy with human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Kevin O; Xu, Chunhui

    2013-06-01

    Damage in cardiac tissues from ischemia or other pathological conditions leads to heart failure; and cell loss or dysfunction in pacemaker tissues due to congenital heart defects, aging, and acquired diseases can cause severe arrhythmias. The promise of successful therapies with stem cells to treat these conditions has remained elusive to the scientific community. However, recent advances in this field have opened new opportunities for regenerative cardiac therapy. Transplantation of cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells has the potential to alleviate heart disease. Since the initial derivation of human embryonic stem cells, significant progress has been made in the generation and characterization of enriched cardiomyocytes and the demonstration of the ability of these cardiomyocytes to survive, integrate, and function in animal models. The scope of therapeutic potential from pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes has been further expanded with the invention of induced pluripotent stem cells, which can be induced to generate functional cardiomyocytes for regenerative cardiac therapy in a patient specific manner. The reprogramming technology has also inspired the recent discovery of direct conversion of fibroblasts into cardiomyocyte-like cells, which may allow endogenous cardiac repair. Regenerative cardiac therapy with human pluripotent stem cells is now moving closer to clinic testing.

  8. Ethical challenges in translational pluripotent stem cell research : Justifying leaps of faith

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, MGJL

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells have great potential for regenerative medicine, but the inherent uncertainty of first-in-human trials combined with the technical complexity of pluripotent stem cells make early-phase pluripotent stem cell trials ethically very challenging. This thesis has addressed these

  9. Choices for Induction of Pluripotency: Recent Developments in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, M.; Zhou, Huiqing; Nadif Kasri, N.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from somatic cells provides tremendous promises for regenerative medicine and its use has widely increased over recent years. However, reprogramming efficiencies remain low and chromosomal instability and tumorigenic potential are

  10. Efficient generation of rat induced pluripotent stem cells using a non-viral inducible vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Merkl

    Full Text Available Current methods of generating rat induced pluripotent stem cells are based on viral transduction of pluripotency inducing genes (Oct4, Sox2, c-myc and Klf4 into somatic cells. These activate endogenous pluripotency genes and reprogram the identity of the cell to an undifferentiated state. Epigenetic silencing of exogenous genes has to occur to allow normal iPS cell differentiation. To gain more control over the expression of exogenous reprogramming factors, we used a novel doxycycline-inducible plasmid vector encoding Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4. To ensure efficient and controlled generation of iPS cells by plasmid transfection we equipped the reprogramming vector with a bacteriophage φC31 attB site and used a φC31 integrase expression vector to enhance vector integration. A series of doxycycline-independent rat iPS cell lines were established. These were characterized by immunocytochemical detection of Oct4, SSEA1 and SSEA4, alkaline phosphatase staining, methylation analysis of the endogenous Oct4 promoter and RT-PCR analysis of endogenous rat pluripotency genes. We also determined the number of vector integrations and the extent to which reprogramming factor gene expression was controlled. Protocols were developed to generate embryoid bodies and rat iPS cells demonstrated as pluripotent by generating derivatives of all three embryonic germ layers in vitro, and teratoma formation in vivo. All data suggest that our rat iPS cells, generated by plasmid based reprogramming, are similar to rat ES cells. Methods of DNA transfection, protein transduction and feeder-free monolayer culture of rat iPS cells were established to enable future applications.

  11. Induced pluripotent stem cells and promises of neuroregenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashok; Verma, Nipun

    2011-01-01

    First created in 2006 from adult somatic cells by a simple molecular genetic trick, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) system is the latest platform in stem cell research. Induced pluripotent stem cells are produced by nuclear reprogramming technology and they resemble embryonic stem cells (ES) in key elements; they possess the potentiality to differentiate into any type of cell in the body. More importantly, the iPS platform has distinct advantage over ES system in the sense that iPS-derived cells are autologous and therefore the iPS-derived transplantation does not require immunosuppressive therapy. In addition, iPS research obviates the political and ethical quandary associated with embryo destruction and ES research. This remarkable discovery of cellular plasticity has important medical implications. This brief review summarizes currently available stem cell platforms, with emphasis on cellular reprogramming and iPS technology and its application in disease modeling and cell replacement therapy in neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Induced pluripotent stem cells derived from rabbits exhibit some characteristics of naïve pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Osteil

    2013-05-01

    Not much is known about the molecular and functional features of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs in rabbits. To address this, we derived and characterized 2 types of rabbit PSCs from the same breed of New Zealand White rabbits: 4 lines of embryonic stem cells (rbESCs, and 3 lines of induced PSCs (rbiPSCs that were obtained by reprogramming adult skin fibroblasts. All cell lines required fibroblast growth factor 2 for their growth and proliferation. All rbESC lines showed molecular and functional properties typically associated with primed pluripotency. The cell cycle of rbESCs had a prolonged G1 phase and a DNA damage checkpoint before entry into the S phase, which are the 2 features typically associated with the somatic cell cycle. In contrast, the rbiPSC lines exhibited some characteristics of naïve pluripotency, including resistance to single-cell dissociation by trypsin, robust activity of the distal enhancer of the mouse Oct4 gene, and expression of naïve pluripotency-specific genes, as defined in rodents. According to gene expression profiles, rbiPSCs were closer to the rabbit inner cell mass (ICM than rbESCs. Furthermore, rbiPSCs were capable of colonizing the ICM after aggregation with morulas. Therefore, we propose that rbiPSCs self-renew in an intermediate state between naïve and primed pluripotency, which represents a key step toward the generation of bona fide naïve PSC lines in rabbits.

  13. Induced pluripotent stem cells derived from rabbits exhibit some characteristics of naïve pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteil, Pierre; Tapponnier, Yann; Markossian, Suzy; Godet, Murielle; Schmaltz-Panneau, Barbara; Jouneau, Luc; Cabau, Cédric; Joly, Thierry; Blachère, Thierry; Gócza, Elen; Bernat, Agnieszka; Yerle, Martine; Acloque, Hervé; Hidot, Sullivan; Bosze, Zsuzsanna; Duranthon, Véronique; Savatier, Pierre; Afanassieff, Marielle

    2013-06-15

    Not much is known about the molecular and functional features of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in rabbits. To address this, we derived and characterized 2 types of rabbit PSCs from the same breed of New Zealand White rabbits: 4 lines of embryonic stem cells (rbESCs), and 3 lines of induced PSCs (rbiPSCs) that were obtained by reprogramming adult skin fibroblasts. All cell lines required fibroblast growth factor 2 for their growth and proliferation. All rbESC lines showed molecular and functional properties typically associated with primed pluripotency. The cell cycle of rbESCs had a prolonged G1 phase and a DNA damage checkpoint before entry into the S phase, which are the 2 features typically associated with the somatic cell cycle. In contrast, the rbiPSC lines exhibited some characteristics of naïve pluripotency, including resistance to single-cell dissociation by trypsin, robust activity of the distal enhancer of the mouse Oct4 gene, and expression of naïve pluripotency-specific genes, as defined in rodents. According to gene expression profiles, rbiPSCs were closer to the rabbit inner cell mass (ICM) than rbESCs. Furthermore, rbiPSCs were capable of colonizing the ICM after aggregation with morulas. Therefore, we propose that rbiPSCs self-renew in an intermediate state between naïve and primed pluripotency, which represents a key step toward the generation of bona fide naïve PSC lines in rabbits.

  14. Characterization and comparison of osteoblasts derived from mouse embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming San; Kannan, Vishnu; de Vries, Anneriek E; Czepiel, Marcin; Wesseling, Evelyn; Balasubramaniyan, Veerakumar; Kuijer, Roelof; Vissink, Arjan; Copray, Sjef; Raghoebar, Gerry

    New developments in stem cell biology offer alternatives for the reconstruction of critical-sized bone defects. One of these developments is the use of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These stem cells are similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells, but can be generated from adult somatic cells and

  15. Human induced pluripotent stem cells: A disruptive innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, J; Bouckenheimer, J; Sansac, C; Lemaître, J-M; Assou, S

    2016-01-01

    This year (2016) will mark the 10th anniversary of the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The finding that the transient expression of four transcription factors can radically remodel the epigenome, transcriptome and metabolome of differentiated cells and reprogram them into pluripotent stem cells has been a major and groundbreaking technological innovation. In this review, we discuss the major applications of this technology that we have grouped in nine categories: a model to study cell fate control; a model to study pluripotency; a model to study human development; a model to study human tissue and organ physiology; a model to study genetic diseases in a dish; a tool for cell rejuvenation; a source of cells for drug screening; a source of cells for regenerative medicine; a tool for the production of human organs in animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Using human pluripotent stem cells to untangle neurodegenerative disease mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgrange, Brigitte; Borgs, Laurence; Grobarczyk, Benjamin; Purnelle, Audrey; Ernst, Patricia; Moonen, Gustave; Nguyen, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic (hES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS), retain the ability to self-renew indefinitely, while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into all cell types of the nervous system. While human pluripotent cell-based therapies are unlikely to arise soon, these cells can currently be used as an inexhaustible source of committed neurons to perform high-throughput screening and safety testing of new candidate drugs. Here, we describe critically the available methods and molecular factors that are used to direct the differentiation of hES or hiPS into specific neurons. In addition, we discuss how the availability of patient-specific hiPS offers a unique opportunity to model inheritable neurodegenerative diseases and untangle their pathological mechanisms, or to validate drugs that would prevent the onset or the progression of these neurological disorders.

  17. Generation of neuropeptidergic hypothalamic neurons from human pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Merkle, Florian T.; Maroof, Asif; Wataya, Takafumi; Sasai, Yoshiki; Studer, Lorenz; Eggan, Kevin; Schier, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurons orchestrate many essential physiological and behavioral processes via secreted neuropeptides, and are relevant to human diseases such as obesity, narcolepsy and infertility. We report the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into many of the major types of neuropeptidergic hypothalamic neurons, including those producing pro-opiolemelanocortin, agouti-related peptide, hypocretin/orexin, melanin-concentrating hormone, oxytocin, arginine vasopressin, corticotropin...

  18. Tracking the embryonic stem cell transition from ground state pluripotency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkan, T.; Olova, N.; Roode, M.; Mulas, C.; Lee, H.J.; Nett, I.; Marks, H.; Walker, R.; Stunnenberg, H.; Lilley, K.S.; Nichols, J.; Reik, W.; Bertone, P.; Smith, A.

    2017-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are locked into self-renewal by shielding from inductive cues. Release from this ground state in minimal conditions offers a system for delineating developmental progression from naive pluripotency. Here we examined the initial transition process. The ES cell

  19. Induced pluripotent stem cells for retinal degenerative diseases: a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-12-31

    Dec 31, 2009 ... and 'wet' AMD. 'Dry' AMD is characterized by atrophy and degeneration of the outer neural retina, retinal pigment .... the production of iPS cells (Judson et al. 2009). Recently,. Kim et al. (2009) generated ..... Induced pluripotent stem cell lines have been produced from many species, including humans and ...

  20. Hot Start to European Pluripotent Stem Cell Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa, Paul A; Steeg, Rachel; Kreisel, Beate; Allsopp, Timothy E

    2017-07-01

    Achieving consistency in standards of access to and quality of human induced pluripotent stem cells has lagged behind their use. In Europe, a network of academic and industrial partners has been established to overcome this challenge. The experience reveals the devil in the detail of worthy ambitions informing future efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Advances in culture and manipulation of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, X; Villa-Diaz, L G; Krebsbach, P H

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cell biology and emerging technologies to reprogram somatic cells to a stem cell-like state are helping bring stem cell therapies for a range of human disorders closer to clinical reality. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have become a promising resource for regenerative medicine and research into early development because these cells are able to self-renew indefinitely and are capable of differentiation into specialized cell types of all 3 germ layers and trophoectoderm. Human PSCs include embryonic stem cells (hESCs) derived from the inner cell mass of blastocyst-stage embryos and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) generated via the reprogramming of somatic cells by the overexpression of key transcription factors. The application of hiPSCs and the finding that somatic cells can be directly reprogrammed into different cell types will likely have a significant impact on regenerative medicine. However, a major limitation for successful therapeutic application of hPSCs and their derivatives is the potential xenogeneic contamination and instability of current culture conditions. This review summarizes recent advances in hPSC culture and methods to induce controlled lineage differentiation through regulation of cell-signaling pathways and manipulation of gene expression as well as new trends in direct reprogramming of somatic cells.

  2. Surface-engineered substrates for improved human pluripotent stem cell culture under fully defined conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Krishanu; Mei, Ying; Reisterer, Colin M; Pyzocha, Neena Kenton; Yang, Jing; Muffat, Julien; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2011-11-15

    The current gold standard for the culture of human pluripotent stem cells requires the use of a feeder layer of cells. Here, we develop a spatially defined culture system based on UV/ozone radiation modification of typical cell culture plastics to define a favorable surface environment for human pluripotent stem cell culture. Chemical and geometrical optimization of the surfaces enables control of early cell aggregation from fully dissociated cells, as predicted from a numerical model of cell migration, and results in significant increases in cell growth of undifferentiated cells. These chemically defined xeno-free substrates generate more than three times the number of cells than feeder-containing substrates per surface area. Further, reprogramming and typical gene-targeting protocols can be readily performed on these engineered surfaces. These substrates provide an attractive cell culture platform for the production of clinically relevant factor-free reprogrammed cells from patient tissue samples and facilitate the definition of standardized scale-up friendly methods for disease modeling and cell therapeutic applications.

  3. Potassium as a pluripotency-associated element identified through inorganic element profiling in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Victor J T; Zolekar, Ashwini; Shi, Yi; Koneru, Bhuvaneswari; Dimitrijevich, Slobodan; Di Pasqua, Anthony J; Wang, Yu-Chieh

    2017-07-10

    Despite their well-known function in maintaining normal cell physiology, how inorganic elements are relevant to cellular pluripotency and differentiation in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has yet to be systematically explored. Using total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), we analyzed the inorganic components of human cells with isogenic backgrounds in distinct states of cellular pluripotency. The elemental profiles revealed that the potassium content of human cells significantly differs when their cellular pluripotency changes. Pharmacological treatment that alters cell membrane permeability to potassium affected the maintenance and establishment of cellular pluripotency via multiple mechanisms in bona fide hPSCs and reprogrammed cells. Collectively, we report that potassium is a pluripotency-associated inorganic element in human cells and provide novel insights into the manipulation of cellular pluripotency in hPSCs by regulating intracellular potassium.

  4. DNA Repair in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Is Distinct from That in Non-Pluripotent Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Li Z.; Park, Sang-Won; Bates, Steven E.; Zeng, Xianmin; Iverson, Linda E.; O'Connor, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for human disease treatment using human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), also carries the risk of added genomic instability. Genomic instability is most often linked to DNA repair deficiencies, which indicates that screening/characterization of possible repair deficiencies in pluripotent human stem cells should be a necessary step prior to their clinical and research use. In this study, a comparison of DNA repair pathways in pluripotent cells, as compared to those in non-pluripotent cells, demonstrated that DNA repair capacities of pluripotent cell lines were more heterogeneous than those of differentiated lines examined and were generally greater. Although pluripotent cells had high DNA repair capacities for nucleotide excision repair, we show that ultraviolet radiation at low fluxes induced an apoptotic response in these cells, while differentiated cells lacked response to this stimulus, and note that pluripotent cells had a similar apoptotic response to alkylating agent damage. This sensitivity of pluripotent cells to damage is notable since viable pluripotent cells exhibit less ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage than do differentiated cells that receive the same flux. In addition, the importance of screening pluripotent cells for DNA repair defects was highlighted by an iPSC line that demonstrated a normal spectral karyotype, but showed both microsatellite instability and reduced DNA repair capacities in three out of four DNA repair pathways examined. Together, these results demonstrate a need to evaluate DNA repair capacities in pluripotent cell lines, in order to characterize their genomic stability, prior to their pre-clinical and clinical use. PMID:22412831

  5. Modelling Neurodegenerative Diseases Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are being modelled in-vitro using human patient-specific, induced pluripotent stem cells and transgenic embryonic stem cells to determine more about disease mechanisms, as well as to discover new treatments for patients. Current research in modelling Alzheimer’s disease......, frontotemporal dementia and Parkinson’s disease using pluripotent stem cells is described, along with the advent of gene-editing, which has been the complimentary tool for the field. Current methods used to model these diseases are predominantly dependent on 2D cell culture methods. Outcomes reveal that only...... some of the phenotype can be observed in-vitro, but these phenotypes, when compared to the patient, correlate extremely well. Many studies have found novel molecular mechanisms involved in the disease and therefore elucidate new potential targets for reversing the phenotype. Future research...

  6. Human pluripotent stem cells: an emerging model in developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zengrong; Huangfu, Danwei

    2013-02-01

    Developmental biology has long benefited from studies of classic model organisms. Recently, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, have emerged as a new model system that offers unique advantages for developmental studies. Here, we discuss how studies of hPSCs can complement classic approaches using model organisms, and how hPSCs can be used to recapitulate aspects of human embryonic development 'in a dish'. We also summarize some of the recently developed genetic tools that greatly facilitate the interrogation of gene function during hPSC differentiation. With the development of high-throughput screening technologies, hPSCs have the potential to revolutionize gene discovery in mammalian development.

  7. In vitro regeneration of kidney from pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osafune, Kenji, E-mail: osafu@cira.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); JST Yamanaka iPS Cell Special Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2010-10-01

    Although renal transplantation has proved a successful treatment for the patients with end-stage renal failure, the therapy is hampered by the problem of serious shortage of donor organs. Regenerative medicine using stem cells, including cell transplantation therapy, needs to be developed to solve the problem. We previously identified the multipotent progenitor cells in the embryonic mouse kidney that can give rise to several kinds of epithelial cells found in adult kidney, such as glomerular podocytes and renal tubular epithelia. Establishing the method to generate the progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells that have the capacity to indefinitely proliferate in vitro is required for the development of kidney regeneration strategy. We review the current status of the research on the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into renal lineages and describe cues to promote this research field.

  8. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Emerging Techniques for Nuclear Reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji Woong

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction of four transcription factors, Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, can successfully reprogram somatic cells into embryonic stem (ES)-like cells. These cells, which are referred to as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, closely resemble embryonic stem cells in genomic, cell biologic, and phenotypic characteristics, and the creation of these special cells was a major triumph in cell biology. In contrast to pluripotent stem cells generated by somatic cell nuclear-transfer (SCNT) or ES cells derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of the blastocyst, direct reprogramming provides a convenient and reliable means of generating pluripotent stem cells. iPS cells have already shown incredible potential for research and for therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine within just a few years of their discovery. In this review, current techniques of generating iPS cells and mechanisms of nuclear reprogramming are reviewed, and the potential for therapeutic applications is discussed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1799–1820. PMID:21194386

  9. Transgene Reactivation in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derivatives and Reversion to Pluripotency of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galat, Yekaterina; Perepitchka, Mariana; Jennings, Lawrence J.; Iannaccone, Philip M.; Hendrix, Mary J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have enormous potential in regenerative medicine and disease modeling. It is now felt that clinical trials should be performed with iPSCs derived with nonintegrative constructs. Numerous studies, however, including those describing disease models, are still being published using cells derived from iPSCs generated with integrative constructs. Our experimental work presents the first evidence of spontaneous transgene reactivation in vitro in several cellular types. Our results show that the transgenes were predominantly silent in parent iPSCs, but in mesenchymal and endothelial iPSC derivatives, the transgenes experienced random upregulation of Nanog and c-Myc. Additionally, we provide evidence of spontaneous secondary reprogramming and reversion to pluripotency in mesenchymal stem cells derived from iPSCs. These findings strongly suggest that the studies, which use cellular products derived from iPSCs generated with retro- or lentiviruses, should be evaluated with consideration of the possibility of transgene reactivation. The in vitro model described here provides insight into the earliest events of culture transformation and suggests the hypothesis that reversion to pluripotency may be responsible for the development of tumors in cell replacement experiments. The main goal of this work, however, is to communicate the possibility of transgene reactivation in retro- or lenti-iPSC derivatives and the associated loss of cellular fidelity in vitro, which may impact the outcomes of disease modeling and related experimentation. PMID:27193052

  10. Derivation of novel human ground state naive pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafni, Ohad; Weinberger, Leehee; Mansour, Abed AlFatah; Manor, Yair S; Chomsky, Elad; Ben-Yosef, Dalit; Kalma, Yael; Viukov, Sergey; Maza, Itay; Zviran, Asaf; Rais, Yoach; Shipony, Zohar; Mukamel, Zohar; Krupalnik, Vladislav; Zerbib, Mirie; Geula, Shay; Caspi, Inbal; Schneir, Dan; Shwartz, Tamar; Gilad, Shlomit; Amann-Zalcenstein, Daniela; Benjamin, Sima; Amit, Ido; Tanay, Amos; Massarwa, Rada; Novershtern, Noa; Hanna, Jacob H

    2013-12-12

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are isolated from the inner cell mass of blastocysts, and can be preserved in vitro in a naive inner-cell-mass-like configuration by providing exogenous stimulation with leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and small molecule inhibition of ERK1/ERK2 and GSK3β signalling (termed 2i/LIF conditions). Hallmarks of naive pluripotency include driving Oct4 (also known as Pou5f1) transcription by its distal enhancer, retaining a pre-inactivation X chromosome state, and global reduction in DNA methylation and in H3K27me3 repressive chromatin mark deposition on developmental regulatory gene promoters. Upon withdrawal of 2i/LIF, naive mouse ES cells can drift towards a primed pluripotent state resembling that of the post-implantation epiblast. Although human ES cells share several molecular features with naive mouse ES cells, they also share a variety of epigenetic properties with primed murine epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). These include predominant use of the proximal enhancer element to maintain OCT4 expression, pronounced tendency for X chromosome inactivation in most female human ES cells, increase in DNA methylation and prominent deposition of H3K27me3 and bivalent domain acquisition on lineage regulatory genes. The feasibility of establishing human ground state naive pluripotency in vitro with equivalent molecular and functional features to those characterized in mouse ES cells remains to be defined. Here we establish defined conditions that facilitate the derivation of genetically unmodified human naive pluripotent stem cells from already established primed human ES cells, from somatic cells through induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell reprogramming or directly from blastocysts. The novel naive pluripotent cells validated herein retain molecular characteristics and functional properties that are highly similar to mouse naive ES cells, and distinct from conventional primed human pluripotent cells. This includes competence in the generation

  11. Effect of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Blood Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focosi, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Summary Population aging has imposed cost-effective alternatives to blood donations. Artificial blood is still at the preliminary stages of development, and the need for viable cells seems unsurmountable. Because large numbers of viable cells must be promptly available for clinical use, stem cell technologies, expansion, and banking represent ideal tools to ensure a regular supply. Provided key donors can be identified, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology could pave the way to a new era in transfusion medicine, just as it is already doing in many other fields of medicine. The present review summarizes the current state of research on iPSC technology in the field of blood banking, highlighting hurdles, and promises. Significance The aging population in Western countries is causing a progressive reduction of blood donors and a constant increase of blood recipients. Because blood is the main therapeutic option to treat acute hemorrhage, cost-effective alternatives to blood donations are being actively investigated. The enormous replication capability of induced pluripotent stem cells and their promising results in many other fields of medicine could be an apt solution to produce the large numbers of viable cells required in transfusion and usher in a new era in transfusion medicine. The present report describes the potentiality, technological hurdles, and promises of induced pluripotent stem cells to generate red blood cells by redifferentiation. PMID:26819256

  12. Induced pluripotent stem cells derived from rabbits exhibit some characteristics of naïve pluripotency

    OpenAIRE

    Osteil, Pierre; Tapponnier, Yann; Markossian, Suzy; Godet, Murielle; Panneau, Barbara; Jouneau, Luc; Cabau, Cédric; Joly, Thierry; Blachère, Thierry; Gócza, Elen; Bernat, Agnieszka; Yerle, Martine; ACLOQUE, HERVE; Hidot, Sullivan; Bosze, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Summary Not much is known about the molecular and functional features of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in rabbits. To address this, we derived and characterized 2 types of rabbit PSCs from the same breed of New Zealand White rabbits: 4 lines of embryonic stem cells (rbESCs), and 3 lines of induced PSCs (rbiPSCs) that were obtained by reprogramming adult skin fibroblasts. All cell lines required fibroblast growth factor 2 for their growth and proliferation. All rbESC lines showed molecular and...

  13. Generation and characterization of reprogrammed sheep induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Balehosur, Deepashree; Murray, Belinda; Kelly, Jennifer M; Sumer, Huseyin; Verma, Paul J

    2012-01-15

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from domestic species have numerous potential applications in agricultural and biomedical sciences; however, despite intensive efforts, derivation of ESCs from sheep remains elusive. The objective was to derive sheep induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), as an alternative pluripotent cell type to ESCs, from sheep fibroblasts by ectopic expression of heterologous transcription factors OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and cMYC. Sheep fibroblasts were infected with pantropic retroviruses coding the four transcription factors and reprogrammed to pluripotency at a rate of 0.002%. The sheep iPSCs (siPSCs) reactivated endogenous OCT4 and SOX2 genes assessed by qRT-PCR and immuno-cytochemistry, retained normal karyotyping, and more importantly, concurrently silenced all exogenous transgenes. The siPSCs were enzymatically dissociated to single cells, making them amenable to efficient transfection and fluorescent-activated cell sorting techniques. Further, the siPSCs differentiated in vitro to form embryoid bodies, and in vivo to form robust teratomas, containing cells representative of the three germ layers. Moreover, when injected into diploid or tetraploid sheep embryos, siPSCs contributed to the inner cell mass of resulting blastocysts, suggesting true pluripotential. These reprogrammed siPSCs may constitute a robust pluripotent alternative to elusive sheep ESCs, with great potential for use in agriculture and pharmaceutical biotechnology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Determine if AngII promotes MB cell tumorigenicity through a AT1R-MYC positive feedback loop. This aim will build on our working model that AngII...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0176 TITLE: Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response

  15. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Mammalian Endangered Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Nun, Inbar Friedrich; Montague, Susanne C; Houck, Marlys L; Ryder, Oliver; Loring, Jeanne F

    2015-01-01

    For some highly endangered species there are too few reproductively capable animals to maintain adequate genetic diversity, and extraordinary measures are necessary to prevent their extinction. Cellular reprogramming is a means to capture the genomes of individual animals as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which may eventually facilitate reintroduction of genetic material into breeding populations. Here, we describe a method for generating iPSCs from fibroblasts of mammalian endangered species.

  16. [Progress and potential applications of induced pluripotent stem cell technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cui-Ling; Zhang, Yu-Ming

    2014-08-01

    Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state through ectopic expression of specific transcription factors. These reprogrammed cells, which were designated as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, are detected to exhibit unlimited self-renewal capacity and pluripotency. This breakthrough in stem cell research provides a powerful and novel tool for the studies on pathogenesis of diseases, reprogramming mechanism and development of new therapies. For this reason, the iPSC technology has currently become one of the hot topics in stem cells research. Recently, major progress in this field has been achieved: initially, researchers succeeded in inducing the reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts by retroviral transduction of four specific transcription factors; in succession, the accelerated development of iPSC technology by employing non-integrating viral vectors, non-viral vectors or removing the introduced foreign genes via gene knock-out has ensured the yields of much safer iPSC; meanwhile, some researches discovered the proofs that a number of micro molecular compounds were potent in accelerating the cellular reprogramming. For a prospect, iPSC are highly promising for regenerative medicine, disease modeling and drug screening. In this review, the recent progress in the generation of iPSC, prospects of their possible clinical applications and problems in the iPSC research are summarized and discussed.

  17. Mechanisms underlying the formation of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Federico; Huangfu, Danwei

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offer unique opportunities for studying human biology, modeling diseases and for therapeutic applications. The simplest approach so far to generate human PSCs lines is through reprogramming of somatic cells from an individual by defined factors, referred to simply as reprogramming. Reprogramming circumvents the ethical issues associated with human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and nuclear transfer hESCs (nt-hESCs), and the resulting induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) retain the same basic genetic makeup as the somatic cell used for reprogramming. Since the first report of iPSCs by Takahashi and Yamanaka, the molecular mechanisms of reprogramming have been extensively investigated. A better mechanistic understanding of reprogramming is fundamental not only to iPSC biology and improving the quality of iPSCs for therapeutic use, but also to our understanding of the molecular basis of cell identity, pluripotency and plasticity. Here we summarize the genetic, epigenetic and cellular events during reprogramming, and the roles of various factors identified thus far in the reprogramming process. PMID:26383234

  18. A murine ESC-like state facilitates transgenesis and homologous recombination in human pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Buecker (Christa); H.H. Chen; J.M. Polo (Jose); L. Daheron (Laurence); L. Bu (Lei); T.S. Barakat (Tahsin Stefan); P. Okwieka (Patricia); A. Porter (Andrew); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); K. Hochedlinger (Konrad); N. Geijsen (Niels)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMurine pluripotent stem cells can exist in two functionally distinct states, LIF-dependent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and bFGF-dependent epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). However, human pluripotent cells so far seemed to assume only an epiblast-like state. Here we demonstrate that human

  19. Defining differentially methylated regions specific for the acquisition of pluripotency and maintenance in human pluripotent stem cells via microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenYin He

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation is critical for the maintenance of human pluripotent stem cells. It has been shown that pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, appear to have a hypermethylated status compared with differentiated cells. However, the epigenetic differences in genes that maintain stemness and regulate reprogramming between embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells remain unclear. Additionally, differential methylation patterns of induced pluripotent stem cells generated using diverse methods require further study.Here, we determined the DNA methylation profiles of 10 human cell lines, including 2 ESC lines, 4 virally derived iPSC lines, 2 episomally derived iPSC lines, and the 2 parental cell lines from which the iPSCs were derived using Illumina's Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. The iPSCs exhibited a hypermethylation status similar to that of ESCs but with distinct differences from the parental cells. Genes with a common methylation pattern between iPSCs and ESCs were classified as critical factors for stemness, whereas differences between iPSCs and ESCs suggested that iPSCs partly retained the parental characteristics and gained de novo methylation aberrances during cellular reprogramming. No significant differences were identified between virally and episomally derived iPSCs. This study determined in detail the de novo differential methylation signatures of particular stem cell lines.This study describes the DNA methylation profiles of human iPSCs generated using both viral and episomal methods, the corresponding somatic cells, and hESCs. Series of ss-DMRs and ES-iPS-DMRs were defined with high resolution. Knowledge of this type of epigenetic information could be used as a signature for stemness and self-renewal and provides a potential method for selecting optimal pluripotent stem cells for human regenerative medicine.

  20. The role of the reprogramming method and pluripotency state in gamete differentiation from patient-specific human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S; Kacin, E; Stamatiadis, P; Franck, S; Van der Jeught, M; Mertes, H; Pennings, G; De Sutter, P; Sermon, K; Heindryckx, B; Geens, M

    2018-04-01

    The derivation of gametes from patient-specific pluripotent stem cells may provide new perspectives for genetic parenthood for patients currently facing sterility. We use current data to assess the gamete differentiation potential of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells and to determine which reprogramming strategy holds the greatest promise for future clinical applications. First, we compare the two best established somatic cell reprogramming strategies: the production of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and somatic cell nuclear transfer followed by embryonic stem cell derivation (SCNT-ESC). Recent reports have indicated that these stem cells, though displaying a similar pluripotency potential, show important differences at the epigenomic level, which may have repercussions on their applicability. By comparing data on the genetic and epigenetic stability of these cell types during derivation and in-vitro culture, we assess the reprogramming efficiency of both technologies and possible effects on the subsequent differentiation potential of these cells. Moreover, we discuss possible implications of mitochondrial heteroplasmy. We also address the ethical aspects of both cell types, as well as the safety considerations associated with clinical applications using these cells, e.g. the known genomic instability of human PSCs during long-term culture. Secondly, we discuss the role of the stem cell pluripotency state in germ cell differentiation. In mice, success in germ cell development from pluripotent stem cells could only be achieved when starting from a naive state of pluripotency. It remains to be investigated if the naive state is also crucial for germ cell differentiation in human cells and to what extent human naive pluripotency resembles the naive state in mouse.

  1. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Attenuating Age-Related Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation towards the bone forming osteoblastic lineage decreases as a function of age and may contribute to age-related...problem of age-related reduced availability of MSC we propose to examine the bone anabolic potential of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) derived MSC

  2. Genome editing in pluripotent stem cells: research and therapeutic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleidi, Michela, E-mail: michela.deleidi@dzne.de [German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) Tübingen within the Helmholtz Association, Tübingen (Germany); Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tübingen (Germany); Yu, Cong [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, New York (United States)

    2016-05-06

    Recent progress in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) and genome editing technologies has opened up new avenues for the investigation of human biology in health and disease as well as the development of therapeutic applications. Gene editing approaches with programmable nucleases have been successfully established in hPSCs and applied to study gene function, develop novel animal models and perform genetic and chemical screens. Several studies now show the successful editing of disease-linked alleles in somatic and patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as well as in animal models. Importantly, initial clinical trials have shown the safety of programmable nucleases for ex vivo somatic gene therapy. In this context, the unlimited proliferation potential and the pluripotent properties of iPSCs may offer advantages for gene targeting approaches. However, many technical and safety issues still need to be addressed before genome-edited iPSCs are translated into the clinical setting. Here, we provide an overview of the available genome editing systems and discuss opportunities and perspectives for their application in basic research and clinical practice, with a particular focus on hPSC based research and gene therapy approaches. Finally, we discuss recent research on human germline genome editing and its social and ethical implications. - Highlights: • Programmable nucleases have proven efficient and specific for genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). • Genome edited hPSCs can be employed to study gene function in health and disease as well as drug and chemical screens. • Genome edited hPSCs hold great promise for ex vivo gene therapy approaches. • Technical and safety issues should be first addressed to advance the clinical use of gene-edited hPSCs.

  3. Genome editing in pluripotent stem cells: research and therapeutic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleidi, Michela; Yu, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) and genome editing technologies has opened up new avenues for the investigation of human biology in health and disease as well as the development of therapeutic applications. Gene editing approaches with programmable nucleases have been successfully established in hPSCs and applied to study gene function, develop novel animal models and perform genetic and chemical screens. Several studies now show the successful editing of disease-linked alleles in somatic and patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as well as in animal models. Importantly, initial clinical trials have shown the safety of programmable nucleases for ex vivo somatic gene therapy. In this context, the unlimited proliferation potential and the pluripotent properties of iPSCs may offer advantages for gene targeting approaches. However, many technical and safety issues still need to be addressed before genome-edited iPSCs are translated into the clinical setting. Here, we provide an overview of the available genome editing systems and discuss opportunities and perspectives for their application in basic research and clinical practice, with a particular focus on hPSC based research and gene therapy approaches. Finally, we discuss recent research on human germline genome editing and its social and ethical implications. - Highlights: • Programmable nucleases have proven efficient and specific for genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). • Genome edited hPSCs can be employed to study gene function in health and disease as well as drug and chemical screens. • Genome edited hPSCs hold great promise for ex vivo gene therapy approaches. • Technical and safety issues should be first addressed to advance the clinical use of gene-edited hPSCs.

  4. Big Animal Cloning Using Transgenic Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: A Case Study of Goat Transgenic Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui; Li, Hui; Huang, Mingrui; Xu, Dan; Wang, Ziyu; Wang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Using of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) could improve production traits and disease resistance by improving the efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. However, robust ESCs have not been established from domestic ungulates. In the present study, we generated goat induced pluripotent stem cells (giPSCs) and transgenic cloned dairy goat induced pluripotent stem cells (tgiPSCs) from dairy goat fibroblasts (gFs) and transgenic cloned dairy goat fibroblasts (tgFs), respectively, using lentiviruses that contained hOCT4, hSOX2, hMYC, and hKLF4 without chemical compounds. The giPSCs and tgiPSCs expressed endogenous pluripotent markers, including OCT4, SOX2, MYC, KLF4, and NANOG. Moreover, they were able to maintain a normal karyotype and differentiate into derivatives from all three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. Using SCNT, tgFs and tgiPSCs were used as donor cells to produce embryos, which were named tgF-Embryos and tgiPSC-Embryos. The fusion rates and cleavage rates had no significant differences between tgF-Embryos and tgiPSC-Embryos. However, the expression of IGF-2, which is an important gene associated with embryonic development, was significantly lower in tgiPSC-Embryos than in tgF-Embryos and was not significantly different from vivo-Embryos.

  5. Inducing pluripotency in vitro: recent advances and highlights in induced pluripotent stem cells generation and pluripotency reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rony, I K; Baten, A; Bloomfield, J A; Islam, M E; Billah, M M; Islam, K D

    2015-04-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are considered patient-specific counterparts of embryonic stem cells as they originate from somatic cells after forced expression of pluripotency reprogramming factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc. iPSCs offer unprecedented opportunity for personalized cell therapies in regenerative medicine. In recent years, iPSC technology has undergone substantial improvement to overcome slow and inefficient reprogramming protocols, and to ensure clinical-grade iPSCs and their functional derivatives. Recent developments in iPSC technology include better reprogramming methods employing novel delivery systems such as non-integrating viral and non-viral vectors, and characterization of alternative reprogramming factors. Concurrently, small chemical molecules (inhibitors of specific signalling or epigenetic regulators) have become crucial to iPSC reprogramming; they have the ability to replace putative reprogramming factors and boost reprogramming processes. Moreover, common dietary supplements, such as vitamin C and antioxidants, when introduced into reprogramming media, have been found to improve genomic and epigenomic profiles of iPSCs. In this article, we review the most recent advances in the iPSC field and potent application of iPSCs, in terms of cell therapy and tissue engineering. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Therapeutic Application of Pluripotent Stem Cells: Challenges and Risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Martin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem-cell-based therapies are considered to be promising and innovative but complex approaches. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs combine the advantages of adult stem cells with the hitherto unique characteristics of embryonic stem cells (ESCs. Major progress has already been achieved with regard to reprogramming technology, but also regarding targeted genome editing and scalable expansion and differentiation of iPSCs and ESCs, in some cases yielding highly enriched preparations of well-defined cell lineages at clinically required dimensions. It is noteworthy, however, that for many applications critical requirements such as the targeted specification into distinct cellular subpopulations and a proper cell maturation remain to be achieved. Moreover, current hurdles such as low survival rates and insufficient functional integration of cellular transplants remain to be overcome. Nevertheless, PSC technologies obviously have come of age and matured to a stage where various clinical applications of PSC-based cellular therapies have been initiated and are conducted.

  7. Pluripotent Stem Cells for Schwann Cell Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    Tissue engineering of Schwann cells (SCs) can serve a number of purposes, such as in vitro SC-related disease modeling, treatment of peripheral nerve diseases or peripheral nerve injury, and, potentially, treatment of CNS diseases. SCs can be generated from autologous stem cells in vitro by

  8. Fluorescent tagged episomals for stoichiometric induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Christopher E; Morales, Blanca M; Schmitz, Ellen M H; Hawkins, John S; Lizama, Carlos O; Zape, Joan P; Hsiao, Edward C; Zovein, Ann C

    2017-06-05

    Non-integrating episomal vectors have become an important tool for induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming. The episomal vectors carrying the "Yamanaka reprogramming factors" (Oct4, Klf, Sox2, and L-Myc + Lin28) are critical tools for non-integrating reprogramming of cells to a pluripotent state. However, the reprogramming process remains highly stochastic, and is hampered by an inability to easily identify clones that carry the episomal vectors. We modified the original set of vectors to express spectrally separable fluorescent proteins to allow for enrichment of transfected cells. The vectors were then tested against the standard original vectors for reprogramming efficiency and for the ability to enrich for stoichiometric ratios of factors. The reengineered vectors allow for cell sorting based on reprogramming factor expression. We show that these vectors can assist in tracking episomal expression in individual cells and can select the reprogramming factor dosage. Together, these modified vectors are a useful tool for understanding the reprogramming process and improving induced pluripotent stem cell isolation efficiency.

  9. Nitric Oxide And Hypoxia Response In Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía Caballano Infantes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of pluripotent cells (ESCs and iPSCs under conditions that maintain their pluripotency is necessary to implement a cell therapy program. Previously, we have described that low nitric oxide (NO donor diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide adduct (DETA-NO added to the culture medium, promote the expansion of these cell types. The molecular mechanisms are not yet known. We present evidences that ESC and iPSCs in normoxia in presence of low NO triggers a similar response to hypoxia, thus maintaining the pluripotency. We have studied the stability of HIF-1α (Hypoxia Inducible Factor in presence of low NO. Because of the close relationship between hypoxia, metabolism, mitochondrial function and pluripotency we have analyzed by q RT-PCR the expression of genes involved in the glucose metabolism such as: HK2, LDHA and PDK1; besides other HIF-1α target gene. We further analyzed the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis such as PGC1α, TFAM and NRF1 and we have observed that low NO maintains the same pattern of expression that in hypoxia. The study of the mitochondrial membrane potential using Mito-Tracker dye showed that NO decrease the mitochondrial function. We will analyze other metabolic parameters, to determinate if low NO regulates mitochondrial function and mimics Hypoxia Response. The knowledge of the role of NO in the Hypoxia Response and the mechanism that helps to maintain self-renewal in pluripotent cells in normoxia, can help to the design of culture media where NO could be optimal for stem cell expansion in the performance of future cell therapies.

  10. Augmentation of musculoskeletal regeneration: role for pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevons, Lauren A; Houghton, Franchesca D; Tare, Rahul S

    2018-03-20

    The rise in the incidence of musculoskeletal diseases is attributed to an increasing ageing population. The debilitating effects of musculoskeletal diseases, coupled with a lack of effective therapies, contribute to huge financial strains on healthcare systems. The focus of regenerative medicine has shifted to pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), namely, human embryonic stem cells and human-induced PSCs, due to the limited success of adult stem cell-based interventions. PSCs constitute a valuable cell source for musculoskeletal regeneration due to their capacity for unlimited self-renewal, ability to differentiate into all cell lineages of the three germ layers and perceived immunoprivileged characteristics. This review summarizes methods for chondrogenic, osteogenic, myogenic and adipogenic differentiation of PSCs and their potential for therapeutic applications.

  11. Choices for Induction of Pluripotency: Recent Developments in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Marinka; Zhou, Huiqing; Nadif Kasri, Nael

    2016-02-01

    The ability to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from somatic cells provides tremendous promises for regenerative medicine and its use has widely increased over recent years. However, reprogramming efficiencies remain low and chromosomal instability and tumorigenic potential are concerns in the use of iPSCs, especially in clinical settings. Therefore, reprogramming methods have been under development to generate safer iPSCs with higher efficiency and better quality. Developments have mainly focused on the somatic cell source, the cocktail of reprogramming factors, the delivery method used to introduce reprogramming factors and culture conditions to maintain the generated iPSCs. This review discusses the developments on these topics and briefly discusses pros and cons of iPSCs in comparison with human embryonic stem cells generated from somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  12. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Regenerative Medicine and Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Duanqing; Xu, Jianyong; Zhuang, Qiang; Tse, Hung-Fat; Esteban, Miguel A.

    The potential of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) for regenerative medicine is unquestionable, but practical and ethical considerations have hampered clinical application and research. In an attempt to overcome these issues, the conversion of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells similar to ESCs, commonly termed nuclear reprogramming, has been a top objective of contemporary biology. More than 40 years ago, King, Briggs, and Gurdon pioneered somatic cell nuclear reprogramming in frogs, and in 1981 Evans successfully isolated mouse ESCs. In 1997 Wilmut and collaborators produced the first cloned mammal using nuclear transfer, and then Thomson obtained human ESCs from in vitro fertilized blastocysts in 1998. Over the last 2 decades we have also seen remarkable findings regarding how ESC behavior is controlled, the importance of which should not be underestimated. This knowledge allowed the laboratory of Shinya Yamanaka to overcome brilliantly conceptual and technical barriers in 2006 and generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from mouse fibroblasts by overexpressing defined combinations of ESC-enriched transcription factors. Here, we discuss some important implications of human iPSCs for biology and medicine and also point to possible future directions.

  13. Human Pluripotent Stem Cells to Engineer Blood Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Xin Yi; Elliott, Morgan B; Macklin, Bria; Gerecht, Sharon

    2018-01-01

    Development of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is a remarkable scientific advancement that allows scientists to harness the power of regenerative medicine for potential treatment of disease using unaffected cells. PSCs provide a unique opportunity to study and combat cardiovascular diseases, which continue to claim the lives of thousands each day. Here, we discuss the differentiation of PSCs into vascular cells, investigation of the functional capabilities of the derived cells, and their utilization to engineer microvascular beds or vascular grafts for clinical application. Graphical Abstract Human iPSCs generated from patients are differentiated toward ECs and perivascular cells for use in disease modeling, microvascular bed development, or vascular graft fabrication.

  14. Cryopreservation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in Defined Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiwei; Chen, Guokai

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes a cryopreservation procedure using an enzyme-free dissociation method to harvest cells and preserve cells in albumin-free chemically defined E8 medium for human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). The dissociation by EDTA/PBS produces small cell aggregates that allow high survival efficiency in passaging and cryopreservation. The preservation in E8 medium eliminates serum or other animal products, and is suitable for the increasing demand for high quality hPSCs in translational research. In combination with the special feature of EDTA/PBS dissociation, this protocol allows efficient cryopreservation in more time-saving manner. PMID:25366897

  15. Tracking the embryonic stem cell transition from ground state pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Tüzer; Olova, Nelly; Roode, Mila; Mulas, Carla; Lee, Heather J; Nett, Isabelle; Marks, Hendrik; Walker, Rachael; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Lilley, Kathryn S; Nichols, Jennifer; Reik, Wolf; Bertone, Paul; Smith, Austin

    2017-04-01

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are locked into self-renewal by shielding from inductive cues. Release from this ground state in minimal conditions offers a system for delineating developmental progression from naïve pluripotency. Here, we examine the initial transition process. The ES cell population behaves asynchronously. We therefore exploited a short-half-life Rex1::GFP reporter to isolate cells either side of exit from naïve status. Extinction of ES cell identity in single cells is acute. It occurs only after near-complete elimination of naïve pluripotency factors, but precedes appearance of lineage specification markers. Cells newly departed from the ES cell state display features of early post-implantation epiblast and are distinct from primed epiblast. They also exhibit a genome-wide increase in DNA methylation, intermediate between early and late epiblast. These findings are consistent with the proposition that naïve cells transition to a distinct formative phase of pluripotency preparatory to lineage priming. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. OCT4: dynamic DNA binding pioneers stem cell pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerabek, Stepan; Merino, Felipe; Schöler, Hans Robert; Cojocaru, Vlad

    2014-03-01

    OCT4 was discovered more than two decades ago as a transcription factor specific to early embryonic development. Early studies with OCT4 were descriptive and looked at determining the functional roles of OCT4 in the embryo as well as in pluripotent cell lines derived from embryos. Later studies showed that OCT4 was one of the transcription factors in the four-factor cocktail required for reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and that it is the only factor that cannot be substituted in this process by other members of the same protein family. In recent years, OCT4 has emerged as a master regulator of the induction and maintenance of cellular pluripotency, with crucial roles in the early stages of differentiation. Currently, mechanistic studies look at elucidating the molecular details of how OCT4 contributes to establishing selective gene expression programs that define different developmental stages of pluripotent cells. OCT4 belongs to the POU family of proteins, which have two conserved DNA-binding domains connected by a variable linker region. The functions of OCT4 depend on its ability to recognize and bind to DNA regulatory regions alone or in cooperation with other transcription factors and on its capacity to recruit other factors required to regulate the expression of specific sets of genes. Undoubtedly, future iPSC-based applications in regenerative medicine will benefit from understanding how OCT4 functions. Here we provide an integrated view of OCT4 research conducted to date by reviewing the different functional roles for OCT4 and discussing the current progress in understanding their underlying molecular mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chromatin and epigenetic regulation of animal development. © 2013.

  17. High throughput sequencing identifies an imprinted gene, Grb10, associated with the pluripotency state in nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Gao, Shuai; Huang, Hua; Liu, Wenqiang; Huang, Huanwei; Liu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Yawei; Le, Rongrong; Kou, Xiaochen; Zhao, Yanhong; Kou, Zhaohui; Li, Jia; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Hailin; Cai, Tao; Sun, Qingyuan; Gao, Shaorong; Han, Zhiming

    2017-07-18

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer and transcription factor mediated reprogramming are two widely used techniques for somatic cell reprogramming. Both fully reprogrammed nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells hold potential for regenerative medicine, and evaluation of the stem cell pluripotency state is crucial for these applications. Previous reports have shown that the Dlk1-Dio3 region is associated with pluripotency in induced pluripotent stem cells and the incomplete somatic cell reprogramming causes abnormally elevated levels of genomic 5-methylcytosine in induced pluripotent stem cells compared to nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells and embryonic stem cells. In this study, we compared pluripotency associated genes Rian and Gtl2 in the Dlk1-Dio3 region in exactly syngeneic nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells with same genomic insertion. We also assessed 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels and performed high-throughput sequencing in these cells. Our results showed that Rian and Gtl2 in the Dlk1-Dio3 region related to pluripotency in induced pluripotent stem cells did not correlate with the genes in nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells, and no significant difference in 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels were observed between fully and partially reprogrammed nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Through syngeneic comparison, our study identifies for the first time that Grb10 is associated with the pluripotency state in nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells.

  18. Induced pluripotent stem cells and Parkinson's disease: modelling and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyun; Huang, Jinsha; Li, Jie; Liu, Ling; Han, Chao; Shen, Yan; Zhang, Guoxin; Jiang, Haiyang; Lin, Zhicheng; Xiong, Nian; Wang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Many neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), are characterized by progressive neuronal loss in different regions of the central nervous system, contributing to brain dysfunction in the relevant patients. Stem cell therapy holds great promise for PD patients, including with foetal ventral mesencephalic cells, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Moreover, stem cells can be used to model neurodegenerative diseases in order to screen potential medication and explore their mechanisms of disease. However, related ethical issues, immunological rejection and lack of canonical grafting protocols limit common clinical use of stem cells. iPSCs, derived from reprogrammed somatic cells, provide new hope for cell replacement therapy. In this review, recent development in stem cell treatment for PD, using hiPSCs, as well as the potential value of hiPSCs in modelling for PD, have been summarized for application of iPSCs technology to clinical translation for PD treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Current protocols in the generation of pluripotent stem cells: theoretical, methodological and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad B Swelstad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Brad B Swelstad, Candace L KerrInstitute for Cell Engineering, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MA, USAAbstract: Pluripotent stem cells have been derived from various embryonic, fetal and adult sources. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs and parthenogenic ESCs (pESCs are derived from the embryo proper while embryonic germ cells (EGCs, embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs, and germ-line stem cells (GSC are produced from germ cells. ECCs were the first pluripotent stem cell lines established from adult testicular tumors while EGCs are generated in vitro from primordial germ cells (PGCs isolated in late embryonic development. More recently, studies have also demonstrated the ability to produce GSCs from adult germ cells, known as spermatogonial stem cells. Unlike ECCs, the source of GSCs are normal, non-cancerous adult tissue. The study of these unique cell lines has provided information that has led to the ability to reprogram somatic cells into an ESC-like state. These cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, have been derived from a number of human fetal and adult origins. With the promises pluripotent stem cells bring to cell-based therapies there remain several considerations that need to be carefully studied prior to their clinical use. Many of these issues involve understanding key factors regulating their generation, including those which define pluripotency. In this regard, the following article discusses critical aspects of pluripotent stem cell derivation and current issues about their therapeutic potential.Keywords: pluripotency, stem cells, derivation, human

  20. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Hair Follicle Bulge Neural Crest Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; Czepiel, Marcin; Krause, Tina; Schaefer, Karl-Herbert; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are promising candidates for the study of disease models as well as for tissue engineering purposes. Part of a strategy to develop safe reprogramming technique is reducing the number of exogenous reprogramming factors. Some cells types are more prone to

  1. Mechanism of Induction: Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vimal Kishor; Kumar, Neeraj; Kalsan, Manisha; Saini, Abhishek; Chandra, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) are self renewable and can differentiate to different types of adult cells, which has shown great promises in the field of regenerative medicine. iPSCs are reprogrammed from human somatic cells through ectopic expression of various transcription factors viz. Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (OSKM). This novel technology enables derivation of patient specific cells, which possess a potential cure for many diseases. During the last decade, significant progresses have been achieved in enhancing the reprogramming efficiency, safety of iPSCs derivation, development of different delivery techniques by various research groups. Nevertheless, it is important to resolve and define the mechanism underlying the pluripotent stem cells. Major bottleneck which arises during iPSCs generation is the availability of source material (cells/tissues), difficulty to deliver transcription factors with no aberrant genetic modifications and limited reprogramming efficiency. Reprogramming may be achieved by employing different cocktails with number of different transcription factors, application of miRNA and some small molecules such as (Valproic acid, CHiR99021, Sodium butyrate, Vitamin C, Parnate etc). Similarly, various starting source materials have been demonstrated for iPSC based therapies including fibroblasts, cord blood, peripheral blood, keritinocytes, urine, etc., with their specific uses and limitations. Moreover, with the advent of many new reprogramming techniques, various direct delivery methods have been introduced such as using synthetic mRNA expressing pluripotent gene network has been shown to be an appropriate technique to deliver transcription factors and a dozen of small molecules which can replace transcription factors or enhance reprogramming efficiency. This article addresses the iPSCs technology mechanisms, progresses and current perspectives in the field.

  2. Identifying Candidate Reprogramming Genes in Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fang; Li, Jingyu; Zhang, Heng; Yang, Xu; An, Tiezhu

    2017-08-01

    Factor-based induced reprogramming approaches have tremendous potential for human regenerative medicine, but the efficiencies of these approaches are still low. In this study, we analyzed the global transcriptional profiles of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (miPSCs) and mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) from seven different labs and present here the first successful clustering according to cell type, not by lab of origin. We identified 2131 different expression genes (DEs) as candidate pluripotency-associated genes by comparing mESCs/miPSCs with somatic cells and 720 DEs between miPSCs and mESCs. Interestingly, there was a significant overlap between the two DE sets. Therefore, we defined the overlap DEs as "consensus DEs" including 313 miPSC-specific genes expressed at a higher level in miPSCs versus mESCs and 184 mESC-specific genes in total and reasoned that these may contribute to the differences in pluripotency between mESCs and miPSCs. A classification of "consensus DEs" according to their different expression levels between somatic cells and mESCs/miPSCs shows that 86% of the miPSC-specific genes are more highly expressed in somatic cells, while 73% of mESC-specific genes are highly expressed in mESCs/miPSCs, indicating that the miPSCs have not efficiently silenced the expression pattern of the somatic cells from which they are derived and failed to completely induce the genes with high expression levels in mESCs. We further revealed a strong correlation between oocyte-enriched factors and insufficiently induced mESC-specific genes and identified 11 hub genes via network analysis. In light of these findings, we postulated that these key hub genes might not only drive somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) reprogramming but also augment the efficiency and quality of miPSC reprogramming.

  3. In vitro chondrogenesis and in vivo repair of osteochondral defect with human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ji-Yun; Kim, Kyung-Il; Park, Siyeon; Im, Gun-Il

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the chondrogenic features of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and examine the differences in the chondrogenesis between hiPSCs and human bone marrow-derived MSCs (hBMMSCs). Embryoid bodies (EBs) were formed from undifferentiated hiPSCs. After EBs were dissociated into single cells, chondrogenic culture was performed in pellets and alginate hydrogel. Chondro-induced hiPSCs were implanted in osteochondral defects created on the patellar groove of immunosuppressed rats and evaluated after 12 weeks. The ESC markers NANOG, SSEA4 and OCT3/4 disappeared while the mesodermal marker BMP-4 appeared in chondro-induced hiPSCs. After 21 days of culture, greater glycosaminoglycan contents and better chondrocytic features including lacuna and abundant matrix formation were observed from chondro-induced hiPSCs compared to chondro-induced hBMMSCs. The expression of chondrogenic markers including SOX-9, type II collagen, and aggrecan in chondro-induced hiPSCs was comparable to or greater than chondro-induced hBMMSCs. A remarkably low level of hypertrophic and osteogenic markers including type X collagen, type I collagen and Runx-2 was noted in chondro-induced hiPSCs compared to chondro-induced hBMMSCs. hiPSCs had significantly greater methylation of several CpG sites in COL10A1 promoter than hBMMSCs in either undifferentiated or chondro-induced state, suggesting an epigenetic cause of the difference in hypertrophy. The defects implanted with chondro-induced hiPSCs showed a significantly better quality of cartilage repair than the control defects, and the majority of cells in the regenerated cartilage consisted of implanted hiPSCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Dermatology: Potentials, Advances, and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilousova, Ganna; Roop, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of methods for reprogramming adult somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has raised the possibility of producing truly personalized treatment options for numerous diseases. Similar to embryonic stem cells (ESCs), iPSCs can give rise to any cell type in the body and are amenable to genetic correction by homologous recombination. These ESC properties of iPSCs allow for the development of permanent corrective therapies for many currently incurable disorders, including inherited skin diseases, without using embryonic tissues or oocytes. Here, we review recent progress and limitations of iPSC research with a focus on clinical applications of iPSCs and using iPSCs to model human diseases for drug discovery in the field of dermatology. PMID:25368014

  5. Induced pluripotent stem cell technology: a decade of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yanhong; Inoue, Haruhisa; Wu, Joseph C; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2017-02-01

    Since the advent of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology a decade ago, enormous progress has been made in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Human iPSCs have been widely used for disease modelling, drug discovery and cell therapy development. Novel pathological mechanisms have been elucidated, new drugs originating from iPSC screens are in the pipeline and the first clinical trial using human iPSC-derived products has been initiated. In particular, the combination of human iPSC technology with recent developments in gene editing and 3D organoids makes iPSC-based platforms even more powerful in each area of their application, including precision medicine. In this Review, we discuss the progress in applications of iPSC technology that are particularly relevant to drug discovery and regenerative medicine, and consider the remaining challenges and the emerging opportunities in the field.

  6. Generation of neuropeptidergic hypothalamic neurons from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Florian T; Maroof, Asif; Wataya, Takafumi; Sasai, Yoshiki; Studer, Lorenz; Eggan, Kevin; Schier, Alexander F

    2015-02-15

    Hypothalamic neurons orchestrate many essential physiological and behavioral processes via secreted neuropeptides, and are relevant to human diseases such as obesity, narcolepsy and infertility. We report the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into many of the major types of neuropeptidergic hypothalamic neurons, including those producing pro-opiolemelanocortin, agouti-related peptide, hypocretin/orexin, melanin-concentrating hormone, oxytocin, arginine vasopressin, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) or thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Hypothalamic neurons can be generated using a 'self-patterning' strategy that yields a broad array of cell types, or via a more reproducible directed differentiation approach. Stem cell-derived human hypothalamic neurons share characteristic morphological properties and gene expression patterns with their counterparts in vivo, and are able to integrate into the mouse brain. These neurons could form the basis of cellular models, chemical screens or cellular therapies to study and treat common human diseases. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Effect of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Blood Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focosi, Daniele; Pistello, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    Population aging has imposed cost-effective alternatives to blood donations. Artificial blood is still at the preliminary stages of development, and the need for viable cells seems unsurmountable. Because large numbers of viable cells must be promptly available for clinical use, stem cell technologies, expansion, and banking represent ideal tools to ensure a regular supply. Provided key donors can be identified, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology could pave the way to a new era in transfusion medicine, just as it is already doing in many other fields of medicine. The present review summarizes the current state of research on iPSC technology in the field of blood banking, highlighting hurdles, and promises. ©AlphaMed Press.

  8. Opportunities and challenges of pluripotent stem cell neurodegenerative disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoe, Jackson; Eggan, Kevin

    2013-07-01

    Human neurodegenerative disorders are among the most difficult to study. In particular, the inability to readily obtain the faulty cell types most relevant to these diseases has impeded progress for decades. Recent advances in pluripotent stem cell technology now grant access to substantial quantities of disease-pertinent neurons both with and without predisposing mutations. While this suite of technologies has revolutionized the field of 'in vitro disease modeling', great care must be taken in their deployment if robust, durable discoveries are to be made. Here we review what we perceive to be several of the stumbling blocks in the use of stem cells for the study of neurological disease and offer strategies to overcome them.

  9. Induced pluripotent stem cells with a mitochondrial DNA deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Anne B C; Gagne, Katelyn E; McLoughlin, Erin M; Baccei, Anna; Gorman, Bryan; Hartung, Odelya; Miller, Justine D; Zhang, Jin; Zon, Rebecca L; Ince, Tan A; Neufeld, Ellis J; Lerou, Paul H; Fleming, Mark D; Daley, George Q; Agarwal, Suneet

    2013-07-01

    In congenital mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disorders, a mixture of normal and mutated mtDNA (termed heteroplasmy) exists at varying levels in different tissues, which determines the severity and phenotypic expression of disease. Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome (PS) is a congenital bone marrow failure disorder caused by heteroplasmic deletions in mtDNA. The cause of the hematopoietic failure in PS is unknown, and adequate cellular and animal models are lacking. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are particularly amenable for studying mtDNA disorders, as cytoplasmic genetic material is retained during direct reprogramming. Here, we derive and characterize iPS cells from a patient with PS. Taking advantage of the tendency for heteroplasmy to change with cell passage, we isolated isogenic PS-iPS cells without detectable levels of deleted mtDNA. We found that PS-iPS cells carrying a high burden of deleted mtDNA displayed differences in growth, mitochondrial function, and hematopoietic phenotype when differentiated in vitro, compared to isogenic iPS cells without deleted mtDNA. Our results demonstrate that reprogramming somatic cells from patients with mtDNA disorders can yield pluripotent stem cells with varying burdens of heteroplasmy that might be useful in the study and treatment of mitochondrial diseases. Copyright © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  10. Induced pluripotent stem cells with a pathological mitochondrial DNA deletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Anne B. C.; Gagne, Katelyn E.; McLoughlin, Erin M.; Baccei, Anna; Gorman, Bryan; Hartung, Odelya; Miller, Justine D.; Zhang, Jin; Zon, Rebecca L.; Ince, Tan A.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Lerou, Paul H.; Fleming, Mark D.; Daley, George Q.; Agarwal, Suneet

    2013-01-01

    In congenital mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disorders, a mixture of normal and mutated mtDNA (termed heteroplasmy) exists at varying levels in different tissues, which determines the severity and phenotypic expression of disease. Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome (PS) is a congenital bone marrow failure disorder caused by heteroplasmic deletions in mtDNA. The cause of the hematopoietic failure in PS is unknown, and adequate cellular and animal models are lacking. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are particularly amenable for studying mtDNA disorders, as cytoplasmic genetic material is retained during direct reprogramming. Here we derive and characterize iPS cells from a patient with PS. Taking advantage of the tendency for heteroplasmy to change with cell passage, we isolated isogenic PS-iPS cells without detectable levels of deleted mtDNA. We found that PS-iPS cells carrying a high burden of deleted mtDNA displayed differences in growth, mitochondrial function, and hematopoietic phenotype when differentiated in vitro, compared to isogenic iPS cells without deleted mtDNA. Our results demonstrate that reprogramming somatic cells from patients with mtDNA disorders can yield pluripotent stem cells with varying burdens of heteroplasmy that might be useful in the study and treatment of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:23400930

  11. Induced pluripotent stem cell technology and aquatic animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Alexis M; Spyropoulos, Demetri D

    2014-06-01

    Aquatic animal species are the overall leaders in the scientific investigation of tough but important global health issues, including environmental toxicants and climate change. Historically, aquatic animal species also stand at the forefront of experimental biology, embryology and stem cell research. Over the past decade, intensive and high-powered investigations principally involving mouse and human cells have brought the generation and study of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to a level that facilitates widespread use in a spectrum of species. A review of key features of these investigations is presented here as a primer for the use of iPSC technology to enhance ongoing aquatic animal species studies. iPSC and other cutting edge technologies create the potential to study individuals from "the wild" closer to the level of investigation applied to sophisticated inbred mouse models. A wide variety of surveys and hypothesis-driven investigations can be envisioned using this new capability, including comparisons of organism-specific development and exposure response and the testing of fundamental dogmas established using inbred mice. However, with these new capabilities, also come new criteria for rigorous baseline assessments and testing. Both the methods for inducing pluripotency and the source material can negatively impact iPSC quality and bourgeoning applications. Therefore, more rigorous strategies not required for inbred mouse models will have to be implemented to approach global health issues using individuals from "the wild" for aquatic animal species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation into Functional Epicardial Progenitor Cells

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    Juan Antonio Guadix

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs are widely used to study cardiovascular cell differentiation and function. Here, we induced differentiation of hPSCs (both embryonic and induced to proepicardial/epicardial progenitor cells that cover the heart during development. Addition of retinoic acid (RA and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4 promoted expression of the mesodermal marker PDGFRα, upregulated characteristic (proepicardial progenitor cell genes, and downregulated transcription of myocardial genes. We confirmed the (proepicardial-like properties of these cells using in vitro co-culture assays and in ovo grafting of hPSC-epicardial cells into chick embryos. Our data show that RA + BMP4-treated hPSCs differentiate into (proepicardial-like cells displaying functional properties (adhesion and spreading over the myocardium of their in vivo counterpart. The results extend evidence that hPSCs are an excellent model to study (proepicardial differentiation into cardiovascular cells in human development and evaluate their potential for cardiac regeneration. : The authors have shown that hPSCs can be instructed in vitro to differentiate into a specific cardiac embryonic progenitor cell population called the proepicardium. Proepicardial cells are required for normal formation of the heart during development and might contribute to the development of cell-based therapies for heart repair. Keywords: human pluripotent stem cells, proepicardium, progenitor cells, cardiovascular, differentiation

  13. Reprogramming of Mouse Calvarial Osteoblasts into Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Yinxiang Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of reprogramming endochondral bone into induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells, but whether similar phenomenon occurs in intramembranous bone remains to be determined. Here we adopted fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based strategy to isolate homogenous population of intramembranous calvarial osteoblasts from newborn transgenic mice carrying both Osx1-GFP::Cre and Oct4-EGFP transgenes. Following retroviral transduction of Yamanaka factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, enriched population of osteoblasts underwent silencing of Osx1-GFP::Cre expression at early stage of reprogramming followed by late activation of Oct4-EGFP expression in the resulting iPS cells. These osteoblast-derived iPS cells exhibited gene expression profiles akin to embryonic stem cells and were pluripotent as demonstrated by their ability to form teratomas comprising tissues from all germ layers and also contribute to tail tissue in chimera embryos. These data demonstrate that iPS cells can be generated from intramembranous osteoblasts.

  14. Non integrative strategy decreases chromosome instability and improves endogenous pluripotency genes reactivation in porcine induced pluripotent-like stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congras, Annabelle; Barasc, Harmonie; Canale-Tabet, Kamila; Plisson-Petit, Florence; Delcros, Chantal; Feraud, Olivier; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Hadadi, Eva; Griscelli, Franck; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Turhan, Ali; Afanassieff, Marielle; Ferchaud, Stéphane; Pinton, Alain; Yerle-Bouissou, Martine; Acloque, Hervé

    2016-06-01

    The pig is an emerging animal model, complementary to rodents for basic research and for biomedical and agronomical purposes. However despite the progress made on mouse and rat models to produce genuine pluripotent cells, it remains impossible to produce porcine pluripotent cell lines with germline transmission. Reprogramming of pig somatic cells using conventional integrative strategies remains also unsatisfactory. In the present study, we compared the outcome of both integrative and non-integrative reprogramming strategies on pluripotency and chromosome stability during pig somatic cell reprogramming. The porcine cell lines produced with integrative strategies express several pluripotency genes but they do not silence the integrated exogenes and present a high genomic instability upon passaging. In contrast, pig induced pluripotent-like stem cells produced with non-integrative reprogramming system (NI-iPSLCs) exhibit a normal karyotype after more than 12 months in culture and reactivate endogenous pluripotency markers. Despite the persistent expression of exogenous OCT4 and MYC, these cells can differentiate into derivatives expressing markers of the three embryonic germ layers and we propose that these NI-iPSLCs can be used as a model to bring new insights into the molecular factors controlling and maintaining pluripotency in the pig and other non-rodent mammalians.

  15. [The alchemy--epigenetic regulation of pluripotency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bem, Joanna; Grabowska, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) self renew their population, also they are pluripotent which means they can differentiate into any given cell type. In specific culture conditions they remain undifferentiated. On the cellular level pluripotency is determined by many transcription factors, e.g. Sox2, Nanog, Klf4, Oct4. Epigenetic regulation is also crucial for both self renewal and pluripotency. This review focuses on epigenetic mechanisms, among them DNA methylation, posttranslational histone modifications, ATP dependent chromatin remodeling and miRNAs interactions. These mechanisms affect embryonic stem cells functions keeping them poised for differentiation.

  16. Development of an inducible caspase-9 safety switch for pluripotent stem cell–based therapies

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    Chuanfeng Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC therapies offer a promising path for patient-specific regenerative medicine. However, tumor formation from residual undifferentiated iPSC or transformation of iPSC or their derivatives is a risk. Inclusion of a suicide gene is one approach to risk mitigation. We introduced a dimerizable-“inducible caspase-9” (iCasp9 suicide gene into mouse iPSC (miPSC and rhesus iPSC (RhiPSC via a lentivirus, driving expression from either a cytomegalovirus (CMV, elongation factor-1 α (EF1α or pluripotency-specific EOS-C(3+ promoter. Exposure of the iPSC to the synthetic chemical dimerizer, AP1903, in vitro induced effective apoptosis in EF1α-iCasp9-expressing (EF1α-iPSC, with less effective killing of EOS-C(3+-iPSC and CMV-iPSC, proportional to transgene expression in these cells. AP1903 treatment of EF1α-iCasp9 miPSC in vitro delayed or prevented teratomas. AP1903 administration following subcutaneous or intravenous delivery of EF1α-iPSC resulted in delayed teratoma progression but did not ablate tumors. EF1α-iCasp9 expression was downregulated during in vitro and in vivo differentiation due to DNA methylation at CpG islands within the promoter, and methylation, and thus decreased expression, could be reversed by 5-azacytidine treatment. The level and stability of suicide gene expression will be important for the development of suicide gene strategies in iPSC regenerative medicine.

  17. Viral Vector-Based Innovative Approaches to Directly Abolishing Tumorigenic Pluripotent Stem Cells for Safer Regenerative Medicine

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    Kaoru Mitsui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs are a promising source of regenerative material for clinical applications. However, hPSC transplant therapies pose the risk of teratoma formation and malignant transformation of undifferentiated remnants. These problems underscore the importance of developing technologies that completely prevent tumorigenesis to ensure safe clinical application. Research to date has contributed to establishing safe hPSC lines, improving the efficiency of differentiation induction, and indirectly ensuring the safety of products. Despite such efforts, guaranteeing the clinical safety of regenerative medicine products remains a key challenge. Given the intrinsic genome instability of hPSCs, selective growth advantage of cancer cells, and lessons learned through failures in previous attempts at hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy, conventional strategies are unlikely to completely overcome issues related to hPSC tumorigenesis. Researchers have recently embarked on studies aimed at locating and directly treating hPSC-derived tumorigenic cells. In particular, novel approaches to directly killing tumorigenic cells by transduction of suicide genes and oncolytic viruses are expected to improve the safety of hPSC-based therapy. This article discusses the current status and future perspectives of methods aimed at directly eradicating undifferentiated tumorigenic hPSCs, with a focus on viral vector transduction.

  18. Viral Vector-Based Innovative Approaches to Directly Abolishing Tumorigenic Pluripotent Stem Cells for Safer Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Kaoru; Ide, Kanako; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Kosai, Ken-Ichiro

    2017-06-16

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are a promising source of regenerative material for clinical applications. However, hPSC transplant therapies pose the risk of teratoma formation and malignant transformation of undifferentiated remnants. These problems underscore the importance of developing technologies that completely prevent tumorigenesis to ensure safe clinical application. Research to date has contributed to establishing safe hPSC lines, improving the efficiency of differentiation induction, and indirectly ensuring the safety of products. Despite such efforts, guaranteeing the clinical safety of regenerative medicine products remains a key challenge. Given the intrinsic genome instability of hPSCs, selective growth advantage of cancer cells, and lessons learned through failures in previous attempts at hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy, conventional strategies are unlikely to completely overcome issues related to hPSC tumorigenesis. Researchers have recently embarked on studies aimed at locating and directly treating hPSC-derived tumorigenic cells. In particular, novel approaches to directly killing tumorigenic cells by transduction of suicide genes and oncolytic viruses are expected to improve the safety of hPSC-based therapy. This article discusses the current status and future perspectives of methods aimed at directly eradicating undifferentiated tumorigenic hPSCs, with a focus on viral vector transduction.

  19. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate MHC and antigen processing molecules in human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Beatriz Suárez-Alvarez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are an attractive resource for new therapeutic approaches that involve tissue regeneration. hESCs have exhibited low immunogenicity due to low levels of Mayor Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class-I and absence of MHC class-II expression. Nevertheless, the mechanisms regulating MHC expression in hESCs had not been explored.We analyzed the expression levels of classical and non-classical MHC class-I, MHC class-II molecules, antigen-processing machinery (APM components and NKG2D ligands (NKG2D-L in hESCs, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and NTera2 (NT2 teratocarcinoma cell line. Epigenetic mechanisms involved in the regulation of these genes were investigated by bisulfite sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays. We showed that low levels of MHC class-I molecules were associated with absent or reduced expression of the transporter associated with antigen processing 1 (TAP-1 and tapasin (TPN components in hESCs and iPSCs, which are involved in the transport and load of peptides. Furthermore, lack of beta2-microglobulin (beta2m light chain in these cells limited the expression of MHC class I trimeric molecule on the cell surface. NKG2D ligands (MICA, MICB were observed in all pluripotent stem cells lines. Epigenetic analysis showed that H3K9me3 repressed the TPN gene in undifferentiated cells whilst HLA-B and beta2m acquired the H3K4me3 modification during the differentiation to embryoid bodies (EBs. Absence of HLA-DR and HLA-G expression was regulated by DNA methylation.Our data provide fundamental evidence for the epigenetic control of MHC in hESCs and iPSCs. Reduced MHC class I and class II expression in hESCs and iPSCs can limit their recognition by the immune response against these cells. The knowledge of these mechanisms will further allow the development of strategies to induce tolerance and improve stem cell allograft acceptance.

  20. A Safeguard System for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Rejuvenated T Cell Therapy

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    Miki Ando

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs has created promising new avenues for therapies in regenerative medicine. However, the tumorigenic potential of undifferentiated iPSCs is a major safety concern for clinical translation. To address this issue, we demonstrated the efficacy of suicide gene therapy by introducing inducible caspase-9 (iC9 into iPSCs. Activation of iC9 with a specific chemical inducer of dimerization (CID initiates a caspase cascade that eliminates iPSCs and tumors originated from iPSCs. We introduced this iC9/CID safeguard system into a previously reported iPSC-derived, rejuvenated cytotoxic T lymphocyte (rejCTL therapy model and confirmed that we can generate rejCTLs from iPSCs expressing high levels of iC9 without disturbing antigen-specific killing activity. iC9-expressing rejCTLs exert antitumor effects in vivo. The system efficiently and safely induces apoptosis in these rejCTLs. These results unite to suggest that the iC9/CID safeguard system is a promising tool for future iPSC-mediated approaches to clinical therapy.

  1. Induced pluripotent stem cells: Challenges and opportunities for cancer immunotherapy

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    Patty eSachamitr

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in cancer treatment over the past 30 years, therapeutic options remain limited and do not always offer a cure for malignancy. Given that tumour associated antigens (TAA are, by definition, self-proteins, the need to productively engage autoreactive T cells remains at the heart of strategies for cancer immunotherapy. These have traditionally focussed on the administration of autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC pulsed with TAA, or the ex vivo expansion and adoptive transfer of tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL as a source of TAA-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL. Although such approaches have shown some efficacy, success has been limited by the poor capacity of moDC to cross-present exogenous TAA to the CD8+ T cell repertoire and the potential for exhaustion of CTL expanded ex vivo. Recent advances in induced pluripotency offer opportunities to generate patient-specific stem cell lines with the potential to differentiate in vitro into cell types whose properties may help address these issues. Here we review recent success in the differentiation of NK cells from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells as well as minor subsets of DC with therapeutic potential, including CD141+XCR1+ DC, capable of cross-presenting TAA to naïve CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, we review recent progress in the use of TIL as the starting material for the derivation of iPSC lines, thereby capturing their antigen specificity in a self-renewing stem cell line, from which potentially unlimited numbers of naïve TAA-specific T cells may be differentiated, free of the risks of exhaustion.

  2. Culture Environment-Induced Pluripotency of SACK-Expanded Tissue Stem Cells

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    Jean-François Paré

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous efforts to improve the efficiency of cellular reprogramming for the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have focused mainly on transcription factors and small molecule combinations. Here, we report the results of our focus instead on the phenotype of the cells targeted for reprogramming. We find that adult mouse pancreatic tissue stem cells derived by the method of suppression of asymmetric cell kinetics (SACK acquire increased potency simply by culture under conditions for the production and maintenance of pluripotent stem cells. Moreover, supplementation with the SACK agent xanthine, which promotes symmetric self-renewal, significantly increases the efficiency and degree of acquisition of pluripotency properties. In transplantation analyses, clonal reprogrammed pancreatic stem cells produce slow-growing tumors with tissue derivative of all three embryonic germ layers. This acquisition of pluripotency, without transduction with exogenous transcription factors, supports the concept that tissue stem cells are predisposed to cellular reprogramming, particularly when symmetrically self-renewing.

  3. p75 neurotrophin receptor is involved in proliferation of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells

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    Moscatelli, Ilana; Pierantozzi, Enrico; Camaioni, Antonella; Siracusa, Gregorio [Department of Public Health and Cell Biology, Section of Histology and Embryology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Campagnolo, Luisa, E-mail: campagno@med.uniroma2.it [Department of Public Health and Cell Biology, Section of Histology and Embryology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2009-11-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors are known to play a role in the proliferation and survival of many different cell types of neuronal and non-neuronal lineages. In addition, there is much evidence in the literature showing that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}), alone or in association with members of the family of Trk receptors, is expressed in a wide variety of stem cells, although its role in such cells has not been completely elucidated. In the present work we have investigated the expression of p75{sup NTR} and Trks in totipotent and pluripotent cells, the mouse pre-implantation embryo and embryonic stem and germ cells (ES and EG cells). p75{sup NTR} and TrkA can be first detected in the blastocyst from which ES cell lines are derived. Mouse ES cells retain p75{sup NTR}/TrkA expression. Nerve growth factor is the only neurotrophin able to stimulate ES cell growth in culture, without affecting the expression of stem cell markers, alkaline phosphatase, Oct4 and Nanog. Such proliferation effect was blocked by antagonizing either p75{sup NTR} or TrkA. Interestingly, immunoreactivity to anti-p75{sup NTR} antibodies is lost upon ES cell differentiation. The expression pattern of neurotrophin receptors in murine ES cells differs from human ES cells, that only express TrkB and C, and do not respond to NGF. In this paper we also show that, while primordial germ cells (PGC) do not express p75{sup NTR}, when they are made to revert to an ES-like phenotype, becoming EG cells, expression of p75{sup NTR} is turned on.

  4. Modeling Genomic Imprinting Disorders Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Stormy J; Germain, Noelle D; Chen, Pin-Fang; Hsiao, Jack S; Glatt-Deeley, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has allowed for the invaluable modeling of many genetic disorders including disorders associated with genomic imprinting. Genomic imprinting involves differential DNA and histone methylation and results in allele-specific gene expression. Most of the epigenetic marks in somatic cells are erased and reestablished during the process of reprogramming into iPSCs. Therefore, in generating models of disorders associated with genomic imprinting, it is important to verify that the imprinting status and allele-specific gene expression patterns of the parental somatic cells are maintained in their derivative iPSCs. Here, we describe three techniques: DNA methylation analysis, allele-specific PCR, and RNA FISH, which we use to analyze genomic imprinting in iPSC models of neurogenetic disorders involving copy number variations of the chromosome 15q11-q13 region.

  5. Auxetic nuclei in embryonic stem cells exiting pluripotency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliara, Stefano; Franze, Kristian; McClain, Crystal R.; Wylde, George W.; Fisher, Cynthia L.; Franklin, Robin J. M.; Kabla, Alexandre J.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Chalut, Kevin J.

    2014-06-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) self-renew in a state of naïve pluripotency in which they are competent to generate all somatic cells. It has been hypothesized that, before irreversibly committing, ESCs pass through at least one metastable transition state. This transition would represent a gateway for differentiation and reprogramming of somatic cells. Here, we show that during the transition, the nuclei of ESCs are auxetic: they exhibit a cross-sectional expansion when stretched and a cross-sectional contraction when compressed, and their stiffness increases under compression. We also show that the auxetic phenotype of transition ESC nuclei is driven at least in part by global chromatin decondensation. Through the regulation of molecular turnover in the differentiating nucleus by external forces, auxeticity could be a key element in mechanotransduction. Our findings highlight the importance of nuclear structure in the regulation of differentiation and reprogramming.

  6. Generation of pluripotent stem cells via protein transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Zhang, Pengfei; Wei, Chao; Zhang, Yunhai

    2014-01-01

    The development of techniques for reprogramming somatic cells led to the birth of the cloned sheep “Dolly” and the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs hold great promise for in vitro disease modeling, new drug screening, regenerative medicine and agricultural production. These cells can differentiate into almost any tissue types and they can be used to produce autografts that will not be rejected by the patient. However, practical application has been limited by the potential for insertion mutagenesis and by the complexity of the associated procedures. A protein-based approach to generation of iPSCs could offer better prospects by avoiding these problems. This review provides an overview of the key processes and mechanism involved in protein-based somatic cell reprogramming, discusses some promising methods for increasing its efficiency and future challenges.

  7. Multiple sclerosis: getting personal with induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ruscio, A; Patti, F; Welner, R S; Tenen, D G; Amabile, G

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be derived from lineage-restricted cells and represent an important tool to develop novel patient-specific cell therapies and research models for inherited and acquired diseases. Recently, patient-derived iPS cells, containing donor genetic background, have offered a breakthrough approach to study human genetics of neurodegenerative diseases. By offering an unlimited source of patient-specific disease-relevant cells, iPS cells hold great promise for understanding disease mechanisms, identifying molecular targets and developing phenotypic screens for drug discovery. This review will discuss the potential impact of using iPS cell-derived models in multiple sclerosis (MS) research and highlight some of the current challenges and prospective for generating novel therapeutic treatments for MS patients. PMID:26158512

  8. Multiphoton autofluorescence lifetime imaging of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, Aisada

    2017-06-01

    The multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging tomograph MPTflex with its flexible 360-deg scan head, articulated arm, and tunable femtosecond laser source was employed to study induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) cultures. Autofluorescence (AF) lifetime imaging was performed with 250-ps temporal resolution and submicron spatial resolution using time-correlated single-photon counting. The two-photon excited AF was based on the metabolic coenzymes NAD(P)H and flavin adenine dinucleotide/flavoproteins. iPS cells generated from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and cocultured with growth-arrested MEFs as feeder cells have been studied. Significant differences on AF lifetime signatures were identified between iPS and feeder cells as well as between their differentiating counterparts.

  9. Modeling Neuropsychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases With Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. LaMarca

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs have revolutionized our ability to model neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, and recent progress in the field is paving the way for improved therapeutics. In this review, we discuss major advances in generating hiPSC-derived neural cells and cutting-edge techniques that are transforming hiPSC technology, such as three-dimensional “mini-brains” and clustered, regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas systems. We examine specific examples of how hiPSC-derived neural cells are being used to uncover the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease, and consider the future of this groundbreaking research.

  10. Induced pluripotent stem cell models of lysosomal storage disorders

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    Daniel K. Borger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have provided new opportunities to explore the cell biology and pathophysiology of human diseases, and the lysosomal storage disorder research community has been quick to adopt this technology. Patient-derived iPSC models have been generated for a number of lysosomal storage disorders, including Gaucher disease, Pompe disease, Fabry disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy, the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, Niemann-Pick types A and C1, and several of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Here, we review the strategies employed for reprogramming and differentiation, as well as insights into disease etiology gleaned from the currently available models. Examples are provided to illustrate how iPSC-derived models can be employed to develop new therapeutic strategies for these disorders. We also discuss how models of these rare diseases could contribute to an enhanced understanding of more common neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, and discuss key challenges and opportunities in this area of research.

  11. Recent Progress Using Pluripotent Stem Cells for Cardiac Regenerative Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Hajime; Shiba, Yuji

    2017-06-23

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have gained interest for cell-based regenerative therapies because of their capacity to differentiate into most somatic cell types, including cardiomyocytes. Remarkable progress in the generation of PSC-derived cardiomyocytes has been made in this decade, and recent preclinical transplantation studies using various animal models have provided proof-of-principle for their use in heart regeneration. However, several obstacles preclude their effective and safe clinical application for cardiac repair, including the need for approaches that prevent tumorigenesis, arrhythmogenesis, and immune rejection. In this review, we focus on recent progress in the field of PSC-based cardiac regenerative therapy, including the remaining hurdles and potential approaches to circumventing them.

  12. Derivation and application of pluripotent stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaqiang; Zhou, Qi

    2016-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are cells that can differentiate into any type of cells in the body, therefore have valuable promise in regenerative medicine of cell replacement therapies and tissue/organ engineering. PSCs can be derived either from early embryos or directly from somatic cells by epigenetic reprogramming that result in customized cells from patients. Here we summarize the methods of deriving PSCs, the various types of PSCs generated with different status, and their versatile applications in both clinical and embryonic development studies. We also discuss an intriguing potential application of PSCs in constructing tissues/organs in large animals by interspecies chimerism. All these emerging findings are likely to contribute to the breakthroughs in biological research and the prosperous prospects of regenerative medicine.

  13. Derivation and characterization of sleeping beauty transposon-mediated porcine induced pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kues, Wilfried A.; Herrmann, Doris; Barg-Kues, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    the nonviral Sleeping Beauty transposon system to deliver the reprogramming factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc. Successful reprogramming to a pluripotent state was indicated by changes in cell morphology and reactivation of the Oct4-EGFP reporter. The transposon-reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem (i...

  14. Modeling human neurological disorders with induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Yoichi; Okano, Hideyuki

    2014-05-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells obtained by reprogramming technology are a source of great hope, not only in terms of applications in regenerative medicine, such as cell transplantation therapy, but also for modeling human diseases and new drug development. In particular, the production of iPS cells from the somatic cells of patients with intractable diseases and their subsequent differentiation into cells at affected sites (e.g., neurons, cardiomyocytes, hepatocytes, and myocytes) has permitted the in vitro construction of disease models that contain patient-specific genetic information. For example, disease-specific iPS cells have been established from patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and autism, as well as from those with neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. A multi-omics analysis of neural cells originating from patient-derived iPS cells may thus enable investigators to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of neurological diseases that have heretofore been unknown. In addition, large-scale screening of chemical libraries with disease-specific iPS cells is currently underway and is expected to lead to new drug discovery. Accordingly, this review outlines the progress made via the use of patient-derived iPS cells toward the modeling of neurological disorders, the testing of existing drugs, and the discovery of new drugs. The production of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from the patients' somatic cells and their subsequent differentiation into specific cells have permitted the in vitro construction of disease models that contain patient-specific genetic information. Furthermore, innovations of gene-editing technologies on iPS cells are enabling new approaches for illuminating the pathogenic mechanisms of human diseases. In this review article, we outlined the current status of neurological diseases-specific iPS cell research and described recently obtained

  15. Derivation of Ethnically Diverse Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Eun Ah; Tomov, Martin L; Suhr, Steven T; Luo, Jiesi; Olmsted, Zachary T; Paluh, Janet L; Cibelli, Jose

    2015-10-20

    The human genome with all its ethnic variations contributes to differences in human development, aging, disease, repair, and response to medical treatments and is an exciting area of research and clinical study. The availability of well-characterized ethnically diverse stem cell lines is limited and has not kept pace with other advances in stem cell research. Here we derived xenofree ethnically diverse-human induced pluripotent stem cell (ED-iPSC) lines from fibroblasts obtained from individuals of African American, Hispanic-Latino, Asian, and Caucasian ethnic origin and have characterized the lines under a uniform platform for comparative analysis. Derived ED-iPSC lines are low passage number and evaluated in vivo by teratoma formation and in vitro by high throughput microarray analysis of EB formation and early differentiation for tri-lineage commitment to endoderm, ectoderm and mesoderm. These new xenofree ED-iPSC lines represent a well-characterized valuable resource with potential for use in future research in drug discovery or clinical investigations.

  16. Induced pluripotent stem cells and their implication for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csobonyeiova, Maria; Polak, Stefan; Koller, Jan; Danisovic, Lubos

    2015-06-01

    In 2006 Yamanaka's group showed that stem cells with properties similar to embryonic stem cells could be generated from mouse fibroblasts by introducing four genes. These cells were termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Because iPSCs avoid many of ethical concerns associated with the use of embryonic material, they have great potential in cell-based regenerative medicine. They are suitable also for other various purposes, including disease modelling, personalized cell therapy, drug or toxicity screening and basic research. Moreover, in the future, there might become possible to generate organs for human transplantation. Despite these progresses, several studies have raised the concern for genetic and epigenetic abnormalities of iPSCs that could contribute to immunogenicity of some cells differentiated from iPSCs. Recent methodological improvements are increasing the ease and efficacy of reprogramming, and reducing the genomic modification. However, to minimize or eliminate genetic alternations in the derived iPSC line creation, factor-free human iPSCs are necessary. In this review we discuss recent possibilities of using iPSCs for clinical applications and new advances in field of their reprogramming methods. The main goal of present article was to review the current knowledge about iPSCs and to discuss their potential for regenerative medicine.

  17. Comparison of the gene expression profile of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cell lines and differentiating embryoid bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Mahendra S

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of molecular pathways of differentiation of embryonic stem cells (hESC is critical for the development of stem cell based medical therapies. In order to identify biomarkers and potential regulators of the process of differentiation, a high quality microarray containing 16,659 seventy base pair oligonucleotides was used to compare gene expression profiles of undifferentiated hESC lines and differentiating embryoid bodies. Results Previously identified "stemness" genes in undifferentiated hESC lines showed down modulation in differentiated cells while expression of several genes was induced as cells differentiated. In addition, a subset of 194 genes showed overexpression of greater than ≥ 3 folds in human embryoid bodies (hEB. These included 37 novel and 157 known genes. Gene expression was validated by a variety of techniques including another large scale array, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, focused cDNA microarrays, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS analysis and immunocytochemisty. Several novel hEB specific expressed sequence tags (ESTs were mapped to the human genome database and their expression profile characterized. A hierarchical clustering analysis clearly depicted a distinct difference in gene expression profile among undifferentiated and differentiated hESC and confirmed that microarray analysis could readily distinguish them. Conclusion These results present a detailed characterization of a unique set of genes, which can be used to assess the hESC differentiation.

  18. Comparison of the gene expression profile of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cell lines and differentiating embryoid bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Bhaskar; Cai, Jingli; Luo, Youngquan; Miura, Takumi; Mejido, Josef; Brimble, Sandii N; Zeng, Xianmin; Schulz, Thomas C; Rao, Mahendra S; Puri, Raj K

    2005-10-05

    The identification of molecular pathways of differentiation of embryonic stem cells (hESC) is critical for the development of stem cell based medical therapies. In order to identify biomarkers and potential regulators of the process of differentiation, a high quality microarray containing 16,659 seventy base pair oligonucleotides was used to compare gene expression profiles of undifferentiated hESC lines and differentiating embryoid bodies. Previously identified "stemness" genes in undifferentiated hESC lines showed down modulation in differentiated cells while expression of several genes was induced as cells differentiated. In addition, a subset of 194 genes showed overexpression of greater than > or = 3 folds in human embryoid bodies (hEB). These included 37 novel and 157 known genes. Gene expression was validated by a variety of techniques including another large scale array, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, focused cDNA microarrays, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) analysis and immunocytochemisty. Several novel hEB specific expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were mapped to the human genome database and their expression profile characterized. A hierarchical clustering analysis clearly depicted a distinct difference in gene expression profile among undifferentiated and differentiated hESC and confirmed that microarray analysis could readily distinguish them. These results present a detailed characterization of a unique set of genes, which can be used to assess the hESC differentiation.

  19. Conversion of primordial germ cells to pluripotent stem cells: methods for cell tracking and culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, Go; Suda, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are unipotent cells committed to germ lineage: PGCs can only differentiate into gametes in vivo. However, upon fertilization, germ cells acquire the capacity to differentiate into all cell types in the body, including germ cells. Therefore, germ cells are thought to have the potential for pluripotency. PGCs can convert to pluripotent stem cells in vitro when cultured under specific conditions that include bFGF, LIF, and the membrane-bound form of SCF (mSCF). Here, the culture conditions which efficiently convert PGCs to pluripotent embryonic germ (EG) cells are described, as well as methods used for identifying pluripotent candidate cells during culture.

  20. A mystery unraveled: nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells in human adult tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simerman, Ariel A; Perone, Marcelo J; Gimeno, María L; Dumesic, Daniel A; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D

    2014-07-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have emerged as the gold standard of pluripotent stem cells and the class of stem cell with the highest potential for contribution to regenerative and therapeutic application; however, their translational use is often impeded by teratoma formation, commonly associated with pluripotency. We discuss a population of nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells, termed Multilineage Differentiating Stress Enduring (Muse) cells, which offer an innovative and exciting avenue of exploration for the potential treatment of various human diseases. This review discusses the origin of Muse cells, describes in detail their various unique characteristics, and considers future avenues of their application and investigation with respect to what is currently known of adult pluripotent stem cells in scientific literature. We begin by defining cell potency, then discuss both mesenchymal and various reported populations of pluripotent stem cells, and finally delve into Muse cells and the characteristics that set them apart from their contemporaries. Muse cells derived from adipose tissue (Muse-AT) are efficiently, routinely and painlessly isolated from human lipoaspirate material, exhibit tripoblastic differentiation both spontaneously and under media-specific induction, and do not form teratomas. We describe qualities specific to Muse-AT cells and their potential impact on the field of regenerative medicine and cell therapy.

  1. Undifferentiated Embryonic Cell Transcription Factor 1 Regulates ESC Chromatin Organization and Gene Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, Susanne M.; van den Boom, Vincent; Thummer, Rajkumar P.; Johannes, Frank; Wardenaar, Rene; Tesson, Bruno M.; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Fusetti, Fabrizia; O'Neill, Laura P.; Turner, Bryan M.; de Haan, Gerald; Eggen, Bart J. L.; O’Neill, Laura P.

    2010-01-01

    Previous reports showed that embryonic stem (ES) cells contain hyperdynamic and globally transcribed chromatin-properties that are important for ES cell pluripotency and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate a role for undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) in regulating ES

  2. Pluripotent stem cells isolated from umbilical cord form embryonic like bodies in a mesenchymal layer culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagias, Nikos; Kouzi-Koliakos, Kokkona; Karagiannis, Vasileios; Tsikouras, P; Koliakos, George G

    2015-03-01

    Recently the matrix of umbilical cord began to use as an alternative source of stem cells additionally to the blood of umbilical cord. Umbilical cord has been used mainly for mesenchymal stem cell banking. The immunological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells in combination with their ability to avoid rejection make them an attractive biological material for transplantations. In this study the isolation of small in size pluripotent stem cells from umbilical cord expressing early transcription factors with characteristics that resemble to embryonic stem cells is investigated. Pluripotent stem cells were isolated from human umbilical cords, by a new strategy method based on unique characteristics such as the small size and the positivity on early transcription factors OCT and Nanog. An enriched population of CXCR4(+) OCT(+) Nanog(+) CD45(-) small stem cells from the cord was isolated. This fraction was able to create alkaline phosphatase positive like spheres forms in a mesenchymal layer with multilineage differentiation capacity. Our results were assessed by RT PCR and electophoresis for the pluripotent genes. These data suggest that umbilical cord provides an attractive source not only of mesenchymal stem cells but moreover of pluripotent stem cells. The method described herein should be applied in the field of stem cell banking in addition to the classical umbilical cord harvesting method. Isolation of a population of cells with pluripotent characteristics from umbilical cord. Adoption of a second centrifugation step for the pluripotent stem isolation. Increasing the value of the cord and explaining the pluripotency. This work will enhance the value of umbilical cord harvesting.

  3. DNA methylation and transcriptional trajectories during human development and reprogramming of isogenic pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roost, Matthias S; Slieker, Roderick C; Bialecka, Monika; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Gomes Fernandes, Maria M; He, Nannan; Suchiman, H Eka D; Szuhai, Karoly; Carlotti, Françoise; de Koning, Eelco J P; Mummery, Christine L; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M

    2017-01-01

    Determining cell identity and maturation status of differentiated pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) requires knowledge of the transcriptional and epigenetic trajectory of organs during development. Here, we generate a transcriptional and DNA methylation atlas covering 21 organs during human fetal

  4. Reprogramming of blood cells into induced pluripotent stem cells as a new cell source for cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueying; Liu, Tie; Van Halm-Lutterodt, Nicholas; Chen, JiaYu; Su, Qingjun; Hai, Yong

    2016-02-17

    An attempt was made to reprogram peripheral blood cells into human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSCs) as a new cell source for cartilage repair. We generated chondrogenic lineage from human peripheral blood via hiPSCs using an integration-free method. Peripheral blood cells were either obtained from a human blood bank or freshly collected from volunteers. After transforming peripheral blood cells into iPSCs, the newly derived iPSCs were further characterized through karyotype analysis, pluripotency gene expression and cell differentiation ability. iPSCs were differentiated through multiple steps, including embryoid body formation, hiPSC-mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like cell expansion, and chondrogenic induction for 21 days. Chondrocyte phenotype was then assessed by morphological, histological and biochemical analysis, as well as the chondrogenic expression. hiPSCs derived from peripheral blood cells were successfully generated, and were characterized by fluorescent immunostaining of pluripotent markers and teratoma formation in vivo. Flow cytometric analysis showed that MSC markers CD73 and CD105 were present in monolayer cultured hiPSC-MSC-like cells. Both alcian blue and toluidine blue staining of hiPSC-MSC-chondrogenic pellets showed as positive. Immunohistochemistry of collagen II and X staining of the pellets were also positive. The sulfated glycosaminoglycan content was significantly increased, and the expression levels of the chondrogenic markers COL2, COL10, COL9 and AGGRECAN were significantly higher in chondrogenic pellets than in undifferentiated cells. These results indicated that peripheral blood cells could be a potential source for differentiation into chondrogenic lineage in vitro via generation of mesenchymal progenitor cells. This study supports the potential applications of utilizing peripheral blood cells in generating seed cells for cartilage regenerative medicine in a patient-specific and cost-effective approach.

  5. Long-term serial cultivation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells in serum-free and feeder-free defined medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Sachiko; Nabeshima, Kou; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Taguchi, Yuki; Mukasa, Hanae; Furue, Miho K; Sato, J Denry; Okamoto, Tetsuji

    2013-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells and mouse induced pluripotent stem (miPS) cells are commonly maintained on inactivated mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cells in medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum or proprietary replacements. An undefined medium containing unknown quantities of reagents has limited the development of applications for pluripotent cells because of the relative lack of knowledge regarding cell responses to differentiating growth factors. Therefore we developed a serum-free medium, designated ESF7, in which mES cells can be maintained in an undifferentiated state without feeder cells. The medium was tested for culturing miPS cells. The miPS cells have been maintained in ESF7 medium for more than 3 years with an undifferentiated phenotype manifested by the expression of pluripotency marker genes and alkaline phosphatase, and these cells exhibited largely normal karyotypes. Furthermore, we found that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) with heparin induced miPS cell differentiation into neuronal cells, both in an adherent monolayer and in embryoid body suspension culture. Moreover, we found that FGF-2 with bone morphogenetic protein 2 induced miPS cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes in embryoid body suspension culture. Furthermore, we transplanted subcutaneously miPS cells maintained in ESF7 into the dorsal flanks of SCID mice; all of the transplants produced tumors with tissues derived from all three embryonic germ layers. As this simple serum-free adherent monoculture system supports the long-term propagation of pluripotent iPS cells in vitro, it will allow us to elucidate cell responses to growth factors under defined conditions, and it should provide useful information for differentiation protocols for human iPS cells.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

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    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  7. Biomedical Application of Dental Tissue-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jung-Hwan Lee; Seog-Jin Seo

    2016-01-01

    The academic researches and clinical applications in recent years found interest in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs-) based regenerative medicine due to their pluripotency able to differentiate into any cell types in the body without using embryo. However, it is limited in generating iPSCs from adult somatic cells and use of these cells due to the low stem cell potency and donor site morbidity. In biomedical applications, particularly, dental tissue-derived iPSCs have been getting atten...

  8. Image-based cell quality evaluation to detect irregularities under same culture process of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaka, Risako; Gotou, Yuto; Yoshida, Kei; Kanie, Kei; Shimizu, Kazunori; Honda, Hiroyuki; Kato, Ryuji

    2017-05-01

    To meet the growing demand for human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) for various applications, technologies that enable the manufacturing of iPSCs on a large scale should be developed. There are several technological challenges in iPSC manufacturing technology. Image-based cell quality evaluation technology for monitoring iPSC quality in culture enables the manufacture of intact cells for further applications. Although several studies have reported the effectiveness of image-based evaluation of iPSCs, it remains challenging to detect irregularities that may arise using the same processing operations during quality evaluation of automated processing. In this study, we investigated the evaluation performance of image-based cell quality analysis in detecting small differences that can result from human measurement, even when the same protocol is followed. To imitate such culture conditions, by image-analysis guided colony pickup, we changed the proportions of morphologically different subpopulations: "good morphology, regular morphology correlated with undifferentiation marker expression" and "bad morphology, irregular morphology correlated with loss of undifferentiation marker expression". In addition, comprehensive gene-expression and metabolomics analyses were carried out for the same samples to investigate performance differences. Our data shows an example of investigating the usefulness and sensitivity of quality evaluation methods for iPSC quality monitoring. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells 10 Years Later: For Cardiac Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yoshinori; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2017-06-09

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are reprogrammed cells that have features similar to embryonic stem cells, such as the capacity of self-renewal and differentiation into many types of cells, including cardiac myocytes. Although initially the reprogramming efficiency was low, several improvements in reprogramming methods have achieved robust and efficient generation of iPSCs without genomic insertion of transgenes. iPSCs display clonal variations in epigenetic and genomic profiles and cellular behavior in differentiation. iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes (iPSC cardiac myocytes) recapitulate phenotypic differences caused by genetic variations, making them attractive human disease models, and are useful for drug discovery and toxicology testing. In addition, iPSC cardiac myocytes can help with patient stratification in regard to drug responsiveness. Furthermore, they can be used as source cells for cardiac regeneration in animal models. Here, we review recent progress in iPSC technology and its applications to cardiac diseases. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Probabilistic Modeling of Reprogramming to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin L; Brumbaugh, Justin; Bar-Nur, Ori; Smith, Zachary; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Meissner, Alexander; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Michor, Franziska

    2016-12-20

    Reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is typically an inefficient and asynchronous process. A variety of technological efforts have been made to accelerate and/or synchronize this process. To define a unified framework to study and compare the dynamics of reprogramming under different conditions, we developed an in silico analysis platform based on mathematical modeling. Our approach takes into account the variability in experimental results stemming from probabilistic growth and death of cells and potentially heterogeneous reprogramming rates. We suggest that reprogramming driven by the Yamanaka factors alone is a more heterogeneous process, possibly due to cell-specific reprogramming rates, which could be homogenized by the addition of additional factors. We validated our approach using publicly available reprogramming datasets, including data on early reprogramming dynamics as well as cell count data, and thus we demonstrated the general utility and predictive power of our methodology for investigating reprogramming and other cell fate change systems. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Specification Of Midbrain Dopamine Neurons From Primate Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jiajie; Liu, Yan; Liu, Huisheng; Chen, Hong; Emborg, Marina E.; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2012-01-01

    By sequentially applying sonic hedgehog (C25II) and CHIR99021 (GSK3β inhibitor) to induce the midbrain floor plate progenitors and fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8) to promote dopaminergic differentiation in a chemically defined medium, we have established a robust system for generation of midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons from human and rhesus monkey embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We found that CHIR99021 specifies diencephalon to hindbrain fates in a concentration-dependent manner and only a narrow concentration range of CHIR99021 at a particular window is necessary to induce the midbrain floor plate progenitors, expressing Corin, En1, FoxA2 and Lmx1a. FGF8 enhances the dopaminergic fate of the progenitors, thus generating DA neurons with midbrain characteristics, including expression of TH, Lmx1a/b, FoxA2, FoxP1, Nurr1 and En1 as well as typical electrophysiological properties. More than half of these DA neurons expressed A9 DA neuron markers Girk2 and ALDH1a1. The new strategy will allow generation of enriched populations of functional midbrain DA neurons from both human and monkey PSCs for disease modeling, drug testing, and potential cell therapy. PMID:22696177

  12. Modeling Neurological Disorders by Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanut Kunkanjanawan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of human brain development are critical as research on neurological disorders have been progressively advanced. However, understanding the process of neurogenesis through analysis of the early embryo is complicated and limited by a number of factors, including the complexity of the embryos, availability, and ethical constrains. The emerging of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs has shed light of a new approach to study both early development and disease pathology. The cells behave as precursors of all embryonic lineages; thus, they allow tracing the history from the root to individual branches of the cell lineage tree. Systems for neural differentiation of hESCs and iPSCs have provided an experimental model that can be used to augment in vitro studies of in vivo brain development. Interestingly, iPSCs derived from patients, containing donor genetic background, have offered a breakthrough approach to study human genetics of neurodegenerative diseases. This paper summarizes the recent reports of the development of iPSCs from patients who suffer from neurological diseases and evaluates the feasibility of iPSCs as a disease model. The benefits and obstacles of iPSC technology are highlighted in order to raising the cautions of misinterpretation prior to further clinical translations.

  13. Generating trunk neural crest from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Miller; Miller, Matthew L; McHenry, Lauren K; Zheng, Tina; Zhen, Qiqi; Ilkhanizadeh, Shirin; Conklin, Bruce R; Bronner, Marianne E; Weiss, William A

    2016-01-27

    Neural crest cells (NCC) are stem cells that generate different lineages, including neuroendocrine, melanocytic, cartilage, and bone. The differentiation potential of NCC varies according to the level from which cells emerge along the neural tube. For example, only anterior "cranial" NCC form craniofacial bone, whereas solely posterior "trunk" NCC contribute to sympathoadrenal cells. Importantly, the isolation of human fetal NCC carries ethical and scientific challenges, as NCC induction typically occur before pregnancy is detectable. As a result, current knowledge of NCC biology derives primarily from non-human organisms. Important differences between human and non-human NCC, such as expression of HNK1 in human but not mouse NCC, suggest a need to study human NCC directly. Here, we demonstrate that current protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (PSC) to NCC are biased toward cranial NCC. Addition of retinoic acid drove trunk-related markers and HOX genes characteristic of a posterior identity. Subsequent treatment with bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) enhanced differentiation to sympathoadrenal cells. Our approach provides methodology for detailed studies of human NCC, and clarifies roles for retinoids and BMPs in the differentiation of human PSC to trunk NCC and to sympathoadrenal lineages.

  14. Skeletal Muscle Cell Induction from Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusaku Kodaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have the potential to differentiate into various types of cells including skeletal muscle cells. The approach of converting ESCs/iPSCs into skeletal muscle cells offers hope for patients afflicted with the skeletal muscle diseases such as the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Patient-derived iPSCs are an especially ideal cell source to obtain an unlimited number of myogenic cells that escape immune rejection after engraftment. Currently, there are several approaches to induce differentiation of ESCs and iPSCs to skeletal muscle. A key to the generation of skeletal muscle cells from ESCs/iPSCs is the mimicking of embryonic mesodermal induction followed by myogenic induction. Thus, current approaches of skeletal muscle cell induction of ESCs/iPSCs utilize techniques including overexpression of myogenic transcription factors such as MyoD or Pax3, using small molecules to induce mesodermal cells followed by myogenic progenitor cells, and utilizing epigenetic myogenic memory existing in muscle cell-derived iPSCs. This review summarizes the current methods used in myogenic differentiation and highlights areas of recent improvement.

  15. Probabilistic Modeling of Reprogramming to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin L. Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs is typically an inefficient and asynchronous process. A variety of technological efforts have been made to accelerate and/or synchronize this process. To define a unified framework to study and compare the dynamics of reprogramming under different conditions, we developed an in silico analysis platform based on mathematical modeling. Our approach takes into account the variability in experimental results stemming from probabilistic growth and death of cells and potentially heterogeneous reprogramming rates. We suggest that reprogramming driven by the Yamanaka factors alone is a more heterogeneous process, possibly due to cell-specific reprogramming rates, which could be homogenized by the addition of additional factors. We validated our approach using publicly available reprogramming datasets, including data on early reprogramming dynamics as well as cell count data, and thus we demonstrated the general utility and predictive power of our methodology for investigating reprogramming and other cell fate change systems.

  16. CRISPR Genome Engineering for Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaterji, Somali; Ahn, Eun Hyun; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of targeted and efficient genome editing technologies, such as repurposed bacterial programmable nucleases (e.g., CRISPR-Cas systems), has abetted the development of cell engineering approaches. Lessons learned from the development of RNA-interference (RNA-i) therapies can spur the translation of genome editing, such as those enabling the translation of human pluripotent stem cell engineering. In this review, we discuss the opportunities and the challenges of repurposing bacterial nucleases for genome editing, while appreciating their roles, primarily at the epigenomic granularity. First, we discuss the evolution of high-precision, genome editing technologies, highlighting CRISPR-Cas9. They exist in the form of programmable nucleases, engineered with sequence-specific localizing domains, and with the ability to revolutionize human stem cell technologies through precision targeting with greater on-target activities. Next, we highlight the major challenges that need to be met prior to bench-to-bedside translation, often learning from the path-to-clinic of complementary technologies, such as RNA-i. Finally, we suggest potential bioinformatics developments and CRISPR delivery vehicles that can be deployed to circumvent some of the challenges confronting genome editing technologies en route to the clinic.

  17. Slow Cooling Cryopreservation Optimized to Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takamichi; Suemori, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the potential for unlimited expansion and differentiation into cells that form all three germ layers. Cryopreservation is one of the key processes for successful applications of hPSCs, because it allows semi-permanent preservation of cells and their easy transportation. Most animal cell lines, including mouse embryonic stem cells, are standardly cryopreserved by slow cooling; however, hPSCs have been difficult to preserve and their cell viability has been extremely low whenever cryopreservation has been attempted.Here, we investigate the reasons for failure of slow cooling in hPSC cryopreservation. Cryopreservation involves a series of steps and is not a straightforward process. Cells may die due to various reasons during cryopreservation. Indeed, hPSCs preserved by traditional methods often suffer necrosis during the freeze-thawing stages, and the colony state of hPSCs prior to cryopreservation is a major factor contributing to cell death.It has now become possible to cryopreserve hPSCs using conventional cryopreservation methods without any specific equipment. This review summarizes the advances in this area and discusses the optimization of slow cooling cryopreservation for hPSC storage.

  18. Therapeutic opportunities: Telomere maintenance in inducible pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourronc, Francoise A. [Department of Microbiology, University of Iowa (United States); Klingelhutz, Aloysius J., E-mail: al-klingelhutz@uiowa.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Iowa (United States)

    2012-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that exogenous expression of a combination of transcription factors can reprogram differentiated cells such as fibroblasts and keratinocytes into what have been termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These iPS cells are capable of differentiating into all the tissue lineages when placed in the right environment and, in the case of mouse cells, can generate chimeric mice and be transmitted through the germline. Safer and more efficient methods of reprogramming are rapidly being developed. Clearly, iPS cells present a number of exciting possibilities, including disease modeling and therapy. A major question is whether the nuclei of iPS cells are truly rejuvenated or whether they might retain some of the marks of aging from the cells from which they were derived. One measure of cellular aging is the telomere. In this regard, recent studies have demonstrated that telomeres in iPS cells may be rejuvenated. They are not only elongated by reactivated telomerase but they are also epigenetically modified to be similar but not identical to embryonic stem cells. Upon differentiation, the derivative cells turn down telomerase, the telomeres begin to shorten again, and the telomeres and the genome are returned to an epigenetic state that is similar to normal differentiated somatic cells. While these preliminary telomere findings are promising, the overall genomic integrity of reprogrammed cells may still be problematic and further studies are needed to examine the safety and feasibility of using iPS cells in regenerative medicine applications.

  19. Comprehensive Mapping of Pluripotent Stem Cell Metabolism Using Dynamic Genome-Scale Network Modeling

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    Sriram Chandrasekaran

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Metabolism is an emerging stem cell hallmark tied to cell fate, pluripotency, and self-renewal, yet systems-level understanding of stem cell metabolism has been limited by the lack of genome-scale network models. Here, we develop a systems approach to integrate time-course metabolomics data with a computational model of metabolism to analyze the metabolic state of naive and primed murine pluripotent stem cells. Using this approach, we find that one-carbon metabolism involving phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, folate synthesis, and nucleotide synthesis is a key pathway that differs between the two states, resulting in differential sensitivity to anti-folates. The model also predicts that the pluripotency factor Lin28 regulates this one-carbon metabolic pathway, which we validate using metabolomics data from Lin28-deficient cells. Moreover, we identify and validate metabolic reactions related to S-adenosyl-methionine production that can differentially impact histone methylation in naive and primed cells. Our network-based approach provides a framework for characterizing metabolic changes influencing pluripotency and cell fate. : Chandrasekaran et al. use computational modeling, metabolomics, and metabolic inhibitors to discover metabolic differences between various pluripotent stem cell states and infer their impact on stem cell fate decisions. Keywords: systems biology, stem cell biology, metabolism, genome-scale modeling, pluripotency, histone methylation, naive (ground state, primed state, cell fate, metabolic network

  20. Design of a Vitronectin-Based Recombinant Protein as a Defined Substrate for Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells into Hepatocyte-Like Cells.

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    Masato Nagaoka

    Full Text Available Maintenance and differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs usually requires culture on a substrate for cell adhesion. A commonly used substratum is Matrigel purified from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma cells, and consists of a complex mixture of extracellular matrix proteins, proteoglycans, and growth factors. Several studies have successfully induced differentiation of hepatocyte-like cells from hPSCs. However, most of these studies have used Matrigel as a cell adhesion substrate, which is not a defined culture condition. In an attempt to generate a substratum that supports undifferentiated properties and differentiation into hepatic lineage cells, we designed novel substrates consisting of vitronectin fragments fused to the IgG Fc domain. hPSCs adhered to these substrates via interactions between integrins and the RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp motif, and the cells maintained their undifferentiated phenotypes. Using a previously established differentiation protocol, hPSCs were efficiently differentiated into mesendodermal and hepatic lineage cells on a vitronectin fragment-containing substrate. We found that full-length vitronectin did not support stable cell adhesion during the specification stage. Furthermore, the vitronectin fragment with the minimal RGD-containing domain was sufficient for differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatic lineage cells under completely defined conditions that facilitate the clinical application of cells differentiated from hPSCs.

  1. rBC2LCN, a new probe for live cell imaging of human pluripotent stem cells.

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    Onuma, Yasuko; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Ito, Yuzuru; Asashima, Makoto

    2013-02-15

    Cell surface biomarkers have been applied to discriminate pluripotent human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells from differentiated cells. Here, we demonstrate that a recombinant lectin probe, rBC2LCN, a new tool for fluorescence-based imaging and flow cytometry analysis of pluripotent stem cells, is an alternative to conventional pluripotent maker antibodies. Live or fixed colonies of both human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells were visualized in culture medium containing fluorescent dye-labeled rBC2LCN. Fluorescent dye-labeled rBC2LCN was also successfully used to separate live pluripotent stem cells from a mixed cell population by flow cytometry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis

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    Juan Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic, autoimmune, inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that leads to permanent neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens are insufficient to treat the irreversible neurological disabilities. Tremendous progress in the experimental and clinical applications of cell-based therapies has recognized stem cells as potential candidates for regenerative therapy for many neurodegenerative disorders including MS. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs derived precursor cells can modulate the autoimmune response in the central nervous system (CNS and promote endogenous remyelination and repair process in animal models. This review highlights studies involving the immunomodulatory and regenerative effects of mesenchymal stem cells and iPSCs derived cells in animal models, and their translation into immunomodulatory and neuroregenerative treatment strategies for MS.

  3. Protein Kinase A Signaling Is Inhibitory for Reprogramming into Pluripotent Stem Cells.

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    Kim, Jong Soo; Hong, Yean Ju; Choi, Hyun Woo; Choi, Sol; Do, Jeong Tae

    2016-03-01

    Somatic cells may be reprogrammed into pluripotent cells by the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors. However, some of the hurdles that affect the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells include extremely low efficiency and slow reprogramming. In the present study, we examined the effects of small molecules on cellular reprogramming and found that 8-Bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP), an analog of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), improves the reprogramming efficiency of reprogrammable mouse fibroblasts induced with dox in serum replacement (SR) medium. Interestingly, treatment with 8-Br-cAMP in mouse embryonic stem cell culture conditions does not affect reprogramming into the pluripotent state; however, reprogramming efficiency is significantly enhanced by inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) in SR medium. Therefore, our results suggest that PKA signaling is unnecessary and may in fact act as a barrier to reprogramming into pluripotent stem cells.

  4. Naive Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived Directly from Isolated Cells of the Human Inner Cell Mass

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    Ge Guo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Conventional generation of stem cells from human blastocysts produces a developmentally advanced, or primed, stage of pluripotency. In vitro resetting to a more naive phenotype has been reported. However, whether the reset culture conditions of selective kinase inhibition can enable capture of naive epiblast cells directly from the embryo has not been determined. Here, we show that in these specific conditions individual inner cell mass cells grow into colonies that may then be expanded over multiple passages while retaining a diploid karyotype and naive properties. The cells express hallmark naive pluripotency factors and additionally display features of mitochondrial respiration, global gene expression, and genome-wide hypomethylation distinct from primed cells. They transition through primed pluripotency into somatic lineage differentiation. Collectively these attributes suggest classification as human naive embryonic stem cells. Human counterparts of canonical mouse embryonic stem cells would argue for conservation in the phased progression of pluripotency in mammals.

  5. Naive Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived Directly from Isolated Cells of the Human Inner Cell Mass.

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    Guo, Ge; von Meyenn, Ferdinand; Santos, Fatima; Chen, Yaoyao; Reik, Wolf; Bertone, Paul; Smith, Austin; Nichols, Jennifer

    2016-04-12

    Conventional generation of stem cells from human blastocysts produces a developmentally advanced, or primed, stage of pluripotency. In vitro resetting to a more naive phenotype has been reported. However, whether the reset culture conditions of selective kinase inhibition can enable capture of naive epiblast cells directly from the embryo has not been determined. Here, we show that in these specific conditions individual inner cell mass cells grow into colonies that may then be expanded over multiple passages while retaining a diploid karyotype and naive properties. The cells express hallmark naive pluripotency factors and additionally display features of mitochondrial respiration, global gene expression, and genome-wide hypomethylation distinct from primed cells. They transition through primed pluripotency into somatic lineage differentiation. Collectively these attributes suggest classification as human naive embryonic stem cells. Human counterparts of canonical mouse embryonic stem cells would argue for conservation in the phased progression of pluripotency in mammals. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived gamete-associated proteins incite rejection of induced pluripotent stem cells in syngeneic mice.

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    Kim, Eun-Mi; Manzar, Gohar; Zavazava, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    The safety of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in autologous recipients has been questioned after iPSCs, but not embryonic stem cells (ESCs), were reported to be rejected in syngeneic mice. This important topic has remained controversial because there has not been a mechanistic explanation for this phenomenon. Here, we hypothesize that iPSCs, but not ESCs, readily differentiate into gamete-forming cells that express meiotic antigens normally found in immune-privileged gonads. Because peripheral blood T cells are not tolerized to these antigens in the thymus, gamete-associated-proteins (GAPs) sensitize T cells leading to rejection. Here, we provide evidence that GAPs expressed in iPSC teratomas, but not in ESC teratomas, are responsible for the immunological rejection of iPSCs. Furthermore, silencing the expression of Stra8, 'the master regulator of meiosis', in iPSCs, using short hairpin RNA led to significant abrogation of the rejection of iPSCs, supporting our central hypothesis that GAPs expressed after initiation of meiosis in iPSCs were responsible for rejection. In contrast to iPSCs, iPSC-derivatives, such as haematopoietic progenitor cells, are able to engraft long-term into syngeneic recipients because they no longer express GAPs. Our findings, for the first time, provide a unifying explanation of why iPSCs, but not ESCs, are rejected in syngeneic recipients, ending the current controversy on the safety of iPSCs and their derivatives. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Reprogramming T cell Lymphocytes to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bared, Kalia

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) provided a novel technology for the study of development and pharmacology and complement embryonic stem cells (ES) for cell therapy applications. Though iPSC are derived from adult tissue they are comparable to ES cells in their behavior; multi-lineage differentiation and self-renewal. This makes iPSC research appealing because they can be studied in great detail and expanded in culture broadly. Fibroblasts were the first cell type reprogrammed to an iPSC using a retrovirus vector, since then alternative cell types including lymphocytes have been used to generate iPSC. Different types of vectors have also been developed to enhance iPSC formation and quality. However, specific T lymphocyte subsets have not been shown to reprogram to a pluripotent state to date. Here, we proposed to derive iPSC from peripheral blood effector and central memory T cells, reasoning that the resultant iPSC will maintain the epigenetic memory of a T lymphocyte, including the T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement. This epigenetic memory will enable the differentiation and expansion of T cell iPSC into professional T cells containing a specific TCR. These could then be used for cell therapy to target specific antigens, as well as to improve culture techniques to expand T cells in vitro. We studied different gene delivery methods to derive iPSC from different types of T lymphocytes. We assessed the viability of viral transduction using flow cytometry to detect green fluorescent marker contained in the viral construct and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to detect Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-Myc gene expression. Our results demonstrate that the Sendai virus construct is the most feasible platform to reprogram T lymphocytes. We anticipate that this platform will provide an efficient and safe approach to derive iPSC from different T cell subsets, including memory T cells.

  8. Effects of Klf4 and c-Myc Knockdown on Pluripotency Maintenance in Porcine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell.

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    Liao, Yu-Jing; Chen, Yi-Shiou; Lee, Ja-Xin; Chen, Lih-Ren; Yang, Jenn-Rong

    2018-01-01

    The importance of Oct4 and Sox2 in maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal is well-understood, but the functions of Klf4 and c-Myc has not been fully investigated. In the present study, we attempted to determine the roles of Klf4 and c-Myc on pluripotency maintenance of porcine induced pluripotent stem (piPS) cells. In this experimental study, we performed short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to knock down the Klf4 and c-Myc functions of piPS cells and examined pluripotency markers and teratoma formation to evaluate piPS cell pluripotency. The shRNA-Klf4 and shRNA-c-Myc vectors containing a reporter gene, TagFP635, were transfected into piPS cells by lentivirus infection. The piPS cells fully expressing infrared fluorescence were selected to confirm gene knockdown of Klf4 and c-Myc reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Next, for pluripotency evaluation, expression of pluripotency markers was detected by immunocytochemical staining, and capability of teratoma formation was investigated by piPS cell transplantation into nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD-SCID) mice. Our findings indicated that Klf4 and c-Myc functions of piPS cells were knocked down by shRNA transfection, and knockdown of Klf4 and c-Myc functions impaired expression of pluripotency markers such as Oct4, AP, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA-1-6, and TRA-1-81. Furthermore, piPS cells without Klf4 and c-Myc expression failed to form teratomas. The pluripotency of piPS cells are crucially dependent upon Klf4 and c-Myc expression. These findings, suggesting potential mechanisms of Klf4 and c-Myc contribution to piPS cell formation, have important implications for application, regulation, and tumorigenesis of piPS cells. Copyright© by Royan Institute. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of donor age on induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Lo Sardo, Valentina; Ferguson, William; Erikson, Galina A; Topol, Eric J; Baldwin, Kristin K; Torkamani, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are being pursued as a source of cells for autologous therapies, many of which will be aimed at aged patients. To explore the impact of age on iPSC quality, we produced iPSCs from blood cells of 16 donors aged 21-100. We find that iPSCs from older donors retain an epigenetic signature of age, which can be reduced through passaging. Clonal expansion via reprogramming also enables the discovery of somatic mutations present in individual donor cells, which are missed by bulk sequencing methods. We show that exomic mutations in iPSCs increase linearly with age, and all iPSC lines analyzed carry at least one gene-disrupting mutation, several of which have been associated with cancer or dysfunction. Unexpectedly, elderly donors (>90 yrs) harbor fewer mutations than predicted, likely due to a contracted blood progenitor pool. These studies establish that donor age is associated with an increased risk of abnormalities in iPSCs and will inform clinical development of reprogramming technology.

  10. A Roadmap for Human Liver Differentiation from Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Lay Teng Ang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available How are closely related lineages, including liver, pancreas, and intestines, diversified from a common endodermal origin? Here, we apply principles learned from developmental biology to rapidly reconstitute liver progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs. Mapping the formation of multiple endodermal lineages revealed how alternate endodermal fates (e.g., pancreas and intestines are restricted during liver commitment. Human liver fate was encoded by combinations of inductive and repressive extracellular signals at different doses. However, these signaling combinations were temporally re-interpreted: cellular competence to respond to retinoid, WNT, TGF-β, and other signals sharply changed within 24 hr. Consequently, temporally dynamic manipulation of extracellular signals was imperative to suppress the production of unwanted cell fates across six consecutive developmental junctures. This efficiently generated 94.1% ± 7.35% TBX3+HNF4A+ human liver bud progenitors and 81.5% ± 3.2% FAH+ hepatocyte-like cells by days 6 and 18 of hPSC differentiation, respectively; the latter improved short-term survival in the Fah−/−Rag2−/−Il2rg−/− mouse model of liver failure.

  11. The business of exploiting induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Catherine

    2011-08-12

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) can be exploited for both research and clinical applications. The first part of this review seeks to provide an understanding of the financial drivers and key elements of a successful business strategy that underpin a company focused on developing iPS-related products and services targeted at the research market. The latter part of the review highlights some of the reasons as to why the reprogramming of somatic cells is currently being used to develop cell-based models to screen for small molecules with drug-like properties rather than to develop cell-based regenerative medicines per se. The latter may be used to repair or replace a patient's damaged cells and thereby have the potential to 'cure' a disease and, in doing so, prevent or delay the onset of associated medical conditions. However, the cost of an expensive regenerative medicine and time to accrue any benefit linked to a decrease in co-morbidity expenditure may not outweigh the benefit for a healthcare community that has finite resources. The implications of this are discussed together with evidence that the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) and the National Health Service (NHS) have established a precedent for a cost-sharing strategy with the pharmaceutical industry.

  12. Generation of functional podocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells

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    Osele Ciampi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Generating human podocytes in vitro could offer a unique opportunity to study human diseases. Here, we describe a simple and efficient protocol for obtaining functional podocytes in vitro from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Cells were exposed to a three-step protocol, which induced their differentiation into intermediate mesoderm, then into nephron progenitors and, finally, into mature podocytes. After differentiation, cells expressed the main podocyte markers, such as synaptopodin, WT1, α-Actinin-4, P-cadherin and nephrin at the protein and mRNA level, and showed the low proliferation rate typical of mature podocytes. Exposure to Angiotensin II significantly decreased the expression of podocyte genes and cells underwent cytoskeleton rearrangement. Cells were able to internalize albumin and self-assembled into chimeric 3D structures in combination with dissociated embryonic mouse kidney cells. Overall, these findings demonstrate the establishment of a robust protocol that, mimicking developmental stages, makes it possible to derive functional podocytes in vitro.

  13. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

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    Doulames, Vanessa M.; Plant, Giles W.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient’s own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI—even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:27070598

  14. Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Dusko; Devito, Liani; Miere, Cristian; Codognotto, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (hESC and hiPSC) have tremendous potential for clinical implementation. In spite of all hurdles and controversy, clinical trials in treatment of spinal cord injury, macular degeneration of retina, type 1 diabetes and heart failure are already ongoing. ClinicalTrials.gov database, International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, PubMed and press releases and websites of companies and institutions working on hESC- and iPSC-based cellular therapy. The initial results from multiple clinical trials demonstrate that hESC-based therapies are safe and promising. Are iPSC cells safe in the clinical application? Is there a room for both hESC and iPSC in the future clinical applications? Increasing number of new clinical trials. Development of hESC- and/or iPSC-based cellular therapy for other diseases. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Detecting Genetic Mosaicism in Cultures of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Duncan Baker

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Genetic changes in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs gained during culture can confound experimental results and potentially jeopardize the outcome of clinical therapies. Particularly common changes in hPSCs are trisomies of chromosomes 1, 12, 17, and 20. Thus, hPSCs should be regularly screened for such aberrations. Although a number of methods are used to assess hPSC genotypes, there has been no systematic evaluation of the sensitivity of the commonly used techniques in detecting low-level mosaicism in hPSC cultures. We have performed mixing experiments to mimic the naturally occurring mosaicism and have assessed the sensitivity of chromosome banding, qPCR, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and digital droplet PCR in detecting variants. Our analysis highlights the limits of mosaicism detection by the commonly employed methods, a pivotal requirement for interpreting the genetic status of hPSCs and for setting standards for safe applications of hPSCs in regenerative medicine.

  16. Pluripotent stem cells: An in vitro model for nanotoxicity assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handral, Harish K; Tong, Huei Jinn; Islam, Intekhab; Sriram, Gopu; Rosa, Vinicus; Cao, Tong

    2016-10-01

    The advent of technology has led to an established range of engineered nanoparticles that are used in diverse applications, such as cell-cell interactions, cell-material interactions, medical therapies and the target modulation of cellular processes. The exponential increase in the utilization of nanomaterials and the growing number of associated criticisms has highlighted the potential risks of nanomaterials to human health and the ecosystem. The existing in vivo and in vitro platforms show limitations, with fluctuations being observed in the results of toxicity assessments. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are viable source of cells that are capable of developing into specialized cells of the human body. PSCs can be efficiently used to screen new biomaterials/drugs and are potential candidates for studying impairments of biophysical morphology at both the cellular and tissue levels during interactions with nanomaterials and for diagnosing toxicity. Three-dimensional in vitro models obtained using PSC-derived cells would provide a realistic, patient-specific platform for toxicity assessments and in drug screening applications. The current review focuses on PSCs as an alternative in vitro platform for assessing the hazardous effects of nanomaterials on health systems and highlights the importance of PSC-derived in vitro platforms. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Generation of functional podocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampi, Osele; Iacone, Roberto; Longaretti, Lorena; Benedetti, Valentina; Graf, Martin; Magnone, Maria Chiara; Patsch, Christoph; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela; Tomasoni, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Generating human podocytes in vitro could offer a unique opportunity to study human diseases. Here, we describe a simple and efficient protocol for obtaining functional podocytes in vitro from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Cells were exposed to a three-step protocol, which induced their differentiation into intermediate mesoderm, then into nephron progenitors and, finally, into mature podocytes. After differentiation, cells expressed the main podocyte markers, such as synaptopodin, WT1, α-Actinin-4, P-cadherin and nephrin at the protein and mRNA level, and showed the low proliferation rate typical of mature podocytes. Exposure to Angiotensin II significantly decreased the expression of podocyte genes and cells underwent cytoskeleton rearrangement. Cells were able to internalize albumin and self-assembled into chimeric 3D structures in combination with dissociated embryonic mouse kidney cells. Overall, these findings demonstrate the establishment of a robust protocol that, mimicking developmental stages, makes it possible to derive functional podocytes in vitro. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Human-induced pluripotent stem cells: potential for neurodegenerative diseases.

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    Ross, Christopher A; Akimov, Sergey S

    2014-09-15

    The cell biology of human neurodegenerative diseases has been difficult to study till recently. The development of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models has greatly enhanced our ability to model disease in human cells. Methods have recently been improved, including increasing reprogramming efficiency, introducing non-viral and non-integrating methods of cell reprogramming, and using novel gene editing techniques for generating genetically corrected lines from patient-derived iPSCs, or for generating mutations in control cell lines. In this review, we highlight accomplishments made using iPSC models to study neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Fronto-Temporal Dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Spinomuscular Atrophy and other polyglutamine diseases. We review disease-related phenotypes shown in patient-derived iPSCs differentiated to relevant neural subtypes, often with stressors or cell "aging", to enhance disease-specific phenotypes. We also discuss prospects for the future of using of iPSC models of neurodegenerative disorders, including screening and testing of therapeutic compounds, and possibly of cell transplantation in regenerative medicine. The new iPSC models have the potential to greatly enhance our understanding of pathogenesis and to facilitate the development of novel therapeutics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells for regenerative medicine.

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    Li, Ke; Kong, Yan; Zhang, Mingliang; Xie, Fei; Liu, Peng; Xu, Shaohua

    2016-02-26

    A long-standing goal in regenerative medicine is to obtain scalable functional cells on demand to replenish cells lost in various conditions, including relevant diseases, injuries, and aging. As an unlimited cell source, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are invaluable for regenerative medicine, because they have the potential to give rise to any cell type in an organism. For therapeutic purposes, it is important to develop specific approach to directing PSC differentiation towards desired cell types efficiently. Through directed differentiation, PSCs could give rise to scalable, clinically relevant cells for in vivo transplantation, as well as for studying diseases in vitro and discovering drugs to treat them. Over the past few years, significant progress has been made in directing differentiation of PSCs into a variety of cell types. In this review, we discuss recent progress in directed differentiation of PSCs, clinical translation of PSC-based cell replacement therapies, and remaining challenges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Therapeutic effects of induced pluripotent stem cells in chimeric mice with β-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guanheng; Shi, Wansheng; Hu, Xingyin; Zhang, Jingzhi; Gong, Zhijuan; Guo, Xinbing; Ren, Zhaorui; Zeng, Fanyi

    2014-08-01

    Although β-thalassemia is one of the most common human genetic diseases, there is still no effective treatment other than bone marrow transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells have been considered good candidates for the future repair or replacement of malfunctioning organs. As a basis for developing transgenic induced pluripotent stem cell therapies for thalassemia, β(654) induced pluripotent stem cells from a β(654) -thalassemia mouse transduced with the normal human β-globin gene, and the induced pluripotent stem cells with an erythroid-expressing reporter GFP were used to produce chimeric mice. Using these chimera models, we investigated changes in various pathological indices including hematologic parameters and tissue pathology. Our data showed that when the chimerism of β(654) induced pluripotent stem cells with the normal human β-globin gene in β(654) mice is over 30%, the pathology of anemia appeared to be reversed, while chimerism ranging from 8% to 16% provided little improvement in the typical β-thalassemia phenotype. Effective alleviation of thalassemia-related phenotypes was observed when chimerism with the induced pluripotent stem cells owning the erythroid-expressing reporter GFP in β(654) mouse was greater than 10%. Thus, 10% or more expression of the exogenous normal β-globin gene reduces the degree of anemia in our β-thalassemia mouse model, whereas treatment with β(654) induced pluripotent stem cells which had the normal human β-globin gene had stable therapeutic effects but in a more dose-dependent manner. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  1. Perspectives for induced pluripotent stem cell technology: new insights into human physiology involved in somatic mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Naoki; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2014-01-31

    Induced pluripotent stem cell technology makes in vitro reprogramming of somatic cells from individuals with various genetic backgrounds possible. By applying this technology, it is possible to produce pluripotent stem cells from biopsy samples of arbitrarily selected individuals with various genetic backgrounds and to subsequently maintain, expand, and stock these cells. From these induced pluripotent stem cells, target cells and tissues can be generated after certain differentiation processes. These target cells/tissues are expected to be useful in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, drug screening, toxicology testing, and proof-of-concept studies in drug development. Therefore, the number of publications concerning induced pluripotent stem cells has recently been increasing rapidly, demonstrating that this technology has begun to infiltrate many aspects of stem cell biology and medical applications. In this review, we discuss the perspectives of induced pluripotent stem cell technology for modeling human diseases. In particular, we focus on the cloning event occurring through the reprogramming process and its ability to let us analyze the development of complex disease-harboring somatic mosaicism.

  2. A comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals conserved features of stem cell pluripotency in planarians and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Roselyne M; Irimia, Manuel; Currie, Ko W; Lin, Alexander; Zhu, Shu Jun; Brown, David D R; Ross, Eric J; Voisin, Veronique; Bader, Gary D; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Pearson, Bret J

    2012-08-01

    Many long-lived species of animals require the function of adult stem cells throughout their lives. However, the transcriptomes of stem cells in invertebrates and vertebrates have not been compared, and consequently, ancestral regulatory circuits that control stem cell populations remain poorly defined. In this study, we have used data from high-throughput RNA sequencing to compare the transcriptomes of pluripotent adult stem cells from planarians with the transcriptomes of human and mouse pluripotent embryonic stem cells. From a stringently defined set of 4,432 orthologs shared between planarians, mice and humans, we identified 123 conserved genes that are ≥5-fold differentially expressed in stem cells from all three species. Guided by this gene set, we used RNAi screening in adult planarians to discover novel stem cell regulators, which we found to affect the stem cell-associated functions of tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and stem cell maintenance. Examples of genes that disrupted these processes included the orthologs of TBL3, PSD12, TTC27, and RACK1. From these analyses, we concluded that by comparing stem cell transcriptomes from diverse species, it is possible to uncover conserved factors that function in stem cell biology. These results provide insights into which genes comprised the ancestral circuitry underlying the control of stem cell self-renewal and pluripotency. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  3. Assessing the Safety of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells and Their Derivatives for Clinical Applications

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    Peter W. Andrews

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells may acquire genetic and epigenetic variants during culture following their derivation. At a conference organized by the International Stem Cell Initiative, and held at The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, Maine, October 2016, participants discussed how the appearance of such variants can be monitored and minimized and, crucially, how their significance for the safety of therapeutic applications of these cells can be assessed. A strong recommendation from the meeting was that an international advisory group should be set up to review the genetic and epigenetic changes observed in human pluripotent stem cell lines and establish a framework for evaluating the risks that they may pose for clinical use.

  4. The role of nanotechnology in induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cells research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lukui; Qiu, Rong; Li, Lushen

    2014-12-01

    This paper reviews the recent studies on development of nanotechnology in the field of induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cells. Stem cell therapy is a promising therapy that can improve the quality of life for patients with refractory diseases. However, this option is limited by the scarcity of tissues, ethical problem, and tumorigenicity. Nanotechnology is another promising therapy that can be used to mimic the extracellular matrix, label the implanted cells, and also can be applied in the tissue engineering. In this review, we briefly introduce implementation of nanotechnology in induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cells research. Finally, the potential application of nanotechnology in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is also discussed.

  5. Efficient generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulin, X; Lizhen, L; Lifei, Z; Shan, F; Ru, L; Kaimin, H; Huang, H

    2012-01-01

    Ectopic expression of defined sets of genetic factors can reprogramme somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that closely resemble embryonic stem cells. However, the low reprogramming efficiency is a significant handicap for mechanistic studies and potential clinical application. In this study, we used human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) as target cells for reprogramming and investigated efficient iPSC generation from hBMMSCs using the compounds of p53 siRNA, valproic acid (VPA) and vitamin C (Vc) with four transcription factors OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC (compound induction system). The synergetic mechanism of the compounds was studied. Our results showed that the compound induction system could efficiently reprogramme hBMMSCs to iPSCs. hBMMSC-derived iPSC populations expressed pluripotent markers and had multi-potential to differentiate into three germ layer-derived cells. p53 siRNA, VPA and Vc had a synergetic effect on cell reprogramming and the combinatorial use of these substances greatly improved the efficiency of iPSC generation by suppressing the expression of p53, decreasing cell apoptosis, up-regulating the expression of the pluripotent gene OCT4 and modifying the cell cycle. Therefore, our study highlights a straightforward method for improving the speed and efficiency of iPSC generation and provides versatile tools for investigating early developmental processes such as haemopoiesis and relevant diseases. In addition, this study provides a paradigm for the combinatorial use of genetic factors and molecules to improve the efficiency of iPSC generation.

  6. Equine induced pluripotent stem cells have a reduced tendon differentiation capacity compared to embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Patricia Bavin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tendon injuries occur commonly in horses and their repair through scar tissue formation predisposes horses to a high rate of re-injury. Pluripotent stem cells may provide a cell replacement therapy to improve tendon tissue regeneration and lower the frequency of re-injury. We have previously demonstrated that equine embryonic stem cells (ESCs differentiate into the tendon cell lineage upon injection into the damaged horse tendon and can differentiate into functional tendon cells in vitro to generate artificial tendons. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have now been derived from horses but, to date, there are no reports on their ability to differentiate into tendon cells. As iPSCs can be produced from adult cell types, they provide a more accessible source of cells than ESCs, which require the use of horse embryos. The aim of this study was to compare tendon differentiation by ESCs and iPSCs produced through two independent methods. In 2-dimensional differentiation assays the iPSCs expressed tendon associated genes and proteins, which were enhanced by the presence of transforming growth factor-β3. However, in 3-dimensional differentiation assays the iPSCs failed to differentiate into functional tendon cells and generate artificial tendons. These results demonstrate the utility of the 3-dimensional in vitro tendon assay for measuring tendon differentiation and the need for more detailed studies to be performed on equine iPSCs to identify and understand their epigenetic differences from pluripotent ESCs prior to their clinical application.

  7. Inference of Transcriptional Network for Pluripotency in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburatani, S.

    2015-01-01

    In embryonic stem cells, various transcription factors (TFs) maintain pluripotency. To gain insights into the regulatory system controlling pluripotency, I inferred the regulatory relationships between the TFs expressed in ES cells. In this study, I applied a method based on structural equation modeling (SEM), combined with factor analysis, to 649 expression profiles of 19 TF genes measured in mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs). The factor analysis identified 19 TF genes that were regulated by several unmeasured factors. Since the known cell reprogramming TF genes (Pou5f1, Sox2 and Nanog) are regulated by different factors, each estimated factor is considered to be an input for signal transduction to control pluripotency in mouse ESCs. In the inferred network model, TF proteins were also arranged as unmeasured factors that control other TFs. The interpretation of the inferred network model revealed the regulatory mechanism for controlling pluripotency in ES cells.

  8. Expression of stem cell pluripotency factors during regeneration in the earthworm Eisenia foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Pengfei; Shao, Qiang; Diao, Xiaoping; Li, Zandong; Han, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell pluripotency factors can induce somatic cells to form induced pluripotent stem cells, which are involved in cell reprogramming and dedifferentiation. The tissue regeneration in the earthworm Eisenia foetida may involve cell dedifferentiation. There is limited information about associations between pluripotency factors and the regeneration. In this report, cDNA sequences of pluripotency factors, oct4, nanog, sox2, c-myc and lin28 genes from the earthworm E. foetida were cloned, and quantitative PCR analysis was performed for their mRNA expressions in the head, clitellum and tail. The maximum up-regulation of oct4, nanog, sox2, c-myc and lin28 occurred at 12h, 4 days, 12h, 2 days, and 24h after amputation for 110, 178, 21, 251 and 325-fold, respectively, in comparison with the controls. The results suggest that the tissues are regenerated via cellular dedifferentiation and reprogramming. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Safety and immune regulatory properties of canine induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Lyndah; Johnson, Valerie; Regan, Dan; Wheat, William; Webb, Saiphone; Koch, Peter; Dow, Steven

    2017-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibit broad immune modulatory activity in vivo and can suppress T cell proliferation and dendritic cell activation in vitro. Currently, most MSC for clinical usage are derived from younger donors, due to ease of procurement and to the superior immune modulatory activity. However, the use of MSC from multiple unrelated donors makes it difficult to standardize study results and compare outcomes between different clinical trials. One solution is the use of MSC derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC); as iPSC-derived MSC have nearly unlimited proliferative potential and exhibit in vitro phenotypic stability. Given the value of dogs as a spontaneous disease model for pre-clinical evaluation of stem cell therapeutics, we investigated the functional properties of canine iPSC-derived MSC (iMSC), including immune modulatory properties and potential for teratoma formation. We found that canine iMSC downregulated expression of pluripotency genes and appeared morphologically similar to conventional MSC. Importantly, iMSC retained a stable phenotype after multiple passages, did not form teratomas in immune deficient mice, and did not induce tumor formation in dogs following systemic injection. We concluded therefore that iMSC were phenotypically stable, immunologically potent, safe with respect to tumor formation, and represented an important new source of cells for therapeutic modulation of inflammatory disorders. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Safety and immune regulatory properties of canine induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndah Chow

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs exhibit broad immune modulatory activity in vivo and can suppress T cell proliferation and dendritic cell activation in vitro. Currently, most MSC for clinical usage are derived from younger donors, due to ease of procurement and to the superior immune modulatory activity. However, the use of MSC from multiple unrelated donors makes it difficult to standardize study results and compare outcomes between different clinical trials. One solution is the use of MSC derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC; as iPSC-derived MSC have nearly unlimited proliferative potential and exhibit in vitro phenotypic stability. Given the value of dogs as a spontaneous disease model for pre-clinical evaluation of stem cell therapeutics, we investigated the functional properties of canine iPSC-derived MSC (iMSC, including immune modulatory properties and potential for teratoma formation. We found that canine iMSC downregulated expression of pluripotency genes and appeared morphologically similar to conventional MSC. Importantly, iMSC retained a stable phenotype after multiple passages, did not form teratomas in immune deficient mice, and did not induce tumor formation in dogs following systemic injection. We concluded therefore that iMSC were phenotypically stable, immunologically potent, safe with respect to tumor formation, and represented an important new source of cells for therapeutic modulation of inflammatory disorders.

  11. Pluripotent stem cell-derived kidney organoids : An in vivo-like in vitro technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutgens, Frans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41397149X; Verhaar, Marianne C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/182921840; Rookmaaker, Maarten B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298655381

    2016-01-01

    Organoids are self-organizing, multicellular structures that contain multiple cell types, represent organ structure and function, and can be used to model organ development, maintenance and repair ex vivo. Organoids, derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) or

  12. SILAC Proteomics of Planarians Identifies Ncoa5 as a Conserved Component of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Böser

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Planarian regeneration depends on the presence of pluripotent stem cells in the adult. We developed an in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC protocol in planarians to identify proteins that are enriched in planarian stem cells. Through a comparison of SILAC proteomes of normal and stem cell-depleted planarians and of a stem cell-enriched population of sorted cells, we identified hundreds of stem cell proteins. One of these is an ortholog of nuclear receptor coactivator-5 (Ncoa5/CIA, which is known to regulate estrogen-receptor-mediated transcription in human cells. We show that Ncoa5 is essential for the maintenance of the pluripotent stem cell population in planarians and that a putative mouse ortholog is expressed in pluripotent cells of the embryo. Our study thus identifies a conserved component of pluripotent stem cells, demonstrating that planarians, in particular, when combined with in vivo SILAC, are a powerful model in stem cell research.

  13. Expanding the Tissue Toolbox : Deriving Colon Tissue from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruens, Lotte; Snippert, Hugo J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Organoid technology holds great potential for disease modeling and regenerative medicine. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Múnera et al. (2017) establish the generation of pluripotent stem cell-derived colon organoids that upon transplantation in mice, resembling human colon to a large extent,

  14. SILAC proteomics of planarians identifies Ncoa5 as a conserved component of pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böser, Alexander; Drexler, Hannes C A; Reuter, Hanna; Schmitz, Henning; Wu, Guangming; Schöler, Hans R; Gentile, Luca; Bartscherer, Kerstin

    2013-11-27

    Planarian regeneration depends on the presence of pluripotent stem cells in the adult. We developed an in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) protocol in planarians to identify proteins that are enriched in planarian stem cells. Through a comparison of SILAC proteomes of normal and stem cell-depleted planarians and of a stem cell-enriched population of sorted cells, we identified hundreds of stem cell proteins. One of these is an ortholog of nuclear receptor coactivator-5 (Ncoa5/CIA), which is known to regulate estrogen-receptor-mediated transcription in human cells. We show that Ncoa5 is essential for the maintenance of the pluripotent stem cell population in planarians and that a putative mouse ortholog is expressed in pluripotent cells of the embryo. Our study thus identifies a conserved component of pluripotent stem cells, demonstrating that planarians, in particular, when combined with in vivo SILAC, are a powerful model in stem cell research. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Human oocytes reprogram adult somatic nuclei of a type 1 diabetic to diploid pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Johannesson, Bjarki; Sagi, Ido; Burnett, Lisa Cole; Kort, Daniel H; Prosser, Robert W; Paull, Daniel; Nestor, Michael W; Freeby, Matthew; Greenberg, Ellen; Goland, Robin S; Leibel, Rudolph L; Solomon, Susan L; Benvenisty, Nissim; Sauer, Mark V; Egli, Dieter

    2014-06-26

    The transfer of somatic cell nuclei into oocytes can give rise to pluripotent stem cells that are consistently equivalent to embryonic stem cells, holding promise for autologous cell replacement therapy. Although methods to induce pluripotent stem cells from somatic cells by transcription factors are widely used in basic research, numerous differences between induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells have been reported, potentially affecting their clinical use. Because of the therapeutic potential of diploid embryonic stem-cell lines derived from adult cells of diseased human subjects, we have systematically investigated the parameters affecting efficiency of blastocyst development and stem-cell derivation. Here we show that improvements to the oocyte activation protocol, including the use of both kinase and translation inhibitors, and cell culture in the presence of histone deacetylase inhibitors, promote development to the blastocyst stage. Developmental efficiency varied between oocyte donors, and was inversely related to the number of days of hormonal stimulation required for oocyte maturation, whereas the daily dose of gonadotropin or the total number of metaphase II oocytes retrieved did not affect developmental outcome. Because the use of concentrated Sendai virus for cell fusion induced an increase in intracellular calcium concentration, causing premature oocyte activation, we used diluted Sendai virus in calcium-free medium. Using this modified nuclear transfer protocol, we derived diploid pluripotent stem-cell lines from somatic cells of a newborn and, for the first time, an adult, a female with type 1 diabetes.

  16. Untangling the Biology of Genetic Cardiomyopathies with Pluripotent Stem Cell Disease Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buikema, Jan W; Wu, Sean M

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Recently, the discovery of strategies to reprogram somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has led to a major paradigm change in developmental and stem cell biology. The application of iPS cells and their cardiac progeny has opened novel directions to study

  17. Rapamycin regulates autophagy and cell adhesion in induced pluripotent stem cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sotthibundhu, Areechun

    2016-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming is a stressful process, which requires cells to engulf somatic features and produce and maintain stemness machineries. Autophagy is a process to degrade unwanted proteins and is required for the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). However, the role of autophagy during iPSC maintenance remains undefined.

  18. Stem Cell Surface Marker Expression Defines Late Stages of Reprogramming to Pluripotency in Human Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Jordan E; Hough, Shelley R; Davidson, Kathryn C; Quaas, Alex M; Rees, Jordan A; Pera, Martin F

    2016-07-01

    Our current understanding of the induction of pluripotency by defined factors indicates that this process occurs in discrete stages characterized by specific alterations in the cellular transcriptome and epigenome. However, the final phase of the reprogramming process is incompletely understood. We sought to generate tools to characterize the transition to a fully reprogramed state. We used combinations of stem cell surface markers to isolate colonies emerging after transfection of human fibroblasts with reprogramming factors and then analyzed their expression of genes associated with pluripotency and early germ lineage specification. We found that expression of a subset of these genes, including the cell-cell adhesion molecule CDH3, characterized a late stage in the reprogramming process. Combined live-cell staining with the antibody GCTM-2 and anti-CDH3 during reprogramming identified colonies of cells that showed gene expression patterns very similar to those of embryonic stem cell or established induced pluripotent stem cell lines, and gave rise to stable induced pluripotent stem cell lines at high frequency. Our findings will facilitate studies of the final stages of reprogramming of human cells to pluripotency and will provide a simple means for prospective identification of fully reprogrammed cells. Reprogramming of differentiated cells back to an embryonic pluripotent state has wide ranging applications in understanding and treating human disease. However, how cells traverse the barriers on the journey to pluripotency still is not fully understood. This report describes tools to study the late stages of cellular reprogramming. The findings enable a more precise approach to dissecting the final phases of conversion to pluripotency, a process that is particularly poorly defined. The results of this study also provide a simple new method for the selection of fully reprogrammed cells, which could enhance the efficiency of derivation of cell lines for research

  19. Reptin regulates pluripotency of embryonic stem cells and somatic cell reprogramming through Oct4-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Eun Kyoung; Cheon, Hyo Cheon; Jang, Il Ho; Choi, Eun Jung; Heo, Soon Chul; Kang, Kyung Taek; Bae, Kwang Hee; Cho, Yee Sook; Seo, Jeong Kon; Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Lee, Taehoon G; Kim, Jae Ho

    2014-12-01

    Oct4 has been implicated in regulation of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in Oct4-dependent regulation of pluripotency and reprogramming have not been clear. To gain insight into the mechanism of regulation of Oct4-mediated self-renewal of ESCs and reprogramming of somatic cells, we attempted to identify Oct4-binding proteins using affinity purification and mass spectrometry. We identified Reptin, a key component of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes, as an Oct4-binding protein. Depletion of endogenous Reptin using lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) led to a decrease in the number and size of alkaline phosphatase-positive colonies of mouse ESCs. In addition, shRNA-mediated silencing of Reptin resulted in decreased expression of pluripotency-specific marker genes, including Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and SSEA-1. Results of the Oct4 reporter assay showed synergism between Oct4 and Reptin, and depletion of endogenous Reptin abolished Oct4 transcriptional activity. Results of a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed the overlapping interaction of Reptin and Oct4 to CR4 in the Oct4 enhancer in ESCs. Knockdown of Reptin using shRNA suppressed the reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells, whereas overexpression of Reptin resulted in enhanced efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cell generation. These results strongly suggest that Reptin plays a key role in maintaining the pluripotency of ESCs and in establishing the pluripotency during reprogramming of somatic cells by regulation of Oct4-mediated gene regulation. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  20. Two sides of the same coin? Unraveling subtle differences between human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells by Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Parrotta, Elvira

    2017-11-28

    Background: Human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, hold enormous promise for many biomedical applications, such as regenerative medicine, drug testing, and disease modeling. Although induced pluripotent stem cells resemble embryonic stem cells both morphologically and functionally, the extent to which these cell lines are truly equivalent, from a molecular point of view, remains controversial. Methods: Principal component analysis and K-means cluster analysis of collected Raman spectroscopy data were used for a comparative study of the biochemical fingerprint of human induced pluripotent stem cells and human embryonic stem cells. The Raman spectra analysis results were further validated by conventional biological assays. Results: Raman spectra analysis revealed that the major difference between human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells is due to the nucleic acid content, as shown by the strong positive peaks at 785, 1098, 1334, 1371, 1484, and 1575 cm–1, which is enriched in human induced pluripotent stem cells. Conclusions: Here, we report a nonbiological approach to discriminate human induced pluripotent stem cells from their native embryonic stem cell counterparts.

  1. Protein regulation of induced pluripotent stem cells by transplanting in a Huntington's animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, S; Han, L; Zhou, G; Mo, C; Duan, J; He, Z; Wang, Z; Ren, L; Zhang, J

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the functional recovery and protein regulation by transplanted induced pluripotent stem cells in a rat model of Huntington's disease (HD). In a quinolinic acid-induced rat model of striatal degeneration, induced pluripotent stem cells were transplanted into the ipsilateral lateral ventricle 10 days after the quinolinic acid injection. At 8 weeks after transplantation, fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT scan and balance-beam test were performed to evaluate the functional recovery of experimental rats. In addition, immunofluorescence and protein array analysis were used to investigate the regulation of stimulated protein expression in the striatum. At 8 weeks after induced pluripotent stem cell transplantation, motor function was improved in comparison with the quinolinic acid-treated rats. High fluorodeoxyglucose accumulation in the injured striatum was also observed by PET/CT scans. In addition, immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that implanted cells migrated from the lateral ventricle into the lesioned striatum and differentiated into striatal projection neurons. Array analysis showed a significant upregulation of GFR (Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor receptor) alpha-1, Adiponectin/Acrp30, basic-fibroblast growth factors, MIP-1 (Macrophage-inflammatory protein) alpha and leptin, as well as downregulation of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-3 in striatum after transplantatation of induced pluripotent stem cells in comparison with the quinolinic acid -treated rats. The findings in this work indicate that transplantation of induced pluripotent stem cells is a promising therapeutic candidate for HD. © 2016 British Neuropathological Society.

  2. The 'sweet' spot of cellular pluripotency: protein glycosylation in human pluripotent stem cells and its applications in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Victor; Loring, Jeanne F; Peterson, Suzanne E

    2015-05-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) promise for the future of regenerative medicine. The structural and biochemical diversity associated with glycans makes them a unique type of macromolecule modification that is involved in the regulation of a vast array of biochemical events and cellular activities including pluripotency in hPSCs. The primary focus of this review article is to highlight recent advances in stem cell research from a glycobiological perspective. We also discuss how our understanding of glycans and glycosylation may help overcome barriers hindering the clinical application of hPSC-derived cells. A literature survey using NCBI-PubMed and Google Scholar was performed in 2014. Regenerative medicine hopes to provide novel strategies to combat human disease and tissue injury that currently lack effective therapies. Although progress in this field is accelerating, many critical issues remain to be addressed in order for cell-based therapy to become a practical and safe treatment option. Emerging evidence suggests that protein glycosylation may significantly influence the regulation of cellular pluripotency, and that the exploitation of protein glycosylation in hPSCs and their differentiated derivatives may lead to transformative and translational discoveries for regenerative medicine. In addition, hPSCs represent a novel research platform for investigating glycosylation-related disease.

  3. Expression of the chitinase family glycoprotein YKL-40 in undifferentiated, differentiated and trans-differentiated mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Hoover

    Full Text Available The glycoprotein YKL-40 (CHI3L1 is a secreted chitinase family protein that induces angiogenesis, cell survival, and cell proliferation, and plays roles in tissue remodeling and immune regulation. It is expressed primarily in cells of mesenchymal origin, is overexpressed in numerous aggressive carcinomas and sarcomas, but is rarely expressed in normal ectodermal tissues. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be induced to differentiate into various mesenchymal tissues and trans-differentiate into some non-mesenchymal cell types. Since YKL-40 has been used as a mesenchymal marker, we followed YKL-40 expression as undifferentiated MSCs were induced to differentiate into bone, cartilage, and neural phenotypes. Undifferentiated MSCs contain significant levels of YKL-40 mRNA but do not synthesize detectable levels of YKL-40 protein. MSCs induced to differentiate into chondrocytes and osteocytes soon began to express and secrete YKL-40 protein, as do ex vivo cultured chondrocytes and primary osteocytes. In contrast, MSCs induced to trans-differentiate into neurons did not synthesize YKL-40 protein, consistent with the general absence of YKL-40 protein in normal CNS parenchyma. However, these trans-differentiated neurons retained significant levels of YKL-40 mRNA, suggesting the mechanisms which prevented YKL-40 translation in undifferentiated MSCs remained in place, and that these trans-differentiated neurons differ in at least this way from neurons derived from neuronal stem cells. Utilization of a differentiation protocol containing β-mercaptoethanol resulted in cells that expressed significant amounts of intracellular YKL-40 protein that was not secreted, which is not seen in normal cells. Thus the synthesis of YKL-40 protein is a marker for MSC differentiation into mature mesenchymal phenotypes, and the presence of untranslated YKL-40 mRNA in non-mesenchymal cells derived from MSCs reflects differences between differentiated and

  4. Reverse engineering human neurodegenerative disease using pluripotent stem cell technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-05-01

    With the technology of reprogramming somatic cells by introducing defined transcription factors that enables the generation of "induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)" with pluripotency comparable to that of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), it has become possible to use this technology to produce various cells and tissues that have been difficult to obtain from living bodies. This advancement is bringing forth rapid progress in iPSC-based disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. More and more studies have demonstrated that phenotypes of adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders could be rather faithfully recapitulated in iPSC-derived neural cell cultures. Moreover, despite the adult-onset nature of the diseases, pathogenic phenotypes and cellular abnormalities often exist in early developmental stages, providing new "windows of opportunity" for understanding mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders and for discovering new medicines. The cell reprogramming technology enables a reverse engineering approach for modeling the cellular degenerative phenotypes of a wide range of human disorders. An excellent example is the study of the human neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using iPSCs. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons (MNs), culminating in muscle wasting and death from respiratory failure. The iPSC approach provides innovative cell culture platforms to serve as ALS patient-derived model systems. Researchers have converted iPSCs derived from ALS patients into MNs and various types of glial cells, all of which are involved in ALS, to study the disease. The iPSC technology could be used to determine the role of specific genetic factors to track down what's wrong in the neurodegenerative disease process in the "disease-in-a-dish" model. Meanwhile, parallel experiments of targeting the same specific genes in human ESCs could also be performed to control

  5. A highly efficient method for generation of therapeutic quality human pluripotent stem cells by using naive induced pluripotent stem cells nucleus for nuclear transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudana Girija Sanal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Even after several years since the discovery of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC, we are still unable to make any significant therapeutic benefits out of them such as cell therapy or generation of organs for transplantation. Recent success in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT made it possible to generate diploid embryonic stem cells, which opens up the way to make high-quality pluripotent stem cells. However, the process is highly inefficient and hence expensive compared to the generation of iPSC. Even with the latest SCNT technology, we are not sure whether one can make therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cell from any patient’s somatic cells or by using oocytes from any donor. Combining iPSC technology with SCNT, that is, by using the nucleus of the candidate somatic cell which got reprogrammed to pluripotent state instead that of the unmodified nucleus of the candidate somatic cell, would boost the efficiency of the technique, and we would be able to generate therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cells. Induced pluripotent stem cell nuclear transfer (iPSCNT combines the efficiency of iPSC generation with the speed and natural reprogramming environment of SCNT. The new technique may be called iPSCNT. This technique could prove to have very revolutionary benefits for humankind. This could be useful in generating organs for transplantation for patients and for reproductive cloning, especially for childless men and women who cannot have children by any other techniques. When combined with advanced gene editing techniques (such as CRISPR-Cas system this technique might also prove useful to those who want to have healthy children but suffer from inherited diseases. The current code of ethics may be against reproductive cloning. However, this will change with time as it happened with most of the revolutionary scientific breakthroughs. After all, it is the right of every human to have healthy offspring and it is

  6. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro

  7. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying, E-mail: ying.chen@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R. [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Knott, Jason G. [Developmental Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University (United States); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  8. Traceability in stem cell research: from participant sample to induced pluripotent stem cell and back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Michael; Moraia, Linda Briceño; Steele, Jane C

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a traceability system developed for the Stem cells for Biological Assays of Novel drugs and prediCtive toxiCology consortium. The system combines records and labels that to biological material across geographical locations and scientific processes from sample donation to induced pluripotent stem cell line. The labeling system uses a unique identification number to link every aliquot of sample at every stage of the reprogramming pathway back to the original donor. Only staff at the clinical recruitment site can reconnect the unique identification number to the identifying details of a specific donor. This ensures the system meets ethical and legal requirements for protecting privacy while allowing full traceability of biological material. The system can be adapted to other projects and for use with different primary sample types.

  9. From teeth, skin, blood to heart : induced pluripotent stem cells as an in vitro model for cardiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dambrot, Cheryl Susan

    2014-01-01

    Since the first reports of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC), the field of pluripotent stem cell (PSC) research has grown in leap and bounds, particularly in the area of (cardiac) disease modeling. This is in part because it is fairly easy to produce cardiomyocytes from hPSC and also

  10. Rapid establishment of the European Bank for induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (EBiSC) - the Hot Start experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Sousa, Paul A.; Steeg, Rachel; Wachter, Elisabeth; Bruce, Kevin; King, Jason; Hoeve, Marieke; Khadun, Shalinee; McConnachie, George; Holder, Julie; Kurtz, Andreas; Seltmann, Stefanie; Dewender, Johannes; Reimann, Sascha; Stacey, Glyn; O'Shea, Orla; Chapman, Charlotte; Healy, Lyn; Zimmermann, Heiko; Bolton, Bryan; Rawat, Trisha; Atkin, Isobel; Veiga, Anna; Kuebler, Bernd; Serano, Blanca Miranda; Saric, Tomo; Hescheler, Jürgen; Brüstle, Oliver; Peitz, Michael; Thiele, Cornelia; Geijsen, Niels; Holst, Bjørn; Clausen, Christian; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle; Gupta, Shailesh K.; Kvist, Alexander J.; Hicks, Ryan; Jonebring, Anna; Brolén, Gabriella; Ebneth, Andreas; Cabrera-Socorro, Alfredo; Foerch, Patrik; Geraerts, Martine; Stummann, Tina C.; Harmon, Shawn; George, Carol; Streeter, Ian; Clarke, Laura; Parkinson, Helen; Harrison, Peter W.; Faulconbridge, Adam; Cherubin, Luca; Burdett, Tony; Trigueros, Cesar; Patel, Minal J.; Lucas, Christa; Hardy, Barry; Predan, Rok; Dokler, Joh; Brajnik, Maja; Keminer, Oliver; Pless, Ole; Gribbon, Philip; Claussen, Carsten; Ringwald, Annette; Kreisel, Beate; Courtney, Aidan; Allsopp, Timothy E.

    2017-01-01

    A fast track “Hot Start” process was implemented to launch the European Bank for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (EBiSC) to provide early release of a range of established control and disease linked human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) lines. Established practice amongst consortium members was

  11. Rapid establishment of the European Bank for induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (EBiSC) - the Hot Start experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Sousa, Paul A; Steeg, Rachel; Wachter, Elisabeth; Bruce, Kevin; King, Jason; Hoeve, Marieke; Khadun, Shalinee; McConnachie, George; Holder, Julie; Kurtz, Andreas; Seltmann, Stefanie; Dewender, Johannes; Reimann, Sascha; Stacey, Glyn; O'Shea, Orla; Chapman, Charlotte; Healy, Lyn; Zimmermann, Heiko; Bolton, Bryan; Rawat, Trisha; Atkin, Isobel; Veiga, Anna; Kuebler, Bernd; Serano, Blanca Miranda; Saric, Tomo; Hescheler, Jürgen; Brüstle, Oliver; Peitz, Michael; Thiele, Cornelia; Geijsen, Niels; Holst, Bjørn; Clausen, Christian; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle; Gupta, Shailesh K; Kvist, Alexander J; Hicks, Ryan; Jonebring, Anna; Brolén, Gabriella; Ebneth, Andreas; Cabrera-Socorro, Alfredo; Foerch, Patrik; Geraerts, Martine; Stummann, Tina C; Harmon, Shawn; George, Carol; Streeter, Ian; Clarke, Laura; Parkinson, Helen; Harrison, Peter W; Faulconbridge, Adam; Cherubin, Luca; Burdett, Tony; Trigueros, Cesar; Patel, Minal J; Lucas, Christa; Hardy, Barry; Predan, Rok; Dokler, Joh; Brajnik, Maja; Keminer, Oliver; Pless, Ole; Gribbon, Philip; Claussen, Carsten; Ringwald, Annette; Kreisel, Beate; Courtney, Aidan; Allsopp, Timothy E

    A fast track "Hot Start" process was implemented to launch the European Bank for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (EBiSC) to provide early release of a range of established control and disease linked human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) lines. Established practice amongst consortium members was

  12. Human induced pluripotent stem cells: a review of the US patent landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Bilyana P; Love, Jane M

    2010-07-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and human embryonic stem cells are cells that have the ability to differentiate into a variety of cell types. Embryonic stem cells are derived from human embryos; however, by contrast, human iPS cells can be obtained from somatic cells that have undergone a process of 'reprogramming' via genetic manipulation such that they develop pluripotency. Since iPS cells are not derived from human embryos, they are a less complicated source of human pluripotent cells and are considered valuable research tools and potentially useful in therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine. Worldwide, there are only three issued patents concerning iPS cells. Therefore, the patent landscape in this field is largely undefined. This article provides an overview of the issued patents as well as the pending published patent applications in the field.

  13. Generation of thyroid follicular cells from pluripotent stem cells: potential for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Will; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 12% of the population in the United States will be afflicted with a thyroid related disorder during their lifetime. Common treatment approaches are tailored to the specific disorder and include surgery, radioactive iodine ablation, antithyroid drugs, thyroid hormone replacement, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Regenerative medicine endeavors to combat disease by replacing or regenerating damaged, diseased, or dysfunctional body parts. A series of achievements in pluripotent stem cell research have transformed regenerative medicine in many ways by demonstrating "repair" of a number of body parts in mice, of which, the thyroid has now been inducted into this special group. Seminal work in pluripotent cells, namely embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, have made possible their path to becoming key tools and biological building blocks for cell-based regenerative medicine to combat the gamut of human diseases, including those affecting the thyroid.

  14. Deep transcriptome profiling of mammalian stem cells supports a regulatory role for retrotransposons in pluripotency maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fort, Alexandre; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Yamada, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    on nuclear and retrotransposon-derived transcripts. We have performed deep profiling of the nuclear and cytoplasmic transcriptomes of human and mouse stem cells, identifying a class of previously undetected stem cell-specific transcripts. We show that long terminal repeat (LTR)-derived transcripts contribute...... extensively to the complexity of the stem cell nuclear transcriptome. Some LTR-derived transcripts are associated with enhancer regions and are likely to be involved in the maintenance of pluripotency....

  15. Potent tumor tropism of induced pluripotent stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells in the mouse intracerebral glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazoe, Tomohiro; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Amano, Shinji; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Although neural and mesenchymal stem cells have been well-known to have a strong glioma tropism, this activity in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has not yet been fully studied. In the present study, we tested tumor tropic activity of mouse iPSCs and neural stem cells derived from the iPSC (iPS-NSCs) using in vitro Matrigel invasion chamber assay and in vivo mouse intracranial tumor model. Both iPSC and iPS-NSC had a similar potent in vitro tropism for glioma conditioned media. The migrated iPSCs to the gliomas kept expressing Nanog-GFP gene, suggesting no neuronal or glial differentiation. iPSCs or iPS-NSCs labeled with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine were intracranially implanted in the contralateral hemisphere to the GL261 glioma cell implantation in the allogeneic C57BL/6 mouse. Active migration of both stem cells was observed 7 days after implantation. Again, the iPSCs located in the tumor area expressed Nanog-GFP gene, suggesting that the migrated cells were still iPSCs. These findings demonstrated that both iPSCs and iPS-NSCs had potent glioma tropism and could be candidates as vehicles in stem cell-based glioma therapy.

  16. Energy metabolism in human pluripotent stem cells and their differentiated counterparts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Varum

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells have the ability to generate all cell types present in the adult organism, therefore harboring great potential for the in vitro study of differentiation and for the development of cell-based therapies. Nonetheless their use may prove challenging as incomplete differentiation of these cells might lead to tumoregenicity. Interestingly, many cancer types have been reported to display metabolic modifications with features that might be similar to stem cells. Understanding the metabolic properties of human pluripotent stem cells when compared to their differentiated counterparts can thus be of crucial importance. Furthermore recent data has stressed distinct features of different human pluripotent cells lines, namely when comparing embryo-derived human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs reprogrammed from somatic cells.We compared the energy metabolism of hESCs, IPSCs, and their somatic counterparts. Focusing on mitochondria, we tracked organelle localization and morphology. Furthermore we performed gene expression analysis of several pathways related to the glucose metabolism, including glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. In addition we determined oxygen consumption rates (OCR using a metabolic extracellular flux analyzer, as well as total intracellular ATP levels by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Finally we explored the expression of key proteins involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism.Our results demonstrate that, although the metabolic signature of IPSCs is not identical to that of hESCs, nonetheless they cluster with hESCs rather than with their somatic counterparts. ATP levels, lactate production and OCR revealed that human pluripotent cells rely mostly on glycolysis to meet their energy demands. Furthermore, our work points to some of the strategies which human pluripotent stem cells may use to maintain high

  17. Temporal repression of endogenous pluripotency genes during reprogramming of porcine induced pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane; Christensen, Marianne; Rasmussen, Mikkel Aabech

    2012-01-01

    transgenes on the expression of the porcine endogenous pluripotency machinery. Endogenous and exogenous gene expression of OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, KLF4, and cMYC was determined at passages 5, 10, 15, and 20, both in cells cultured at 1¿µg/mL doxycycline or 4¿µg/mL doxycycline. Our results revealed that endogenous...

  18. Multiple Roles of MYC in Integrating Regulatory Networks of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagnocchi, Luca; Zippo, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are defined by their self-renewal potential, which permits their unlimited propagation, and their pluripotency, being able to generate cell of the three embryonic lineages. These properties render PSCs a valuable tool for both basic and medical research. To induce and stabilize the pluripotent state, complex circuitries involving signaling pathways, transcription regulators and epigenetic mechanisms converge on a core transcriptional regulatory network of PSCs, thus determining their cell identity. Among the transcription factors, MYC represents a central hub, which modulates and integrates multiple mechanisms involved both in the maintenance of pluripotency and in cell reprogramming. Indeed, it instructs the PSC-specific cell cycle, metabolism and epigenetic landscape, contributes to limit exit from pluripotency and modulates signaling cascades affecting the PSC identity. Moreover, MYC extends its regulation on pluripotency by controlling PSC-specific non-coding RNAs. In this report, we review the MYC-controlled networks, which support the pluripotent state and discuss how their perturbation could affect cell identity. We further discuss recent finding demonstrating a central role of MYC in triggering epigenetic memory in PSCs, which depends on the establishment of a WNT-centered self-reinforcing circuit. Finally, we comment on the therapeutic implications of the role of MYC in affecting PSCs. Indeed, PSCs are used for both disease and cancer modeling and to derive cells for regenerative medicine. For these reasons, unraveling the MYC-mediated mechanism in those cells is fundamental to exploit their full potential and to identify therapeutic targets. PMID:28217689

  19. Generation of a Three-Dimensional Kidney Structure from Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Yasuhiro; Taguchi, Atsuhiro; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2017-01-01

    The kidney is a vital organ that has an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis by fluid volume regulation and waste product excretion. This role cannot be performed without the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the kidney. Therefore, it is important to generate the 3D structure of the kidney when inducing functional kidney tissue or the whole organ from pluripotent stem cells. In this chapter, we describe the detailed methods to induce kidney progenitor cells from pluripotent stem cells, which are based on embryological development. We also provide a method to generate 3D kidney tissue with vascularized glomeruli upon transplantation.

  20. Pluripotent Conversion of Muscle Stem Cells Without Reprogramming Factors or Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Bipasha; Shenoy P, Sudheer

    2016-02-01

    Muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs) are multipotent stem cells that can differentiate into several lineages including skeletal muscle precursor cells. Here, we show that MDSCs from myostatin null mice (Mstn (-/-) ) can be readily induced into pluripotent stem cells without using reprogramming factors. Microarray studies revealed a strong upregulation of markers like Leukemia Inhibitory factor (LIF) and Leukemia Inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) in Mstn (-/-) MDSCs as compared to wild type MDSCs (WT-MDSCs). Furthermore when cultured in mouse embryonic stem cell media with LIF for 95 days, Mstn (-/-) MDSCs formed embryonic stem cell (ES) like colonies. We termed such ES like cells as the culture-induced pluripotent stem cells (CiPSC). CiPSCs from Mstn (-/-) MDSCs were phenotypically similar to ESCs, expressed high levels of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2 and SSEA-1, maintained a normal karyotype. Furthermore, CiPSCs formed embryoid bodies and teratomas when injected into immunocompromised mice. In addition, CiPSCs differentiated into somatic cells of all three lineages. We further show that culturing in ES cell media, resulted in hypermethylation and downregulation of BMP2 in Mstn(-/-) MDSCs. Western blot further confirmed a down regulation of BMP2 signaling in Mstn (-/-) MDSCs in supportive of pluripotent reprogramming. Given that down regulation of BMP2 has been shown to induce pluripotency in cells, we propose that lack of myostatin epigenetically reprograms the MDSCs to become pluripotent stem cells. Thus, here we report the successful establishment of ES-like cells from adult stem cells of the non-germline origin under culture-induced conditions without introducing reprogramming genes.

  1. Trib2 regulates the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells and enhances reprogramming efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Eun Kyoung; Park, Jae Kyung; Cheon, Hyo Cheon; Kwon, Yang Woo; Heo, Soon Chul; Choi, Eun Jung; Seo, Jeong Kon; Jang, Il Ho; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Jae Ho

    2017-11-24

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent cells characterized by self-renewability and differentiation potential. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are ES cell-equivalent cells derived from somatic cells by the introduction of core reprogramming factors. ES and iPS cells are important sources for understanding basic biology and for generating therapeutic cells for clinical applications. Tribbles homolog 2 (Trib2) functions as a scaffold in signaling pathways. However, the relevance of Trib2 to the pluripotency of ES and iPS cells is unknown. In the present study, we elucidated the importance of Trib2 in maintaining pluripotency in mouse ES cells and in generating iPS cells from somatic cells through the reprogramming process. Trib2 expression decreased as ES cells differentiated, and Trib2 knockdown in ES cells changed their colony morphology while reducing the activity of alkaline phosphatase and the expression of the pluripotency marker genes Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and Klf4. Trib2 directly interacted with Oct4 and elevated Oct4 promoter activity. During the generation of iPS cells, Trib2 knockdown decreased the reprogramming efficiency of mouse embryonic fibroblasts, whereas Trib2 overexpression significantly increased their reprogramming efficiency. In summary, our results suggest that Trib2 is important for maintaining self-renewal in ES cells and for pluripotency induction during the reprogramming process.

  2. Establishment of Hepatocellular Cancer Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using a Reprogramming Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Joon; Jeong, Jaemin; Park, Sunhoo; Jin, Young-Woo; Lee, Seung-Sook; Lee, Seung Bum; Choi, Dongho

    2017-03-15

    Cancer is known to be a disease by many factors. However, specific results of reprogramming by pluripotency-related transcription factors remain to be scarcely reported. Here, we verified potential effects of pluripotent-related genes in hepatocellular carcinoma cancer cells. To better understand reprogramming of cancer cells in different genetic backgrounds, we used four liver cancer cell lines representing different states of p53 (HepG2, Hep3B, Huh7 and PLC). Retroviral-mediated introduction of reprogramming related genes (KLF4, Oct4, Sox2, and Myc) was used to induce the expression of proteins related to a pluripotent status in liver cancer cells. Hep3B cells (null p53) exhibited a higher efficiency of reprogramming in comparison to the other liver cancer cell lines. The reprogrammed Hep3B cells acquired similar characteristics to pluripotent stem cells. However, loss of stemness in Hep3B-iPCs was detected during continual passage. We demonstrated that reprogramming was achieved in tumor cells through retroviral induction of genes associated with reprogramming. Interestingly, the reprogrammed pluripotent cancer cells (iPCs) were very different from original cancer cells in terms of colony shape and expressed markers. The induction of pluripotency of liver cancer cells correlated with the status of p53, suggesting that different expression level of p53 in cancer cells may affect their reprogramming.

  3. Derivation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) Lines and Mechanism of Pluripotency: Historical Perspective and Recent Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Arvind

    2017-12-01

    Derivation of human embryonic stem cell (hES) lines in 1998 was not only a major technological breakthrough in the field of regenerative medicine; it also triggered a passionate debate about the ethical issues associated with the utilization of human embryos for derivation of hESC lines. Successful derivation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) lines from human somatic cells with defined reprogramming factors by Shinya Yamanaka`s group in 2007 was another breakthrough that generated enormous excitement and hope for the development of donor-specific personalized cell replacement therapies (CRT) without the ethical dilemma associated with it. As we approach twentieth anniversary of derivation of hESC lines and the tenth anniversary of isolation of donor-specific iPSC lines, this manuscript summarizes the key advances in pluripotent stem cell (PSC) research field that led to derivation of human iPSC lines, different methodologies for derivation iPSC lines and characterization of the mechanism of reprogramming. We will also review progress towards generating donor-specific somatic cell lineages from iPSC lines, especially the functional immune cell lineages, and progress towards advancing these findings to the clinic. Finally, we will discuss the challenges, such as genome instability and inherent immunogenicity of hPSC lines that need to be addressed to develop safe and effective iPSC-based CRT.

  4. Detailed characterization of the mouse embryonic stem cell transcriptome reveals novel genes and intergenic splicing associated with pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanton Lawrence W

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptional control of embryonic stem (ES cell pluripotency has been a subject of intense study. Transcriptional regulators including Oct4 (Oct3/4 index, Sox2 and Nanog are fundamental for maintaining the undifferentiated state. However, the ES cell transcriptome is not limited to their targets, and exhibits considerable complexity when assayed with microarray, MPSS, cDNA/EST sequencing, and SAGE technologies. To identify novel genes associated with pluripotency, we globally searched for ES transcripts not corresponding to known genes, validated their sequences, determined their expression profiles, and employed RNAi to test their function. Results Gene Identification Signature (GIS analysis, a SAGE derivative distinguished by paired 5' and 3' transcript end tags, identified 153 candidate novel transcriptional units (TUs distinct from known genes in a mouse E14 ES mRNA library. We focused on 16 TUs free of artefacts and mapping discrepancies, five of which were validated by RTPCR product sequencing. Two of the TUs were revealed by annotation to represent novel protein-coding genes: a PRY-domain cluster member and a KRAB-domain zinc finger. The other three TUs represented intergenic splicing events involving adjacent, functionally unrelated protein-coding genes transcribed in the same orientation, with one event potentially encoding a fusion protein containing domains from both component genes (Clk2 and Scamp3. Expression profiling using embryonic samples and adult tissue panels confirmed that three of the TUs were unique to or most highly expressed in ES cells. Expression levels of all five TUs dropped dramatically during three distinct chemically induced differentiation treatments of ES cells in culture. However, siRNA knockdowns of the TUs did not alter mRNA levels of pluripotency or differentiation markers, and did not affect cell morphology. Conclusion Transcriptome libraries retain considerable potential for novel

  5. Reprogramming primordial germ cells into pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Durcova-Hills

    Full Text Available Specification of primordial germ cells (PGCs results in the conversion of pluripotent epiblast cells into monopotent germ cell lineage. Blimp1/Prmt5 complex plays a critical role in the specification and maintenance of the early germ cell lineage. However, PGCs can be induced to dedifferentiate back to a pluripotent state as embryonic germ (EG cells when exposed to exogenous signaling molecules, FGF-2, LIF and SCF.Here we show that Trichostatin A (TSA, an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, is a highly potent agent that can replace FGF-2 to induce dedifferentiation of PGCs into EG cells. A key early event during dedifferentiation of PGCs in response to FGF-2 or TSA is the down-regulation of Blimp1, which reverses and apparently relieves the cell fate restriction imposed by it. Notably, the targets of Blimp1, which include c-Myc and Klf-4, which represent two of the key factors known to promote reprogramming of somatic cells to pluripotent state, are up-regulated. We also found early activation of the LIF/Stat-3 signaling pathway with the translocation of Stat-3 into the nucleus. By contrast, while Prmt5 is retained in EG cells, it translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it probably has an independent role in regulating pluripotency.We propose that dedifferentiation of PGCs into EG cells may provide significant mechanistic insights on early events associated with reprogramming of committed cells to a pluripotent state.

  6. Pluripotent stem cells derived from mouse primordial germ cells by small molecule compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tohru; Kaga, Yoshiaki; Sekita, Yoichi; Fujikawa, Keita; Nakatani, Tsunetoshi; Odamoto, Mika; Funaki, Soichiro; Ikawa, Masahito; Abe, Kuniya; Nakano, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) can give rise to pluripotent stem cells known as embryonic germ cells (EGCs) when cultured with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), stem cell factor (SCF), and leukemia inhibitory factor. Somatic cells can give rise to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by introduction of the reprogramming transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4. The effects of Sox2 and Klf4 on somatic cell reprogramming can be reproduced using the small molecule compounds, transforming growth factor-β receptor (TGFβR) inhibitor and Kempaullone, respectively. Here we examined the effects of TGFβR inhibitor and Kempaullone on EGC derivation from PGCs. Treatment of PGCs with TGFβR inhibitor and/or Kempaullone generated pluripotent stem cells under standard embryonic stem cell (ESC) culture conditions without bFGF and SCF, which we termed induced EGCs (iEGCs). The derivation efficiency of iEGCs was dependent on the differentiation stage and sex. DNA methylation levels of imprinted genes in iEGCs were reduced, with the exception of the H19 gene. The promoters of genes involved in germline development were generally hypomethylated in PGCs, but three germline genes showed comparable DNA methylation levels among iEGs, ESCs, and iPSCs. These results show that PGCs can be reprogrammed into pluripotent state using small molecule compounds, and that DNA methylation of these germline genes is not maintained in iEGCs. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  7. Extract of mouse embryonic stem cells induces the expression of pluripotency genes in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Paria Motamen; Foroutan, Tahereh; Javeri, Arash; Taha, Masoumeh Fakhr

    2017-11-01

    In some previous studies, the extract of embryonic carcinoma cells (ECCs) and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been used to reprogram somatic cells to more dedifferentiated state. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of mouse ESCs extract on the expression of some pluripotency markers in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Human ADSCs were isolated from subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue and characterized by flow cytometric analysis for the expression of some mesenchymal stem cell markers and adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation. Frequent freeze-thaw technique was used to prepare cytoplasmic extract of ESCs. Plasma membranes of the ADSCs were reversibly permeabilized by streptolysin-O (SLO). Then the permeabilized ADSCs were incubated with the ESC extract and cultured in resealing medium. After reprogramming, the expression of some pluripotency genes was evaluated by RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analyses. Third-passaged ADSCs showed a fibroblast-like morphology and expressed mesenchymal stem cell markers. They also showed adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. QPCR analysis revealed a significant upregulation in the expression of some pluripotency genes including OCT4 , SOX2 , NANOG , REX1 and ESG1 in the reprogrammed ADSCs compared to the control group. These findings showed that mouse ESC extract can be used to induce reprogramming of human ADSCs. In fact, this method is applicable for reprogramming of human adult stem cells to a more pluripotent sate and may have a potential in regenerative medicine.

  8. Retinoic acid-treated pluripotent stem cells undergoing neurogenesis present increased aneuploidy and micronuclei formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela C Sartore

    Full Text Available The existence of loss and gain of chromosomes, known as aneuploidy, has been previously described within the central nervous system. During development, at least one-third of neural progenitor cells (NPCs are aneuploid. Notably, aneuploid NPCs may survive and functionally integrate into the mature neural circuitry. Given the unanswered significance of this phenomenon, we tested the hypothesis that neural differentiation induced by all-trans retinoic acid (RA in pluripotent stem cells is accompanied by increased levels of aneuploidy, as previously described for cortical NPCs in vivo. In this work we used embryonal carcinoma (EC cells, embryonic stem (ES cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells undergoing differentiation into NPCs. Ploidy analysis revealed a 2-fold increase in the rate of aneuploidy, with the prevalence of chromosome loss in RA primed stem cells when compared to naïve cells. In an attempt to understand the basis of neurogenic aneuploidy, micronuclei formation and survivin expression was assessed in pluripotent stem cells exposed to RA. RA increased micronuclei occurrence by almost 2-fold while decreased survivin expression by 50%, indicating possible mechanisms by which stem cells lose their chromosomes during neural differentiation. DNA fragmentation analysis demonstrated no increase in apoptosis on embryoid bodies treated with RA, indicating that cell death is not the mandatory fate of aneuploid NPCs derived from pluripotent cells. In order to exclude that the increase in aneuploidy was a spurious consequence of RA treatment, not related to neurogenesis, mouse embryonic fibroblasts were treated with RA under the same conditions and no alterations in chromosome gain or loss were observed. These findings indicate a correlation amongst neural differentiation, aneuploidy, micronuclei formation and survivin downregulation in pluripotent stem cells exposed to RA, providing evidence that somatically generated chromosomal

  9. Human Intestinal Tissue with Adult Stem Cell Properties Derived from Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Forster

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetically engineered human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have been proposed as a source for transplantation therapies and are rapidly becoming valuable tools for human disease modeling. However, many applications are limited due to the lack of robust differentiation paradigms that allow for the isolation of defined functional tissues. Here, using an endogenous LGR5-GFP reporter, we derived adult stem cells from hPSCs that gave rise to functional human intestinal tissue comprising all major cell types of the intestine. Histological and functional analyses revealed that such human organoid cultures could be derived with high purity and with a composition and morphology similar to those of cultures obtained from human biopsies. Importantly, hPSC-derived organoids responded to the canonical signaling pathways that control self-renewal and differentiation in the adult human intestinal stem cell compartment. This adult stem cell system provides a platform for studying human intestinal disease in vitro using genetically engineered hPSCs.

  10. Expansion on stromal cells preserves the undifferentiated state of human hematopoietic stem cells despite compromised reconstitution ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Mattias; Sierra, Maria I; Sasidharan, Rajkumar; Prashad, Sacha L; Romero, Melissa; Saarikoski, Pamela; Van Handel, Ben; Huang, Andy; Li, Xinmin; Mikkola, Hanna K A

    2013-01-01

    Lack of HLA-matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) limits the number of patients with life-threatening blood disorders that can be treated by HSC transplantation. So far, insufficient understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing human HSC has precluded the development of effective protocols for culturing HSC for therapeutic use and molecular studies. We defined a culture system using OP9M2 mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) stroma that protects human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) from differentiation and apoptosis. In addition, it facilitates a dramatic expansion of multipotent progenitors that retain the immunophenotype (CD34+CD38-CD90+) characteristic of human HSPC and proliferative potential over several weeks in culture. In contrast, transplantable HSC could be maintained, but not significantly expanded, during 2-week culture. Temporal analysis of the transcriptome of the ex vivo expanded CD34+CD38-CD90+ cells documented remarkable stability of most transcriptional regulators known to govern the undifferentiated HSC state. Nevertheless, it revealed dynamic fluctuations in transcriptional programs that associate with HSC behavior and may compromise HSC function, such as dysregulation of PBX1 regulated genetic networks. This culture system serves now as a platform for modeling human multilineage hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell hierarchy and studying the complex regulation of HSC identity and function required for successful ex vivo expansion of transplantable HSC.

  11. Expansion on stromal cells preserves the undifferentiated state of human hematopoietic stem cells despite compromised reconstitution ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Magnusson

    Full Text Available Lack of HLA-matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSC limits the number of patients with life-threatening blood disorders that can be treated by HSC transplantation. So far, insufficient understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing human HSC has precluded the development of effective protocols for culturing HSC for therapeutic use and molecular studies. We defined a culture system using OP9M2 mesenchymal stem cell (MSC stroma that protects human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC from differentiation and apoptosis. In addition, it facilitates a dramatic expansion of multipotent progenitors that retain the immunophenotype (CD34+CD38-CD90+ characteristic of human HSPC and proliferative potential over several weeks in culture. In contrast, transplantable HSC could be maintained, but not significantly expanded, during 2-week culture. Temporal analysis of the transcriptome of the ex vivo expanded CD34+CD38-CD90+ cells documented remarkable stability of most transcriptional regulators known to govern the undifferentiated HSC state. Nevertheless, it revealed dynamic fluctuations in transcriptional programs that associate with HSC behavior and may compromise HSC function, such as dysregulation of PBX1 regulated genetic networks. This culture system serves now as a platform for modeling human multilineage hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell hierarchy and studying the complex regulation of HSC identity and function required for successful ex vivo expansion of transplantable HSC.

  12. Induced pluripotent stem cells: current progress and potential for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Giovanni; Meissner, Alexander

    2009-02-01

    Lineage-restricted cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state through overexpression of defined transcription factors. Here, we summarize recent progress in the direct reprogramming field and discuss data comparing embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Results from many independent groups suggest that mouse and human iPS cells, once established, generally exhibit a normal karyotype, are transcriptionally and epigenetically similar to ES cells and maintain the potential to differentiate into derivatives of all germ layers. Recent developments provide optimism that safe, viral-free human iPS cells could be derived routinely in the near future. An important next step will be to identify ways of assessing which iPS cell lines are sufficiently reprogrammed and safe to use for therapeutic applications. The approach of generating patient-specific pluripotent cells will undoubtedly transform regenerative medicine in many ways.

  13. Genome editing of human pluripotent stem cells to generate human cellular disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Musunuru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Disease modeling with human pluripotent stem cells has come into the public spotlight with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2012 to Drs John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent. This discovery has opened the door for the generation of pluripotent stem cells from individuals with disease and the differentiation of these cells into somatic cell types for the study of disease pathophysiology. The emergence of genome-editing technology over the past few years has made it feasible to generate and investigate human cellular disease models with even greater speed and efficiency. Here, recent technological advances in genome editing, and its utility in human biology and disease studies, are reviewed.

  14. Advancing pluripotent stem cell culture: it is a matter of setting the standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartipy, Peter

    2013-04-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), defined by their ability to proliferate indefinitely and the capacity to differentiate into all tissue cell types of the adult, represent a platform for the realization of breakthrough technologies for industrial and regenerative medicine applications. We have witnessed tremendous developments over the last decade related to methods for establishment, maintenance, differentiation, and applications of hPSCs and their derivatives. Despite all progress made in the hPSC field, there are still fundamental issues yet to be resolved. For example, our understanding of the pluripotent state remains limited, which in turn may have substantial consequences on how we interpret and communicate scientific data concerning hPSCs. This brief commentary aims to highlight recent important findings that demonstrate additional levels of complexity to the current assessment of pluripotent stem cell cultures. In addition, these data may help to provide some explanations for the challenges in reproducing hPSC differentiation protocols across laboratories.

  15. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Afford New Opportunities in Inherited Cardiovascular Disease Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Bayzigitov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease pathogenesis are required to create more effective and safer methods of their therapy. The studies can be carried out only when model systems that fully recapitulate pathological phenotype seen in patients are used. Application of laboratory animals for cardiovascular disease modeling is limited because of physiological differences with humans. Since discovery of induced pluripotency generating induced pluripotent stem cells has become a breakthrough technology in human disease modeling. In this review, we discuss a progress that has been made in modeling inherited arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies, studying molecular mechanisms of the diseases, and searching for and testing drug compounds using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

  16. Induced pluripotent stem cells for retinal degenerative diseases: a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It can be used as an unlimited source for cell differentiation or tissue engineering, either of which is a promising therapy for human degenerative diseases. Induced pluripotent cells are both an unlimited source for retinal regeneration and an expectant tool for pharmaprojects and developmental or disease modelling.

  17. Human finger-prick induced pluripotent stem cells facilitate the development of stem cell banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hong-Kee; Toh, Cheng-Xu Delon; Ma, Dongrui; Yang, Binxia; Liu, Tong Ming; Lu, Jun; Wong, Chee-Wai; Tan, Tze-Kai; Li, Hu; Syn, Christopher; Tan, Eng-Lee; Lim, Bing; Lim, Yoon-Pin; Cook, Stuart A; Loh, Yuin-Han

    2014-05-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from somatic cells of patients can be a good model for studying human diseases and for future therapeutic regenerative medicine. Current initiatives to establish human iPSC (hiPSC) banking face challenges in recruiting large numbers of donors with diverse diseased, genetic, and phenotypic representations. In this study, we describe the efficient derivation of transgene-free hiPSCs from human finger-prick blood. Finger-prick sample collection can be performed on a "do-it-yourself" basis by donors and sent to the hiPSC facility for reprogramming. We show that single-drop volumes of finger-prick samples are sufficient for performing cellular reprogramming, DNA sequencing, and blood serotyping in parallel. Our novel strategy has the potential to facilitate the development of large-scale hiPSC banking worldwide.

  18. Alternative Routes to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Revealed by Reprogramming of the Neural Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Steven A; Olufs, Zachariah P G; Tran, Khoa A; Zaidan, Nur Zafirah; Sridharan, Rupa

    2016-03-08

    During the reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to induced pluripotent stem cells, the activation of pluripotency genes such as NANOG occurs after the mesenchymal to epithelial transition. Here we report that both adult stem cells (neural stem cells) and differentiated cells (astrocytes) of the neural lineage can activate NANOG in the absence of cadherin expression during reprogramming. Gene expression analysis revealed that only the NANOG+E-cadherin+ populations expressed stabilization markers, had upregulated several cell cycle genes; and were transgene independent. Inhibition of DOT1L activity enhanced both the numbers of NANOG+ and NANOG+E-cadherin+ colonies in neural stem cells. Expressing SOX2 in MEFs prior to reprogramming did not alter the ratio of NANOG colonies that express E-cadherin. Taken together these results provide a unique pathway for reprogramming taken by cells of the neural lineage. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Concise Review: Advances in Generating Hepatocytes from Pluripotent Stem Cells for Translational Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkolnicka, Dagmara; Hay, David C

    2016-06-01

    The liver is one of the major organs in the human body. Severe or prolonged exposure of the liver to different factors may cause life-threatening disease, which necessitates donor organ transplantation. While orthotopic liver transplantation can be used to effectively treat liver failure, it is an invasive procedure, which is severely limited by organ donation. Therefore, alternative sources of liver support have been proposed and studied. This includes the use of pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes as a renewable source of cells for therapy. In addition to cell-based therapies, in vitro engineered liver tissue provides powerful models for human drug discovery and disease modeling. This review focuses on the generation of hepatocyte-like cells from pluripotent stem cells and their application in translational medicine. Stem Cells 2016;34:1421-1426. © 2016 The Authors Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press 2016.

  20. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Generation, Characterization, and Differentiation--Methods and Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graversen, Veronica Kon; Chavala, Sai H

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) remains a promising technique for cell replacement therapy. Diverse populations of somatic cells have been examined for their reprogramming potential. Recently, ocular ciliary body epithelial cells (CECs) have been reprogrammed with high reprogramming efficiency and single transcription factor reprogramming, making them an exciting candidate for cellular reprogramming strategies.

  1. Concise review: reprogramming strategies for cardiovascular regenerative medicine: from induced pluripotent stem cells to direct reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budniatzky, Inbar; Gepstein, Lior

    2014-04-01

    Myocardial cell-replacement therapies are emerging as novel therapeutic paradigms for myocardial repair but are hampered by the lack of sources of autologous human cardiomyocytes. The recent advances in stem cell biology and in transcription factor-based reprogramming strategies may provide exciting solutions to this problem. In the current review, we describe the different reprogramming strategies that can give rise to cardiomyocytes for regenerative medicine purposes. Initially, we describe induced pluripotent stem cell technology, a method by which adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed to yield pluripotent stem cells that could later be coaxed ex vivo to differentiate into cardiomyocytes. The generated induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes could then be used for myocardial cell transplantation and tissue engineering strategies. We also describe the more recent direct reprogramming approaches that aim to directly convert the phenotype of one mature cell type (fibroblast) to another (cardiomyocyte) without going through a pluripotent intermediate cell type. The advantages and shortcomings of each strategy for cardiac regeneration are discussed, along with the hurdles that need to be overcome on the road to clinical translation.

  2. Reprogramming Methods Do Not Affect Gene Expression Profile of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Trevisan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are pluripotent cells derived from adult somatic cells. After the pioneering work by Yamanaka, who first generated iPSCs by retroviral transduction of four reprogramming factors, several alternative methods to obtain iPSCs have been developed in order to increase the yield and safety of the process. However, the question remains open on whether the different reprogramming methods can influence the pluripotency features of the derived lines. In this study, three different strategies, based on retroviral vectors, episomal vectors, and Sendai virus vectors, were applied to derive iPSCs from human fibroblasts. The reprogramming efficiency of the methods based on episomal and Sendai virus vectors was higher than that of the retroviral vector-based approach. All human iPSC clones derived with the different methods showed the typical features of pluripotent stem cells, including the expression of alkaline phosphatase and stemness maker genes, and could give rise to the three germ layer derivatives upon embryoid bodies assay. Microarray analysis confirmed the presence of typical stem cell gene expression profiles in all iPSC clones and did not identify any significant difference among reprogramming methods. In conclusion, the use of different reprogramming methods is equivalent and does not affect gene expression profile of the derived human iPSCs.

  3. Reprogramming Methods Do Not Affect Gene Expression Profile of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Marta; Desole, Giovanna; Costanzi, Giulia; Lavezzo, Enrico; Palù, Giorgio; Barzon, Luisa

    2017-01-20

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are pluripotent cells derived from adult somatic cells. After the pioneering work by Yamanaka, who first generated iPSCs by retroviral transduction of four reprogramming factors, several alternative methods to obtain iPSCs have been developed in order to increase the yield and safety of the process. However, the question remains open on whether the different reprogramming methods can influence the pluripotency features of the derived lines. In this study, three different strategies, based on retroviral vectors, episomal vectors, and Sendai virus vectors, were applied to derive iPSCs from human fibroblasts. The reprogramming efficiency of the methods based on episomal and Sendai virus vectors was higher than that of the retroviral vector-based approach. All human iPSC clones derived with the different methods showed the typical features of pluripotent stem cells, including the expression of alkaline phosphatase and stemness maker genes, and could give rise to the three germ layer derivatives upon embryoid bodies assay. Microarray analysis confirmed the presence of typical stem cell gene expression profiles in all iPSC clones and did not identify any significant difference among reprogramming methods. In conclusion, the use of different reprogramming methods is equivalent and does not affect gene expression profile of the derived human iPSCs.

  4. A simplified protocol for differentiation of electrophysiologically mature neuronal networks from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Gunhanlar (Nilhan); G. Shpak (Guy); M. Van Der Kroeg; L.A. Gouty-Colomer; S.T. Munshi (Shashini T.); B. Lendemeijer (Bert); M. Ghazvini (Mehrnaz); C. Dupont (Claire); W.J.G. Hoogendijk (Witte); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); F.M.S. Vrij (Femke); S.A. Kushner (Steven)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractProgress in elucidating the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders has been hindered by the limited availability of living human brain tissue. The emergence of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has offered a unique alternative strategy using

  5. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology and Direct Conversion : New Possibilities to Study and Treat Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roessler, Reinhard; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    Recent developments in in vitro disease modeling and regenerative medicine have placed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in the center of attention as a unique source to study Parkinson's disease. After only 5 years of intensive research, human iPSCs can be generated without viral integration

  6. Identification of polymer surface adsorbed proteins implicated in pluripotent human embryonic stem cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Moamen; Rao, Wei; Smith, James G W; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Young, Lorraine E; Barrett, David A; Davies, Martyn C; Denning, Chris; Alexander, Morgan R

    2016-08-16

    Improved biomaterials are required for application in regenerative medicine, biosensing, and as medical devices. The response of cells to the chemistry of polymers cultured in media is generally regarded as being dominated by proteins adsorbed to the surface. Here we use mass spectrometry to identify proteins adsorbed from a complex mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) conditioned medium found to support pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) expansion on a plasma etched tissue culture polystyrene surface. A total of 71 proteins were identified, of which 14 uniquely correlated with the surface on which pluripotent stem cell expansion was achieved. We have developed a microarray combinatorial protein spotting approach to test the potential of these 14 proteins to support expansion of a hESC cell line (HUES-7) and a human induced pluripotent stem cell line (ReBl-PAT) on a novel polymer (N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl) methacrylamide). These proteins were spotted to form a primary array yielding several protein mixture 'hits' that enhanced cell attachment to the polymer. A second array was generated to test the function of a refined set of protein mixtures. We found that a combination of heat shock protein 90 and heat shock protein-1 encourage elevated adherence of pluripotent stem cells at a level comparable to fibronectin pre-treatment.

  7. Expand and Regularize Federal Funding for Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen-Smith, Jason; Scott, Christopher Thomas; McCormick, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research has sparked incredible scientific and public excitement, as well as significant controversy. hESCs are pluripotent, which means, in theory, that they can be differentiated into any type of cell found in the human body. Thus, they evoke great enthusiasm about potential clinical applications. They are…

  8. Human pluripotent stem cells as tools for neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disease modeling and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Stefania; Faravelli, Irene; Cardano, Marina; Conti, Luciano

    2015-06-01

    Although intensive efforts have been made, effective treatments for neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases have not been yet discovered. Possible reasons for this include the lack of appropriate disease models of human neurons and a limited understanding of the etiological and neurobiological mechanisms. Recent advances in pluripotent stem cell (PSC) research have now opened the path to the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) starting from somatic cells, thus offering an unlimited source of patient-specific disease-relevant neuronal cells. In this review, the authors focus on the use of human PSC-derived cells in modeling neurological disorders and discovering of new drugs and provide their expert perspectives on the field. The advent of human iPSC-based disease models has fuelled renewed enthusiasm and enormous expectations for insights of disease mechanisms and identification of more disease-relevant and novel molecular targets. Human PSCs offer a unique tool that is being profitably exploited for high-throughput screening (HTS) platforms. This process can lead to the identification and optimization of molecules/drugs and thus move forward new pharmacological therapies for a wide range of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental conditions. It is predicted that improvements in the production of mature neuronal subtypes, from patient-specific human-induced pluripotent stem cells and their adaptation to culture, to HTS platforms will allow the increased exploitation of human pluripotent stem cells in drug discovery programs.

  9. Identification of Cisplatin-Regulated Metabolic Pathways in Pluripotent Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stechow, von L.; Ruiz-Aracama, A.; Water, B.; Peijnenburg, A.; Danen, E.; Lommen, A.

    2013-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic compound, cisplatin causes various kinds of DNA lesions but also triggers other pertubations, such as ER and oxidative stress. We and others have shown that treatment of pluripotent stem cells with cisplatin causes a plethora of transcriptional and post-translational alterations

  10. Identification of cisplatin-regulated metabolic pathways in pluripotent stem cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stechow, von L.; Ruiz-Aracama, A.; Water, van de B.; Peijnenburg, A.; Danen, E.H.J.; Lommen, A.

    2013-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic compound, cisplatin causes various kinds of DNA lesions but also triggers other pertubations, such as ER and oxidative stress. We and others have shown that treatment of pluripotent stem cells with cisplatin causes a plethora of transcriptional and post-translational alterations

  11. Efficient cryopreservation of human pluripotent stem cells by surface-based vitrification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neubauer, Julia C; Beier, Axel F; Geijsen, Niels; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Efficient cryopreservation of human stem cells is crucial for guaranteeing a permanent supply of high-quality cell material for drug discovery or regenerative medicine. Conventionally used protocols usually employing slow freezing rates, however, result in low recovery rates for human pluripotent

  12. Toward Development of Pluripotent Porcine Stem Cells by Road Mapping Early Embryonic Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petkov, Stoyan; Freude, Kristine; Mashayekhi-Nezamabadi, Kaveh

    2017-01-01

    The lack in production of bona fide porcine pluripotent stem cells has definitely been hampered by a lack of research into porcine embryo development. Embryonic development in mammals is the extraordinary transition of a single-celled fertilized zygote into a complex fetus, which occurs in the ut...

  13. Long term culture of mesenchymal stem cells in hypoxia promotes a genetic program maintaining their undifferentiated and multipotent status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Carvalho Marcelo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the bone marrow, hematopietic and mesenchymal stem cells form a unique niche in which the oxygen tension is low. Hypoxia may have a role in maintaining stem cell fate, self renewal and multipotency. However, whereas most studies addressed the effect of transient in vitro exposure of MSC to hypoxia, permanent culture under hypoxia should reflect the better physiological conditions. Results Morphologic studies, differentiation and transcriptional profiling experiments were performed on MSC cultured in normoxia (21% O2 versus hypoxia (5% O2 for up to passage 2. Cells at passage 0 and at passage 2 were compared, and those at passage 0 in hypoxia generated fewer and smaller colonies than in normoxia. In parallel, MSC displayed (>4 fold inhibition of genes involved in DNA metabolism, cell cycle progression and chromosome cohesion whereas transcripts involved in adhesion and metabolism (CD93, ESAM, VWF, PLVAP, ANGPT2, LEP, TCF1 were stimulated. Compared to normoxic cells, hypoxic cells were morphologically undifferentiated and contained less mitochondrias. After this lag phase, cells at passage 2 in hypoxia outgrew the cells cultured in normoxia and displayed an enhanced expression of genes (4-60 fold involved in extracellular matrix assembly (SMOC2, neural and muscle development (NOG, GPR56, SNTG2, LAMA and epithelial development (DMKN. This group described herein for the first time was assigned by the Gene Ontology program to "plasticity". Conclusion The duration of hypoxemia is a critical parameter in the differentiation capacity of MSC. Even in growth promoting conditions, hypoxia enhanced a genetic program that maintained the cells undifferentiated and multipotent. This condition may better reflect the in vivo gene signature of MSC, with potential implications in regenerative medicine.

  14. Striatal Transplantation of Human Dopaminergic Neurons Differentiated From Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived From Umbilical Cord Blood Using Lentiviral Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberg, Anna; Stanslowsky, Nancy; Klein, Alexander; Wesemann, Maike; Haase, Alexandra; Martin, Ulrich; Dengler, Reinhard; Grothe, Claudia; Ratzka, Andreas; Wegner, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are promising sources for regenerative therapies like the replacement of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. They offer an unlimited cell source that can be standardized and optimized to produce applicable cell populations to gain maximal functional recovery. In the present study, human cord blood-derived iPSCs (hCBiPSCs) were differentiated into dopaminergic neurons utilizing two different in vitro protocols for neural induction: (protocol I) by fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) signaling, (protocol II) by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/transforming growth factor (TGF-β) inhibition. After maturation, in vitro increased numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons (7.4% of total cells) were observed by protocol II compared to 3.5% in protocol I. Furthermore, 3 weeks after transplantation in hemiparkinsonian rats in vivo, a reduced number of undifferentiated proliferating cells was achieved with protocol II. In contrast, proliferation still occurred in protocol I-derived grafts, resulting in tumor-like growth in two out of four animals 3 weeks after transplantation. Protocol II, however, did not increase the number of TH(+) cells in the striatal grafts of hemiparkinsonian rats. In conclusion, BMP/TGF-β inhibition was more effective than FGF-2 signaling with regard to dopaminergic induction of hCBiPSCs in vitro and prevented graft overgrowth in vivo.

  15. ALS mutant FUS proteins are recruited into stress granules in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived motoneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Lenzi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide an opportunity to study human diseases mainly in those cases for which no suitable model systems are available. Here, we have taken advantage of in vitro iPSCs derived from patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and carrying mutations in the RNA-binding protein FUS to study the cellular behavior of the mutant proteins in the appropriate genetic background. Moreover, the ability to differentiate iPSCs into spinal cord neural cells provides an in vitro model mimicking the physiological conditions. iPSCs were derived from FUSR514S and FUSR521C patient fibroblasts, whereas in the case of the severe FUSP525L mutation, in which fibroblasts were not available, a heterozygous and a homozygous iPSC line were raised by TALEN-directed mutagenesis. We show that aberrant localization and recruitment of FUS into stress granules (SGs is a prerogative of the FUS mutant proteins and occurs only upon induction of stress in both undifferentiated iPSCs and spinal cord neural cells. Moreover, we show that the incorporation into SGs is proportional to the amount of cytoplasmic FUS, strongly correlating with the cytoplasmic delocalization phenotype of the different mutants. Therefore, the available iPSCs represent a very powerful system for understanding the correlation between FUS mutations, the molecular mechanisms of SG formation and ALS ethiopathogenesis.

  16. Visualization of morphological categories of colonies for monitoring of effect on induced pluripotent stem cell culture status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risako Nagasaka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available From the recent advances, there are growing expectations toward the mass production of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs for varieties of applications. For such type of industrial cell manufacturing, the technology which can stabilize the production efficiency is strongly required. Since the present iPSC culture is covered by delicate manual operations, there are still quality differences in produced cells from same culture protocols. To monitor the culture process of iPSCs with the quantified data to evaluate the culture status, we here introduce image-based visualization method of morphological diversity of iPSC colonies. We have set three types of experiments to evaluate the influential factors in iPSC culture technique that may disturb the undifferentiation status of iPSC colonies: (Exp. 1 technical differences in passage skills, (Exp. 2 technical differences in feeder cell preparation, and (Exp. 3 technical differences in maintenance skills (medium exchange frequency with the combination of manual removal of morphologically irregular colonies. By measuring the all existing colonies from real-time microscopic images, the heterogenous change of colony morphologies in the culture vessel was visualized. By such visualization with morphologically categorized Manhattan chart, the difference between technical skills could be compared for evaluating appropriate cell processing.

  17. Identification of Cardiomyocyte-Fated Progenitors from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Marked with CD82

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Takeda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Here, we find that human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC-derived cardiomyocyte (CM-fated progenitors (CFPs that express a tetraspanin family glycoprotein, CD82, almost exclusively differentiate into CMs both in vitro and in vivo. CD82 is transiently expressed in late-stage mesoderm cells during hiPSC differentiation. Purified CD82+ cells gave rise to CMs under nonspecific in vitro culture conditions with serum, as well as in vivo after transplantation to the subrenal space or injured hearts in mice, indicating that CD82 successfully marks CFPs. CD82 overexpression in mesoderm cells as well as in undifferentiated hiPSCs increased the secretion of exosomes containing β-catenin and reduced nuclear β-catenin protein, suggesting that CD82 is involved in fated restriction to CMs through Wnt signaling inhibition. This study may contribute to the understanding of CM differentiation mechanisms and to cardiac regeneration strategies. : Takeda et al. find that CD82+ is a cell-surface marker on cardiomyocyte-fated progenitors made from human iPSCs. Keywords: iPSCs, CD82, cardiomyocytes, progenitors, exosome, Wnt inhibition

  18. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: A New Frontier for Stem Cells in Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, K; Menichanin, D; Bright, R; Ivanovski, S; Hutmacher, D W; Gronthos, S; Bartold, P M

    2015-11-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are the newest member of a growing list of stem cell populations that hold great potential for use in cell-based treatment approaches in the dental field. This review summarizes the dental tissues that have successfully been utilized to generate iPSC lines, as well as the potential uses of iPSCs for tissue regeneration in different dental applications. While iPSCs display great promise in a number of dental applications, there are safety concerns with these cells that need to be addressed before they can be used in clinical settings. This review outlines some of the apprehensions to the use of iPSCs clinically, and it details approaches that are being employed to ensure the safety and efficacy of these cells. One of the major approaches being investigated is the differentiation of iPSCs prior to use in patients. iPSCs have successfully been differentiated into a wide range of cells and tissue types. This review focuses on 2 differentiation approaches-the differentiation of iPSCs into mesenchymal stem cells and the differentiation of iPSCs into osteoprogenitor cells. Both these resulting populations of cells are particularly relevant to the dental field. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  19. Towards Personalized Regenerative Cell Therapy: Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Bolund, Lars; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with the capacity of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, and can be isolated from several adult tissues. However, isolating MSCs from adult tissues for cell therapy is hampered by the invasive procedure, the rarity of the cells and their attenuated proliferation capacity when cultivated and expanded in vitro. Human MSCs derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-MSCs) have now evolved as a promising alternative cell source for MSCs and regenerative medicine. Several groups, including ours, have reported successful derivation of functional iPSC-MSCs and applied these cells in MSC-based therapeutic testing. Still, the current experience and understanding of iPSC-MSCs with respect to production methods, safety and efficacy are primitive. In this review, we highlight the methodological progress in iPSC-MSC research, describing the importance of choosing the right sources of iPSCs, iPSC reprogramming methods, iPSC culture systems, embryoid body intermediates, pathway inhibitors, basal medium, serum, growth factors and culture surface coating. We also highlight some progress in the application of iPSC-MSCs in direct cell therapy, tissue engineering and gene therapy.

  20. Differentiation of hypothalamic-like neurons from human pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liheng; Meece, Kana; Williams, Damian J.; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Zimmer, Matthew; Heinrich, Garrett; Martin Carli, Jayne; Leduc, Charles A.; Sun, Lei; Zeltser, Lori M.; Freeby, Matthew; Goland, Robin; Tsang, Stephen H.; Wardlaw, Sharon L.; Egli, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is the central regulator of systemic energy homeostasis, and its dysfunction can result in extreme body weight alterations. Insights into the complex cellular physiology of this region are critical to the understanding of obesity pathogenesis; however, human hypothalamic cells are largely inaccessible for direct study. Here, we developed a protocol for efficient generation of hypothalamic neurons from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs...

  1. Early embryonic development, assisted reproductive technologies, and pluripotent stem cell biology in domestic mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane; Hinrichs, K.; Lazzari, G.

    2013-01-01

    Over many decades assisted reproductive technologies, including artificial insemination, embryo transfer, in vitro production (IVP) of embryos, cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and stem cell culture, have been developed with the aim of refining breeding strategies for improved...... of pre-implantation development in cattle, pigs, horses, and dogs. Biological aspects and impact of assisted reproductive technologies including IVP, SCNT, and culture of pluripotent stem cells are also addressed....

  2. New frontiers in human cell biology and medicine: can pluripotent stem cells deliver?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2012-11-12

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide enormous opportunities to treat disease using cell therapy. But human stem cells can also drive biomedical and cell biological discoveries in a human model system, which can be directly linked to understanding disease or developing new therapies. Finally, rigorous scientific studies of these cells can and should inform the many science and medical policy issues that confront the translation of these technologies to medicine. In this paper, I discuss these issues using amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as an example.

  3. Recapitulation of Human Retinal Development from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generates Transplantable Populations of Cone Photoreceptors

    OpenAIRE

    Anai Gonzalez-Cordero; Kamil Kruczek; Arifa Naeem; Milan Fernando; Magdalena Kloc; Joana Ribeiro; Debbie Goh; Yanai Duran; Samuel J.I. Blackford; Laura Abelleira-Hervas; Robert D. Sampson; Ian O. Shum; Matthew J. Branch; Peter J. Gardner; Jane C. Sowden

    2017-01-01

    Summary Transplantation of rod photoreceptors, derived either from neonatal retinae or pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), can restore rod-mediated visual function in murine models of inherited blindness. However, humans depend more upon cone photoreceptors that are required for daylight, color, and high-acuity vision. Indeed, macular retinopathies involving loss of cones are leading causes of blindness. An essential step for developing stem cell-based therapies for maculopathies is the ability to...

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Like Cells Derived from Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Ameliorate Diabetic Polyneuropathy in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Himeno, Tatsuhito; Kamiya, Hideki; Naruse, Keiko; Cheng, Zhao; Ito, Sachiko; Kondo, Masaki; Okawa, Tetsuji; Fujiya, Atsushi; Kato, Jiro; Suzuki, Hirohiko; Kito, Tetsutaro; Hamada, Yoji; Oiso, Yutaka; Isobe, Kenichi; Nakamura, Jiro

    2013-01-01

    Background. Although pathological involvements of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) have been reported, no dependable treatment of DPN has been achieved. Recent studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) ameliorate DPN. Here we demonstrate a differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into MSC-like cells and investigate the therapeutic potential of the MSC-like cell transplantation on DPN. Research Design and Methods. For induction into MSC-like cells, GFP-expressing iPSC...

  5. Expression of Pluripotency Markers in Nonpluripotent Human Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Per Henrik; Benedikz, Eirikur; Uhlén, Per; Hovatta, Outi; Sundström, Erik

    2017-06-15

    Nonpluripotent neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from the human fetal central nervous system were found to express a number of messenger RNA (mRNA) species associated with pluripotency, such as NANOG, REX1, and OCT4. The expression was restricted to small subpopulations of NPCs. In contrast to pluripotent stem cells, there was no coexpression of the pluripotency-associated genes studied. Although the expression of these genes rapidly declined during the in vitro differentiation of NPCs, we found no evidence that the discrete expression was associated with the markers of multipotent neural stem cells (CD133 + /CD24 lo ), the capacity of sphere formation, or high cell proliferation rates. The rate of cell death among NPCs expressing pluripotency-associated genes was also similar to that of other NPCs. Live cell imaging showed that NANOG- and REX1-expressing NPCs continuously changed morphology, as did the nonexpressing cells. Depletion experiments showed that after the complete removal of the subpopulations of NANOG- and REX1-expressing NPCs, the expression of these genes appeared in other NPCs within a few days. The percentage of NANOG- and REX1-expressing cells returned to that observed before depletion. Our results are best explained by a model in which there is stochastic transient expression of pluripotency-associated genes in proliferating NPCs.

  6. Modified Lentiviral LTRs Allow Flp Recombinase–mediated Cassette Exchange and In Vivo Tracing of “Factor-free” Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehle, Johannes; Turan, Soeren; Cantz, Tobias; Hoffmann, Dirk; Suerth, Julia D; Maetzig, Tobias; Zychlinski, Daniela; Klein, Christoph; Steinemann, Doris; Baum, Christopher; Bode, Juergen; Schambach, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Methods for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) for disease modeling and cell therapies have progressed from integrating vectors to transient delivery of reprogramming factors, avoiding permanent genomic modification. A major limitation of unmodified iPSCs is the assessment of their distribution and contribution to adverse reactions in autologous cell therapy. Here, we report that polycistronic lentiviral vectors with single Flp recombinase (Flp) recognition target (FRT) sites can be used to generate murine iPSCs that are devoid of the reprogramming cassette but carry an intergenic 300-bp long terminal repeat sequence. Performing quantitative polymerase chain reaction on this marker, we could determine genetic identity and tissue contribution of iPSC-derived teratomas in mice. Moreover, we generated iPSCs carrying heterospecific FRT twin sites, enabling excision and recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) of the reprogramming cassette for another expression unit of choice. Following screening of iPSCs for “safe harbor” integration sites, expression cassettes were introduced by RMCE into various previously silenced loci of selected single-copy iPSCs. Analysis of DNA methylation showed that RMCE reverted the local epigenetic signature, which allowed transgene expression in undifferentiated iPSCs and in differentiated progeny. These findings support the concept of creating clonotypically defined exchangeable and traceable pluripotent stem cells for disease research and cell therapy. PMID:24434935

  7. Initial Attempts of Development and Characterization of an In Vitro Blood Brain Barrier Model Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldeman, Charlotte; Saaby, Lasse; Hall, Vanessa Jane

    The human blood brain barrier has yet to be successfully replicated as an in vitro model. One of the more promising approaches has been to develop an in vitro model derived from human pluripotent stem cells. However, as promising as this model may be, a successful replication of the differentiation...... method on different kinds of pluripotent stem cell lines have yet to be accomplished. We try to approach the promising method as described by Stebbins et al. (2015) to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells into brain like endothelial cells (BECs). Five different human pluripotent stem cell lines...... were screened for the possibility to differentiate into BECs. Tüb1159, Tüb16423, Bioni010-C, WTSli024-A and WTSli002-A stem cell lines were initially seeded on Matrigel cultured with mTESR1 media to confluence, then seeded on Matrigel as a single cell suspension. After two-three days of culture we...

  8. Making gametes from pluripotent stem cells--a promising role for very small embryonic-like stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhartiya, Deepa; Hinduja, Indira; Patel, Hiren; Bhilawadikar, Rashmi

    2014-11-24

    The urge to have one's own biological child supersedes any desire in life. Several options have been used to obtain gametes including pluripotent stem cells (embryonic ES and induced pluripotent iPS stem cells); gonadal stem cells (spermatogonial SSCs, ovarian OSCs stem cells), bone marrow, mesenchymal cells and fetal skin. However, the field poses a huge challenge including inefficient existing protocols for differentiation, epigenetic and genetic changes associated with extensive in vitro manipulation and also ethical/regulatory constraints. A tremendous leap in the field occurred using mouse ES and iPS cells wherein they were first differentiated into epiblast-like cells and then primordial germ cell-like cells. These on further development produced sperm, oocytes and live offspring (had associated genetic problems). Evidently differentiating pluripotent stem cells into primordial germ cells (PGCs) remains a major bottleneck. Against this backdrop, we propose that a novel population of pluripotent stem cells termed very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) may serve as an alternative, potential source of autologus gametes, keeping in mind that they are indeed PGCs surviving in adult mammalian ovaries and testes. Both VSELs and PGCs are pluripotent, relatively quiescent because of epigenetic modifications of parentally imprinted genes loci like Igf2-H19 and KCNQ1p57, share several markers like Stella, Fragilis, Mvh, Dppa2, Dppa4, Sall4, Blimp1 and functional receptors. VSELs are localized in the basement membrane of seminiferous tubules in testis and in the ovary surface epithelium. Ovarian stem cells from mouse, rabbit, sheep, marmoset and humans (menopausal women and those with premature ovarian failure) spontaneously differentiate into oocyte-like structures in vitro with no additional requirement of growth factors. Thus a more pragmatic option to obtain autologus gametes may be the pluripotent VSELs and if we could manipulate them in vivo - existing

  9. Cell fiber-based three-dimensional culture system for highly efficient expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Nagata, Shogo; Okitsu, Teru; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2017-06-06

    Human pluripotent stem cells are a potentially powerful cellular resource for application in regenerative medicine. Because such applications require large numbers of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cells, a scalable culture system of human pluripotent stem cell needs to be developed. Several suspension culture systems for human pluripotent stem cell expansion exist; however, it is difficult to control the thickness of cell aggregations in these systems, leading to increased cell death likely caused by limited diffusion of gases and nutrients into the aggregations. Here, we describe a scalable culture system using the cell fiber technology for the expansion of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The cells were encapsulated and cultured within the core region of core-shell hydrogel microfibers, resulting in the formation of rod-shaped or fiber-shaped cell aggregations with sustained thickness and high viability. By encapsulating the cells with type I collagen, we demonstrated a long-term culture of the cells by serial passaging at a high expansion rate (14-fold in four days) while retaining its pluripotency. Therefore, our culture system could be used for large-scale expansion of human pluripotent stem cells for use in regenerative medicine.

  10. NuRD blocks reprogramming of mouse somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Min; Ling, Te; Xie, Wenbing; Sun, He; Zhou, Yonggang; Zhu, Qiaoyun; Shen, Meili; Zong, Le; Lyu, Guoliang; Zhao, Yun; Ye, Tao; Gu, Jun; Tao, Wei; Lu, Zhigang; Grummt, Ingrid

    2013-07-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by overexpression of a defined set of transcription factors requires epigenetic changes in pluripotency genes. Nuclear reprogramming is an inefficient process and the molecular mechanisms that reset the epigenetic state during iPSC generation are largely unknown. Here, we show that downregulation of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD) complex is required for efficient reprogramming. Overexpression of Mbd3, a subunit of NuRD, inhibits induction of iPSCs by establishing heterochromatic features and silencing embryonic stem cell-specific marker genes, including Oct4 and Nanog. Depletion of Mbd3, on the other hand, improves reprogramming efficiency and facilitates the formation of pluripotent stem cells that are capable of generating viable chimeric mice, even in the absence of c-Myc or Sox2. The results establish Mbd3/NuRD as an important epigenetic regulator that restricts the expression of key pluripotency genes, suggesting that drug-induced downregulation of Mbd3/NuRD may be a powerful means to improve the efficiency and fidelity of reprogramming. Copyright © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  11. In vitro and in vivo differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into retina-like organs and comparison with that from mouse pluripotent epiblast stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hitomi; Hara, Akira; Niwa, Masayuki; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2009-09-01

    Correctly inducing the differentiation of pluripotent hESCs to a specific lineage with high purity is highly desirable for regenerative cell therapy. Our first effort to perform in vitro differentiation of hESCs resulted in a limited recapitulation of the ocular tissue structures. When undifferentiated hESCs were placed in vivo into the ocular tissue, in this case into the vitreous cavity, 3-dimensional retina-like structures reminiscent of the invagination of the optic vesicle were generated. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the presence of both a neural retina-like cell layer and a retinal pigmented epithelium-like cell layer, possibly equivalent to the developing E12.5 mouse retina. Furthermore, mouse epiblast-derived stem cells, which are reported to share some characteristics with hESCs, but not with mouse ESCs, also generated retinal anlage-like structures in vivo. hESC-derived retina-like structures present a novel therapeutic possibility for retinal diseases and also provide a novel experimental system to study early human eye development. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Biomedical Application of Dental Tissue-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hwan Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The academic researches and clinical applications in recent years found interest in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs- based regenerative medicine due to their pluripotency able to differentiate into any cell types in the body without using embryo. However, it is limited in generating iPSCs from adult somatic cells and use of these cells due to the low stem cell potency and donor site morbidity. In biomedical applications, particularly, dental tissue-derived iPSCs have been getting attention as a type of alternative sources for regenerating damaged tissues due to high potential of stem cell characteristics, easy accessibility and attainment, and their ectomesenchymal origin, which allow them to have potential for nerve, vessel, and dental tissue regeneration. This paper will cover the overview of dental tissue-derived iPSCs and their application with their advantages and drawbacks.

  13. Biomedical Application of Dental Tissue-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Seo, Seog-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The academic researches and clinical applications in recent years found interest in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs-) based regenerative medicine due to their pluripotency able to differentiate into any cell types in the body without using embryo. However, it is limited in generating iPSCs from adult somatic cells and use of these cells due to the low stem cell potency and donor site morbidity. In biomedical applications, particularly, dental tissue-derived iPSCs have been getting attention as a type of alternative sources for regenerating damaged tissues due to high potential of stem cell characteristics, easy accessibility and attainment, and their ectomesenchymal origin, which allow them to have potential for nerve, vessel, and dental tissue regeneration. This paper will cover the overview of dental tissue-derived iPSCs and their application with their advantages and drawbacks.

  14. Expression pattern of the human ABC transporters in pluripotent embryonic stem cells and in their derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Zsuzsa; Lőrincz, Réka; Szebényi, Kornélia; Péntek, Adrienn; Varga, Nóra; Likó, István; Várady, György; Szakács, Gergely; Orbán, Tamás I; Sarkadi, Balázs; Apáti, Agota

    2014-09-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have key roles in various physiological functions as well as providing chemical defense and stress tolerance in human tissues. In this study, we have examined the expression pattern of all ABC proteins in pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and in their differentiated progenies. We paid special attention to the cellular expression and localization of multidrug transporter ABC proteins. Stem cell differentiation was carried out without chemical induction or cell sorting, and specialized cell types were separated mechanically. Cellular features regarding pluripotency and tissue identity, as well as ABC transporter expression were studied by flow cytomtery, immuno-microscopy, and qPCR-based low-density arrays. Pluripotent hESCs and differentiated cell types (cardiomyocytes, neuronal cells, and mesenchymal stem cells) were distinguished by morphology, immunostaining markers, and selected mRNA expression patterns. We found that the mRNA expression levels of the 48 human ABC proteins also clearly distinguished the pluripotent and the respective differentiated cell types. When multidrug and lipid transporter ABC protein expression was examined by using well characterized specific antibodies by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, the protein expression data corresponded well to the mRNA expression results. Moreover, the cellular localization of these important human ABC transporter proteins could be established in the pluripotent and differentiated hESC derived samples. These studies provide valuable information regarding ABC protein expression in human stem cells and their differentiated offspring. The results may also help to obtain further information concerning the specialized cellular functions of selected ABC transporters. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  15. Complicity in stem cell research: the case of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devolder, Katrien

    2010-09-01

    Many who object to human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research because they believe it involves complicity in embryo destruction have welcomed induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) research as an ethical alternative. This opinion article aims to show that complicity arguments against hESC research are prima facie inconsistent with accepting iPSC research as it is currently done. Those who oppose hESC research on grounds of complicity should either (i) oppose iPSC research as well, (ii) advocate a radical change in the way iPSC research is done, (iii) demonstrate that complicity arguments against iPSC research are weaker than those against hESC research or (iv) reject complicity arguments against both hESC and iPSC research, either by adopting a more limited conception of complicity that allows acceptance of some hESC research, or by accepting that destroying embryos for important scientific research is not wrong.

  16. SON connects the splicing-regulatory network with pluripotency in human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinyi; Göke, Jonathan; Sachs, Friedrich; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Liang, Hongqing; Feng, Bo; Bourque, Guillaume; Bubulya, Paula A; Ng, Huck-Hui

    2013-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) harbour the ability to undergo lineage-specific differentiation into clinically relevant cell types. Transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers are known to play important roles in the maintenance of pluripotency of hESCs. However, little is known about regulation of pluripotency through splicing. In this study, we identify the spliceosome-associated factor SON as a factor essential for the maintenance of hESCs. Depletion of SON in hESCs results in the loss of pluripotency and cell death. Using genome-wide RNA profiling, we identified transcripts that are regulated by SON. Importantly, we confirmed that SON regulates the proper splicing of transcripts encoding for pluripotency regulators such as OCT4, PRDM14, E4F1 and MED24. Furthermore, we show that SON is bound to these transcripts in vivo. In summary, we connect a splicing-regulatory network for accurate transcript production to the maintenance of pluripotency and self-renewal of hESCs.

  17. Endogenous Fluorescence Signatures in Living Pluripotent Stem Cells Change with Loss of Potency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squirrell, Jayne M.; Fong, Jimmy J.; Ariza, Carlos A.; Mael, Amber; Meyer, Kassondra; Shevde, Nirupama K.; Roopra, Avtar; Lyons, Gary E.; Kamp, Timothy J.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of stem cells is limited by the non-uniformity of their phenotypic state. Thus it would be advantageous to noninvasively monitor stem cell status. Driven by this challenge, we employed multidimensional multiphoton microscopy to quantify changes in endogenous fluorescence occurring with pluripotent stem cell differentiation. We found that global and cellular-scale fluorescence lifetime of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and murine embryonic stem cells (mESC) consistently decreased with differentiation. Less consistent were trends in endogenous fluorescence intensity with differentiation, suggesting intensity is more readily impacted by nuances of species and scale of analysis. What emerges is a practical and accessible approach to evaluate, and ultimately enrich, living stem cell populations based on changes in metabolism that could be exploited for both research and clinical applications. PMID:22952742

  18. Motor neuron derivation from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells: experimental approaches and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faravelli, Irene; Bucchia, Monica; Rinchetti, Paola; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Frattini, Emanuele; Corti, Stefania

    2014-07-14

    Motor neurons are cells located in specific areas of the central nervous system, such as brain cortex (upper motor neurons), brain stem, and spinal cord (lower motor neurons), which maintain control over voluntary actions. Motor neurons are affected primarily by a wide spectrum of neurological disorders, generally indicated as motor neuron diseases (MNDs): these disorders share symptoms related to muscular atrophy and paralysis leading to death. No effective treatments are currently available. Stem cell-derived motor neurons represent a promising research tool in disease modeling, drug screening, and development of therapeutic approaches for MNDs and spinal cord injuries. Directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells - human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) - toward specific lineages is the first crucial step in order to extensively employ these cells in early human development investigation and potential clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be generated from patients' own somatic cells (for example, fibroblasts) by reprogramming them with specific factors. They can be considered embryonic stem cell-like cells, which express stem cell markers and have the ability to give rise to all three germ layers, bypassing the ethical concerns. Thus, hiPSCs constitute an appealing alternative source of motor neurons. These motor neurons might be a great research tool, creating a model for investigating the cellular and molecular interactions underlying early human brain development and pathologies during neurodegeneration. Patient-specific iPSCs may also provide the premises for autologous cell replacement therapies without related risks of immune rejection. Here, we review the most recent reported methods by which hESCs or iPSCs can be differentiated toward functional motor neurons with an overview on the potential clinical applications.

  19. A defined and xeno-free culture method enabling the establishment of clinical-grade human embryonic, induced pluripotent and adipose stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiina Rajala

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The growth of stem cells in in vitro conditions requires optimal balance between signals mediating cell survival, proliferation, and self-renewal. For clinical application of stem cells, the use of completely defined conditions and elimination of all animal-derived materials from the establishment, culture, and differentiation processes is desirable.Here, we report the development of a fully defined xeno-free medium (RegES, capable of supporting the expansion of human embryonic stem cells (hESC, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC and adipose stem cells (ASC. We describe the use of the xeno-free medium in the derivation and long-term (>80 passages culture of three pluripotent karyotypically normal hESC lines: Regea 06/015, Regea 07/046, and Regea 08/013. Cardiomyocytes and neural cells differentiated from these cells exhibit features characteristic to these cell types. The same formulation of the xeno-free medium is capable of supporting the undifferentiated growth of iPSCs on human feeder cells. The characteristics of the pluripotent hESC and iPSC lines are comparable to lines derived and cultured in standard undefined culture conditions. In the culture of ASCs, the xeno-free medium provided significantly higher proliferation rates than ASCs cultured in medium containing allogeneic human serum (HS, while maintaining the differentiation potential and characteristic surface marker expression profile of ASCs, although significant differences in the surface marker expression of ASCs cultured in HS and RegES media were revealed.Our results demonstrate that human ESCs, iPSCs and ASCs can be maintained in the same defined xeno-free medium formulation for a prolonged period of time while maintaining their characteristics, demonstrating the applicability of the simplified xeno-free medium formulation for the production of clinical-grade stem cells. The basic xeno-free formulation described herein has the potential to be further optimized for specific

  20. Reconstitution of mouse oogenesis in a dish from pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Hikabe, Orie; Obata, Yayoi; Hirao, Yuji

    2017-09-01

    This protocol is an extension to: Nat. Protoc. 8, 1513-1524 (2013); doi: 10.1038/nprot.2013.090; published online 11 July 2013Generation of functional oocytes in culture from pluripotent stem cells should provide a useful model system for improving our understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying oogenesis. In addition, it has potential applications as an alternative source of oocytes for reproduction. Using the most advanced mouse model in regard to reproductive engineering and stem cell biology, we previously developed a culture method that produces functional primorial germ cells starting from pluripotent cells in culture and described it in a previous protocol. This Protocol Extension describes an adaptation of this existing Protocol in which oogenesis also occurs in vitro, thus substantially modifying the technique. Oocytes generated from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells give rise to healthy pups. Here, we describe the protocol for oocyte generation in culture. The protocol is mainly composed of three different culture stages: in vitro differentiation (IVDi), in vitro growth (IVG), and in vitro maturation (IVM), which in total take ∼5 weeks. In each culture period, there are several checkpoints that enable the number of oocytes being produced in the culture to be monitored. The basic structure of the culture system should provide a useful tool for clarifying the complicated sequence of oogenesis in mammals.

  1. Gene targeting in human-induced pluripotent stem cells with adenoviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Kohnosuke

    2014-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAdV), which is also called gutless AdV, has been used to deliver donor DNA for gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells. Surprisingly, the targeting efficacies, both per chromosomal integration (drug-resistant colony) and per treated cells, are much higher than those by standard electroporation and equivalent to those by utilizing artificial nucleases, such as TAL effector nucleases (Aizawa et al., Mol Ther 20:424-431, 2012; Suzuki, Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:13781-13786, 2008). Importantly, gene targeting with HDAdVs was equally efficient in transcriptionally inactive loci in human ES/iPS cells. Therefore, multiple gene-targeted clones can be obtained from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) cultured in one 100-mm dish. For virus-mediated gene targeting, it is not required to introduce artificial double-strand breaks. By using electroporation for gene targeting, target cells should be expanded to 10⁶-10⁷ cells. In contrast, as an advantage of virus-mediated method, DNA delivery efficiency is high even in a smaller number of cells, resulting in minimizing the number of passages/cell divisions before performing gene targeting. The characteristics suggest that HDAdV-mediated gene targeting has potential advantages for manipulation of chromosomes of pluripotent stem cells for therapeutic applications.

  2. Physical passaging of embryoid bodies generated from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Young Son

    Full Text Available Spherical three-dimensional cell aggregates called embryoid bodies (EBs, have been widely used in in vitro differentiation protocols for human pluripotent stem cells including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs. Recent studies highlight the new devices and techniques for hEB formation and expansion, but are not involved in the passaging or subculture process. Here, we provide evidence that a simple periodic passaging markedly improved hEB culture condition and thus allowed the size-controlled, mass production of human embryoid bodies (hEBs derived from both hESCs and hiPSCs. hEBs maintained in prolonged suspension culture without passaging (>2 weeks showed a progressive decrease in the cell growth and proliferation and increase in the apoptosis compared to 7-day-old hEBs. However, when serially passaged in suspension, hEB cell populations were significantly increased in number while maintaining the normal rates of cell proliferation and apoptosis and the differentiation potential. Uniform-sized hEBs produced by manual passaging using a 1∶4 split ratio have been successfully maintained for over 20 continuous passages. The passaging culture method of hEBs, which is simple, readily expandable, and reproducible, could be a powerful tool for improving a robust and scalable in vitro differentiation system of human pluripotent stem cells.

  3. A novel antibody for human induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells recognizes a type of keratan sulfate lacking oversulfated structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Keiko; Tateyama, Daiki; Toyoda, Hidenao; Kawasaki, Nana; Hashii, Noritaka; Nakao, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Shogo; Nonaka, Motohiro; Matsumura, Hiroko; Hirose, Yoshinori; Morita, Ayaha; Katayama, Madoka; Sakuma, Makoto; Kawasaki, Nobuko; Furue, Miho Kusuda; Kawasaki, Toshisuke

    2013-03-01

    We have generated a monoclonal antibody (R-10G) specific to human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS)/embryonic stem (hES) cells by using hiPS cells (Tic) as an antigen, followed by differential screening of mouse hybridomas with hiPS and human embryonal carcinoma (hEC) cells. Upon western blotting with R-10G, hiPS/ES cell lysates gave a single but an unusually diffuse band at a position corresponding to >250 kDa. The antigen protein was isolated from the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lysates with an affinity column of R-10G. The R-10G positive band was resistant to digestion with peptide N-glycanase F (PNGase F), neuraminidase, fucosidase, chondrotinase ABC and heparinase mix, but it disappeared almost completely on digestion with keratanase, keratanase II and endo-β-galactosidase, indicating that the R-10G epitope is a keratan sulfate. The carrier protein of the R-10G epitope was identified as podocalyxin by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis of the R-10G positive-protein band material obtained on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The R-10G epitope is a type of keratan sulfate with some unique properties. (1) The epitope is expressed only on hiPS/ES cells, i.e. not on hEC cells, unlike those recognized by the conventional hiPS/ES marker antibodies. (2) The epitope is a type of keratan sulfate lacking oversulfated structures and is not immunologically cross-reactive with high-sulfated keratan sulfate. (3) The R-10G epitope is distributed heterogeneously on hiPS cells, suggesting that a single colony of undifferentiated hiPS cells consists of different cell subtypes. Thus, R-10G is a novel antibody recognizing hiPS/ES cells, and should be a new molecular probe for disclosing the roles of glycans on these cells.

  4. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from the pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    The value of stem cells has become increasingly evident in recent years with the advent of genetic engineering tools that allow site-specific modifications to the genome. The use of stem cells to induce modifications has several potential benefits for the livestock industry including improving anim...

  5. Directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells into chondrogenic lineages for articular cartilage treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Lach

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, increases in the number of articular cartilage injuries caused by environmental factors or pathological conditions have led to a notable rise in the incidence of premature osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis, considered a disease of civilization, is the leading cause of disability. At present, standard methods for treating damaged articular cartilage, including autologous chondrocyte implantation or microfracture, are short-term solutions with important side effects. Emerging treatments include the use of induced pluripotent stem cells, a technique that could provide a new tool for treatment of joint damage. However, research in this area is still early, and no optimal protocol for transforming induced pluripotent stem cells into chondrocytes has yet been established. Developments in our understanding of cartilage developmental biology, together with the use of modern technologies in the field of tissue engineering, provide an opportunity to create a complete functional model of articular cartilage.

  6. A Standard Nomenclature for Referencing and Authentication of Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Andreas; Seltmann, Stefanie; Bairoch, Amos; Bittner, Marie-Sophie; Bruce, Kevin; Capes-Davis, Amanda; Clarke, Laura; Crook, Jeremy M; Daheron, Laurence; Dewender, Johannes; Faulconbridge, Adam; Fujibuchi, Wataru; Gutteridge, Alexander; Hei, Derek J; Kim, Yong-Ou; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kokocinski, Anja Kolb-; Lekschas, Fritz; Lomax, Geoffrey P; Loring, Jeanne F; Ludwig, Tenneille; Mah, Nancy; Matsui, Tohru; Müller, Robert; Parkinson, Helen; Sheldon, Michael; Smith, Kelly; Stachelscheid, Harald; Stacey, Glyn; Streeter, Ian; Veiga, Anna; Xu, Ren-He

    2018-01-09

    Unambiguous cell line authentication is essential to avoid loss of association between data and cells. The risk for loss of references increases with the rapidity that new human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) lines are generated, exchanged, and implemented. Ideally, a single name should be used as a generally applied reference for each cell line to access and unify cell-related information across publications, cell banks, cell registries, and databases and to ensure scientific reproducibility. We discuss the needs and requirements for such a unique identifier and implement a standard nomenclature for hPSCs, which can be automatically generated and registered by the human pluripotent stem cell registry (hPSCreg). To avoid ambiguities in PSC-line referencing, we strongly urge publishers to demand registration and use of the standard name when publishing research based on hPSC lines. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Induced pluripotent stem cell: A headway in reprogramming with promising approach in regenerative biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, N; Singh, M K

    2017-06-01

    Since the embryonic stem cells have knocked the doorsteps, they have proved themselves in the field of science, research, and medicines, but the hovered restrictions confine their application in human welfare. Alternate approaches used to reprogram the cells to the pluripotent state were not up to par, but the innovation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) paved a new hope for the researchers. Soon after the discovery, iPSCs technology is undergoing renaissance day by day, i.e., from the use of genetic material to recombinant proteins and now only chemicals are employed to convert somatic cells to iPSCs. Thus, this technique is moving straightforward and productive at an astonishing pace. Here, we provide a brief introduction to iPSCs, the mechanism and methods for their generation, their prevailing and prospective applications and the future opportunities that can be expected from them.

  8. Induced pluripotent stem cell: A headway in reprogramming with promising approach in regenerative biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Rawat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the embryonic stem cells have knocked the doorsteps, they have proved themselves in the field of science, research, and medicines, but the hovered restrictions confine their application in human welfare. Alternate approaches used to reprogram the cells to the pluripotent state were not up to par, but the innovation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs paved a new hope for the researchers. Soon after the discovery, iPSCs technology is undergoing renaissance day by day, i.e., from the use of genetic material to recombinant proteins and now only chemicals are employed to convert somatic cells to iPSCs. Thus, this technique is moving straightforward and productive at an astonishing pace. Here, we provide a brief introduction to iPSCs, the mechanism and methods for their generation, their prevailing and prospective applications and the future opportunities that can be expected from them.

  9. A Standard Nomenclature for Referencing and Authentication of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kurtz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Unambiguous cell line authentication is essential to avoid loss of association between data and cells. The risk for loss of references increases with the rapidity that new human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC lines are generated, exchanged, and implemented. Ideally, a single name should be used as a generally applied reference for each cell line to access and unify cell-related information across publications, cell banks, cell registries, and databases and to ensure scientific reproducibility. We discuss the needs and requirements for such a unique identifier and implement a standard nomenclature for hPSCs, which can be automatically generated and registered by the human pluripotent stem cell registry (hPSCreg. To avoid ambiguities in PSC-line referencing, we strongly urge publishers to demand registration and use of the standard name when publishing research based on hPSC lines.

  10. Recombinase-Mediated Reprogramming and Dystrophin Gene Addition in mdx Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Chunli; Farruggio, Alfonso P.; Bjornson, Christopher R. R.; Chavez, Christopher L.; Geisinger, Jonathan M.; Neal, Tawny L.; Karow, Marisa; Calos, Michele P.

    2014-01-01

    A cell therapy strategy utilizing genetically-corrected induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) may be an attractive approach for genetic disorders such as muscular dystrophies. Methods for genetic engineering of iPSC that emphasize precision and minimize random integration would be beneficial. We demonstrate here an approach in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy that focuses on the use of site-specific recombinases to achieve genetic engineering. We employed non-viral, plasmid-...

  11. Generation and Characterization of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Patients with mtDNA Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämäläinen, Riikka H; Suomalainen, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from patient cells has revolutionized disease modeling in recent years. One research area, where disease models have previously been scarce, is disorders with mutations in mitochondrial DNA. These are a common cause for human disease and often cause very tissue specific phenotypes with vast clinical heterogeneity. iPS technology has now opened up new possibilities for mechanistic studies of these diseases.

  12. Generation of Footprint-Free Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Human Fibroblasts Using Episomal Plasmid Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Sun, Jane; Wolvetang, Ernst J

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have provided novel insights into the etiology of disease and are set to transform regenerative medicine and drug screening over the next decade. The generation of human iPSCs free of a genetic footprint of the reprogramming process is crucial for the realization of these potential uses. Here we describe in detail the generation of human iPSC from control and disease-carrying individuals' fibroblasts using episomal plasmids.

  13. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Model for Accelerated Patient- and Disease-specific Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Gunaseeli, I.; Doss, M.X.; Antzelevitch, C.; Hescheler, J.; Sachinidis, A.

    2010-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells hold great promise for therapy of a number of degenerative diseases such as ischemic heart failure, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes mellitus, sickle cell anemia and Huntington disease. They also have the potential to accelerate drug discovery in 3 ways. The first involves the delineation of chemical components for efficient reprogramming of patient’s blood cells or cells from biopsies, obviating the need for cellular delivery of re...

  14. The openness of pluripotent epigenome - Defining the genomic integrity of stemness for regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejun H Parsons

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is an editorial, and it doesn't include an abstract. Full text of this article is available in HTML and PDF.Cite this article as: Parsons XH. The openness of pluripotent epigenome - Defining the genomic Integrity of stemness for regenerative medicine. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(1:020114.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0201.14

  15. Generation of disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaecheol; Kim, Youngkyun; Yi, Hyoju; Diecke, Sebastian; Kim, Juryun; Jung, Hyerin; Rim, Yeri Alice; Jung, Seung Min; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yong Goo; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2014-02-04

    Since the concept of reprogramming mature somatic cells to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) was demonstrated in 2006, iPSCs have become a potential substitute for embryonic stem cells (ESCs) given their pluripotency and "stemness" characteristics, which resemble those of ESCs. We investigated to reprogram fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) to generate iPSCs using a 4-in-1 lentiviral vector system. A 4-in-1 lentiviral vector containing Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc was transduced into RA and OA FLSs isolated from the synovia of two RA patients and two OA patients. Immunohistochemical staining and real-time PCR studies were performed to demonstrate the pluripotency of iPSCs. Chromosomal abnormalities were determined based on the karyotype. SCID-beige mice were injected with iPSCs and sacrificed to test for teratoma formation. After 14 days of transduction using the 4-in-1 lentiviral vector, RA FLSs and OA FLSs were transformed into spherical shapes that resembled embryonic stem cell colonies. Colonies were picked and cultivated on matrigel plates to produce iPSC lines. Real-time PCR of RA and OA iPSCs detected positive markers of pluripotency. Immunohistochemical staining tests with Nanog, Oct4, Sox2, Tra-1-80, Tra-1-60, and SSEA-4 were also positive. Teratomas that comprised three compartments of ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm were formed at the injection sites of iPSCs. Established iPSCs were shown to be compatible by karyotyping. Finally, we confirmed that the patient-derived iPSCs were able to differentiate into osteoblast, which was shown by an osteoimage mineralization assay. FLSs derived from RA and OA could be cell resources for iPSC reprogramming. Disease- and patient-specific iPSCs have the potential to be applied in clinical settings as source materials for molecular diagnosis and regenerative therapy.

  16. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Platform for Personalized and Precision Cardiovascular Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsa, Elena; Ahrens, John H; Wu, Joseph C

    2016-07-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have revolutionized the field of human disease modeling, with an enormous potential to serve as paradigm shifting platforms for preclinical trials, personalized clinical diagnosis, and drug treatment. In this review, we describe how hiPSCs could transition cardiac healthcare away from simple disease diagnosis to prediction and prevention, bridging the gap between basic and clinical research to bring the best science to every patient. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Study familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Lu; Li, Yang; Tchao, Jason; Kaplan, Aaron D.; Lin, Bo; Li, You; Mich-Basso, Jocelyn; Lis, Agnieszka; Hassan, Narmeen; London, Barry; Bett, Glenna C.L.; Tobita, Kimimasa; Rasmusson, Randall L.; Yang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Aims Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is one the most common heart disorders, with gene mutations in the cardiac sarcomere. Studying HCM with patient-specific induced pluripotent stem-cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) would benefit the understanding of HCM mechanism, as well as the development of personalized therapeutic strategies. Methods and results To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the abnormal CM functions in HCM, we derived iPSCs from an HCM patient with...

  18. Induced pluripotent stem cells show metabolomic differences to embryonic stem cells in polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines and primary metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Meissen

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells are different from embryonic stem cells as shown by epigenetic and genomics analyses. Depending on cell types and culture conditions, such genetic alterations can lead to different metabolic phenotypes which may impact replication rates, membrane properties and cell differentiation. We here applied a comprehensive metabolomics strategy incorporating nanoelectrospray ion trap mass spectrometry (MS, gas chromatography-time of flight MS, and hydrophilic interaction- and reversed phase-liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight MS to examine the metabolome of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs compared to parental fibroblasts as well as to reference embryonic stem cells (ESCs. With over 250 identified metabolites and a range of structurally unknown compounds, quantitative and statistical metabolome data were mapped onto a metabolite networks describing the metabolic state of iPSCs relative to other cell types. Overall iPSCs exhibited a striking shift metabolically away from parental fibroblasts and toward ESCs, suggestive of near complete metabolic reprogramming. Differences between pluripotent cell types were not observed in carbohydrate or hydroxyl acid metabolism, pentose phosphate pathway metabolites, or free fatty acids. However, significant differences between iPSCs and ESCs were evident in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine lipid structures, essential and non-essential amino acids, and metabolites involved in polyamine biosynthesis. Together our findings demonstrate that during cellular reprogramming, the metabolome of fibroblasts is also reprogrammed to take on an ESC-like profile, but there are select unique differences apparent in iPSCs. The identified metabolomics signatures of iPSCs and ESCs may have important implications for functional regulation of maintenance and induction of pluripotency.

  19. Induced pluripotent stem cells show metabolomic differences to embryonic stem cells in polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines and primary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissen, John K; Yuen, Benjamin T K; Kind, Tobias; Riggs, John W; Barupal, Dinesh K; Knoepfler, Paul S; Fiehn, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells are different from embryonic stem cells as shown by epigenetic and genomics analyses. Depending on cell types and culture conditions, such genetic alterations can lead to different metabolic phenotypes which may impact replication rates, membrane properties and cell differentiation. We here applied a comprehensive metabolomics strategy incorporating nanoelectrospray ion trap mass spectrometry (MS), gas chromatography-time of flight MS, and hydrophilic interaction- and reversed phase-liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight MS to examine the metabolome of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) compared to parental fibroblasts as well as to reference embryonic stem cells (ESCs). With over 250 identified metabolites and a range of structurally unknown compounds, quantitative and statistical metabolome data were mapped onto a metabolite networks describing the metabolic state of iPSCs relative to other cell types. Overall iPSCs exhibited a striking shift metabolically away from parental fibroblasts and toward ESCs, suggestive of near complete metabolic reprogramming. Differences between pluripotent cell types were not observed in carbohydrate or hydroxyl acid metabolism, pentose phosphate pathway metabolites, or free fatty acids. However, significant differences between iPSCs and ESCs were evident in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine lipid structures, essential and non-essential amino acids, and metabolites involved in polyamine biosynthesis. Together our findings demonstrate that during cellular reprogramming, the metabolome of fibroblasts is also reprogrammed to take on an ESC-like profile, but there are select unique differences apparent in iPSCs. The identified metabolomics signatures of iPSCs and ESCs may have important implications for functional regulation of maintenance and induction of pluripotency.

  20. Differentiation of murine embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells to renal lineage in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morizane, Ryuji; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells which have the unlimited proliferative capacity and extensive differentiation potency can be an attractive source for kidney regeneration therapies. Recent breakthroughs in the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have provided with another potential source for the artificially-generated kidney. The purpose of this study is to know how to differentiate mouse ES and iPS cells into renal lineage. We used iPS cells from mouse fibroblasts by transfection of four transcription factors, namely Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4. Real-time PCR showed that renal lineage markers were expressed in both ES and iPS cells after the induction of differentiation. It also showed that a tubular specific marker, KSP progressively increased to day 18, although the differentiation of iPS cells was slower than ES cells. The results indicated that renal lineage cells can be differentiated from both murine ES and iPS cells. Several inducing factors were tested whether they influenced on cell differentiation. In ES cells, both of GDNF and BMP7 enhanced the differentiation to metanephric mesenchyme, and Activin enhanced the differentiation of ES cells to tubular cells. Activin also enhanced the differentiation of iPS cells to tubular cells, although the enhancement was lower than in ES cells. ES and iPS cells have a potential to differentiate to renal lineage cells, and they will be an attractive resource of kidney regeneration therapy. This differentiation is enhanced by Activin in both ES and iPS cells.

  1. Differentiation of murine embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells to renal lineage in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morizane, Ryuji [Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Monkawa, Toshiaki, E-mail: monkawa@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Itoh, Hiroshi [Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-12-25

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells which have the unlimited proliferative capacity and extensive differentiation potency can be an attractive source for kidney regeneration therapies. Recent breakthroughs in the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have provided with another potential source for the artificially-generated kidney. The purpose of this study is to know how to differentiate mouse ES and iPS cells into renal lineage. We used iPS cells from mouse fibroblasts by transfection of four transcription factors, namely Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4. Real-time PCR showed that renal lineage markers were expressed in both ES and iPS cells after the induction of differentiation. It also showed that a tubular specific marker, KSP progressively increased to day 18, although the differentiation of iPS cells was slower than ES cells. The results indicated that renal lineage cells can be differentiated from both murine ES and iPS cells. Several inducing factors were tested whether they influenced on cell differentiation. In ES cells, both of GDNF and BMP7 enhanced the differentiation to metanephric mesenchyme, and Activin enhanced the differentiation of ES cells to tubular cells. Activin also enhanced the differentiation of iPS cells to tubular cells, although the enhancement was lower than in ES cells. ES and iPS cells have a potential to differentiate to renal lineage cells, and they will be an attractive resource of kidney regeneration therapy. This differentiation is enhanced by Activin in both ES and iPS cells.

  2. Alloimmune Responses of Humanized Mice to Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel G. Kooreman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in using embryonic stem cell (ESC and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC derivatives for tissue regeneration. However, an increased understanding of human immune responses to stem cell-derived allografts is necessary for maintaining long-term graft persistence. To model this alloimmunity, humanized mice engrafted with human hematopoietic and immune cells could prove to be useful. In this study, an in-depth analysis of graft-infiltrating human lymphocytes and splenocytes revealed that humanized mice incompletely model human immune responses toward allogeneic stem cells and their derivatives. Furthermore, using an “allogenized” mouse model, we show the feasibility of reconstituting immunodeficient mice with a functional mouse immune system and describe a key role of innate immune cells in the rejection of mouse stem cell allografts.

  3. Valproic acid assisted reprogramming of fibroblasts for generation of pluripotent stem cells in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Puspendra S; Singh, Renu; Kumar, Kuldeep; Sahoo, Nihar R; Agarwal, Pranjali; Mili, Bhabesh; Das, Kinsuk; Sarkar, Mihir; Bhanja, Subrat K; Das, Bikash C; Dhara, Sujoy K; Bag, Sadhan

    2017-01-01

    Generation of pluripotent stem cells by reprogramming somatic cells of quality animals has numerous potential applications in agricultural and biomedical sciences. Unfortunately, till now, reprogramming of buffalo fetal fibroblast cells (bFFs) has been very ineffient despite intensive efforts. Here, we attempted to enhance reprogramming efficiency by using the HDAC inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) in bFFs transfected with pLentG-KOSM pseudo virus carrying mouse specific pluripotent genes. FACS analysis revealed that VPA treatment significantly increased (p cells in comparison to VPA untreated control. Further, among different concentrations, 1.5 mM VPA was found to be optimal, increasing about 5 fold GFP + cells and 2.5-fold GFP+ colonies with significantly (P stem cell (ESC)-like morphology, normal karyotype, and were positive for alkaline phosphatase staining as well as immune-positive for the ESC specific markers Oct4, Nanog, SSEA1, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81. The primary colonies revealed significantly higher (P reprogrammed cells readily formed embryoid bodies in vitro and cells of all three germ layers. These results indicated that VPA treatment of viral transducted cells can improve the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells and help their long term maintenance in buffalo.

  4. Endocrine disruptors induce perturbations in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria of human pluripotent stem cell derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamani, Uthra; Gross, Andrew R; Ocampo, Camille; Andres, Allen M; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Sareen, Dhruv

    2017-08-09

    Persistent exposure to man-made endocrine disrupting chemicals during fetal endocrine development may lead to disruption of metabolic homeostasis contributing to childhood obesity. Limited cellular platforms exist to test endocrine disrupting chemical-induced developmental abnormalities in human endocrine tissues. Here we use an human-induced pluripotent stem cell-based platform to demonstrate adverse impacts of obesogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals in the developing endocrine system. We delineate the effects upon physiological low-dose exposure to ubiquitous endocrine disrupting chemicals including, perfluoro-octanoic acid, tributyltin, and butylhydroxytoluene, in endocrine-active human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived foregut epithelial cells and hypothalamic neurons. Endocrine disrupting chemicals induce endoplasmic reticulum stress, perturb NF-κB, and p53 signaling, and diminish mitochondrial respiratory gene expression, spare respiratory capacity, and ATP levels. As a result, normal production and secretion of appetite control hormones, PYY, α-MSH, and CART, are hampered. Blocking NF-κB rescues endocrine disrupting chemical-induced aberrant mitochondrial phenotypes and endocrine dysregulation, but not ER-stress and p53-phosphorylation changes.Harmful chemicals that disrupt the endocrine system and hormone regulation have been associated with obesity. Here the authors apply a human pluripotent stem cell-based platform to study the effects of such compounds on developing gut endocrine and neuroendocrine systems.

  5. A Comprehensive, Ethnically Diverse Library of Sickle Cell Disease-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonmi Park

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Sickle cell anemia affects millions of people worldwide and is an emerging global health burden. As part of a large NIH-funded NextGen Consortium, we generated a diverse, comprehensive, and fully characterized library of sickle-cell-disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from patients of different ethnicities, β-globin gene (HBB haplotypes, and fetal hemoglobin (HbF levels. iPSCs stand to revolutionize the way we study human development, model disease, and perhaps eventually, treat patients. Here, we describe this unique resource for the study of sickle cell disease, including novel haplotype-specific polymorphisms that affect disease severity, as well as for the development of patient-specific therapeutics for this phenotypically diverse disorder. As a complement to this library, and as proof of principle for future cell- and gene-based therapies, we also designed and employed CRISPR/Cas gene editing tools to correct the sickle hemoglobin (HbS mutation. : In this resource article, Mostoslavsky, Murphy, and colleagues of the NextGen consortium describe a diverse, comprehensive, and characterized library of sickle cell disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from patients of different ethnicities, β-globin gene (HBB haplotypes and fetal hemoglobin (HbF levels. This bank is readily available and accessible to all investigators. Keywords: induced pluripotent stem cells, iPSCs, sickle cell disease, disease modeling, directed differentiation, gene correction

  6. TRIM28 is an Epigenetic Barrier to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Denise Catherine; de Vries, Nienke Alexandra; Gisler, Santiago; Lieftink, Cor; Akhtar, Waseem; Gogola, Ewa; Pawlitzky, Inka; Hulsman, Danielle; Tanger, Ellen; Koppens, Martijn; Beijersbergen, Roderick Leonardus; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells there has been intense interest in understanding the mechanisms that allow a somatic cell to be reprogrammed back to a pluripotent state. Several groups have studied the alterations in gene expression that occur as somatic cells modify their genome to that of an embryonic stem cell. Underpinning many of the gene expression changes are modifications to the epigenetic profile of the associated chromatin. We have used a large-scale shRNA screen to identify epigenetic modifiers that act as barriers to reprogramming. We have uncovered an important role for TRIM28 in cells resisting transition between somatic and pluripotent states. TRIM28 achieves this by maintaining the H3K9me3 repressed state and keeping endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) silenced. We propose that knockdown of TRIM28 during reprogramming results in more plastic H3K9me3 domains, dysregulation of genes nearby H3K9me3 marks, and up regulation of ERVs, thus facilitating the transition through reprogramming. Stem Cells 2017;35:147-157. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  7. Myocardial commitment from human pluripotent stem cells: Rapid production of human heart grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garreta, Elena; de Oñate, Lorena; Fernández-Santos, M Eugenia; Oria, Roger; Tarantino, Carolina; Climent, Andreu M; Marco, Andrés; Samitier, Mireia; Martínez, Elena; Valls-Margarit, Maria; Matesanz, Rafael; Taylor, Doris A; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Montserrat, Nuria

    2016-08-01

    Genome editing on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) together with the development of protocols for organ decellularization opens the door to the generation of autologous bioartificial hearts. Here we sought to generate for the first time a fluorescent reporter human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line by means of Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to efficiently produce cardiomyocyte-like cells (CLCs) from hPSCs and repopulate decellularized human heart ventricles for heart engineering. In our hands, targeting myosin heavy chain locus (MYH6) with mCherry fluorescent reporter by TALEN technology in hESCs did not alter major pluripotent-related features, and allowed for the definition of a robust protocol for CLCs production also from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) in 14 days. hPSCs-derived CLCs (hPSCs-CLCs) were next used to recellularize acellular cardiac scaffolds. Electrophysiological responses encountered when hPSCs-CLCs were cultured on ventricular decellularized extracellular matrix (vdECM) correlated with significant increases in the levels of expression of different ion channels determinant for calcium homeostasis and heart contractile function. Overall, the approach described here allows for the rapid generation of human cardiac grafts from hPSCs, in a total of 24 days, providing a suitable platform for cardiac engineering and disease modeling in the human setting. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling Inborn Errors of Hepatic Metabolism Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pournasr, Behshad; Duncan, Stephen A

    2017-11-01

    Inborn errors of hepatic metabolism are because of deficiencies commonly within a single enzyme as a consequence of heritable mutations in the genome. Individually such diseases are rare, but collectively they are common. Advances in genome-wide association studies and DNA sequencing have helped researchers identify the underlying genetic basis of such diseases. Unfortunately, cellular and animal models that accurately recapitulate these inborn errors of hepatic metabolism in the laboratory have been lacking. Recently, investigators have exploited molecular techniques to generate induced pluripotent stem cells from patients' somatic cells. Induced pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into a wide variety of cell types, including hepatocytes, thereby offering an innovative approach to unravel the mechanisms underlying inborn errors of hepatic metabolism. Moreover, such cell models could potentially provide a platform for the discovery of therapeutics. In this mini-review, we present a brief overview of the state-of-the-art in using pluripotent stem cells for such studies. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line from chorionic villi of a Turner syndrome spontaneous abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Shagufta; Panicker, M M; Gupta, Pawan Kumar

    2017-03-01

    A major cause of spontaneous abortions is chromosomal abnormality of foetal cells. We report the generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line from the fibroblasts isolated from chorionic villi of an early spontaneously aborted foetus with Turner syndrome. The Turner syndrome villus induced pluripotent stem cell line is transgene free, retains the original XO karyotype, expresses pluripotency markers and undergoes trilineage differentiation. This pluripotent stem cell model of Turner syndrome should serve as a tool to study the developmental abnormalities of foetus and placenta that lead to early embryo lethality and profound symptoms like infertility in 45 XO survivors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Pluri-IQ: Quantification of Embryonic Stem Cell Pluripotency through an Image-Based Analysis Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Perestrelo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Image-based assays, such as alkaline phosphatase staining or immunocytochemistry for pluripotent markers, are common methods used in the stem cell field to assess pluripotency. Although an increased number of image-analysis approaches have been described, there is still a lack of software availability to automatically quantify pluripotency in large images after pluripotency staining. To address this need, we developed a robust and rapid image processing software, Pluri-IQ, which allows the automatic evaluation of pluripotency in large low-magnification images. Using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC as a model, we combined an automated segmentation algorithm with a supervised machine-learning platform to classify colonies as pluripotent, mixed, or differentiated. In addition, Pluri-IQ allows the automatic comparison between different culture conditions. This efficient user-friendly open-source software can be easily implemented in images derived from pluripotent cells or cells that express pluripotent markers (e.g., OCT4-GFP and can be routinely used, decreasing image assessment bias.

  11. Current status of treating neurodegenerative disease with induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pen, A E; Jensen, U B

    2017-01-01

    Degenerative diseases of the brain have proven challenging to treat, let alone cure. One of the treatment options is the use of stem cell therapy, which has been under investigation for several years. However, treatment with stem cells comes with a number of drawbacks, for instance the source of these cells. Currently, a number of options are tested to produce stem cells, although the main issues of quantity and ethics remain for most of them. Over recent years, the potential of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has been widely investigated and these cells seem promising for production of numerous different tissues both in vitro and in vivo. One of the major advantages of iPSCs is that they can be made autologous and can provide a sufficient quantity of cells by culturing, making the use of other stem cell sources unnecessary. As the first descriptions of iPSC production with the transcription factors Sox2, Klf4, Oct4 and C-Myc, called the Yamanaka factors, a variety of methods has been developed to convert somatic cells from all germ layers to pluripotent stem cells. Improvement of these methods is necessary to increase the efficiency of reprogramming, the quality of pluripotency and the safety of these cells before use in human trials. This review focusses on the current accomplishments and remaining challenges in the production and use of iPSCs for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases of the brain such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Telomere Elongation and Naive Pluripotent Stem Cells Achieved from Telomerase Haplo-Insufficient Cells by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ying Sung

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Haplo-insufficiency of telomerase genes in humans leads to telomere syndromes such as dyskeratosis congenital and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Generation of pluripotent stem cells from telomerase haplo-insufficient donor cells would provide unique opportunities toward the realization of patient-specific stem cell therapies. Recently, pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (ntESCs have been efficiently achieved by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT. We tested the hypothesis that SCNT could effectively elongate shortening telomeres of telomerase haplo-insufficient cells in the ntESCs with relevant mouse models. Indeed, telomeres of telomerase haplo-insufficient (Terc+/− mouse cells are elongated in ntESCs. Moreover, ntESCs derived from Terc+/− cells exhibit naive pluripotency as evidenced by generation of Terc+/− ntESC clone pups by tetraploid embryo complementation, the most stringent test of naive pluripotency. These data suggest that SCNT could offer a powerful tool to reprogram telomeres and to discover the factors for robust restoration of telomeres and pluripotency of telomerase haplo-insufficient somatic cells. : Sung et al. demonstrate in a mouse model that telomeres of telomerase haplo-insufficient cells can be elongated by somatic cell nuclear transfer. Moreover, ntESCs derived from Terc+/− cells exhibit pluripotency evidenced by generation of Terc+/−ntESC clone pups by tetraploid embryo complementation, the most stringent test of naive pluripotency.

  13. Hematopoietic specification from human pluripotent stem cells: current advances and challenges toward de novo generation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slukvin, Igor I

    2013-12-12

    Significant advances in cellular reprogramming technologies and hematopoietic differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have already enabled the routine production of multiple lineages of blood cells in vitro and opened novel opportunities to study hematopoietic development, model genetic blood diseases, and manufacture immunologically matched cells for transfusion and cancer immunotherapy. However, the generation of hematopoietic cells with robust and sustained multilineage engraftment has not been achieved. Here, we highlight the recent advances in understanding the molecular and cellular pathways leading to blood development from hPSCs and discuss potential approaches that can be taken to facilitate the development of technologies for de novo production of hematopoietic stem cells.

  14. Incorporation of Biomaterials in Multicellular Aggregates Modulates Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt-Leal, Andrés M.; Carpenedo, Richard L.; Ungrin, Mark; Zandstra, Peter W.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials are increasingly being used to engineer the biochemical and biophysical properties of the extracellular stem cell microenvironment in order to tailor niche characteristics and direct cell phenotype. To date, stem cell-biomaterial interactions have largely been studied by introducing stem cells into artificial environments, such as 2D cell culture on biomaterial surfaces, encapsulation of cell suspensions within hydrogel materials, or cell seeding on 3D polymeric scaffolds. In this study, microparticles fabricated from different materials, such as agarose, PLGA and gelatin, were stably integrated, in a dose-dependent manner, within aggregates of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) prior to differentiation as a means to directly examine stem cell-biomaterial interactions in 3D. Interestingly, the presence of the materials within the stem cell aggregates differentially modulated the gene and protein expression patterns of several differentiation markers without adversely affecting cell viability. Microparticle incorporation within 3D stem cell aggregates can control the spatial presentation of extracellular environmental cues (i.e. soluble factors, extracellular matrix and intercellular adhesion molecules) as a means to direct the differentiation of stem cells for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. In addition, these results suggest that the physical presence of microparticles within stem cell aggregates does not compromise PSC differentiation, but in fact the choice of biomaterials can impact the propensity of stem cells to adopt particular differentiated cell phenotypes. PMID:20864164

  15. A DNMT3B alternatively spliced exon and encoded peptide are novel biomarkers of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailesh Gopalakrishna-Pillai

    Full Text Available A major obstacle in human stem cell research is the limited number of reagents capable of distinguishing pluripotent stem cells from partially differentiated or incompletely reprogrammed derivatives. Although human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs express numerous alternatively spliced transcripts, little attention has been directed at developing splice variant-encoded protein isoforms as reagents for stem cell research. In this study, several genes encoding proteins involved in important signaling pathways were screened to detect alternatively spliced transcripts that exhibited differential expression in pluripotent stem cells (PSCs relative to spontaneously differentiated cells (SDCs. Transcripts containing the alternatively spliced exon 10 of the de novo DNA methyltransferase gene, DNMT3B, were identified that are expressed in PSCs. To demonstrate the utility and superiority of splice variant specific reagents for stem cell research, a peptide encoded by DNMT3B exon 10 was used to generate an antibody, SG1. The SG1 antibody detects a single DNMT3B protein isoform that is expressed only in PSCs but not in SDCs. The SG1 antibody is also demonstrably superior to other antibodies at distinguishing PSCs from SDCs in mixed cultures containing both pluripotent stem cells and partially differentiated derivatives. The tightly controlled down regulation of DNMT3B exon 10 containing transcripts (and exon 10 encoded peptide upon spontaneous differentiation of PSCs suggests that this DNMT3B splice isoform is characteristic of the pluripotent state. Alternatively spliced exons, and the proteins they encode, represent a vast untapped reservoir of novel biomarkers that can be used to develop superior reagents for stem cell research and to gain further insight into mechanisms controlling stem cell pluripotency.

  16. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from osteoarthritis patient-derived synovial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Son, Myung Jin; Son, Mi-Young; Seol, Binna; Kim, Janghwan; Park, Jongjin; Kim, Jung Hwa; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Su A; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Kang-Sik; Han, Yong-Mahn; Chang, Jae-Suk; Cho, Yee Sook

    2011-10-01

    This study was undertaken to generate and characterize human induced pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and to examine whether these cells can be developed into disease-relevant cell types for use in disease modeling and drug discovery. Human synovial cells isolated from two 71-year-old women with advanced OA were characterized and reprogrammed into induced PSCs by ectopic expression of 4 transcription factors (Oct-4, SOX2, Klf4, and c-Myc). The pluripotency status of each induced PSC line was validated by comparison with human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We found that OA patient-derived human synovial cells had human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like characteristics, as indicated by the expression of specific markers, including CD14-, CD19-, CD34-, CD45-, CD44+, CD51+, CD90+, CD105+, and CD147+. Microarray analysis of human MSCs and human synovial cells further determined their unique and overlapping gene expression patterns. The pluripotency of established human induced PSCs was confirmed by their human ESC-like morphology, expression of pluripotency markers, gene expression profiles, epigenetic status, normal karyotype, and in vitro and in vivo differentiation potential. The potential of human induced PSCs to differentiate into distinct mesenchymal cell lineages, such as osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes, was further confirmed by positive expression of markers for respective cell types and positive staining with alizarin red S (osteoblasts), oil red O (adipocytes), or Alcian blue (chondrocytes). Functional chondrocyte differentiation of induced PSCs in pellet culture and 3-dimensional polycaprolactone scaffold culture was assessed by chondrocyte self-assembly and histology. Our findings indicate that patient-derived synovial cells are an attractive source of MSCs as well as induced PSCs and have the potential to advance cartilage tissue engineering and cell-based models of cartilage defects. Copyright © 2011 by the

  17. Thinking outside the liver: Induced pluripotent stem cells for hepatic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba Rao, Mekala; Sasikala, Mitnala; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) unraveled a mystery in stem cell research, after identification of four re-programming factors for generating pluripotent stem cells without the need of embryos. This breakthrough in generating iPSCs from somatic cells has overcome the ethical issues and immune rejection involved in the use of human embryonic stem cells. Hence, iPSCs form a great potential source for developing disease models, drug toxicity screening and cell-based therapies. These cells have the potential to differentiate into desired cell types, including hepatocytes, under in vitro as well as under in vivo conditions given the proper microenvironment. iPSC-derived hepatocytes could be useful as an unlimited source, which can be utilized in disease modeling, drug toxicity testing and producing autologous cell therapies that would avoid immune rejection and enable correction of gene defects prior to cell transplantation. In this review, we discuss the induction methods, role of reprogramming factors, and characterization of iPSCs, along with hepatocyte differentiation from iPSCs and potential applications. Further, we discuss the location and detection of liver stem cells and their role in liver regeneration. Although tumor formation and genetic mutations are a cause of concern, iPSCs still form a promising source for clinical applications. PMID:23801830

  18. The science and ethics of induced pluripotency: what will become of embryonic stem cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, David G; Nelson, Timothy J; Mueller, Paul S; Hook, C Christopher

    2011-07-01

    For over a decade, the field of stem cell research has advanced tremendously and gained new attention in light of novel insights and emerging developments for regenerative medicine. Invariably, multiple considerations come into play, and clinicians and researchers must weigh the benefits of certain stem cell platforms against the costs they incur. Notably, human embryonic stem (hES) cell research has been a source of continued debate, leading to differing policies and regulations worldwide. This article briefly reviews current stem cell platforms, looking specifically at the two existing pluripotent lines available for potential therapeutic applications: hES cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. We submit iPS technology as a viable and possibly superior alternative for future medical and research endeavors as it obviates many ethical and resource-related concerns posed by hES cells while prospectively matching their potential for scientific use. However, while the clinical realities of iPS cells appear promising, we must recognize the current limitations of this technology, avoid hype, and articulate ethically acceptable medical and scientific goals.

  19. Widespread Mitotic Bookmarking by Histone Marks and Transcription Factors in Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyuan Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available During mitosis, transcription is halted and many chromatin features are lost, posing a challenge for the continuity of cell identity, particularly in fast cycling stem cells, which constantly balance self-renewal with differentiation. Here we show that, in pluripotent stem cells, certain histone marks and stem cell regulators remain associated with specific genomic regions of mitotic chromatin, a phenomenon known as mitotic bookmarking. Enhancers of stem cell-related genes are bookmarked by both H3K27ac and the master regulators OCT4, SOX2, and KLF4, while promoters of housekeeping genes retain high levels of mitotic H3K27ac in a cell-type invariant manner. Temporal degradation of OCT4 during mitotic exit compromises its ability both to maintain and induce pluripotency, suggesting that its regulatory function partly depends on its bookmarking activity. Together, our data document a widespread yet specific bookmarking by histone modifications and transcription factors promoting faithful and efficient propagation of stemness after cell division.

  20. Widespread Mitotic Bookmarking by Histone Marks and Transcription Factors in Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiyuan; Pelham-Webb, Bobbie; Di Giammartino, Dafne Campigli; Li, Jiexi; Kim, Daleum; Kita, Katsuhiro; Saiz, Nestor; Garg, Vidur; Doane, Ashley; Giannakakou, Paraskevi; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Elemento, Olivier; Apostolou, Effie

    2017-05-16

    During mitosis, transcription is halted and many chromatin features are lost, posing a challenge for the continuity of cell identity, particularly in fast cycling stem cells, which constantly balance self-renewal with differentiation. Here we show that, in pluripotent stem cells, certain histone marks and stem cell regulators remain associated with specific genomic regions of mitotic chromatin, a phenomenon known as mitotic bookmarking. Enhancers of stem cell-related genes are bookmarked by both H3K27ac and the master regulators OCT4, SOX2, and KLF4, while promoters of housekeeping genes retain high levels of mitotic H3K27ac in a cell-type invariant manner. Temporal degradation of OCT4 during mitotic exit compromises its ability both to maintain and induce pluripotency, suggesting that its regulatory function partly depends on its bookmarking activity. Together, our data document a widespread yet specific bookmarking by histone modifications and transcription factors promoting faithful and efficient propagation of stemness after cell division. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanical stimulation of cyclic tensile strain induces reduction of pluripotent related gene expressions via activation of Rho/ROCK and subsequent decreasing of AKT phosphorylation in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teramura, Takeshi; Takehara, Toshiyuki; Onodera, Yuta; Nakagawa, Koichi; Hamanishi, Chiaki; Fukuda, Kanji

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mechanical stimulation is an important factor for regulation of stem cell fate. ► Cyclic stretch to human induced pluripotent stem cells activated small GTPase Rho. ► Rho-kinase activation attenuated pluripotency via inhibition of AKT activation. ► This reaction could be reproduced only by transfection of dominant active Rho. ► Rho/ROCK are important molecules in mechanotransduction and control of stemness. -- Abstract: Mechanical stimulation has been shown to regulate the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. However, the effects of the mechanical stress on the stemness or related molecular mechanisms have not been well determined. Pluripotent stem cells such as embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are used as good materials for cell transplantation therapy and research of mammalian development, since they can self-renew infinitely and differentiate into various cell lineages. Here we demonstrated that the mechanical stimulation to human iPS cells altered alignment of actin fibers and expressions of the pluripotent related genes Nanog, POU5f1 and Sox2. In the mechanically stimulated iPS cells, small GTPase Rho was activated and interestingly, AKT phosphorylation was decreased. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase ROCK recovered the AKT phosphorylation and the gene expressions. These results clearly suggested that the Rho/ROCK is a potent primary effector of mechanical stress in the pluripotent stem cells and it participates to pluripotency-related signaling cascades as an upper stream regulator.

  2. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells from Newborns with Spina Bifida Aperta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Yohei; Nonaka, Masahiro; Sasaki, Natsu; Shofuda, Tomoko; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Yuichiro; Pooh, Ritsuko K; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Yamasaki, Mami

    2017-12-01

    We established induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) from three newborns with spina bifida aperta (SBa) using clinically practical methods. We aimed to develop stem cell lines derived from newborns with SBa for future therapeutic use. SBa is a common congenital spinal cord abnormality that causes defects in neurological and urological functions. Stem cell transplantation therapies are predicted to provide beneficial effects for patients with SBa. However, the availability of appropriate cell sources is inadequate for clinical use because of their limited accessibility and expandability, as well as ethical issues. Fibroblast cultures were established from small fragments of skin obtained from newborns with SBa during SBa repair surgery. The cultured cells were transfected with episomal plasmid vectors encoding reprogramming factors necessary for generating iPSCs. These cells were then differentiated into NSPCs by chemical compound treatment, and NSPCs were expanded using neurosphere technology. We successfully generated iPSC lines from the neonatal dermal fibroblasts of three newborns with SBa. We confirmed that these lines exhibited the characteristics of human pluripotent stem cells. We successfully generated NSPCs from all SBa newborn-derived iPSCs with a combination of neural induction and neurosphere technology. We successfully generated iPSCs and iPSC-NSPCs from surgical samples obtained from newborns with SBa with the goal of future clinical use in patients with SBa.

  3. A synthetic, xeno-free peptide surface for expansion and directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Jin

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells have the potential to become an unlimited cell source for cell replacement therapy. The realization of this potential, however, depends on the availability of culture methods that are robust, scalable, and use chemically defined materials. Despite significant advances in hiPSC technologies, the expansion of hiPSCs relies upon the use of animal-derived extracellular matrix extracts, such as Matrigel, which raises safety concerns over the use of these products. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of expanding and differentiating hiPSCs on a chemically defined, xeno-free synthetic peptide substrate, i.e. Corning Synthemax(® Surface. We demonstrated that the Synthemax Surface supports the attachment, spreading, and proliferation of hiPSCs, as well as hiPSCs' lineage-specific differentiation. hiPSCs colonies grown on Synthemax Surfaces exhibit less spread and more compact morphology compared to cells grown on Matrigel™. The cytoskeleton characterization of hiPSCs grown on the Synthemax Surface revealed formation of denser actin filaments in the cell-cell interface. The down-regulation of vinculin and up-regulation of zyxin expression were also observed in hiPSCs grown on the Synthemax Surface. Further examination of cell-ECM interaction revealed that hiPSCs grown on the Synthemax Surface primarily utilize α(vβ(5 integrins to mediate attachment to the substrate, whereas multiple integrins are involved in cell attachment to Matrigel. Finally, hiPSCs can be maintained undifferentiated on the Synthemax Surface for more than ten passages. These studies provide a novel approach for expansion of hiPSCs using synthetic peptide engineered surface as a substrate to avoid a potential risk of contamination and lot-to-lot variability with animal derived materials.

  4. Tumorigenic risk of human induced pluripotent stem cell explants cultured on mouse SNL76/7 feeder cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, Mizuna; Mitsui, Youji, E-mail: y-mitsui8310@hb.tp1.jp; Kumazaki, Tsutomu; Kawahara, Yuta; Matsuo, Taira; Takahashi, Tomoko, E-mail: t-takahashi@kph.bunri-u.ac.jp

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • hiPS cell explants formed malignant tumors when SNL76/7 feeder cells were used. • Multi type tumors developed by interaction of SNL76/7 feeder cells with hiPS cells. • Tumorigenic risk occurs by co-culture of hiPS cells with SNL76/7 feeder cells. - Abstract: The potential for tumor formation from transplanted human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) derivatives represents a high risk in their application to regenerative medicine. We examined the genetic origin and characteristics of tumors, that were formed when 13 hiPSC lines, established by ourselves, and 201B7 hiPSC from Kyoto University were transplanted into severe combined immune-deficient (SCID) mice. Though teratomas formed in 58% of mice, five angiosarcomas, one malignant solitary fibrous tumor and one undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma formed in the remaining mice. Three malignant cell lines were established from the tumors, which were derived from mitomycin C (MMC)-treated SNL76/7 (MMC-SNL) feeder cells, as tumor development from fusion cells between MMC-SNL and hiPSCs was negative by genetic analysis. While parent SNL76/7 cells produced malignant tumors, neither MMC-SNL nor MMC-treated mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) produced malignant tumors. When MMC-SNL feeder cells were co-cultured with hiPSCs, growing cell lines were generated, that expressed genes similar to the parent SNL76/7 cells. Thus, hiPSCs grown on MMC-SNL feeder cells have a high risk of generating feeder-derived malignant tumors. The possible mechanism(s) of growth restoration and the formation of multiple tumor types are discussed with respect of the interactions between MMC-SNL and hiPSC.

  5. Generation and Characterization of Erythroid Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Hsin Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the imbalance in the supply and demand of red blood cells (RBCs, especially for alloimmunized patients or patients with rare blood phenotypes, extensive research has been done to generate therapeutic quantities of mature RBCs from hematopoietic stem cells of various sources, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, and cord blood. Since human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs can be maintained indefinitely in vitro, they represent potentially inexhaustible sources of donor-free RBCs. In contrast to other ex vivo stem-cell-derived cellular therapeutics, tumorigenesis is not a concern, as RBCs can be irradiated without marked adverse effects on in vivo function. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the recent publications relevant to the generation and characterization of hESC- and iPSC-derived erythroid cells and discuss challenges to be met before the eventual realization of clinical usage of these cells.

  6. Challenges of using pluripotent stem cells for safety assessments of substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojnits, Kinga; Bremer, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    Various European Union (EU) legislations request the use of in vitro tests for toxicological evaluations in order to increase the safety of consumer and patients but also to reduce the number vertebrates. The review provides a brief overview on EU legislations in place but without further interpretation. At present several ongoing EU projects address the need of developing predictive in vitro tests including projects assessing the potential of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines as basis for a range of toxicity tests. Tests based on human cells would avoid interspecies variations and as such predict more precisely adverse effects to the human body. However, the ethical situation on the use of toxicity tests based on hESCs is still under debate since no harmonization within Europe on the use of hESC lines has been achieved yet. A mutual acceptance of toxicity tests based on hESCs for regulatory applications is therefore challenging. Recent reports on the establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are pointing to a way out of this dilemma, since these cells have apparently very similar characteristics as hESCs and could serve as basis for the development of toxicity tests. A careful scientific comparison between pluripotent cells of different origin is now needed in order to make final judgments. In any case, the development of reliable and relevant in vitro toxicity tests based on human pluripotent cells requires additional quality assessments of critical parameter that are also summarized within the review.

  7. Preclinical derivation and imaging of autologously transplanted canine induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew S; Xu, Dan; Plews, Jordan R; Nguyen, Patricia K; Nag, Divya; Lyons, Jennifer K; Han, Leng; Hu, Shijun; Lan, Feng; Liu, Junwei; Huang, Mei; Narsinh, Kazim H; Long, Charles T; de Almeida, Patricia E; Levi, Benjamin; Kooreman, Nigel; Bangs, Charles; Pacharinsak, Cholawat; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Yeung, Alan C; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Robbins, Robert C; Longaker, Michael T; Wu, Joseph C

    2011-09-16

    Derivation of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) opens a new avenue for future applications of regenerative medicine. However, before iPSCs can be used in a clinical setting, it is critical to validate their in vivo fate following autologous transplantation. Thus far, preclinical studies have been limited to small animals and have yet to be conducted in large animals that are physiologically more similar to humans. In this study, we report the first autologous transplantation of iPSCs in a large animal model through the generation of canine iPSCs (ciPSCs) from the canine adipose stromal cells and canine fibroblasts of adult mongrel dogs. We confirmed pluripotency of ciPSCs using the following techniques: (i) immunostaining and quantitative PCR for the presence of pluripotent and germ layer-specific markers in differentiated ciPSCs; (ii) microarray analysis that demonstrates similar gene expression profiles between ciPSCs and canine embryonic stem cells; (iii) teratoma formation assays; and (iv) karyotyping for genomic stability. Fate of ciPSCs autologously transplanted to the canine heart was tracked in vivo using clinical positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. To demonstrate clinical potential of ciPSCs to treat models of injury, we generated endothelial cells (ciPSC-ECs) and used these cells to treat immunodeficient murine models of myocardial infarction and hindlimb ischemia.

  8. Impact of transient down-regulation of DREAM in human embryonic stem cell pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fontán-Lozano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the functions of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM in embryonic stem cells (ESCs. However, DREAM interacts with cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB in a Ca2+-dependent manner, preventing CREB binding protein (CBP recruitment. Furthermore, CREB and CBP are involved in maintaining ESC self-renewal and pluripotency. However, a previous knockout study revealed the protective function of DREAM depletion in brain aging degeneration and that aging is accompanied by a progressive decline in stem cells (SCs function. Interestingly, we found that DREAM is expressed in different cell types, including human ESCs (hESCs, human adipose-derived stromal cells (hASCs, human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (hBMSCs, and human newborn foreskin fibroblasts (hFFs, and that transitory inhibition of DREAM in hESCs reduces their pluripotency, increasing differentiation. We stipulate that these changes are partly mediated by increased CREB transcriptional activity. Overall, our data indicates that DREAM acts in the regulation of hESC pluripotency and could be a target to promote or prevent differentiation in embryonic cells.

  9. Ribosomal stress induces L11- and p53-dependent apoptosis in mouse pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado-Palacin, Lucia; Llanos, Susana; Serrano, Manuel

    2012-02-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is the most demanding energetic process in proliferating cells and it is emerging as a critical sensor of cellular homeostasis. Upon disturbance of ribosome biogenesis, specific free ribosomal proteins, most notably L11, bind and inhibit Mdm2, resulting in activation of the tumor suppressor p53. This pathway has been characterized in somatic and cancer cells, but its function in embryonic pluripotent cells has remained unexplored. Here, we show that treatment with low doses of Actinomycin D or depletion of ribosomal protein L37, two well-established inducers of ribosomal stress, activate p53 in an L11-dependent manner in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Activation of p53 results in transcriptional induction of p53 targets, including p21, Mdm2, Pidd, Puma, Noxa and Bax. Finally, ribosomal stress elicits L11- and p53-dependent apoptosis in ESCs/iPSCs. These results extend to pluripotent cells the functionality of the ribosomal stress pathway and we speculate that this could be a relevant cellular checkpoint during early embryogenesis.

  10. To clone or not to clone? Induced pluripotent stem cells can be generated in bulk culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Charlotte A; Hemeda, Hatim; Pieper, Lisa A; Lenz, Michael; Qin, Jie; Joussen, Sylvia; Sontag, Stephanie; Wanek, Paul; Denecke, Bernd; Schüler, Herdit M; Zenke, Martin; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are usually clonally derived. The selection of fully reprogrammed cells generally involves picking of individual colonies with morphology similar to embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Given that fully reprogrammed cells are highly proliferative and escape from cellular senescence, it is conceivable that they outgrow non-pluripotent and partially reprogrammed cells during culture expansion without the need of clonal selection. In this study, we have reprogrammed human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) with episomal plasmid vectors. Colony frequency was higher and size was larger when using murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) as stromal support instead of HDFs or human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We have then compared iPSCs which were either clonally derived by manual selection of a single colony, or derived from bulk-cultures of all initial colonies. After few passages their morphology, expression of pluripotency markers, and gene expression profiles did not reveal any significant differences. Furthermore, clonally-derived and bulk-cultured iPSCs revealed similar in vitro differentiation potential towards the three germ layers. Therefore, manual selection of individual colonies does not appear to be necessary for the generation of iPSCs - this is of relevance for standardization and automation of cell culture procedures.

  11. Current state and perspectives in modeling and control of human pluripotent stem cell expansion processes in stirred-tank bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvanauskas, Vytautas; Grincas, Vykantas; Simutis, Rimvydas; Kagawa, Yuki; Kino-Oka, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    Implementation of model-based practices for process development, control, automation, standardization, and validation are important factors for therapeutic and industrial applications of human pluripotent stem cells. As robust cultivation strategies for pluripotent stem cell expansion and differentiation have yet to be determined, process development could be enhanced by application of mathematical models and advanced control systems to optimize growth conditions. Therefore, it is important to understand both the potential of possible applications and the apparent limitations of existing mathematical models to improve pluripotent stem cell cultivation technologies. In the present review, the authors focus on these issues as they apply to stem cell expansion processes. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:355-364, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  12. Studying the lay of the land : views and experiences of professionals in the translational pluripotent stem cell field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, Michelle G J L; van Delden, Johannes J M; Bredenoord, Annelien L

    AIM: The inherent uncertainty of first-in-human trials, combined with the technical complexity of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), makes early phase PSC studies ethically challenging. Conducting parallel bioethics research based on experiences and views of professionals in the stem cell field is

  13. In vivo generation of transplantable human hematopoietic cells from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Giovanni; Welner, Robert S; Nombela-Arrieta, Cesar; D'Alise, Anna Morena; Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Ebralidze, Alexander K; Kraytsberg, Yevgenya; Ye, Min; Kocher, Olivier; Neuberg, Donna S; Khrapko, Konstantin; Silberstein, Leslie E; Tenen, Daniel G

    2013-02-21

    Lineage-restricted cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells through overexpression of 4 transcription factors. iPS cells are similar to human embryonic stem (hES) cells and have the same ability to generate all the cells of the human body, including blood cells. However, this process is extremely inefficient and to date has been unsuccessful at differentiating iPS into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We hypothesized that iPS cells, injected into NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ immunocompromised (NSG) mice could give rise to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) during teratoma formation. Here, we report a novel in vivo system in which human iPS cells differentiate within teratomas to derive functional myeloid and lymphoid cells. Similarly, HSPCs can be isolated from teratoma parenchyma and reconstitute a human immune system when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Our data provide evidence that in vivo generation of patient customized cells is feasible, providing materials that could be useful for transplantation, human antibody generation, and drug screening applications.

  14. Autologous Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived β-Like Cells for Diabetes Cellular Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, Jeffrey R; Pagliuca, Felicia W

    2017-05-01

    Development of stem cell technologies for cell replacement therapy has progressed rapidly in recent years. Diabetes has long been seen as one of the first applications for stem cell-derived cells because of the loss of only a single cell type-the insulin-producing β-cell. Recent reports have detailed strategies that overcome prior hurdles to generate functional β-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells in vitro, including from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Even with this accomplishment, addressing immunological barriers to transplantation remains a major challenge for the field. The development of clinically relevant hiPSC derivation methods from patients and demonstration that these cells can be differentiated into β-like cells presents a new opportunity to treat diabetes without immunosuppression or immunoprotective encapsulation or with only targeted protection from autoimmunity. This review focuses on the current status in generating and transplanting autologous β-cells for diabetes cell therapy, highlighting the unique advantages and challenges of this approach. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  15. Mesenchymal and induced pluripotent stem cells: general insights and clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zomer HD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Helena D Zomer,1 Atanásio S Vidane,1 Natalia N Gonçalves,1 Carlos E Ambrósio2 1Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; 2Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Animal Sciences and Food Engineering, University of São Paulo, Pirassununga, SP, Brazil Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells have awakened a great deal of interest in regenerative medicine due to their plasticity, and immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. They are high-yield and can be acquired through noninvasive methods from adult tissues. Moreover, they are nontumorigenic and are the most widely studied. On the other hand, induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells can be derived directly from adult cells through gene reprogramming. The new iPS technology avoids the embryo destruction or manipulation to generate pluripotent cells, therefore, are exempt from ethical implication surrounding embryonic stem cell use. The pre-differentiation of iPS cells ensures the safety of future approaches. Both mesenchymal stem cells and iPS cells can be used for autologous cell transplantations without the risk of immune rejection and represent a great opportunity for future alternative therapies. In this review we discussed the therapeutic perspectives using mesenchymal and iPS cells. Keywords: cell transplantation, cell therapy, iPS, MSC

  16. Peripheral blood derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from a female with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Barratt Ross

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained from a 62-year-old female with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM. PBMCs were reprogrammed to a pluripotent state following transfection with non-integrative episomal vectors carrying reprogramming factors OCT4, SOX2, LIN28, KLF4 and L-MYC. iPSCs were shown to express pluripotency markers, possess trilineage differentiation potential, carry rare variants identified in DNA isolated directly from the patient's whole blood, have a normal karyotype and no longer carry episomal vectors for reprogramming. This line is a useful resource for identifying unknown genetic causes of HCM.

  17. TRIM28 epigenetic corepressor is indispensable for stable induced pluripotent stem cell formation

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    Marta Klimczak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cellular reprogramming proceeds in a stepwise pathway initiated by binding and transcription of pluripotency factors followed by genome-wide epigenetic changes. Priming events, such as erasure of DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling determines the success of pluripotency acquisition later. Therefore, growing efforts are made to understand epigenetic regulatory network that makes reprogramming possible and efficient. Here, we analyze the role of transcriptional corepressor TRIM28, involved in heterochromatin formation, during the process of reprogramming of mouse somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells. We demonstrate that Trim28 knockdown (Trim28 KD causes that emerging iPS cells differentiate immediately back into MEFs therefore they fail to yield stable iPS cell colonies. To better comprehend the mechanism of TRIM28 action in reprogramming, we performed a reverse-phase protein array (RPPA using in excess of 300 different antibodies and compared the proteomic profiles of wild-type and Trim28 KD cells during reprogramming. We revealed the differences in the dynamics of reprogramming of wild-type and Trim28 KD cells. Interestingly, proteomic profile of Trim28 KD cells at the final stage of reprogramming resembled differentiated state rather than maintenance of pluripotency and self-renewal, strongly suggesting spontaneous differentiation of Trim28 KD cells back to their parental cell type. We also observed that action of TRIM28 in reprogramming is accompanied by differential enrichment of proteins involved in cell cycle, adhesion and stemness. Collectively, these results suggest that regulation of epigenetic modifications coordinated by TRIM28 plays a crucial role in reprogramming process.

  18. Retinoblastoma-binding proteins 4 and 9 are important for human pluripotent stem cell maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Michael D; Wederell, Elizabeth; Robertson, Gordon; Delaney, Allen; Morozova, Olena; Poon, Steven S S; Yap, Damian; Fee, John; Zhao, Yongjun; McDonald, Helen; Zeng, Thomas; Hirst, Martin; Marra, Marco A; Aparicio, Samuel A J R; Eaves, Connie J

    2011-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms that maintain human pluripotent stem (PS) cells are not completely understood. Here we sought to identify new candidate PS cell regulators to facilitate future improvements in their generation, expansion, and differentiation. We used bioinformatic analyses of multiple serial-analysis-of-gene-expression libraries (generated from human PS cells and their differentiated derivatives), together with small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening to identify candidate pluripotency regulators. Validation of candidate regulators involved promoter analyses, Affymetrix profiling, real-time PCR, and immunoprecipitation. Promoter analysis of genes differentially expressed across multiple serial-analysis-of-gene-expression libraries identified E2F motifs in the promoters of many PS cell-specific genes (e.g., POU5F1, NANOG, SOX2, FOXD3). siRNA analyses identified two retinoblastoma binding proteins (RBBP4, RBBP9) as required for maintenance of multiple human PS cell types. Both RBBPs were bound to RB in human PS cells, and E2F motifs were present in the promoters of genes whose expression was altered by decreasing RBBP4 and RBBP9 expression. Affymetrix and real-time PCR studies of siRNA-treated human PS cells showed that reduced RBBP4 or RBBP9 expression concomitantly decreased expression of POU5F1, NANOG, SOX2, and/or FOXD3 plus certain cell cycle genes (e.g., CCNA2, CCNB1), while increasing expression of genes involved in organogenesis (particularly neurogenesis). These results reveal new candidate positive regulators of human PS cells, providing evidence of their ability to regulate expression of pluripotency, cell cycle, and differentiation genes in human PS cells. These data provide valuable new leads for further elucidating mechanisms of human pluripotency. Copyright © 2011 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term culture of undifferentiated spermatogonia isolated from immature and adult bovine testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyatno; Kitamura, Yuka; Ikeda, Shuntaro; Minami, Naojiro; Yamada, Masayasu; Imai, Hiroshi

    2018-03-01

    Undifferentiated spermatogonia eventually differentiate in the testis to produce haploid sperm. Within this cell population, there is a small number of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). SSCs are rare cells in the testis, and their cellular characteristics are poorly understood. Establishment of undifferentiated cell line would provide an indispensable tool for studying their biological nature and spermiogenesis/spermatogenesis in vitro. However, there have been few reports on the long-term culture of undifferentiated spermatogonia in species other than rodents. Here, we report the derivation and long-term in vitro culture of undifferentiated spermatogonia cell lines from immature and adult bovine testes. Cell lines from immature testes were maintained in serum-free culture conditions in the presence of glial-cell-line-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) and bovine leukemia inhibitory factor (bLIF). These cell lines have embryonic stem (ES)-like cell morphology, express pluripotent-stem-cell-specific and germ-cell-specific markers at the protein and mRNA levels, and contributed to the inner cell mass (ICM) of embryos in the blastocyst stage. Meanwhile, cell lines established from adult testes were maintained in low-serum media in the presence of 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (BIO). These cell lines have characteristics resembling those of previously reported male mouse germ cell lines as confirmed by their botryoidally aggregated morphology, as well as the expression of germ-cell-specific markers and pluripotent stem cell markers. These findings could be useful for the development of long-term culture of undifferentiated spermatogonia, which could aid in conservation of species and improvement of livestock production through genome editing technology. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Generation of human melanocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Shigeki Ohta

    Full Text Available Epidermal melanocytes play an important role in protecting the skin from UV rays, and their functional impairment results in pigment disorders. Additionally, melanomas are considered to arise from mutations that accumulate in melanocyte stem cells. The mechanisms underlying melanocyte differentiation and the defining characteristics of melanocyte stem cells in humans are, however, largely unknown. In the present study, we set out to generate melanocytes from human iPS cells in vitro, leading to a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of human melanocyte differentiation. We generated iPS cell lines from human dermal fibroblasts using the Yamanaka factors (SOX2, OCT3/4, and KLF4, with or without c-MYC. These iPS cell lines were subsequently used to form embryoid bodies (EBs and then differentiated into melanocytes via culture supplementation with Wnt3a, SCF, and ET-3. Seven weeks after inducing differentiation, pigmented cells expressing melanocyte markers such as MITF, tyrosinase, SILV, and TYRP1, were detected. Melanosomes were identified in these pigmented cells by electron microscopy, and global gene expression profiling of the pigmented cells showed a high similarity to that of human primary foreskin-derived melanocytes, suggesting the successful generation of melanocytes from iPS cells. This in vitro differentiation system should prove useful for understanding human melanocyte biology and revealing the mechanism of various pigment cell disorders, including melanoma.

  1. Cryopreservation of Hair-Follicle Associated Pluripotent (HAP) Stem Cells Maintains Differentiation and Hair-Growth Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M; Kajiura, Satoshi; Cao, Wenluo; Liu, Fang; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Hair follicles contain nestin-expressing pluripotent stem cells which originate above the bulge area of the follicle, below the sebaceous gland. We have termed these cells hair follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. We have established efficient cryopreservation methods of the hair follicle that maintain the pluripotency of HAP stem cells as well as hair growth. We cryopreserved the whole hair follicle by slow-rate cooling in TC-Protector medium or in DMSO-containing medium and storage in liquid nitrogen or at -80 °C. After thawing and culture of the cryopreserved whisker follicles, growing HAP stem cells formed hair spheres. The hair spheres contained cells that differentiated to neurons, glial cells, and other cell types. The hair spheres derived from slow-cooling cryopreserved hair follicles were as pluripotent as hair spheres from fresh hair follicles. We have also previously demonstrated that cryopreserved mouse whisker hair follicles maintain their hair-growth potential. DMSO better cryopreserved mouse whisker follicles compared to glycerol. DMSO-cryopreserved hair follicles also maintained the HAP stem cells, evidenced by P75 ntr expression. Subcutaneous transplantation of DMSO-cryopreserved hair follicles in nude mice resulted in extensive hair fiber growth over 8 weeks, indicating the functional recovery of hair-shaft growth of cryopreserved hair follicles. HAP stem cells can be used for nerve and spinal-cord repair. This biobanking of hair follicles can allow each patient the potential for their own stem cell use for regenerative medicine or hair transplantation.

  2. Chemically Induced Reprogramming of Somatic Cells to Pluripotent Stem Cells and Neural Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Dhruba; Jiang, Peng

    2016-02-06

    The ability to generate transplantable neural cells in a large quantity in the laboratory is a critical step in the field of developing stem cell regenerative medicine for neural repair. During the last few years, groundbreaking studies have shown that cell fate of adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed through lineage specific expression of transcription factors (TFs)-and defined culture conditions. This key concept has been used to identify a number of potent small molecules that could enhance the efficiency of reprogramming with TFs. Recently, a growing number of studies have shown that small molecules targeting specific epigenetic and signaling pathways can replace all of the reprogramming TFs. Here, we provide a detailed review of the studies reporting the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs), neural stem cells (ciNSCs), and neurons (ciN). We also discuss the main mechanisms of actions and the pathways that the small molecules regulate during chemical reprogramming.

  3. Cardiac regeneration using pluripotent stem cells—Progression to large animal models

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    James J.H. Chong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs have indisputable cardiomyogenic potential and therefore have been intensively investigated as a potential cardiac regenerative therapy. Current directed differentiation protocols are able to produce high yields of cardiomyocytes from PSCs and studies in small animal models of cardiovascular disease have proven sustained engraftment and functional efficacy. Therefore, the time is ripe for cardiac regenerative therapies using PSC derivatives to be tested in large animal models that more closely resemble the hearts of humans. In this review, we discuss the results of our recent study using human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CM in a non-human primate model of ischemic cardiac injury. Large scale remuscularization, electromechanical coupling and short-term arrhythmias demonstrated by our hESC-CM grafts are discussed in the context of other studies using adult stem cells for cardiac regeneration.

  4. Quantitative glycomics monitoring of induced pluripotent- and embryonic stem cells during neuronal differentiation

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    Michiyo Terashima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the structure of cell surface glycoforms occurring during the stages of stem cell differentiation remain unclear. We describe a rapid glycoblotting-based cellular glycomics method for quantitatively evaluating changes in glycoform expression and structure during neuronal differentiation of murine induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs. Our results show that changes in the expression of cellular N-glycans are comparable during the differentiation of iPSCs and ESCs. The expression of bisect-type N-glycans was significantly up-regulated in neurons that differentiated from both iPSCs and ESCs. From a glycobiological standpoint, iPSCs are an alternative neural cell source in addition to ESCs.

  5. Clonal reversal of ageing-associated stem cell lineage bias via a pluripotent intermediate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlestedt, Martin; Erlandsson, Eva; Kristiansen, Trine

    2017-01-01

    Ageing associates with significant alterations in somatic/adult stem cells and therapies to counteract these might have profound benefits for health. In the blood, haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) ageing is linked to several functional shortcomings. However, besides the recent realization...... with the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This allows us to specifically focus on aged HSCs presenting with a pronounced lineage skewing, a hallmark of HSC ageing. Functional and molecular evaluations reveal haematopoiesis from these iPS clones to be indistinguishable from that associating...... that individual HSCs might be preset differentially already from young age, HSCs might also age asynchronously. Evaluating the prospects for HSC rejuvenation therefore ultimately requires approaching those HSCs that are functionally affected by age. Here we combine genetic barcoding of aged murine HSCs...

  6. Role of tumor suppressor genes in the cancer-associated reprogramming of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Chu; Murayama, Yoshinobu; Hashimoto, Koichiro; Nakamura, Yukio; Lin, Chang-Shin; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Saito, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    Because of their pluripotent characteristics, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) possess great potential for therapeutic application and for the study of degenerative disorders. These cells are generated from normal somatic cells, multipotent stem cells, or cancer cells. They express embryonic stem cell markers, such as OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, and REX1, and can differentiate into all adult tissue types, both in vitro and in vivo. However, some of the pluripotency-promoting factors have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Here, we describe the merits of tumor suppresser genes as reprogramming factors for the generation of iPSCs without tumorigenic activity. The initial step of reprogramming is induction of the exogenous pluripotent factors to generate the oxidative stress that leads to senescence by DNA damage and metabolic stresses, thus inducing the expression of tumor suppressor genes such as p21CIP1 and p16INK4a through the activation of p53 to be the pre-induced pluripotent stem cells (pre-iPSCs). The later stage includes overcoming the barrier of reprogramming-induced senescence or cell-cycle arrest by shutting off the function of these tumor suppressor genes, followed by the induction of endogenous stemness genes for the full commitment of iPSCs (full-iPSCs). Thus, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by oxidative stress might be critical for the induction of endogenous reprogramming-factor genes via epigenetic changes or antioxidant reactions. We also discuss the critical role of tumor suppressor genes in the evaluation of the tumorigenicity of human cancer cell-derived pluripotent stem cells, and describe how to overcome their tumorigenic properties for application in stem cell therapy in the field of regenerative medicine.

  7. Techniques for the induction of human pluripotent stem cell differentiation towards cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Jarosław; Kolanowski, Tomasz J; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2017-05-01

    The derivation of pluripotent stem cells from human embryos and the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from somatic cells opened a new chapter in studies on the regeneration of the post-infarction heart and regenerative medicine as a whole. Thus, protocols for obtaining iPSCs were enthusiastically adopted and widely used for further experiments on cardiac differentiation. iPSC-mediated cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) under in vitro culture conditions are generated by simulating natural cardiomyogenesis and involve the wingless-type mouse mammary tumour virus integration site family (WNT), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling pathways. New strategies have been proposed to take advantage of small chemical molecules, organic compounds and even electric or mechanical stimulation. There are three main approaches to support cardiac commitment in vitro: embryoid bodis (EBs), monolayer in vitro cultures and inductive co-cultures with visceral endoderm-like (END2) cells. In EB technique initial uniform size of pluripotent stem cell (PSC) colonies has a pivotal significance. Hence, some methods were designed to support cells aggregation. Another well-suited procedure is based on culturing cells in monolayer conditions in order to improve accessibility of growth factors and nutrients. Other distinct tactics are using visceral endoderm-like cells to culture them with PSCs due to secretion of procardiac cytokines. Finally, the appropriate purification of the obtained cardiomyocytes is required prior to their administration to a patient under the prospective cellular therapy strategy. This goal can be achieved using non-genetic methods, such as the application of surface markers and fluorescent dyes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell research trends: complementation and diversification of the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobold, Sabine; Guhr, Anke; Kurtz, Andreas; Löser, Peter

    2015-05-12

    Research in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is rapidly developing and there are expectations that this research may obviate the need to use human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), the ethics of which has been a subject of controversy for more than 15 years. In this study, we investigated approximately 3,400 original research papers that reported an experimental use of these types of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and were published from 2008 to 2013. We found that research into both cell types was conducted independently and further expanded, accompanied by a growing intersection of both research fields. Moreover, an in-depth analysis of papers that reported the use of both cell types indicates that hESCs are still being used as a "gold standard," but in a declining proportion of publications. Instead, the expanding research field is diversifying and hESC and hiPSC lines are increasingly being used in more independent research and application areas. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Human Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Research Trends: Complementation and Diversification of the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Kobold

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Research in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs is rapidly developing and there are expectations that this research may obviate the need to use human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, the ethics of which has been a subject of controversy for more than 15 years. In this study, we investigated approximately 3,400 original research papers that reported an experimental use of these types of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs and were published from 2008 to 2013. We found that research into both cell types was conducted independently and further expanded, accompanied by a growing intersection of both research fields. Moreover, an in-depth analysis of papers that reported the use of both cell types indicates that hESCs are still being used as a “gold standard,” but in a declining proportion of publications. Instead, the expanding research field is diversifying and hESC and hiPSC lines are increasingly being used in more independent research and application areas.

  10. Retinal Ganglion Cell Diversity and Subtype Specification from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Kirstin B. Langer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs are the projection neurons of the retina and transmit visual information to postsynaptic targets in the brain. While this function is shared among nearly all RGCs, this class of cell is remarkably diverse, comprised of multiple subtypes. Previous efforts have identified numerous RGC subtypes in animal models, but less attention has been paid to human RGCs. Thus, efforts of this study examined the diversity of RGCs differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs and characterized defined subtypes through the expression of subtype-specific markers. Further investigation of these subtypes was achieved using single-cell transcriptomics, confirming the combinatorial expression of molecular markers associated with these subtypes, and also provided insight into more subtype-specific markers. Thus, the results of this study describe the derivation of RGC subtypes from hPSCs and will support the future exploration of phenotypic and functional diversity within human RGCs. : In this article, Langer and colleagues present extensive characterization of RGC subtypes derived from human pluripotent stem cells, with multiple subtypes identified by subtype-specific molecular markers. Their results present a more detailed analysis of RGC diversity in human cells and yield the use of different markers to identify RGC subtypes. Keywords: iPSC, retina, retinal ganglion cell, RGC subtype, stem cell, ipRGC, alpha RGC, direction selective RGC, RNA-seq

  11. Development of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Secreting Neurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Carina Lund

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons regulate human puberty and reproduction. Modeling their development and function in vitro would be of interest for both basic research and clinical translation. Here, we report a three-step protocol to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs into GnRH-secreting neurons. Firstly, hPSCs were differentiated to FOXG1, EMX2, and PAX6 expressing anterior neural progenitor cells (NPCs by dual SMAD inhibition. Secondly, NPCs were treated for 10 days with FGF8, which is a key ligand implicated in GnRH neuron ontogeny, and finally, the cells were matured with Notch inhibitor to bipolar TUJ1-positive neurons that robustly expressed GNRH1 and secreted GnRH decapeptide into the culture medium. The protocol was reproducible both in human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, and thus provides a translational tool for investigating the mechanisms of human puberty and its disorders.

  12. Hair Follicle Development in Mouse Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Skin Organoids

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    Jiyoon Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian hair follicle arises during embryonic development from coordinated interactions between the epidermis and dermis. It is currently unclear how to recapitulate hair follicle induction in pluripotent stem cell cultures for use in basic research studies or in vitro drug testing. To date, generation of hair follicles in vitro has only been possible using primary cells isolated from embryonic skin, cultured alone or in a co-culture with stem cell-derived cells, combined with in vivo transplantation. Here, we describe the derivation of skin organoids, constituting epidermal and dermal layers, from a homogeneous population of mouse pluripotent stem cells in a 3D culture. We show that skin organoids spontaneously produce de novo hair follicles in a process that mimics normal embryonic hair folliculogenesis. This in vitro model of skin development will be useful for studying mechanisms of hair follicle induction, evaluating hair growth or inhibitory drugs, and modeling skin diseases.

  13. Three-dimensional tissues using human pluripotent stem cell spheroids as biofabrication building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haishuang; Li, Qiang; Lei, Yuguo

    2017-04-24

    A recently emerged approach for tissue engineering is to biofabricate tissues using cellular spheroids as building blocks. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), can be cultured to generate large numbers of cells and can presumably be differentiated into all the cell types of the human body in vitro, thus are an ideal cell source for biofabrication. We previously developed a hydrogel-based cell culture system that can economically produce large numbers of hPSC spheroids. With hPSCs and this culture system, there are two potential methods to biofabricate a desired tissue. In Method 1, hPSC spheroids are first utilized to biofabricate an hPSC tissue that is subsequently differentiated into the desired tissue. In Method 2, hPSC spheroids are first converted into tissue spheroids in the hydrogel-based culture system and the tissue spheroids are then utilized to biofabricate the desired tissue. In this paper, we systematically measured the fusion rates of hPSC spheroids without and with differentiation toward cortical and midbrain dopaminergic neurons and found spheroids' fusion rates dropped sharply as differentiation progressed. We found Method 1 was appropriate for biofabricating neural tissues.

  14. Potential and Limitation of HLA-Based Banking of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casimir de Rham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Great hopes have been placed on human pluripotent stem (hPS cells for therapy. Tissues or organs derived from hPS cells could be the best solution to cure many different human diseases, especially those who do not respond to standard medication or drugs, such as neurodegenerative diseases, heart failure, or diabetes. The origin of hPS is critical and the idea of creating a bank of well-characterized hPS cells has emerged, like the one that already exists for cord blood. However, the main obstacle in transplantation is the rejection of tissues or organ by the receiver, due to the three main immunological barriers: the human leukocyte antigen (HLA, the ABO blood group, and minor antigens. The problem could be circumvented by using autologous stem cells, like induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells, derived directly from the patient. But iPS cells have limitations, especially regarding the disease of the recipient and possible difficulties to handle or prepare autologous iPS cells. Finally, reaching standards of good clinical or manufacturing practices could be challenging. That is why well-characterized and universal hPS cells could be a better solution. In this review, we will discuss the interest and the feasibility to establish hPS cells bank, as well as some economics and ethical issues.

  15. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Based Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kime, Cody; Mandegar, Mohammad A; Srivastava, Deepak; Yamanaka, Shinya; Conklin, Bruce R; Rand, Tim A

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPS cells) are rapidly emerging as a powerful tool for biomedical discovery. The advent of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS cells) with human embryonic stem (hES)-cell-like properties has led to hPS cells with disease-specific genetic backgrounds for in vitro disease modeling and drug discovery as well as mechanistic and developmental studies. To fully realize this potential, it will be necessary to modify the genome of hPS cells with precision and flexibility. Pioneering experiments utilizing site-specific double-strand break (DSB)-mediated genome engineering tools, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), have paved the way to genome engineering in previously recalcitrant systems such as hPS cells. However, these methods are technically cumbersome and require significant expertise, which has limited adoption. A major recent advance involving the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) endonuclease has dramatically simplified the effort required for genome engineering and will likely be adopted widely as the most rapid and flexible system for genome editing in hPS cells. In this unit, we describe commonly practiced methods for CRISPR endonuclease genomic editing of hPS cells into cell lines containing genomes altered by insertion/deletion (indel) mutagenesis or insertion of recombinant genomic DNA. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Neural Conversion and Patterning of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells: A Developmental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirra, Alexandra; Wiethoff, Sarah; Patani, Rickie

    2016-01-01

    Since the reprogramming of adult human terminally differentiated somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) became a reality in 2007, only eight years have passed. Yet over this relatively short period, myriad experiments have revolutionized previous stem cell dogmata. The tremendous promise of hiPSC technology for regenerative medicine has fuelled rising expectations from both the public and scientific communities alike. In order to effectively harness hiPSCs to uncover fundamental mechanisms of disease, it is imperative to first understand the developmental neurobiology underpinning their lineage restriction choices in order to predictably manipulate cell fate to desired derivatives. Significant progress in developmental biology provides an invaluable resource for rationalising directed differentiation of hiPSCs to cellular derivatives of the nervous system. In this paper we begin by reviewing core developmental concepts underlying neural induction in order to provide context for how such insights have guided reductionist in vitro models of neural conversion from hiPSCs. We then discuss early factors relevant in neural patterning, again drawing upon crucial knowledge gained from developmental neurobiological studies. We conclude by discussing open questions relating to these concepts and how their resolution might serve to strengthen the promise of pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine.

  17. Neural Conversion and Patterning of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells: A Developmental Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Zirra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the reprogramming of adult human terminally differentiated somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs became a reality in 2007, only eight years have passed. Yet over this relatively short period, myriad experiments have revolutionized previous stem cell dogmata. The tremendous promise of hiPSC technology for regenerative medicine has fuelled rising expectations from both the public and scientific communities alike. In order to effectively harness hiPSCs to uncover fundamental mechanisms of disease, it is imperative to first understand the developmental neurobiology underpinning their lineage restriction choices in order to predictably manipulate cell fate to desired derivatives. Significant progress in developmental biology provides an invaluable resource for rationalising directed differentiation of hiPSCs to cellular derivatives of the nervous system. In this paper we begin by reviewing core developmental concepts underlying neural induction in order to provide context for how such insights have guided reductionist in vitro models of neural conversion from hiPSCs. We then discuss early factors relevant in neural patterning, again drawing upon crucial knowledge gained from developmental neurobiological studies. We conclude by discussing open questions relating to these concepts and how their resolution might serve to strengthen the promise of pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine.

  18. Idiopathic Autism: Cellular and Molecular Phenotypes in Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaozhuo; Campanac, Emilie; Cheung, Hoi-Hung; Ziats, Mark N; Canterel-Thouennon, Lucile; Raygada, Margarita; Baxendale, Vanessa; Pang, Alan Lap-Yin; Yang, Lu; Swedo, Susan; Thurm, Audrey; Lee, Tin-Lap; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Chan, Wai-Yee; Hoffman, Dax A; Rennert, Owen M

    2017-08-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder whose pathophysiology remains elusive as a consequence of the unavailability for study of patient brain neurons; this deficit may potentially be circumvented by neural differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells. Rare syndromes with single gene mutations and autistic symptoms have significantly advanced the molecular and cellular understanding of autism spectrum disorders; however, in aggregate, they only represent a fraction of all cases of autism. In an effort to define the cellular and molecular phenotypes in human neurons of non-syndromic autism, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from three male autism spectrum disorder patients who had no identifiable clinical syndromes, and their unaffected male siblings and subsequently differentiated these patient-specific stem cells into electrophysiologically active neurons. iPSC-derived neurons from these autistic patients displayed decreases in the frequency and kinetics of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents relative to controls, as well as significant decreases in Na + and inactivating K + voltage-gated currents. Moreover, whole-genome microarray analysis of gene expression identified 161 unique genes that were significantly differentially expressed in autistic patient iPSC-derived neurons (>twofold, FDR autism spectrum disorder. Our data demonstrate aberrant voltage-gated currents and underlying molecular changes related to synaptic function in iPSC-derived neurons from individuals with idiopathic autism as compared to unaffected siblings controls.

  19. Impaired neural differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells generated from a mouse model of Sandhoff disease.

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    Yasuhiro Ogawa

    Full Text Available Sandhoff disease (SD is a glycosphingolipid storage disease that arises from mutations in the Hexb gene and the resultant deficiency in β-hexosaminidase activity. This deficiency results in aberrant lysosomal accumulation of the ganglioside GM2 and related glycolipids, and progressive deterioration of the central nervous system. Dysfunctional glycolipid storage causes severe neurodegeneration through a poorly understood pathogenic mechanism. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology offers new opportunities for both elucidation of the pathogenesis of diseases and the development of stem cell-based therapies. Here, we report the generation of disease-specific iPSCs from a mouse model of SD. These mouse model-derived iPSCs (SD-iPSCs exhibited pluripotent stem cell properties and significant accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. In lineage-directed differentiation studies using the stromal cell-derived inducing activity method, SD-iPSCs showed an impaired ability to differentiate into early stage neural precursors. Moreover, fewer neurons differentiated from neural precursors in SD-iPSCs than in the case of the wild type. Recovery of the Hexb gene in SD-iPSCs improved this impairment of neuronal differentiation. These results provide new insights as to understanding the complex pathogenic mechanisms of SD.

  20. Sendai Virus-Based Reprogramming of Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells from Umbilical Cord Wharton's Jelly into Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miere, Cristian; Devito, Liani; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    In an attempt to bring pluripotent stem cell biology closer to reaching its full potential, many groups have focused on improving reprogramming protocols over the past several years. The episomal modified Sendai virus-based vector has emerged as one of the most practical ones. Here we describe reprogramming of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) derived from umbilical cord Wharton's Jelly into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) using genome non-integrating Sendai virus-based vectors. The detailed protocols of iPSC colony cryopreservation (vitrification) and adaption to feeder-free culture conditions are also included.

  1. Induction of dental pulp-derived induced pluripotent stem cells in the absence of c-Myc for differentiation into neuron-like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Ching Chang

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The human DPCs from deciduous and permanent teeth can undergo reprogramming to establish pluripotent stem cell lines without c-Myc. These surgical residues, usually regarded as medical waste, can be used as an alternative source of pluripotent stem cells for personalized medicine.

  2. Reprogramming of Human Fibroblasts to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Sleeping Beauty Transposon-Based Stable Gene Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebe, Attila; Ivics, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a source of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells and resemble human embryonic stem (ES) cells in gene expression profiles, morphology, pluripotency, and in vitro differentiation potential. iPS cells are applied in disease modeling, drug screenings, toxicology screenings, and autologous cell therapy. In this protocol, we describe how to derive human iPS cells from fibroblasts by Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated gene transfer of reprogramming factors. First, the components of the non-viral Sleeping Beauty transposon system, namely a transposon vector encoding reprogramming transcription factors and a helper plasmid expressing the SB transposase, are electroporated into human fibroblasts. The reprogramming cassette undergoes transposition from the transfected plasmids into the fibroblast genome, thereby resulting in stable delivery of the reprogramming factors. Reprogramming by using this protocol takes ~4 weeks, after which the iPS cells are isolated and clonally propagated.

  3. Advancing induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology by assessing genetic instability and immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Requena Osete, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    [eng] Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) can be made from adult somatic cells by reprogramming them with Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc. IPSC have given rise to a new technology to study and treat human disease (Takahashi et al., 2007). However, before iPSC clinical application, we need to step back and address two main challenges: (i) Genetic stability of iPSC. (ii) Immune response of iPSC-derived cells. To address these key issues, the overall mission of this PhD thesis is to adva...

  4. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Defined Three-Dimensional Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiazzo, Massimiliano; Tabata, Yoji; Lutolf, Matthias P

    2017-01-01

    Since the groundbreaking discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) many research groups have attempted to improve the efficiency of the classical cell reprogramming process. Surprisingly, the contribution of the three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment to iPSC generation has been largely overlooked. Here we describe a protocol for the generation of iPSCs in defined poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels that, besides allowing higher reprogramming efficiency, are also a powerful tool to study the influence of biophysical parameters on iPSC generation.

  5. CRISPR-Cas9: a promising tool for gene editing on induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Kang, Ki Ho; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in genome editing with programmable nucleases have opened up new avenues for multiple applications, from basic research to clinical therapy. The ease of use of the technology-and particularly clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-will allow us to improve our understanding of genomic variation in disease processes via cellular and animal models. Here, we highlight the progress made in correcting gene mutations in monogenic hereditary disorders and discuss various CRISPR-associated applications, such as cancer research, synthetic biology, and gene therapy using induced pluripotent stem cells. The challenges, ethical issues, and future prospects of CRISPR-based systems for human research are also discussed.

  6. Paving the way towards complex blood-brain barrier models using pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauschke, Karin; Frederiksen, Lise; Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2017-01-01

    to the unique tightness and selective permeability of the BBB and has been shown to be disrupted in many diseases and brain disorders, such as, vascular dementia, stroke, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Given the progress that pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have made in the last two decades......A tissue with great need to be modelled in vitro is the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is a tight barrier that covers all blood vessels in the brain and separates the brain microenvironment from the blood system. It consists of three cell types (neurovascular unit (NVU)) that contribute...

  7. Induced pluripotent stem cell - derived neurons for the study of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Kofoed; Stummann, Tina C.; Madsen, Helena Borland

    2016-01-01

    The neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is caused by a CAG-repeat expansion in the ATXN3 gene. In this study, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines were established from two SCA3 patients. Dermal fibroblasts were reprogrammed using an integration-free method...... displaying synchronized spontaneous calcium oscillations within 28 days of maturation, and expressed the mature neuronal markers NeuN and Synapsin 1 implying a relatively advanced state of maturity, although not comparable to that of the adult human brain. Interestingly, we were not able to recapitulate...

  8. Considerations for pre-clinical models and clinical trials of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Stillitano, Francesca; Salem, Joe Elie; Kovacic, Jason C; Fuster, Valentin; Hajjar, Roger J

    2014-01-09

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represent an appealing source from which to develop cell replacement therapies. Different initiatives have been launched to promote their development toward clinical applications. This article will review the main questions that should be considered before translating PSC-derived cardiomyocytes into clinical investigations, including the development of good manufacturing practice-level PSC lines, the development of efficient protocols to generate pure populations of cardiac myocytes, and the development of techniques to improve the retention and survival rate of transplanted cells.

  9. Stochastic NANOG fluctuations allow mouse embryonic stem cells to explore pluripotency

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abranches, E.; Guedes, A.M.V.; Moravec, Martin; Maamar, H.; Svoboda, Petr; Raj, A.; Henrique, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 14 (2014), s. 2770-2779 ISSN 0950-1991 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP305/12/G034 Grant - others:Fundacao para a Ciencia e Tecnologia(PT) SFRH/ BPD/78313/2011; Fundacao para a Ciencia e Tecnologia(PT) SFRH/BD/80191/2011; Fundacao para a Ciencia e Tecnologia(PT) PTDC/SAUOBD/100664/2008; GA AV ČR M200521202 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Gene expression heterogeneity * Pluripotency * Lineage priming * Nanog * Stem cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.462, year: 2014

  10. Generation of transgene-free mouse induced pluripotent stem cells using an excisable lentiviral system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, E; Nemes, C; Davis, R P; Ujhelly, O; Klincumhom, N; Polgar, Z; Muenthaisong, S; Pirity, M K; Dinnyes, A

    2014-04-01

    One goal of research using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) is to generate patient-specific cells which can be used to obtain multiple types of differentiated cells as disease models. Minimally or non-integrating methods to deliver the reprogramming genes are considered to be the best but they may be inefficient. Lentiviral delivery is currently among the most efficient methods but it integrates transgenes into the genome, which may affect the behavior of the iPSC if integration occurs into an important locus. Here we designed a polycistronic lentiviral construct containing four pluripotency genes with an EGFP selection marker. The cassette was excisable with the Cre-loxP system making possible the removal of the integrated transgenes from the genome. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts were reprogrammed using this viral system, rapidly resulting in large number of iPSC colonies. Based on the lowest EGFP expression level, one parental line was chosen for excision. Introduction of the Cre recombinase resulted in transgene-free iPSC subclones. The effect of the transgenes was assessed by comparing the parental iPSC with two of its transgene-free subclones. Both excised and non-excised iPSCs expressed standard pluripotency markers. The subclones obtained after Cre recombination were capable of differentiation in vitro, in contrast to the parental, non-excised cells and formed germ-line competent chimeras in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Systematic optimization of human pluripotent stem cells media using Design of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Paulo A.; Chailangkarn, Thanathom; Muotri, Alysson R.

    2015-05-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) are used to study the early stages of human development in vitro and, increasingly due to somatic cell reprogramming, cellular and molecular mechanisms of disease. Cell culture medium is a critical factor for hPSC to maintain pluripotency and self-renewal. Numerous defined culture media have been empirically developed but never systematically optimized for culturing hPSC. We applied design of experiments (DOE), a powerful statistical tool, to improve the medium formulation for hPSC. Using pluripotency and cell growth as read-outs, we determined the optimal concentration of both basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and neuregulin-1 beta 1 (NRG1β1). The resulting formulation, named iDEAL, improved the maintenance and passage of hPSC in both normal and stressful conditions, and affected trimethylated histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) epigenetic status after genetic reprogramming. It also enhances efficient hPSC plating as single cells. Altogether, iDEAL potentially allows scalable and controllable hPSC culture routine in translational research. Our DOE strategy could also be applied to hPSC differentiation protocols, which often require numerous and complex cell culture media.

  12. Systematic optimization of human pluripotent stem cells media using Design of Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Paulo A; Chailangkarn, Thanathom; Muotri, Alysson R

    2015-05-05

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) are used to study the early stages of human development in vitro and, increasingly due to somatic cell reprogramming, cellular and molecular mechanisms of disease. Cell culture medium is a critical factor for hPSC to maintain pluripotency and self-renewal. Numerous defined culture media have been empirically developed but never systematically optimized for culturing hPSC. We applied design of experiments (DOE), a powerful statistical tool, to improve the medium formulation for hPSC. Using pluripotency and cell growth as read-outs, we determined the optimal concentration of both basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and neuregulin-1 beta 1 (NRG1β1). The resulting formulation, named iDEAL, improved the maintenance and passage of hPSC in both normal and stressful conditions, and affected trimethylated histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) epigenetic status after genetic reprogramming. It also enhances efficient hPSC plating as single cells. Altogether, iDEAL potentially allows scalable and controllable hPSC culture routine in translational research. Our DOE strategy could also be applied to hPSC differentiation protocols, which often require numerous and complex cell culture media.

  13. Long-Term Culture of Self-renewing Pancreatic Progenitors Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Trott

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells have been proposed as an unlimited source of pancreatic β cells for studying and treating diabetes. However, the long, multi-step differentiation protocols used to generate functional β cells inevitably exhibit considerable variability, particularly when applied to pluripotent cells from diverse genetic backgrounds. We have developed culture conditions that support long-term self-renewal of human multipotent pancreatic progenitors, which are developmentally more proximal to the specialized cells of the adult pancreas. These cultured pancreatic progenitor (cPP cells express key pancreatic transcription factors, including PDX1 and SOX9, and exhibit transcriptomes closely related to their in vivo counterparts. Upon exposure to differentiation cues, cPP cells give rise to pancreatic endocrine, acinar, and ductal lineages, indicating multilineage potency. Furthermore, cPP cells generate insulin+ β-like cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that they offer a convenient alternative to pluripotent cells as a source of adult cell types for modeling pancreatic development and diabetes.

  14. Long-Term Culture of Self-renewing Pancreatic Progenitors Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Jamie; Tan, Ee Kim; Ong, Sheena; Titmarsh, Drew M; Denil, Simon L I J; Giam, Maybelline; Wong, Cheng Kit; Wang, Jiaxu; Shboul, Mohammad; Eio, Michelle; Cooper-White, Justin; Cool, Simon M; Rancati, Giulia; Stanton, Lawrence W; Reversade, Bruno; Dunn, N Ray

    2017-06-06

    Pluripotent stem cells have been proposed as an unlimited source of pancreatic β cells for studying and treating diabetes. However, the long, multi-step differentiation protocols used to generate functional β cells inevitably exhibit considerable variability, particularly when applied to pluripotent cells from diverse genetic backgrounds. We have developed culture conditions that support long-term self-renewal of human multipotent pancreatic progenitors, which are developmentally more proximal to the specialized cells of the adult pancreas. These cultured pancreatic progenitor (cPP) cells express key pancreatic transcription factors, including PDX1 and SOX9, and exhibit transcriptomes closely related to their in vivo counterparts. Upon exposure to differentiation cues, cPP cells give rise to pancreatic endocrine, acinar, and ductal lineages, indicating multilineage potency. Furthermore, cPP cells generate insulin+ β-like cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that they offer a convenient alternative to pluripotent cells as a source of adult cell types for modeling pancreatic development and diabetes. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Novel Method for Isolation of Pluripotent Stem Cells from Human Umbilical Cord Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Manuela; Imberti, Barbara; Bianchi, Niccolò; Pezzotta, Anna; Morigi, Marina; Del Fante, Claudia; Redi, Carlo Alberto; Perotti, Cesare

    2017-09-01

    Very small embryonic-like cells (VSELs) are a population of very rare pluripotent stem cells isolated in adult murine bone marrow and many other tissues and organs, including umbilical cord blood (UCB). VSEL existence is still not universally accepted by the scientific community, so for this purpose, we sought to investigate whether presumptive VSELs (pVSELs) could be isolated from human UCB with an improved protocol based on the isolation of enriched progenitor cells by depletion of nonprogenitor cells with magnetic separation. Progenitor cells, likely including VSELs, cultured with retinoic acid were able to form dense colonies and cystic embryoid bodies and to differentiate toward the ecto-meso-endoderm lineages as shown by the positivity to specific markers. VSEL differentiative potential toward mesodermal lineage was further demonstrated in vitro upon exposure to an established inductive protocol, which induced the acquisition of renal progenitor cell phenotype. VSEL-derived renal progenitors showed regenerative potential in a cisplatin model of acute kidney injury by restoring renal function and tubular structure through induction of proliferation of endogenous renal cells. The data presented here foster the great debate that surrounds VSELs and, more in general, the existence of cells endowed with pluripotent features in adult tissues. In fact, the possibility to find and isolate subpopulations of cells that fully fit all the criteria utilized to define pluripotency remains, nowadays, almost unproven. Thus, efforts to better characterize the phenotype of these intriguing cells are crucial to understand their possible applications for regenerative and precision medicine purposes.

  16. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem (Ips cells in serum- and feeder-free defined culture and TGF-Β1 regulation of pluripotency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Yamasaki

    Full Text Available Human Embryonic Stem cells (hESCs and human induced Pluripotent Stem cells (hiPSCs are commonly maintained on inactivated mouse embryonic fibroblast as feeder cells in medium supplemented with FBS or proprietary replacements. Use of culture medium containing undefined or unknown components has limited the development of applications for pluripotent cells because of the relative lack of knowledge regarding cell responses to differentiating growth factors. In addition, there is no consensus as to the optimal formulation, or the nature of the cytokine requirements of the cells to promote their self-renewal and inhibit their differentiation. In this study, we successfully generated hiPSCs from human dental pulp cells (DPCs using Yamanaka's factors (Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc with retroviral vectors in serum- and feeder-free defined culture conditions. These hiPSCs retained the property of self-renewal as evaluated by the expression of self-renewal marker genes and proteins, morphology, cell growth rates, and pluripotency evaluated by differentiation into derivatives of all three primary germ layers in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we found that TGF-β1 increased the expression levels of pluripotency markers in a dose-dependent manner. However, increasing doses of TGF-β1 suppressed the growth rate of hiPSCs cultured under the defined conditions. Furthermore, over short time periods the hiPSCs cultured in hESF9 or hESF9T exhibited similar morphology, but hiPSCs maintained in hESF9 could not survive beyond 30 passages. This result clearly confirmed that hiPSCs cultured in hESF9 medium absolutely required TGF-β1 to maintain pluripotency. This simple serum-free adherent monoculture system will allow us to elucidate the cell responses to growth factors under defined conditions and can eliminate the risk might be brought by undefined pathogens.

  17. The importance of drug transporters in human pluripotent stem cells and in early tissue differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apáti, Ágota; Szebényi, Kornélia; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Várady, György; Orbán, Tamás I; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2016-01-01

    Drug transporters are large transmembrane proteins which catalyse the movement of a wide variety of chemicals, including drugs as well as xeno- and endobiotics through cellular membranes. The major groups of these proteins include the ATP-binding cassette transporters which in eukaryotes work as ATP-fuelled drug 'exporters' and the Solute Carrier transporters, with various transport directions and mechanisms. In this review, we discuss the key ATP-binding cassette and Solute Carrier drug transporters which have been reported to contribute to the function and/or protection of undifferentiated human stem cells and during tissue differentiation. We review the various techniques for studying transporter expression and function in stem cells, and the role of drug transporters in foetal and placental tissues is also discussed. We especially focus on the regulation of transporter expression by factors modulating cell differentiation properties and on the function of the transporters in adjustment to environmental challenges. The relatively new and as yet unexplored territory of transporters in stem cell biology may rapidly expand and bring important new information regarding the metabolic and epigenetic regulation of 'stemness' and the early differentiation properties. Drug transporters are clearly important protective and regulatory components in stem cells and differentiation.

  18. Deconstructing the pluripotency gene regulatory network

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Mo

    2018-04-04

    Pluripotent stem cells can be isolated from embryos or derived by reprogramming. Pluripotency is stabilized by an interconnected network of pluripotency genes that cooperatively regulate gene expression. Here we describe the molecular principles of pluripotency gene function and highlight post-transcriptional controls, particularly those induced by RNA-binding proteins and alternative splicing, as an important regulatory layer of pluripotency. We also discuss heterogeneity in pluripotency regulation, alternative pluripotency states and future directions of pluripotent stem cell research.

  19. Effect of angiotensin II on proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells into mesodermal progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizuka, Toshiaki, E-mail: tishizu@ndmc.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-8513 (Japan); Goshima, Hazuki; Ozawa, Ayako; Watanabe, Yasuhiro [Department of Pharmacology, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-8513 (Japan)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II enhanced LIF-induced DNA synthesis of mouse iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the DNA synthesis via induction of superoxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II enhanced differentiation into mesodermal progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the differentiation via activation of p38 MAPK. -- Abstract: Previous studies suggest that angiotensin receptor stimulation may enhance not only proliferation but also differentiation of undifferentiated stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, in the present study, we determined the involvement of the angiotensin receptor in the proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Stimulation with angiotensin II (Ang II) significantly increased DNA synthesis in mouse iPS cells cultured in a medium with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Pretreatment of the cells with either candesartan (a selective Ang II type 1 receptor [AT{sub 1}R] antagonist) or Tempol (a cell-permeable superoxide scavenger) significantly inhibited Ang II-induced DNA synthesis. Treatment with Ang II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Pretreatment with candesartan significantly inhibited Ang II- induced JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. In contrast, induction of mouse iPS cell differentiation into Flk-1-positive mesodermal progenitor cells was performed in type IV collagen (Col IV)- coated dishes in a differentiation medium without LIF. When Col IV-exposed iPS cells were treated with Ang II for 5 days, the expression of Flk-1 was significantly increased compared with that in the cells treated with the vehicle alone. Pretreatment of the cells with both candesartan and SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) significantly inhibited the Ang II- induced increase in Flk-1 expression

  20. Single cell lineage analysis of mouse embryonic stem cells at the exit from pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Trott

    2013-08-01

    Understanding how interactions between extracellular signalling pathways and transcription factor networks influence cellular decision making will be crucial for understanding mammalian embryogenesis and for generating specialised cell types in vitro. To this end, pluripotent mouse Embryonic Stem (mES cells have proven to be a useful model system. However, understanding how transcription factors and signalling pathways affect decisions made by individual cells is confounded by the fact that measurements are generally made on groups of cells, whilst individual mES cells differentiate at different rates and towards different lineages, even in conditions that favour a particular lineage. Here we have used single-cell measurements of transcription factor expression and Wnt/β-catenin signalling activity to investigate their effects on lineage commitment decisions made by individual cells. We find that pluripotent mES cells exhibit differing degrees of heterogeneity in their expression of important regulators from pluripotency, depending on the signalling environment to which they are exposed. As mES cells differentiate, downregulation of Nanog and Oct4 primes cells for neural commitment, whilst loss of Sox2 expression primes cells for primitive streak commitment. Furthermore, we find that Wnt signalling acts through Nanog to direct cells towards a primitive streak fate, but that transcriptionally active β-catenin is associated with both neural and primitive streak commitment. These observations confirm and extend previous suggestions that pluripotency genes influence lineage commitment and demonstrate how their dynamic expression affects the direction of lineage commitment, whilst illustrating two ways in which the Wnt signalling pathway acts on this network during cell fate assignment.

  1. Vectors to Increase Production Efficiency of Inducible Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    This invention describes the discovery that specific p53 isoform increase the number of inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPS). It is known that the activity of p53 regulates the self-renewal and pluripotency of normal and cancer stem cells, and also affects re-programming efficiency of iPS cells. This p53 isoform-based technology provides a more natural process of increasing iPS cell production than previous methods of decreasing p53. NCI seeks licensees for this technology.

  2. Manipulation of signaling thresholds in "engineered stem cell niches" identifies design criteria for pluripotent stem cell screens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheem Peerani

    Full Text Available In vivo, stem cell fate is regulated by local microenvironmental parameters. Governing parameters in this stem cell niche include soluble factors, extra-cellular matrix, and cell-cell interactions. The complexity of this in vivo niche limits analyses into how individual niche parameters regulate stem cell fate. Herein we use mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC and micro-contact printing (microCP to investigate how niche size controls endogenous signaling thresholds. microCP is used to restrict colony diameter, separation, and degree of clustering. We show, for the first time, spatial control over the activation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway (Jak-Stat. The functional consequences of this niche-size-dependent signaling control are confirmed by demonstrating that direct and indirect transcriptional targets of Stat3, including members of the Jak-Stat pathway and pluripotency-associated genes, are regulated by colony size. Modeling results and empirical observations demonstrate that colonies less than 100 microm in diameter are too small to maximize endogenous Stat3 activation and that colonies separated by more than 400 microm can be considered independent from each other. These results define parameter boundaries for the use of ESCs in screening studies, demonstrate the importance of context in stem cell responsiveness to exogenous cues, and suggest that niche size is an important parameter in stem cell fate control.

  3. Totipotency, Pluripotency and Nuclear Reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Wolf, Don

    Mammalian development commences with the totipotent zygote which is capable of developing into all the specialized cells that make up the adult animal. As development unfolds, cells of the early embryo proliferate and differentiate into the first two lineages, the pluripotent inner cell mass and the trophectoderm. Pluripotent cells can be isolated, adapted and propagated indefinitely in vitro in an undifferentiated state as embryonic stem cells (ESCs). ESCs retain their ability to differentiate into cells representing the three major germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm or ectoderm or any of the 200+ cell types present in the adult body. Since many human diseases result from defects in a single cell type, pluripotent human ESCs represent an unlimited source of any cell or tissue type for replacement therapy thus providing a possible cure for many devastating conditions. Pluripotent cells resembling ESCs can also be derived experimentally by the nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells. Reprogrammed somatic cells may have an even more important role in cell replacement therapies since the patient's own somatic cells can be used for reprogramming thereby eliminating immune based rejection of transplanted cells. In this review, we summarize two major approaches to reprogramming: (1) somatic cell nuclear transfer and (2) direct reprogramming using genetic manipulations.

  4. Rat embryonic fibroblasts improve reprogramming of human keratinocytes into induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linta, Leonhard; Stockmann, Marianne; Kleinhans, Karin N; Böckers, Anja; Storch, Alexander; Zaehres, Holm; Lin, Qiong; Barbi, Gotthold; Böckers, Tobias M; Kleger, Alexander; Liebau, Stefan

    2012-04-10

    Patient-specific human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells not only provide a promising tool for cellular disease models in general, but also open up the opportunity to establish cell-type-specific systems for personalized medicine. One of the crucial prerequisites for these strategies, however, is a fast and efficient reprogramming strategy from easy accessible somatic cell populations. Keratinocytes from plucked human hair had been introduced as a superior cell source for reprogramming purposes compared with the widely used skin fibroblasts. The starting cell population is, however, limited and thereby further optimization in terms of time, efficiency, and quality is inevitable. Here we show that rat embryonic fibroblasts (REFs) should replace mouse embryonic fibroblasts as feeder cells in the reprogramming process. REFs enable a significantly more efficient reprogramming procedure as shown by colony number and total amount of SSEA4-positive cells. We successfully produced keratinocyte-derived hiPS (k-hiPS) cells from various donors. The arising k-hiPS cells display the hallmarks of pluripotency such as expression of stem cell markers and differentiation into all 3 germ layers. The increased reprogramming efficiency using REFs as a feeder layer occurred independent of the proliferation rate in the parental keratinocytes and acts, at least in part, in a non-cell autonomous way by secreting factors known to facilitate pluripotency such as Tgfb1, Inhba and Grem1. Hence, we provide an easy to use and highly efficient reprogramming system that could be very useful for a broad application to generate human iPS cells. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  5. Qualitative modeling identifies IL-11 as a novel regulator in maintaining self-renewal in human pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi ePeterson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotency in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs is regulated by three transcription factors - OCT3/4, SOX2 and NANOG. To fully exploit the therapeutic potential of these cells it is essential to have a good mechanistic understanding of the maintenance of self-renewal and pluripotency. In this study, we demonstrate a powerful systems biology approach in which we first expand literature-based network encompassing the core regulators of pluripotency by assessing the behaviour of genes targeted by perturbation experiments. We focused our attention on highly regulated genes encoding cell surface and secreted proteins as these can be more easily manipulated by the use of inhibitors or recombinant proteins. Qualitative modeling based on combining boolean networks and in silico perturbation experiments were employed to identify novel pluripotency-regulating genes. We validated Interleukin-11 (IL-11 and demonstrate that this cytokine is a novel pluripotency-associated factor capable of supporting self-renewal in the absence of exogenously added bFGF in culture. To date, the various protocols for hESCs maintenance require supplementation with bFGF to activate the Activin/Nodal branch of the TGFβ signaling pathway. Additional evidence supporting our findings is that IL-11 belongs to the same protein family as LIF, which is known to be necessary for maintaining pluripotency in mouse but not in human ESCs. These cytokines operate through the same gp130 receptor which interacts with Janus kinases. Our finding might explain why mESCs are in a more naïve cell state compared to hESCs and how to convert primed hESCs back to the naïve state. Taken together, our integrative modeling approach has identified novel genes as putative candidates to be incorporated into the expansion of the current gene regulatory network responsible for inducing and maintaining pluripotency.

  6. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Advances in the Quest for Genetic Stability during Reprogramming Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Turinetto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the extent and nature of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC genetic instability is important for both basic research and future clinical use. As previously demonstrated regarding embryonic stem cells, such DNA aberrations might affect the differentiation capacity of the cells and increase their tumorigenicity. Here, we first focus on the contribution of multiple DNA damage response pathways during cellular reprogramming. We then discuss the origin and mechanisms responsible for the modification of genetic material in iPSCs (pre-existing variations in somatic cells, mutations induced by reprogramming factors, and mutations induced by culture expansion and deepen the possible functional consequences of genetic variations in these cells. Lastly, we present some recent improvements of iPSC generation methods aimed at obtaining cells with fewer genetic variations.

  7. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Advances in the Quest for Genetic Stability during Reprogramming Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Luca; Giachino, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Evaluation of the extent and nature of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) genetic instability is important for both basic research and future clinical use. As previously demonstrated regarding embryonic stem cells, such DNA aberrations might affect the differentiation capacity of the cells and increase their tumorigenicity. Here, we first focus on the contribution of multiple DNA damage response pathways during cellular reprogramming. We then discuss the origin and mechanisms responsible for the modification of genetic material in iPSCs (pre-existing variations in somatic cells, mutations induced by reprogramming factors, and mutations induced by culture expansion) and deepen the possible functional consequences of genetic variations in these cells. Lastly, we present some recent improvements of iPSC generation methods aimed at obtaining cells with fewer genetic variations. PMID:28902128

  8. Recreating the Cardiac Microenvironment in Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Human Physiology and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmanli, Ayhan; Domian, Ibrahim John

    2017-05-01

    The advent of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) biology has opened unprecedented opportunities for the use of tissue engineering to generate human cardiac tissue for in vitro study. Engineering cardiac constructs that recapitulate human development and disease requires faithful recreation of the cardiac niche in vitro. Here we discuss recent progress in translating the in vivo cardiac microenvironment into PSC models of the human heart. We review three key physiologic features required to recreate the cardiac niche and facilitate normal cardiac differentiation and maturation: the biochemical, biophysical, and bioelectrical signaling cues. Finally, we discuss key barriers that must be overcome to fulfill the promise of stem cell biology in preclinical applications and ultimately in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Advances in the Quest for Genetic Stability during Reprogramming Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinetto, Valentina; Orlando, Luca; Giachino, Claudia

    2017-09-13

    Evaluation of the extent and nature of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) genetic instability is important for both basic research and future clinical use. As previously demonstrated regarding embryonic stem cells, such DNA aberrations might affect the differentiation capacity of the cells and increase their tumorigenicity. Here, we first focus on the contribution of multiple DNA damage response pathways during cellular reprogramming. We then discuss the origin and mechanisms responsible for the modification of genetic material in iPSCs (pre-existing variations in somatic cells, mutations induced by reprogramming factors, and mutations induced by culture expansion) and deepen the possible functional consequences of genetic variations in these cells. Lastly, we present some recent improvements of iPSC generation methods aimed at obtaining cells with fewer genetic variations.

  10. Development and Characterization of a Brain Endothelial Cell Phenotype using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldeman, Charlotte; Saaby, Lasse; Holst, Bjørn

    The transport of substances from blood to brain is regulated by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), i.e. the barrier properties of the brain endothelium. The endothelium restricts the transport into the brain of the majority of new drug candidates. Cultured monolayers of brain endothelial cells can...... be used to investigate drug transport in vitro, and screen candidates for permeation properties. One recent approach is to develop in vitro models of the BBB using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) as described by Stebbins et al. (2015).The aim of the present study was to investigate whether...... the published protocols were generically applicable and thus to develop and characterize in vitro models of the BBB using hIPSCs from different sources. Two stem cell lines, Bioni010-C and WTSli024-A, were seeded and maintained on Matrigel in mTesR1 media. Cells were then seeded as single cells at different...

  11. Bioengineering of injectable encapsulated aggregates of pluripotent stem cells for therapy of myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wang, Hai; Reese, Benjamin E.; Gushchina, Liubov V.; Jiang, Meng; Agarwal, Pranay; Xu, Jiangsheng; Zhang, Mingjun; Shen, Rulong; Liu, Zhenguo; Weisleder, Noah; He, Xiaoming

    2016-10-01

    It is difficult to achieve minimally invasive injectable cell delivery while maintaining high cell retention and animal survival for in vivo stem cell therapy of myocardial infarction. Here we show that pluripotent stem cell aggregates pre-differentiated into the early cardiac lineage and encapsulated in a biocompatible and biodegradable micromatrix, are suitable for injectable delivery. This method significantly improves the survival of the injected cells by more than six-fold compared with the conventional practice of injecting single cells, and effectively prevents teratoma formation. Moreover, this method significantly enhances cardiac function and survival of animals after myocardial infarction, as a result of a localized immunosuppression effect of the micromatrix and the in situ cardiac regeneration by the injected cells.

  12. MicroRNA-Mediated Reprogramming of Somatic Cells into Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmaier, Shelley E S; Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V L

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs or miRNAs belong to a class of small noncoding RNAs that play a crucial role in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Nascent miRNAs are expressed as a longer transcript, which are then processed into a smaller 18-23-nucleotide mature miRNAs that bind to the target transcripts and induce cleavage or inhibit translation. MiRNAs therefore represent another key regulator of gene expression in establishing and maintaining unique cellular fate. Several classes of miRNAs have been identified to be uniquely expressed in embryonic stem cells (ESC) and regulated by the core transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4. One such class of miRNAs is the mir-302/367 cluster that is enriched in pluripotent cells in vivo and in vitro. Using the mir-302/367 either by themselves or in combination with the Yamanaka reprogramming factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4) has resulted in the establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) with high efficiencies. In this chapter, we outline the methodologies for establishing and utilizing the miRNA-based tools for reprogramming somatic cells into iPSC.

  13. Production of embryonic and fetal-like red blood cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Jung Chang

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that human embryonic stem cells can be differentiated into embryonic and fetal type of red blood cells that sequentially express three types of hemoglobins recapitulating early human erythropoiesis. We report here that we have produced iPS from three somatic cell types: adult skin fibroblasts as well as embryonic and fetal mesenchymal stem cells. We show that regardless of the age of the donor cells, the iPS produced are fully reprogrammed into a pluripotent state that is undistinguishable from that of hESCs by low and high-throughput expression and detailed analysis of globin expression patterns by HPLC. This suggests that reprogramming with the four original Yamanaka pluripotency factors leads to complete erasure of all functionally important epigenetic marks associated with erythroid differentiation regardless of the age or the tissue type of the donor cells, at least as detected in these assays. The ability to produce large number of erythroid cells with embryonic and fetal-like characteristics is likely to have many translational applications.

  14. Mitochondrial resetting and metabolic reprogramming in induced pluripotent stem cells and mitochondrial disease modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Chen, Chien-Tsun; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear reprogramming with pluripotency factors enables somatic cells to gain the properties of embryonic stem cells. Mitochondrial resetting and metabolic reprogramming are suggested to be key early events in the induction of human skin fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We review recent advances in the study of the molecular basis for mitochondrial resetting and metabolic reprogramming in the regulation of the formation of iPSCs. In particular, the recent progress in using iPSCs for mitochondrial disease modeling was discussed. iPSCs rely on glycolysis rather than oxidative phosphorylation as a major supply of energy. Mitochondrial resetting and metabolic reprogramming thus play crucial roles in the process of generation of iPSCs from somatic cells. Neurons, myocytes, and cardiomyocytes are cells containing abundant mitochondria in the human body, which can be differentiated from iPSCs or trans-differentiated from fibroblasts. Generating these cells from iPSCs derived from skin fibroblasts of patients with mitochondrial diseases or by trans-differentiation with cell-specific transcription factors will provide valuable insights into the role of mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in mitochondrial disease modeling and serves as a novel platform for screening of drugs to treat patients with mitochondrial diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Pluripotent stem cells in translation: a Food and Drug Administration-National Institutes of Health collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleitman, Naomi; Rao, Mahendra S; Owens, David F

    2013-07-01

    Recently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the U.S. National Institutes of Health, and the stem cell research community have collaborated on a series of workshops that address moving pluripotent stem cell therapies into the clinic. The first two workshops in the series focused on preclinical science, and a third, future workshop will focus on clinical trials. This summary addresses major points from both of the recent preclinically focused meetings. When entering into a therapeutics developmental program based on pluripotent cells, investigators must make decisions at the very early stages that will have major ramifications during later phases of development. Presentations and discussions from both invited participants and FDA staff described the need to characterize and document the quality, variability, and suitability of the cells and commercial reagents used at every translational stage. This requires consideration of future regulatory requirements, ranging from donor eligibility of the original source material to the late-stage manufacturing protocols. Federal, industrial, and academic participants agreed that planning backward is the best way to anticipate what evidence will be needed to justify human testing of novel therapeutics and to eliminate wasted efforts.

  16. Epigenetic Modulation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation to Oligodendrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Douvaras

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells provide an invaluable tool for generating human, disease-relevant cells. Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, characterized by myelin damage. Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the central nervous system (CNS; they differentiate from progenitor cells, and their membranes ensheath axons, providing trophic support and allowing fast conduction velocity. The current understanding of oligodendrocyte biology was founded by rodent studies, where the establishment of repressive epigenetic marks on histone proteins, followed by activation of myelin genes, leads to lineage progression. To assess whether this epigenetic regulation is conserved across species, we differentiated human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells to oligodendrocytes and asked whether similar histone marks and relative enzymatic activities could be detected. The transcriptional levels of enzymes responsible for methylation and acetylation of histone marks were analyzed during oligodendrocyte differentiation, and the post-translational modifications on histones were detected using immunofluorescence. These studies showed that also in human cells, differentiation along the oligodendrocyte lineage is characterized by the acquisition of multiple repressive histone marks, including deacetylation of lysine residues on histone H3 and trimethylation of residues K9 and K27. These data suggest that the epigenetic modulation of oligodendrocyte identity is highly conserved across species.

  17. Innate immune response of human pluripotent stem cell-derived airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Brendan A S; Kushwah, Rahul; Mechael, Rami; Shapovalova, Zoya; Alev, Cantas; Bhatia, Mickie

    2015-07-01

    The acquisition of innate immune response is requisite to having bona fide differentiation of airway epithelium. Procedures developed to differentiate lung airway from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have demonstrated anecdotal evidence for innate immune response, but an in-depth exploration of response levels is lacking. Herein, using an established method of airway epithelial generation from hPSCs, we show that hPSC-derived epithelial cells are able to up-regulate expression of TNFα, IL8 and IL1β in response to challenge with bacterial endotoxin LPS, but lack response from genes associated with innate immune response in other cell types. Further, stimulation of cells with TNF-α resulted in auto-induction of TNFα transcript, as well as cytokine responses of IL8 and IL1β. The demonstration of innate immune induction in hPSC-derived airway epithelia gives further strength to the functionality of in vitro protocols aimed at generating differentiated airway cells that can potentially be used in a translational setting. Finally, we propose that innate immune challenge of airway epithelium from human pluripotent stem cell sources be used as a robust validation of functional in vitro differentiation. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. Hepatic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in miniaturized format suitable for high-throughput screen

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    Arnaud Carpentier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs including embryonic (ESC and induced pluripotent (iPSC stem cells into functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs creates new opportunities to study liver metabolism, genetic diseases and infection of hepatotropic viruses (hepatitis B and C viruses in the context of specific genetic background. While supporting efficient differentiation to HLCs, the published protocols are limited in terms of differentiation into fully mature hepatocytes and in a smaller-well format. This limitation handicaps the application of these cells to high-throughput assays. Here we describe a protocol allowing efficient and consistent hepatic differentiation of hPSCs in 384-well plates into functional hepatocyte-like cells, which remain differentiated for more than 3 weeks. This protocol affords the unique opportunity to miniaturize the hPSC-based differentiation technology and facilitates screening for molecules in modulating liver differentiation, metabolism, genetic network, and response to infection or other external stimuli.

  19. Inherent Immunogenicity or Lack Thereof of Pluripotent Stem Cells: Implications for Cell Replacement Therapy

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    Arvind Chhabra

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Donor-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs offer opportunities for personalized cell replacement therapeutic approaches due to their unlimited self-renewal potential and ability to differentiate into different somatic cells. A significant progress has been made toward generating iPSC lines that are free of integrating viral vectors, development of xeno-free culture conditions, and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs into functional somatic cell lineages. Since donor-specific iPSC lines are genetically identical to the individual, they are expected to be immunologically matched and these iPSC lines and their cellular derivatives are not expected to be immunologically rejected. However, studies in mouse models, utilizing rejection of teratomas as a model, have claimed that syngenic iPSC lines, especially the iPSC lines derived with integrating viral vectors, could be inherently immunogenic. This manuscript reviews current understanding of inherent immunogenicity of PSC lines, especially that of the human iPSC lines and their cellular derivatives, and strategies to overcome it.

  20. Ex vivo Generation of Genetically Modified Macrophages from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Mania; Kuhn, Alexandra; Kunkiel, Jessica; Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich; Moritz, Thomas; Lachmann, Nico

    2017-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, including induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), have the capacity to differentiate towards all three germ layers and have been highlighted as an attractive cell source for the field of regenerative medicine. Thus, stable expression of therapeutic transgenes in iPSCs, as well as thereof derived progeny of hematopoietic lineage, may lay the foundation for innovative cell replacement therapies. We have utilized human iPSC lines genetically modified by lentiviral vector technology or targeted integration of reporter genes to evaluate transgene expression during hematopoietic specification and differentiation towards macrophages. Use of lentiviral vectors equipped with an ubiquitous chromatin opening element (CBX3-UCOE) as well as zinc finger nuclease-mediated targeting of an expression cassette into the human adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) safe harbor resulted in stable transgene expression in iPSCs. When iPSCs were differentiated along the myeloid pathway into macrophages, both strategies yielded sustained transgene expression during the hematopoietic specification process including mature CD14+ and CD11b+ macrophages. Combination of human iPSC technology with either lentiviral vector technology or designer nuclease-based genome editing allows for the generation of transgenic iPSC-derived macrophages with stable transgene expression which may be useful for novel cell and gene replacement therapies.

  1. Biomedical and Clinical Promises of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disorders

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    Nopporn Jongkamonwiwat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders are characterized by the chronic and progressive loss of neuronal structures and functions. There is a variability of the onsets and causes of clinical manifestations. Cell therapy has brought a new concept to overcome brain diseases, but the advancement of this therapy is limited by the demands of specialized neurons. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have been promised as a renewable resource for generating human neurons for both laboratory and clinical purposes. By the modulations of appropriate signalling pathways, desired neuron subtypes can be obtained, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide genetically matched neurons for treating patients. These hPSC-derived neurons can also be used for disease modeling and drug screening. Since the most urgent problem today in transplantation is the lack of suitable donor organs and tissues, the derivation of neural progenitor cells from hPSCs has opened a new avenue for regenerative medicine. In this review, we summarize the recent reports that show how to generate neural derivatives from hPSCs, and discuss the current evidence of using these cells in animal studies. We also highlight the possibilities and concerns of translating these hPSC-derived neurons for biomedical and clinical uses in order to fight against neurological disorders.

  2. Epigenetic Modulation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation to Oligodendrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douvaras, Panagiotis; Rusielewicz, Tomasz; Kim, Kwi Hye; Haines, Jeffery D.; Casaccia, Patrizia; Fossati, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells provide an invaluable tool for generating human, disease-relevant cells. Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, characterized by myelin damage. Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the central nervous system (CNS); they differentiate from progenitor cells, and their membranes ensheath axons, providing trophic support and allowing fast conduction velocity. The current understanding of oligodendrocyte biology was founded by rodent studies, where the establishment of repressive epigenetic marks on histone proteins, followed by activation of myelin genes, leads to lineage progression. To assess whether this epigenetic regulation is conserved across species, we differentiated human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells to oligodendrocytes and asked whether similar histone marks and relative enzymatic activities could be detected. The transcriptional levels of enzymes responsible for methylation and acetylation of histone marks were analyzed during oligodendrocyte differentiation, and the post-translational modifications on histones were detected using immunofluorescence. These studies showed that also in human cells, differentiation along the oligodendrocyte lineage is characterized by the acquisition of multiple repressive histone marks, including deacetylation of lysine residues on histone H3 and trimethylation of residues K9 and K27. These data suggest that the epigenetic modulation of oligodendrocyte identity is highly conserved across species. PMID:27110779

  3. Combinatorial Extracellular Matrix Microenvironments for Probing Endothelial Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Luqia; Kim, Joseph J; Wanjare, Maureen; Patlolla, Bhagat; Coller, John; Natu, Vanita; Hastie, Trevor J; Huang, Ngan F

    2017-07-26

    Endothelial cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells are a promising cell type for enhancing angiogenesis in ischemic cardiovascular tissues. However, our understanding of microenvironmental factors that modulate the process of endothelial differentiation is limited. We examined the role of combinatorial extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on endothelial differentiation systematically using an arrayed microscale platform. Human pluripotent stem cells were differentiated on the arrayed ECM microenvironments for 5 days. Combinatorial ECMs composed of collagen IV + heparan sulfate + laminin (CHL) or collagen IV + gelatin + heparan sulfate (CGH) demonstrated significantly higher expression of CD31, compared to single-factor ECMs. These results were corroborated by fluorescence activated cell sorting showing a 48% yield of CD31 + /VE-cadherin + cells on CHL, compared to 27% on matrigel. To elucidate the signaling mechanism, a gene expression time course revealed that VE-cadherin and FLK1 were upregulated in a dynamically similar manner as integrin subunit β3 (>50 fold). To demonstrate the functional importance of integrin β3 in promoting endothelial differentiation, the addition of neutralization antibody inhibited endothelial differentiation on CHL-modified dishes by >50%. These data suggest that optimal combinatorial ECMs enhance endothelial differentiation, compared to many single-factor ECMs, in part through an integrin β3-mediated pathway.

  4. A Dishful of a Troubled Mind: Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Psychiatric Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kálmán, Sára; Hathy, Edit; Réthelyi, János M

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells and direct reprogramming represent powerful methods for modeling the development of neurons in vitro. Moreover, this approach is also a means for comparing various cellular phenotypes between cell lines originating from healthy and diseased individuals or isogenic cell lines engineered to differ at only one or a few genomic loci. Despite methodological constraints and initial skepticism regarding this approach, the field is expanding at a fast pace. The improvements include the development of new differentiation protocols resulting in selected neuronal populations (e.g., dopaminergic, GABAergic, hippocampal, and cortical), the widespread use of genome editing methods, and single-cell techniques. A major challenge awaiting in vitro disease modeling is the integration of clinical data in the models, by selection of well characterized clinical populations. Ideally, these models will also demonstrate how different diagnostic categories share overlapping molecular disease mechanisms, but also have unique characteristics. In this review we evaluate studies with regard to the described developments, to demonstrate how differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells and direct reprogramming can contribute to psychiatry.

  5. Disease Modeling and Phenotypic Drug Screening for Diabetic Cardiomyopathy using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Faye M. Drawnel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a complication of type 2 diabetes, with known contributions of lifestyle and genetics. We develop environmentally and genetically driven in vitro models of the condition using human-induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes. First, we mimic diabetic clinical chemistry to induce a phenotypic surrogate of diabetic cardiomyopathy, observing structural and functional disarray. Next, we consider genetic effects by deriving cardiomyocytes from two diabetic patients with variable disease progression. The cardiomyopathic phenotype is recapitulated in the patient-specific cells basally, with a severity dependent on their original clinical status. These models are incorporated into successive levels of a screening platform, identifying drugs that preserve cardiomyocyte phenotype in vitro during diabetic stress. In this work, we present a patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC model of a complex metabolic condition, showing the power of this technique for discovery and testing of therapeutic strategies for a disease with ever-increasing clinical significance.

  6. Disease modeling and phenotypic drug screening for diabetic cardiomyopathy using human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawnel, Faye M; Boccardo, Stefano; Prummer, Michael; Delobel, Frédéric; Graff, Alexandra; Weber, Michael; Gérard, Régine; Badi, Laura; Kam-Thong, Tony; Bu, Lei; Jiang, Xin; Hoflack, Jean-Christophe; Kiialainen, Anna; Jeworutzki, Elena; Aoyama, Natsuyo; Carlson, Coby; Burcin, Mark; Gromo, Gianni; Boehringer, Markus; Stahlberg, Henning; Hall, Benjamin J; Magnone, Maria Chiara; Kolaja, Kyle; Chien, Kenneth R; Bailly, Jacques; Iacone, Roberto

    2014-11-06

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a complication of type 2 diabetes, with known contributions of lifestyle and genetics. We develop environmentally and genetically driven in vitro models of the condition using human-induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes. First, we mimic diabetic clinical chemistry to induce a phenotypic surrogate of diabetic cardiomyopathy, observing structural and functional disarray. Next, we consider genetic effects by deriving cardiomyocytes from two diabetic patients with variable disease progression. The cardiomyopathic phenotype is recapitulated in the patient-specific cells basally, with a severity dependent on their original clinical status. These models are incorporated into successive levels of a screening platform, identifying drugs that preserve cardiomyocyte phenotype in vitro during diabetic stress. In this work, we present a patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) model of a complex metabolic condition, showing the power of this technique for discovery and testing of therapeutic strategies for a disease with ever-increasing clinical significance. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Mechanobiology: Manipulating the Biophysical Microenvironment for Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Ronald G; Simmons, Craig A

    2015-11-01

    A stem cell in its microenvironment is subjected to a myriad of soluble chemical cues and mechanical forces that act in concert to orchestrate cell fate. Intuitively, many of these soluble and biophysical factors have been the focus of intense study to successfully influence and direct cell differentiation in vitro. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have been of considerable interest in these studies due to their great promise for regenerative medicine. Culturing and directing differentiation of hPSCs, however, is currently extremely labor-intensive and lacks the efficiency required to generate large populations of clinical-grade cells. Improved efficiency may come from efforts to understand how the cell biophysical signals can complement biochemical signals to regulate cell pluripotency and direct differentiation. In this concise review, we explore hPSC mechanobiology and how the hPSC biophysical microenvironment can be manipulated to maintain and differentiate hPSCs into functional cell types for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  8. Cardiac repair in guinea pigs with human engineered heart tissue from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Florian; Breckwoldt, Kaja; Pecha, Simon; Kelly, Allen; Geertz, Birgit; Starbatty, Jutta; Yorgan, Timur; Cheng, Kai-Hung; Lessmann, Katrin; Stolen, Tomas; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Smith, Godfrey; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-11-02

    Myocardial injury results in a loss of contractile tissue mass that, in the absence of efficient regeneration, is essentially irreversible. Transplantation of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes has beneficial but variable effects. We created human engineered heart tissue (hEHT) strips from human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes and hiPSC-derived endothelial cells. The hEHTs were transplanted onto large defects (22% of the left ventricular wall, 35% decline in left ventricular function) of guinea pig hearts 7 days after cryoinjury, and the results were compared with those obtained with human endothelial cell patches (hEETs) or cell-free patches. Twenty-eight days after transplantation, the hearts repaired with hEHT strips exhibited, within the scar, human heart muscle grafts, which had remuscularized 12% of the infarct area. These grafts showed cardiomyocyte proliferation, vascularization, and evidence for electrical coupling to the intact heart tissue in a subset of engrafted hearts. hEHT strips improved left ventricular function by 31% compared to that before implantation, whereas the hEET or cell-free patches had no effect. Together, our study demonstrates that three-dimensional human heart muscle constructs can repair the injured heart. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. A Dishful of a Troubled Mind: Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Psychiatric Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sára Kálmán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells and direct reprogramming represent powerful methods for modeling the development of neurons in vitro. Moreover, this approach is also a means for comparing various cellular phenotypes between cell lines originating from healthy and diseased individuals or isogenic cell lines engineered to differ at only one or a few genomic loci. Despite methodological constraints and initial skepticism regarding this approach, the field is expanding at a fast pace. The improvements include the development of new differentiation protocols resulting in selected neuronal populations (e.g., dopaminergic, GABAergic, hippocampal, and cortical, the widespread use of genome editing methods, and single-cell techniques. A major challenge awaiting in vitro disease modeling is the integration of clinical data in the models, by selection of well characterized clinical populations. Ideally, these models will also demonstrate how different diagnostic categories share overlapping molecular disease mechanisms, but also have unique characteristics. In this review we evaluate studies with regard to the described developments, to demonstrate how differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells and direct reprogramming can contribute to psychiatry.

  10. Human induced pluripotent stem cells and neurodegenerative disease: prospects for novel therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Wook; Hysolli, Eriona; Kim, Kun-Yong; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Park, In-Hyun

    2012-04-01

    The lack of effective treatments for various neurodegenerative disorders has placed huge burdens on society. We review the current status in applying induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology for the cellular therapy, drug screening, and in-vitro modeling of neurodegenerative diseases. iPSCs are generated from somatic cells by overexpressing four reprogramming factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and Myc). Like human embryonic stem cells, iPSCs have features of self-renewal and pluripotency, and allow in-vitro disease modeling, drug screening, and cell replacement therapy. Disease-specific iPSCs were derived from patients of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and spinal muscular atrophy. Neurons differentiated from these iPSCs recapitulated the in-vivo phenotypes, providing platforms for drug screening. In the case of Parkinson's disease, iPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons gave positive therapeutic effect on a rodent Parkinson's disease model as a proof of principle in using iPSCs as sources of cell replacement therapy. Beyond iPSC technology, much effort is being made to generate neurons directly from dermal fibroblasts with neuron-specific transcription factors, which does not require making iPSCs as an intermediate cell type. We summarize recent progress in using iPSCs for modeling the progress and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and provide evidence for future perspectives in this field.

  11. Modeling Neurovascular Disorders and Therapeutic Outcomes with Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M. Bosworth

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurovascular unit (NVU is composed of neurons, astrocytes, pericytes, and endothelial cells that form the blood–brain barrier (BBB. The NVU regulates material exchange between the bloodstream and the brain parenchyma, and its dysfunction is a primary or secondary cause of many cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. As such, there are substantial research thrusts in academia and industry toward building NVU models that mimic endogenous organization and function, which could be used to better understand disease mechanisms and assess drug efficacy. Human pluripotent stem cells, which can self-renew indefinitely and differentiate to almost any cell type in the body, are attractive for these models because they can provide a limitless source of individual cells from the NVU. In addition, human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs offer the opportunity to build NVU models with an explicit genetic background and in the context of disease susceptibility. Herein, we review how iPSCs are being used to model neurovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, with particular focus on contributions of the BBB, and discuss existing technologies and emerging opportunities to merge these iPSC progenies with biomaterials platforms to create complex NVU systems that recreate the in vivo microenvironment.

  12. [Progress in induced pluripotent stem cell research for age-related neurodegenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daisuke; Yagi, Takuya; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2013-03-01

    In 2006, Takahashi et al. established a method for reprogramming somatic cells by introducing definite transcription factors, which enabled the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with pluripotency comparable to that of embryonic stem cells. In turn, it has become possible to use these iPSCs for producing various tissues needed for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, which have been difficult to obtain from living bodies. This advancement is expected to bring forth rapid progress in the clarification of mechanisms underlying the diseases and discovery of new innovative drugs and lead to rapid progress in regenerative medicine. In recent years, recapitulation and analysis of disease conditions using iPSCs derived from the patients themselves have been reported, and remarkable advances have been made, even for late-onset neurodegenerative disorders. These findings show that the phenotypes of late-onset neurodegenerative disorders can be recapitulated in iPSC-derived neuronal cells, which are reflected the early developmental stages, indicating cellular abnormalities exist from the prenatal period, despite the late onset diseases. In this review, we summarize the state of iPSCs research in the context of neurodegenerative disorders, discuss the possible ways for understanding the mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders and discovering new drugs, and describe some other aspects of regenerative medicine.

  13. Applications of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Studying the Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wenbin; Cao, Lan; Kalionis, Bill; Xia, Shijin; Tai, Xiantao

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is the umbrella term for the progressive loss of structure or function of neurons. Incurable neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) show dramatic rising trends particularly in the advanced age groups. However, the underlying mechanisms are not yet fully elucidated, and to date there are no biomarkers for early detection or effective treatments for the underlying causes of these diseases. Furthermore, due to species variation and differences between animal models (e.g., mouse transgenic and knockout models) of neurodegenerative diseases, substantial debate focuses on whether animal and cell culture disease models can correctly model the condition in human patients. In 2006, Yamanaka of Kyoto University first demonstrated a novel approach for the preparation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which displayed similar pluripotency potential to embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Currently, iPSCs studies are permeating many sectors of disease research. Patient sample-derived iPSCs can be used to construct patient-specific disease models to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of disease development and to test new therapeutic strategies. Accordingly, the present review will focus on recent progress in iPSC research in the modeling of neurodegenerative disorders and in the development of novel therapeutic options.

  14. Highly efficient generation of definitive endoderm lineage from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, K; Takebe, T; Suzuki, Y; Kamiya, A; Nakauchi, H; Taniguchi, H

    2012-05-01

    Although hepatocytes can be an option for liver transplantation, the shortage of donor organs continues to worsen. Since the development of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology, it is eagerly anticipated to produce functional elements from pluripotent stem cells. These functional cells differentiated from iPS cells could be used for transplantation, drug screening, and in vitro toxicology. Human iPS cells are maintained on Mitomycin C-treated mouse embryonic fibroblast layers in DMEM-Ham F12-based medium supplemented with Knockout Serum Replacement, nonessential amino acids, 2-mercaptoethanol, and Glutamax. Differentiation of human iPS cells into a definitive endodermal lineage was induced with PRMI 1640 medium supplemented with B27 and 100 ng/mL human activin A. Two B27 supplements were examined with and without insulin. Furthermore, the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 was used to examine the effect of inhibiting insulin signaling. We established efficient induction of definitive endodermal differentiation from iPS cells. Quantitative analysis revealed efficient (93.03 ± 2.74%) differentiation of human iPS cells into definitive endoderm cells using B27 minus insulin. This protocol may contribute as a fundamental technique to promote human iPS studies to develop cellular sources for transplantation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells: a new source for cell-based therapeutics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lázaro, Irene; Yilmazer, Açelya; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2014-07-10

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from somatic cells by the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors has provided the regenerative medicine field with a new tool for cell replacement strategies. The advantages that these pluripotent cells can offer in comparison to other sources of stem cells include the generation of patient-derived cells and the lack of embryonic tissue while maintaining a versatile differentiation potential. The promise of iPS cell derivatives for therapeutic applications is encouraging albeit very early in development, with the first clinical study currently ongoing in Japan. Many challenges are yet to be circumvented before this technology can be clinically translated widely though. The delivery and expression of the reprogramming factors, the genomic instability, epigenetic memory and impact of cell propagation in culture are only some of the concerns. This article aims to critically discuss the potential of iPS cells as a new source of cell therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mathematical Models of Pluripotent Stem Cells: At the Dawn of Predictive Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pir, Pınar; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine, ranging from stem cell therapy to organ regeneration, is promising to revolutionize treatments of diseases and aging. These approaches require a perfect understanding of cell reprogramming and differentiation. Predictive modeling of cellular systems has the potential to provide insights about the dynamics of cellular processes, and guide their control. Moreover in many cases, it provides alternative to experimental tests, difficult to perform for practical or ethical reasons. The variety and accuracy of biological processes represented in mathematical models grew in-line with the discovery of underlying molecular mechanisms. High-throughput data generation led to the development of models based on data analysis, as an alternative to more established modeling based on prior mechanistic knowledge. In this chapter, we give an overview of existing mathematical models of pluripotency and cell fate, to illustrate the variety of methods and questions. We conclude that current approaches are yet to overcome a number of limitations: Most of the computational models have so far focused solely on understanding the regulation of pluripotency, and the differentiation of selected cell lineages. In addition, models generally interrogate only a few biological processes. However, a better understanding of the reprogramming process leading to ESCs and iPSCs is required to improve stem-cell therapies. One also needs to understand the links between signaling, metabolism, regulation of gene expression, and the epigenetics machinery.

  17. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Progranulin-Deficient Frontotemporal Dementia Uncover Specific Reversible Neuronal Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Almeida

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic mechanisms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD remain poorly understood. Here we generated multiple induced pluripotent stem cell lines from a control subject, a patient with sporadic FTD, and an FTD patient with a novel heterozygous GRN mutation (progranulin [PGRN] S116X. In neurons and microglia differentiated from PGRN S116X induced pluripotent stem cells, the levels of intracellular and secreted PGRN were reduced, establishing patient-specific cellular models of PGRN haploinsufficiency. Through a systematic screen of inducers of cellular stress, we found that PGRN S116X neurons, but not sporadic FTD neurons, exhibited increased sensitivity to staurosporine and other kinase inhibitors. Moreover, the serine/threonine kinase S6K2, a component of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, was specifically downregulated in PGRN S116X neurons. Both increased sensitivity to kinase inhibitors and reduced S6K2 were rescued by PGRN expression. Our findings identify cell-autonomous, reversible defects in patient neurons with PGRN deficiency, and provide a compelling model for studying PGRN-dependent pathogenic mechanisms and testing potential therapies.

  18. The unique spliceosome signature of human pluripotent stem cells is mediated by SNRPA1, SNRPD1, and PNN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Dae Kim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Spliceosomes are the core host of pre-mRNA splicing, allowing multiple protein isoforms to be produced from a single gene. Herein, we reveal that spliceosomes are more abundant in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSs, including human embryonic stem cells (hESs and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSs, than non-hPSs, and their presence is associated with high transcriptional activity. Supportively, spliceosomal components involved in the catalytically active pre-mRNA splicing step were mainly co-localized with hPS spliceosomes. By profiling the gene expression of 342 selected splicing factors, we found that 71 genes were significantly altered during the reprogramming of human somatic cells into hiPSs. Among them, SNRPA1, SNRPD1, and PNN were significantly up-regulated during the early stage of reprogramming, identified as hub genes by interaction network and cluster analysis. SNRPA1, SNRPD1, or PNN depletion led to a pronounced loss of pluripotency and significantly blocked hiPS generation. SNRPA1, SNRPD1, and PNN co-localized with the hPS spliceosomes, physically interacted with each other, and positively influenced the appearance of hPS spliceosomes. Our data suggest that SNRPA1, SNRPD1, and PNN are key players in the regulation of pluripotency-specific spliceosome assembly and the acquisition and maintenance of pluripotency.

  19. Advances in pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells: from biomaterials to organ regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Kathy O

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), by virtue of their capability to self-renew and differentiate into a variety of cell types, represent the first type of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to be used in clinical transplantation during recent phase-I trials; however, it is still unclear whether hESC-derived tissues can self-organize and form part of the vascularized, functional organ following transplantation. Recently, endothelial cells (ECs) or angiogenic factors such as VEGFA have been demonstrated to support development and regeneration of multiple organ systems, including the heart, pancreas, liver, lung and bone marrow. Therefore, co-transplantation of ECs derived from the same parental PSCs that differentiate into cell types of interest; or overexpression of the inductive angiogenic factors responsible for organ regeneration might be beneficial to support function of hPSC-derived tissues. In this special issue, we discuss how protein kinases (Ng and colleagues); DNA methylation and histone modification (Tsui and colleagues) regulate cellular pluripotency and cell-fate specification of PSCs. In addition, we discuss how ECs and angiogenic factors could contribute to repair and regeneration of organs such as the heart (Yuan and colleagues), the cardiovascular system (Tse and colleagues) and the pancreas (Lui). We also discuss the role of mesenchymal stem cells or paracrine factors secreted by them in tissue repair (Li and colleagues). Lastly, we discuss how to generate self-organized and vascularized tissues derived from PSCs in a 2- or 3-dimensional format by fusing tissue bioengineering approaches with stem cell technology (Chen).

  20. Scalable cultivation of human pluripotent stem cells on chemically-defined surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Michael Chi-Wei

    Human stem cells (SCs) are classified as self-renewing cells possessing great ability in therapeutic applications due of their ability to differentiate along any major cell lineage in the human body. Despite their restorative potential, widespread use of SCs is hampered by strenuous control issues. Along with the need for strict xeno-free environments to sustain growth in culture, current methods for growing human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) rely on platforms which impede large-scale cultivation and therapeutic delivery. Hence, any progress towards development of large-scale culture systems is severely hindered. In a concentrated effort to develop a scheme that can serve as a model precursor for large scale SC propagation in clinical use, we have explored methods for cultivating hPSCs on completely defined surfaces. We discuss novel approaches with the potential to go beyond the limitations presented by current methods. In particular, we studied the cultivation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) on surface which underwent synthetic or chemical modification. Current methods for hPSCs rely on animal-based extracellular matrices (ECMs) such as mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) or feeders and murine sacoma cell-derived substrates to facilitate their growth. While these layers or coatings can be used to maximize the output of hPSC production, they cannot be considered for clinical use because they risk introducing foreign pathogens into culture. We have identified and developed conditions for a completely defined xeno-free substrate used for culturing hPSCs. By utilizing coupling chemistry, we can functionalize ester groups on a given surface and conjugate synthetic peptides containing the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif, known for their role in cell adhesion. This method offers advantages over traditional hPSC culture by keeping the modified substrata free of xenogenic response and can be scaled up in

  1. Strategies for heart regeneration: approaches ranging from induced pluripotent stem cells to direct cardiac reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Ieda, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death for which current therapeutic regimens are limited. Following myocardial injury, endogenous cardiac fibroblasts, which account for more than half of the cells in the heart, proliferate and synthesize extracellular matrix, leading to fibrosis and heart failure. As terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes have little regenerative capacity following injury, development of cardiac regenerative therapy is highly desired. Embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are promising tools for regenerative medicine; however, these stem cells demonstrate variable cardiac differentiation efficiency and tumorigenicity, which should be solved for clinical applications. Up until the last decade, it was an established theory that cardiomyocytes could only be produced from fibroblasts mediating through stem cells. However, in 2010, we reported for the first time a novel method of the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes, demonstrating various reprogramming pathways exist. This review summarizes the latest trends in stem cell and regenerative research, touching upon iPS cells, partial reprogramming strategy, and direct cardiac reprogramming. Specifically, we examine the many recent advances in both in vitro and in vivo direct cardiac reprogramming, and explore the application of these methods to cardiovascular regenerative medicine.

  2. Potential for a pluripotent adult stem cell treatment for acute radiation sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgerson, Denis O; Reidenberg, Bruce E; Harris, Alan G; Pecora, Andrew L

    2012-06-20

    Accidental radiation exposure and the threat of deliberate radiation exposure have been in the news and are a public health concern. Experience with acute radiation sickness has been gathered from atomic blast survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and from civilian nuclear accidents as well as experience gained during the development of radiation therapy for cancer. This paper reviews the medical treatment reports relevant to acute radiation sickness among the survivors of atomic weapons at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, among the victims of Chernobyl, and the two cases described so far from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi disaster. The data supporting the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the new efforts to expand stem cell populations ex vivo for infusion to treat bone marrow failure are reviewed. Hematopoietic stem cells derived from bone marrow or blood have a broad ability to repair and replace radiation induced damaged blood and immune cell production and may promote blood vessel formation and tissue repair. Additionally, a constituent of bone marrow-derived, adult pluripotent stem cells, very small embryonic like stem cells, are highly resistant to ionizing radiation and appear capable of regenerating radiation damaged tissue including skin, gut and lung.

  3. Tyrosine Kinase Expressed in Hepatocellular Carcinoma, TEC, Controls Pluripotency and Early Cell Fate Decisions of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells via Regulation of Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanova, Tereza; Konecna, Zaneta; Zbonakova, Zuzana; La Venuta, Giuseppe; Zoufalova, Karolina; Jelinkova, Sarka; Varecha, Miroslav; Rotrekl, Vladimir; Krejci, Pavel; Nickel, Walter; Dvorak, Petr; Kunova Bosakova, Michaela

    2017-09-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) require signaling provided by fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors. This can be initiated by the recombinant FGF2 ligand supplied exogenously, but hPSC further support their niche by secretion of endogenous FGF2. In this study, we describe a role of tyrosine kinase expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (TEC) kinase in this process. We show that TEC-mediated FGF2 secretion is essential for hPSC self-renewal, and its lack mediates specific differentiation. Following both short hairpin RNA- and small interfering RNA-mediated TEC knockdown, hPSC secretes less FGF2. This impairs hPSC proliferation that can be rescued by increasing amounts of recombinant FGF2. TEC downregulation further leads to a lower expression of the pluripotency markers, an improved priming towards neuroectodermal lineage, and a failure to develop cardiac mesoderm. Our data thus demonstrate that TEC is yet another regulator of FGF2-mediated hPSC pluripotency and differentiation. Stem Cells 2017;35:2050-2059. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  4. Controlled Growth and the Maintenance of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells by Cultivation with Defined Medium on Extracellular Matrix-Coated Micropatterned Dishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Chiemi; Miyajima, Hiroshi; Yoda, Yusuke; Imazato, Hideo; Yamamoto, Takako; Gomi, Shinichi; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Kagawa, Kenichi; Sasaki, Tetsuji; Kawamata, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Here, we introduce a new serum-free defined medium (SPM) that supports the cultivation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) on recombinant human vitronectin-N (rhVNT-N)-coated dishes after seeding with either cell clumps or single cells. With this system, there was no need for an intervening sequential adaptation process after moving hPSCs from feeder layer-dependent conditions. We also introduce a micropatterned dish that was coated with extracellular matrix by photolithographic technology. This procedure allowed the cultivation of hPSCs on 199 individual rhVNT-N-coated small round spots (1 mm in diameter) on each 35-mm polystyrene dish (termed "patterned culture"), permitting the simultaneous formation of 199 uniform high-density small-sized colonies. This culture system supported controlled cell growth and maintenance of undifferentiated hPSCs better than dishes in which the entire surface was coated with rhVNT-N (termed "non-patterned cultures"). Non-patterned cultures produced variable, unrestricted cell proliferation with non-uniform cell growth and uneven densities in which we observed downregulated expression of some self-renewal-related markers. Comparative flow cytometric studies of the expression of pluripotency-related molecules SSEA-3 and TRA-1-60 in hPSCs from non-patterned cultures and patterned cultures supported this concept. Patterned cultures of hPSCs allowed sequential visual inspection of every hPSC colony, giving an address and number in patterned culture dishes. Several spots could be sampled for quality control tests of production batches, thereby permitting the monitoring of hPSCs in a single culture dish. Our new patterned culture system utilizing photolithography provides a robust, reproducible and controllable cell culture system and demonstrates technological advantages for the mass production of hPSCs with process quality control.

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Obtained from Synovial Fluid Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells on a Matrigel Coating Exhibited Enhanced Proliferation and Differentiation Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Yu-Liang; Sun, Yang-Peng; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Wen-Jing; Jiang, Rui; Li, Wen-Yu; Zheng, You-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (iPSC-MSCs) serve as a promising source for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. However, optimal methods for transforming iPSCs into MSCs and the characteristics of iPSC-MSCs obtained from different methods remain poorly understood. In this study, we developed a one-step method for obtaining iPSC-MSCs (CD146+STRO-1+ MSCs) from human synovial fluid MSC-derived induced iPSCs (SFMSC-iPSCs). CD146-STRO-1-SFMSCs were reprogram...

  6. Generation of mouse and human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from primary somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, I M; Fleischer, A; Bachiller, D

    2013-08-01

    Cellular reprogramming consists of the conversion of differentiated cells into pluripotent cells; the so-called induced Pluripotent Stem Cells. iPSC are amenable to in vitro manipulation and, in theory, direct production of any differentiated cell type. Furthermore, iPSC can be obtained from sick individuals and subsequently used for disease modeling, drug discovery and regenerative treatments. iPSC production was first achieved by transducing, with the use of retroviral vectors, four specific transcription factors: Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and c-Myc (OKSM), into primary cells in culture Takahashi and Yamanaka, (Cell 126(4):663-676, 2006). Many alternative protocols have since been proposed: repeated transfections of expression plasmids containing the four pluripotency-associated genes Okita et al. (Science 322(5903):949-953, 2008), lentiviral delivery of the four factors Sommer et al. (Stem Cells 27(3):543-549, 2009), Sendai virus delivery Fusaki et al. (Proceedings of the Japan Academy. Series B, Physical and Biological Sciences 85(8):348-362, 2009), removal of the reprogramming vectors by 'piggyBac' transposition Woltjen et al. (Nature 458(7239):766-770, 2009); Kaji et al. (Nature 458(7239):771-775, 2009), Cre-recombinase excisable viruses Soldner et al. (Cell 136(5):964-977, 2009), episomal vectors Yu et al. (Science 324(5928):797-801, 2009), cell-penetrating reprogramming proteins Zhou et al. (Stem Cells 4(5):381-384, 2009), mammalian artificial chromosomes Hiratsuka et al. (PLoS One 6(10):e25961, 2011) synthetically modified mRNAs Warren et al. (Scientific Reports 2:657, 2012), miRNA Anokye-Danso et al. (Cell Stem Cell 8(4):376-388, 2009); however, although some of these methods are commercially available, in general they still need to attain the reproducibility and reprogramming efficiency required for routine applications Mochiduki and Okita (Biotechnol Journal 7(6):789-797, 2012). Herein we explain, in four detailed protocols, the isolation of mouse and human

  7. Chemical Activation of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Reversibly Reduces Tendon Stem Cell Proliferation, Inhibits Their Differentiation, and Maintains Cell Undifferentiation

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    Alessandra Menon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult stem cell-based therapeutic approaches for tissue regeneration have been proposed for several years. However, adult stem cells are usually limited in number and difficult to be expanded in vitro, and they usually tend to quickly lose their potency with passages, as they differentiate and become senescent. Culturing stem cells under reduced oxygen tensions (below 21% has been proposed as a tool to increase cell proliferation, but many studies reported opposite effects. In particular, cell response to hypoxia seems to be very stem cell type specific. Nonetheless, it is clear that a major role in this process is played by the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF, the master regulator of cell response to oxygen deprivation, which affects cell metabolism and differentiation. Herein, we report that a chemical activation of HIF in human tendon stem cells reduces their proliferation and inhibits their differentiation in a reversible and dose-dependent manner. These results support the notion that hypoxia, by activating HIF, plays a crucial role in preserving stem cells in an undifferentiated state in the “hypoxic niches” present in the tissue in which they reside before migrating in more oxygenated areas to heal a damaged tissue.

  8. Generation of a TALEN-mediated, p63 knock-in in human induced pluripotent stem cells

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    Yuki Kobayashi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The expression of p63 in surface ectodermal cells during development of the cornea, skin, oral mucosa and olfactory placodes is integral to the process of cellular self-renewal and the maintenance of the epithelial stem cell status. Here, we used TALEN technology to generate a p63 knock-in (KI human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS cell line in which p63 expression can be visualized via enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP expression. The KI-hiPS cells maintained pluripotency and expressed the stem cell marker gene, ΔNp63α. They were also able to successfully differentiate into functional corneal epithelial cells as assessed by p63 expression in reconstructed corneal epithelium. This approach enables the tracing of p63-expressing cell lineages throughout epithelial development, and represents a promising application in the field of stem cell research.

  9. Generation of a TALEN-mediated, p63 knock-in in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Hayashi, Ryuhei; Quantock, Andrew J; Nishida, Kohji

    2017-12-01

    The expression of p63 in surface ectodermal cells during development of the cornea, skin, oral mucosa and olfactory placodes is integral to the process of cellular self-renewal and the maintenance of the epithelial stem cell status. Here, we used TALEN technology to generate a p63 knock-in (KI) human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell line in which p63 expression can be visualized via enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression. The KI-hiPS cells maintained pluripotency and expressed the stem cell marker gene, ΔNp63α. They were also able to successfully differentiate into functional corneal epithelial cells as assessed by p63 expression in reconstructed corneal epithelium. This approach enables the tracing of p63-expressing cell lineages throughout epithelial development, and represents a promising application in the field of stem cell research. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Plant hormones increase efficiency of reprogramming mouse somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells and reduce tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Palomo, Ana Belén; McLenachan, Samuel; Requena Osete, Jordi; Menchón, Cristina; Barrot, Carme; Chen, Fred; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Edel, Michael J

    2014-03-15

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by defined pluripotency and self-renewal factors has taken stem cell technology to the forefront of regenerative medicine. However, a number of challenges remain in the field including efficient protocols and the threat of cancer. Reprogramming of plant somatic cells to plant embryonic stem cells using a combination of two plant hormones was discovered in 1957 and has been a routine university laboratory practical for over 30 years. The plant hormones responsible for cell reprogramming to pluripotency, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and isopentenyl adenosine (IPA), are present in human cells, leading to the exciting possibility that plant hormones might reprogram mammalian cells without genetic factors. We found that plant hormones on their own could not reprogram mammalian cells but increase the efficiency of the early formation of iPS cells combined with three defined genetic factors during the first 3 weeks of reprogramming by accelerating the cell cycle and regulating pluripotency genes. Moreover, the cytokinin IPA, a known human anticancer agent, reduced the threat of cancer of iPS cell in vitro by regulating key cancer and stem cell-related genes, most notably c-Myc and Igf-1. In conclusion, the plant hormones, auxin and cytokinin, are new small chemicals useful for enhancing early reprogramming efficiency of mammalian cells and reducing the threat of cancer from iPS cells. These findings suggest a novel role for plant hormones in the biology of mammalian cell plasticity.

  11. Monitoring Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes with Genetically Encoded Calcium and Voltage Fluorescent Reporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shinnawi, Rami; Huber, Irit; Maizels, Leonid; Shaheen, Naim; Gepstein, Amira; Arbel, Gil; Tijsen, Anke J.; Gepstein, Lior

    2015-01-01

    The advent of the human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technology has transformed biomedical research, providing new tools for human disease modeling, drug development, and regenerative medicine. To fulfill its unique potential in the cardiovascular field, efficient methods should be

  12. Genetic regulators of a pluripotent adult stem cell system in planarians identified by RNAi and clonal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Daniel E; Ho, Jaclyn J; Reddien, Peter W

    2012-03-02

    Pluripotency is a central, well-studied feature of embryonic development, but the role of pluripotent cell regulation in somatic tissue regeneration remains poorly understood. In planarians, regeneration of entire animals from tissue fragments is promoted by the activity of adult pluripotent stem cells (cNeoblasts). We utilized transcriptional profiling to identify planarian genes expressed in adult proliferating, regenerative cells (neoblasts). We also developed quantitative clonal analysis methods for expansion and differentiation of cNeoblast descendants that, together with RNAi, revealed gene roles in stem cell biology. Genes encoding two zinc finger proteins, Vasa, a LIM domain protein, Sox and Jun-like transcription factors, two candidate RNA-binding proteins, a Setd8-like protein, and PRC2 (Polycomb) were required for proliferative expansion and/or differentiation of cNeoblast-derived clones. These findings suggest that planarian stem cells utilize molecular mechanisms found in germ cells and other pluripotent cell types and identify genetic regulators of the planarian stem cell system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Definitive Endoderm Formation from Plucked Human Hair-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and SK Channel Regulation

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    Anett Illing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells present an extraordinary powerful tool to investigate embryonic development in humans. Essentially, they provide a unique platform for dissecting the distinct mechanisms underlying pluripotency and subsequent lineage commitment. Modest information currently exists about the expression and the role of ion channels during human embryogenesis, organ development, and cell fate determination. Of note, small and intermediate conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels have been reported to modify stem cell behaviour and differentiation. These channels are broadly expressed throughout human tissues and are involved in various cellular processes, such as the after-hyperpolarization in excitable cells, and also in differentiation processes. To this end, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs generated from plucked human hair keratinocytes have been exploited in vitro to recapitulate endoderm formation and, concomitantly, used to map the expression of the SK channel (SKCa subtypes over time. Thus, we report the successful generation of definitive endoderm from hiPSCs of ectodermal origin using a highly reproducible and robust differentiation system. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence that SKCas subtypes are dynamically regulated in the transition from a pluripotent stem cell to a more lineage restricted, endodermal progeny.

  14. Cardiomyocytes Derived From Pluripotent Stem Cells Recapitulate Electrophysiological Characteristics of an Overlap Syndrome of Cardiac Sodium Channel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, Richard P.; Casini, Simona; van den Berg, Cathelijne W.; Hoekstra, Maaike; Remme, Carol Ann; Dambrot, Cheryl; Salvatori, Daniela; Ward-van Oostwaard, Dorien; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Verkerk, Arie O.; Freund, Christian; Mummery, Christine L.

    2012-01-01

    Background-Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) offer a new paradigm for modeling genetic cardiac diseases, but it is unclear whether mouse and human PSCs can truly model both gain-and loss-of-function genetic disorders affecting the Na+ current (I-Na) because of the immaturity of the PSC-derived

  15. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuron as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity Ingrid L. Druwe1, Timothy J. Shafer2, Kathleen Wallace2, Pablo Valdivia3 ,and William R. Mundy2. 1University of North Carolina, Curriculum in Toxicology...

  16. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Based Assay Predicts Developmental Toxicity Potential of ToxCast Chemicals (ACT meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide initiatives to screen for toxicity potential among the thousands of chemicals currently in use require inexpensive and high-throughput in vitro models to meet their goals. The devTOX quickPredict platform is an in vitro human pluripotent stem cell-based assay used to as...

  17. Patch-Clamp Recording from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes: Improving Action Potential Characteristics through Dynamic Clamp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, Arie O.; Veerman, Christiaan C.; Zegers, Jan G.; Mengarelli, Isabella; Bezzina, Connie R.; Wilders, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) hold great promise for studying inherited cardiac arrhythmias and developing drug therapies to treat such arrhythmias. Unfortunately, until now, action potential (AP) measurements in hiPSC-CMs have been hampered by the virtual

  18. Selection Based on FOXA2 Expression Is Not Sufficient to Enrich for Dopamine Neurons From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguila, Julio Cesar; Blak, Alexandra; van Arensbergen, Joris; Sousa, Amaia; Vázquez, Nerea; Aduriz, Ariane; Gayosso, Mayela; Lopez Mato, Maria Paz; Lopez de Maturana, Rakel; Hedlund, Eva; Sonntag, Kai-Christian

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are potential cell sources for regenerative approaches in Parkinson disease. Inductive differentiation protocols can generate midbrain dopamine neurons but result in heterogeneous cell mixtures. Therefore, selection strategies are necessary to obtain uniform dopamine cell populations. Here, we developed a selection approach using lentivirus vectors to express green fluorescent protein under the promoter region of FOXA2, a transcription factor that is expressed in the floor plate domain that gives rise to dopamine neurons during embryogenesis. We first validated the specificity of the vectors in human cell lines against a promoterless construct. We then selected FOXA2-positive neural progenitors from several human pluripotent stem cell lines, which demonstrated a gene expression profile typical for the ventral domain of the midbrain and floor plate, but failed to enrich for dopamine neurons. To investigate whether this was due to the selection approach, we overexpressed FOXA2 in neural progenitors derived from human pluripotent stem cell lines. FOXA2 forced expression resulted in an increased expression of floor plate but not mature neuronal markers. Furthermore, selection of the FOXA2 overexpressing fraction also failed to enrich for dopamine neurons. Collectively, our results suggest that FOXA2 is not sufficient to induce a dopaminergic fate in this system. On the other hand, our study demonstrates that a combined approach of promoter activation and lentivirus vector technology can be used as a versatile tool for the selection of a defined cell population from a variety of human pluripotent stem cell lines. PMID:25024431

  19. A Multi-Lineage Screen Reveals mTORC1 Inhibition Enhances Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Mesendoderm and Blood Progenitor Production

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    Emanuel Joseph Paul Nazareth

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs exist in heterogeneous micro-environments with multiple subpopulations, convoluting fate-regulation analysis. We patterned hPSCs into engineered micro-environments and screened responses to 400 small-molecule kinase inhibitors, measuring yield and purity outputs of undifferentiated, neuroectoderm, mesendoderm, and extra-embryonic populations. Enrichment analysis revealed mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibition as a strong inducer of mesendoderm. Dose responses of mTOR inhibitors such as rapamycin synergized with Bone Morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4 and activin A to enhance the yield and purity of BRACHYURY-expressing cells. Mechanistically, small interfering RNA knockdown of RAPTOR, a component of mTOR complex 1, phenocopied the mesendoderm-enhancing effects of rapamycin. Functional analysis during mesoderm and endoderm differentiation revealed that mTOR inhibition increased the output of hemogenic endothelial cells 3-fold, with a concomitant enhancement of blood colony-forming cells. These data demonstrate the power of our multi-lineage screening approach and identify mTOR signaling as a node in hPSC differentiation to mesendoderm and its derivatives.

  20. Melatonin improves reprogramming efficiency and proliferation of bovine-induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chunyu; Li, Xiangchen; Gao, Yuhua; Yuan, Ziao; Hu, Pengfei; Wang, Hui; Liu, Changqing; Guan, Weijun; Ma, Yuehui

    2016-09-01

    Melatonin can modulate neural stem cell (NSC) functions such as proliferation and differentiation into NSC-derived pluripotent stem cells (N-iPS) in brain tissue, but the effect and mechanism underlying this are unclear. Thus, we studied how primary cultured bovine NSCs isolated from the retinal neural layer could transform into N-iPS cell. NSCs were exposed to 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 μm melatonin, and cell viability studies indicated that 10 μm melatonin can significantly increase cell viability and promote cell proliferation in NSCs in vitro. Thus, 10 μm melatonin was used to study miR-302/367-mediated cell reprogramming of NSCs. We noted that this concentration of melatonin increased reprogramming efficiency of N-iPS cell generation from primary cultured bovine NSCs and that this was mediated by downregulation of apoptosis-related genes p53 and p21. Then, N-iPS cells were treated with 1, 10, 100, or 500 μm melatonin, and N-iPS (M-N-iPS) cell proliferation was measured. We noted that 100 μm melatonin increased proliferation of N-iPS cells via increased phosphorylation of intracellular ERK1/2 via activation of its pathway in M-N-iPS via melatonin receptors 1 (MT1). Finally, we verified that N-iPS cells and M-N-iPS cells are similar to typical embryonic stem cells including the expression of pluripotency markers (Oct4 and Nanog), the ability to form teratomas in vivo, and the capacity to differentiate into all three embryonic germ layers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Characterization and therapeutic potential of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitor cells.

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    Ali Nsair

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular progenitor cells (CPCs have been identified within the developing mouse heart and differentiating pluripotent stem cells by intracellular transcription factors Nkx2.5 and Islet 1 (Isl1. Study of endogenous and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived CPCs has been limited due to the lack of specific cell surface markers to isolate them and conditions for their in vitro expansion that maintain their multipotency.We sought to identify specific cell surface markers that label endogenous embryonic CPCs and validated these markers in iPSC-derived Isl1(+/Nkx2.5(+ CPCs. We developed conditions that allow propagation and characterization of endogenous and iPSC-derived Isl1(+/Nkx2.5(+ CPCs and protocols for their clonal expansion in vitro and transplantation in vivo. Transcriptome analysis of CPCs from differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells identified a panel of surface markers. Comparison of these markers as well as previously described surface markers revealed the combination of Flt1(+/Flt4(+ best identified and facilitated enrichment for Isl1(+/Nkx2.5(+ CPCs from embryonic hearts and differentiating iPSCs. Endogenous mouse and iPSC-derived Flt1(+/Flt4(+ CPCs differentiated into all three cardiovascular lineages in vitro. Flt1(+/Flt4(+ CPCs transplanted into left ventricles demonstrated robust engraftment and differentiation into mature cardiomyocytes (CMs.The cell surface marker combination of Flt1 and Flt4 specifically identify and enrich for an endogenous and iPSC-derived Isl1(+/Nkx2.5(+ CPC with trilineage cardiovascular potential in vitro and robust ability for engraftment and differentiation into morphologically and electrophysiologically mature adult CMs in vivo post transplantation into adult hearts.

  2. Generation of electrophysiologically functional cardiomyocytes from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongran Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells can efficiently differentiate into the three germ layers similar to those formed by differentiated embryonic stem (ES cells. This provides a new source of cells in which to establish preclinical allogeneic transplantation models. Our iPS cells were generated from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs transfected with the Yamanaka factors, the four transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc, without antibiotic selection or MEF feeders. After the formation of embryoid bodies (EBs, iPS cells spontaneously differentiated into Flk1-positive cardiac progenitors and cardiomyocytes expressing cardiac-specific markers such as alpha sarcomeric actinin (α-actinin, cardiac alpha myosin heavy chain (α-MHC, cardiac troponin T (cTnT, and connexin 43 (CX43, as well as cardiac transcription factors Nk2 homebox 5 (Nkx2.5 and gata binding protein 4 (gata4. The electrophysiological activity of iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPS-CMs was detected in beating cell clusters with optical mapping and RH237 a voltage-sensitive dye, and in single contracting cells with patch-clamp technology. Incompletely differentiated iPS cells formed teratomas when transplanted into a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model of myocardial infarction. Our results show that somatic cells can be reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells, which in turn spontaneously differentiate into electrophysiologically functional mature cardiomyocytes expressing cardiac-specific makers, and that these cells can potentially be used to repair myocardial infarction (MI in the future.

  3. GMP scale-up and banking of pluripotent stem cells for cellular therapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausubel, Lara J; Lopez, Patricia M; Couture, Larry A

    2011-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), which include human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as well as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), represent an important source of cellular therapies in regenerative medicine and the study of early human development. As such, it is becoming increasingly important to develop methods for the large-scale banking of human PSC lines. There are several well-established methods for the propagation of human PSCs. The key to development of a good manufacturing practice (GMP) bank is to determine a manufacturing method that is amenable to large-scale production using materials that are fully documented. We have developed several banks of hESCs using animal feeder cells, animal-based matrices, or animal-free matrices. Protocols for growing hESCs on mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are well established and are very helpful for producing research grade banks of cells. As most human ESCs cultured by research laboratories have been exposed to xenogeneic reagents, it is not imperative that all materials used in the production of a master cell bank be animal-free in origin. Nevertheless, as the field develops, it will no doubt become increasingly important to produce a bank of cells for clinical use without xenogeneic reagents, particularly nonhuman feeder cells which might harbor viruses with potential risk to human health or cell product integrity. Thus, even for cell lines previously exposed to xenogeneic reagents, it is important to minimize any subsequent exposure of the cell lines to additional adventitious agents. We have specifically described procedures for the growth of hESCs on Matrigel, an animal-matrix, and CELLstart, an animal-free matrix, and these can be used to produce hESCs as part of a clinical manufacturing process.

  4. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived beating cardiac tissues on paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Xu, Cong; Zhu, Yujuan; Yu, Yue; Sun, Ning; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Feng, Ke; Qin, Jianhua

    2015-11-21

    There is a growing interest in using paper as a biomaterial scaffold for cell-based applications. In this study, we made the first attempt to fabricate a paper-based array for the culture, proliferation, and direct differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into functional beating cardiac tissues and create "a beating heart on paper." This array was simply constructed by binding a cured multi-well polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold with common, commercially available paper substrates. Three types of paper material (print paper, chromatography paper and nitrocellulose membrane) were tested for adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human-derived iPSCs. We found that hiPSCs grew well on these paper substrates, presenting a three-dimensional (3D)-like morphology with a pluripotent property. The direct differentiation of human iPSCs into functional cardiac tissues on paper was also achieved using our modified differentiation approach. The cardiac tissue retained its functional activities on the coated print paper and chromatography paper with a beating frequency of 40-70 beats per min for up to three months. Interestingly, human iPSCs could be differentiated into retinal pigment epithelium on nitrocellulose membrane under the conditions of cardiac-specific induction, indicating the potential roles of material properties and mechanical cues that are involved in regulating stem cell differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that different grades of paper could offer great opportunities as bioactive, low-cost, and 3D in vitro platforms for stem cell-based high-throughput drug testing at the tissue/organ level and for tissue engineering applications.

  5. Human induced pluripotent stem cells can reach complete terminal maturation: in vivo and in vitro evidence in the erythropoietic differentiation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobari, Ladan; Yates, Frank; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Francina, Alain; Kiger, Laurent; Mazurier, Christelle; Rouzbeh, Shaghayegh; El-Nemer, Wassim; Hebert, Nicolas; Giarratana, Marie-Catherine; François, Sabine; Chapel, Alain; Lapillonne, Hélène; Luton, Dominique; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Douay, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Background Human induced pluripotent stem cells offer perspectives for cell therapy and research models for diseases. We applied this approach to the normal and pathological erythroid differentiation model by establishing induced pluripotent stem cells from normal and homozygous sickle cell disease donors. Design and Methods We addressed the question as to whether these cells can reach complete erythroid terminal maturation notably with a complete switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin. Sickle cell disease induced pluripotent stem cells were differentiated in vitro into red blood cells and characterized for their terminal maturation in terms of hemoglobin content, oxygen transport capacity, deformability, sickling and adherence. Nucleated erythroblast populations generated from normal and pathological induced pluripotent stem cells were then injected into non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficiency mice to follow the in vivo hemoglobin maturation. Results We observed that in vitro erythroid differentiation results in predominance of fetal hemoglobin which rescues the functionality of red blood cells in the pathological model of sickle cell disease. We observed, in vivo, the switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin after infusion of nucleated erythroid precursors derived from either normal or pathological induced pluripotent stem cells into mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that human induced pluripotent stem cells: i) can achieve complete terminal erythroid maturation, in vitro in terms of nucleus expulsion and in vivo in terms of hemoglobin maturation; and ii) open the way to generation of functionally corrected red blood cells from sickle cell disease induced pluripotent stem cells, without any genetic modification or drug treatment. PMID:22733021

  6. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) stably expressing CRISPR-based synergistic activation mediator (SAM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Kai; Zhou, Yan; Hyttel, Poul

    2016-01-01

    Human fibroblasts were engineered to express the CRISPR-based synergistic activation mediator (SAM) complex: dCas9-VP64 and MS2-P65-HSF1. Two induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) clones expressing SAM were established by transducing these fibroblasts with lentivirus expressing OCT4, SOX2, KLF4...... a novel, useful tool to investigate genetic regulation of stem cell proliferation and differentiation through CRISPR-mediated activation of endogenous genes....

  7. Induction of Pluripotency in Astrocytes through a Neural Stem Cell-like State*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima-Koyama, May; Lee, Joonseong; Ohta, Sho; Yamamoto, Takuya; Nishida, Eisuke

    2015-01-01

    It remains controversial whether the routes from somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are related to the reverse order of normal developmental processes. Specifically, it remains unaddressed whether or not the differentiated cells become iPSCs through their original tissue stem cell-like state. Previous studies analyzing the reprogramming process mostly used fibroblasts; however, the stem cell characteristics of fibroblasts made it difficult to address this. Here, we generated iPSCs from mouse astrocytes, a type of glial cells, by three (OCT3/4, KLF4, and SOX2), two (OCT3/4 and KLF4), or four (OCT3/4, KLF4, and SOX2 plus c-MYC) factors. Sox1, a neural stem cell (NSC)-specific transcription factor, is transiently up-regulated during reprogramming, and Sox1-positive cells become iPSCs. The up-regulation of Sox1 is essential for OCT3/4- and KLF4-induced reprogramming. Genome-wide analysis revealed that the gene expression profile of Sox1-expressing intermediate-state cells resembles that of NSCs. Furthermore, the intermediate-state cells are able to generate neurospheres, which can differentiate into both neurons and glial cells. Remarkably, during fibroblast reprogramming, neither Sox1 up-regulation nor an increase in neurogenic potential occurs. Our results thus demonstrate that astrocytes are reprogrammed through an NSC-like state. PMID:26553868

  8. Heart regeneration for clinical application update 2016: from induced pluripotent stem cells to direct cardiac reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of death for which current therapeutic regimens are limited. Following myocardial injury, endogenous cardiac fibroblasts, which account for more than half of the cells in the heart, proliferate and synthesize extracellular matrix, leading to fibrosis and heart failure. As terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes have little regenerative capacity following injury, the development of cardiac regenerative therapy is highly desired. Embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are promising tools for regenerative medicine. However, these stem cells demonstrate variable cardiac differentiation efficiency and tumorigenicity, which must be resolved prior to clinical regenerative applications. Until the last decade, an established theory was that cardiomyocytes could only be produced from fibroblasts through iPS cell generation. In 2010, we first reported cardiac differentiation from fibroblasts by direct reprogramming, and we demonstrated that various cardiac reprogramming pathways exist. This review summarizes the latest trends in stem cell and regenerative research regarding iPS cells, a partial reprogramming strategy, and direct cardiac reprogramming. We also examine the many recent advances in direct cardiac reprogramming and explore the suitable utilization of these methods for regenerative medicine in the cardiovascular field.

  9. Transactivator protein: An alternative for delivery of recombinant proteins for safer reprogramming of induced Pluripotent Stem Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Fazlina; Ahmad, Raja Norazireen Raja; Farzaneh, Farzin

    2017-05-02

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are somatic cells reprogrammed to pluripotency by forced expression of pluripotency factors. These cells are shown to have the same pluripotent potential as embryonic stem cells (ESC) and considered as an alternative to the much controversial usage of ESC which involved human embryos. However, the traditional method in reprogramming cells into iPSC using genome-integrating retro- or lenti- viruses remains an obstacle for its application in clinical setting. Although numerous studies have been conducted for a safer DNA-based reprogramming, reprogramming of iPSC by genetic modifications may raise the possibility of malignant transformation and has been a major limitation for its usage in clinical applications. Therefore, there is a need for an alternative method to reprogram the cells without the use of gene editing and a much safer way to deliver transcription factors to induce pluripotency on target cells. Using protein transduction approach, a number of studies have demonstrated the generation of human iPSCs from human fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts by direct delivery of reprogramming proteins. In this review, the definition and mechanism of HIV-TAT protein (a type of protein transduction domain) in delivering recombinant proteins, including the potential of protein-based delivery to induce iPSC were further discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from virus-free in vivo reprogramming of BALB/c mouse liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lázaro, Irene; Bussy, Cyrill; Yilmazer, Açelya; Jackson, Maj Simonsen; Humphreys, Neil E; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2014-09-01

    The in vivo cell reprogramming of terminally differentiated somatic cells to a pluripotent state by the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors has been previously shown in the BALB/c mouse liver upon plasmid DNA injection with no teratoma formation in the host tissue. Here, we hypothesized that the reprogrammed cells could be extracted from the tissue and cultured in vitro. We called these cells in vivo induced pluripotent stem (i(2)PS) cells because they showed pluripotent characteristics equivalent to a standard mouse ES cell line (E14TG2A). The pluripotent character of i(2)PS cells was determined by a battery of morphological, molecular and functional assays, including their contribution to adult tissues of chimeric mice upon blastocyst injection. These observations further confirm that terminally differentiated somatic cells in wild type, adult animals can be reprogrammed in vivo using virus-free methodologies. The reprogrammed cells can generate in vitro stem cell colonies that exhibit pluripotency similar to ES cells with numerous implications for the application of in vivo reprogramming for tissue regenerative purposes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reliable generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Robert; Ornelas, Loren; Yeager, Nicole; Mandefro, Berhan; Sahabian, Anais; Lenaeus, Lindsay; Targan, Stephan R; Svendsen, Clive N; Sareen, Dhruv

    2014-12-01

    Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for many applications, including disease modeling to elucidate mechanisms involved in disease pathogenesis, drug screening, and ultimately regenerative medicine therapies. A frequently used starting source of cells for reprogramming has been dermal fibroblasts isolated from skin biopsies. However, numerous repositories containing lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) generated from a wide array of patients also exist in abundance. To date, this rich bioresource has been severely underused for iPSC generation. We first attempted to create iPSCs from LCLs using two existing methods but were unsuccessful. Here we report a new and more reliable method for LCL reprogramming using episomal plasmids expressing pluripotency factors and p53 shRNA in combination with small molecules. The LCL-derived iPSCs (LCL-iPSCs) exhibited identical characteristics to fibroblast-derived iPSCs (fib-iPSCs), wherein they retained their genotype, exhibited a normal pluripotency profile, and readily differentiated into all three germ-layer cell types. As expected, they also maintained rearrangement of the heavy chain immunoglobulin locus. Importantly, we also show efficient iPSC generation from LCLs of patients with spinal muscular atrophy and inflammatory bowel disease. These LCL-iPSCs retained the disease mutation and could differentiate into neurons, spinal motor neurons, and intestinal organoids, all of which were virtually indistinguishable from differentiated cells derived from fib-iPSCs. This method for reliably deriving iPSCs from patient LCLs paves the way for using invaluable worldwide LCL repositories to generate new human iPSC lines, thus providing an enormous bioresource for disease modeling, drug discovery, and regenerative medicine applications. ©AlphaMed Press.

  12. Induced pluripotent stem cells as a cellular model for studying Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigida AL

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Down Syndrome (DS, or Trisomy 21 Syndrome, is one of the most common genetic diseases. It is a chromosomal abnormality caused by a duplication of chromosome 21. DS patients show the presence of a third copy (or a partial third copy of chromosome 21 (trisomy, as result of meiotic errors. These patients suffer of many health problems, such as intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, duodenal stenosis, Alzheimer's disease, leukemia, immune system deficiencies, muscle hypotonia and motor disorders. About one in 1000 babies born each year are affected by DS. Alterations in the dosage of genes located on chromosome 21 (also called HSA21 are responsible for the DS phenotype. However, the molecular pathogenic mechanisms of DS triggering are still not understood; newest evidences suggest the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms. For obvious ethical reasons, studies performed on DS patients, as well as on human trisomic tissues are limited. Some authors have proposed mouse models of this syndrome. However, not all the features of the syndrome are represented. Stem cells are considered the future of molecular and regenerative medicine. Several types of stem cells could provide a valid approach to offer a potential treatment for some untreatable human diseases. Stem cells also represent a valid system to develop new cell-based drugs and/or a model to study molecular disease pathways. Among stem cell types, patient-derived induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells offer some advantages for cell and tissue replacement, engineering and studying: self-renewal capacity, pluripotency and ease of accessibility to donor tissues. These cells can be reprogrammed into completely different cellular types. They are derived from adult somatic cells via reprogramming with ectopic expression of four transcription factors (Oct3/4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4; or, Oct3/4, Sox2, Nanog, and Lin28. By reprogramming cells from DS patients, it is possible to obtain new tissue with

  13. Progress and Future Challenges of Human Induced Pluripotents Stem Cell in Regenerative Medicine

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    Anna Meiliana

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Less than a decade ago the prospect for reprogramming the human somatic cell looked bleak at best. It seemed that the only methods at our disposal for the generation of human isogenic pluripotent cells would have to involve somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT. Shinya Yamanaka in August 2006 in his publication (Cell promised to change everything by showing that it was apparently very simple to revert the phenotype of a differentiated cell to a pluripotent one by overexpressing four transcription factors in murine fibroblasts. CONTENT: Mouse and human somatic cells can be genetically reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs by the expression of a defined set of factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4, as well as Nanog and LIN28. iPSCs could be generated from mouse and human fibroblasts as well as from mouse liver, stomach, pancreatic, neural stem cells, and keratinocytes. Similarity of iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs has been demonstrated in their morphology, global expression profiles, epigenetic status, as well as in vitro and in vivo differentiation potential for both mouse and human cells. Many techniques for human iPSCs (hiPSCs derivation have been developed in recent years, utilizing different starting cell types, vector delivery systems, and culture conditions. A refined or perfected combination of these techniques might prove to be the key to generating clinically applicable hiPSCs. SUMMARY: iPSCs are a revolutionary tool for generating in vitro models of human diseases and may help us to understand the molecular basis of epigenetic reprogramming. Progress of the last four years has been truly amazing, almost verging on science fiction, but if we can learn to produce such cells cheaply and easily, and control their differentiation, our efforts to understand and fight disease will become more accessible, controllable and tailored. Ability to safely and efficiently derive hiPSCs may be of decisive importance to

  14. Recombinase-mediated reprogramming and dystrophin gene addition in mdx mouse induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunli; Farruggio, Alfonso P; Bjornson, Christopher R R; Chavez, Christopher L; Geisinger, Jonathan M; Neal, Tawny L; Karow, Marisa; Calos, Michele P

    2014-01-01

    A cell therapy strategy utilizing genetically-corrected induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) may be an attractive approach for genetic disorders such as muscular dystrophies. Methods for genetic engineering of iPSC that emphasize precision and minimize random integration would be beneficial. We demonstrate here an approach in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy that focuses on the use of site-specific recombinases to achieve genetic engineering. We employed non-viral, plasmid-mediated methods to reprogram mdx fibroblasts, using phiC31 integrase to insert a single copy of the reprogramming genes at a safe location in the genome. We next used Bxb1 integrase to add the therapeutic full-length dystrophin cDNA to the iPSC in a site-specific manner. Unwanted DNA sequences, including the reprogramming genes, were then precisely deleted with Cre resolvase. Pluripotency of the iPSC was analyzed before and after gene addition, and ability of the genetically corrected iPSC to differentiate into myogenic precursors was evaluated by morphology, immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR, FACS analysis, and intramuscular engraftment. These data demonstrate a non-viral, reprogramming-plus-gene addition genetic engineering strategy utilizing site-specific recombinases that can be applied easily to mouse cells. This work introduces a significant level of precision in the genetic engineering of iPSC that can be built upon in future studies.

  15. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells using non-synthetic mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohani, L; Fabian, C; Holland, H; Naaldijk, Y; Dressel, R; Löffler-Wirth, H; Binder, H; Arnold, A; Stolzing, A

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe some of the crucial steps to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using mRNA transfection. Our approach uses a V. virus-derived capping enzyme instead of a cap-analog, ensuring 100% proper cap orientation for in vitro transcribed mRNA. V. virus' 2'-O-Methyltransferase enzyme creates a cap1 structure found in higher eukaryotes and has higher translation efficiency compared to other methods. Use of the polymeric transfection reagent polyethylenimine proved superior to other transfection methods. The mRNA created via this method did not trigger an intracellular immune response via human IFN-gamma (hIFN-γ) or alpha (hIFN-α) release, thus circumventing the use of suppressors. Resulting mRNA and protein were expressed at high levels for over 48h, thus obviating daily transfections. Using this method, we demonstrated swift activation of pluripotency associated genes in human fibroblasts. Low oxygen conditions further facilitated colony formation. Differentiation into different germ layers was confirmed via teratoma assay. Reprogramming with non-synthetic mRNA holds great promise for safe generation of iPSCs of human origin. Using the protocols described herein we hope to make this method more accessible to other groups as a fast, inexpensive, and non-viral reprogramming approach. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Derivation of Transgene-Free Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from a Single Drop of Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong Yu; Tan, Hong-Kee; Loh, Yuin-Han

    2016-08-17

    Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have great potential for future use in therapeutic regenerative medicine. Based on the current protocol for deriving hiPSCs, invasive procedures such as skin biopsies and venipuncture are required for obtaining donor samples. Herein, we present a detailed protocol for deriving hiPSCs from human finger-prick (FP) blood. In this method, the transgene-free hiPSCs can be easily generated from only 10 µl of FP blood. The finger-pricked iPSCs (FPiPSCs) show all the pluripotency markers and can be easily differentiated into various cell lineages. The time required for deriving the FPiPSCs is relatively short-10 to 15 days for FP blood expansion and 20 to 30 days for reprogramming. This method can be easily adapted for setting up a large scale iPSC bank as it requires only 10 µl of the donor FP blood, which can be easily collected. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Study of mitochondrial respiratory defects on reprogramming to human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Sandy S C; Van Bergen, Nicole J; Jackson, Stacey; Liang, Helena; Mackey, David A; Hernández, Damián; Lim, Shiang Y; Hewitt, Alex W; Trounce, Ian; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C B

    2016-05-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into a pluripotent state is known to be accompanied by extensive restructuring of mitochondria and switch in metabolic requirements. Here we utilized Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) as a mitochondrial disease model to study the effects of homoplasmic mtDNA mutations and subsequent oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects in reprogramming. We obtained fibroblasts from a total of 6 LHON patients and control subjects, and showed a significant defect in complex I respiration in LHON fibroblasts by high-resolution respiratory analysis. Using episomal vector reprogramming, our results indicated that human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) generation is feasible in LHON fibroblasts. In particular, LHON-specific OXPHOS defects in fibroblasts only caused a mild reduction and did not significantly affect reprogramming efficiency, suggesting that hiPSC reprogramming can tolerate a certain degree of OXPHOS defects. Our results highlighted the induction of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF1), mitochondrial fusion (MFN1, MFN2) and glycine production (GCAT) during reprogramming. However, LHON-associated OXPHOS defects did not alter the kinetics or expression levels of these genes during reprogramming. Together, our study provides new insights into the effects of mtDNA mutation and OXPHOS defects in reprogramming and genes associated with various aspects of mitochondrial biology.

  18. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Basic Research to Potential Clinical Applications in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa de Souza Fernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs are derived from a direct reprogramming of human somatic cells to a pluripotent stage through ectopic expression of specific transcription factors. These cells have two important properties, which are the self-renewal capacity and the ability to differentiate into any cell type of the human body. So, the discovery of hiPSCs opens new opportunities in biomedical sciences, since these cells may be useful for understanding the mechanisms of diseases in the production of new diseases models, in drug development/drug toxicity tests, gene therapies, and cell replacement therapies. However, the hiPSCs technology has limitations including the potential for the development of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities leading to tumorigenicity. Nowadays, basic research in the hiPSCs field has made progress in the application of new strategies with the aim to enable an efficient production of high-quality of hiPSCs for safety and efficacy, necessary to the future application for clinical practice. In this review, we show the recent advances in hiPSCs’ basic research and some potential clinical applications focusing on cancer. We also present the importance of the use of statistical methods to evaluate the possible validation for the hiPSCs for future therapeutic use toward personalized cell therapies.

  19. Aneuploidy induces profound changes in gene expression, proliferation and tumorigenicity of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, Uri; Arad, Gal; Weissbein, Uri; Mandefro, Berhan; Maimon, Adva; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Narwani, Kavita; Clark, Amander T; Andrews, Peter W; Benvenisty, Nissim; Carlos Biancotti, Juan

    2014-09-08

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) tend to acquire genomic aberrations in culture, the most common of which is trisomy of chromosome 12. Here we dissect the cellular and molecular implications of this trisomy in hPSCs. Global gene expression analyses reveal that trisomy 12 profoundly affects the gene expression profile of hPSCs, inducing a transcriptional programme similar to that of germ cell tumours. Comparison of proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis between diploid and aneuploid hPSCs shows that trisomy 12 significantly increases the proliferation rate of hPSCs, mainly as a consequence of increased replication. Furthermore, trisomy 12 increases the tumorigenicity of hPSCs in vivo, inducing transcriptionally distinct teratomas from which pluripotent cells can be recovered. Last, a chemical screen of 89 anticancer drugs discovers that trisomy 12 raises the sensitivity of hPSCs to several replication inhibitors. Together, these findings demonstrate the extensive effect of trisomy 12 and highlight its perils for successful hPSC applications.

  20. Naked Mole Rat Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Their Contribution to Interspecific Chimera

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    Sang-Goo Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Naked mole rats (NMRs are exceptionally long-lived, cancer-resistant rodents. Identifying the defining characteristics of these traits may shed light on aging and cancer mechanisms. Here, we report the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from NMR fibroblasts and their contribution to mouse-NMR chimeric embryos. Efficient reprogramming could be observed under N2B27+2i conditions. The iPSCs displayed a characteristic morphology, expressed pluripotent markers, formed embryoid bodies, and showed typical differentiation patterns. Interestingly, NMR embryonic fibroblasts and the derived iPSCs had propensity for a tetraploid karyotype and were resistant to forming teratomas, but within mouse blastocysts they contributed to both interspecific placenta and fetus. Gene expression patterns of NMR iPSCs were more similar to those of human than mouse iPSCs. Overall, we uncovered unique features of NMR iPSCs and report a mouse-NMR chimeric model. The iPSCs and associated cell culture systems can be used for a variety of biological and biomedical applications.

  1. Human induced pluripotent stem cells and male infertility: an overview of current progress and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Li, Zili; Zhao, Qian; Li, Honggang; Xiong, Chengliang

    2018-02-01

    Recently, significant progress has been made in ART for the treatment of male infertility. However, current ART has failed to help infertile patients with non-obstructive azoospermia, unless donor sperm is used. In fact, most couples wish to have their own genetically related child. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can be generated from patients' somatic cells and in vitro derivation of functional germ cells from patient-specific iPSCs may provide new therapeutic strategies for infertile couples. The overall developmental dynamics of human primordial germ cells are similar to that in mice, but accumulating evidence suggests that there are crucial differences between human and mouse PGC specification. Unlike mouse iPSCs (miPSCs) in naive state, hiPSCs exhibit a primed pluripotency which possess less potential for the germ cell fate. Based on research in mice, male germ cells at different stages have been derived from hiPSCs with different protocols, including spontaneous differentiation, overexpression of germ cell regulators, addition of cytokines, co-culture with gonadal cells in vitro and xeno-transplantation. The aim of this review is to summarize the current advances in derivation of male germ cells from hiPSCs and raise the perspectives of hiPSCs in medical application for male infertility, as well as in basic research for male germ cell development. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

  2. Recombinase-mediated reprogramming and dystrophin gene addition in mdx mouse induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunli Zhao

    Full Text Available A cell therapy strategy utilizing genetically-corrected induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC may be an attractive approach for genetic disorders such as muscular dystrophies. Methods for genetic engineering of iPSC that emphasize precision and minimize random integration would be beneficial. We demonstrate here an approach in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy that focuses on the use of site-specific recombinases to achieve genetic engineering. We employed non-viral, plasmid-mediated methods to reprogram mdx fibroblasts, using phiC31 integrase to insert a single copy of the reprogramming genes at a safe location in the genome. We next used Bxb1 integrase to add the therapeutic full-length dystrophin cDNA to the iPSC in a site-specific manner. Unwanted DNA sequences, including the reprogramming genes, were then precisely deleted with Cre resolvase. Pluripotency of the iPSC was analyzed before and after gene addition, and ability of the genetically corrected iPSC to differentiate into myogenic precursors was evaluated by morphology, immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR, FACS analysis, and intramuscular engraftment. These data demonstrate a non-viral, reprogramming-plus-gene addition genetic engineering strategy utilizing site-specific recombinases that can be applied easily to mouse cells. This work introduces a significant level of precision in the genetic engineering of iPSC that can be built upon in future studies.

  3. May I Cut in? Gene Editing Approaches in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Brookhouser

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the decade since Yamanaka and colleagues described methods to reprogram somatic cells into a pluripotent state, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs have demonstrated tremendous promise in numerous disease modeling, drug discovery, and regenerative medicine applications. More recently, the development and refinement of advanced gene transduction and editing technologies have further accelerated the potential of hiPSCs. In this review, we discuss the various gene editing technologies that are being implemented with hiPSCs. Specifically, we describe the emergence of technologies including zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/Cas9 that can be used to edit the genome at precise locations, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each of these technologies. In addition, we present the current applications of these technologies in elucidating the mechanisms of human development and disease, developing novel and effective therapeutic molecules, and engineering cell-based therapies. Finally, we discuss the emerging technological advances in targeted gene editing methods.

  4. Investigation of Hepatoprotective Activity of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in the Mouse Model of Liver Injury

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    Chih-Hung Chiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To date liver transplantation is the only effective treatment for end-stage liver diseases. Considering the potential of pluripotency and differentiation into tridermal lineages, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs may serve as an alternative of cell-based therapy. Herein, we investigated the effect of iPSC transplantation on thioacetamide- (TAA- induced acute/fulminant hepatic failure (AHF in mice. Firstly, we demonstrated that iPSCs had the capacity to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells (iPSC-Heps that expressed various hepatic markers, including albumin, α-fetoprotein, and hepatocyte nuclear factor-3β, and exhibited biological functions. Intravenous transplantation of iPSCs effectively reduced the hepatic necrotic area, improved liver functions and motor activity, and rescued TAA-treated mice from lethal AHF. 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate cell labeling revealed that iPSCs potentially mobilized to the damaged liver area. Taken together, iPSCs can effectively rescue experimental AHF and represent a potentially favorable cell source of cell-based therapy.

  5. Using induced pluripotent stem cells derived neurons to model brain diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy E McKinney

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to use induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC to model brain diseases is a powerful tool for unraveling mechanistic alterations in these disorders. Rodent models of brain diseases have spurred understanding of pathology but the concern arises that they may not recapitulate the full spectrum of neuron disruptions associated with human neuropathology. iPSC derived neurons, or other neural cell types, provide the ability to access pathology in cells derived directly from a patient's blood sample or skin biopsy where availability of brain tissue is limiting. Thus, utilization of iPSC to study brain diseases provides an unlimited resource for disease modelling but may also be used for drug screening for effective therapies and may potentially be used to regenerate aged or damaged cells in the future. Many brain diseases across the spectrum of neurodevelopment, neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric are being approached by iPSC models. The goal of an iPSC based disease model is to identify a cellular phenotype that discriminates the disease-bearing cells from the control cells. In this mini-review, the importance of iPSC cell models validated for pluripotency, germline competency and function assessments is discussed. Selected examples for the variety of brain diseases that are being approached by iPSC technology to discover or establish the molecular basis of the neuropathology are discussed.

  6. Generation of an integration-free induced pluripotent stem cell line (CSC-43 from a patient with sporadic Parkinson's disease

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    Ana Marote

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available An induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line was generated from a 36-year-old patient with sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD. Skin fibroblasts were reprogrammed using the non-integrating Sendai virus technology to deliver OCT3/4, SOX2, c-MYC and KLF4 factors. The generated cell line (CSC-43 exhibits expression of common pluripotency markers, in vitro differentiation into three germ layers and normal karyotype. This iPSC line can be used to study the mechanisms underlying the development of PD.

  7. Development of one control and one tumor-specific induced pluripotent stem cell line from laryngeal carcinoma patient

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    Yamin Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Skin fibroblasts and tumor fibroblasts were extracted from a 64-year old male patient clinically diagnosed with laryngeal carcinoma. Control and tumor specific induced pluripotent stem cells were reprogrammed with 5 reprogramming factors, Klf-4, c-Myc, Oct-4, Sox-2, and Lin-28, using the messenger RNA reprogramming system. The transgene-free iPSC lines showed pluripotency, confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. The iPSC lines also showed normal karyotype, and could form embryoid bodies in vitro and differentiate into the 3 germ layers in vivo. This in vitro cellular model can be used to study the oncogenesis and pathogenesis of laryngeal carcinoma.

  8. Generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line from an adult male with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism

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    Yumei Luo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome (TS with 45,X/46,XY mosaic karyotype is a rare sex chromosome disorder with an occurrence of 0.15‰ at birth. We report the generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a Chinese adult male with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism. The iPSC line retains the original 45,X/46,XY mosaic karyotype, expresses pluripotency markers and undergoes trilineage differentiation. Therefore, it offers an unprecedented cellular model to investigate the profound symptoms like infertility of TS in the male, and serve as a useful tool to develop therapies for the disease.

  9. Comprehensive protocols for CRISPR/Cas9-based gene editing in human pluripotent stem cells

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    Santos, David P.; Kiskinis, Evangelos; Eggan, Kevin; Merkle, Florian T.

    2016-01-01

    Application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to edit the genomes of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has the potential to revolutionize hPSC-based disease modeling, drug screening, and transplantation therapy. Here, we aim to provide a single resource to enable groups, even those with limited experience with hPSC culture or the CRISPR/Cas9 system, to successfully perform genome editing. The methods are presented in detail and are supported by a theoretical framework to allow for the incorporation of inevitable improvements in the rapidly evolving gene-editing field. We describe protocols to generate hPSC lines with gene-specific knock-outs, small targeted mutations, or knock-in reporters. PMID:27532820

  10. Current reprogramming systems in regenerative medicine: from somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Hu, Chenxia; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) paved the way for research fields including cell therapy, drug screening, disease modeling and the mechanism of embryonic development. Although iPSC technology has been improved by various delivery systems, direct transduction and small molecule regulation, low reprogramming efficiency and genomic modification steps still inhibit its clinical use. Improvements in current vectors and the exploration of novel vectors are required to balance efficiency and genomic modification for reprogramming. Herein, we set out a comprehensive analysis of current reprogramming systems for the generation of iPSCs from somatic cells. By clarifying advantages and disadvantages of the current reprogramming systems, we are striding toward an effective route to generate clinical grade iPSCs.

  11. Functional Thyroid Follicular Cells Differentiation from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Suspension Culture

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    Ayumi Arauchi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of regenerated thyroid follicular cells (TFCs is a promising therapeutic strategy for patients with hypothyroidism. Here, we have succeeded in inducing functional TFCs from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs in scalable suspension culture. Differentiation of iPSCs with Activin A treatment produced Sox17- and FoxA2-expressing definitive endodermal cells that also expressed thyroid transcription factors Pax8 and Nkx2-1. Further treatment with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH induced TFCs expressing various types of thyroid proteins including TSH receptor, sodium–iodide symporter, thyroglobulin, and thyroid peroxidase. Interestingly, differentiated cells secreted free thyroxine in vitro. These results indicate successful differentiation of human iPSCs to functional TFCs that may enable us to fabricate thyroid tissues for regenerative medicine and disease models.

  12. Modeling human diseases with induced pluripotent stem cells: from 2D to 3D and beyond.

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    Liu, Chun; Oikonomopoulos, Angelos; Sayed, Nazish; Wu, Joseph C

    2018-03-08

    The advent of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) presents unprecedented opportunities to model human diseases. Differentiated cells derived from iPSCs in two-dimensional (2D) monolayers have proven to be a relatively simple tool for exploring disease pathogenesis and underlying mechanisms. In this Spotlight article, we discuss the progress and limitations of the current 2D iPSC disease-modeling platform, as well as recent advancements in the development of human iPSC models that mimic in vivo tissues and organs at the three-dimensional (3D) level. Recent bioengineering approaches have begun to combine different 3D organoid types into a single '4D multi-organ system'. We summarize the advantages of this approach and speculate on the future role of 4D multi-organ systems in human disease modeling. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Isolation and culture of porcine neural progenitor cells from embryos and pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Aabech; Hall, Vanessa Jane; Hyttel, Poul

    2013-01-01

    therapy. The pig has become recognized as an important large animal model and establishment of in vitro-derived porcine NPCs would allow for preclinical safety testing by transplantation in a porcine biomedical model. In this chapter, a detailed method for isolation and in vitro culture of porcine NPCs......The isolation and culture of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from pluripotent stem cells has facilitated in vitro mechanistic studies of diseases related to the nervous system, as well as discovery of new medicine. In addition, NPCs are envisioned to play a crucial role in future cell replacement....... The cells have the potential of long-term culture and the ability to differentiate into neural and glial cells....

  14. Modelling Human Channelopathies Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: A Comprehensive Review

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    Martin Müller

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells has pioneered the field of regenerative medicine and developmental biology. They can be generated by overexpression of a defined set of transcription factors in somatic cells derived from easily accessible tissues such as skin or plucked hair or even human urine. In case of applying this tool to patients who are classified into a disease group, it enables the generation of a disease- and patient-specific research platform. iPS cells have proven a significant tool to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms in various diseases such as diabetes, blood disorders, defined neurological disorders, and genetic liver disease. One of the first successfully modelled human diseases was long QT syndrome, an inherited cardiac channelopathy which causes potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmia. This review summarizes the efforts of reprogramming various types of long QT syndrome and discusses the potential underlying mechanisms and their application.

  15. Chondroitin Sulfate Is Indispensable for Pluripotency and Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

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    Izumikawa, Tomomi; Sato, Ban; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) proteoglycans are present on the surfaces of virtually all cells and in the extracellular matrix and are required for cytokinesis at early developmental stages. Studies have shown that heparan sulfate (HS) is essential for maintaining mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that are primed for differentiation, whereas the function of CS has not yet been elucidated. To clarify the role of CS, we generated glucuronyltransferase-I-knockout ESCs lacking CS. We found that CS was required to maintain the pluripotency of ESCs and promoted initial ESC commitment to differentiation compared with HS. In addition, CS-A and CS-E polysaccharides, but not CS-C polysaccharides, bound to E-cadherin and enhanced ESC differentiation. Multiple-lineage differentiation was inhibited in chondroitinase ABC-digested wild-type ESCs. Collectively, these results suggest that CS is a novel determinant in controlling the functional integrity of ESCs via binding to E-cadherin.

  16. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Novel Tool in Psychiatric Research.

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    Kim, Sewoong; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Oh, Daeyoung; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Kim, Borah

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provides a valuable opportunity to study neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative psychiatric diseases by offering an unlimited source for patient-specific neuronal and glial cells. The present review focuses on the recent advancements in modeling psychiatric disorders such as Phelan-McDermid syndrome, Timothy syndrome, Rett syndrome, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and dementia. The treatment effects identified in studies on iPSCs using known therapeutic compounds are also summarized in this review. Here we discuss validation of cellular models and explore iPSCs as a novel drug screening tool. Although there are several limitations associated with the current methods used to study mental disorders, using iPSCs as a model system provides the advantage of rewinding and reviewing the development and degeneration of human neural cells.

  17. Structural Analysis of Three-dimensional Human Neural Tissue derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terrence Brooks, Patrick; Rasmussen, Mikkel Aabech; Hyttel, Poul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed at establishing a method for production of a three-dimensional (3D) human neural tissue derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and analyzing the outcome by a combination of tissue ultrastructure and expression of neural markers. Methods: A two......-step cell culture procedure was implemented by subjecting human iPSCs to a 3D scaffoldbased neural differentiation protocol. First, neural fate-inducing small molecules were used to create a neuroepithelial monolayer. Second, the monolayer was trypsinized into single cells and seeded into a porous...... polystyrene scaffold and further cultured to produce a 3D neural tissue. The neural tissue was characterized by a combination of immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results: iPSCs developed into a 3D neural tissue expressing markers for neural progenitor cells, early neural...

  18. Being human: The role of pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine and humanizing Alzheimer's disease models.

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    Sproul, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have the capacity to revolutionize medicine by allowing the generation of functional cell types such as neurons for cell replacement therapy. However, the more immediate impact of PSCs on treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) will be through improved human AD model systems for mechanistic studies and therapeutic screening. This review will first briefly discuss different types of PSCs and genome-editing techniques that can be used to modify PSCs for disease modeling or for personalized medicine. This will be followed by a more in depth analysis of current AD iPSC models and a discussion of the need for more complex multicellular models, including cell types such as microglia. It will finish with a discussion on current clinical trials using PSC-derived cells and the long-term potential of such strategies for treating AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Human heart disease: lessons from human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

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    Giacomelli, E; Mummery, C L; Bellin, M

    2017-10-01

    Technical advances in generating and phenotyping cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC-CMs) are now driving their wider acceptance as in vitro models to understand human heart disease and discover therapeutic targets that may lead to new compounds for clinical use. Current literature clearly shows that hPSC-CMs recapitulate many molecular, cellular, and functional aspects of human heart pathophysiology and their responses to cardioactive drugs. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of hPSC-CMs models that have been described to date and highlight their most recent and remarkable contributions to research on cardiovascular diseases and disorders with cardiac traits. We conclude discussing immediate challenges, limitations, and emerging solutions.

  20. Concise Review: Methods and Cell Types Used to Generate Down Syndrome Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Youssef Hibaoui

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21, is the most common viable chromosomal disorder, with an incidence of 1 in 800 live births. Its phenotypic characteristics include intellectual impairment and several other developmental abnormalities, for the majority of which the pathogenetic mechanisms remain unknown. Several models have been used to investigate the mechanisms by which the extra copy of chromosome 21 leads to the DS phenotype. In the last five years, several laboratories have been successful in reprogramming patient cells carrying the trisomy 21 anomaly into induced pluripotent stem cells, i.e., T21-iPSCs. In this review, we summarize the different T21-iPSCs that have been generated with a particular interest in the technical procedures and the somatic cell types used for the reprogramming.

  1. Surface Topography Guides Morphology and Spatial Patterning of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Colonies

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    Giulio Abagnale

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of topographic cues for commitment of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that groove-ridge structures with a periodicity in the submicrometer range induce elongation of iPSC colonies, guide the orientation of apical actin fibers, and direct the polarity of cell division. Elongation of iPSC colonies impacts also on their intrinsic molecular patterning, which seems to be orchestrated from the rim of the colonies. BMP4-induced differentiation is enhanced in elongated colonies, and the submicron grooves impact on the spatial modulation of YAP activity upon induction with this morphogen. Interestingly, TAZ, a YAP paralog, shows distinct cytoskeletal localization in iPSCs. These findings demonstrate that topography can guide orientation and organization of iPSC colonies, which may affect the interaction between mechanosensors and mechanotransducers in iPSCs.

  2. CRISPR-Cas9: a promising tool for gene editing on induced pluripotent stem cells

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    Kim, Eun Ji; Kang, Ki Ho; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in genome editing with programmable nucleases have opened up new avenues for multiple applications, from basic research to clinical therapy. The ease of use of the technology—and particularly clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)—will allow us to improve our understanding of genomic variation in disease processes via cellular and animal models. Here, we highlight the progress made in correcting gene mutations in monogenic hereditary disorders and discuss various CRISPR-associated applications, such as cancer research, synthetic biology, and gene therapy using induced pluripotent stem cells. The challenges, ethical issues, and future prospects of CRISPR-based systems for human research are also discussed. PMID:28049282

  3. Targeted Differentiation of Regional Ventral Neuroprogenitors and Related Neuronal Subtypes from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Liankai Chi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Embryoid body (EB formation and adherent culture (AD paradigms are equivalently thought to be applicable for neural specification of human pluripotent stem cells. Here, we report that sonic hedgehog-induced ventral neuroprogenitors under EB conditions are fated to medial ganglionic eminence (MGE, while the AD cells mostly adopt a floor-plate (FP fate. The EB-MGE later on differentiates into GABA and cholinergic neurons, while the AD-FP favors dopaminergic neuron specification. Distinct developmental, metabolic, and adhesion traits in AD and EB cells may potentially account for their differential patterning potency. Gene targeting combined with small-molecule screening experiments identified that concomitant inhibition of Wnts, STAT3, and p38 pathways (3i could largely convert FP to MGE under AD conditions. Thus, differentiation paradigms and signaling regulators can be integrated together to specify distinct neuronal subtypes for studying and treating related neurological diseases, such as epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease.

  4. An Efficient Platform for Astrocyte Differentiation from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Julia TCW

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence implicates the importance of glia, particularly astrocytes, in neurological and psychiatric diseases. Here, we describe a rapid and robust method for the differentiation of highly pure populations of replicative astrocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs, via a neural progenitor cell (NPC intermediate. We evaluated this protocol across 42 NPC lines (derived from 30 individuals. Transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that hiPSC-astrocytes from four individuals are highly similar to primary human fetal astrocytes and characteristic of a non-reactive state. hiPSC-astrocytes respond to inflammatory stimulants, display phagocytic capacity, and enhance microglial phagocytosis. hiPSC-astrocytes also possess spontaneous calcium transient activity. Our protocol is a reproducible, straightforward (single medium, and rapid (<30 days method to generate populations of hiPSC-astrocytes that can be used for neuron-astrocyte and microglia-astrocyte co-cultures for the study of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  5. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Harbor Homoplasmic and Heteroplasmic Mitochondrial DNA Mutations While Maintaining Human Embryonic Stem Cell-like Metabolic Reprogramming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prigione, A.; Lichtner, B.; Kuhl, H.; Struys, E.A.; Wamelink, M.M.C.; Lehrach, H.; Ralser, M.; Timmermann, B.; Adjaye, J.

    2011-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been recently found to harbor genomic alterations. However, the integrity of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) within reprogrammed cells has yet to be investigated. mtDNA mutations occur at a high rate and contribute to the pathology of a number of human

  6. The Construction and Identification of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived from Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells

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    Liang-Fang Zhu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed to establish an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML cells in vitro and identify their biological characteristics. Methods: Cells from the AML-infiltrated skin from an M6 patient were infected with a lentivirus carrying OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and C-MYC to induce iPSCs. The characteristics of the iPSCs were confirmed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP staining. The proliferation ability of iPSCs was detected with a CCK-8 assay. The expression of pluripotency markers was measured by immunostaining, and the expression of stem cell-related genes was detected by qRT-PCR; distortion during the induction process was detected by karyotype analysis; the differentiation potential of iPSCs was determined by embryoid body-formation and teratoma-formation assays. ALP staining confirmed that these cells exhibited positive staining and had the characteristics of iPSCs. Results: The CCK-8 assay showed that the iPSCs had the ability to proliferate. Immunostaining demonstrated that iPSC clones showed positive expression of NANOG, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81. qRT-PCR results revealed that the mRNA expression of Nanog, Lin28, Cripto, FOX3, DNMT3b, DPPA2, and DPPA4 significantly increased in iPSCs. Karyotype analysis found no chromosome aberration in the iPSCs. The results of the embryoid body-formation and teratoma-formation assays indicated that the iPSCs had the potential to differentiate into all three germ layers. Conclusion: Our study provided evidence that an iPSC line derived from AML cells was successfully established.

  7. Differentiation of blood T cells: Reprogramming human induced pluripotent stem cells into neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ping-Hsing; Chang, Yun-Ching; Lee, Yi-Yen; Ko, Yu-Ling; Yang, Yu-Hsuan; Lin, Chun-Fu; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Yu, Wen-Chung; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Chen, Ming-Teh

    2015-06-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) morphologically and functionally resemble human embryonic stem cells, which presents the opportunity to use patient-specific somatic cells for disease modeling and drug screening. In order to take one step closer to clinical applications, it is important to generate iPSCs through a less invasive approach and from any accessible tissue, including peripheral blood. Meanwhile, how to differentiate blood cell-derived iPSCs into neuron-like cells is still unclear. We utilized Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1-based episomal vectors, a nonviral system that can reprogram somatic cells into iPSCs in both feeder-dependent and feeder-free conditions, to generate iPSCs from T cells via electroporation and then induce them into neuronal cells. We successfully isolated sufficient T cells from 20 mL peripheral blood of the donors and reprogrammed these T cells into iPSCs within 4 weeks.